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Sample records for aids rural treatment

  1. HIV Testing and HIV/AIDS Treatment Services in Rural Counties in 10 Southern States: Service Provider Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Madeline; Anthony, Monique-Nicole; Vila, Christie; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; Weidle, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Forty percent of AIDS cases are reported in the southern United States, the region with the largest proportion of HIV/AIDS cases from rural areas. Data are limited regarding provider perspectives of the accessibility and availability of HIV testing and treatment services in southern rural counties. Purpose: We surveyed providers in the…

  2. Lessons learned while implementing an HIV/AIDS care and treatment program in rural Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Moon, Troy D; Burlison, Janeen R; Sidat, Mohsin; Pires, Paulo; Silva, Wilson; Solis, Manuel; Rocha, Michele; Arregui, Chiqui; Manders, Eric J; Vergara, Alfredo E; Vermund, Sten H

    2010-04-23

    Mozambique has severe resource constraints, yet with international partnerships, the nation has placed over 145,000 HIV-infected persons on antiretroviral therapies (ART) through May-2009. HIV clinical services are provided at > 215 clinical venues in all 11 of Mozambique's provinces. Friends in Global Health (FGH), affiliated with Vanderbilt University in the United States (US), is a locally licensed non-governmental organization (NGO) working exclusively in small city and rural venues in Zambézia Province whose population reaches approximately 4 million persons. Our approach to clinical capacity building is based on: 1) technical assistance to national health system facilities to implement ART clinical services at the district level, 2) human capacity development, and 3) health system strengthening. Challenges in this setting are daunting, including: 1) human resource constraints, 2) infrastructure limitations, 3) centralized care for large populations spread out over large distances, 4) continued high social stigma related to HIV, 5) limited livelihood options in rural areas and 6) limited educational opportunities in rural areas. Sustainability in rural Mozambique will depend on transitioning services from emergency foreign partners to local authorities and continued funding. It will also require "wrap-around" programs that help build economic capacity with agricultural, educational, and commercial initiatives. Sustainability is undermined by serious health manpower and infrastructure limitations. Recent U.S. government pronouncements suggest that the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief will support concurrent community and business development. FGH, with its Mozambican government counterparts, see the evolution of an emergency response to a sustainable chronic disease management program as an essential and logical step. We have presented six key challenges that are essential to address in rural Mozambique. PMID:25097450

  3. Laos: rural economy threatened by AIDS.

    PubMed

    Zola, A M

    1994-01-01

    Laos is a rural country in which more than 70% of the work force depends upon the agricultural sector for its livelihood. Crop production in Laos is a low-productivity, labor-intensive affair which is highly vulnerable to disruption by natural disasters and outbreaks of disease. Laos is also a crossroads for trade from Cambodia, China, Thailand, and Vietnam. While such trade has some positive effect upon the domestic economy, it also facilitates the spread of sexually transmitted diseases into Laos from neighboring countries with high rates of HIV infection. The northwestern trading corridor bordering Thailand, Myanmar, and China is of particular concern with regard to the spread of HIV. The Lao government identified eleven individuals infected with HIV and had officially reported only one case of AIDS to the World Health Organization (WHO) as of April 1992. Although WHO has not yet confirmed or projected the number of HIV-seropositive and AIDS cases in Laos, scant available data suggest that AIDS is concentrated in urban areas. Poverty and isolation will not, however, protect rural villages from HIV. The implications of a growing HIV/AIDS epidemic for rural social structures are considered. It is clear that such a situation could lead to agroeconomic dislocation and jeopardize national food security. The following measures are recommended to confront HIV/AIDS in the agricultural sector: change cropping systems, provide AIDS prevention education and technical assistance, and recruit village cadres to increase AIDS awareness among young Lao and care for the very ill. PMID:12287639

  4. What Works? HIV/AIDS Education in Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McReynolds, Vicki

    By May 1989, 29 states and territories had mandated HIV/AIDS education in their public schools. Rural schools face special problems in the delivery of such education. From telephone interviews and a survey questionnaire, 32 rural school districts across the country were identified that use effective strategies in their HIV/AIDS education programs.…

  5. Prevention of HIV/AIDS Education in Rural Communities III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torabi, Mohammad R., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This third special issue of the Health Education Monograph Series on HIV/AIDS Prevention in Rural Communities presents 9 articles on: "Rural Adolescent Views of HIV Prevention: Focus Groups at Two Indiana Rural 4-H Clubs" (William L. Yarber and Stephanie A. Sanders); "Implementing HIV Education: Beyond Curriculum" (Susan Frelick Wooley);…

  6. Prevention of HIV/AIDS Education in Rural Communities II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torabi, Mohammad R., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This second special issue of the Health Education Monograph Series on HIV/AIDS Prevention in Rural Communities presents seven articles: (1) "Preventing Maternal-Infant Transmission of HIV: Social and Ethical Issues" (James G. Anderson, Marilyn M. Anderson, and Tara Booth); (2) "HIV Infection in Diverse Rural Population: Migrant Farm Workers in…

  7. Patterns in Student Financial Aid at Rural Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, David E.; Katsinas, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses the 2005 Basic Classifications of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as a framing device through which to examine patterns of student financial aid at America's rural community colleges, which represent 64% of all U.S. community colleges. Rural community colleges serve more first-time, full-time students than…

  8. Improving NGO collaboration in AIDS prevention in rural Haiti.

    PubMed

    Stetson, V; Narcisse-prudent, M

    1994-05-01

    Zanmi Lasante (Health Friends), a nongovernmental organization (NGO) based in rural Haiti, provides an example of the effective role NGOs can play in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) prevention. The group has produced a video, "Chache Lavi, Detwi Lavi," based on the true story of a rural woman who became infected when she migrated to Port-au-Prince to seek employment. The video illustrates the association between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and broader social issues such as peasants' access to land, political upheaval, and unequal gender relationships. To promote collaboration, Save the Children established the NGO Coalition for the Prevention of AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) in the Central Plateau. Women, particularly adolescent females, are the coalition's target population. Activities have included literacy and income generation training for women, development of algorithms for STD treatment without laboratory diagnosis, a training course for health professionals on STD services and counseling, training of trainers workshops, and preparation of informational materials. The 10 participating NGOs and private voluntary organizations meet quarterly to share information and evaluate programs. PMID:12345904

  9. AIDS in Rural Areas: Challenges to Providing Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounds, Kathleen A.

    1988-01-01

    Examined the development and provision of social services to persons with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and their families in rural areas and barriers to the delivery of care. Subjects (N=15) were persons who coordinated or provided services to AIDS victims. Found structural factors, confidentiality, fear of contagion, and homophobia…

  10. Localizing HIV/AIDS discourse in a rural Kenyan community.

    PubMed

    Banda, Felix; Oketch, Omondi

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of multimodal texts used in HIV/AIDS campaigns in rural western Kenya using multimodal discourse analysis (Kress and Van Leeuwen, 2006; Martin and Rose, 2004). Twenty HIV/AIDS documents (posters, billboards and brochures) are analysed together with interview data (20 unstructured one-on-one interviews and six focus groups) from the target group to explore the effectiveness of the multimodal texts in engaging the target rural audience in meaningful interaction towards behavioural change. It is concluded that in some cases the HIV/AIDS messages are misinterpreted or lost as the multimodal texts used are unfamiliar and contradictory to the everyday life experiences of the rural folk. The paper suggests localization of HIV/AIDS discourse through use of local modes of communication and resources. PMID:21574281

  11. AIDS Knowledge and HIV Stigma among Children Affected by HIV/AIDS in Rural China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Xiuyun; Stanton, Bonita

    2011-01-01

    The current study was designed to assess the level of AIDS knowledge and its relationship with personal stigma toward people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) among children living in communities of high HIV prevalence in rural China. The data were collected in 2009 from 118 orphanage orphans (children who had lost both of their parents to HIV and…

  12. HIV/AIDS peer education: a rural health project.

    PubMed

    Marick, Josephine

    2002-02-01

    This article describes a program conducted by a group of adolescents in a rural western Nebraska high school that was designed to inform their peers about the risk of HIV/AIDS. The program was funded by state and county agencies. An AIDS Task Force composed of community health leaders developed the guidelines for the program. The Task Force met annually to plan for the coming year, implement changes, and evaluate the program. A community health nurse served as the coordinator of the program and also served as a rural school nurse. A group of students called peer helpers carried out the HIV/AIDS program. Peer helpers created an awareness of HIV/AIDS with dissemination of factual information and also served as a referral resource for their peers. A number of recommendations are provided for future implementation of programs designed to help adolescents develop a healthy lifestyle. PMID:11853375

  13. Treatments for HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS HIV medicines are giving women longer, healthier futures and new strength. While there's no cure for HIV, the treatments today allow women to live longer, fuller lives. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved many drugs for treating HIV. ...

  14. Psychosocial Issues in Rural AIDS Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Heather; Civic, Diane

    1989-01-01

    Examines issues in care provision by social workers to individuals affected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in rural communities during each stage of HIV infection. Describes psychosocial features, client fears, and appropriate social worker responses. Considers caregivers' personal issues, including fear of contagion and exposure to…

  15. HIV / AIDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: Symptoms , Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment Past Issues / Summer ... and have resulted in a dramatic decrease in AIDS deaths in the U.S. NIH Research to Results ...

  16. The Fourth Special Issue on HIV/AIDS Education and Prevention in Rural Communities. The Health Education Monograph Series, Volume 18, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torabi, Mohammad R., Ed.

    This collection of papers on HIV/AIDS prevention and education in rural communities includes: "Understudied HIV/STD Risk Behaviors among a Sample of Rural South Carolina Women: A Descriptive Pilot Study" (William L. Yarber, Richard A. Crosby, and Stephanie A. Sanders); "Risk and Co-Factors among Women Related to HIV Infection and AIDS Treatment"…

  17. HIV/AIDS and time allocation in rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Bignami-Van Assche, Simona; Van Assche, Ari; Anglewicz, Philip; Fleming, Peter; van de Ruit, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    AIDS-related morbidity and mortality are expected to have a large economic impact in rural Malawi, because they reduce the time that adults can spend on production for subsistence and on income-generating activities. However, households may compensate for production losses by reallocating tasks among household members. The data demands for measuring these effects are high, limiting the amount of empirical evidence. In this paper, we utilize a unique combination of qualitative and quantitative data, including biomarkers for HIV, collected by the 2004 Malawi Diffusion and Ideational Change Project, to analyze the association between AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, and time allocation decisions in rural Malawian households. We find that AIDS-related morbidity and mortality have important economic effects on women’s time, whereas men’s time is unresponsive to the same shocks. Most notably, AIDS is shown to induce diversification of income sources, with women (but not men) reallocating their time, generally from work-intensive (typically farming and heavy chores) to cash-generating tasks (such as casual labor). PMID:22639544

  18. Competencies for Rural Development Professionals in the Era of HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Dine; Westendorp, Annemarie M. B.; Wals, Arjen E. J.; Mulder, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The impact of HIV/AIDS on food security and rural livelihoods is still insufficiently understood. It is evident, however, that rural development professionals need to respond to the changes that have taken place in rural areas due to the pandemic. This article explores competencies that they need in order to deal with the complex HIV/AIDS issues…

  19. AIDS Treatment In Brazil: Impacts And Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Amy Stewart; Fonseca, Elize Massard da; Bastos, Francisco I.; Gruskin, Sofia

    2009-01-01

    Brazil has one of the developing world's largest, and arguably most successful, AIDS treatment programs. In this paper we review the treatment program, including controversial policies that Brazil has used to promote widespread local and global access to AIDS treatment. We also examine the lessons learned from this program and highlight the challenges Brazil faces, including the rising costs of AIDS treatment and changes in donors' funding priorities. Finally, we explore the relevance of Brazil's treatment program for other countries and its broad implications for global AIDS and health policy. PMID:19597210

  20. Flexible kinship: caring for AIDS orphans in rural Lesotho

    PubMed Central

    Block, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has devastated families in rural Lesotho, leaving many children orphaned. Families have adapted to the increase in the number of orphans and HIV-positive children in ways that provide children with the best possible care. Though local ideas about kinship and care are firmly rooted in patrilineal social organization, in practice, maternal caregivers, often grandmothers, are increasingly caring for orphaned children. Negotiations between affinal kin capitalize on flexible kinship practices in order to legitimate new patterns of care, which have shifted towards a model that often favours matrilocal practices of care in the context of idealized patrilineality. PMID:25866467

  1. Correlates of Adherence among Rural Indian Women Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Salem, Benissa; Ernst, E. J.; Keenan, Colleen; Suresh, P.; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ganguly, Kalyan; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Liu, Yihang

    2012-01-01

    In this prospective, randomized clinical trial, correlates of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) were assessed using a baseline questionnaire among 68 rural women living with AIDS (WLA) in India. Unadjusted analyses revealed positive relationships of ART adherence with Hindu religion, and support from spouses and parents, whereas negative associations were found with depression, poor quality of life, and having ten or more HIV symptoms. Multiple linear regression analysis also revealed that WLA who were Hindu, not depressed, had ART support from spouses and parents, and perceived some benefit from ART were more adherent to ART than their respective counterparts. This study reveals the unique challenges which rural WLA experience and the need to mitigate these challenges early in ART treatment. Further, the findings enable the refinement of an intervention program which will focus on strengthening ART adherence among rural WLA. PMID:23687468

  2. Older Adults with HIV/AIDS in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yurong; Fuller-Thomson, Esme; Anne Mitchell, Christine; Zhang, Xiulan

    2013-01-01

    Although the number of older people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) has increased substantially, few studies have focused on older PLWHA in developing countries. Based on a sample of 866 rural PLWHA in Henan, Anhui and Yunnan provinces in China, this study compares the characteristics of PLWHA aged 50 or older (n=185) with younger PLWHA (n=681). Most of the older PLWHA were female (n=112), illiterate, married and at the clinical stage of HIV. Over 90% of older people with HIV/AIDS lived in Henan and Anhui provinces. The severe epidemic in Henan and Anhui provinces was caused by commercial blood and plasma donation. Older PLWHA were less educated, received less social support and were more likely to live alone than younger PLWHA. The results underline the importance of developing programs and policy initiatives targeted at older people infected with HIV/AIDS. The policy and program recommendations include using a gender sensitive strategy, designing specific AIDS education and prevention programs suitable for low-literacy older adults and social support interventions for older PLWHA. PMID:24454590

  3. The Experience of HIV/AIDS among Rural Women in the Northwestern United States: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mphande-Finn, Joyce T.; Sommers-Flanagan, John

    2007-01-01

    The unique experience of HIV/AIDS among rural women in the United States was explored using qualitative interviews with 7 women who are HIV positive. Based on these interviews, eight themes emerged. These included (a) daily powerful emotions, (b) emotional and physical abandonment, (c) romantic betrayal, (d) medical treatment issues, (e) loss and…

  4. Challenges Experienced by Rural Women in India Living with AIDS and Implications for the Delivery of HIV/AIDS Care

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline M.; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ganguly, Kalyan K.; William, Ravi Raj; Heravian, Anisa; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Greengold, Barbara; Ekstrand, Maria; Rao, Pantangi Venkata Rama

    2012-01-01

    Researchers explored the barriers to AIDS care for rural women living with AIDS, and investigated alternative delivery models to increase the women’s adherence to anti-retroviral therapy. Community-based participatory research focus groups were conducted by the researchers with a convenience sample of 39 women living with AIDS from a Primary Health Center near Chennai, India and with nurses, physicians and Accredited Social Health Activists (Ashas), lay health care workers. The most prevalent barriers expressed by the women were sickness-related, psychological, financial issues with childcare, and distance and/or transportation to the site. Women living with AIDS reviewed Ashas favorably. PMID:21409663

  5. Impact of Asha Intervention on Stigma among Rural Indian Women with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Ekstrand, Maria; Salem, Benissa; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ganguly, Kalyan; Leake, Barbara; Marfisee, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Rural women living with HIV/AIDS (WLA) in India face multifarious challenges which affect access to antiretroviral regimens and management of HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this pilot study, using cluster randomization, is to compare the effectiveness of the Asha-Life (AL) intervention, delivered by HIV-trained village woman, Asha (Accredited Social Health Activist), with a Usual Care (UC) group on reduction of internalized stigma and avoidant coping among 68 women living with AIDS (WLA) in rural India over a six-month period. The findings demonstrated that participation in the AL intervention was associated with significant reductions in internalized stigma and the use of avoidant coping strategies at follow-up. The findings of our study are promising in terms of the role rural village women (Asha) may play in reducing internalized stigma and avoidant coping in the lives of rural women living with AIDS in India. PMID:23539322

  6. Hearing Aids and Hearing Impaired Students in Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodford, Charles

    This paper describes functions of the components of hearing aids and provides a detailed procedure to detect hearing aid dysfunctions. The most common type of hearing aids for school children are the behind the ear type. Various hearing aid components change sound into an electrical signal, which is amplified and adjusted by a volume control. The…

  7. Rural/Urban Residence, Migration, HIV/AIDS, and Safe Sex Practices among Men in Zimbabwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambisa, William; Stokes, C. Shannon

    2006-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic was initially thought to be primarily an urban phenomenon. However, migration between rural and urban areas has resulted in the spread of the virus to all segments of the population. Prevention efforts continue to focus on the ABCs of AIDS, namely, abstinence among young adults, being faithful within a monogamous relationship,…

  8. Talking about, Knowing about HIV/AIDS in Canada: A Rural-Urban Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veinot, Tiffany C.; Harris, Roma

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To explore information exchange about HIV/AIDS among people living in rural and urban communities and to assess the value of social capital theory, as well as demographic factors, in predicting community members' knowledge of HIV/AIDS and their likelihood of having talked about the disease. Method: A random-digit dial telephone survey was…

  9. AIDS Education in Rural Oregon School Districts: Compliance with State Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Loyde W.; McGrew, Robin R.

    The Oregon State Department of Education mandates age-appropriate curricula for all grade levels on infectious diseases, including AIDS, ARC, HIV, and Hepatitis B. The objectives of this study were: (1) to determine the extent to which AIDS education was occurring in three remote rural Oregon school districts; (2) to examine the focus of the…

  10. HIV/AIDS: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: Symptoms , Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment Past Issues / Summer ... and have resulted in a dramatic decrease in AIDS deaths in the U.S. NIH Research to Results ...

  11. Knowledge of Rural Nurses' Aides About End-of-Life Care

    PubMed Central

    Denham, Sharon A.; Meyer, Michael G.; Rathbun, Ann; Toborg, Mary A.; Thornton, Leslie

    2006-01-01

    Currently, little is known about the role of nurses' aides (NAs) in rural long-term care facilities or their impact on the process of death and dying in rural healthcare environments. Focus groups with NAs were held in 6 rural counties located in 5 states to assess attitudes and perceptions about end-of-life care and training needs. Key informants from 8 states and the District of Columbia added to the understandings. Nurses' aides (N = 63) and key informans (N = 21) worked in a variety of rural settings that provide end-of-life care (ie, nursing homes, hospitals, hospices, home healthcare agencies). Five themes about the needs of rural NAs around end-of-life care were identified in the focus groups, and 4 themes emerged from key informant interviews. A prototype computer-based training module on communication about end-of-life issues was developed, tested, and found useful and compelling. PMID:16775473

  12. Perceptions of Shared Decision Making and Decision Aids Among Rural Primary Care Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melinda M.; Gorman, Paul N.; Rugge, J. Bruin; Fagnan, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Shared Decision Making (SDM) and Decision Aids (DAs) increase patients’ involvement in healthcare decisions and enhance satisfaction with their choices. Studies of SDM and DAs have primarily occurred in academic centers and large health systems, but most primary care is delivered in smaller practices and over 20% of Americans live in rural areas where poverty, disease prevalence and limited access to care may increase the need for SDM and DAs. Objective To explore perceptions and practices of rural primary care clinicians regarding SDM and DAs. Design Cross sectional survey. Setting and Participants Primary care clinicians affiliated with the Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network (ORPRN). Results Surveys were returned by 181 of 231 eligible participants (78%), 174 could be analyzed. Two-thirds of participants were physicians, 84% practiced family medicine, and 55% were male. Sixty five percent of respondents were unfamiliar with the term “SDM”, but following definition, 97% reported they found the approach useful for conditions with multiple treatment options. Over 90% of clinicians perceived helping patients make decisions regarding chronic pain and health behavior change as moderate/hard in difficulty. Although 69% of respondents preferred that patients play an equal role in making decisions, they estimate this happens only 35% of the time. Time was reported as the largest barrier to engaging in SDM (63%). Respondents were receptive to using DAs to facilitate SDM in printed (95%) or web-based formats (72%) and topic preference varied by clinician specialty and decision difficulty. Conclusions Rural clinicians recognized the value of SDM and were receptive to using DAs in multiple formats. Integration of DAs to facilitate SDM in routine patient care may require addressing practice operation and reimbursement. PMID:22247423

  13. Comparison of the health-related quality of life, CD4 count and viral load of AIDS patients and people with HIV who have been on treatment for 12 months in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Igumbor, Jude; Stewart, Aimee; Holzemer, William

    2013-03-01

    This study compared the level of CD4 count, viral load and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) between treatment-naïve AIDS patients and a cohort of people living with HIV who have been on treatment for 12 months. This study is based on a secondary data analysis of the records of 642 people with HIV consisting of 311 treatment-naïve AIDS patients and 331 people with HIV who have been on treatment for 12 months. The study findings are mostly presented in tables and analysed using the t-test to compare HRQOL scores, CD4 count and viral load in the two groups. The study generally noted poor financial capacity and low activity tolerance among the participants. Significant changes were noted in all the domains of HRQOL compared between the treatment-naïve patients and the 12 months treatment cohort. In the same manner, the median CD4 cell count and viral load differed significantly between both groups. The treatment-naïve and the 12 months treatment cohorts consistently reported much lower quality of life scores in the level of dependence domain which includes the measures of mobility, activity of daily living, dependence on medication and work capacity. There were little or no associations between the biomedical markers (CD4 count and viral load) and HRQOL indicators. However, the quality of life tended to increase with increase in the CD4 cell count. The poor to no association between the biomedical markers and HRQOL indicators show that these cannot be direct proxies of each other and that the CD4 cell count and viral load alone may be inadequate eligibility criteria for social support. PMID:23777555

  14. RURAL RECREATION ENTERPRISES FOR PROFIT, AN AID TO RURAL AREAS DEVELOPMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    MANY RURAL AREAS OF THE U.S. POSSESS ENOUGH SPACE AND NATURAL ATTRACTIONS TO SERVE AS A BASIS FOR ESTABLISHING EITHER PART OR FULL-TIME RECREATIONAL ENTERPRISES. MOST OUTDOOR LEISURE ACTIVITIES CENTER AROUND WATER, HUNTING AND FISHING, ADMIRING SCENERY, AND ENJOYING THE NATURAL RURAL LANDSCAPE. THUS THE DEVELOPMENT OF RURAL RECREATION RESOURCES IS…

  15. Knowledge and attitudes of university students regarding HIV/AIDS: an urban--rural difference.

    PubMed

    Lal, P; Kumar, A; Ingle, G K; Gulati, N

    1994-12-01

    A total of 322 students from two colleges of Delhi University, one located in urban and the other in the rural area were surveyed to assess and compare their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding HIV/AIDS. A pretested and self-administered questionnaire containing mostly close ended questions was used. Observations revealed that majority of the students were aware of various aspects of HIV/AIDS. However, they also had some misconceptions particularly regarding transmission of the disease. The science and urban students had significantly more knowledge as compared to their counter parts, there by leading to more positive attitudes among them. Findings suggest intensification of AIDS education campaign focussed on removal of misconceptions and changing negative attitudes, more so amongst rural students. Science students can prove as a potential source of peer communication to the non-science students both in urban as well as rural areas. PMID:7759799

  16. Correlates of Stigma among Rural Indian Women Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Ekstrand, Maria; Zolt-Gilburne, Jessica; Ganguly, Kalyan; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Suresh, P.; Marfisee, Mary; Leake, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    AIDS-related stigma has received increasing attention in the literature; however, little is known about the devastating impact it has on rural women living with AIDS (WLA) in India. This cross-sectional study (N = 68), analyzed from complete baseline data, identified a number of correlates of stigma among rural WLA in South India. Structured instruments were used to capture sociodemographic history, stigma, knowledge of HIV, depressive symptoms along with the recording of CD4 data. A higher level of felt stigma and more AIDS symptoms were related to avoidant coping, while fewer adherence strategies and lower support for ART adherence were also associated with avoidant coping. These findings promote the need for support and resources for rural India WLA. PMID:21915715

  17. The social context of food insecurity among persons living with HIV/AIDS in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander C.; Bangsberg, David R.; Emenyonu, Nneka; Senkungu, Jude K.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Weiser, Sheri D.

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS and food insecurity are two of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa, with each heightening the vulnerability to, and worsening the severity of, the other. Less research has focused on the social determinants of food insecurity in resource-limited settings, including social support and HIV-related stigma. In this study, we analyzed data from a cohort of 456 persons from the Uganda AIDS Rural Treatment Outcomes study, an ongoing prospective cohort of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) initiating HIV antiretroviral therapy in Mbarara, Uganda. Quarterly data were collected by structured interviews. The primary outcome, food insecurity, was measured with the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale. Key covariates of interest included social support, internalized HIV-related stigma, HIV-related enacted stigma, and disclosure of HIV serostatus. Severe food insecurity was highly prevalent overall (38%) and more prevalent among women than among men. Social support, HIV disclosure, and internalized HIV-related stigma were associated with food insecurity; these associations persisted after adjusting for household wealth, employment status, and other previously identified correlates of food insecurity. The adverse effects of internalized stigma persisted in a lagged specification, and the beneficial effect of social support further persisted after the inclusion of fixed effects. International organizations have increasingly advocated for addressing food insecurity as part of HIV/AIDS programming to improve morbidity and mortality. This study provides quantitative evidence on social determinants of food insecurity among PLWHA in resource-limited settings and suggests points of intervention. These findings also indicate that structural interventions to improve social support and/or decrease HIV-related stigma may also improve the food security of PLWHA. PMID:22019367

  18. Association of Information Sources and Knowledge on HIV/AIDS in Rural China

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yufeng; Wang, Huadong; Chen, Baifeng; Chen, Yujuan; Zhang, Tiejun; Xu, Tan; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between the number of available information sources on HIV/AIDS and HIV/AIDS-related knowledge in a rural population in China. Design We performed a cross-sectional survey on the number and types of sources of HIV/AIDS information available to rural residents of China and assessed HIV/AIDS-related knowledge in this population. We collected information from 5,355 Chinese rural residents and then correlated the results of the scores on knowledge to the numbers of information sources, and adjusted for age, sex, education and occupation. Results The sources of HIV/AIDs information reported by subjects included television, radio, newspapers, periodicals, discussions with neighbors and friends. There were significant differences in sources of information based on gender, occupation, educational level and age. The average number of information sources was 3.01 ± 1.74. The average score on the AIDS related knowledge questionnaire was 8.21 ± 4.23. Subjects who reported 6 sources of HIV/AIDS information had an average score of 11.67 ± 3.0 on the HIV/AIDS knowledge questionnaire. Subjects who reported between 3–7 sources of HIV/AIDS information had significantly higher scores than those who had 1,2 or 8 sources of information. Conclusions There is an association between HIV/AIDS knowledge and the number of available information sources. By increasing the sources, one could not always make more people curious or interested in HIV/AIDS knowledge. PMID:25834646

  19. "Hanging in" with HIV/AIDS in the rural north of Thailand: a grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Klunklin, Areewan; Greenwood, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    A study was undertaken in 1997 through 2000 in the rural north of Thailand to describe and theorize the HIV/AIDS experiences of wives and widows there. Participants confronted four causally interrelated problems in their struggle to survive with HIV/ AIDS: physical, economic, psychoemotional, and sociocultural, and they used two social processes to manage them: namely, "hiding out" and "hanging in" with HIV/AIDS. This report describes and discusses the second of these basic social processes through which wives and widows in the rural north of Thailand cope with their HIV/AIDS infection. Hanging in involves a range of very active strategies derived from both traditional Thai culture and Western medicine and aimed at allowing participants to make the best of their predicament. In addition, this report renders explicit what is typically left implicit in grounded theory research; that is, that culture is the source both of the problems participants experienced and the means to their effective amelioration. PMID:16536262

  20. Treatment and related AIDS email lists.

    PubMed

    John, J S

    1999-12-01

    There are a number of email lists or ¿listserves' which allow people with similar interests to share information online. The article provides an introduction to this forum and topics include types of lists, email filters, and writing etiquette. Major AIDS treatment lists are also described and details include the type of site information, a web site address by which to subscribe, and projected number of messages one will receive per day. Contact information is provided for further information and other listserves. PMID:11367129

  1. Are Rural Women Powerless When it Comes to HIV & AIDS Risk? Implications for Adult Education Programmes in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiggundu, Edith; Castle, Jane

    2007-01-01

    There is an urgent need for fresh approaches to HIV & AIDS education for adults and youth in South Africa, particularly for those marginalised by society, such as rural black women. In this article we explore the factors which affect awareness, condom use and HIV & AIDS risk among a group of women who attend classes in a rural Adult Education…

  2. Economic empowerment and AIDS-related stigma in rural Kenya: a double-edged sword?

    PubMed

    Gnauck, Katherine; Ruiz, Jamie; Kellett, Nicole; Sussman, Andrew; Sullivan, Mary Ann; Montoya, Maria; Levin, Nick; Tomedi, Angelo; Mwanthi, Mutuku A

    2013-01-01

    Economic empowerment, HIV risk and AIDS-related stigma appear intricately intertwined for women in Kenya. Their interaction must be understood in order to implement effective economic interventions that also decrease HIV risk and stigma. We conducted a qualitative study amongst women in a rural Kamba-speaking community of southeastern Kenya to pursue whether engagement in an economic empowerment initiative (a basket weaving cooperative) influences women's perspectives and experiences with HIV risk and AIDS-related stigma. We conducted seven women's focus groups: participants in the local basket-weaving cooperative comprised four focus groups and non-participants comprised the remaining three groups. The HIV status of the women was not known. Three dominant themes emerged from the focus groups: empowerment, pervasive vulnerability and unanticipated social paradoxes. Contradictions found in these themes suggest that economic empowerment can become a double-edged sword. Economic empowerment enhanced perceived individual, domestic and social community status. However, this enhancement was not protective of domestic violence and perceived HIV risk. Social perceptions may have paradoxically contributed barriers to HIV testing and treatment putting women at greater HIV risk. In conclusion, economic empowerment initiatives for women in developing countries in the context of the HIV epidemic should be coupled with peer mediated support and HIV-risk education. PMID:23668536

  3. AIDing cancer treatment: Reducing AID activity via HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rebhandl, Stefan; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-08-01

    The activation induced deaminase (AID) catalyses the two key events underlying humoral adaptive immunity: class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of antibody genes in B lymphocytes. AID accomplishes this task by directly deaminating cytosines within the genomic immunoglobulin locus, thereby triggering a complex mutagenic process eventually leading to improved effector function of antibodies. However, it has long been noticed that AID can be aberrantly expressed in cancer and that its activity is not absolutely restricted to antibody genes, as substantial genome-wide off-target mutations have been observed, which contribute to tumorigenesis and clonal evolution of AID-expressing malignancies. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Montamat-Sicotte et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 2365-2376] investigate the feasibility and efficacy of in vivo inhibition of AID with HSP90 inhibitors in a mouse model of B-cell leukemia and in vitro with a human breast cancer cell line, thereby demonstrating that cancer patients may benefit from preventing noncanonical AID functions. PMID:26151367

  4. South African AIDS Orphans: Examining Assumptions around Vulnerability from the Perspective of Rural Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Patricia C.

    2006-01-01

    The article examines assumptions circulating in development or interventionist discourse concerning the vulnerabilities of AIDS orphans in South Africa. Ongoing ethnographic research, begun in March 2003, with 31 rural children and youth between the ages of 14 and 22, in Magangangozi, KwaZulu-Natal, points to the ways in which global terms may…

  5. Trades and Aides: The Gendering of Vocational Education in Rural Alberta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Alison; Servage, Laura; Hamm, Zane

    2014-01-01

    This article examines two Canadian high school work experience programs that focus on rural youth. The first encourages students to consider work in skilled trades, while the second encourages them to become qualified as healthcare aides. Both programs were designed to encourage high school students to explore careers in fields where labor market…

  6. Evaluation of HIV/AIDS Secondary School Peer Education in Rural Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Maas, Frank; Otte, Willem M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we assessed whether peer education is an effective method of HIV/AIDS awareness, in terms of knowledge, misconception and behavior, among adolescents in the rural area of Nigeria. A comparative case series (n = 250), cross-sectional structured survey (n = 135) and focus group discussions (n = 80) were undertaken among adolescents.…

  7. Rural Drug Users: Factors Associated with Substance Abuse Treatment Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Oser, Carrie B.; Leukefeld, Carl G.; Tindall, Michele Staton; Garrity, Thomas F.; Carlson, Robert G.; Falck, Russel; Wang, Jichuan; Booth, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a modified version of Andersen’s (1968, 1995) Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to identify the correlates of the number of substance abuse treatment episodes received by rural drug users. Data were collected from face-to-face interviews with 711 drug users in rural areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky. Descriptive analyses examine rural drug users’ substance use histories and retrospective substance abuse treatment service utilization patterns. A negative binomial regression model indicated that selected predisposing, historical health, and enabling factors were significantly associated with the utilization of substance abuse treatment among rural drug users. Despite high levels of recent and lifetime self-reported substance use among these rural drug users, treatment services were underutilized. Future studies are needed to examine the impact of the health care system and characteristics of the external environment associated with rural substance abuse treatment in order to increase utilization among drug users. PMID:20463206

  8. 46 CFR 197.314 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.314 Section 197... HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.314 First aid and... consists of— (i) Basic first aid supplies; and (ii) Any additional supplies necessary to treat minor...

  9. 46 CFR 197.314 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.314 Section 197... HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.314 First aid and... consists of— (i) Basic first aid supplies; and (ii) Any additional supplies necessary to treat minor...

  10. 46 CFR 197.314 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.314 Section 197... HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.314 First aid and... consists of— (i) Basic first aid supplies; and (ii) Any additional supplies necessary to treat minor...

  11. Rural perspectives on HIV/AIDS prevention: a comparative study of Thailand and Ghana.

    PubMed

    Aheto, Denis Worlanyo; Gbesemete, Kwame Prosper

    2005-04-01

    The paper compares rural perspectives in Thailand and Ghana on the level of condom acceptance in sexual relations, willingness to test oneself for HIV before and in marriage and sources of information on HIV/AIDS. We also compared the policy approaches to combating HIV/AIDS in both countries. The results indicates that in the villages studied in Thailand, all single men and the majority of the single women were in favour of using condoms in sexual relations. This group also showed a positive attitude to HIV/AIDS test before and in marriage. However, married men in rural Thailand disapproved of the use of condoms with their wives but married women in the sample population were open to the possibility of using condoms. Both married men and women were strongly against HIV/AIDS test in marriage. In contrast to Thailand, most single men in the communities studied in Ghana showed a disapproval to the use of condoms in sexual relations. However, they condoned HIV test before marriage. Married men and women in rural Ghana were against the use of condoms in sexual relations as well as HIV/AIDS test in marriage. In order to mitigate mother-to-child transmission, the Thais applied anti-retroviral drug care for HIV positive pregnant women during pregnancy and after delivery. In Ghana on the other hand, pregnant women were subject to HIV test and counselling. The mode of information acquisition on HIV/AIDS in both countries were through the media, campaigns and village volunteers. Finally, we observed that fighting poverty is a sine qua non for the success of any HIV/AIDS eradication programme. PMID:15760696

  12. AIDS: risk behaviors among rural Mexican women married to migrant workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Salgado de Snyder, V N; Díaz Pérez, M; Maldonado, M

    1996-04-01

    International migration between Mexico and the United States has been acknowledged as a phenomenon that may contribute to the spread of AIDS in rural Mexico. The purpose of this study is to identify the information held by the participants regarding AIDS and to describe selected high-risk behaviors for AIDS transmission among a representative sample of rural women living in Mexico who are married to immigrant temporary workers to the United States. The women who participated in the study were married, of reproductive age, and had active sex lives with their spouses. Results revealed that most of the women interviewed had at least some knowledge about AIDS. Although some misconceptions were evident, most of the information they had was accurate. About one-third of the women felt at risk for AIDS, mostly because they doubted their husbands' fidelity, or because in the last five years they had donated blood, received a blood transfusion, or received an intramuscular or intravenous injection. The results of the study are discussed within the sociocultural context that surrounds the lives of the women interviewed. PMID:8727653

  13. A model of expanding HIV/AIDS education in Chinese rural areas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Liu, G-T; Wang, L-R; Wu, Y-F; Wang, X-L

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore an effective model of HIV/AIDS health education for a rural Chinese population. Students in two middle schools were given HIV/AIDS health education. The education in Tiechang town was carried out in the form of delivering multimedia lectures, video tapes and brochures, while in Daping town brochures were distributed to students. After receiving health education, each student extended the health education to three peasants who were their relatives or neighbours. After the education was provided, the test scores of AIDS knowledge increased significantly in the students of Tiechang town (0.50 baseline, 0.69 post-test1, 0.68 post-test2). For the expansion subjects, the scores increased significantly (0.56 baseline versus 0.74 post-test) in the Tiechang group, and also increased mildly (0.52 baseline versus 0.59 post-test) in the Daping group. Empowering secondary school students to teach others about AIDS was a highly effective model for spreading AIDS prevention knowledge among the rural Chinese population. PMID:19933206

  14. Optimal control of HIV/AIDS dynamic: Education and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Amiru; Abdullah, Farah Aini

    2014-07-01

    A mathematical model which describes the transmission dynamics of HIV/AIDS is developed. The optimal control representing education and treatment for this model is explored. The existence of optimal Control is established analytically by the use of optimal control theory. Numerical simulations suggest that education and treatment for the infected has a positive impact on HIV/AIDS control.

  15. 46 CFR 197.454 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.454 Section 197.454 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Equipment § 197.454 First aid and treatment equipment. The diving supervisor shall ensure that medical...

  16. 46 CFR 197.314 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.314 Section 197.314 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.314 First aid and treatment equipment. (a) Each dive location...

  17. 46 CFR 197.454 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.454 Section 197.454 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Equipment § 197.454 First aid and treatment equipment. The diving supervisor shall ensure that medical...

  18. 46 CFR 197.314 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.314 Section 197.314 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.314 First aid and treatment equipment. (a) Each dive location...

  19. 46 CFR 197.454 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.454 Section 197.454 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... Equipment § 197.454 First aid and treatment equipment. The diving supervisor shall ensure that medical...

  20. HIV/AIDS Adherence: Teaching about Treatment and Stigma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Jena Nicols

    2008-01-01

    Advances in HIV/AIDS treatment have dramatically changed the nature of HIV/AIDS education and prevention, creating new opportunities and challenges. This activity is designed to help participants reflect on the impact that HIV treatment can have on a person's life. It also enables trainers to engage participants in a dialogue about the impact of…

  1. AIDS, Metaphor and Ritual: The Crafting of Care in Rural South African Childhoods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Patricia C

    2013-01-01

    Based on a two-year study of 31 young people aged 14-20 who had lost one or both parents to HIV/AIDS, in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, the article draws on an in-depth ethnographic account of a 17-year-old girl's life process. It traces forms of care between adults and children within her family across several generations, exploring how…

  2. Effects of a Theory-Based Audio HIV/AIDS Intervention for Illiterate Rural Females in Amhara, Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogale, Gebeyehu W.; Boer, Henk; Seydel, Erwin R.

    2011-01-01

    In Ethiopia the level of illiteracy in rural areas is very high. In this study, we investigated the effects of an audio HIV/AIDS prevention intervention targeted at rural illiterate females. In the intervention we used social-oriented presentation formats, such as discussion between similar females and role-play. In a pretest and posttest…

  3. Ubiquitous burden: the contribution of migration to AIDS and Tuberculosis mortality in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bocquier, Philipe; Collinson, Mark A.; Clark, Samuel J.; Gerritsen, Annette A.M.; Kahn, Kathleen; TollMan, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The paper aims to estimate the extent to which migrants are contributing to AIDS or tuberculosis (TB) mortality among rural sub-district populations. The Agincourt (South Africa) health and socio-demographic surveillance system provided comprehensive data on vital and migration events between 1994 and 2006. AIDS and TB cause-deleted life expectancy, and crude death rates by gender, migration status and period were computed. The annualised crude death rate almost tripled from 5·39 [95% CI 5·13–5·65] to 15·10 [95% CI 14·62–15·59] per 1000 over the years 1994–2006. The contribution of AIDS and TB in returned migrants to the increase in crude death rate was 78·7% [95% CI 77·4–80·1] for males and 44·4% [95% CI 43·2–46·1] for females. So, in a typical South African setting dependent on labour migration for rural livelihoods, the contribution of returned migrants, many infected with AIDS and TB, to the burden of disease is high. PMID:25574071

  4. Assessment of AIDS Risk among Treatment Seeking Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, John L.; And Others

    Intravenous (IV) drug abusers are at risk for contracting transmittable diseases such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and hepatitis B. This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of risk behaviors for acquiring and transmitting AIDS and hepatitis B among treatment-seeking drug abusers (N=168). Subjects participated in a…

  5. 46 CFR 197.454 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.454 Section 197.454 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.454 First aid and...

  6. 46 CFR 197.454 - First aid and treatment equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false First aid and treatment equipment. 197.454 Section 197.454 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Periodic Tests and Inspections of Diving Equipment § 197.454 First aid and...

  7. Librarian-initiated HIV/AIDS prevention intervention program outcome in rural communities in Oyo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ajuwon, G A; Komolafe-Opadeji, H O; Ikhizama, B

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to meet the HIV/AIDS information and service needs of citizens living in selected rural, underserved communities in Oyo State, Nigeria. This was a librarian-initiated intervention program (pre-post) study of heads of rural households in Oyo State. A questionnaire was used for pre- and post-intervention assessment. The education covered knowledge about HIV/AIDS, routes of transmission, prevention strategies, and attitude toward persons living with HIV. It increased participants' knowledge about AIDS and improved attitude toward those living with HIV. Provision and dissemination of information on HIV/AIDS through librarians to rural settlers is an important prevention strategy and librarians can make major contributions. PMID:25228485

  8. 'Take your mat and go!': rural Malawian women's strategies in the HIV/AIDS era.

    PubMed

    Schatz, Enid

    2005-01-01

    In much of HIV/AIDS prevention literature, women are depicted as passive and ill-equipped to confront the epidemic without external support to enhance their status, autonomy, and negotiation skills. This paper critically evaluates this depiction, using data from in-depth interviews conducted with married couples in rural Malawi. It focuses on the extent to which married women perceive that they have the ability to protect themselves from infection and on the prevention strategies that they employ. Interview data suggest that women have identified a range of contextually appropriate ways to resist exposure to HIV. These strategies include sitting and discussing the dangers of HIV/AIDS with their husbands; utilizing social networks for advice and as advocates; publicly confronting husbands' girlfriends; and divorcing men who do not adopt safer practices. These locally-formulated strategies are not likely to be followed consistently, and they may not be the most effective strategies in preventing husbands from straying or protecting women from contracting HIV/AIDS. Their existence, however, demonstrates that rural Malawian women believe that they have some agency to protect themselves; and, they are in fact using locally appropriate strategies to do so. PMID:16864217

  9. Rural children's attitudes to people with HIV/AIDS in Mali: the causes of stigma.

    PubMed

    Castle, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Qualitative research among young people and other community members in rural Mali elicited knowledge and attitudes with regard to HIV/AIDS. Findings indicated that rumours concerning methods of infection are likely to increase the stigmatization of those with the disease. The most frequently stated mode of transmission involved urinating in a place where someone with AIDS had already urinated. Shared clothes, food and water were seen as sources of infection. Both children and teachers recommended that people with AIDS be isolated. Even talking to them would lead to a risk of infection. Discriminatory views were likely to have been reinforced by parents and community elders who possessed the same misinformation. The notion that AIDS results from sexual encounters between young women and dogs belonging to white people in Côte d'Ivoire was also widespread. These discourses may reflect perceived xenophobia and risk to migrants associated with current tensions between the two countries, together with misgivings about Western sexual liberalism. A holistic educational programme is proposed to address not simply HIV/AIDS, but the social context in which infection occurs, with view to combating stigma and discrimination associated with not just HIV but also with migration in this setting. PMID:21972829

  10. Qualitative changes in AIDS preventative attitudes in a rural Senegalese population.

    PubMed

    Wade, A S; Enel, C; Lagarde, E

    2006-07-01

    Recent changes in knowledge and attitudes towards AIDS in a rural population of Senegal were assessed comparing two cross-sectional studies conducted six years apart (1997 and 2003). Random samples of 866 and 709 adults aged 15-59 were included. Sociodemographic characteristics of the two population samples were very similar. The proportion of those who estimated their personal risk of being infected by HIV as high or very high fell from 49.1% in 1997 to 17.2% in 2003. The proportion of those who reported having already changed their behaviour to protect themselves from AIDS fell from 56.3% to 24.9%. Methods cited as protection against HIV changed over the period. Fidelity and/or partner selection was cited by 93% of respondents in 1997 and 58% in 2003 when suspicion of potentially soiled materials appeared. Finally, attitudes towards persons living with HIV or AIDS (PLWHA) in 2003 were ambivalent: while 73.9% thought that a PLWHA should not be allowed to mix with other villagers, 65.1% would be ready to provide care to a PLWHA. Drastic changes in attitudes towards the AIDS threat could be identified over the period. AIDS preventive attitudes measured in 1997 were not sustained in 2003, while stigmatization of PLWHA was very widespread. PMID:16777645

  11. Living with death in a time of AIDS: A rural South African case study1

    PubMed Central

    POSEL, DEBORAH; KAHN, KATHLEEN; WALKER, LIZ

    2010-01-01

    Aims To examine how a rural community profoundly affected by escalating rates of largely AIDS-related deaths of young and middle-aged people makes sense of this phenomenon and its impact on their everyday lives. Methods Data were collected in Agincourt subdistrict, Limpopo Province. Twelve focus groups were constituted according to age and gender and met three times (a total of 36 focus-group discussions [FGDs]). The FGDs explored sequentially people’s expectations of their lives in the “new” South Africa, their interpretations of the acceleration of death amongst the young and middle-aged, and their understandings of HIV/AIDS. Discussions were recorded, fully transcribed, and thematically analysed. Results Respondents acknowledged escalating death rates in their community, yet few referred directly to HIV/AIDS as the cause. Rather, respondents focused on the social and cultural causes of death, including the erosion of cultural norms and traditions such as cultural taboos on sex. There are many competing versions of what HIV/AIDS is, what causes it and how it is spread, ranging from scientific explanations to conspiracy theories. Findings highlight the relationship between AIDS and other traditional diseases with some respondents suggesting that AIDS is a new form of other longstanding illnesses. Conclusions This study points to the centrality of cultural explanations in understanding “bad death” (AIDS death) in the Agincourt area. Physical illness is understood to be a symptom of “cultural damage”. Implications of this for public health practice and research are outlined. PMID:17676515

  12. Household displacement and health risk behaviors among AIDS-affected children in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Zhao, Junfeng; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Guoxiang; Lin, Xiuyun; Zhang, Liying

    2011-01-01

    When parents die of or are infected with HIV, children might have to leave their own household and be displaced to other living arrangement and some may even be displaced multiple times. The objective of this study is to examine the association between household displacement and health risk behaviors among AIDS orphans (children who have lost one or both of their parents to HIV/AIDS) and vulnerable children (children living with HIV-infected parents) in rural China. The sample consisted of 1015 children (549 AIDS orphans, 466 vulnerable children) in family-based care. The children were assigned to three displacement groups according to the number of household displacement (i.e., none, once, at least twice) after their parents became ill or died of AIDS. Cigarette smoking, alcohol use, violence, public property destruction, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempt were used to assess the health risk behaviors of these children. Both bivariate and multivariate tests were used to assess the differences in health risk behaviors among displacement groups. The findings indicated that children who were displaced at least twice were more likely to report a higher frequency of public property destruction and suicide ideation than those who were never displaced or displaced once. Multivariate analysis revealed that public property destruction, suicide ideation and suicide attempt were significantly associated with the household displacement among these children, controlling for gender, age, child status (AIDS orphans vs. vulnerable children) and the duration of household displacement. Results in the current study suggest that a stable living environment was important for both AID orphans and vulnerable children in communities of high prevalence of HIV/AIDS. The government, community and other agencies need to make efforts to avoid frequent household displacement among these children after the HIV-related infection or death of their parents. PMID:21400311

  13. Thymostimulin treatment in AIDS-related complex.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, L; Chisesi, T; Galli, M; Gritti, F M; Ielasi, G; Lazzarin, A; Mezzaroma, I; Moroni, M; Raise, E; Vaglia, A

    1988-06-01

    Thirty-four patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC) were treated for 6 months with thymostimulin, a thymic hormone. Clinical and immunological findings after a 1-year follow-up were compared with those in 24 age- and sex-matched controls receiving no immunotherapy. Statistical evaluation after 6 and 12 months showed significant differences in the two groups. The thymostimulin-treated group had higher leukocyte and lymphocyte counts, more positivity in intradermal tests with multiple recall antigens, and less lymphadenopathy and weight loss. The number of OKT3+ and OKT4+ lymphocytes decreased significantly in the control group, but did not change in the thymostimulin-treated patients. Finally, after 18 months of follow-up, no progression to AIDS was seen among the treated subjects, whereas 3 of the controls developed the disease. We conclude that thymostimulin, alone or in combination with antiviral drugs, may be helpful in the management of ARC patients. PMID:3259480

  14. ASHA-Life Intervention Perspectives Voiced By Rural Indian Women Living with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Ekstrand, Maria; Srivastava, Neha; Carpenter, Catherine L.; Salem, Benissa E.; Al-Harassi, Shawana; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Sinha, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    In this focus group study, we explored the experiences of 16 rural women living with AIDS (WLA) who participated in the Asha-Life (AL) intervention to gain an understanding of the environmental, psychosocial and cultural impact of the AL on their lives. Four themes emerged among AL participants: a) The Importance of Tangible Support, b) Need for Social Support, c) Ongoing Challenges to Accessing Antiretroviral Therapy (ART), and d) Perspectives on Future Programs. Our research findings support the development of future programs targeting mother-child dyads which emphasize nutritional knowledge, while reducing barriers to receiving ART, and physical, emotional, and financial support. PMID:26147930

  15. ASHA-Life Intervention Perspectives Voiced by Rural Indian Women Living With AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Ekstrand, Maria; Srivastava, Neha; Carpenter, Catherine L; Salem, Benissa E; Al-Harrasi, Shawana; Ramakrishnan, Padma; Sinha, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    In this focus group study, we explored the experiences of 16 rural women living with AIDS (WLA) who participated in the Asha-Life (AL) intervention to gain an understanding of the environmental, psychosocial, and cultural impact of the AL on their lives. Four themes emerged among AL participants: (a) the importance of tangible support, (b) need for social support, (c) ongoing challenges to accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART), and (d) perspectives on future programs. Our research findings support the development of future programs targeting mother-child dyads which emphasize nutritional knowledge, while reducing barriers to receiving ART, and physical, emotional, and financial support. PMID:26147930

  16. Cultural and gender issues related to HIV/AIDS prevention in rural Swaziland: a focus group analysis.

    PubMed

    Buseh, Aaron G; Glass, Laurie K; McElmurry, Beverly J

    2002-02-01

    HIV/AIDS is a serious public health problem in Swaziland, a small land-locked Southern African country. The epidemic affects all subpopulations, but women are increasingly at risk for contracting the disease. Focus groups were conducted in a rural area to obtain qualitative information on the rural dimensions of HIV/AIDS, vulnerability to HIV/AIDS, and sociocultural factors influencing the spread of AIDS. Five themes were identified from analyses of the focus groups that are relevant in developing an AIDS prevention program for this population in Swaziland. Implications for future research and health care practice focus on gender-sensitive cultural research (e.g., women and men's roles and responsibilities in rural Swaziland society) and how social, economic, and cultural factors impact the spread of AIDS. Recommendations include reorienting and allocating resources for health, education, and social services to address the relative neglect of rural areas and strengthening policies and programs to achieve the equal participation of all women in all aspects of society's decisions. Specifically, policies related to economic and food security should result in programs to improve local access by women to all resources. PMID:11868964

  17. Psychosocial Differences Between Whites and African Americans Living With HIV/AIDS in Rural Areas of 13 U.S. States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davantes Heckman, Bernadette

    2006-01-01

    Context: Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) prevalence rates are increasing rapidly in rural areas of the United States. As rural African Americans are increasingly affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is important to identify psychosocial factors unique to this group so that AIDS mental health interventions can be culturally…

  18. Urban-Rural Differences in Motivation to Control Prejudice toward People with HIV/AIDS: The Impact of Perceived Identifiability in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunn, Janice Yanushka; Solomon, Sondra E.; Varni, Susan E.; Miller, Carol T.; Forehand, Rex L.; Ashikaga, Takamaru

    2008-01-01

    Context: HIV/AIDS is occurring with increasing frequency in rural areas of the United States, and people living with HIV/AIDS in rural communities report higher levels of perceived stigma than their more urban counterparts. The extent to which stigmatized individuals perceive stigma could be influenced, in part, by prevailing community attitudes.…

  19. Building a medicine bank for Venezuela. AIDS treatment access.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    A partnership began in 1994 between United Against AIDS International (UAAI) of New York and Accion Ciudadana Contra el SIDA (ACCSI) of Venezuela has led to the development of a volunteer infrastructure including medicine and medical supply donors, airlines, truck drivers, customs officials, storage facilities, and medical personnel to bring treatment to people with AIDS (PWA) in Venezuela. Renate Koch, ACCSI director, began bringing medications home to Venezuela in early 1994, following a visit to New York City, where she met with representatives of ACT UP], the Global Network of People with AIDS, and other New York-based HIV/AIDS associations. Hugh Ward, who founded UAAI to provide HIV/AIDS drugs to PWA in Venezuela, later met with Koch and several other nongovernmental organizations in Caracas. Ward explained that most unused medicines and treatments given to people with AIDS in the US are thrown away after the patient has died or when the patient's health condition demands an alternate treatment. A network of New York-based AIDS organizations and doctors' groups now collects the medicines returned to them by PWA for donation to the medicine bank program. Once the medicines are received in Caracas, they are stored at Accion Ecumenica health clinic for distribution to PWA. While there is always a need for more medicines and supplies, the current network is able to back-stock enough quantities to ensure that patients will receive consistent and sustained treatment. Limited quantities of retrovirals and protease inhibitors are included in the medicine bank. PMID:12321757

  20. Women Living with HIV in Rural Areas. Implementing a Response using the HIV and AIDS Risk Assessment and Reduction Model

    PubMed Central

    Bandali, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The global fight against HIV is progressing; however, women living in rural areas particularly in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) continue to face the devastating consequences of HIV and AIDS. Lack of knowledge and geographical barriers to HIV services are compounded by gender norms often limiting the negotiation of safe sexual practices among women living in rural areas. This paper discusses findings from a qualitative study conducted in rural areas of Mozambique examining factors that influenced women to engage in HIV risk-reduction practices. The findings from this study led to the emergence of an HIV and AIDS risk assessment and reduction (HARAR) model, which is described in detail. The model helps in understanding gender-related factors influencing men and women to engage in risk-reduction practices, which can be used as a framework in other settings to design more nuanced and contextual policies and programs. PMID:25089093

  1. The Environmental and Social Influences of HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Focus on Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Oramasionwu, Christine U.; Daniels, Kelly R.; Labreche, Matthew J.; Frei, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) pandemic has caused far-reaching effects in sub-Saharan Africa. The pandemic has effectively diminished the workforce, increased poverty rates, reduced agricultural productivity, and transformed the structure of many rural households. HIV/AIDS further strains the already fragile relationship between livelihood and the natural and social environments of these regions. Therefore, the objective of this review is to characterize the impact of HIV/AIDS on the environment and the social infrastructure of rural sub-Saharan Africa. There are many aspects of rural life that contribute to disease transmission of HIV/AIDS and that pose unique challenges to the population dynamics in sub-Saharan Africa. Widespread AIDS-related mortality has caused a decrease in population growth for many African countries. In turn, these alterations in population dynamics have resulted in a decrease in the percentage of prime-age working adults, as well as a gender disparity, whereby, females carry a growing burden of household responsibilities. There is a rising proportion of older adults, often females, who assume the role of provider and caretaker for other dependent family members. These changing dynamics have caused many to exploit their natural surroundings, adopting less sustainable land use practices and utilizing protected resources as a primary means of generating revenue. PMID:21845169

  2. Increasing access to oral health care for people living with HIV/AIDS in rural Oregon.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jill; Mofidi, Mahyar; Bednarsh, Helene; Gambrell, Alan; Tobias, Carol R

    2012-05-01

    Access to oral health care for people living with HIV/AIDS is a severe problem. This article describes the design and impact of an Innovations in Oral Health Care Initiative program, funded through the Health Resources and Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau's Special Projects of National Significance (SPNS) program, that expanded oral health-care services for these individuals in rural Oregon. From April 2007 to August 2010, 473 patients received dental care (exceeding the target goal of 410 patients) and 153 dental hygiene students were trained to deliver oral health care to HIV-positive patients. The proportion of patients receiving oral health care increased from 10% to 65%, while the no-show rate declined from 40% to 10%. Key implementation components were leveraging SPNS funding and services to create an integrated delivery system, collaborations that resulted in improved service delivery systems, using dental hygiene students to deliver oral health care, enhanced care coordination through the services of a dental case manager, and program capacity to adjust to unanticipated needs. PMID:22547878

  3. Care arrangements of AIDS orphans and their relationship with children's psychosocial well-being in rural China.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Qun; Lin, Xiuyun; Zhang, Liying; Stanton, Bonita

    2011-03-01

    There is an estimated 100,000 children orphaned by AIDS in China, but data on the care arrangement of these orphans are limited. In this study, we examine the relationship between AIDS orphans' care arrangement and their psychosocial well-being among a sample of AIDS orphans in rural China. A total of 296 children who lost both parents to AIDS participated in the study, including 176 in orphanages, 90 in kinship care and 30 in community-based group homes. All participants completed a cross-sectional survey assessing their traumatic symptoms, physical health and schooling. Data reveal that the AIDS orphans in group homes reported the best outcomes in three domains of psychosocial well-being, followed by those in the orphanages and then the kinship care. The differences in psychosocial well-being among the three groups of children persist after controlling for key demographic characteristics. The findings suggest that the appropriate care arrangement for AIDS orphans should be evaluated within the specific social and cultural context where the orphans live. In resource-poor regions or areas stricken hardest by the AIDS epidemic, kinship care may not sufficiently serve the needs of AIDS orphans. Community-based care models, with appropriate government and community support preserving the family style and low child-to-caregiver ratio may constitute an effective and sustainable care model for the best interest of the AIDS orphans in developing countries. PMID:20587602

  4. Impact of Community-Based HIV/AIDS Treatment on Household Incomes in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Feulefack, Joseph F.; Luckert, Martin K.; Mohapatra, Sandeep; Cash, Sean B.; Alibhai, Arif; Kipp, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Though health benefits to households in developing countries from antiretroviral treatment (ART) programs are widely reported in the literature, specific estimates regarding impacts of treatments on household incomes are rare. This type of information is important to governments and donors, as it is an indication of returns to their ART investments, and to better understand the role of HIV/AIDS in development. The objective of this study is to estimate the impact of a community-based ART program on household incomes in a previously underserved rural region of Uganda. A community-based ART program, based largely on labor contributions from community volunteers, was implemented and evaluated. All households with HIV/AIDS patients enrolled in the treatment programme (n = 134 households) were surveyed five times; once at the beginning of the treatment and every three months thereafter for a period of one year. Data were collected on household income from cash earnings and value of own production. The analysis, using ordinary least squares and quantile regressions, identifies the impact of the ART program on household incomes over the first year of the treatment, while controlling for heterogeneity in household characteristics and temporal changes. As a result of the treatment, health conditions of virtually all patients improved, and household incomes increased by approximately 30% to 40%, regardless of household income quantile. These increases in income, however, varied significantly depending on socio-demographic and socio-economic control variables. Overall, results show large and significant impacts of the ART program on household incomes, suggesting large returns to public investments in ART, and that treating HIV/AIDS is an important precondition for development. Moreover, development programs that invest in human capital and build wealth are important complements that can increase the returns to ART programs. PMID:23840347

  5. 30 years later: Social Representations about AIDS and sexual practices of rural towns residents.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Francisca Marina de Souza Freire; Santos, José Anderson Galdino; Loredanna, Stedile; Araújo, Eunice; Saldanha, Ana Alayde Werba; Silva, Josevânia da

    2016-06-01

    In the 30 years of the AIDS pandemic in Brazil, it is recognized the HIV virus internalization of the phenomenon as a challenge to care and current health policies. In this sense, it aimed to verify sex practices and social representations that rural towns residents have about the disease. Attended by 789 people, men and women, between 18 and 90 years old, residents in 41 towns with fewer than 11,000 inhabitants in the state of Paraiba / Brazil. Data were collected by a questionnaire and the free association of words test. The results showed low concern about disease, perception of invulnerability to HIV infection and not using condoms during sexual intercourse, and confidence in the major reason related partner. Also showed endure derogatory and stereotypical representations, revealing that still persist in rural areas, beliefs and representations concerning the beginning of the epidemic. From these findings, it is possible to point out deficiencies in the care provided by the health services in these localities, which may result in increased vulnerability of this population to diseases, so there is the need to intensify information campaigns and intervention. The results reveal the existence of three different types of modes of learning health literacy skills in informal context: : i) learning that takes place in action, in achieving daily tasks; ii) learning processes that result from problem solving; iii) learning that occurs in an unplanned manner, resulting from accidental circumstances and, in some cases, devoid of intentionality. Nos 30 anos da pandemia da Aids no Brasil, reconhece-se o fenômeno da interiorização do vírus HIV como um desafio ao cuidado e às politicas de saúde atuais. Neste sentido, objetivou-se conhecer práticas sexuais e as representações sociais que residentes de cidades rurais têm acerca da doença. Participaram 789 pessoas, homens e mulheres, entre 18 e 90 anos de idade, residentes em 41 cidades com menos de 11.000 habitantes

  6. Environmental Change, Risky Sexual Behavior, and the HIV/AIDS Pandemic: Linkages Through Livelihoods in Rural Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lori M.; Reid-Hresko, John; Dickinson, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Local natural resources are central to rural livelihoods across much of the developing world. Such “natural capital” represents one of several types of assets available to households as they craft livelihood strategies. In order to explore the potential for environmental scarcity and change to contribute to perpetuation of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, we examine the association between declining natural capital and engaging in risky sexual behaviors, as potentially another livelihood strategy. Such association has been demonstrated in Kenya and Tanzania, through the fish-for-sex trade. To explore the possibility of this connection within rural Haitian livelihoods we use Demographic and Health Survey data, with a focus on rural women, combined with vegetation measures generated from satellite imagery. We find that lack of condom use in recent sexual encounters is associated with local environmental scarcity – controlling for respondent age, education, religion and knowledge of AIDS preventive measures. The results suggest that explicit consideration of the environmental dimensions of HIV/AIDS may be of relevance in scholarship examining factors shaping the pandemic. PMID:22416143

  7. 30 CFR 50.20-3 - Criteria-Differences between medical treatment and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and first aid. 50.20-3 Section 50.20-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... first aid. (a) Medical treatment includes, but is not limited to, the suturing of any wound, treatment... treatment. Tetanus and flu shots are considered preventative in nature. First aid includes any...

  8. 30 CFR 50.20-3 - Criteria-Differences between medical treatment and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and first aid. 50.20-3 Section 50.20-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... first aid. (a) Medical treatment includes, but is not limited to, the suturing of any wound, treatment... treatment. Tetanus and flu shots are considered preventative in nature. First aid includes any...

  9. 30 CFR 50.20-3 - Criteria-Differences between medical treatment and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and first aid. 50.20-3 Section 50.20-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... first aid. (a) Medical treatment includes, but is not limited to, the suturing of any wound, treatment... treatment. Tetanus and flu shots are considered preventative in nature. First aid includes any...

  10. HIV/AIDS - Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Sexual Practices among Migrant Wives in Rural Anhui Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Huachun; Dai, Xin; Meng, Xiaojun; Wang, Huadong; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Yanchun; Zhang, Lin; Gao, Yongqing; Tang, Song; Xu, Tan; Sun, Wenjie; Wen, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Migrant wives have been increasing in some poor rural regions of China and they may bridge HIV transmission across regions. This study aimed to assess HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes and sexual practices among this population in rural Anhui Province, China. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with questionnaire of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and sexual practices between June 2011 and May 2012. A total of 730 migrant wives and 207 local women were enrolled in this study. Unpaired T-test, Chi-square was utilized to compare the difference of HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes and sexual practices between migrant wives and local women. Results Around 80% of the migrant wives were from Yunnan, Guizhou, or Sichuan Provinces. The main sources of HIV/AIDS information were TV/radio, posters, and newspapers/periodicals. HIV/AIDS knowledge level among migrant wives was significantly lower than that among local women (e.g. 47.1% vs 57.0% (p<0.001) answered “Yes” for the question “Can an apparently healthy person be HIV-infected?”), and stigma and prejudice towards HIV/AIDS among migrant wives were more common than those among local women (e.g. 73.2% vs 65.7% (p=0.006) answered “No” for the question “If a shopkeeper or food seller had the HIV, would you buy food from them?”). Compared to local women, migrant wives were more likely to have ever had sex during menstruation (6.8% vs 3.4%, p=0.065) and extramarital sex (17.5% vs 10.1%, p=0.01), and were less likely to consistently use condoms with their husbands (45.8% vs 57.5%, p<0.001) or extramarital sex partners (48.8% vs 58.95, p<0.001). Conclusions Migrant wives in rural China had a low HIV/AIDS knowledge level and high prevalence of stigma and prejudice and risky sexual behaviors. Local HIV/AIDS prevention programs should target this neglected population. PMID:25844269

  11. Family Aided Community Treatment for the Treatment of Early Psychosis: A Proof of Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Melton, Ryan P; Dykeman, Cass

    2016-08-01

    Major psychotic disorders are one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. If these conditions are identified early and treatment promptly implemented, the prognosis is improved. This study examined the impact of a yearlong family aided community treatment (FACT) intervention upon psychiatric symptoms. Psychiatric symptom scores improved with the FACT intervention. Improved training on early recognition for mental health clinicians, implementation of a specific treatment model in community settings and policy around treatment funding allocation are implications of this study. PMID:26738497

  12. Respect for persons permits prioritizing treatment for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Metz, Thaddeus

    2008-08-01

    I defend a certain claim about rationing in the context of HIV/AIDS, namely the 'priority thesis' that the state of a developing country with a high rate of HIV should provide highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART) to those who would die without it, even if doing so would require not treating most other life-threatening diseases. More specifically,I defend the priority thesis in a negative way by refuting two influential and important arguments against it inspired by the Kantian principle of respect for persons. The 'equality argument' more or less maintains that prioritizing treatment for HIV/AIDS would objectionably treat those who suffer from it as more important than those who do not. The 'responsibility argument' says, roughly, that to ration life-saving treatment by prioritizing those with HIV would wrongly fail to hold people responsible for their actions, since most people infected with HIV could have avoided the foreseeable harm of infection. While it appears that a Kantian must think that one of these two arguments is sound, I maintain that, in fact, respect for persons grounds neither the equality nor responsibility argument against prioritizing HAART and hence at least permits doing so. If this negative defence of the priority thesis succeeds, then conceptual space is opened up for the possibility that respect for persons requires prioritizing HAART which argument I sketch in the conclusion as something to articulate and defend in future work. PMID:19143086

  13. Immunophototherapy for the treatment of AIDS and AIDS-related infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlager, Kenneth J.

    1992-06-01

    Immunophototherapy (IPT) is an experimental method of medical treatment that seeks to provide for the selective destruction of diseased cells and microbes such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-T4 cells and the rapid elimination of their toxic by-products from the human body. Photosensitive monoclonal or polyclonal antibody fragments, which are specific to the diseased cell or microbe, will be used to treat acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and related infections. These antibody fragments are tagged with photosensitive compounds and metal colloids and then intravenously injected into the patient. The tagged antibodies quickly and selectively bind to the diseased cells or microbes in the blood stream and affected organs. These cells or microbes are then selectively destroyed by irradiation of these complexes with light of the proper wavelength. This light activates the photosensitive material which then creates singlet oxygen that destroys the microbe or cell. Toxic products of lysis are quickly discharged from the body by activation of the reticuloendothelial system. IPT has been demonstrated by Biotronics to be very effective in the in vitro selective destruction of specified cell types. In a proposed AIDS-treatment research program, IPT will be first demonstrated in vitro for a set of infected blood samples using commercially-available antibodies labeled with appropriate photosensitizers. Efficacy will be determined by a p24 antigen immunodiagnostic test that will indicate the % inhibition in comparison to controls and samples treated with the drug AZT. Subcontracted animal efficacy studies will use a SCID-hu mouse model and PCR/DNA-RNA for endpoint analysis. Toxicity studies of animal (rat) models will be based on post-treatment investigations of lymph nodes, spleen, liver and other organs.

  14. HIV/AIDS epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Viviana; Ho, David D; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool

    2010-01-01

    The HIV-1 pandemic is a complex mix of diverse epidemics within and between countries and regions of the world, and is undoubtedly the defining public-health crisis of our time. Research has deepened our understanding of how the virus replicates, manipulates, and hides in an infected person. Although our understanding of pathogenesis and transmission dynamics has become more nuanced and prevention options have expanded, a cure or protective vaccine remains elusive. Antiretroviral treatment has transformed AIDS from an inevitably fatal condition to a chronic, manageable disease in some settings. This transformation has yet to be realised in those parts of the world that continue to bear a disproportionate burden of new HIV-1 infections and are most a% ected by increasing morbidity and mortality. This Seminar provides an update on epidemiology, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention interventions pertinent to HIV-1. PMID:16890836

  15. A computer aided treatment event recognition system in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Junyi Mart, Christopher; Bayouth, John

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated system to safeguard radiation therapy treatments by analyzing electronic treatment records and reporting treatment events. Methods: CATERS (Computer Aided Treatment Event Recognition System) was developed to detect treatment events by retrieving and analyzing electronic treatment records. CATERS is designed to make the treatment monitoring process more efficient by automating the search of the electronic record for possible deviations from physician's intention, such as logical inconsistencies as well as aberrant treatment parameters (e.g., beam energy, dose, table position, prescription change, treatment overrides, etc). Over a 5 month period (July 2012–November 2012), physicists were assisted by the CATERS software in conducting normal weekly chart checks with the aims of (a) determining the relative frequency of particular events in the authors’ clinic and (b) incorporating these checks into the CATERS. During this study period, 491 patients were treated at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics for a total of 7692 fractions. Results: All treatment records from the 5 month analysis period were evaluated using all the checks incorporated into CATERS after the training period. About 553 events were detected as being exceptions, although none of them had significant dosimetric impact on patient treatments. These events included every known event type that was discovered during the trial period. A frequency analysis of the events showed that the top three types of detected events were couch position override (3.2%), extra cone beam imaging (1.85%), and significant couch position deviation (1.31%). The significant couch deviation is defined as the number of treatments where couch vertical exceeded two times standard deviation of all couch verticals, or couch lateral/longitudinal exceeded three times standard deviation of all couch laterals and longitudinals. On average, the application takes about 1 s per patient when

  16. Interactive Voice Response Self-Monitoring to Assess Risk Behaviors in Rural Substance Users Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Jalie A.; Blum, Elizabeth R.; Xie, Lili; Roth, David L.; Simpson, Cathy A.

    2011-01-01

    Community-dwelling HIV/AIDS patients in rural Alabama self-monitored (SM) daily HIV risk behaviors using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system, which may enhance reporting, reduce monitored behaviors, and extend the reach of care. Sexually active substance users (35 men, 19 women) engaged in IVR SM of sex, substance use, and surrounding contexts for 4–10 weeks. Baseline predictors of IVR utilization were assessed, and longitudinal IVR SM effects on risk behaviors were examined. Frequent (n = 22), infrequent (n = 22), and non-caller (n = 10) groups were analyzed. Non-callers had shorter durations of HIV medical care and lower safer sex self-efficacy and tended to be older heterosexuals. Among callers, frequent callers had lost less social support. Longitudinal logistic regression models indicated reductions in risky sex and drug use with IVR SM over time. IVR systems appear to have utility for risk assessment and reduction for rural populations living with HIV disease. PMID:21311964

  17. An SMS-based HIV/AIDS education and awareness model for rural areas in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Suwamaru, Joseph Kim

    2012-01-01

    Access to basic healthcare in many parts of Papua New Guinea (PNG) remains a challenge partly because the majority of the population is thinly scattered across a geographically rugged country. The major health problems in PNG pertain to malaria, tuberculosis and diarrheal diseases while HIV has reached epidemic levels. The proliferation of the mobile phone technology in PNG has been unprecedented since the introduction of competition in the sector in July 2007. Users in rural areas now access the mobile phone signal making it their preferred form of modern communications medium. This paper introduces an SMS-based HIV/AIDS education, awareness and information dissemination model for a predominantly rural-based PNG society. PMID:23138091

  18. Web-based treatment of alcohol problems among rural women.

    PubMed

    Finfgeld-Connett, Deborah; Madsen, Richard

    2008-09-01

    It is estimated that 6 million women in the United States misuse alcohol. Of that number, many live in rural areas and face numerous barriers to treatment. The World Wide Web has the potential to help such individuals overcome these barriers. In light of emergent findings supporting the effectiveness of online alcohol treatment services for women, a randomized pilot study was conducted to evaluate a Web-based, self-guided alcohol treatment program. Eligible women were randomized to standard care or an online treatment program. Web-based treatment components included gender-specific reference modules and decision making modules, an asynchronous bulletin board, and a synchronous chat feature. The average age of the participants (N = 44) was 50 (SD = 11 years), and their baseline Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score was 18 (SD = 6), with 8 being the cut-off score for problem drinking. At 3-month follow up, both treatment groups decreased their drinking; however, no significant differences were found between them. PMID:18823000

  19. [Chinese medicine and acupuncture in the treatment of AIDS].

    PubMed

    Sommers, B

    1995-01-01

    Acupuncture, a therapeutic Chinese practice, may reduce fever, activate the immune system, and stimulate white blood cells. Scientists feel acupuncture encourages the production of natural hormones, called endorphins, which reduce pain, promote sleep and regulate body systems. Endorphins can be produced by massages, acupuncture and the body's natural activity. Medicinal plants, herbs, vitamins and minerals help the body maintain a healthy balance. Acupuncture is done with tiny sterile needles, placed painlessly in the skin and left there from several seconds to almost an hour. AIDS patients who experience pain, coughing, weight loss, or gland inflammation respond well to acupuncture and herbal medications. The Chinese believe that people with sleeping problems or depression have a lack of equilibrium of the heart. An acupuncturist would treat the heart with points near the wrist and ear. This treatment also assists alcohol and drug addiction, improving health and reducing the desire for the drug. PMID:11363371

  20. HIV/AIDS and homelessness, Part 2: treatment issues.

    PubMed

    Douaihy, Antoine B; Stowell, Keith R; Bui, Thuy; Daley, Dennis; Salloum, Ihsan

    2005-11-01

    Various factors interfere wtih proper access to and initiation of antiretroviral therapy in the HIV-infected homeless population, and it is important for health care providers to explore and address barriers to obtaining antiretroviral therapy and to foster a trusting relationship before offering therapy so that its success may be maximized. Patient education about the multifaceted aspects of antiretroviral therapy is a crucial component of care. Care providers should aggressively identify barriers to adherence and facilitate patient adherence by using multiple strategies, establishing solid lines of communication within the provider team, bringing program services to patients, and educating ancillary service providers about adherence. Comanagement of antiretroviral therapy requires an interdisciplinary approach that includes case managers, mental health and substance abuse counselors, shelter providers, medical specialists, and parole/probation officers. More research is needed to understand the complexities of HIV/AIDS within the homeless population and to develop treatment interventions. PMID:16329182

  1. Community-based family-style group homes for children orphaned by AIDS in rural China: an ethnographic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yan; Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Stanton, Bonita; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    As the number of children orphaned by AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) has reached 17.3 million, most living in resource-poor settings, interest has grown in identifying and evaluating appropriate care arrangements for them. In this study, we describe the community-based family-style group homes (‘group homes’) in rural China. Guided by an ecological framework of children’s wellbeing, we conducted a series of ethnographic observations, in-depth interviews and group discussions in the rural areas of Henan Province, which has been severely impacted by the AIDS endemic through commercial blood collection. Based on our observations and discussions, group homes appear to provide stable and safe living environments for children orphaned by AIDS. Adequate financial support from non-government organizations (NGOs) as well as the central and provincial governments has ensured a low child–caregiver ratio and attention to the basic needs of the children at group homes. The foster parents were selected from the local community and appear to have adequate qualifications and dedication. They receive a monthly stipend, periodical evaluation and parenting consultation from supporting NGOs. The foster parents and children in the group homes have formed strong bonds. Both children and foster parents reported positively on health and education. Characteristics of community-based group homes can be replicated in other care arrangements for AIDS orphans in resource-poor settings for the optimal health outcomes of those vulnerable children. We also call for capacity building for caregivers and communities to provide sustainable and supportive living environment for these children. PMID:25124083

  2. Community-based family-style group homes for children orphaned by AIDS in rural China: an ethnographic investigation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Chi, Peilian; Li, Xiaoming; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Stanton, Bonita; Li, Li

    2015-09-01

    As the number of children orphaned by AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) has reached 17.3 million, most living in resource-poor settings, interest has grown in identifying and evaluating appropriate care arrangements for them. In this study, we describe the community-based family-style group homes ('group homes') in rural China. Guided by an ecological framework of children's wellbeing, we conducted a series of ethnographic observations, in-depth interviews and group discussions in the rural areas of Henan Province, which has been severely impacted by the AIDS endemic through commercial blood collection. Based on our observations and discussions, group homes appear to provide stable and safe living environments for children orphaned by AIDS. Adequate financial support from non-government organizations (NGOs) as well as the central and provincial governments has ensured a low child-caregiver ratio and attention to the basic needs of the children at group homes. The foster parents were selected from the local community and appear to have adequate qualifications and dedication. They receive a monthly stipend, periodical evaluation and parenting consultation from supporting NGOs. The foster parents and children in the group homes have formed strong bonds. Both children and foster parents reported positively on health and education. Characteristics of community-based group homes can be replicated in other care arrangements for AIDS orphans in resource-poor settings for the optimal health outcomes of those vulnerable children. We also call for capacity building for caregivers and communities to provide sustainable and supportive living environment for these children. PMID:25124083

  3. The convergence of HIV/AIDS and customary tenure on women's access to land in rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Tschirhart, Naomi; Kabanga, Lucky; Nichols, Sue

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the convergence of HIV/AIDS and the social processes through which women access customary land in rural Malawi. Data were collected from focus group discussions with women in patrilineal and matrilineal communities. Women's land tenure is primarily determined through kinship group membership, customary inheritance practices and location of residence. In patrilineal communities, land is inherited through the male lineage and women access land through relationships with male members who are the rightful heirs. Conversely in matrilineal matrilocal communities, women as daughters directly inherit the land. This research found that in patrilineal communities, HIV/AIDS, gendered inequalities embedded in customary inheritance practices and resource shortages combine to affect women's access to land. HIV/AIDS may cause the termination of a woman's relationship with the access individual due to stigma or the individual's death. Termination of such relationships increases tenure insecurity for women accessing land in a community where they do not have inheritance rights. In contrast to the patrilineal patrilocal experience, research on matrilineal matrilocal communities demonstrates that where women are the inheritors of the land and have robust land tenure rights, they are not at risk of losing their access to land due to HIV/AIDS. PMID:26771077

  4. The Impact of HIV/AIDS and ARV Treatment on Worker Absenteeism: Implications for African Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habyarimana, James; Mbakile, Bekezela; Pop-Eleches, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    We characterize medium and long-run labor market impacts of HIV/AIDS and ARV treatment using unique panel data of worker absenteeism and information from an AIDS treatment program at a large mining firm in Botswana. We present robust evidence of an inverse-V shaped pattern in worker absenteeism around the time of ARV treatment inception.…

  5. The effect of a visual aid on the comprehension of cataract surgery in a rural, indigent South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Karan, Abraar M.; Campbell, Daniel J.; Mayer, Hylton R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether a visual aid improves the understanding and retention of information presented during informed consent for rural, indigent patients presenting for cataract surgery. Materials and Methods This was a randomized, unmasked, interventional study. We recruited patients who presented to the Hande Surgical Hospital in Chennai, India, for cataract surgery. Patients were randomized into two groups: verbal consent alone (group A) and verbal consent plus a poster (group B). Both groups completed an 11-question true/false quiz immediately before and after informed consent and one day after surgery. Results A total of 60 patients were recruited for the study, with 30 randomly assigned to each group; 23 patients from group A and 17 from group B completed the study. Informed consent improved patient scores in both groups; however, group B had significantly higher mean scores on postoperative day 1 (7.4 vs 8.7, P = 0.005) and significantly greater improvement in mean scores from pre–informed consent to postoperative day 1 (1.3 vs 3.6, P = 0.002). Conclusions Informed consent improves patient understanding of cataract surgery. Using a visual aid during informed consent for cataract surgery improves understanding and retention of information more than verbal consent alone in a rural South Indian population. PMID:23362389

  6. From rhetoric to reality? Putting HIV and AIDS rights talk into practice in a South African rural community.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catherine; Nair, Yugi

    2014-01-01

    Whilst international rhetoric on HIV and AIDS frequently invokes discourses of human rights to inspire and guide action, translating universal rights talk into practice in specific settings remains a challenge. Community mobilisation is often strategy of choice. We present a case study of the Entabeni Project in South Africa--in which a foreign-funded NGO sought to work with female health volunteers in a deep rural community to increase their access to two HIV-relevant rights: women's rights (especially gender equality) and rights to health (especially access to HIV- and AIDS-related services). Whilst the project had short-term health-related successes, it was less successful in implementing a gender empowerment agenda. The concept of women's rights had no purchase with women who had little interest in directly challenging male power, foregrounding the fight against poverty as their main preoccupation. The area's traditional chief and gatekeeper insisted the project should remain 'apolitical'. Project funders prioritised 'numbers reached' over a gender empowerment orientation. In the absence of (1) a marginalised group who are willing to assert their rights; and (2) a context where powerful people are willing to support these claims, 'rights' may be a blunt tool for HIV-related work with women in deeply oppressive and remote rural communities beyond the reach of international treaties and urban-based activist movements. PMID:25005486

  7. RURAL/URBAN RESIDENCE, ACCESS, AND PERCEIVED NEED FOR TREATMENT AMONG AFRICAN AMERICAN COCAINE USERS

    PubMed Central

    BORDERS, TYRONE F.; BOOTH, BRENDA M.; STEWART, KATHARINE E.; CHENEY, ANN M.; CURRAN, GEOFFREY M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine how rural/urban residence, perceived access, and other factors impede or facilitate perceived need for drug use treatment, a concept closely linked to treatment utilization. Study Design Two hundred rural and 200 urban African American cocaine users who were not receiving treatment were recruited via Respondent-Driven Sampling and completed a structured in-person interview. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to test the associations between perceived need and rural/urban residence, perceived access, and other predisposing (eg, demographics), enabling (eg, insurance), and health factors (eg, psychiatric distress). Principal Findings In bivariate analyses, rural relative to urban cocaine users reported lower perceived treatment need (37% vs 48%), availability, affordability, overall ease of access, and effectiveness, as well as lower perceived acceptability of residential, outpatient, self-help, and hospital-based services. In multivariate analyses, there was a significant interaction between rural/urban residence and the acceptability of religious counseling. At the highest level of acceptability, rural users had lower odds of perceived need (OR=.23); at the lowest level, rural users had higher odds of perceived need (OR=2.74) than urban users. Among rural users, the acceptability of religious counseling was negatively associated with perceived need (OR=.64). Ease of access was negatively associated (OR=.71) whereas local treatment effectiveness (OR=1.47) and the acceptability of hospital-based treatment (OR=1.29) were positively associated with perceived need among all users. Conclusions Our findings suggest rural/urban disparities in perceived need and access to drug use treatment. Among rural and urban cocaine users, improving perceptions of treatment effectiveness and expanding hospital-based services could promote treatment seeking. PMID:25213603

  8. "Driving the devil away": qualitative insights into miraculous cures for AIDS in a rural Tanzanian ward

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The role of religious beliefs in the prevention of HIV and attitudes towards the infected has received considerable attention. However, little research has been conducted on Faith Leaders' (FLs) perceptions of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the developing world. This study investigated FLs' attitudes towards different HIV treatment options (traditional, medical and spiritual) available in a rural Tanzanian ward. Methods Qualitative interviews were conducted with 25 FLs purposively selected to account for all the denominations present in the area. Data was organised into themes using the software package NVIVO-7. The field work guidelines were tailored as new topics emerged and additional codes progressively added to the coding frame. Results Traditional healers (THs) and FLs were often reported as antagonists but duality prevailed and many FLs simultaneously believed in traditional healing. Inter-denomination mobility was high and guided by pragmatism. Praying for the sick was a common practice and over one third of respondents said that prayer could cure HIV. Being HIV-positive was often seen as "a punishment from God" and a consequence of sin. As sinning could result from "the work of Satan", forgiveness was possible, and a "reconciliation with God" deemed as essential for a favourable remission of the disease. Several FLs believed that "evil spirits" inflicted through witchcraft could cause the disease and claimed that they could cast "demons" away. While prayers could potentially cure HIV "completely", ART use was generally not discouraged because God had "only a part to play". The perceived potential superiority of spiritual options could however lead some users to interrupt treatment. Conclusions The roll-out of ART is taking place in a context in which the new drugs are competing with a diversity of existing options. As long as the complementarities of prayers and ART are not clearly and explicitly stated by FLs, spiritual options may be

  9. AIDS-related experiences of primary care physicians in rural California, 1995.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C E

    1996-01-01

    A telephone survey was conducted of primary care physicians in nonmetropolitan counties of California. In a random sample of those counties reporting fewer than 30 cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) as of December 1994, all physicians in practice were called; in counties reporting from 31 to 150 cases of AIDS as of the same date, a 30% random sample was selected for interviewing. Completion rates were 82% in the smallest counties and 70% in the larger counties (overall 72%). Two thirds of physicians reported that they had seen a patient positive for the human immunodeficiency virus and were providing continuing care for the disease. In all, 60% of physicians had seen a patient with AIDS. In these counties, there were 653 primary care physicians and 873 patients living with AIDS. The proportion of physicians providing care to persons with AIDS was twice that reported in previous surveys done in Los Angeles, California. In the interval (1985-1994), there was a 20-fold increase in the number of AIDS cases in California. In the nonmetropolitan areas, the number of AIDS cases in late 1994 was 290 times that reported in 1985. PMID:8686298

  10. Struggling with growing bodies within silence and denial: Perspectives of HIV and AIDS among youth in Rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Chikovore, Jeremiah; Nystrom, Lennarth; Lindmark, Gunilla; Ahlberg, Beth Maina

    2013-01-01

    Concerns regarding HIV and AIDS were elicited from 546 school youth (51% female, age range 9–25 years) in a Zimbabwean rural district, through a self-generated question writing process. Concerns emerged around how to avoid infection at a time when they were undergoing secondary sexual development, had growing feelings for love and were even engaging in sexual activity, but had limited access to preventive methods due to denial by the adult world. Fears were expressed regarding how to tell one’s HIV status, even just after sex. HIV and AIDS were visualised in terms of suffering, loneliness, quarantine and death. The youth stressed they would have difficulties communicating with other people should they suspect or find they are infected with HIV, as this would imply they had been sexually active. They seemed to have knowledge around HIV and AIDS that either was incomplete, or they could not apply given a context of silence and denial around their sexuality. Some of the knowledge was coloured with misconceptions, suggesting contradictory information from multiple sources. After more than two decades, the scenario portrayed raises questions about interventions targeting young people. The question is why is their situation in this state when several stakeholders are actively participating in debates and interventions around their well-being? Campaigns and interventions may need to consider young people’s complex social contexts, the factors generating and sustaining their situation, and what role diverse actors and social change processes play in this. PMID:23814546

  11. Struggling with growing bodies within silence and denial: Perspectives of HIV and AIDS among youth in Rural Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Chikovore, Jeremiah; Nystrom, Lennarth; Lindmark, Gunilla; Ahlberg, Beth Maina

    2010-04-01

    Concerns regarding HIV and AIDS were elicited from 546 school youth (51% female, age range 9-25 years) in a Zimbabwean rural district, through a self-generated question writing process. Concerns emerged around how to avoid infection at a time when they were undergoing secondary sexual development, had growing feelings for love and were even engaging in sexual activity, but had limited access to preventive methods due to denial by the adult world. Fears were expressed regarding how to tell one's HIV status, even just after sex. HIV and AIDS were visualised in terms of suffering, loneliness, quarantine and death. The youth stressed they would have difficulties communicating with other people should they suspect or find they are infected with HIV, as this would imply they had been sexually active. They seemed to have knowledge around HIV and AIDS that either was incomplete, or they could not apply given a context of silence and denial around their sexuality. Some of the knowledge was coloured with misconceptions, suggesting contradictory information from multiple sources. After more than two decades, the scenario portrayed raises questions about interventions targeting young people. The question is why is their situation in this state when several stakeholders are actively participating in debates and interventions around their well-being? Campaigns and interventions may need to consider young people's complex social contexts, the factors generating and sustaining their situation, and what role diverse actors and social change processes play in this. PMID:23814546

  12. Tuberculosis notifications, characteristics and treatment outcomes: urban vs. rural Solomon Islands, 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Hill, P. C.; Bissell, K.; Harries, A. D.; Viney, K.; Gounder, S.

    2014-01-01

    Setting: All provincial tuberculosis (TB) management units in the Solomon Islands. Objective: To compare TB notifications, characteristics and treatment outcomes in urban vs. rural areas. Design: A retrospective descriptive cohort study involving record review and data extraction from provincial TB and laboratory registers and treatment charts from 2000 to 2011. Results: Of 4137 TB cases notified, 1364 (33%) were from urban and 3227 (67%) from rural areas. Notification rates per year of study were consistently higher in urban areas (104–150 per 100 000 population) than in rural areas (49–70/100 000). Cases in rural areas were more likely to have smear-negative pulmonary TB and less likely to have extra-pulmonary TB (P < 0.001). TB cases in rural areas were more likely to die from TB than those from urban areas (3.2% vs. 5.9%). In contrast, TB cases in rural areas were less likely to default (2.8% vs. 1.8%). Conclusion: TB notification rates were much higher in urban than in rural areas in the Solomon Islands. Rural patients are more likely to die from the disease but are slightly less likely to default. Further research is required to explore the possibility of under-reporting in rural areas and to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:26477283

  13. Nanotechnology: a magic bullet for HIV AIDS treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lalit; Verma, Shivani; Prasad, Deo Nandan; Bhardwaj, Ankur; Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar; Jain, Amit Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has become devastating in last a few years. Nearly 7400 new infection cases are coming every day. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), which involves combination of at least three antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, has been used to extend the life span of the HIV-infected patients. HAART has played an important role to reduce mortality rate in the developed countries but in the developing countries condition is still worst with millions of people being infected by this disease. For the improvement of the situation, nanotechnology-based drug system has been explored for the HIV therapeutics. Nanosystems used for HIV therapeutics offer some unique advantage like enhancement of bioavailability, water solubility, stability, and targeting ability of ARV drugs. Main nanotechnology-based systems explored for HIV therapeutics are liposomes, nanoparticles, niosomes, polymeric micelles, and dendrimers. Present manuscript reviews conventional method of HIV therapeutics and recent advances in the field of nanotechnology-based systems for treatment of HIV-AIDS. PMID:24564348

  14. Orthodontics: computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaxing; Li, Zhongke; Wei, Suyuan; Deng, Fanglin; Yao, Sen

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the outline of our newly developed computer-aided 3D dental cast analyzing system with laser scanning, and its preliminary clinical applications. The system is composed of a scanning device and a personal computer as a scanning controller and post processor. The scanning device is composed of a laser beam emitter, two sets of linear CCD cameras and a table which is rotatable by two-degree-of-freedom. The rotating is controlled precisely by a personal computer. The dental cast is projected and scanned with a laser beam. Triangulation is applied to determine the location of each point. Generation of 3D graphics of the dental cast takes approximately 40 minutes. About 170,000 sets of X,Y,Z coordinates are store for one dental cast. Besides the conventional linear and angular measurements of the dental cast, we are also able to demonstrate the size of the top surface area of each molar. The advantage of this system is that it facilitates the otherwise complicated and time- consuming mock surgery necessary for treatment planning in orthognathic surgery.

  15. Child Growth, Shocks, and Food Aid in Rural Ethiopia. World Bank Policy Research Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamano, Takashi; Alderman, Harold; Christiaensen, Luc

    Children that grow slowly experience poorer psychomotor development and tend to have delayed school enrollment and lower scores on cognitive tests. Rural households in developing countries often are unable to protect their consumption against temporary income shocks, such as droughts. Such income shocks have been shown to have negative effects on…

  16. Determining the Feasibility of Government-Aided Day Secondary Schools in Rural Uganda.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvin, Richard

    To judge the feasibility of establishing government-supported day secondary schools in rural areas, researchers in Uganda tested whether a school attendance area delineated by a circle of five kilometers' radius from the school would provide sufficient numbers of students. At present the Ugandan government supports only secondary boarding schools,…

  17. A novel economic intervention to reduce HIV risks among school-going AIDS orphans in rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ssewamala, Fred M; Alicea, Stacey; Bannon, William M; Ismayilova, Leyla

    2008-01-01

    This study tested an economic intervention to reduce HIV risks among AIDS-orphaned adolescents. Adolescents (n = 96) were randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for orphans in Uganda. Data obtained at baseline and 12-month follow-up revealed significant differences between the treatment and control groups in HIV prevention attitudes and educational planning. PMID:18155037

  18. Provider, Patient, and Family Perspectives of Adolescent Alcohol Use and Treatment in Rural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Adam J.; Ettaro, Lorraine; Rodriguez, Keri L.; Mocik, John; Clark, Duncan B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We examined rural primary care providers' (PCPs) self-reported practices of screening, brief interventions, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) on adolescent alcohol use and examined PCPs', adolescents', and parents' attitudes regarding SBIRT on adolescent alcohol use in rural clinic settings. Methods: In 2007, we mailed surveys that…

  19. Implementing “insider” ethnography: lessons from the Public Conversations about HIV/AIDS project in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Angotti, Nicole; Sennott, Christie

    2015-01-01

    We describe the conceptualization and implementation of a research methodology in which “insider” community members work with “outsider” investigators as participant observers to document everyday conversations taking place in public settings in their communities. Our study took place in a resource-poor area of rural South Africa and focused on HIV/AIDS, yet we aim here to provide a road map for those interested in implementing this approach in other contexts for various empirical ends. Because this approach is unusual, we highlight considerations in selecting a team of ethnographers, describe the training process, and offer ways to ensure the data collected are trustworthy and confidential. We describe the advantages and limitations of utilizing “insider ethnography” in contexts where being indigenous to the study site provides access to perspectives that cannot be obtained through other methods. Finally, we examine how mutuality and the positionality of the research team affect data collection and quality. PMID:26451131

  20. What Can a Woman Do with a Camera? Turning the Female Gaze on Poverty and HIV and AIDS in Rural South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moletsane, Relebohile; Mitchell, Claudia; de Lange, Naydene; Stuart, Jean; Buthelezi, Thabisile; Taylor, Myra

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the use of participatory video in finding solutions to challenges faced by schools and communities in the contexts of poverty and the AIDS pandemic in one rural community in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Locating the analysis within the study of feminist visual culture and the notion of the female gaze, the article focuses on…

  1. Impact of an Asha Intervention on Depressive Symptoms among Rural Women Living with AIDS in India: Comparison of the Asha-Life and Usual Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Salem, Benissa E.; Meyer, Visha; Ganguly, Kalyan K.; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ramakrishnan, Padma

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized pilot study is to conduct an intervention with 68 rural women living with AIDS to compare the effectiveness of two different programs on depressive symptoms. The trial was designed to assess the impact of the Asha-Life intervention engaging with an HIV-trained village woman, Asha (Accredited Social Health Activist),…

  2. Alaska Native and Rural Youths' Views of Sexual Health: A Focus Group Project on Sexually Transmitted Diseases, HIV/AIDS, and Unplanned Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leston, Jessica D.; Jessen, Cornelia M.; Simons, Brenna C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The disparity in rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), HIV/AIDS, and unplanned pregnancy between Alaska Native (AN) and non-AN populations, particularly among young adults and females, is significant and concerning. Focus groups were conducted to better understand the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of rural Alaska youth…

  3. The Design of a Survey Instrument to Aid in Identifying Sex Related Barriers to Employment and the Administration of That Instrument to Rural and Urban Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, B. Dolores; Mook, Corena

    A project was conducted to design a survey instrument that would help in identifying sex-related barriers to employment and to administer that instrument to employers in both rural and urban counties of Kansas. It was projected that the data derived from the survey could be used to aid in designing vocational education methods and techniques.…

  4. Scaling-up treatment for HIV/AIDS: lessons learned from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajesh; Irwin, Alexander; Raviglione, Mario C; Kim, Jim Yong

    2004-01-24

    The UN has launched an initiative to place 3 million people in developing countries on antiretroviral AIDS treatment by end 2005 (the 3 by 5 target). Lessons for HIV/AIDS treatment scale-up emerge from recent experience with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Expansion of treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis through the multipartner mechanism known as the Green Light Committee (GLC) has enabled gains in areas relevant to 3 by 5, including policy development, drug procurement, rational use of drugs, and the strengthening of health systems. The successes of the GLC and the obstacles it has encountered provide insights for building sustainable HIV/AIDS treatment programmes. PMID:14751708

  5. Perceptions of childhood diarrhoea and its treatment in rural Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    de Zoysa, I; Carson, D; Feachem, R; Kirkwood, B; Lindsay-Smith, E; Loewenson, R

    1984-01-01

    In the course of a study on the acceptability and feasibility of home-based oral rehydration therapy in rural Zimbabwe, information was collected on attitudes and beliefs about diarrhoea and on action taken in response to an episode of diarrhoea in a child. Diarrhoea was found to be a perceived threat at community and family level and numerous possible causes of diarrhoea were described which were assigned to two broad classes: (1) 'physical' causes, such as a polluted environment, diet and teething and (2) 'social and spiritual' causes such as those associated with a depressed fontanelle. These domains were not, however, mutually exclusive; 76% of the described episodes of diarrhoea were attributed to 'physical' causes, 15% to 'social and spiritual' causes and 8% to a combination of both. Reported utilization rates of the formal health services were unexpectedly high. In contrast, we recorded a low demand for indigenous herbalists (n'angas). Home management was common and comprised the administration of indigenous herbal remedies, of sugar and salt solutions, of over-the-counter drugs or of enemas. These remedies were given on their own or alongside the treatment prescribed by a health worker. A number of variables were examined to assess their influence on health-seeking behaviour: perceived cause and severity of the illness, socio-demographic characteristics of the respondent or child and accessibility of the health services.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6505741

  6. Marital Aspirations, Sexual Behaviors, and HIV/AIDS in Rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Shelley; Poulin, Michelle; Kohler, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    We explore how marital aspirations are related to the sexual behaviors of adolescents and young adults in Malawi, where HIV/AIDS prevalence among adults exceeds 10%. We also consider whether the specter of AIDS is shaping ideals about marriage. By combining survey data (N = 1,087) and in-depth interviews (N = 133) with young Malawians from the Malawi Diffusion and Ideational Change Project, we show that looking for and finding a suitable spouse are linked to sexual behaviors and, thus, HIV risks. Moreover, concerns about contracting HIV are closely tied to the ideal characteristics of a future spouse. Our findings draw long-overdue attention to the importance of marital aspirations in understanding adolescent sexual behaviors and risks in the era of AIDS. PMID:20161389

  7. FLOCCULATION-FLOTATION AIDS FOR TREATMENT OF COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the flocculation/flotation characteristics of combined sewer overflow through laboratory and field testing. The concept involves the introduction of chemicals and buoyant flotation aids into the overflow and the subsequent cofloccu...

  8. Gaps between HIV/AIDS policies and treatment in correctional facilities.

    PubMed

    Amankwaa, A A; Bavon, A L; Amankwaa, L C

    2001-01-01

    In this article the authors examined correctional policy and its impact on the incidence of HIV/AIDS in prison population. Using data from the Florida Correctional System, they find that HIV/AIDS is still the leading cause of death. Improved treatment and care may have led to declines in AIDS-related mortality but the prison population continues to experience a much higher risk of mortality than he general population in spite of changes in the treatment and provision of care to infected patients. The dominance of HIV-related deaths indicates that treatment and voluntary testing policy have been ineffective. The authors argue that the persistence of HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths is largely attributable to continuing unequal distribution of health care resources between identified and unidentified HIV-infected inmates. Their analysis suggests that future changes in HIV/AIDS policy ib testing and treatment can contribute to improvement in health conditions of infected inmates. PMID:12638386

  9. 75 FR 37438 - Minnesota Rural Health Cooperative; Analysis of the Agreement Containing Consent Order to Aid...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ...The consent agreement in this matter settles alleged violations of federal law prohibiting unfair or deceptive acts or practices or unfair methods of competition. The attached Analysis to Aid Public Comment describes both the allegations in the draft complaint and the terms of the consent order -- embodied in the consent agreement -- that would settle these...

  10. Impact of an ASHA Intervention on Depressive Symptoms among Rural Women Living with AIDS in India: Comparison of the Asha Life and Usual Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Salem, Benissa E.; Meyer, Visha; Ganguly, Kalyan K; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ramakrishnan, Padma

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized pilot study is to conduct an intervention with 68 rural women living with AIDS to compare the effectiveness of two different programs on depressive symptoms. The trial was designed to assess the impact of the Asha-Life intervention, engaging an HIV-trained village woman, Asha (Accredited Social Health Activist), to participate in the care of WLA, along with other health care providers compared to a Usual Care group. Two high prevalence HIV/AIDS villages in rural Andhra Pradesh, which were demographically alike and served by distinct Public Health Centers, were selected randomly from a total of 16 villages. The findings of this study demonstrated that the Asha-Life participants significantly reduced their depressive symptom scores compared to the Usual Care participants. Moreover, women living with AIDS who demonstrated higher depressive symptom scores at baseline had greater reduction in their depressive symptoms than women with lower scores. PMID:22676466

  11. African American cocaine users' preferred treatment site: variations by rural/urban residence, stigma, and treatment effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Borders, Tyrone F; Booth, Brenda M; Curran, Geoffrey M

    2015-03-01

    To encourage access, policy makers and providers need information about variations in drug users' treatment preferences. This study examined how rural/urban residence, stigma surrounding drug use, and perceived treatment availability and effectiveness are associated with African American cocaine users' preferences for the site of treatment (local, or in one's home town; nearby, or in a town nearby; and distant, or in a town farther away). Two hundred rural and 200 urban cocaine users were recruited using respondent-driven sampling and completed in-person interviews. Multinomial logit regression analyses were conducted to estimate the relative odds of preferring local vs. nearby and local vs. distant treatment. Rural cocaine users preferred distant (58%), and urban users preferred local (57%) treatment. Rural residence and a lifetime history of treatment were associated with higher odds of preferring nearby vs. local treatment; older age and greater perceived local treatment effectiveness were associated with lower odds of preferring nearby vs. local treatment. Rural residence, access to an automobile, higher rejection/discrimination stigma scores, and higher Brief Symptom Inventory-Global Severity Index scores were associated with higher odds of preferring distant vs. local treatment; older age, lower educational attainment, and greater perceived discrimination after treatment were associated with lower odds of preferring distant vs. local treatment. The findings from this study suggest that a regional approach to organizing drug use treatment services could better satisfy the preferences of rural African American cocaine users, whereas local treatment services should be expanded to meet the needs of urban cocaine users. PMID:25456092

  12. African American Cocaine Users’ Preferred Treatment Site: Variations by Rural/Urban Residence, Stigma, and Treatment Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Borders, Tyrone F.; Booth, Brenda M.; Curran, Geoffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    To encourage access, policy makers and providers need information about variations in drug users’ treatment preferences. This study examined how rural/urban residence, stigma surrounding drug use, and perceived treatment availability and effectiveness are associated with African American cocaine users’ preferences for the site of treatment (local, or in one’s home town; nearby, or in a town nearby; and distant, or in a town farther away). Two hundred rural and 200 urban cocaine users were recruited using Respondent-Driven Sampling and completed in-person interviews. Multinomial logit regression analyses were conducted to estimate the relative odds of preferring local vs. nearby and local vs. distant treatment. Rural cocaine users preferred distant (58%) and urban users preferred local (57%) treatment. Rural residence and a lifetime history of treatment were associated with higher odds of preferring nearby vs. local treatment; older age and greater perceived local treatment effectiveness were associated with lower odds of preferring nearby vs. local treatment. Rural residence, access to an automobile, higher rejection/discrimination stigma scores, and higher Brief Symptom Inventory-Global Severity Index scores were associated with higher odds of preferring distant vs. local treatment; older age, lower educational attainment, and greater perceived discrimination after treatment were associated with lower odds of preferring distant vs. local treatment. The findings from this study suggest that a regional approach to organizing drug use treatment services could better satisfy the preferences of rural African American cocaine users, whereas local treatment services should be expanded to meet the needs of urban cocaine users. PMID:25456092

  13. Building partnerships to support community-led HIV/AIDS management: a case study from rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Nair, Yugi; Campbell, Catherine

    2008-05-01

    The importance of partnerships between marginalised communities and support agencies (from the public sector, private sector and civil society) is a pillar of HIV/AIDS management policy. Such alliances are notoriously difficult to promote and sustain. We present a case study focusing on the first stage of a project seeking to build partnerships to facilitate local responses to HIV/AIDS in a remote rural community in South Africa. To date the Entabeni project has been successful in its goal of training volunteer health workers in home-based care, peer education, project management and procedures for accessing grants and services. The paper focuses on the project's other goal - to create external support structures for these volunteers (drawing on government departments, local NGOs and private-sector philanthropists). The partnership aims to empower volunteers to lead HIV-prevention and AIDS-care efforts, and to make public services more responsive to local needs. We illustrate how features of the local public-sector environment have actively worked against effective community empowerment. These include a rigid hierarchy, poor communication between senior and junior health professionals, lack of social development skills and the demoralisation and/or exhaustion of public servants dealing with multiple social problems in under-resourced settings. We outline the obstacles that have prevented private-sector involvement, suggesting a degree of scepticism about the potential for private-sector contributions to development in remote areas. We discuss how the project's most effective partners have been two small under-funded NGOs - run by highly committed individuals with a keen understanding of social-development principles, flexible working styles and a willingness to work hard for small gains. Despite many challenges, the partnership formation process has seen some positive achievements; we outline these and discuss the essential role played by an external change agent

  14. Treatment of Farm Families under Need Analysis for Student Aid. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Computer Systems, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    In response to Congressional request, this report compares the treatment of student financial aid applicants from farm families and non-farm families under two need-analysis formulae. Both the need-analysis methodology for Pell Grants and the Congressional Methodology (CM) for other federal aid calculate ability to pay as a function of income and…

  15. Psychological Interventions with AIDS and HIV: Prevention and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jeffrey A.; Murphy, Debra A.

    1992-01-01

    Notes that research to date has yielded important findings for primary prevention efforts for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and has identified psychological dimensions relevant to mental health interventions for persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Sees pressing need for more systematic intervention outcome research in…

  16. Medical Students' Perceptions and Proposed Treatment Strategies for AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladany, Nicholas; Stern, Marilyn

    Research has consistently found that health care providers report having negative attitudes and perceptions toward Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. This study was conducted to examine the independent and joint influences of a patient's mode of acquisition of illness (blood transfusion versus sexual promiscuity), patient blame…

  17. Factors Associated with Recidivism among Corrections-Based Treatment Participants in Rural and Urban Areas.

    PubMed

    Staton-Tindall, Michele; Harp, Kathi L H; Winston, Erin; Webster, J Matthew; Pangburn, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    The majority of corrections-based treatment outcome studies focus on individuals paroling to urban areas; thus there is a significant gap in the literature on outcomes, including recidivism, among individuals paroling to non-urban and rural communities. This study examines differences in factors associated with recidivism among former corrections-based treatment participants living in urban and rural communities following release. Analyses focused on secondary data collected from treatment participants in one southeastern state over a four year period between July 2006 and June 2010 including both baseline (treatment intake) and follow-up data (12-months post-release). Findings indicated that individuals in urban areas were 2.4 times more likely to recidivate than rural individuals. Other factors identified in separate rural and urban analyses also emerged as significant predictors in the overall model including age, gender, race, employment and drug use. Overall, these findings suggest that corrections-based treatment participants living in urban and rural areas following release may share similar risk factors for recidivism. However, rural areas may be protective for returning to custody despite the presence of some of these risks. PMID:25858761

  18. Social capital and HIV competent communities: the role of community groups in managing HIV/AIDS in rural Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catherine; Scott, Kerry; Nhamo, Mercy; Nyamukapa, Constance; Madanhire, Claudius; Skovdal, Morten; Sherr, Lorraine; Gregson, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Community involvement is increasingly identified as a "critical enabler" of an effective HIV/AIDS response. We explore pathways between community participation and HIV prevention, treatment and impact mitigation in Zimbabwe, reviewing six qualitative studies in Manicaland. These find that community group membership is often (not always) associated with decreased HIV incidence, reduced stigma and improved access to some services, particularly amongst women. Participation in formal community groups (e.g., church or women's groups) and informal local networks (e.g., neighbours, families) provides opportunities for critical dialogue about HIV/AIDS, often facilitating renegotiation of harmful social norms, sharing of previously hidden personal experiences of HIV/AIDS, formulation of positive action plans and solidarity to action them. However, implementation of new plans and insights is constrained by poverty, social uncertainty and poor service delivery. Furthermore, dialogue may have negative effects, spreading false information and entrenching negative norms. The extent that formal groups and informal networks facilitate externally imposed HIV/AIDS interventions varies. They potentially provide vital practical and emotional support, facilitating service access, treatment adherence and AIDS care. However, they may sometimes play a negative role in prevention activities, challenging stereotypes about sexuality or gender. There is an urgent need for greater recognition of the role of indigenous community groups and networks, and the inclusion of "strengthening local responses" as a key element of interventions and policy. Such efforts require great sensitivity. Heavy-handed external interference in complex indigenous relationships risks undermining the localism and bottom-up initiative and activism that might be central to their effectiveness. Cautious efforts might seek to enhance the potentially beneficial effects of groups, especially for women, and limit potentially

  19. Social capital and HIV Competent Communities: The role of community groups in managing HIV/AIDS in rural Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine; Scott, Kerry; Nhamo, Mercy; Nyamukapa, Constance; Madanhire, Claudius; Skovdal, Morten; Sherr, Lorraine; Gregson, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Community involvement is increasingly identified as a “critical enabler” of an effective HIV/AIDS response. We explore pathways between community participation and HIV prevention, treatment and impact mitigation in Zimbabwe, reviewing six qualitative studies in Manicaland. These find that community group membership is often (not always) associated with decreased HIV incidence, reduced stigma and improved access to some services, particularly amongst women. Participation in formal community groups (e.g., church or women's groups) and informal local networks (e.g., neighbours, families) provides opportunities for critical dialogue about HIV/AIDS, often facilitating renegotiation of harmful social norms, sharing of previously hidden personal experiences of HIV/AIDS, formulation of positive action plans and solidarity to action them. However, implementation of new plans and insights is constrained by poverty, social uncertainty and poor service delivery. Furthermore, dialogue may have negative effects, spreading false information and entrenching negative norms. The extent that formal groups and informal networks facilitate externally imposed HIV/AIDS interventions varies. They potentially provide vital practical and emotional support, facilitating service access, treatment adherence and AIDS care. However, they may sometimes play a negative role in prevention activities, challenging stereotypes about sexuality or gender. There is an urgent need for greater recognition of the role of indigenous community groups and networks, and the inclusion of “strengthening local responses” as a key element of interventions and policy. Such efforts require great sensitivity. Heavy-handed external interference in complex indigenous relationships risks undermining the localism and bottom-up initiative and activism that might be central to their effectiveness. Cautious efforts might seek to enhance the potentially beneficial effects of groups, especially for women, and limit

  20. Barriers to receiving substance abuse treatment among rural pregnant women in Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Afton; Shannon, Lisa

    2012-12-01

    Research presenting outcomes for women who enter substance abuse treatment during pregnancy consistently shows benefits. While treatment has nearly universal benefits, there are many barriers to seeking substance abuse treatment for pregnant women. The purpose of this study is to explore barriers for rural pregnant women seeking substance abuse treatment. There were three eligibility criteria for study participation: (1) aged 18 and older, (2) pregnant, and (3) undergoing short-term inpatient detoxification at the University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center. Eighty-five rural women (N = 85) were included in the analysis. Substance use history and previous treatment were assessed with measures adapted from the Addiction Severity Index. Treatment barriers were measured with three qualitative questions and were coded into four overarching categories: availability, accessibility, affordability, and acceptability barriers. This sample had an extensive substance use history. Almost all participants had used alcohol (98%), marijuana (98%), illicit opiates (99%), and cigarettes (97%). On average, participants reported about two barriers to receiving treatment (Mean = 1.8; SD = 1.3), with over 80% of the sample reporting having experienced any barrier to treatment. The majority experienced acceptability (51%) and accessibility (49%) barriers. Twenty-six percent (26%) of the sample reported availability barriers. A smaller percentage of participants reported affordability barriers (13%). Rural pregnant women seeking substance abuse treatment face many obstacles to receiving needed treatment. More studies on barriers to substance abuse treatment among rural pregnant women are needed. Identifying these barriers can help in improving treatment access and services. PMID:22139045

  1. Agreement between Prospective Interactive Voice Response Telephone Reporting and Structured Recall Reports of Risk Behaviors in Rural Substance Users Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Cathy A.; Xie, Lili; Blum, Elizabeth; Tucker, Jalie A.

    2014-01-01

    Sound measurement of risk behaviors is essential to guide tailored risk reduction strategies as HIV infection patterns shift toward rural minorities, particularly in the South where HIV disease remains highly stigmatized. Interactive Voice Response (IVR) systems appear to enhance reports of sensitive behaviors and can support telehealth applications to extend the reach of care in rural, underserved areas. This study evaluated the feasibility and data quality of an IVR telephone reporting system with rural substance users living with HIV/AIDS. Community-dwelling patients were recruited from a non-profit HIV medical clinic in rural Alabama (N = 35 men, 19 women). Participants engaged in daily IVR reporting of substance use and sexual practices for up to 10 weeks. IVR reports were compared with retrospective Timeline Followback (TLFB) interview reports for the same period. IVR and TLFB reports showed good to excellent agreement for summary measures of alcohol consumption and sexual activity. Agreements for illicit drug use reports were less satisfactory. Reports of monetary spending on alcohol and drugs were significantly higher on the IVR. Most individuals showed good agreements for reports of day-to-day alcohol and drug use and sexual practices. The study established the utility of IVR assessment with rural, disadvantaged adults living with HIV/AIDS who are priority targets for risk reduction interventions. PMID:21443312

  2. Changing global essential medicines norms to improve access to AIDS treatment: lessons from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nunn, A; Fonseca, E Da; Gruskin, S

    2009-01-01

    Brazil's large-scale, successful HIV/AIDS treatment programme is considered by many to be a model for other developing countries aiming to improve access to AIDS treatment. Far less is known about Brazil's important role in changing global norms related to international pharmaceutical policy, particularly international human rights, health and trade policies governing access to essential medicines. Prompted by Brazil's interest in preserving its national AIDS treatment policies during World Trade Organisation trade disputes with the USA, these efforts to change global essential medicines norms have had important implications for other countries, particularly those scaling up AIDS treatment. This paper analyses Brazil's contributions to global essential medicines policy and explains the relevance of Brazil's contributions to global health policy today. PMID:19333805

  3. Changing global essential medicines norms to improve access to AIDS treatment: Lessons from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, A.; Fonseca, E. Da; Gruskin, S.

    2009-01-01

    Brazil's large-scale, successful HIV/AIDS treatment programme is considered by many to be a model for other developing countries aiming to improve access to AIDS treatment. Far less is known about Brazil's important role in changing global norms related to international pharmaceutical policy, particularly international human rights, health and trade policies governing access to essential medicines. Prompted by Brazil's interest in preserving its national AIDS treatment policies during World Trade Organisation trade disputes with the USA, these efforts to change global essential medicines norms have had important implications for other countries, particularly those scaling up AIDS treatment. This paper analyses Brazil's contributions to global essential medicines policy and explains the relevance of Brazil's contributions to global health policy today. PMID:19333805

  4. An assessment of HIV treatment outcomes among utilizers of semi-mobile clinics in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Sara E; Martinez, Jose M; Olson, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa, and rates of retention in treatment are low. Some research has shown that mobile clinics are effective in connecting people in rural areas with health care. We compared HIV outcomes between HIV-positive patients who chose to access treatment from a regional hospital to those who chose care in one of four semi-mobile clinics closer to where they live. The subjects for this analysis were HIV-positive residents in West Pokot accessing care at one of four semi-mobile sites (Kabichbich, Chepareria, Kacheliba, and Sigor) or at the regional hospital in Kapenguria. We examined four outcome variables between the two groups: (1) retention in HIV treatment, (2) change in CD4 count, (3) adherence to ARVs, and (4) deaths. The patients who chose semi-mobile clinic care were less well educated, poorer, and sicker than those who chose to continue care in the regional hospital. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in any of the four outcome measures. Although the population of patients attending semi-mobile clinics was on average poorer and sicker than those attending the hospital, their outcomes were similar. Care at the semi-mobile clinics did not result in significantly different outcomes from care in the district hospital. This program showed that semi-mobile clinics are a viable alternative to hospital care for very ill, isolated populations, but further measures must be taken to improve retention and adherence in these settings. PMID:25495796

  5. “The problem is ours, it is not CRAIDS’ ”. Evaluating sustainability of Community Based Organisations for HIV/AIDS in a rural district in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While sustainability of health programmes has been the subject of empirical studies, there is little evidence specifically on the sustainability of Community Based Organisations (CBOs) for HIV/AIDS. Debates around optimal approaches in community health have centred on utilitarian versus empowerment approaches. This paper, using the World Bank Multi-Country AIDS Program (MAP) in Zambia as a case study, seeks to evaluate whether or not this global programme contributed to the sustainability of CBOs working in the area of HIV/AIDS in Zambia. Lessons for optimising sustainability of CBOs in lower income countries are drawn. Methods In-depth interviews with representatives of all CBOs that received CRAIDS funding (n = 18) and district stakeholders (n= 10) in Mumbwa rural district in Zambia, in 2010; and national stakeholders (n=6) in 2011. Results Funding: All eighteen CBOs in Mumbwa that received MAP funding between 2003 and 2008 had existed prior to receiving MAP grants, some from as early as 1992. This was contrary to national level perceptions that CBOs were established to access funds rather than from the needs of communities. Funding opportunities for CBOs in Mumbwa in 2010 were scarce. Health services: While all CBOs were functioning in 2010, most reported reductions in service provision. Home visits had reduced due to a shortage of food to bring to people living with HIV/AIDS and scarcity of funding for transport, which reduced antiretroviral treatment adherence support and transport of patients to clinics. Organisational capacity and viability: Sustainability had been promoted during MAP through funding Income Generating Activities. However, there was a lack of infrastructure and training to make these sustainable. Links between health facilities and communities improved over time, however volunteers’ skills levels had reduced. Conclusions Whilst the World Bank espoused the idea of sustainability in their plans, it remained on the periphery of

  6. Survival of AIDS patients treated with traditional chinese medicine in rural central china: a retrospective cohort study, 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yantao; Wang, Xin; Li, Zhengwei; Jiang, Ziqiang; Guo, Huijun; Liu, Zhibin; Xu, Liran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the survival of AIDS patients treated with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in addition to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) and of AIDS patients treated with cART. Data of patients taking cART between 30 October 2003 and 30 October 2004 in the National TCM HIV Treatment Trial Program area were retrospectively analyzed, with follow-up from 30 October 2004 to 30 October 2012. The log-rank test was used to compare survival between the two groups. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine hazard ratios to identify prognostic factors. The study included 521 patients in the TCM + cART group followed up for 3548 person-years and 375 patients in the cART group followed up for 2523 person-years. Mortality rates were 3.2/100 person-years and 4.2/100 person-years in the TCM + cART and cART groups, respectively. The difference in survival was significant. After adjusting for explanatory variables, the mortality rate of AIDS patients in the cART group was 1.7 times higher than in the TCM + cART group. Male sex, older age, little education, and lower CD4 cell count were risk factors for mortality. TCM intervention in addition to cART could increase survival of AIDS patients. PMID:25821482

  7. Difference in psychosocial well-being between paternal and maternal AIDS orphans in rural China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Lin, Xiuyun; Stanton, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    This study compares psychosocial well-being between paternal and maternal orphans in rural China in a sample (n = 459) of children who had lost one parent to HIV and who were in family-based care. Measures included academic marks, education expectation, trusting relationships with current caregivers, self-reported health status, depression, loneliness, posttraumatic stress, and social support. No significant differences were reported between maternal and paternal orphans, except that paternal orphans reported better trusting relationships with caregivers than maternal orphans. Children with a healthy surviving parent reported significantly better scores for depression, loneliness, posttraumatic stress, and social support than children with a sick parent. Analyses showed significance with regard to orphan status on academic marks and trusting relationships with caregivers while controlling for age, gender, surviving parent's health status, and family socioeconomic status. Results underscore the importance of psychosocial support for children whose surviving parent is living with HIV or another illness. PMID:20133172

  8. Arrestees' perceived needs for substance-specific treatment: exploring urban-rural differences.

    PubMed

    Lo, Celia C; Stephens, Richard C

    2002-11-01

    An interview study among a group of arrestees in seven county jails was conducted in the state of Ohio between June 1999 and September 2001, examining the prevalence of alcohol and drug dependence within the group and assessing the need for substance-abuse treatment. Four of the county jails where interviews were conducted are in urban areas, and three are in rural areas. The present study focused on demographic variables, situation-related factors, current drug dependence diagnoses, past treatment experience, and jail location-rural or urban. It sought to assess whether these factors predicted arrestees' perceived needs for substance-specific treatment (for alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and/or opiate addiction); and, further, whether any predictors of a perceived need for treatment would be identical for arrestees housed in rural jails and those housed in urban jails. The results show that some of the factors assessed do exert differential effects on rural and urban arrestees' perceived needs for substance-specific treatment. Future treatment policy within the criminal justice system should perhaps take into account inmates' individual characteristics and the rural or urban location of the jail initiating their processing. It may be possible, by paying attention to these variables, to enhance inmates' motivation to enter treatment programs, leading ultimately to drug-use cessation. PMID:12492260

  9. The Economic Burden of HIV/AIDS and Myocardial Infarction Treatment in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Denizar Vianna; Bahia, Luciana

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the expenses of HIV/AIDS and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) treatment in Brazil. Methods. A search in the Brazilian epidemiological database (DATASUS) on AMI and AIDS hospitalizations and their costs was done from January 1998 to December 2011. The number of HIV/AIDS cases and antiretroviral treatment (ART) costs was obtained from public Brazilian databases. Results. In 5 years, HIV/AIDS cases increased 38.5%, mainly in patients aged 25–49. There were 180,640 patients in ART in 2007 at a cost of R$ 3,920 per patient/year. The hospitalizations due to AIDS were stable over the last 13 years; however, the hospitalizations due to AMI have increased 78%. In 2007, the expenses with hospitalizations for HIV/AIDS and AMI (25–49 years) were approximately 0.12 and 1.52% of the Ministry of Health budget allocated to reimburse inpatient costs. The expenses on ART totaled 1.5% of the total budget (all age groups). Conclusion. The prevalence of HIV/AIDS is still increasing in Brazil. There are scientific evidences suggesting an increased incidence of AIM in this population. Considering the high costs for the treatment of both diseases, an economic analysis is important to alert health managers to strengthen the preventive measures to guarantee the financial sustainability of such treatment. PMID:24489516

  10. Spatial and social inequities in HIV testing utilization in the context of rapid scale-up of HIV/AIDS services in rural Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Agadjanian, Victor; Murray, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    The massive scale-up of HIV counseling, testing, and treatment services in resource-limited sub-Saharan settings with high HIV prevalence has significant implications for the course of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. It also offers important broader policy lessons for improving access to critical health services. Applying GIS-based methods and multilevel regression analysis to unique longitudinal three-wave survey data from rural Mozambique, this study investigates the impact of a rapid expansion of HIV-related services on access to and utilization of HIV testing. The results illustrate the declining importance of spatial barriers to utilization of HIV testing services as these services expanded. In addition, the expansion of HIV-related services decreased the spatial variability of HIV testing among the survey respondents. At the same time, some important non-spatial variation, such as that in educational level, persisted despite the expansion of services. These results illustrate the process and consequences of health service diffusion. PMID:24835024

  11. Spatial and social inequities in HIV testing utilization in the context of rapid scale-up of HIV/AIDS services in rural Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Agadjanian, Victor; Murray, Alan T

    2014-07-01

    The massive scale-up of HIV counseling, testing, and treatment services in resource-limited sub-Saharan settings with high HIV prevalence has significant implications for the course of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. It also offers important broader policy lessons for improving access to critical health services. Applying GIS-based methods and multilevel regression analysis to unique longitudinal three-wave survey data from rural Mozambique, this study investigates the impact of a rapid expansion of HIV-related services on access to and utilization of HIV testing. The results illustrate the declining importance of spatial barriers to utilization of HIV testing services as these services expanded. In addition, the expansion of HIV-related services decreased the spatial variability of HIV testing among the survey respondents. At the same time, some important non-spatial variation, such as that in educational level, persisted despite the expansion of services. These results illustrate the process and consequences of health service diffusion. PMID:24835024

  12. Decision aids for localized prostate cancer treatment choice: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Violette, Philippe D; Agoritsas, Thomas; Alexander, Paul; Riikonen, Jarno; Santti, Henrikki; Agarwal, Arnav; Bhatnagar, Neera; Dahm, Philipp; Montori, Victor; Guyatt, Gordon H; Tikkinen, Kari A O

    2015-01-01

    Patients who are diagnosed with localized prostate cancer need to make critical treatment decisions that are sensitive to their values and preferences. The role of decision aids in facilitating these decisions is unknown. The authors conducted a systematic review of randomized trials of decision aids for localized prostate cancer. Teams of 2 reviewers independently identified, selected, and abstracted data from 14 eligible trials (n = 3377 men), of which 10 were conducted in North America. Of these, 11 trials compared decision aids with usual care, and 3 trials compared decision aids with other decision aids. Two trials suggested a modest positive impact on decisional regret. Results across studies varied widely for decisional conflict (4 studies), satisfaction with decision (2 studies), and knowledge (2 studies). No impact on treatment choices was observed (6 studies). In conclusion, scant evidence at high risk of bias suggests the variable impact of existing decision aids on a limited set of decisional processes and outcomes. Because current decision aids provide information but do not directly facilitate shared decision making, subsequent efforts would benefit from user-centered design of decision aids that promote shared decision making. PMID:25772796

  13. Mental health first aid training of the public in a rural area: a cluster randomized trial [ISRCTN53887541

    PubMed Central

    Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A; O'Kearney, Richard; Dear, Keith BG

    2004-01-01

    Background A Mental Health First Aid course has been developed which trains members of the public in how to give initial help in mental health crisis situations and to support people developing mental health problems. This course has previously been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial in a workplace setting and found to produce a number of positive effects. However, this was an efficacy trial under relatively ideal conditions. Here we report the results of an effectiveness trial in which the course is given under more typical conditions. Methods The course was taught to members of the public in a large rural area in Australia by staff of an area health service. The 16 Local Government Areas that made up the area were grouped into pairs matched for size, geography and socio-economic level. One of each Local Government Area pair was randomised to receive immediate training while one served as a wait-list control. There were 753 participants in the trial: 416 in the 8 trained areas and 337 in the 8 control areas. Outcomes measured before the course started and 4 months after it ended were knowledge of mental disorders, confidence in providing help, actual help provided, and social distance towards people with mental disorders. The data were analysed taking account of the clustered design and using an intention-to-treat approach. Results Training was found to produce significantly greater recognition of the disorders, increased agreement with health professionals about which interventions are likely to be helpful, decreased social distance, increased confidence in providing help to others, and an increase in help actually provided. There was no change in the number of people with mental health problems that trainees had contact with nor in the percentage advising someone to seek professional help. Conclusions Mental Health First Aid training produces positive changes in knowledge, attitudes and behaviour when the course is given to members of the public by

  14. Substance Abuse Treatment, HIV/AIDS, and the Continuum of Response for People Who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kresina, Thomas F.; Lubran, Robert; Clark, H. Westley; Cheever, Laura W.

    2012-01-01

    The continuum of response (CoR) to HIV/AIDS is a framework for implementation of HIV prevention, care, and treatment programs based on a national strategic plan for HIV/AIDS services. The CoR for people who inject drugs (PWID) is an important extension of the developed CoR to HIV/AIDS. The CoR-PWID employs stakeholders who together plan, develop, pilot, and provide a full range of services that address the various prevention, care/support, and treatment needs of people, families, and communities infected or affected by HIV/AIDS and injection drug use. The CoR-PWID comprises a broad range of services that include but are not limited to the World Health Organization priority interventions for HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and care in the health sector and the package of essential interventions for the prevention, treatment, and care of HIV for people who inject drugs. Implementation of these well-defined, essential prevention, care/support, and treatment services, in addition to locally defined needed services, in a coordinated fashion is important to clients, their families, and communities. The CoR-PWID is, therefore, a necessary framework essential for service development for countries that address HIV/AIDS in populations of PWID. PMID:23243517

  15. Health status, treatment and drug use in rural Bangladesh: a case study of a village.

    PubMed

    Roy, J

    1997-05-01

    In Bangladesh, the government healthcare system remains a very minor source of health care for rural households. The availability of registered physicians is scare in rural areas, and the people, the majority of whom are underweight as indicated by body mass index measurement have to depend on pharmacy salespersons, quacks and herbal or spiritual healers. Unlike Australia, almost every pharmacy salesperson illegally recommends and sells prescription medicines. In addition, there are also unqualified village 'doctors' who do not own a pharmacy shop but provide written prescriptions. However, the treatments provided by these village 'doctors' remain open to question, with instances of maltreatment or inadequate treatment. The treatments are mostly symptomatic and polypharmacy is common, with antibiotics and vitamins prescribed widely. On the other hand, rural people sometimes do not buy all the drugs that are prescribed for them, partly because of financial constraint. In addition, self-medication is common. While family planning and immunisation are slowly becoming popular among rural families, general health knowledge is still poor. Public healthcare campaigns as well as proper training for the rural prescribers could be helpful in improving the present poor rural healthcare system. PMID:9444124

  16. PTSD Treatment-Seeking Among Rural Latino Combat Veterans: A Review of the Literature*

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Michael R.; Moore, Roland S.; Ames, Genevieve M.

    2013-01-01

    Latino combat soldiers report both higher prevalence and greater overall severity of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms than non-Hispanic Caucasians. However, these veterans face unique social and cultural barriers to accessing treatment for PTSD that distinguish them from their non-Hispanic white counterparts. Latino veterans who reside in rural settings face additional socio-cultural and structural impediments, in that they are likely to reside far from VA (Veterans Administration) medical facilities, have limited access to public transportation, and hold more conservative views toward mental health treatment than those residing in urban locales. However, little is known about the unique individual, sociocultural, and structural barriers to treatment faced by rural Latino veterans. This paper synthesizes the separate mental health and treatment-seeking literatures pertaining to Latinos, rural populations, and veterans, with the goal of identifying fruitful areas of conceptual overlap, and providing direction for future theory building, research, and targeted interventions. PMID:23762782

  17. The Mpondombili Project: preventing HIV/AIDS and unintended pregnancy among rural South African school-going adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mantell, Joanne E; Harrison, Abigail; Hoffman, Susie; Smit, Jennifer A; Stein, Zena A; Exner, Theresa M

    2006-11-01

    Unintended pregnancy, HIV and other sexually transmitted infections are major threats to the health of South African youth. Gendered social norms make it difficult for young women to negotiate safer sex, and sexual coercion and violence are prevalent. Sexual activity among adolescents is influenced strongly by conservative social norms, which favour abstinence. In reality, most young people are sexually active by the end of the teen years. Girls' decision to have sex is often a passive one, influenced by partners. The Mpondombili Project is a school-based intervention in rural KwaZulu-Natal that aims to promote delay in the onset of sexual activity and condom use as complementary strategies for both sexually experienced and inexperienced youth. Interactive training was carried out with peer educators, teachers and nurses over a 15-month period, and a manual developed. The intervention was implemented in late 2003 with 670 adolescents in two schools. Issues covered included HIV/STI transmission, risk behaviours, HIV testing, pregnancy and contraception, gender inequality, sexual communication and negotiation, managing abusive situations, fear of AIDS, stigma and discrimination and sexual rights. The diversity of young people's relationships and vulnerability to sexual risk call for the promotion of both risk avoidance (delay in sexual initiation) and risk reduction (condom use) together, regardless of ideology, especially where HIV is well-established, to protect their health. PMID:17101429

  18. Transnational medicine in public arenas: AIDS treatments in the South.

    PubMed

    Dodier, Nicolas

    2005-09-01

    This article looks at the AIDS-related controversy surrounding the experiments on and the availability of medicines in southern countries. It situates these debates in a longer-term history of transnational medicine. It highlights the rise of international therapeutic modernity at the beginning of the 1990s, based on the strict regulation of clinical trials and on the formalization of the international ethical rules governing experiments. This rise helped to change radically the reception of experiments conducted in southern countries around AIDS. With regard to this new ethics applied to clinical trials in southern countries, this article goes on to demonstrate the confrontation at the end of the 1990s between two different approaches to the universalization of healthcare. Finally, it shows how new laws on international trade have reinitiated this confrontation. Through this story, the article suggests in what sense the study of the political transformations of transnational medicine could offer a new field of investigation for the social sciences. PMID:16404688

  19. Use of job aids to improve facility-based postnatal counseling and care in rural Benin.

    PubMed

    Jennings, L; Yebadokpo, A; Affo, J; Agbogbe, M

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the effect of a job aids-focused intervention on quality of facility-based postnatal counseling, and whether increased communication improved in-hospital newborn care and maternal knowledge of home practices and danger signs requiring urgent care. Ensuring mothers and newborns receive essential postnatal services, including health counseling, is integral to their survival. Yet, quality of clinic-based postnatal services is often low, and evidence on effective improvement strategies is scarce. Using a pre-post randomized design, data were drawn from direct observations and interviews with 411 mother-newborn pairs. Multi-level regression models with difference-in-differences analyses estimated the intervention's relative effect, adjusting for changes in the comparison arm. The mean percent of recommended messages provided to recently-delivered women significantly improved in the intervention arm as compared to the control (difference-in-differences [∆i - ∆c] +30.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 19.3, 42.5), and the proportion of newborns thermally protected within the first hour (∆i - ∆c +33.7, 95 % CI 19.0, 48.4) and delayed for bathing (∆i - ∆c +23.9, 95 % CI 9.4, 38.4) significantly increased. No significant changes were observed in early breastfeeding (∆i - ∆c +6.8, 95 % CI -2.8, 16.4) which was nearly universal. Omitting traditional umbilical cord substances rose slightly, but was insignificant (∆i - ∆c +8.5, 95 % CI -2.8, 19.9). The proportion of mothers with correct knowledge of maternal (∆i - ∆c +27.8, 95 % CI 11.0, 44.6) and newborn (∆i - ∆c +40.3, 95 % CI 22.2, 58.4) danger signs grew substantially, as did awareness of several home-care practices (∆i - ∆c +26.0, 95 % CI 7.7, 44.3). Counseling job aids can improve the quality of postnatal services. However, achieving reduction goals in maternal and neonatal mortality will likely require more comprehensive approaches to link enhanced facility services with

  20. Sexual behavior as a function of stigma and coping with stigma among people with HIV/AIDS in rural New England.

    PubMed

    Varni, Susan E; Miller, Carol T; Solomon, Sondra E

    2012-11-01

    The relationship between coping with HIV/AIDS stigma and engaging in risky sexual behavior (i.e., inconsistent condom use) was examined in HIV-positive adults living in rural areas. Participants answered questions about their experiences with HIV/AIDS prejudice and discrimination (enacted stigma) and their perceptions of felt HIV/AIDS stigma (disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concern with public attitudes). They were also asked about how they coped with HIV/AIDS stigma, and about their sexual activity during the past 90 days. We hypothesized that using disengagement coping to manage the stress of HIV/AIDS stigma would be related to risky sexual behavior. Multinomial logistic regression results showed that using disengagement coping (avoidance, denial, and wishful thinking) coupled with high levels of enacted stigma was associated with less risky rather than more risky sexual behavior. That is, disengagement coping coupled with high stigma increased the odds of not having vaginal or anal sex versus inconsistently using condoms. Implications for people with HIV/AIDS who use disengagement coping to manage stress to deal with HIV/AIDS stigma are discussed. PMID:22782789

  1. Sexual Behavior as a Function of Stigma and Coping with Stigma Among People with HIV/AIDS in Rural New England

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Sondra E.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between coping with HIV/AIDS stigma and engaging in risky sexual behavior (i.e., inconsistent condom use) was examined in HIV-positive adults living in rural areas. Participants answered questions about their experiences with HIV/AIDS prejudice and discrimination (enacted stigma) and their perceptions of felt HIV/AIDS stigma (disclosure concerns, negative self-image, and concern with public attitudes). They were also asked about how they coped with HIV/AIDS stigma, and about their sexual activity during the past 90 days. We hypothesized that using disengagement coping to manage the stress of HIV/AIDS stigma would be related to risky sexual behavior. Multinomial logistic regression results showed that using disengagement coping (avoidance, denial, and wishful thinking) coupled with high levels of enacted stigma was associated with less risky rather than more risky sexual behavior. That is, disengagement coping coupled with high stigma increased the odds of not having vaginal or anal sex versus inconsistently using condoms. Implications for people with HIV/AIDS who use disengagement coping to manage stress to deal with HIV/AIDS stigma are discussed. PMID:22782789

  2. Family economic strengthening and mental health functioning of caregivers for AIDS-affected children in rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Julia Shu-Huah; Ssewamala, Fred M.; Han, Chang-Keun

    2015-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, many extended families assume the role of caregivers for children orphaned by AIDS (AIDS-affected children). The economic and psychological stress ensued from caregiving duties often predispose caregivers to poor mental health outcomes. Yet, very few studies exist on effective interventions to support these caregivers. Using data from a randomized controlled trial called Suubi-Maka (N = 346), this paper examines whether a family economic strengthening intervention among families caring for AIDS-affected children (ages 12–14) in Uganda would improve the primary caregivers’ mental health functioning. The Suubi-Maka study comprised of a control condition (n = 167) receiving usual care for AIDS-affected children, and a treatment condition (n = 179) receiving a family economic strengthening intervention, including matched savings accounts, and financial planning and management training to incentivize families to save money for education and/or family-level income generating projects. This paper uses data from baseline/pre-intervention (wave 1) interviews with caregivers and 12-month post-intervention initiation (wave 2). The caregiver’s mental health measure adapted from previous studies in sub- Saharan Africa had an internal consistency of .88 at wave 1 and .90 at wave 2. At baseline, the two study groups did not significantly differ on caregiver’s mental health functioning. However, at 12-month follow-up, multiple regression analysis located significant differences between the two study groups on mental health functioning. Specifically, following the intervention, caregivers in the treatment condition reported positive improvements on their mental health functioning, especially in the symptom areas of obsession–compulsion, interpersonal sensitivity, hostility, and psychoticism. Findings point to a need for programs and policies aimed at supporting caregivers of AIDS-affected children to begin to consider incorporating family

  3. Contextualising women's mental distress and coping strategies in the time of AIDS: a rural South African case study.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rochelle; Campbell, Catherine

    2014-12-01

    Increasing attention is paid to impacts of HIV/AIDS on women's mental health, often framed by decontextualized psychiatric understandings of emotional distress and treatment. We contribute to the small qualitative literature extending these findings through exploring HIV/AIDS--affected women's own accounts of their distress-focusing on the impacts of social context, and women's efforts to cope outside of medical support services. Nineteen in-depth interviews were conducted with women experiencing depression or anxiety-like symptoms in a wider study of services in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Thematic analysis was framed by Summerfield's emphasis on contexts and resilience. Women highlighted family conflicts (particularly abandonment by men), community-level violence, poverty and HIV/AIDS as drivers of distress. Whilst HIV/AIDS placed significant burdens on women, poverty and relationship difficulties were more central in their accounts. Four coping mechanisms were identified. Women drew on indigenous local resources in their psychological re-framing of negative situations, and their mobilisation of emotional and financial support from inter-personal networks, churches and HIV support groups. Less commonly, they sought expert advice from traditional healers, medical services or social workers, but access to these was limited. Though all tried to supplement government grants with income generation efforts, only a minority regarded these as successful. Findings support ongoing efforts to bolster strained mental health services with support groups, which often offer valuable emotional and practical support. Without parallel poverty alleviation strategies, however, support groups may sometimes offer little more than encouraging passive acceptance of the inevitability of suffering--potentially exacerbating the hopelessness underpinning women's distress. PMID:24670517

  4. The traditional treatment of AIDS in Uganda: benefits and problems. Key issues and debates: traditional healers.

    PubMed

    Baguma, P

    1996-07-01

    Many Ugandans turn to the traditional healing system for help in dealing with the psychosocial stress associated with HIV infection as well as for herbal treatments. Use of traditional healers for this purpose is encouraged by social and cultural beliefs that posit AIDS is a result of witchcraft or a curse from God. It is believed that if a sick person does not obtain treatment and dies, his spirit will cause further disease. Of concern is a tendency for people with AIDS to travel from one part of the country to another, seeking a cure from spiritualists, pure herbalists, and visionaries. Moreover, the intensified emergence of cults in response to the AIDS crisis creates potential for serious exploitation and further spread of the AIDS virus. Not only do these groups drain a family's financial resources, some practice unsafe practices such as intergroup sex or contact with unscreened blood. The estimated 6000-120,000 traditional healers in Uganda have the potential to provide a structure through which AIDS-related psychosocial problems are managed ("psychohealing"). Steps should be taken to understand the conditions that facilitate the emergence of healers purporting to be able to cure AIDS, the type of clients attracted to these services, and the costs and benefits of traditional medicine, with the ultimate goal of involving traditional healers in ongoing AIDS information, education, and counseling programs. PMID:12179373

  5. [Treatment with doxycycline and nifuroxazide of Isospora belli infection in AIDS].

    PubMed

    Meyohas, M C; Capella, F; Poirot, J L; Lecomte, I; Binet, D; Eliaszewicz, M; Frottier, J

    1990-06-01

    Isospora belli infection is the most frequent coccidiosis after cryptosporidiosis in AIDS patients. Chronic watery diarrhea is observed. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is the recommended treatment. Four AIDS patients were intolerant to this drug and were treated with doxycycline and nifuroxazide. Three patients were cured. Two patients died of other infections. The two last patients relapsed and were treated again with long term doxycycline. No relapse occurred during the following twelve months. PMID:2385457

  6. COMPUTER-AIDED SYNTHESIS OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT AND SLUDGE DISPOSAL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computer-aided design procedure for the preliminary synthesis of wastewater treatment and sludge disposal systems is developed. It selects the components in the wastewater treatment and sludge disposal trains from a list of candidate process units with fixed design characterist...

  7. The Economic Impact of AIDS Treatment: Labor Supply in Western Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Zivin, Joshua Graff; Goldstein, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Using longitudinal survey data collected in collaboration with a treatment program, this paper estimates the economic impacts of antiretroviral treatment. The responses in two outcomes are studied: (1) labor supply of treated adult AIDS patients; and (2) labor supply of individuals in patients' households. Within six months after treatment…

  8. The influence of antiretroviral treatment on willingness to test: a qualitative study in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Phakathi, Zipho; Van Rooyen, Heidi; Fritz, Katherine; Richter, Linda

    2011-06-01

    Previous quantitative studies suggest a mutually reinforcing relationship between HIV counselling and testing (HCT) and antiretroviral treatment (ART). HCT is the entry into ART, and access to ART appears to increase HIV-testing uptake in settings with historically low uptake. Adopting a qualitative approach, this study examined the influence of ART on willingness to test for HIV, in a rural community in South Africa. Ninety-six in-depth interviews from a large community-based HIV-prevention trial were analysed. The data provide insight into the community members' views, perceptions and experiences regarding ART, and how they draw on these in making decisions about HIV testing. Several key factors that supported a positive relationship between ART and HIV testing were noted. These included the beliefs that ART brings hope and that it prolongs life; the powerful positive effect of witnessing the recovery of someone on treatment; and that ART encourages early HIV-testing behaviour. A few negative factors that could potentially weaken the effects of this positive relationship between ART and HCT uptake were the disclosure difficulties experienced by those enrolled in treatment, beliefs that ART does not cure HIV disease, and the travel distance to testing and treatment facilities from where people live and work. HIV/AIDS-service providers and programme planners should actively draw on these observations, to encourage increased HIV testing in communities and to ensure that the maximum number of people get the HIV treatment and care services that they require. PMID:25859740

  9. Home Water Treatment Habits and Effectiveness in a Rural Arizona Community

    PubMed Central

    Lothrop, Nathan; Wilkinson, Sarah T.; Verhougstraete, Marc; Sugeng, Anastasia; Loh, Miranda M.; Klimecki, Walter; Beamer, Paloma I.

    2015-01-01

    Drinking water quality in the United States (US) is among the safest in the world. However, many residents, often in rural areas, rely on unregulated private wells or small municipal utilities for water needs. These utilities may violate the Safe Drinking Water Act contaminant guidelines, often because they lack the required financial resources. Residents may use alternative water sources or install a home water treatment system. Despite increased home water treatment adoption, few studies have examined their use and effectiveness in the US. Our study addresses this knowledge gap by examining home water treatment in a rural Arizona community. Water samples were analyzed for metal(loid)s, and home treatment and demographic data were recorded in 31 homes. Approximately 42% of homes treated their water. Independent of source water quality, residents with higher income (OR = 1.25; 95%CI (1.00 – 1.64)) and education levels (OR = 1.49; 95%CI (1.12 – 2.12)) were more likely to treat their water. Some contaminant concentrations were effectively reduced with treatment, while some were not. We conclude that increased educational outreach on contaminant testing and treatment, especially to rural areas with endemic water contamination, would result in a greater public health impact while reducing rural health disparities. PMID:26120482

  10. Incarceration of people living with HIV/AIDS: Implications for Treatment-As-Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Milloy, M-J; Montaner, Julio S.G.; Wood, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Contact with the criminal justice system, including incarceration, is a common experience for many people living with HIV/AIDS. Optimism has recently been expressed that correctional facilities could be important locations for Treatment-as-Prevention (TasP)-based initiatives. We review recent findings regarding the effect of incarceration on patterns of HIV transmission, testing, treatment initiation and retention. We found that the prevalence of HIV infection among incarcerated individuals remains higher than analogous non-incarcerated populations. Recent studies have shown that voluntary HIV/AIDS testing is feasible in many correctional facilities, although the number of previously undiagnosed individuals identified has been modest. Studies have implied enhanced linkage to HIV/AIDS treatment and care in jails in the United States was associated with improvements in the HIV cascade of care. However, for many individuals living with HIV/AIDS, exposure to the correctional system remains an important barrier to retention in HIV/AIDS treatment and care. Future research should evaluate structural interventions to address these barriers and facilitate the scale-up of TasP-based efforts among individuals living in correctional settings. PMID:24962285

  11. Causes, Consequences, and Prevention of Burnout among Substance Abuse Treatment Counselors: A Rural versus Urban Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Oser, Carrie B.; Biebel, Elizabeth P.; Pullen, Erin; Harp, Kathi LH

    2012-01-01

    Substance abuse counselors are vulnerable to burnout, which has negative repercussions for the counselor, employing organization, and clients. However, little is known about differences in counselor burnout from the counselors’ perspective in rural versus urban treatment centers. In 2008, focus group data from 28 rural and urban counselors in a southern state was analyzed, revealing three burnout themes across all counselors: causes, consequences, and prevention. However, there were various differences between rural and urban counselors in sub-themes with only rural counselors citing office politics and low occupational prestige as causes of burnout. Only urban counselors reported responses endorsing the sub-themes of role reversal, clients trying to choose their counselors, and changing jobs as consequences of burnout. All counselors cited co-worker support, clinical supervision, and self-care as important strategies for managing burnout. In sum, context clearly matters as rural counselors cited more causes of burnout; yet, the implications of burnout are universal in that they often lead to poor quality clinical care. There is a continued need for greater understanding of addiction as a disease, which would reduce stigma, especially in rural areas, as well as increase the prestige and earning potential of the substance abuse counseling occupation. PMID:23662328

  12. Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment Resource Allocation in Rural and Frontier Conditions: The Impact of Including Organizational Readiness to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minugh, P. Allison; Janke, Susan L.; Lomuto, Nicoletta A.; Galloway, Diane K.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural and frontier states are significantly affected by substance abuse and poverty. The high rate of substance abuse coupled with high levels of dependence on state-funded treatment systems places a burden on rural treatment systems and makes resource allocation a central planning issue. Purpose: The goal of this study was to combine…

  13. Rural Issues in Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Treatment: Award for Excellence Papers. Technical Assistance Publication Series No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This document consists of papers that received recognition in a competition sponsored by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and the National Rural Institute on Alcohol and Drug Abuse. The competition sought to focus attention on problems in providing treatment and prevention services for drug and alcohol problems in rural areas. The papers…

  14. HIV/AIDS, Drug Abuse Treatment, and the Correctional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses in-prison prevalence and transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Focuses on epidemiology in prison settings, the role of ethnicity and gender in transmission, screening for HIV, segregating the HIV-positive inmate, condom distribution, medical treatment for HIV-positive inmates, HIV education and prevention, and tuberculosis…

  15. Metered oxygen supply aids treatment of domestic sewage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weliky, N.; Hooper, T. J.; Silverman, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Microbiological fixed-bed process was developed in which supplementary oxygen required by microbial species is supplied by electrochemical device. Rate of addition of oxygen to waste treatment process is controlled to maintain aerobic metabolism and prevent anaerobic metabolisms which produce odorous or toxic products.

  16. Depression Treatment Among Rural Older Adults: Preferences and Factors Influencing Future Service Use

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, Katherine A.; McKibbin, Christine L.; Wykes, Thomas L.; Lee, Aaron A.; Carrico, Catherine P.; McConnell, Katelynn A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate depression treatment preferences and anticipated service use in a sample of adults aged 55 years or older who reside in rural Wyoming. Sixteen participants (mean age = 59) completed 30- to 60-minute, semi-structured interviews. Qualitative methods were used to characterize common themes. Social/provider support and community gatekeepers were perceived by participants as important potential facilitators for seeking depression treatment. In contrast, perceived stigma and the value placed on self-sufficiency emerged as key barriers to seeking treatment for depression in this rural, young-old sample. Participants anticipated presenting for treatment in the primary care sector and preferred a combination of medication and psychotherapy for treatment. Participants were, however, more willing to see mental health professionals if they were first referred by a clergy member or primary care physician. PMID:24409008

  17. Predictors of Substance Abuse Treatment Entry Among Rural Illicit Stimulant Users in Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Robert G.; Sexton, Rocky; Wang, Jichuan; Falck, Russel; Leukefeld, Carl G.; Booth, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Illicit drug use in the rural United States is increasingly common, yet little is known about drug users’ treatment-seeking behaviors. This study identifies predictors of substance abuse treatment entry over 24 months among 710 illicit stimulant users in rural areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky. Active users of powdered cocaine, crack cocaine, and/or methamphetamine (MA) were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Participants completed structured interviews at baseline and follow-up questionnaires every 6 months for 24 months. Data were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. The paper is informed by the Anderson-Newman Model. Overall, 18.7% of the sample entered treatment. Ohio or Kentucky residence, perceived need for substance abuse treatment, higher ASI legal problem composite scores, prior substance abuse treatment, and tranquilizer use were positively associated with treatment entry. Non-daily crack cocaine users and marijuana users were less likely to enter treatment. The findings can help inform rural substance abuse treatment program development and outreach. PMID:20391264

  18. Project ADAPT: A Program to Assess Depression and Provide Proactive Treatment in Rural Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luptak, Marilyn; Kaas, Merrie J.; Artz, Margaret; McCarthy, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We describe and evaluate a project designed to pilot test an evidence-based clinical intervention for assessing and treating depression in older adults in rural primary care clinics. Project ADAPT--Assuring Depression Assessment and Proactive Treatment--utilized existing primary care resources to overcome barriers to sustainability…

  19. Designing slanted soil system for greywater treatment for irrigation purposes in rural area of arid regions.

    PubMed

    Maiga, Y; Moyenga, D; Nikiema, B C; Ushijima, K; Maiga, A H; Funamizu, N

    2014-01-01

    To solve the unpleasant disposal of greywater in rural area and allow its collection for reuse in gardening, a slanted soil treatment system (SSTS) was designed and installed in two households. Granitic gravel of 1-9 mm size was used as the filter medium. The aim of this study was to design a SSTS and assess its suitability as a treatment system allowing greywater reuse in gardening. The efficiency of the SSTS was assessed based on organic matter and bacterial pollution removal. The developed SSTS allowed the collection of greywater from three main sources (shower, dishwashing and laundry) in rural area. The SSTS is efficient in removing at least 50% of suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand and biological oxygen demand. The study highlighted that, contrary to the common perception, greywater streams in rural area are heavily polluted with faecal indicators. The removal efficiency of faecal indicators was lower than 2 log units, and the bacteriological quality of the effluents is generally higher than the WHO reuse guidelines for restricted irrigation. Longer retention time is required to increase the efficiency. The possibility of reusing the treated greywater as irrigation water is discussed on the basis of various qualitative parameters. The SSTS is a promising greywater treatment system for small communities in the rural area in the Sahelian region. To increase the treatment efficiency, future research will focus on the characteristics of the SSTS, the grain size and the establishment of a pretreatment step. PMID:25189850

  20. Gender Differences in Sexual Practices and Beliefs among Rural Injection Drug Users in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagumny, Matthew J.; Holt, Tamala Ray

    1999-01-01

    Survey examines gender differences in sexual practices and beliefs about condom use among rural injecting drug users admitted to treatment programs. Results indicate that Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome knowledge was extremely limited for both males and females in this sample, suggesting that basic HIV/AIDS…

  1. [Application of different death evaluation indicators for HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zeng, L; Ma, Y

    2016-05-10

    AIDS has gradually changed from a fatal disease to a manageable chronic disease since the advent of antiretroviral drugs. In 2003, China initiated a national free antiretroviral treatment program for people living with HIV/AIDS, several death evaluation indicators have been used to evaluate public health effect of the program. Death evaluation indicators used frequently in domestic and overseas include mortality, case fatality rate, excess mortality, standard mortality ratio, years of potential life lost, disability-adjusted life year and life expectancy. This paper summarizes the different death indicators applied in effectiveness evaluation of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment, elaborates the application range and significance of these indicators and suggests the research in related life expectancy and burden of disease which have not been conducted in China. PMID:27188376

  2. Costs of HIV+/AIDS at CD4+ counts disease stages based on treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    Gable, C B; Tierce, J C; Simison, D; Ward, D; Motte, K

    1996-08-01

    We report treatment protocols for HIV+/AIDS patients by CD4+ counts (T-lymphocyte cells/mm3: > or = 500, 499-200, 199-50, and < 50) as a tool to provide better definition and to project annual costs (total charges for services) and lifetimes costs for HIV+/AIDS. The treatment protocols, derived from the literature and an HIV+/AIDS Physician Panel, defined the resource use associated with antiretroviral therapy and opportunistic disease prophylaxis and treatment. Resource use costs were derived from the published literature, insurance database, Medicare fee schedules, surveys, and the Physician Panel. At CD4+ counts, the rates of opportunistic diseases were derived from the Physician Panel experience; the mean occupancy times were derived from the literature. The sensitivity analysis indicated stability of the lifetime costs to variation in mean occupancy times, rates of opportunistic diseases, rates of adverse events (AE), and costs. The total annual costs (1995 dollars) of HIV+/AIDS patients ranged from $1,934 (> or = 500), $6,015 (200-499), and $9,031 (50-199), to $25,239 ( < 50). The annual costs of opportunistic diseases are esophageal candidiasis (EC) ($2,194), tuberculosis (TB) ($2,924), cryptococcal meningitis (CM) ($17,264), toxoplasmosis ($17,631), Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) (+20,153), Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) ($22,329), wasting syndrome ($26,676), central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma ($27,333), Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) [mild ($3,545), moderate ($4,889), and severe ($32,609)], Kaposi' sarcoma (KS) [mild/moderate ($5,902), and severe ($10,744)], and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis ($100,337). The projected lifetime costs of HIV+/AIDS are $94,726 (annual costs $7,645). Our lower lifetime costs as compared with recent estimates may be due to including resources only for HIV+/AIDS-related treatment and not for non-HIV+/AIDS conditions, as well as reduced resource use resulting from more efficient diagnostic and therapeutic techniques

  3. onlineDeCISion.org: a web-based decision aid for DCIS treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozanne, Elissa M; Schneider, Katharine H; Soeteman, Djøra; Stout, Natasha; Schrag, Deborah; Fordis, Michael; Punglia, Rinaa S

    2015-11-01

    Women diagnosed with DCIS face complex treatment decisions and often do so with inaccurate and incomplete understanding of the risks and benefits involved. Our objective was to create a tool to guide these decisions for both providers and patients. We developed a web-based decision aid designed to provide clinicians with tailored information about a patient’s recurrence risks and survival outcomes following different treatment strategies for DCIS. A theoretical framework, microsimulation model (Soeteman et al., J Natl Cancer 105:774–781, 2013) and best practices for web-based decision tools guided the development of the decision aid. The development process used semi-structured interviews and usability testing with key stakeholders, including a diverse group of multidisciplinary clinicians and a patient advocate. We developed onlineDeCISion.​org to include the following features that were rated as important by the stakeholders: (1) descriptions of each of the standard treatment options available; (2) visual projections of the likelihood of time-specific (10-year and lifetime) breast-preservation, recurrence, and survival outcomes; and (3) side-by-side comparisons of down-stream effects of each treatment choice. All clinicians reviewing the decision aid in usability testing were interested in using it in their clinical practice. The decision aid is available in a web-based format and is planned to be publicly available. To improve treatment decision making in patients with DCIS, we have developed a web-based decision aid onlineDeCISion.​org that conforms to best practices and that clinicians are interested in using in their clinics with patients to better inform treatment decisions. PMID:26475704

  4. Virtual Reality versus Computer-Aided Exposure Treatments for Fear of Flying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortella-Feliu, Miquel; Botella, Cristina; Llabres, Jordi; Breton-Lopez, Juana Maria; del Amo, Antonio Riera; Banos, Rosa M.; Gelabert, Joan M.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence is growing that two modalities of computer-based exposure therapies--virtual reality and computer-aided psychotherapy--are effective in treating anxiety disorders, including fear of flying. However, they have not yet been directly compared. The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of three computer-based exposure treatments for…

  5. The Impact of Residency Training on Physicians' AIDS-Related Treatment Practices: A Longitudinal Panel Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yedidia, Michael J.; Berry, Carolyn A.

    1999-01-01

    Study of 394 physicians graduating in 1989 from six New York medical schools found that certain residency-training factors had sustained effects on physician behavior in caring for AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) patients, but not on the number of patients treated. Determinants of treatment practice included residency environment,…

  6. 30 CFR 50.20-3 - Criteria-Differences between medical treatment and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criteria-Differences between medical treatment and first aid. 50.20-3 Section 50.20-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ACCIDENTS, INJURIES, ILLNESSES, EMPLOYMENT, AND PRODUCTION IN MINES NOTIFICATION, INVESTIGATION, REPORTS AND RECORDS OF...

  7. 30 CFR 50.20-3 - Criteria-Differences between medical treatment and first aid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criteria-Differences between medical treatment and first aid. 50.20-3 Section 50.20-3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ACCIDENTS, INJURIES, ILLNESSES, EMPLOYMENT, AND PRODUCTION IN MINES NOTIFICATION, INVESTIGATION, REPORTS AND RECORDS OF...

  8. Self-Treatment of Pain in a Rural Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallerand, April Hazard; Fouladbakhsh, Judith M.; Templin, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, 42% of adults say they experience pain daily, the majority often relying on self-treatment. In addition, an increasing number of people are seeking complementary/alternative therapies, often without informing their health care providers. Purpose: To explore the occurrence of pain and the modalities of self-treatment used by…

  9. Local Stability of AIDS Epidemic Model Through Treatment and Vertical Transmission with Time Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novi W, Cascarilla; Lestari, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to explain stability of the spread of AIDS through treatment and vertical transmission model. Human with HIV need a time to positively suffer AIDS. The existence of a time, human with HIV until positively suffer AIDS can be delayed for a time so that the model acquired is the model with time delay. The model form is a nonlinear differential equation with time delay, SIPTA (susceptible-infected-pre AIDS-treatment-AIDS). Based on SIPTA model analysis results the disease free equilibrium point and the endemic equilibrium point. The disease free equilibrium point with and without time delay are local asymptotically stable if the basic reproduction number is less than one. The endemic equilibrium point will be local asymptotically stable if the time delay is less than the critical value of delay, unstable if the time delay is more than the critical value of delay, and bifurcation occurs if the time delay is equal to the critical value of delay.

  10. Use of traditional medicines in the management of HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Tanzania: a case in the Bukoba rural district

    PubMed Central

    Kisangau, Daniel P; Lyaruu, Herbert VM; Hosea, Ken M; Joseph, Cosam C

    2007-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical surveys were carried out to document herbal remedies used in the management of HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections in Bukoba Rural district, Tanzania. The district is currently an epicenter of HIV/AIDS and although over 90% of the population in the district relies on traditional medicines to manage the disease, this knowledge is impressionistic and not well documented. The HIV/AIDS opportunistic conditions considered during the study were Tuberculosis (TB), Herpes zoster (Shingles), Herpes simplex (Genital herpes), Oral candidiasis and Cryptococcal meningitis. Other symptomatic but undefined conditions considered were skin rashes and chronic diarrhea. Methods An open-ended semi-structured questionnaire was used in collecting field information. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the ethnobotanical data collected. Factor of informant consensus (Fic) was used to analyze the ethnobotanical importance of the plants. Results In the present study, 75 plant species belonging to 66 genera and 41 families were found to be used to treat one or more HIV/AIDS related infections in the district. The study revealed that TB and oral candidiasis were the most common manifestations of HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections affecting most of the population in the area. It unveils the first detailed account of ethnomedical documentation of plants focusing the management of HIV/AIDS related infections in the district. Conclusion It is concluded that the ethnopharmacological information reported forms a basis for further research to identify and isolate bioactive constituents that can be developed to drugs for the management of the HIV/AIDS opportunistic infections. PMID:17623081

  11. Behavioral Responses of Patients in AIDS Treatment Programs: Sexual Behavior in Kenya*

    PubMed Central

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Goldstein, Markus; Zivin, Joshua Graff; Habyarimana, James; Pop-Eleches, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    We estimate changes in sexual behavior for HIV-positive individuals enrolled in an AIDS treatment program using longitudinal household survey data collected in western Kenya. We find that sexual activity is lowest at the time that treatment is initiated and increases significantly in the subsequent six months, consistent with the health improvements that result from ART treatment. More importantly, we find large and significant increases of 10 to 30 percentage points in the reported use of condoms during last sexual intercourse. The increases in condom use appear to be driven primarily by a program effect, applying to all HIV clinic patients regardless of treatment status. PMID:22523483

  12. Behavioral Responses of Patients in AIDS Treatment Programs: Sexual Behavior in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Goldstein, Markus; Zivin, Joshua Graff; Habyarimana, James; Pop-Eleches, Cristian

    2012-04-19

    We estimate changes in sexual behavior for HIV-positive individuals enrolled in an AIDS treatment program using longitudinal household survey data collected in western Kenya. We find that sexual activity is lowest at the time that treatment is initiated and increases significantly in the subsequent six months, consistent with the health improvements that result from ART treatment. More importantly, we find large and significant increases of 10 to 30 percentage points in the reported use of condoms during last sexual intercourse. The increases in condom use appear to be driven primarily by a program effect, applying to all HIV clinic patients regardless of treatment status. PMID:22523483

  13. Evaluation of rural wastewater treatment processes in a county of eastern China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui-Yu; Qiang, Zhi-Min; Wang, Wei-Dong; Jin, Hui

    2012-07-01

    With the rapid urbanization and industrialization in China, wastewater treatment in rural areas has become an increasing national concern. The selection of appropriate treatment processes closely based on the actual local status is crucial for the prevention of water quality deterioration in rural areas of China. This study presents a full year survey on the performances of various rural wastewater treatment processes at a county level in eastern China including seven three-chamber septic tanks (ST), five micro-power biological facilities (MP), seven constructed wetlands (CW), three stabilization ponds (SP) and five centralized activated sludge treatment plants (AS). It was found that although ST could remove a notable portion of total suspended solids (TSS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD(Cr)), it was ineffective in reducing nutrients and pathogens. Reliability and stability analyses showed that the centralized AS and decentralized CW processes outperformed the SP and MP processes. There were obvious discrepancies between the mean design concentrations, which ensure that 95% of the effluents meet the discharge standards, and the actual effluent concentrations determined for each process. The expected compliance with the tentatively adopted second-grade discharge standards (GB 18918-2002) was unsatisfactory for most of the water quality parameters examined, indicating an urgent need to design more practical discharge standards for decentralized treatment processes. Based on an overall assessment of reliability, stability and cost-effectiveness, the centralized AS was suitable for densely populated towns while the decentralized CW was suitable for sparsely populated villages. PMID:22378384

  14. Economic returns to investment in AIDS treatment in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Resch, Stephen; Korenromp, Eline; Stover, John; Blakley, Matthew; Krubiner, Carleigh; Thorien, Kira; Hecht, Robert; Atun, Rifat

    2011-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, aid organizations and developing country governments have invested heavily in AIDS treatment. By 2010, more than five million people began receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART)--yet each year, 2.7 million people are becoming newly infected and another two million are dying without ever having received treatment. As the need for treatment grows without commensurate increase in the amount of available resources, it is critical to assess the health and economic gains being realized from increasingly large investments in ART. This study estimates total program costs and compares them with selected economic benefits of ART, for the current cohort of patients whose treatment is cofinanced by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. At end 2011, 3.5 million patients in low and middle income countries will be receiving ART through treatment programs cofinanced by the Global Fund. Using 2009 ART prices and program costs, we estimate that the discounted resource needs required for maintaining this cohort are $14.2 billion for the period 2011-2020. This investment is expected to save 18.5 million life-years and return $12 to $34 billion through increased labor productivity, averted orphan care, and deferred medical treatment for opportunistic infections and end-of-life care. Under alternative assumptions regarding the labor productivity effects of HIV infection, AIDS disease, and ART, the monetary benefits range from 81 percent to 287 percent of program costs over the same period. These results suggest that, in addition to the large health gains generated, the economic benefits of treatment will substantially offset, and likely exceed, program costs within 10 years of investment. PMID:21998648

  15. Economic Returns to Investment in AIDS Treatment in Low and Middle Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Resch, Stephen; Korenromp, Eline; Stover, John; Blakley, Matthew; Krubiner, Carleigh; Thorien, Kira; Hecht, Robert; Atun, Rifat

    2011-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, aid organizations and developing country governments have invested heavily in AIDS treatment. By 2010, more than five million people began receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) – yet each year, 2.7 million people are becoming newly infected and another two million are dying without ever having received treatment. As the need for treatment grows without commensurate increase in the amount of available resources, it is critical to assess the health and economic gains being realized from increasingly large investments in ART. This study estimates total program costs and compares them with selected economic benefits of ART, for the current cohort of patients whose treatment is cofinanced by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. At end 2011, 3.5 million patients in low and middle income countries will be receiving ART through treatment programs cofinanced by the Global Fund. Using 2009 ART prices and program costs, we estimate that the discounted resource needs required for maintaining this cohort are $14.2 billion for the period 2011–2020. This investment is expected to save 18.5 million life-years and return $12 to $34 billion through increased labor productivity, averted orphan care, and deferred medical treatment for opportunistic infections and end-of-life care. Under alternative assumptions regarding the labor productivity effects of HIV infection, AIDS disease, and ART, the monetary benefits range from 81 percent to 287 percent of program costs over the same period. These results suggest that, in addition to the large health gains generated, the economic benefits of treatment will substantially offset, and likely exceed, program costs within 10 years of investment. PMID:21998648

  16. Factors associated with seeking treatment for postpartum morbidities in rural India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aditya; Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To understand the prevalence of postpartum morbidities and factors associated with treatment-seeking behaviour among currently married women aged 15-49 residing in rural India. METHODS: We used data from the nationally representative District Level Household Survey from 2007-2008. Cross-tabulation was used to understand the differentials for the prevalence of postpartum morbidities and treatment-seeking behaviours across selected background characteristics. Two-level binary logistic regression was applied to understand the factors associated with treatment-seeking behaviour. RESULTS: Approximately 39.8% of rural women suffered from at least one of the six postpartum morbidities including high fever, lower abdominal pain, foul-smelling vaginal discharge, excessive bleeding, convulsions, and severe headache. Morbidities were more prevalent among poor, illiterate, Muslim, and high-parity women. About 55.1% of these rural women sought treatment/consultation for their problems. The odds of seeking treatment/consultation increased as economic status and years of schooling among both the woman and her husband increased. Poor, uneducated, unemployed, Hindu, and tribal women were less likely to seek treatment/consultation for postpartum morbidities than their counterparts were. The odds of seeking treatment/consultation decreased as the distance to the nearest private health facility increased. Most women visited a private hospital (46.3%) or a friend/family member’s home (20.8%) for treatment/consultation. Only a small percentage visited publicly funded health institutions such as a primary health centre (8.8%), community health centre (6.5%), health sub-centre (2.8%), or district hospital (13.1%). Rural women from the northeast region of India were 50% less likely to seek treatment/consultation than women from the central region were. CONCLUSIONS: Providing antenatal and delivery care, and ensuring nearby government healthcare facilities are available to

  17. Mathematical analysis of a two strain HIV/AIDS model with antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Bhunu, C P; Garira, W; Magombedze, G

    2009-09-01

    A two strain HIV/AIDS model with treatment which allows AIDS patients with sensitive HIV-strain to undergo amelioration is presented as a system of non-linear ordinary differential equations. The disease-free equilibrium is shown to be globally asymptotically stable when the associated epidemic threshold known as the basic reproduction number for the model is less than unity. The centre manifold theory is used to show that the sensitive HIV-strain only and resistant HIV-strain only endemic equilibria are locally asymptotically stable when the associated reproduction numbers are greater than unity. Qualitative analysis of the model including positivity, boundedness and persistence of solutions are presented. The model is numerically analysed to assess the effects of treatment with amelioration on the dynamics of a two strain HIV/AIDS model. Numerical simulations of the model show that the two strains co-exist whenever the reproduction numbers exceed unity. Further, treatment with amelioration may result in an increase in the total number of infective individuals (asymptomatic) but results in a decrease in the number of AIDS patients. Further, analysis of the reproduction numbers show that antiretroviral resistance increases with increase in antiretroviral use. PMID:19357968

  18. Drinking water treatment for a rural karst region in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthies, K.; Schott, C.; Anggraini, A. K.; Silva, A.; Diedel, R.; Mühlebach, H.; Fuchs, S.; Obst, U.; Brenner-Weiss, G.

    2016-06-01

    An interdisciplinary German-Indonesian joint research project on Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) focused on the development and exemplary implementation of adapted technologies to improve the water supply situation in a model karst region in southern Java. The project involving 19 sub-projects covers exploration of water resources, water extraction, distribution as well as water quality assurance, and waste water treatment. For the water quality assurance, an appropriate and sustainable drinking water treatment concept was developed and exemplarily implemented. Monitoring results showed that the main quality issue was the contamination with hygienically relevant bacteria. Based on the gained results, a water treatment concept was developed consisting of a central sand filtration prior to the distribution network, a semi-central hygienization where large water volumes are needed to remove bacteria deriving from water distribution and a final point-of-use water treatment. This paper focuses on the development of a central sand filtration plant and some first analysis for the development of a recipe for the local production of ceramic filters for household water treatment. The first results show that arsenic and manganese are leaching from the filters made of local raw material. Though discarding the first, filtrates should be sufficient to reduce arsenic and manganese concentration effectively. Moreover, hydraulic conductivities of filter pots made of 40 % pore-forming agents are presented and discussed.

  19. Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV/AIDS: Perception of Health Care Workers in Rural Areas of Oyo State

    PubMed Central

    Aishat, Usman; Olubunmi, Ayinde

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Proper implementation of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services requires adequate knowledge and appropriate attitudes and practices on the part of the health care providers especially in rural areas where access to health care delivery is very limited in Oyo State. Materials and Methods. This is a descriptive cross-sectional survey of 350 health care workers in a two-stage sampling technique. Data was obtained using interviewer-administered, pretested, semistructured questionnaires. The data was analyzed using Epi Info software version 7. Results. The knowledge of PMTCT of HIV was poor among the health care workers (69.1%). However, more than half (58.3%) had good attitudes towards PMTCT of HIV/AIDS. Predictors of good knowledge of PMTCT were religion [AOR = 1.6, 95% CI (1.1–2.6)], cadre of occupation [AOR = 10.2, 95% CI (2.9–35.1)], and length of service [AOR = 4.3, 95% CI (2.3–19.4)]. Predictors of good attitude towards PMTCT were length of service in the current hospital [AOR = 2.8, 95% CI (1.5–5.2)] and cadre of occupation [AOR = 3.9, 95% CI (1.28–11.9)]. Conclusion. Despite poor knowledge of PMTCT of HIV/AIDS among the health care workers, the attitude towards PMTCT of HIV/AIDS was good. There is need for the involvement of the stakeholders in bridging the gap between knowledge of and attitude towards prevention of MTCT of HIV/AIDS among health care workers in the rural areas. PMID:26904361

  20. Prevalence, awareness, treatment, control of type 2 diabetes mellitus and risk factors in Chinese rural population: the RuralDiab study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaotian; Li, Yuqian; Li, Linlin; Zhang, Luning; Ren, Yongcheng; Zhou, Hao; Cui, Lingling; Mao, Zhenxing; Hu, Dongsheng; Wang, Chongjian

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and to explore potential risk factors in rural areas of China. A total of 16413 individuals aged 18–74 years in rural districts were recruited from the Rural Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (RuralDiab) study for the epidemiological research. Meanwhile, a meta-analysis including 7 published studies was conducted to validate the result of the cross-sectional study. The rates of crude and age-standardized prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM were 12.19%, 67.00%, 62.35%, 22.20% and 6.98%, 60.11%, 54.85%, 18.77%, respectively. The prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM displayed increased trends with age (Ptrend < 0.01) and were strongly associated with education, drinking, more vegetable and fruit intake, physical activity, family history of diabetes, body mass index (BMI). The results of this meta-analysis showed that the pooled prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM in China countryside were 7.3% (5.3–9.4%), 57.3% (36.9–77.6%), 48.4% (32.4–64.5%) and 21.0% (9.9–32.1%), respectively. The prevalence of T2DM was high with inadequate awareness, treatment and control of T2DM in China rural areas. Healthy lifestyles should be advocated to reduce prevalence and improve awareness, treatment, and control of T2DM in Chinese rural residents. PMID:27510966

  1. Prevalence, awareness, treatment, control of type 2 diabetes mellitus and risk factors in Chinese rural population: the RuralDiab study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaotian; Li, Yuqian; Li, Linlin; Zhang, Luning; Ren, Yongcheng; Zhou, Hao; Cui, Lingling; Mao, Zhenxing; Hu, Dongsheng; Wang, Chongjian

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and to explore potential risk factors in rural areas of China. A total of 16413 individuals aged 18-74 years in rural districts were recruited from the Rural Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (RuralDiab) study for the epidemiological research. Meanwhile, a meta-analysis including 7 published studies was conducted to validate the result of the cross-sectional study. The rates of crude and age-standardized prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM were 12.19%, 67.00%, 62.35%, 22.20% and 6.98%, 60.11%, 54.85%, 18.77%, respectively. The prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM displayed increased trends with age (Ptrend < 0.01) and were strongly associated with education, drinking, more vegetable and fruit intake, physical activity, family history of diabetes, body mass index (BMI). The results of this meta-analysis showed that the pooled prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM in China countryside were 7.3% (5.3-9.4%), 57.3% (36.9-77.6%), 48.4% (32.4-64.5%) and 21.0% (9.9-32.1%), respectively. The prevalence of T2DM was high with inadequate awareness, treatment and control of T2DM in China rural areas. Healthy lifestyles should be advocated to reduce prevalence and improve awareness, treatment, and control of T2DM in Chinese rural residents. PMID:27510966

  2. Antenatal anthelmintic treatment, birthweight, and infant survival in rural Nepal.

    PubMed

    Christian, Parul; Khatry, Subarna K; West, Keith P

    Anthelmintic treatment, which is recommended during pregnancy in areas where there is a high rate of anaemia, needs further investigation. We examined prospectively the association between anthelmintic treatment and maternal anaemia, birthweight, and infant mortality in a study of prenatal supplements, in which women received albendazole twice during pregnancy. Women given albendazole in the second trimester of pregnancy had a lower rate of severe anaemia during the third trimester. Birthweight of infants of women who had received two doses of albendazole rose by 59 g (95% CI 19-98), and infant mortality at 6 months fell by 41% (RR 0.59; 95% CI 0.43-0.82). Antenatal anthelmintics could be effective in reducing maternal anaemia and improving birthweight and infant survival in hookworm-endemic regions. PMID:15364190

  3. Rural-Urban Differences in Household Treatment-Seeking Behaviour for Suspected Malaria in Children at Bata District, Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Romay-Barja, Maria; Jarrin, Inma; Ncogo, Policarpo; Nseng, Gloria; Sagrado, Maria Jose; Santana-Morales, Maria A.; Aparcio, Pilar; Valladares, Basilio; Riloha, Matilde; Benito, Agustin

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five years old in Equatorial Guinea. However, little is known about the community management of malaria and treatment-seeking patterns. We aimed to assess symptoms of children with reported malaria and treatment-seeking behaviour of their caretakers in rural and urban areas in the Bata District. Methodology A cross-sectional study was conducted in the district of Bata and 440 houses were selected from 18 rural villages and 26 urban neighbourhoods. Differences between rural and urban caregivers and children with reported malaria were assessed through the chi-squared test for independence of categorical variables and the t-Student or the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test for normally or not-normally distributed continuous variables, respectively. Results Differences between rural and urban households were observed in caregiver treatment-seeking patterns. Fever was the main symptom associated with malaria in both areas. Malaria was treated first at home, particularly in rural areas. The second step was to seek treatment outside the home, mainly at hospital and Health Centre for rural households and at hospital and private clinic for urban ones. Artemether monotherapy was the antimalarial treatment prescribed most often. Households waited for more than 24 hours before seeking treatment outside and delays were longest in rural areas. The total cost of treatment was higher in urban than in rural areas in Bata. Conclusions The delays in seeking treatment, the type of malaria therapy received and the cost of treatment are the principal problems found in Bata District. Important steps for reducing malaria morbidity and mortality in this area are to provide sufficient supplies of effective antimalarial drugs and to improve malaria treatment skills in households and in both public and private sectors. PMID:26284683

  4. AIDS (image)

    MedlinePlus

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medication can suppress symptoms. ...

  5. Prevention, control and treatment of HIV-AIDS among injecting drug use in Bandung, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Alisjahbana, Bachti; Susanto, Herman; Roesli, Rully; Yusuf, Hadi; Hinduan, Zahrotur; Mase, Johannes C; Surahman, Eri; van der Ven, Andre

    2009-07-01

    Indonesia is facing a growing HIV-epidemic that in many areas is driven by injecting drug use (IDU). IDUs underutilize health services, partly because of legal aspects which also cause that many are held in prison, where further HIV- transmission may take place. Most HIV-infected patients present with advanced HIV-AIDS and many deaths before starting antiretroviral treatment. The growing HIV-epidemic in Indonesia has socio-economical implications for individual patients as well as for the health system and for society. IMPACT, a multidisciplinary university-based program in Bandung, West-Java, integrates HIV-prevention and treatment, combining research and implementation. Biomedical, public health and sociobehavioral expertise is used for educational programs for adolescents; scaling-up HIV-testing, harm reduction strategies and care for HIV/AIDS in hospital, community and prison; and institutional as well as individual capacity building related to IDU and HIV/AIDS. It is expected that these activities can make a significant contribution to control of HIV-AIDS in the context of injecting drug use in West-Java and Indonesia as a whole. PMID:19920301

  6. Antiretroviral Drugs-Loaded Nanoparticles Fabricated by Dispersion Polymerization with Potential for HIV/AIDS Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ogunwuyi, Oluwaseun; Kumari, Namita; Smith, Kahli A.; Bolshakov, Oleg; Adesina, Simeon; Gugssa, Ayele; Anderson, Winston A.; Nekhai, Sergei; Akala, Emmanuel O.

    2016-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral (ARV) therapy (HAART) for chronic suppression of HIV replication has revolutionized the treatment of HIV/AIDS. HAART is no panacea; treatments must be maintained for life. Although great progress has been made in ARV therapy, HIV continues to replicate in anatomical and intracellular sites where ARV drugs have restricted access. Nanotechnology has been considered a platform to circumvent some of the challenges in HIV/AIDS treatment. Dispersion polymerization was used to fabricate two types (PMM and ECA) of polymeric nanoparticles, and each was successfully loaded with four ARV drugs (zidovudine, lamivudine, nevirapine, and raltegravir), followed by physicochemical characterization: scanning electron microscope, particle size, zeta potential, drug loading, and in vitro availability. These nanoparticles efficiently inhibited HIV-1 infection in CEM T cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells; they hold promise for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. The ARV-loaded nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol on the corona may facilitate tethering ligands for targeting specific receptors expressed on the cells of HIV reservoirs. PMID:27013886

  7. Antiretroviral Drugs-Loaded Nanoparticles Fabricated by Dispersion Polymerization with Potential for HIV/AIDS Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ogunwuyi, Oluwaseun; Kumari, Namita; Smith, Kahli A; Bolshakov, Oleg; Adesina, Simeon; Gugssa, Ayele; Anderson, Winston A; Nekhai, Sergei; Akala, Emmanuel O

    2016-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral (ARV) therapy (HAART) for chronic suppression of HIV replication has revolutionized the treatment of HIV/AIDS. HAART is no panacea; treatments must be maintained for life. Although great progress has been made in ARV therapy, HIV continues to replicate in anatomical and intracellular sites where ARV drugs have restricted access. Nanotechnology has been considered a platform to circumvent some of the challenges in HIV/AIDS treatment. Dispersion polymerization was used to fabricate two types (PMM and ECA) of polymeric nanoparticles, and each was successfully loaded with four ARV drugs (zidovudine, lamivudine, nevirapine, and raltegravir), followed by physicochemical characterization: scanning electron microscope, particle size, zeta potential, drug loading, and in vitro availability. These nanoparticles efficiently inhibited HIV-1 infection in CEM T cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells; they hold promise for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. The ARV-loaded nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol on the corona may facilitate tethering ligands for targeting specific receptors expressed on the cells of HIV reservoirs. PMID:27013886

  8. Early Commitment on Financial Aid and College Decision Making of Poor Students: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Rural China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chengfang; Zhang, Linxiu; Luo, Renfu; Wang, Xiaobing; Rozelle, Scott; Sharbono, Brian; Adams, Jennifer; Shi, Yaojiang; Yue, Ai; Li, Hongbin; Glauben, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Many educational systems have struggled with the question about how best to give out financial aid. In particular, if students do not know the amount of financial aid that they can receive before they make a decision about where to go to college and what major to study, it may distort their decision. This study utilizes an experiment (implemented…

  9. Design, Development, and Evaluation of Visual Aids for Communicating Prescription Drug Instructions to Nonliterate Patients in Rural Cameroon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngoh, Lucy N.; Shepherd, Marvin D.

    1997-01-01

    Culturally sensitive visual aids designed to help convey drug information to nonliterate female adults requiring antibiotics were developed. Researchers conceptualized the messages, and a local artist produced the visual aids. Comprehension and compliance with prescription instructions were evaluated (N=78). Results and practical implications are…

  10. Treatment with phenobarbital and monitoring of epileptic patients in rural Mali.

    PubMed Central

    Nimaga, K.; Desplats, D.; Doumbo, O.; Farnarier, G.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of phenobarbital treatment for epileptic patients in rural Mali. METHODS: Epileptic patients were treated at home with phenobarbital at daily dosages ranging from 50 mg for children to 200 mg for adults and their condition was monitored. Advice was given to patients, their families, and the village authorities in order to achieve compliance. An uninterrupted supply of generic phenobarbital was provided and a rural physician made two follow-up visits to each village to ensure that the drug was taken in the correct doses. The physician gave information to the population, distributed the phenobarbital in sufficient quantities to cover the periods between visits, and monitored the patients' responses to treatment. During the first year the physician visited the patients every two months. The frequency of visits was subsequently reduced to once every four months. FINDINGS: In the six months preceding treatment the average rate of seizures among patients exceeded four per month. After a year of treatment, 80.2% of the patients experienced no seizures for at least five months. A total of 15.7% of patients experienced a reduction in seizures. In many cases no further seizures occurred and there were improvements in physical health, mental health and social status. There were very few side-effects and no cases of poisoning were reported. The cost of treatment per patient per year was 7 US dollars for generic phenobarbital and 8.4 US dollars for logistics. CONCLUSION: Low doses of phenobarbital were very effective against epilepsy. However, there is an urgent need for programmes involving increased numbers of physicians in rural areas and, at the national level, for the inclusion of epilepsy treatment in the activities of health care facilities. Internationally, an epilepsy control programme providing free treatment should be developed. PMID:12163916

  11. Application of psyllium husk as coagulant and coagulant aid in semi-aerobic landfill leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamadani, Yasir A J; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian; Umar, Muhammad; Bashir, Mohammed J K; Adlan, Mohd Nordin

    2011-06-15

    Landfill leachate is a heavily polluted and a likely hazardous liquid that is produced as a result of water infiltration through solid wastes generated industrially and domestically. This study investigates the potential of using psyllium husk as coagulant and coagulant aid for the treatment of landfill leachate. Psyllium husk has been tested as primary coagulant and as coagulant aid with poly-aluminum chloride (PACl) and aluminum sulfate (alum). As primary coagulant, the optimum dosage and pH for PACl were 7.2 and 7.5 g/L, respectively, with removal efficiencies of 55, 80 and 95% for COD, color and TSS, respectively. For alum, the optimum conditions were 11 g/L alum dosage and pH 6.5 with removal efficiencies of 58, 79 and 78% for COD, color and TSS, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of COD, color and TSS were 64, 90 and 96%, respectively, when psyllium husk was used as coagulant aid with PACl. Based on the results, psyllium husk was found to be more effective as coagulant aid with PACl in the removal of COD, color and TSS as compared to alum. Zeta potential test was carried out for leachate, PACl, alum and psyllium husk before and after running the jar test to enhance the results of the jar test experiments. PMID:21507572

  12. Substance Use Disorders and HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment Intervention: Research and Practice Considerations

    PubMed Central

    CAMPBELL, AIMEE N. C.; TROSS, SUSAN; CALSYN, DONALD A.

    2013-01-01

    Social workers are often on the front lines of the HIV/AIDS epidemic – delivering prevention education and interventions, offering or linking individuals to HIV testing, and working to improve treatment access, retention, and adherence, especially among vulnerable populations. Individuals with substance use disorders face additional challenges to reducing sexual and drug risk behaviors, as well as barriers to testing, treatment, and antiretroviral therapy adherence. This paper presents current data on HIV transmission and research evidence on prevention and intervention with substance abusers and highlights how individual social workers can take advantage of this knowledge in practice and through adoption and implementation within organizations. PMID:23731423

  13. Barriers to Diagnosis and Treatment of Depression: Voices from a Rural African-American Faith Community

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Keneshia; Greer-Williams, Nancy; Willis, Nathaniel; Hartwig, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Mental health disparities exist for rural African-Americans regarding the early detection of depression and its effective treatment. Disparities that are evident in rural communities include limited mental health resources and the stigma of depression. The faith community has a long-standing history of being the initial source of help to those who experience depression. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine how rural African-American faith communities view the barriers to diagnosis and treatment of depression. A convenience sample of 24 persons (N = 24) participated in focus groups and interviews. Four internal barriers were identified: personal business, “mind-set,” “denial,” and “put on a front.” Additionally, four external barriers were identified: “spiritual beliefs,” “lack of medical resources,” “lack of education about depression,” and “stigma.” The identified barriers supported the results from previous studies, but they also highlighted other less acknowledged barriers. In conclusion, interventions are needed to overcome these barriers in order to eliminate the depression disparities experienced by this population. PMID:24218871

  14. The Effects of HIV/AIDS Scourge on Production and Income among Rural Households in Adamawa State of Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    I. B., Iya; G.S., Purokayo; Yusuf, Gabdo

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates the determinants and the impact of HIV/AIDS on households in Adamawa State. 120 respondents affected with HIV/AIDS were selected for interview using simple random sampling techniques. Both primary and secondary data were used in its analysis to determine the impact of the disease on household’s income. The data collected were analyzed using descriptive analytical techniques and a logistic regression model was employed to estimate the likelihood that a household witnessed a fall in income as a result of the disease. The paper revealed that HIV/AIDS had an adverse impact on household’s productivity, income, saving and capital formation. The paper, therefore recommends an intensive Aids education programme and Government at all level as well as NGO’s should endeavor to provide adequate HIV testing kits, medication and free counseling services to enable the households determine their HIV status. PMID:22980122

  15. Lifetime incidences of traumatic events and mental health among children affected by HIV/AIDS in rural China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Barnett, Douglas; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Xiuyun; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Hong, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Naar-King, Sylvie; Stanton, Bonita

    2009-09-01

    Cross-sectional data were gathered from 1,625 children (M age = 12.85, SD = 2.21) which included 755 AIDS orphans, 466 vulnerable children, and 404 comparison children. Participants completed self-report measures of exposure to traumatic events, and psychosocial adjustment including behavior problems, depression, self-esteem, and future orientation. AIDS orphans and vulnerable children reported experiencing a higher total occurrence, density, duration, initial impact and lasting impact of traumatic events compared to comparison children. Scores reflecting adjustment were lower among orphans and vulnerable children than among comparison children. Both orphan status and traumatic events contributed unique variance in the expected direction to the prediction of psychosocial adjustment. The data in the current study suggested that children affected by HIV/AIDS in China are exposed to more trauma and suffer more adjustment problems than children who do not experience HIV/AIDS in their families. PMID:20183657

  16. Developing and Implementing Monitoring and Evaluation Methods in the New Era of Expanded Care and Treatment of HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, R. Cameron; Bicego, George; Marconi, Katherine; Bessinger, Ruth; van Praag, Eric; Noriega-Minichiello, Shanti; Pappas, Gregory; Fronczak, Nancy; Peersman, Greet; Fiorentino, Renee K.; Rugg, Deborah; Novak, John

    2004-01-01

    The sharp rise in the HIV/AIDS burden worldwide has elicited calls for increased efforts to combat the spread and impact of HIV/AIDS. Efforts must continue with the aim to decrease new infections. At the same time, care and treatment services for those already infected can lead to longer, productive lives, thereby minimizing negative effects on…

  17. Geriatric consultation can aid in complex treatment decisions for elderly cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schiphorst, A H W; Ten Bokkel Huinink, D; Breumelhof, R; Burgmans, J P J; Pronk, A; Hamaker, M E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment decisions for elderly cancer patients can be challenging. A geriatric assessment may identify unknown medical conditions, give insight on patients' ability to tolerate treatment and guide treatment decisions. Our aim was to study the value of a geriatric consultation in oncological decision-making. Data on cancer patients referred for geriatric consultation for clinical optimisation or due to uncertainty regarding their optimal treatment strategy were prospectively analysed. Outcome of geriatric evaluations, non-oncological interventions and suggested adaptations of oncological treatment proposals were evaluated. Seventy-two patients were referred for consultation, over half of which in a curative treatment setting. Prevalence of geriatric syndromes was 93%, previously undiagnosed conditions were identified in 49% of patients and non-oncological interventions were initiated in 56%. Time was spent discussing patients' priorities (53% of consultations), expectations on treatment (50%) and advance care planning (14%). For 82% of patients, suggestions were made regarding the optimal treatment decision: a more intensive treatment was recommended in 39%, a less intensive therapy for 42% and in 19% only supportive care was suggested. The results demonstrate that a geriatric consultation can aid in complex treatment decisions and may allow for a reduction in over- and undertreatment of elderly cancer patients. PMID:26211484

  18. Poor response to tuberculosis treatment with regimens without rifampicin in immunosuppressed AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    O'Donnel, M M; Souza Carvalho, S; Gadelha, A J; Morgado, M G; Galhardo, M C G; Lourenço, M C; Rolla, V C

    2002-12-01

    A prospective study was conducted on 79 advanced immunosuppressed AIDS patients from 1997 to 1999, during which nine cases of tuberculosis (TB) were diagnosed. The main clinical and laboratory characteristics and the response to TB treatment were reviewed. The clinical manifestations of TB were: pulmonary (six cases), extrapulmonary (two cases) and disseminated (one case). These patients were being treated with highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) and were not responding. In three cases an optional regimen without rifampicin (RMP) was indicated to maintain HAART during TB treatment. A clinical response to TB treatment (disappearance of fever) was observed in 6/9 patients during a mean of 73 days (SD = 96). The three unresponsive patients were those treated without RMP. A switch to TB regimens containing RMP was proposed and successful. In our study, though it was limited by a small sample size, the response to TB regimens without rifampin was poor in immunosupressed patients failing HAART. PMID:12585969

  19. Study of Enteromorpha polysaccharides as a new-style coagulant aid in dye wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan; Li, Qian; Dong, Hongyu; Yan, Han

    2014-03-15

    Enteromorpha is one of the common fouling green algae, which has brought serious environmental problems in past years. This study was aimed to apply it in water treatment process. Enteromorpha polysaccharides (Ep) were used as a new-style coagulant aid to assess its effect on coagulation behavior and floc characteristics. Color removal was used to evaluate coagulation effects and floc properties were investigated by Photometric Dispersion Analyzer (PDA). Results showed that when Ep was used in combination with aluminum chloride (AC), color removal could be apparently improved, and the optimal solution pH ranged 6.0-8.0. The growth rate and average size of flocs formed by AC-Ep were larger than those by AC in steady-state after floc growth phase, and meanwhile the distribution of floc size had a wider range. Besides, floc recoverability could be significantly improved when Ep was used as coagulant aid. PMID:24528717

  20. Persistent HIV-related stigma in rural Uganda during a period of increasing HIV incidence despite treatment expansion

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Brian T.; Weiser, Sheri D.; Boum, Yap; Siedner, Mark J.; Mocello, A. Rain; Haberer, Jessica E.; Hunt, Peter W.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Bangsberg, David R.; Tsai, Alexander C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Program implementers have argued that the increasing availability of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) will reduce the stigma of HIV. We analyzed data from Uganda to assess how HIV-related stigma has changed during a period of ART expansion. Design Serial cross-sectional surveys. Methods We analyzed data from the Uganda AIDS Rural Treatment Outcomes (UARTO) study during 2007-2012 to estimate trends in internalized stigma among people living with HIV (PLHIV) at the time of treatment initiation. We analyzed data from the Uganda Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) from 2006 and 2011 to estimate trends in stigmatizing attitudes and anticipated stigma in the general population. We fitted regression models adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, with year of data collection as the primary explanatory variable. Results We estimated an upward trend in internalized stigma among PLHIV presenting for treatment initiation (adjusted b=0.18; 95% CI, 0.06 to 0.30). In the general population, the odds of reporting anticipated stigma were greater in 2011 compared to 2006 (adjusted OR=1.80; 95% CI, 1.51 to 2.13), despite an apparent decline in stigmatizing attitudes (adjusted OR=0.62; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.74). Conclusions Internalized stigma has increased over time among PLHIV in the setting of worsening anticipated stigma in the general population. Further study is needed to better understand the reasons for increasing HIV-related stigma in Uganda and its impact on HIV prevention efforts. PMID:25268886

  1. Occurrence and removal of pharmaceutical and hormone contaminants in rural wastewater treatment lagoons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolin; Zheng, Wei; Kelly, Walton R

    2013-02-15

    Rural communities in the United States usually use a series of aerated lagoons to treat domestic wastewater. Effluents from these systems are typically discharged to receiving watersheds, which leads to a potential transfer of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and steroid hormones from sanitary sewage to the environment. The primary objectives of this study are to identify and quantify PPCPs and steroid hormones in rural sewage treatment lagoons, to investigate the removal efficiency of these emerging contaminants in the treatment processes, and to monitor their occurrence in the surrounding watershed. In this study, a method has been developed to analyze thirteen PPCPs and eight steroid hormones in various water samples. Among all of the PPCPs considered, ten chemicals were detected in sewage influents, lagoon waters of different treatment stages, or effluents at concentrations in the ng/L to low μg/L range. Three hormones were observed in the influents at total concentrations as high as 164 ng/L, but no hormone residues were detected in the effluents. This indicates that the aerated lagoons may effectively remove hormone contaminants. With the exception of carbamazepine, removal rates for the other detected PPCPs were relatively high in the range of 88 to 100% in September with average air temperature equal to 20 °C. However, the removal efficiency of nine PPCPs in the rural wastewater treatment plant exhibited large temporal variability. The concentrations of PPCPs in the lagoon waters and effluents collected in November, with average air temperature equal to 4.4 °C, were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those samples collected in September. Occurrence of these PPCP contaminants in the surrounding watershed was also monitored. The discharge of effluents significantly elevated the PPCP concentrations in the receiving creek and increased their occurrence in the adjacent river. PMID:23314119

  2. [Analysis of Microbial Community in the Membrane Bio-Reactor (MBR) Rural Sewage Treatment System].

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiao; Cui, Bing-jian; Jin, De-cai; Wu, Shang-hua; Yang, Bo; Deng, Ye; Zhuang, Guo-qiang; Zhuang, Xu-liang

    2015-09-01

    Uncontrolled release and arbitrary irrigation reuse of rural wastewater may lead to water pollution, and the microbial pathogens could threaten the safety of freshwater resources and public health. To understand the microbial community structure of rural wastewater and provide the theory for microbial risk assessment of wastewater irrigation, microbial community diversities in the Membrane Bio-Reactor (MBR) process for rural wastewater treatment was studied by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and 16S rDNA gene clone library. Meanwhile, changes of Arcobacter spp. and total bacteria before and after treatment were detected through real-time quantitative PCR. The clone library results showed that there were 73 positive clones included Proteobacteria (91. 80%), Firmicutes (2. 70%), Bacteroidetes (1. 40%), and uncultured bacteria (4. 10%) in the untreated wastewater. The typical pathogenic genus Arcobacter belonging to e-Proteobacteria was the dominant component of the library, accounting for 68. 5% of all clones. The main groups and their abundance in different treatments were significantly distinct. The highest values of species abundance (S), Shannon-Wiener (H) and Evenness (E) were observed in the adjusting tank, which were 43. 0, 3. 56 and 0. 95, respectively. The real-time quantitative PCR results showed that the copy number of Arcobacter spp. was (1. 09 ± 0. 064 0) x 10(11) copies.L-1 in the untreated sewage, which was consistent with the result of 16S rDNA gene clone library. Compared to untreated wastewater, bacterial copy number in the treated effluent decreased 100 to 1 000 times, respectively, suggesting that MBR treatment system could remove the microbial quantity in such scale. In the recycled water, the physicochemical parameters and indicator bacteria met the water quality standard of farmland irrigation. However, further research is needed to estimate the potential health risks caused by residual pathogenic microorganisms in

  3. Risk and protective factors for depression symptoms among children affected by HIV/AIDS in rural China: a structural equation modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Xiaoming; Barnett, Douglas; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Stanton, Bonita

    2012-05-01

    Previous research has revealed a negative impact of orphanhood and HIV-related stigma on the psychological well-being of children affected by HIV/AIDS. Little is known about psychological protective factors that can mitigate the effect of orphanhood and HIV-related stigma on psychological well-being. This research examines the relationships among several risk and protective factors for depression symptoms using structural equation modeling. Cross-sectional data were collected from 755 AIDS orphans and 466 children of HIV-positive parents aged 6-18 years in 2006-2007 in rural central China. Participants reported their experiences of traumatic events, perceived HIV-related stigma, perceived social support, future orientation, trusting relationships with current caregivers, and depression symptoms. We found that the experience of traumatic events and HIV-related stigma had a direct contributory effect on depression among children affected by HIV/AIDS. Trusting relationships together with future orientation and perceived social support mediated the effects of traumatic events and HIV-related stigma on depression. The final model demonstrated a dynamic interplay among future orientation, perceived social support and trusting relationships. Trusting relationships was the most proximate protective factor for depression. Perceived social support and future orientation were positively related to trusting relationships. We conclude that perceived social support, trusting relationships, and future orientation offer multiple levels of protection that can mitigate the effect of traumatic events and HIV-related stigma on depression. Trusting relationships with caregivers provides the most immediate source of psychological support. Future prevention interventions seeking to improve psychological well-being among children affected by HIV/AIDS should attend to these factors. PMID:22405505

  4. Risk and Protective Factors for Depression Symptoms among Children Affected by HIV/AIDS in Rural China: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Li, Xiaoming; Barnett, Douglas; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Stanton, Bonita

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has revealed a negative impact of orphanhood and HIV-related stigma on the psychological well-being of children affected by HIV/AIDS. Little is known about psychological protective factors that can mitigate the effect of orphanhood and HIV-related stigma on psychological well-being. This research examines the relationships among several risk and protective factors for depression symptoms using structural equation modeling. Cross-sectional data were collected from 755 AIDS orphans and 466 children of HIV-positive parents aged 6–18 years in 2006–2007 in rural central China. Participants reported their experiences of traumatic events, perceived HIV-related stigma, perceived social support, future orientation, trusting relationships with current caregivers, and depression symptoms. We found that the experience of traumatic events and HIV-related stigma had a direct contributory effect on depression among children affected by HIV/AIDS. Trusting relationships together with future orientation and perceived social support mediated the effects of traumatic events and HIV-related stigma on depression. The final model demonstrated a dynamic interplay among future orientation, perceived social support and trusting relationships. Trusting relationships was the most proximate protective factor for depression. Perceived social support and future orientation were positively related to trusting relationships. We conclude that perceived social support, trusting relationships, and future orientation offer multiple levels of protection that can mitigate the effect of traumatic events and HIV-related stigma on depression. Trusting relationships with caregivers provides the most immediate source of psychological support. Future prevention interventions seeking to improve psychological well-being among children affected by HIV/AIDS should attend to these factors. PMID:22405505

  5. Treatment counselor's attitudes about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered clients: urban vs. rural settings.

    PubMed

    Eliason, Michele J; Hughes, Tonda

    2004-03-01

    Treatment counselors' attitudes about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) clients can have important effects on these client's recovery. There is a common, but unexamined, perception that LGBT people are more accepted in urban areas (and thus urban treatment programs) and that urban counselors have greater knowledge of the needs of the LGBT community. This study examined the attitudes and knowledge of treatment counselors from two geographic regions: urban Chicago (n = 109) and rural Iowa (n = 242) in 2000. The instrument assessed demographic characteristics, knowledge, and experiences working with LGBT clients, and attitudes about LGBT clients (an adaptation of Herek's Attititudes about Lesbians and Gays rating scale). Only a few demographic differences between the urban and rural counselors were identified. Chicago counselors were more racially diverse and more likely to have grown up in an urban area than the Iowa counselors. The Iowa counselors had slightly higher levels of formal education. Although the Chicago providers reported having considerably more contact with LGBT clients and more formal and continuing education about LGBT people, they did not have more positive attitudes or report more knowledge of specific LGBT issues that might influence alcohol and drug treatment. Overall, both Chicago and Iowa counselors had very little formal education regarding the needs of LGBT clients, and nearly half reported negative or ambivalent attitudes. Many of the counselors lacked knowledge about legal issues such as domestic partnership and power of attorney, the concepts of domestic partnership and internalized homophobia, and issues related to family of origin and current family. PMID:15115216

  6. CONCENTRATION AND DRUG PRICES IN THE RETAIL MARKET FOR MALARIA TREATMENT IN RURAL TANZANIA

    PubMed Central

    GOODMAN, CATHERINE; KACHUR, S. PATRICK; ABDULLA, SALIM; BLOLAND, PETER; MILLS, ANNE

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The impact of market concentration has been little studied in markets for ambulatory care in the developing world, where the retail sector often accounts for a high proportion of treatments. This study begins to address this gap through an analysis of the consumer market for malaria treatment in rural areas of three districts in Tanzania. We developed methods for investigating market definition, sales volumes and concentration, and used these to explore the relationship between antimalarial retail prices and competition. The market was strongly geographically segmented and highly concentrated in terms of antimalarial sales. Antimalarial prices were positively associated with market concentration. High antimalarial prices were likely to be an important factor in the low proportion of care seekers obtaining appropriate treatment. Retail sector distribution of subsidised antimalarials has been proposed to increase the coverage of effective treatment, but this analysis indicates that local market power may prevent such subsidies from being passed on to rural customers. Policymakers should consider the potential to maintain lower retail prices by decreasing concentration among antimalarial providers and recommending retail price levels. PMID:19301420

  7. Perceptions of Women Living with AIDS in Rural India Related to the Engagement of HIV-Trained Accredited Social Health Activists for Care and Support

    PubMed Central

    NYAMATHI, ADELINE M.; WILLIAM, RAVI RAJ; GANGULY, KALYAN K.; SINHA, SANJEEV; HERAVIAN, ANISA; ALBARRÁN, CYNTHIA R.; THOMAS, ALEXANDRA; GREENGOLD, BARBARA; EKSTRAND, MARIA; RAMAKRISHNA, PADMA; RAO, PANTANGI RAMA

    2011-01-01

    A community-based participatory research study was conducted using focus groups with 39 women living with AIDS (WLA) in the rural setting of Andhra Pradesh, India. In addition, three nurses, two physicians, and five reproductive health accredited social health activists (ASHAs) took part in focus groups. The WLA offered insight into the benefits of HIV-trained ASHAs including emotional support, assistance with travel to health care providers and antiretroviral therapy medication adherence. Health care providers also identified benefits of using HIV-trained ASHAs and suggested modalities for how to train these individuals. These findings will contribute to the design of a future program of care involving HIV-trained ASHAs. PMID:21331322

  8. Hepatotoxicity during Treatment for Tuberculosis in People Living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Araújo-Mariz, Carolline; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa; Acioli-Santos, Bartolomeu; Maruza, Magda; Montarroyos, Ulisses Ramos; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar; Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros; de Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima P. Militão

    2016-01-01

    Hepatotoxicity is frequently reported as an adverse reaction during the treatment of tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of hepatotoxicity and to identify predictive factors for developing hepatotoxicity after people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) start treatment for tuberculosis. This was a prospective cohort study with PLWHA who were monitored during the first 60 days of tuberculosis treatment in Pernambuco, Brazil. Hepatotoxicity was considered increased levels of aminotransferase, namely those that rose to three times higher than the level before initiating tuberculosis treatment, these levels being associated with symptoms of hepatitis. We conducted a multivariate logistic regression analysis and the magnitude of the associations was expressed by the odds ratio with a confidence interval of 95%. Hepatotoxicity was observed in 53 (30.6%) of the 173 patients who started tuberculosis treatment. The final multivariate logistic regression model demonstrated that the use of fluconazole, malnutrition and the subject being classified as a phenotypically slow acetylator increased the risk of hepatotoxicity significantly. The incidence of hepatotoxicity during treatment for tuberculosis in PLWHA was high. Those classified as phenotypically slow acetylators and as malnourished should be targeted for specific care to reduce the risk of hepatotoxicity during treatment for tuberculosis. The use of fluconazole should be avoided during tuberculosis treatment in PLWHA. PMID:27332812

  9. An Electronic Medical Record system to support HIV treatment in rural Haiti.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Darius; Farmer, Paul; Nevil, Patrice; Mukherjee, Joia S; Leandre, Fernet; Fraser, Hamish S F

    2003-01-01

    HIV-AIDS has become the world's leading infectious cause of adult deaths. Approximately 5% of Haiti's adult population is infected with HIV, making it the most affected nation in the western hemisphere[1]. The non-governmental organization Zanmi Lasante (ZL) launched an innovative program 5 years ago to treat HIV patients in the very impoverished central plateau with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART)[1]. ZL currently follows more than 4000 HIV-positive patients, over 10% of whom are already on HAART, and was recently awarded funds from the Haitian grant from the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Expanding treatment in a region with few doctors and virtually no roads, electricity, or electronic communication is a major challenge requiring careful coordination of clinical care, investigations and drug supplies. We describe a prototype Electronic Medical Record system to support treatment of HIV and tuberculosis in remote and impoverished areas. PMID:14728383

  10. [HIV-AIDS: ethics in healthcare, research, and access to treatments].

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    Violence and gravity cannot be ignored when considering HIV and AIDS challenges. However, coping with this pandemic disease caused us to build up and experience new ways of solidarity that have transformed our views of medical care and public health. The few achievements of these years throw a new light on the figure of the ill person. They brought new references allowing a different understanding of the political stakes of public health. Partnership or even therapeutic alliance are now a framework to the understanding of respect, solidarity and equity. New viewpoints exist on the health care relationship. Our achievements show at first injustice in the access of treatments at the international level. They make clear our moral responsibilities toward every person that require a treatment. This idea should be emphasized when applied on the most vulnerable communities. The most urgent challenges that remain today are extreme precariousness situations, treatment access conditions, information, and quality of life. PMID:12942447

  11. Perception of Exercise Lifestyle as a Valid Tool for Prevention and Treatment of Depression in Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Karen; Lee, Jenny Seung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examines perception of exercise lifestyle prescription as a valid treatment for depression among rural patients at a primary care clinic in Texas. Methods The researchers created a depression and exercise survey completed by 104 patients ages 18 and up living in central, economically disadvantaged rural Texas. Logistic regression was used to analyze data obtained. Results There was a significant difference (p = 0.01) in perception of exercise as a valid treatment for depression as a function of demographic variables, however not as a function of exercise duration (p = 0.12) in the rural primary care clinic’s patients. Even though it was not a statistically significant finding, there was a positive correlation found between the amount of exercise engaged in per day and the likelihood to have a positive perception of exercise prescription as a tool in depression prevention and treatment. Conclusion Participants between ages 40 to 59 years old, female, and of Hispanic ethnicity independently are most likely to perceive exercise lifestyle as a valid treatment for depression. This is the first study to look specifically at patient perception of exercise as a valid treatment tool for depression not only in rural areas, but also in the nation. Findings from this pilot study may help healthcare service providers learn how to best incorporate exercise prescription into depression prevention and treatment in rural areas, leading to reducing depression epidemics. PMID:26770890

  12. The Impact of Visual Aids and Enhanced Training on the Delivery of Positive Health, Dignity, and Prevention Messages to Adult Patients Living with HIV in Rural North Central Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Audet, Carolyn M.; Gutin, Sarah A.; Blevins, Meridith; Chiau, Elvino; Alvim, Fernanda; Jose, Eurico; Vaz, Lara M. E.; Shepherd, Bryan E; Dawson Rose, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Positive health, dignity, and prevention (PHDP) interventions target people living with HIV and AIDS (PLHIV) to promote well-being and prevent onward transmission. Concern that increased life expectancy and improved well-being would lead to increased risky sexual behaviour and subsequent HIV transmission motivated researchers to test novel strategies to support treatment adherence, encourage safer sex, STI treatment and partner testing, prevention of mother to child transmission, and support uptake of family planning. Methods We assessed the number and type of PHDP messages delivered to PLHIV before and after the implementation of an educational intervention for health providers combined with the distribution of visual job aids and monthly technical assistance. Results From April 21, 2013 to March 20, 2014, we documented 54,731 clinical encounters at three rural health centres in Zambézia province, Mozambique from 9,248 unique patients. The percentage of patients who received all seven PHDP messages during their last three visits was 1.9% pre-intervention vs. 13.6% post- intervention (p=<0.001). Younger patients (25 years vs. 35) and those with a recent HIV diagnosis (two weeks vs. two years) had higher odds of receiving any PHDP message (Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.22 and 2.79, respectively). Patients >59 days late collecting medications were not more likely to receive adherence messages than adherent patients (p=0.17). Discussion Targeting HIV prevention efforts to PLHIV is an effective HIV prevention approach to eliminate HIV transmission. Despite intensive training and support, PHDP message delivery remained unacceptably low in rural Mozambique. Patients at high risk for treatment abandonment were not more likely to be counselled about adherence and support measures, something that needs to be addressed. Conclusions We need to develop novel strategies to motivate health care providers to deliver these messages more consistently to all patients and develop

  13. Evaluation of disease patterns, treatment and prognosis of tuberculosis in AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Atomiya, Angela Naomi; Uip, David Emerson; Leite, Olavo Henrique Munhoz

    2002-02-01

    Patterns of disease, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of tuberculosis in 100 patients co-infected with AIDS at Casa da AIDS clinic was studied. Demographic characteristics were as follows: 76 male patients, 24 female patients, 67 caucasian, average 35.8 years-old (SD +/- 8.5). Sexual transmission of HIV was reported in 68 patients. Pulmonary tuberculosis was seen in 40 patients, extrapulmonary in 11, and combined in 49 patients. In 63 patients, TCD(4)(+) counts were below 200/mm(3) when tuberculosis was diagnosed. Fifty-five patients had their diagnoses confirmed by bacteriological identification of Mycobacterium; either through direct observation and/or culture. Tuberculosis was treated with rifampin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide in 60 patients, reinforced treatment in 14 and alternative treatment in the other 13 patients. Tuberculosis therapy lasted up to 9 months in 66% of the patients. Fifty-four patients were treated with a two-drug antiretroviral regimen and the remaining 46 patients received a triple regimen, which included a protease inhibitor. Among the latter, 35 patients were co-treated with rifampin. The occurrence of hepatic liver enzyme abnormalities was statistically related to alternative antiretroviral regimens (p = 0.01) and to the co-administration of rifampin and protease inhibitor (p = 0.019). Clinical resolution of tuberculosis was obtained in 74 patients. Twelve patients died during tuberculosis treatment. Resolution of tuberculosis was statistically significant related to antituberculosis treatment adherence (p = 0.001). The risk of no response to the treatment was 1.84 times more frequent among patients treated with alternative regimens regardless of the duration of the therapy. We conclude that the characteristics of tuberculosis in HIV infected patients requires that special attention be directed to the types and duration of both antiretroviral and anti-TB therapy in order to achieve the highest level of care. PMID:11980601

  14. Epinephrine (adrenaline) in the first-aid, out-of-hospital treatment of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Simons, F Estelle R

    2004-01-01

    Epinephrine (adrenaline), the initial treatment of choice for systemic anaphylaxis, is an alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist with bidirectional, cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated pharmacological effects on target organs, and a narrow therapeutic index. In a recent study, 0.95% of a geographically-defined population was found to have had epinephrine dispensed for out-of-hospital use; dispensing rates within this population varied from 1.44% for individuals under age 17 years to 0.32% for those older than 65 years. Although epinephrine is widely available in the community, it is not necessarily given in a timely manner when anaphylaxis occurs. Individuals with anaphylaxis may fail to respond to first-aid treatment with epinephrine for a variety of reasons. These include: (1) delay in treatment (in an animal model, epinephrine injection at the nadir of shock fails to provide sustained haemodynamic recovery); (2) administration of epinephrine by sub-optimal routes such as subcutaneous injection or inhalation from a pressurized metered-dose inhaler instead of intramuscular injection; (3) administration of an inappropriately low epinephrine dose due to the limitations currently imposed by the availability of only two fixed-dose auto-injectors: EpiPen Jr 0.15 mg or EpiPen 0.3 mg; and (4) injection of 'outdated' epinephrine, with inadvertent administration of an inadequate dose. Additional fixed-dose formulations of epinephrine are needed to facilitate optimal first-aid dosing in patients of all ages and sizes. PMID:15025402

  15. Optimization of Multicomponent Behavioral and Biobehavioral Interventions for the Prevention and Treatment of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Collins, Linda M; Kugler, Kari C; Gwadz, Marya Viorst

    2016-01-01

    To move society toward an AIDS-free generation, behavioral interventions for prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS must be not only effective, but also cost-effective, efficient, and readily scalable. The purpose of this article is to introduce to the HIV/AIDS research community the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST), a new methodological framework inspired by engineering principles and designed to develop behavioral interventions that have these important characteristics. Many behavioral interventions comprise multiple components. In MOST, randomized experimentation is conducted to assess the individual performance of each intervention component, and whether its presence/absence/setting has an impact on the performance of other components. This information is used to engineer an intervention that meets a specific optimization criterion, defined a priori in terms of effectiveness, cost, cost-effectiveness, and/or scalability. MOST will enable intervention science to develop a coherent knowledge base about what works and does not work. Ultimately this will improve behavioral interventions systematically and incrementally. PMID:26238037

  16. Posterior internal fixation plus vertebral bone implantation under navigational aid for thoracolumbar fracture treatment

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, WEI; KONG, WEIQING; ZHAO, BIZHEN; FU, YISHAN; ZHANG, TAO; XU, JIANGUANG

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the method of posterior thoracolumbar vertebral pedicle screw reduction and fixation combined with vertebral bone implantation via the affected vertebral body under navigational aid for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures. The efficacy of the procedure was also measured. Between June 2005 and March 2011, posterior thoracolumbar vertebral pedicle screw reduction and fixation plus artificial bone implantation via the affected vertebral pedicle under navigational aid was used to treat 30 patients with thoracolumbar fractures, including 18 males and 12 females, ranging in age from 21 to 57 years. Compared with the values prior to surgery, intraspinal occupation, vertebral height ratio and Cobb angle at the follow-up were significantly improved. At the long-term follow-up, the postoperative Cobb angle loss was <1° and the anterior vertebral body height loss was <2 mm. Posterior thoracolumbar vertebral pedicle screw reduction and fixation combined with vertebral bone implantation via the affected vertebral body under navigational aid may increase the accuracy and safety of surgery, and it is an ideal method of internal implantation. Bone implantation via the affected vertebral body may increase vertebral stability. PMID:23935737

  17. Cone beam computed tomography aided diagnosis and treatment of endodontic cases: Critical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Funda; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç; Yeta, Naz Yakar; Öztan, Meltem Dartar

    2016-01-01

    Although intraoral radiographs still remain the imaging method of choice for the evaluation of endodontic patients, in recent years, the utilization of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics showed a significant jump. This case series presentation shows the importance of CBCT aided diagnosis and treatment of complex endodontic cases such as; root resorption, missed extra canal, fusion, oblique root fracture, non-diagnosed periapical pathology and horizontal root fracture. CBCT may be a useful diagnostic method in several endodontic cases where intraoral radiography and clinical examination alone are unable to provide sufficient information. PMID:27551342

  18. Sinus barotrauma--late diagnosis and treatment with computer-aided endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anders Schermacher; Buchwald, Christian; Vesterhauge, Søren

    2003-02-01

    Sinus barotrauma is usually easy to diagnose, and treatment achieves good results. We present two severe cases where delayed diagnosis caused significant morbidity. The signs and symptoms were atypical and neither the patients themselves, nor the initial examiners recognized that the onset of symptoms coincided with descent in a commercial airliner. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal, but in both cases showed opafication of the sphenoid sinuses, which lead to the correct diagnosis. Subsequent surgical intervention consisting of endoscopic computer-aided surgery showed blood and petechia in the affected sinuses. This procedure provided immediate relief. PMID:12602451

  19. Cone beam computed tomography aided diagnosis and treatment of endodontic cases: Critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Funda; Kamburoglu, Kıvanç; Yeta, Naz Yakar; Öztan, Meltem Dartar

    2016-07-28

    Although intraoral radiographs still remain the imaging method of choice for the evaluation of endodontic patients, in recent years, the utilization of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in endodontics showed a significant jump. This case series presentation shows the importance of CBCT aided diagnosis and treatment of complex endodontic cases such as; root resorption, missed extra canal, fusion, oblique root fracture, non-diagnosed periapical pathology and horizontal root fracture. CBCT may be a useful diagnostic method in several endodontic cases where intraoral radiography and clinical examination alone are unable to provide sufficient information. PMID:27551342

  20. Building Institutions to Serve Agriculture. A Summary Report of the CIC-AID Rural Development Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agency for International Development (Dept. of State), Washington, DC.

    To analyze the accomplishments under contracts between the Agency for International Development (AID) and U.S. land grant universities for technical assistance abroad in the development of educational and research institutions in agriculture and related fields, the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) collected data from the home campus of…

  1. Lifetime Incidences of Traumatic Events and Mental Health among Children Affected by HIV/AIDS in Rural China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xiaoming; Barnett, Douglas; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Xiuyun; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng; Hong, Yan; Zhang, Liying; Naar-King, Sylvie; Stanton, Bonita

    2009-01-01

    Cross-sectional data were gathered from 1,625 children (M age = 12.85, SD = 2.21) which included 755 AIDS orphans, 466 vulnerable children, and 404 comparison children. Participants completed self-report measures of exposure to traumatic events, and psychosocial adjustment including behavior problems, depression, self-esteem, and future…

  2. Methods to model and predict the ViewRay treatment deliveries to aid patient scheduling and treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shi; Wu, Yu; Wooten, H Omar; Green, Olga; Archer, Brent; Li, Harold; Yang, Deshan

    2016-01-01

    A software tool is developed, given a new treatment plan, to predict treatment delivery time for radiation therapy (RT) treatments of patients on ViewRay magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) delivery system. This tool is necessary for managing patient treatment scheduling in our clinic. The predicted treatment delivery time and the assessment of plan complexities could also be useful to aid treatment planning. A patient's total treatment delivery time, not including time required for localization, is modeled as the sum of four components: 1) the treatment initialization time; 2) the total beam-on time; 3) the gantry rotation time; and 4) the multileaf collimator (MLC) motion time. Each of the four components is predicted separately. The total beam-on time can be calculated using both the planned beam-on time and the decay-corrected dose rate. To predict the remain-ing components, we retrospectively analyzed the patient treatment delivery record files. The initialization time is demonstrated to be random since it depends on the final gantry angle of the previous treatment. Based on modeling the relationships between the gantry rotation angles and the corresponding rotation time, linear regression is applied to predict the gantry rotation time. The MLC motion time is calculated using the leaves delay modeling method and the leaf motion speed. A quantitative analysis was performed to understand the correlation between the total treatment time and the plan complexity. The proposed algorithm is able to predict the ViewRay treatment delivery time with the average prediction error 0.22min or 1.82%, and the maximal prediction error 0.89 min or 7.88%. The analysis has shown the correlation between the plan modulation (PM) factor and the total treatment delivery time, as well as the treatment delivery duty cycle. A possibility has been identified to significantly reduce MLC motion time by optimizing the positions of closed MLC pairs. The accuracy of

  3. Perceived Need for Substance Abuse Treatment among Illicit Stimulant Drug Users in Rural Areas of Ohio, Arkansas, and Kentucky

    PubMed Central

    Falck, Russel S.; Wang, Jichuan; Carlson, Robert G.; Krishnan, Laura L.; Leukefeld, Carl; Booth, Brenda M.

    2007-01-01

    Non-medical drug use in rural communities in the United States is a significant and growing public health threat. Understanding what motivates drug users in rural areas to seek substance abuse treatment may help in addressing the problem. Perceived need for treatment, a construct indicative of problem recognition and belief in problem solution, has been identified as an important predictor of help-seeking behavior. This cross-sectional study used data collected through face-to-face interviews to examine factors associated with perceived need for drug abuse treatment among not-in-treatment, adult, illicit stimulant drug users (n=710) in rural areas of Ohio, Kentucky, and Arkansas. More than one-quarter of the sample perceived a need for treatment. Results from a stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that white users, users with better physical and mental health status, and occasional users of methamphetamine were significantly less likely to see a need for treatment. Users with higher Addiction Severity Index composite scores for family/social problems or legal problems, and users with prior drug abuse treatment experience were significantly more likely to perceive a need for treatment. These findings have practical implications for efforts addressing substance abuse in rural areas. PMID:17604917

  4. Quality of life, clinical characteristics and treatment adherence of people living with HIV/AIDS1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Cristina de Oliveira e; Reis, Renata Karina; Nogueira, Jordana Almeida; Gir, Elucir

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to assess the quality of life of people living with HIV/AIDS and verify its association with clinical characteristics and treatment adherence. METHOD: cross-sectional study conducted in a hospital in the state of Paraíba, Brazil. A questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic and clinical data. The quality of life scale proposed by the World Health Organization and a questionnaire to measure treatment adherence were used. RESULTS: of the 314 interviewees, 190 (60.5%) were male, aged 43 years on average, 121 (38.5%) had attended up to five years of schooling, 108 (34.4%) received up to two times the minimum wage, and 112 (35.7%) were on sick leave. In regard to clinical variables, individuals with an undetectable viral load scored higher in all the domains concerning quality of life, with statistically significant differences in three domains. Regarding treatment adherence, 235 (73.8%) presented poor adherence and those who strictly adhered to treatment obtained better scores in quality of life. The results show that quality of life is better among individuals adherent to ART. Supporting people to adhere to the antiretroviral treatment should be a persistent task of healthcare workers and other people participating in the treatment, such as family members and friends. PMID:25591095

  5. The old problem of adherence: research on treatment adherence and its relevance for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Wright, M T

    2000-12-01

    The international published research on patient adherence was selectively reviewed with the goal of determining its relevance for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. Results show that not adhering to treatment regimes is so widespread that no combination of sociodemographic variables is reliably predictive of patients' not following doctors' orders. Achieving 100% adherence for any treatment or patient group does not appear to be realistic. Characteristics of the patient's situation, of the given therapy, and of the disease itself affect adherence. In addition, the patient-doctor relationship and the context of the treatment are important. Often overlooked are the existential dimensions of meaning, self-determination and quality of life which are particularly important for the chronically ill. Treatment needs to be negotiated individually with each patient on the basis of an open therapeutic relationship and with the help of multidimensional interventions. Lessons from the discourse on safer sex can steer adherence research and practice away from a behavioural and reductionist approach toward the context and meaning of treatment. PMID:11177448

  6. Combined Intimate Partner Violence and HIV/AIDS Prevention in Rural Uganda: Design of the SHARE Intervention Strategy.

    PubMed

    Wagman, Jennifer A; King, Elizabeth J; Namatovu, Fredinah; Kiwanuka, Deus; Kairania, Robert; Semanda, John Baptist; Nalugoda, Fred; Serwadda, David; Wawer, Maria J; Gray, Ronald; Brahmbhatt, Heena

    2016-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) has a bidirectional relationship with HIV infection. Researchers from the Rakai Health Sciences Program (RHSP), an HIV research and services organization in rural Uganda, conducted a combination IPV and HIV prevention intervention called the Safe Homes and Respect for Everyone (SHARE) Project between 2005 and 2009. SHARE was associated with significant declines in physical and sexual IPV and overall HIV incidence, and its model could be adopted as a promising practice in other settings. In this article we describe how SHARE's IPV-prevention strategies were integrated into RHSP's existing HIV programming and provide recommendations for replication of the approach. PMID:26086189

  7. Efforts to secure universal access to HIV/AIDS treatment: a comparison of BRICS countries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Boing, Alexandra Crispim; Silveira, Marysabel P T; Bertoldi, Andréa D; Ziganshina, Liliya E; Khaziakhmetova, Veronica N; Khamidulina, Rashida M; Chokshi, Maulik R; McGee, Shelley; Suleman, Fatima

    2014-02-01

    This article illustrates how the BRICS countries have been building their focused leadership, making important high level commitment and national policy changes, and improving their health systems, in addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemics in respective settings. Specific aspects are focused on efforts of creating public provisions to secure universal access to ARVs from the aspects of active responsive system and national program, health system strengthening, fostering local production of ARVs, supply chain management, and information system strengthening. Challenges in each BRICS country are analyzed respectively. The most important contributors to the success of response to HIV/AIDS include: creating legal basis for healthcare as a fundamental human right; political commitment to necessary funding for universal access and concrete actions to secure equal quality care; comprehensive system to secure demands that all people in need are capable of accessing prevention, treatment and care; active community involvement; decentralization of the management system considering the local settings; integration of treatment and prevention; taking horizontal approach to strengthen health systems; fully use of the TRIPS flexibility; and regular monitoring and evaluation to serve evidence based decision making. PMID:25155561

  8. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Badowski, Melissa E; Perez, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol), anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone), or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide). The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (–2.0 to 3.2 kg), dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes. PMID:26929669

  9. Current Scenario of HIV/AIDS, Treatment Options, and Major Challenges with Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative organism of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the inability of modern medicine to find a cure for it has placed HIV as one of the most dreaded pathogens of the 21st century. With millions of people infected with HIV, it was once thought to result in “medical apocalypse”. However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), it is now possible to control HIV. Adherence to ART helps to keep the viral load under control and prolong the time of progression to AIDS, resulting in near normal life expectancy. Even with the introduction of ART, a substantial number of patients fail to adhere due to a variety of reasons, including adverse side effects, drug abuse, mental disorders, socioeconomic status, literacy, and social stigma. With the availability of so many options for HIV treatment at each stage of the disease progression, physicians can switch between the treatment regimens to avoid and/or minimize the adverse effects of drugs. Close monitoring, major social reforms, and adequate counselling should also be implemented to circumvent other challenges. PMID:27054050

  10. Photodynamic therapy for treatment of AIDS-related mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Vanessa G.

    1992-06-01

    Since 1975, Phase I/II studies have demonstrated the successfulness of hematoporphyrin derivative photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of various malignancies of the skin, eye, bladder, lung, and head and neck. Moreover, in 1981 two cases of traditional Western cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (TKS) have been treated with photodynamic therapy with both early and late complete response. To date, attempts to cure and palliation of the more aggressive AIDS-related oral Kaposi's sarcoma with conventional radiation, chemotherapy or immunotherapy, or surgical excision have been limited and often associated with debilitating mucositis and further immunosuppression. Certain aspects of photodynamic therapy may be efficacious for treatment of mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma: (1) the selective retention of hematoporphyrin derivative by neoplastic lesions (endothelial cell tumors); (2) a tumor- specific cytotoxic agent (i.e., free oxygen radical); (3) absence of systemic toxicity from immunosuppression; (4) the potential for retreatment without increasing side effects; and (5) porphyrin-mediated photoinactivation of enveloped viruses. Herein presented are seven cases of AIDS-related KS (EKS) with diffuse, superficial, and nodular mucocutaneous lesions treated with dihematoporphyrin derivative and photodynamic therapy with subsequent dramatic early partial and complete responses.

  11. Current Scenario of HIV/AIDS, Treatment Options, and Major Challenges with Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Usman, Muhammad; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative organism of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the inability of modern medicine to find a cure for it has placed HIV as one of the most dreaded pathogens of the 21(st) century. With millions of people infected with HIV, it was once thought to result in "medical apocalypse". However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), it is now possible to control HIV. Adherence to ART helps to keep the viral load under control and prolong the time of progression to AIDS, resulting in near normal life expectancy. Even with the introduction of ART, a substantial number of patients fail to adhere due to a variety of reasons, including adverse side effects, drug abuse, mental disorders, socioeconomic status, literacy, and social stigma. With the availability of so many options for HIV treatment at each stage of the disease progression, physicians can switch between the treatment regimens to avoid and/or minimize the adverse effects of drugs. Close monitoring, major social reforms, and adequate counselling should also be implemented to circumvent other challenges. PMID:27054050

  12. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Badowski, Melissa E; Perez, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol), anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone), or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide). The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (-2.0 to 3.2 kg), dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes. PMID:26929669

  13. Policy perspectives and attitudes towards mental health treatment in rural Senegal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental health is often given low priority in health policy planning, particularly in developing countries. Several international health bodies, including the World Health Organization, recommend integrating mental health into primary care settings to reduce mortality and morbidity associated with mental illness, particularly in low-resource settings. Objective This study explores health care workers' and policy stakeholders’ knowledge and attitudes regarding mental illness, interactions with patients in the community, and perceived training needs at a health clinic in rural southeastern Senegal. Interviews were conducted with eight key informant medical staff members and community health workers. Methods Interview data were analyzed and interpreted using a qualitative content analysis based on the grounded theory approach. Results The findings indicate that staff members encounter many patients with emotional/psychological problems or mental illnesses, and they employ various strategies in treating these patients. Respondents also highlighted the need for more training to address and diagnose mental health problems, especially severe psychiatric illnesses. Conclusions Findings are used to discuss recommendations for developing a comprehensive mental health primary care treatment approach that includes screening patients for mental health problems screening, incorporating rural villagers' attitudes and beliefs about mental illness into treatment, and utilizing community health workers—who are often a first health contact for many—to work with the medical staff to identify mental health problems. PMID:24646335

  14. A systematic review of decision aids for patients making a decision about treatment for early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nicholas Zdenkowski; Butow, Phyllis; Tesson, Stephanie; Boyle, Frances

    2016-04-01

    Several complex treatment decisions may be offered to women with early stage breast cancer, about a range of treatments from different modalities including surgery, radiotherapy, and endocrine and chemotherapy. Decision aids can facilitate shared decision-making and improve decision-related outcomes. We aimed to systematically identify, describe and appraise the literature on treatment decision aids for women with early breast cancer, synthesise the data and identify breast cancer decisions that lack a decision aid. A prospectively developed search strategy was applied to MEDLINE, the Cochrane databases, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science and abstract databases from major conferences. Data were extracted into a pre-piloted form. Quality and risk of bias were measured using Qualsyst criteria. Results were synthesised into narrative format. Thirty-three eligible articles were identified, evaluating 23 individual treatment decision aids, comprising 13 randomised controlled trial reports, seven non-randomised comparative studies, eight single-arm pre-post studies and five cross-sectional studies. The decisions addressed by these decision aids were: breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy (+/- reconstruction); use of chemotherapy and/or endocrine therapy; radiotherapy; and fertility preservation. Outcome measures were heterogeneous, precluding meta-analysis. Decisional conflict decreased, and knowledge and satisfaction increased, without any change in anxiety or depression, in most studies. No studies were identified that evaluated decision aids for neoadjuvant systemic therapy, or contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Decision aids are available and improved decision-related outcomes for many breast cancer treatment decisions including surgery, radiotherapy, and endocrine and chemotherapy. Decision aids for neoadjuvant systemic therapy and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy could not be found, and may be warranted. PMID:27017240

  15. HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and behaviors among rural married migrant women in Shandong Province, China: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Song, Yapei; Kang, Dianmin; Wang, Guoyong; Wei, Chongyi; Tao, Xiaorun; Huang, Tao; Qian, Yuesheng; Zhu, Tiwen; Yang, Shan; Yu, Shaoqi; Wang, Hong; Ma, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Migrant women in China are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. This study described HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and behaviors among married migrant women in Shandong province in comparison to non-migrant local women and identified factors associated with HIV testing history and extramarital sex among married migrant women. A probability-based sample of 1,076 migrant and 1,195 local women were included in the analyses. Compared to local women, married migrant women had lower levels of HIV/AIDS knowledge and were more likely to have had premarital sex, extramarital sex, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and drug use. Less than a quarter of migrant women used condoms consistently in extramarital sex. Only 31.0 % of married migrant women had ever tested for HIV, and the rate of premarital HIV testing was very low. Multivariable analysis showed that married migrant women with a history of extramarital sex were more likely to be from Yunnan province, be living in Yantai city, be in their first marriage, have lower family income, have poor relationship with spouses, use drug, have a history of sexually transmitted diseases, and have lower social support. Our findings provide further evidence that married migrant women are at higher risk for HIV infection and that targeted interventions need to be developed for this population. PMID:25323941

  16. Stability analysis of an HIV/AIDS epidemic model with treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Liming; Li, Xuezhi; Ghosh, Mini; Guo, Baozhu

    2009-07-01

    An HIV/AIDS epidemic model with treatment is investigated. The model allows for some infected individuals to move from the symptomatic phase to the asymptomatic phase by all sorts of treatment methods. We first establish the ODE treatment model with two infective stages. Mathematical analyses establish that the global dynamics of the spread of the HIV infectious disease are completely determined by the basic reproduction number [real]0. If [real]0<=1, the disease-free equilibrium is globally stable, whereas the unique infected equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable if [real]0>1. Then, we introduce a discrete time delay to the model to describe the time from the start of treatment in the symptomatic stage until treatment effects become visible. The effect of the time delay on the stability of the endemically infected equilibrium is investigated. Moreover, the delay model exhibits Hopf bifurcations by using the delay as a bifurcation parameter. Finally, numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the results.

  17. Computer aided diagnosis and treatment planning for developmental dysplasia of the hip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Lu, Hongbing; Cai, Wenli; Li, Xiang; Meng, Jie; Liang, Zhengrong

    2005-04-01

    The developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a congenital malformation affecting the proximal femurs and acetabulum that are subluxatable, dislocatable, and dislocated. Early diagnosis and treatment is important because failure to diagnose and improper treatment can result in significant morbidity. In this paper, we designed and implemented a computer aided system for the diagnosis and treatment planning of this disease. With the design, the patient received CT (computed tomography) or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan first. A mixture-based PV partial-volume algorithm was applied to perform bone segmentation on CT image, followed by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and display of the segmented image, demonstrating the special relationship between the acetabulum and femurs for visual judgment. Several standard procedures, such as Salter procedure, Pemberton procedure and Femoral Shortening osteotomy, were simulated on the screen to rehearse a virtual treatment plan. Quantitative measurement of Acetabular Index (AI) and Femoral Neck Anteversion (FNA) were performed on the 3D image for evaluation of DDH and treatment plans. PC graphics-card GPU architecture was exploited to accelerate the 3D rendering and geometric manipulation. The prototype system was implemented on PC/Windows environment and is currently under clinical trial on patient datasets.

  18. Recent advances in the treatment of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Cattelan, Anna M; Trevenzoli, Marco; Aversa, Savina M L

    2002-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common malignancy associated with HIV infection and is considered an AIDS defining condition by the US Centers of Disease Control Guidelines. Several advances in the treatment of AIDS-related KS have been achieved over the past few years, even though a gold standard therapy for KS has not yet been defined and treatment must be tailored to individual needs. Since the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), a dramatic clinical response has been documented in patients with KS, making HAART an essential approach in the management of KS in most, if not all, patients with AIDS-related KS. However, in case of aggressive, visceral, and/or life-threatening KS, more complex therapeutic schedules have to be taken into account, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and/or immunotherapy. In general, systemic treatment for KS is limited to widespread, symptomatic disease, whereas local interventions are indicated for minimal, cosmetically troublesome lesions. Among new cytotoxic agents, liposomal anthracyclines and paclitaxel are highly effective molecules for KS and have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as first-line and second-line monotherapy, respectively, for advanced KS. Furthermore, a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of KS has lead to the development of an array of new experimental agents. Many antiangiogenic agents such as AGM 1470 (TNP 470), thalidomide, and glufanide disodium (IM 862) have produced encouraging responses in patients with KS and large clinical trials are in progress. Retinoic acids may also block neoangiogenesis as well as proliferation of KS cells in vitro, and they have been used either systemically or topically with a high response rate. Thus, a topical compound 0.1% alitretinoin gel was approved in 1999 by the FDA for the treatment of skin lesions associated with KS. Human chorionic gonadotropin, a hormonal agent, has shown a strong inhibitory activity in KS

  19. Treatment uptake by individuals infected with Plasmodium falciparum in rural Gambia, West Africa.

    PubMed Central

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Clarke, Sian; Alexander, Neâl; Manneh, Fandingding; Doherty, Tom; Pinder, Margaret; Walraven, Gijs; Greenwood, Brian

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To find out what proportion of Plasmodium falciparum infections are treated in rural Gambia. METHODS: Subjects from four villages in the Gambia were followed over nine months through visits to village health workers. Monthly cross-sectional malaria surveys measured the prevalence of P. falciparum infection. Linked databases were searched for treatment requests. Treated cases were individuals with parasitaemia who requested treatment during narrow or extended periods (14 or 28 days, respectively) before or after a positive blood film was obtained. FINDINGS: Parasite prevalence peaked in November 1998, when 399/653 (61%) individuals had parasitaemia. Parasite prevalence was highest throughout the study in children aged 5-10 years. Although access to treatment was better than in most of sub-Saharan Africa, only 20% of infected individuals sought medical treatment up to 14 days before or after a positive blood film. Within two months of a positive blood film, 199/726 (27%) individuals with parasitaemia requested treatment. Despite easy access to health care, less than half (42%) of those with parasite densities consistent with malaria attacks (5000/ l) requested treatment. High parasite density and infection during October-November were associated with more frequent treatment requests. Self-treatment was infrequent in study villages: in 3/120 (2.5%) households antimalarial drugs had been used in the preceding malaria season. CONCLUSION: Many P. falciparum infections may be untreated because of their subclinical nature. Intermittent presumptive treatment may reduce morbidity and mortality. It is likely that not all untreated infections were asymptomatic. Qualitative research should explore barriers to treatment uptake, to allow educational interventions to be planned. PMID:12471399

  20. Staying on the Roller Coaster with Clients: Implications of the New HIV/AIDS Medical Treatments for Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, Paula J.

    2000-01-01

    There have been dramatic improvements in the medical treatment of persons with HIV/AIDS. This article provides an overview of the new medical treatments, highlights some of the salient psychosocial issues that impact both clients and counselors, discusses common counselor responses, and suggests some helpful interventions. (Author/MKA)

  1. "It's my secret": barriers to paediatric HIV treatment in a poor rural South African setting.

    PubMed

    Kimani-Murage, E W; Manderson, L; Norris, S A; Kahn, K

    2013-01-01

    In South Africa, a third of children born are exposed to HIV, while fewer undergo an HIV confirmatory test. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) coverage among children remains low-despite roll-out of the national ART programme in South Africa in 2004. This study sought to understand critical barriers to seeking HIV-related care for children in rural South Africa. Data presented in this article derive from community-based qualitative research in poor rural villages in north-east South Africa; this includes 21 in-depth interviews in 2008 among caregivers of children identified as HIV-positive in 2007 from a randomly selected community-based sample. Using NVIVO 8, data were coded and analysed, using a constant comparative method to identify themes and their repetitions and variations. Structural barriers leading to poor access to health care, and social and systems barriers, all influenced paediatric HIV treatment seeking. Of concern was the expressed need to maintain secrecy regarding a child's HIV status to avoid stigma and discrimination, and misconceptions regarding the course of HIV disease in children; this led to a delay in seeking appropriate care. These barriers need to be addressed, including through focused awareness campaigns, improved access to health care and interventions to address rural poverty and development at both household and community levels. In addition, training of health care professionals to improve their attitudes and practice may be necessary. However, this study only provides the perspective of the caregivers; further studies with health care providers are needed to gain a fuller picture for appropriate policy and practice guidance. PMID:23244783

  2. Rural Barriers to Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Infant Hearing Loss in Appalachia

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Matthew L.; Hardin, Bryan; Rayle, Christopher; Lester, Cathy; Studts, Christina R.; Shinn, Jennifer B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to assess regional parental barriers in the diagnostic and therapeutic process following abnormal newborn hearing screening (NHS) testing. Study Design Cross-sectional questionnaire study Setting Tertiary medical center Patients Parents of infants who failed NHS in Kentucky from January 2009 – February 2012 Main Outcome Measure Demographic information, county of origin, and attitudes and perceptions regarding NHS and barriers in the NHS diagnostic process. Results There were 460 participants in the study, which included25.4% of parents were from the Appalachian region. 21% of Appalachian parents found the process on newborn hearing testing difficult. Appalachian parents were more likely to have no more than 12 years of education (OR 1.7, p=0.02) and Medicaid insurance (OR 2.3, p<0.001) compared with non-Appalachian parents. A higher percentage of Appalachian parents were unaware of the NHS results at the time of hospital discharge than non-Appalachians (14% v. 7%, p=0.03). Distance from the diagnostic/therapeutic center represented was a significant barrier for Appalachian parents (OR 2.8, p=0.001). Compared with urban parents, a greater percentage of rural parents had never heard of a cochlear implant (p=0.01). Appalachian parents expressed a strong interest in telemedicine and a desire for closer services. Conclusion Multiple barriers including education, distance, accessibility, socioeconomic factors can affect timely diagnosis and treatment of congenital hearing loss for children residing in rural areas. Educational and telemedicine programs may benefit parents in Appalachia, as well as parents in other rural areas. PMID:25325844

  3. Hidden love: sexual ideologies and relationship ideals among rural South African adolescents in the context of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Abigail

    2008-02-01

    In KwaZulu/Natal, South Africa, the social construction of young people's sexuality reflects both a complex historical process of cultural and religious integration, as well as the contemporary resurgence of 'traditionalism'. How do young people interpret these factors to construct and give meaning to their own sexualities? This multi-method qualitative study examined sexuality and relationship formation among sexually experienced young people aged 14-19 in a rural sub-district. In this setting, sexual activity is highly stigmatised, particularly for young teenage women. Dominant sexual ideologies centre on 'good behaviour', the idea that 'sex is wrong', and abstinence as a preferred prevention strategy. Young women's relationships are often hidden but sexual relationships are also an important part of the transition to adulthood. These dichotomies of love and romance versus stigma and secrecy frame young people's discourse about sexuality. A discourse about healthy sexuality is largely absent, impeding the prevention of HIV in this setting. PMID:18247210

  4. Can Schools Support HIV/AIDS-Affected Children? Exploring the 'Ethic of Care' amongst Rural Zimbabwean Teachers.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Catherine; Andersen, Louise; Mutsikiwa, Alice; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2016-01-01

    How realistic is the international policy emphasis on schools 'substituting for families' of HIV/AIDS-affected children? We explore the ethic of care in Zimbabwean schools to highlight the poor fit between the western caring schools literature and daily realities of schools in different material and cultural contexts. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 44 teachers and 55 community members, analysed in light of a companion study of HIV/AIDS-affected pupils' own accounts of their care-related experiences. We conceptualise schools as spaces of engagement between groups with diverse needs and interests (teachers, pupils and surrounding community members), with attention to the pathways through which extreme adversity impacts on those institutional contexts and social identifications central to giving and receiving care. Whilst teachers were aware of how they might support children, they seldom put these ideas into action. Multiple factors undermined caring teacher-pupil relationships in wider contexts of poverty and political uncertainty: loss of morale from low salaries and falling professional status; the inability of teachers to solve HIV/AIDS-related problems in their own lives; the role of stigma in deterring HIV/AIDS-affected children from disclosing their situations to teachers; authoritarian teacher-learner relations and harsh punishments fuelling pupil fear of teachers; and lack of trust in the wider community. These factors undermined: teacher confidence in their skills and capacity to support affected pupils and motivation to help children with complex problems; solidarity and common purpose amongst teachers, and between teachers and affected children; and effective bridging alliances between schools and their surrounding communities-all hallmarks of HIV-competent communities. We caution against ambitious policy expansions of teachers' roles without recognition of the personal and social costs of emotional labour, and the need for significant

  5. Can Schools Support HIV/AIDS-Affected Children? Exploring the ‘Ethic of Care’ amongst Rural Zimbabwean Teachers

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine; Andersen, Louise; Mutsikiwa, Alice; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2016-01-01

    How realistic is the international policy emphasis on schools ‘substituting for families’ of HIV/AIDS-affected children? We explore the ethic of care in Zimbabwean schools to highlight the poor fit between the western caring schools literature and daily realities of schools in different material and cultural contexts. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 44 teachers and 55 community members, analysed in light of a companion study of HIV/AIDS-affected pupils’ own accounts of their care-related experiences. We conceptualise schools as spaces of engagement between groups with diverse needs and interests (teachers, pupils and surrounding community members), with attention to the pathways through which extreme adversity impacts on those institutional contexts and social identifications central to giving and receiving care. Whilst teachers were aware of how they might support children, they seldom put these ideas into action. Multiple factors undermined caring teacher-pupil relationships in wider contexts of poverty and political uncertainty: loss of morale from low salaries and falling professional status; the inability of teachers to solve HIV/AIDS-related problems in their own lives; the role of stigma in deterring HIV/AIDS-affected children from disclosing their situations to teachers; authoritarian teacher-learner relations and harsh punishments fuelling pupil fear of teachers; and lack of trust in the wider community. These factors undermined: teacher confidence in their skills and capacity to support affected pupils and motivation to help children with complex problems; solidarity and common purpose amongst teachers, and between teachers and affected children; and effective bridging alliances between schools and their surrounding communities–all hallmarks of HIV-competent communities. We caution against ambitious policy expansions of teachers' roles without recognition of the personal and social costs of emotional labour, and the need for

  6. Treatment of Diarrhoea in Rural African Communities: An Overview of Measures to Maximise the Medicinal Potentials of Indigenous Plants

    PubMed Central

    Njume, Collise; Goduka, Nomalungelo I.

    2012-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in rural communities in Africa, particularly in children under the age of five. This calls for the development of cost effective alternative strategies such as the use of herbal drugs in the treatment of diarrhoea in these communities. Expenses associated with the use of orthodox medicines have generated renewed interest and reliance on indigenous medicinal plants in the treatment and management of diarrhoeal infections in rural communities. The properties of many phenolic constituents of medicinal plants such as their ability to inhibit enteropooling and delay gastrointestinal transit are very useful in the control of diarrhoea, but problems such as scarcity of valuable medicinal plants, lack of standardization of methods of preparation, poor storage conditions and incertitude in some traditional health practitioners are issues that affect the efficacy and the practice of traditional medicine in rural African communities. This review appraises the current strategies used in the treatment of diarrhoea according to the Western orthodox and indigenous African health-care systems and points out major areas that could be targeted by health-promotion efforts as a means to improve management and alleviate suffering associated with diarrhoea in rural areas of the developing world. Community education and research with indigenous knowledge holders on ways to maximise the medicinal potentials in indigenous plants could improve diarrhoea management in African rural communities. PMID:23202823

  7. CBCT-Aided Microscopic and Ultrasonic Treatment for Upper or Middle Thirds Calcified Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Ming; Guo, Bin; Guo, Li-Yang; Yang, Yan; Hong, Xiao; Pan, Hong-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Root canal calcification is considered a great challenge during root canal treatment. Although the application of ultrasonic instruments and dental operating microscope (DOM) has advantages, dealing with calcified root canals still suffers a great risk of failure because of limited information about the location, length, and direction of obliteration on periapical radiographs. In this work, a cone-beam computed tomography- (CBCT-) aided method aimed at solving complicated calcified root canals in which conventional approaches could not work was proposed. Thirteen teeth with sixteen calcified canals (12 calcified in the upper third, 4 calcified in the middle third), which cannot be negotiated with conventional methods, were treated with the aid of CBCT. The location of calcification and depth of instrumentation and operating direction were calculated and assessed in three dimensions with ultrasonic instruments under DOM. In all thirteen teeth, canals with upper and middle thirds calcification were treated successfully. Finally, a guideline was proposed to help achieve consistent apical patency in calcified canals. PMID:27525269

  8. Responding to medical crises: AIDS treatment, responsibilisation and the logic of choice.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    The framing of HIV/AIDS as a crisis has facilitated the rollout of large-scale intervention programmes that represent an enormous effort at mainstreaming biomedical rationalities and neoliberal notions of responsibilisation and self-care. Based on a 'logic of choice' (Mol 2008) and 'responsibilised citizenship' (Robins 2005a), although veiled in a language of rights and partnership, the heavy focus on individual behaviour and a pharmaceutical 'solution' to AIDS shifts the burden of responsibility for the success of the heavily funded programmes onto the shoulders of the patients and conceals alternative forms of responsibility. Analysing how HIV-positive people in Tanzania navigate life with HIV and the complex treatment regimens, this paper looks beyond biomedical rationality, which places the preservation of individual biological life at the centre of its logic, and analyses people's constant struggle to negotiate the meaning of 'responsible behaviour' in the context of their lived realities. This repositions the notion of responsibility in the realm of the social and reveals the rationality behind apparently irrational practices. PMID:23898836

  9. The treatment gap and primary health care for people with epilepsy in rural Gambia.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Rosalind; Loppy, Louie; Walraven, Gijs

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study primary-level management for people with epilepsy in rural Gambia by means of community surveys. METHODS: After population screening was carried out, visits were made by a physician who described the epidemiology of epilepsy and its management. Gaps between required management and applied management were investigated by conducting interviews and discussions with people with epilepsy and their communities. FINDINGS: The lifetime prevalence of epilepsy was 4.9/1000 and the continuous treatment rate was less than 10%. The choice of treatment was shaped by beliefs in an external spiritual cause of epilepsy and was commonly expected to be curative but not preventive. Treatment rarely led to the control of seizures, although when control was achieved, the level of community acceptance of people with epilepsy increased. Every person with epilepsy had sought traditional treatment. Of the 69 people with active epilepsy, 42 (61%) said they would like to receive preventive biomedical treatment if it were available in their local community. Key programme factors included the local provision of effective treatment and community information with, in parallel, clarification of the use of preventive treatment and genuine integration with current traditional sources of treatment and advice. CONCLUSION: Primary-level management of epilepsy could be integrated into a chronic disease programme covering hypertension, diabetes, asthma and mental health. Initial diagnosis and prescribing could take place away from the periphery but recurrent dispensing would be conducted locally. Probable epilepsy etiologies suggest that there is scope for primary prevention through the strengthening of maternal and child health services. PMID:12077613

  10. [Contribution to the treatment of children in the first aid medical service of the stomatological department].

    PubMed

    Sustová, Z

    1990-09-01

    At the first aid medical service of the stomatological department of a type II hospital with policlinic in the course of the calendar year a total of 1,761 children from 2-15 years were treated. During this period the staff treater 1,718 teeth and 43 times they treater soft tissues of the oral cavity. Most frequently periodontitis of the decidual teeth was treated, resorption of the root of a decidual tooth, pulpitis and caries. As to therapy, extractions were most frequent, followed by trepanation of the pulp cavity and treatment of the tooth by a provisional filling. The author draws attention to unsuitable therapeutic procedures such as trepanation of the pulp cavity in case of periodonititis of a decidual tooth and application of cobalt in pulpitis of a decidual tooth after the age of seven years. She emphasizes also the necessity to use local anaesthesia in extraction of decidual teeth. PMID:2103625

  11. A visual dosing aid for first-line pediatric antiretroviral treatment in resource-poor settings.

    PubMed

    Callens, Steven F J; Westreich, Daniel; Kitetele, Faustin; Lusiama, Jean; Shabani, Nicole; Belhorn, Tom; Colebunders, Robert; Behets, Frieda; Van Rie, Annelies

    2009-04-01

    The visual dosing aid (VDA) was developed to facilitate dosing calculations in response to children's; growth and weight during antiretroviral treatment. The theoretical accuracy of the VDA was assessed using anthropometric data from 55 children receiving care in the USA and 324 children in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The VDA dose was similar to the WHO recommended dose. A potentially significant relative dosing difference of >or=20% occurred in <3% of children for NVP, AZT and d4T, but was observed in 20% for 3TC, overdosing being more frequent. The VDA compared well with generic pediatric fixed dose combination tablets. Results did not differ between sites. The VDA enables accurate dosing of pediatric ART in distinct populations and could facilitate roll-out of pediatric ART in resource-poor settings. PMID:19022850

  12. Knowledge and Attitude of Faculty Members Working in Dental Institutions towards the Dental Treatment of Patients with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Sharma, Nilima; Mohanty, Vikrant; Marya, Charumohan; Rekhi, Amit; Oberoi, Avneet

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dentists have an ethical responsibility to provide treatment to HIV-infected patients, particularly because oral lesions are common among these patients. However, there are no official guidelines as to how to treat people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (PLWHA) or how to screen for potentially infectious people. Materials and Method. A descriptive cross-sectional questionnaire based study which assessed the knowledge and attitude of the faculty members towards the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS was carried out in the Sudha Rustagi College of Dental Sciences, Faridabad, and Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi. Results. The willingness to treat patients with HIV was found to be 86.0% among the faculty members in the present study. The majority (79%) of the faculty members thought that treating an HIV-positive patient is ethical responsibility of the dentist. There was a positive attitude (88.0%) among faculty members that routine dental care should be a part of the treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS. Conclusion. The level of knowledge regarding HIV and AIDS was acceptable in the present study. However, continuing dental education (CDE) programmes should be conducted on a regular basis for updating the knowledge level of the faculty members towards the dental treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS patients. PMID:27379262

  13. Awareness and knowledge of HIV/AIDS among married women in rural Bangladesh and exposure to media: a secondary data analysis of the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Asaduzzaman, Mohammad; Higuchi, Michiyo; Sarker, Mohammad Abul Bashar; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aims of this study were to describe awareness and knowledge of HIV/AIDS among Bangladeshi married women in rural areas and to examine associations between exposure to mass media and their awareness and comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS where mass media has been suggested to be vital sources of information. From the original dataset of the sixth Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey in 2011, the data of 11,570 rural married women aged 15–49 years old were extracted. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We found that approximately two-thirds of women (63.0%) aged 15–49 years had heard about HIV/AIDS. Exposure to each type of media was significantly associated with awareness of HIV/AIDS. Comparing to those who were not exposed to each of the investigated media, the adjusted ORs of comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS were significantly high for those exposed to newspapers/magazines less than once a week (1.34, 95% CI 1.09–1.65), newspapers/ magazines at least once a week (1.44, 95% CI 1.07–1.94), television at least once a week (1.41, 95% CI 1.18–1.68). It was suggested that television can be utilized to increase awareness and comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS through effective programs. Although the level of exposure was still low, significant associations between exposure to newspapers/magazines and comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS suggested potential of written messages to promote knowledge of HIV/AIDS. PMID:27019532

  14. Awareness and knowledge of HIV/AIDS among married women in rural Bangladesh and exposure to media: a secondary data analysis of the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Asaduzzaman, Mohammad; Higuchi, Michiyo; Sarker, Mohammad Abul Bashar; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    The aims of this study were to describe awareness and knowledge of HIV/AIDS among Bangladeshi married women in rural areas and to examine associations between exposure to mass media and their awareness and comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS where mass media has been suggested to be vital sources of information. From the original dataset of the sixth Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey in 2011, the data of 11,570 rural married women aged 15-49 years old were extracted. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We found that approximately two-thirds of women (63.0%) aged 15-49 years had heard about HIV/AIDS. Exposure to each type of media was significantly associated with awareness of HIV/AIDS. Comparing to those who were not exposed to each of the investigated media, the adjusted ORs of comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS were significantly high for those exposed to newspapers/magazines less than once a week (1.34, 95% CI 1.09-1.65), newspapers/ magazines at least once a week (1.44, 95% CI 1.07-1.94), television at least once a week (1.41, 95% CI 1.18-1.68). It was suggested that television can be utilized to increase awareness and comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS through effective programs. Although the level of exposure was still low, significant associations between exposure to newspapers/magazines and comprehensive knowledge of HIV/AIDS suggested potential of written messages to promote knowledge of HIV/AIDS. PMID:27019532

  15. Computer-aided analysis of star shot films for high-accuracy radiation therapy treatment units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depuydt, Tom; Penne, Rudi; Verellen, Dirk; Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Leysen, Katrien; Vandevondel, Iwein; Poels, Kenneth; Reynders, Truus; Gevaert, Thierry; Duchateau, Michael; Tournel, Koen; Boussaer, Marlies; Cosentino, Dorian; Garibaldi, Cristina; Solberg, Timothy; De Ridder, Mark

    2012-05-01

    As mechanical stability of radiation therapy treatment devices has gone beyond sub-millimeter levels, there is a rising demand for simple yet highly accurate measurement techniques to support the routine quality control of these devices. A combination of using high-resolution radiosensitive film and computer-aided analysis could provide an answer. One generally known technique is the acquisition of star shot films to determine the mechanical stability of rotations of gantries and the therapeutic beam. With computer-aided analysis, mechanical performance can be quantified as a radiation isocenter radius size. In this work, computer-aided analysis of star shot film is further refined by applying an analytical solution for the smallest intersecting circle problem, in contrast to the gradient optimization approaches used until today. An algorithm is presented and subjected to a performance test using two different types of radiosensitive film, the Kodak EDR2 radiographic film and the ISP EBT2 radiochromic film. Artificial star shots with a priori known radiation isocenter size are used to determine the systematic errors introduced by the digitization of the film and the computer analysis. The estimated uncertainty on the isocenter size measurement with the presented technique was 0.04 mm (2σ) and 0.06 mm (2σ) for radiographic and radiochromic films, respectively. As an application of the technique, a study was conducted to compare the mechanical stability of O-ring gantry systems with C-arm-based gantries. In total ten systems of five different institutions were included in this study and star shots were acquired for gantry, collimator, ring, couch rotations and gantry wobble. It was not possible to draw general conclusions about differences in mechanical performance between O-ring and C-arm gantry systems, mainly due to differences in the beam-MLC alignment procedure accuracy. Nevertheless, the best performing O-ring system in this study, a BrainLab/MHI Vero system

  16. Perspectives on Obesity and Its Treatment: Health Care Providers and the General Public in Rural West Virginia and Urban Baltimore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menez, Steven; Cheskin, Lawrence; Geller, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the perspectives of the general public and health care providers (HCPs) on obesity and its treatment in rural West Virginia (WV) and Baltimore, MD. Method: Surveys were completed in both locations by the general public (WV: "n" = 200; Baltimore: "n" = 171) and HCPs (WV: "n" = 25;…

  17. The Changing Face of AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Cindy

    1998-01-01

    The New Mexico AIDS Education and Training Center developed a self-guided Internet course to help New Mexico's rural health-care providers treat and counsel today's changing AIDS patients. The Center also provides on-site customized training to rural health-care providers, acts as an information center, and funds mini-sabbaticals during which…

  18. Access to artemisinin-based anti-malarial treatment and its related factors in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination treatment (ACT) has been widely adopted as one of the main malaria control strategies. However, its promise to save thousands of lives in sub-Saharan Africa depends on how effective the use of ACT is within the routine health system. The INESS platform evaluated effective coverage of ACT in several African countries. Timely access within 24 hours to an authorized ACT outlet is one of the determinants of effective coverage and was assessed for artemether-lumefantrine (Alu), in two district health systems in rural Tanzania. Methods From October 2009 to June 2011we conducted continuous rolling household surveys in the Kilombero-Ulanga and the Rufiji Health and Demographic Surveillance Sites (HDSS). Surveys were linked to the routine HDSS update rounds. Members of randomly pre-selected households that had experienced a fever episode in the previous two weeks were eligible for a structured interview. Data on individual treatment seeking, access to treatment, timing, source of treatment and household costs per episode were collected. Data are presented on timely access from a total of 2,112 interviews in relation to demographics, seasonality, and socio economic status. Results In Kilombero-Ulanga, 41.8% (CI: 36.6–45.1) and in Rufiji 36.8% (33.7–40.1) of fever cases had access to an authorized ACT provider within 24 hours of fever onset. In neither of the HDSS site was age, sex, socio-economic status or seasonality of malaria found to be significantly correlated with timely access. Conclusion Timely access to authorized ACT providers is below 50% despite interventions intended to improve access such as social marketing and accreditation of private dispensing outlets. To improve prompt diagnosis and treatment, access remains a major bottle neck and new more innovative interventions are needed to raise effective coverage of malaria treatment in Tanzania. PMID:23651521

  19. A collection and treatment system for organic waste and wastewater in a sensitive rural area.

    PubMed

    Malmén, L; Palm, O; Norin, E

    2003-01-01

    In the municipality of Sund, located in a sensitive rural area in Aland, a demonstration project is now carried out with the overall objective to move the most concentrated fractions of wastewater from the coastal area to a treatment plant situated close to arable land. Blackwater and greywater septic sludge from about twenty households and two tourist camps are treated together with energy rich organic material from a nearby potato-chip factory. The collection concept is based on the use of extremely efficient water-saving toilets, with separate systems for the blackwater and greywater in the households. The collected materials are co-treated in a batchwise aerobic thermophilic treatment process (wet composting process), where the materials reach at least 55 degrees C during a minimum of 10 hours. The dry matter content of the collected material was about 2%. After stabilisation and sanitation (by the temperature rise caused by microbial activity during the treatment process), the compost slurry is utilized as a liquid organic fertilizer on arable land. PMID:14753521

  20. Traditional Healing, Biomedicine and the Treatment of HIV/AIDS: Contrasting South African and Native American Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Traditional healing remains an important aspect of many people’s engagement with healthcare and, in this, responses to the treatment of HIV/AIDS are no different. However, given the gravity of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic, there has been much debate as to the value of traditional healing in this respect. Accordingly, this paper explores the extent to which meaningful accommodation between the biomedical and traditional sectors is possible (and/or even desirable). It does this through a consideration of Native American and South African experiences, looking at how the respective groups, in which medical pluralism is common, have addressed the issue of HIV/AIDS. The paper points to the importance of developing “culturally appropriate” forms of treatment that emphasise complementary rather than adversarial engagement between the traditional and biomedical systems and how policymakers can best facilitate this. PMID:25903057

  1. "Living by the hoe" in the age of treatment: perceptions of household well-being after antiretroviral treatment among family members of persons with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kaler, Amy; Alibhai, Arif; Kipp, Walter; Rubaale, Tom; Konde-Lule, Joseph

    2010-04-01

    This paper considers the effects of antiretroviral treatment on the households of person with AIDS in western Uganda. Interviews were carried out with 110 co-resident "treatment partners" of people receiving treatment. We discuss these family members' accounts of the impact of sickness, followed by treatment, on their household's livelihood, defined as the activities needed to obtain and process the resources required to sustain the households. The household's ability to muster labour for subsistence agriculture was of paramount concern when family members considered what treatment meant for the households. While they were very happy with the treatment, they said that households have not yet recovered from the shock of AIDS sicknesses. PMID:20162471

  2. Effects of a Rural Family Drug Treatment Court Collaborative on Child Welfare Outcomes: Comparison Using Propensity Score Analysis.

    PubMed

    Pollock, McLean D; Green, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies that have examined the impact of family drug treatment courts (FDTCs) on child welfare outcomes have produced mixed results. This study evaluates the impact of a rural, FDTC collaborative on child welfare outcomes using propensity score analysis. Findings from the study show that children in the treatment group had longer stays in child welfare custody but were substantially less likely to experience future incidents of maltreatment than those in families with parental substance use disorders without these services. PMID:26827480

  3. Treatment of Tungiasis with Dimeticone: A Proof-of-Principle Study in Rural Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Thielecke, Marlene; Nordin, Per; Ngomi, Nicholas; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Tungiasis (sand flea disease) is a neglected tropical disease, prevalent in resource-poor communities in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by an inflammatory response against penetrated female sand fleas (Tunga penetrans) embedded in the skin of the host. Although associated with debilitating acute and chronic morbidity, there is no proven effective drug treatment. By consequence patients attempt to remove embedded sand fleas with non-sterile sharp instruments, such as safety pins, a procedure that represents a health threat by itself. In this proof-of-principle study we compared the topical application of a mixture of two dimeticones of low viscosity (NYDA) to the topical application of a 0.05% solution of KMnO4 in 47 school children in an endemic area in rural Kenya. The efficacy of the treatment was assessed during a follow up period of seven days using viability signs of the embedded parasites, alterations in the natural development of lesion morphology and the degree of local inflammation as outcome measures. Seven days after treatment, in the dimeticone group 78% (95% CI 67–86%) of the parasites had lost all signs of viability as compared to 39% (95% CI 28–52%) in the KMnO4 group (p<0.001). In the dimeticone group 90% (95% CI 80–95%) of the penetrated sand fleas showed an abnormal development already after 5 days, compared to 53% (95% CI 40–66%; p<0.001) in the KMnO4 group. Seven days after treatment, signs of local skin inflammation had significantly decreased in the dimeticone group (p<0.001). This study identified the topical application of dimeticones of low viscosity (NYDA) as an effective means to kill embedded sand fleas. In view of the efficacy and safety of the topical treatment with dimeticone, the mechanical extraction of embedded sand fleas using hazardous instruments is no longer warranted. PMID:25079375

  4. Medicinal plants used for the treatment of various skin disorders by a rural community in northern Maputaland, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin diseases have been of major concern recently due to their association with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immunity Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). The study area (northern Maputaland) has the highest HIV infection rate in South Africa, which made them more prone to a wide range of skin conditions. Fungal infections due to the hot climate and overcrowding households are common in this area, as well as burn accidents due to the use of wood as the major fuel for cooking. It is known that the lay people in this area depend on medicinal plants for their primary health care. However no survey has been done in northern Maputaland to document the medicinal plants used to treat various skin disorder. Methods Interviews were undertaken at 80 homesteads, using structured questionnaires. The focus was on plants used for dermatological conditions and information regarding vernacular plant names, plant parts used, preparation (independently and in various combinations) and application was collected. Results A total of 87 lay people, both male (22%) and female (78%) were interviewed on their knowledge of medicinal plants used to treat disorders of the skin. Forty-seven plant species from 35 families were recorded in the present survey for the treatment of 11 different skin disorders including abscesses, acne, burns, boils, incisions, ringworm, rashes, shingles, sores, wounds and warts. When searching the most frequently used scientific databases (ScienceDirect, Scopus and Pubmed), nine plant species (Acacia burkei, Brachylaena discolor, Ozoroa engleri, Parinari capensis, subsp. capensis, Portulacaria afra, Sida pseudocordifolia, Solanum rigescens, Strychnos madagascariensis and Drimia delagoensis) were found to be recorded for the first time globally as a treatment for skin disorders. Fourteen plant combinations were used. Surprisingly, the application of enema’s was frequently mentioned. Conclusions The preference of traditional medicine over

  5. The 2015 Clinical Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of HIV/AIDS in HIV-Infected Koreans

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Committee for Clinical Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of HIV/AIDS of the Korean Society for AIDS was founded in 2010. The first edition of the Korean guidelines was published in 2011, and revised in 2013. The recommendations in the guideline contain important information for physicians working with HIV/AIDS in the clinical field. However, due to the rapid discovery of new data in the field of HIV and the evolution of the clinical environment in Korea, it has become necessary to revise the guideline again. This guideline aims to provide up-to-date comprehensive information regarding the diagnosis and management of HIV/AIDS in Korea. This guideline deals with issues regarding the initial assessment of newly diagnosed patients, timing of antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation, preferred ART regimens in treatment-naïve as well as treatment-experienced patients and special populations such as HBV/HCV co-infected patients, or pregnant women. A brief summary of the revised guidelines and key changes to the original version of the guidelines are summarized below. PMID:26483998

  6. HIV treatment as prevention: the key to an AIDS-free generation.

    PubMed

    Hull, Mark W; Montaner, Julio S G

    2013-12-01

    The presence of elevated HIV viral load within blood and genital secretions is a critical driver of transmission events. Long-term suppression of viral load to undetectable levels through the use of antiretroviral therapy is now standard practice for clinical management of HIV. Antiretroviral therapy therefore can play a key role as a means to curb HIV transmission. Results of a randomized clinical trial, in conjunction with several observational studies, have now confirmed that antiretroviral therapy markedly decreases HIV transmission risk. Mathematical models and population-based ecologic studies suggest that further expansion of antiretroviral coverage within current guidelines can play a major role in controlling the spread of HIV. Expansion of so-called "Treatment as Prevention" initiatives relies upon maximal uptake of the HIV continuum-of-care cascade to allow for successful identification of those not yet known to be HIV-infected, engagement of patients in appropriate care, and subsequently achieving sustained virologic suppression in patients with the use of antiretroviral therapy. Since 2010, the Joint United Nations AIDS (UNAIDS) program has called for the inclusion of antiretroviral treatment as a key pillar in the global strategy to control the spread of HIV infection. This has now been invigorated by the release of the World Health Organization's 2013 Consolidated Antiretroviral Therapy Guidelines, recommending treatment to be offered to all HIV-infected individuals with CD4 cell counts below 500/mm(3), and, regardless of CD4 cell count, to serodiscordant couples, TB and HBV co-infected individuals, pregnant women, and children below the age of 5 years. PMID:25214752

  7. First aid and treatment for cervical spinal cord injury with fracture and dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Yisheng, W; Fuying, Z; Limin, W; Junwei, Li; Guofu, P; Weidong, W

    2007-01-01

    patients were treated by posterior approach surgery and combined anterior and posterior approach surgery was performed in a single sitting on 28 patients. Results: All patients were followed for 0.5-18 years (mean 11.8 years). At least one Frankel grade improvement was observed in 178 (60.3%) patients. In the anterior surgery group, the best results were observed in the cases with slight compressive fracture with disc herniation (44/50 patients, 88.0%). In the posterior surgery group, one Frankel grade improvement was observed in the cases with developmental spinal canal stenosis with trauma, lamina fractures, ligament injuries and hematoma (27/31, 87.1%). Most of the patients in the Frankel D group recovered normal neurological function after surgery. The majority of the patients with Frankel C neurological deficit (102/124) had the ability to walk postoperatively, while most of the seriously injured patients (Frankel A and B) had no improvement in their neurological function. Radiolographic fusion of the operated segments occurred in most patients within three months. Loss of intervertebral height and cervical physiological curvature was observed to varying degrees in 30.1% (71/236) of the cases in the anterior surgery group. Conclusion: First aid measures of early closed reduction or realignment and immobilization of the cervical spine, breathing support and high-dose methylprednisolone were most important in the treatment for traumatic spinal cord injury. Surgery should be performed as soon as the indications of spinal injury appear. The choice of the approach—anterior, posterior or both, should be based on the type of the injury and the surgeon's experience. Any complications should be actively prevented and treated. PMID:21139782

  8. Improving malaria home treatment by training drug retailers in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Marsh, V M; Mutemi, W M; Willetts, A; Bayah, K; Were, S; Ross, A; Marsh, K

    2004-04-01

    Recent global malaria control initiatives highlight the potential role of drug retailers to improve access to early effective malaria treatment. We report on the findings and discuss the implications of an educational programme for rural drug retailers and communities in Kenya between 1998 and 2001 in a study population of 70,000. Impact was evaluated through annual household surveys of over-the-counter (OTC) drug use and simulated retail client surveys in an early (1999) and a late (2000) implementation area. The programme achieved major improvements in drug selling practices. The proportion of OTC anti-malarial drug users receiving an adequate dose rose from 8% (n = 98) to 33% (n = 121) between 1998 and 1999 in the early implementation area. By 2001, and with the introduction of sulphadoxine pyrimethamine group drugs in accordance with national policy, this proportion rose to 64% (n = 441) across the early and late implementation areas. Overall, the proportion of shop-treated childhood fevers receiving an adequate dose of a recommended anti-malarial drug within 24 h rose from 1% (n = 681) to 28% (n = 919) by 2001. These findings strongly support the inclusion of private drug retailers in control strategies aiming to improve prompt effective treatment of malaria. PMID:15078263

  9. Individual treatment of hotel and restaurant waste water in rural areas.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, S W H; Ghyselbrecht, N; Vermeiren, T J L; Depuydt, V; Boeckaert, C

    2012-01-01

    About 25 hotels, restaurants and pubs in the rural community Heuvelland are situated in the area designated for individual water treatment. In order to meet the legislation by the end of 2015, each business needs to install an individual waste water treatment system (IWTS). To study this situation, three catering businesses were selected for further research. The aim of the study was to quantify the effluent quality and to assess IWTS performance for these catering businesses. First of all, the influence of discharging untreated waste water on the receiving surface water was examined. The results showed a decrease in water quality after the discharge point at every business. With the collected data, simulations with the software WEST were performed. With this software two types of IWTSs with different (buffer) volumes were modelled and tested for each catering business. The first type is a completely mixed activated sludge reactor and the second type is a submerged aerobic fixed-bed reactor. The results of these simulations demonstrate that purification with an IWTS is possible if the capacity is large enough and if an adequate buffer volume is installed and if regular maintenance is performed. PMID:22629640

  10. Integrated, Home-based Treatment for MDR-TB and HIV in Rural South Africa: An Alternate Model of Care

    PubMed Central

    Brust, James C.M.; Shah, N. Sarita; Scott, Michelle; Chaiyachati, Krisda; Lygizos, Melissa; van der Merwe, Theo L.; Bamber, Sheila; Radebe, Zanele; Loveday, Marian; Moll, Anthony P.; Margot, Bruce; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Friedland, Gerald H.; Gandhi, Neel R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Treatment outcomes for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in South Africa have suffered as centralized, inpatient treatment programs struggle to cope with rising prevalence and HIV co-infection rates. A new treatment model is needed to expand treatment capacity and improve MDR-TB and HIV outcomes. We describe the design and preliminary results of an integrated, home-based MDR-TB/HIV treatment program created in rural KwaZulu-Natal. In 2008, a decentralized center was established to provide outpatient MDR-TB and HIV treatment. Nurses, community health workers, and family supporters have been trained to administer injections, provide adherence support, and monitor adverse reactions in patients’ homes. Physicians assess clinical response, adherence, and adverse reaction severity to MDR-TB and HIV therapy at monthly follow-up visits. Treatment outcomes are assessed by monthly cultures and CD4 and viral load every 6 months. Eighty patients initiated MDR-TB therapy from 2/2008–4/2010; 66 were HIV co-infected. Retention has been high (only 5% defaults, 93% of visits attended) and preliminary outcomes have been favorable (77% cured/still on treatment, 82% undetectable viral load). Few patients have required escalation of care (9%), had severe adverse events (8%), or died (6%). Integrated, home-based treatment for MDR-TB and HIV is a promising treatment model to expand capacity and achieve improved outcomes in rural, resource-poor, and high-HIV prevalent settings. PMID:22668560

  11. Corneal foreign bodies--first aid, treatment, and outcomes. Skills review for an occupational health setting.

    PubMed

    Owens, J K; Scibilia, J; Hezoucky, N

    2001-05-01

    Eye injuries from foreign body incidents remain prevalent in the workplace setting. Often the professional nurse provides the first line of treatment. The informal class presented at the authors' facility offered a comprehensive, organized presentation of a common injury encountered in the practice of occupational health nursing. Strenghts of the presentation included handouts demonstrating eye eversion technique and a flip chart summarizing the content to be placed in each medical station as quick reference. One challenge involved presenting the information to all nurses. The site encompasses four locations and some nurses function as the only staff in the plant for a given shift. With the support of administration and some creative scheduling, 10 of 17 nurses attended one of three classes offered in one morning, and the remaining 7 were able to view the class on videotape. Videotaping the presentation also provided material for future orientation, as well as an opportunity for review. Overall analysis found this a worthwhile offering relevant to practice. A brief formal written evaluation indicated the objectives for the class were achieved and elicited subjects for future topics. Informal chart reviews to check for documentation of visual acuity testing and eversion of the upper lid for foreign body injuries is another outcome measure currently in progress. In addition, a performance improvement project could be accomplished easily by retrospective chart review of assessment and treatment documentation, and tracking of revisits and referrals. Knowledge of current standards in the assessment, first aid, and treatment of eye injuries is every occupational health nurse's responsibility. However, prevention of foreign body injuries is far superior to any treatment modality available. As highly visible leaders within the occupational setting, nurses can be advocates and role models for safe work practices. Occupational health nurses may promote safe eye practices by

  12. Self-treatment of malaria in rural communities, Butajira, southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed Central

    Deressa, Wakgari; Ali, A.; Enqusellassie, F.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To quantify the use of self-treatment and to determine the actions taken to manage malaria illness. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was undertaken in six peasant associations in Butajira district, southern Ethiopia, between January and September 1999. Simple random sampling was used to select a sample of 630 households with malaria cases within the last six months. FINDINGS: Overall, 616 (>97%) of the study households acted to manage malaria, including the use of antimalarial drugs at home (112, 17.8%), visiting health services after taking medication at home (294, 46.7%), and taking malaria patients to health care facilities without home treatment (210, 33.3%). Although 406 (64.5%) of the households initiated treatment at home, the use of modern drugs was higher (579, 92%) than that of traditional medicine (51, 8%). Modern drugs used included chloroquine (457, 73.5%) and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (377, 60.6%). Malaria control programmes were the main sources of antimalarials. In most cases of malaria, treatment was started (322, 52.3%) or health services visited (175, 34.7%) within two days of the onset of symptoms. Cases of malaria in the lowland areas started treatment and visited health services longer after the onset of malaria than those in the midland areas (adjusted odds ratio, 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.30-0.64; and adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.25-0.56, respectively). Similarly, those further than one hour's walk from the nearest health care facility initiated treatment later than those with less than one hour's walk (adjusted odds ratio, 0.62; 95% CI 0.43-0.87). This might be because of inaccessibility to antimalarial drugs and distant health care facilities in the lowland areas; however, statistically insignificant associations were found for sex, age, and religion. CONCLUSION: Self-treatment at home is the major action taken to manage malaria. Efforts should be made to improve the availability of effective antimalarials

  13. Sustained-release nanoART formulation for the treatment of neuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Jayant, Rahul Dev; Atluri, Venkata SR; Agudelo, Marisela; Sagar, Vidya; Kaushik, Ajeet; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach was developed for the coencapsulation of an anti-HIV drug (tenofovir) and a latency-breaking agent (vorinostat), using magnetically guided layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled nanocarriers for the treatment of neuroAIDS. Ultrasmall iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (10±3 nm) were synthesized and characterized. The LbL technique was used to achieve a sustained release profile, and application of 2 bilayers ([tenofovir+dextran sulphate]2+vorinostat) to magnetic nanoparticles resulted in a 2.8 times increase in drug (tenofovir) loading and also resulted in an increase in the drug release period by 30-fold, with 100% drug release in sustained manner over a period of 5 days with the simultaneous stimulation of latent HIV expression. Nanoformulation showed a good blood–brain barrier transmigration ability (37.95%±1.5%) with good in vitro antiviral efficacy (~33% reduction of p24 level) over a period of 5 days after HIV infection in primary human astrocytes, with good cell viability (>90%). Hence, LbL arrangements of drugs on magnetic nanoparticles provides sustained release and, therefore, may improve the patient’s adherence to therapy and lead to better compliance. PMID:25709433

  14. Role of Lycopene in Preventing Oral Diseases as a Nonsurgical Aid of Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonia; Jawanda, Manveen Kaur; Arora, Vikram; Mehta, Nishant; Yadav, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Without pigments, we are nothing. Life presents us with a kaleidoscope of colors. From the green grass of home to a forest's ruddy autumn hues, we are surrounded by living colors. Living things obtain their colors, with few exceptions, from natural pigments. In addition to their role in coloration, natural pigments carry out a variety of important biological functions. Of the various classes of pigments in nature, the carotenoids are among the most widespread and important ones, especially due to their varied functions. Lycopene is a red plant pigment found in tomatoes, apricots, guavas, watermelons, papayas, and pink grapefruits, with tomatoes being the largest contributor to the dietary intake of humans. Lycopene exhibits higher singlet oxygen quenching ability. Due to its strong color and nontoxicity, it is a useful food coloring agent. Moreover, it plays a multifunctional role as a nonsurgical aid in the treatment of oral diseases like leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, lichen planus, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and also prevents the destruction of periodontal tissues. This review article focuses mainly on the role of lycopene in the prevention of various oral diseases. PMID:26330986

  15. Role of Lycopene in Preventing Oral Diseases as a Nonsurgical Aid of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonia; Jawanda, Manveen Kaur; Arora, Vikram; Mehta, Nishant; Yadav, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Without pigments, we are nothing. Life presents us with a kaleidoscope of colors. From the green grass of home to a forest's ruddy autumn hues, we are surrounded by living colors. Living things obtain their colors, with few exceptions, from natural pigments. In addition to their role in coloration, natural pigments carry out a variety of important biological functions. Of the various classes of pigments in nature, the carotenoids are among the most widespread and important ones, especially due to their varied functions. Lycopene is a red plant pigment found in tomatoes, apricots, guavas, watermelons, papayas, and pink grapefruits, with tomatoes being the largest contributor to the dietary intake of humans. Lycopene exhibits higher singlet oxygen quenching ability. Due to its strong color and nontoxicity, it is a useful food coloring agent. Moreover, it plays a multifunctional role as a nonsurgical aid in the treatment of oral diseases like leukoplakia, oral submucous fibrosis, lichen planus, oral squamous cell carcinoma, and also prevents the destruction of periodontal tissues. This review article focuses mainly on the role of lycopene in the prevention of various oral diseases. PMID:26330986

  16. HIV/AIDS Outreach and Substance Abuse Treatment for Hard-To-Reach Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Lena, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    The six articles of this special section focus on HIV/AIDS outreach efforts with: (1) African-American drug users; (2) homeless substance abusers; (3) women at high risk; (4) Latinos at high risk; and (5) African Americans at high risk. All the programs were part of a federally funded outreach effort aimed at HIV/AIDS prevention. (SLD)

  17. Does Rurality Affect Quality of Life Following Treatment for Breast Cancer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid-Arndt, Stephanie A.; Cox, Cathy R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The present research examined the extent to which rural residence and social support seeking are associated with quality of life (QOL) among breast cancer patients following chemotherapy. Methods: Female breast cancer patients (n = 46) from communities of varying degrees of rurality in a Midwestern state completed psychological and QOL…

  18. Malaria treatment in the retail sector: Knowledge and practices of drug sellers in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Manuel W; Dillip, Angel; Lengeler, Christian; Obrist, Brigit; Msechu, June J; Makemba, Ahmed M; Mshana, Christopher; Schulze, Alexander; Mshinda, Hassan

    2008-01-01

    Background Throughout Africa, the private retail sector has been recognised as an important source of antimalarial treatment, complementing formal health services. However, the quality of advice and treatment at private outlets is a widespread concern, especially with the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). As a result, ACTs are often deployed exclusively through public health facilities, potentially leading to poorer access among parts of the population. This research aimed at assessing the performance of the retail sector in rural Tanzania. Such information is urgently required to improve and broaden delivery channels for life-saving drugs. Methods During a comprehensive shop census in the districts of Kilombero and Ulanga, Tanzania, we interviewed 489 shopkeepers about their knowledge of malaria and malaria treatment. A complementary mystery shoppers study was conducted in 118 retail outlets in order to assess the vendors' drug selling practices. Both studies included drug stores as well as general shops. Results Shopkeepers in drug stores were able to name more malaria symptoms and were more knowledgeable about malaria treatment than their peers in general shops. In drug stores, 52% mentioned the correct child-dosage of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) compared to only 3% in general shops. In drug stores, mystery shoppers were more likely to receive an appropriate treatment (OR = 9.6), but at an approximately seven times higher price. Overall, adults were more often sold an antimalarial than children (OR = 11.3). On the other hand, general shopkeepers were often ready to refer especially children to a higher level if they felt unable to manage the case. Conclusion The quality of malaria case-management in the retail sector is not satisfactory. Drug stores should be supported and empowered to provide correct malaria-treatment with drugs they are allowed to dispense. At the same time, the role of general shops as first contact points

  19. Preliminary Evaluation of Psychoeducational Support Interventions on Quality of Life in Rural Breast Cancer Survivors Post-Primary Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Karen; McNees, Patrick; Azuero, Andres; Loerzel, Victoria Wochna; Su, Xiaogang; Hassey, Lauren A.

    2010-01-01

    While most cancer survivors are at risk for being lost in the transition from treatment to survivorship, rural breast cancer survivors face special challenges that might place them at particular risk. This small scale preliminary study had two specific aims: (Aim 1) establish the feasibility of rural breast cancer survivors participation in a longitudinal quality of life (QOL) intervention trial; (Aim 2) determine the effects of the BCEI, the Breast Cancer Education Intervention, on overall QOL. Fifty-three rural breast cancer survivors were randomized to either an Experimental (n=27) or a Wait Control arm (n=26). Participants in the Experimental arm received the BCEI consisting of three face-to-face education and support sessions, two face-to-face and three telephone follow-up sessions along with supplemental written and audiotape materials over a six month period. BCEI modules and interventions are organized within a QOL framework. To address the possible effects of attention, Wait Control participants received three face to face sessions and three telephone sessions during the first six months of participation in the study, but not the BCEI intervention. Research questions addressing Aim 1 were: (a) can rural breast cancer survivors be recruited into a longitudinal intervention trial and (b) can their participation be retained. Research questions for Aim 2 were: (a) do participants who received the BCEI show improvement in overall QOL and (b) is the QOL improvement sustained over time. Data were analyzed using repeated measures general linear mixed models. Results demonstrated the ability to recruit and retain 53 rural breast cancer survivors; that the Experimental arm showed improvement in overall QOL (p=0.013), and; there were significant differences in overall QOL between the Experimental and Wait Control groups at both month 3 and month 6. Thus, it appears that at least some rural breast cancer survivors can and will participate in a larger trial, will

  20. Rurality and Rural Education: Discourses Underpinning Rurality and Rural Education Research in South African Postgraduate Education Research 1994-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nkambule, T.; Balfour, R. J.; Pillay, G.; Moletsane, R.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, rurality and rural education have been marginalised bodies of knowledge in South Africa. The post-1994 era has seen an emerging government concern to address the continuing interplay between poverty, HIV/AIDS, underdevelopment, and underachievement in schools categorised as rural. To address these concerns, scholars in South African…

  1. Characteristics of substance abuse treatment programs providing services for HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C virus infection, and sexually transmitted infections: the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lawrence S; Kritz, Steven Allan; Goldsmith, R Jeffrey; Bini, Edmund J; Rotrosen, John; Baker, Sherryl; Robinson, Jim; McAuliffe, Patrick

    2006-06-01

    Illicit drug users sustain the epidemics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), hepatitis C (HCV), and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Substance abuse treatment programs present a major intervention point in stemming these epidemics. As a part of the "Infections and Substance Abuse" study, established by the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network, sponsored by National Institute on Drug Abuse, three surveys were developed; for treatment program administrators, for clinicians, and for state and District of Columbia health and substance abuse department administrators, capturing service availability, government mandates, funding, and other key elements related to the three infection groups. Treatment programs varied in corporate structure, source of revenue, patient census, and medical and non-medical staffing; medical services, counseling services, and staff education targeted HIV/AIDS more often than HCV or STIs. The results from this study have the potential to generate hypotheses for further health services research to inform public policy. PMID:16716846

  2. 'I believe that the staff have reduced their closeness to patients': an exploratory study on the impact of HIV/AIDS on staff in four rural hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Dieleman, Marjolein; Bwete, Vincent; Maniple, Everd; Bakker, Mirjam; Namaganda, Grace; Odaga, John; van der Wilt, Gert Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background Staff shortages could harm the provision and quality of health care in Uganda, so staff retention and motivation are crucial. Understanding the impact of HIV/AIDS on staff contributes to designing appropriate retention and motivation strategies. This research aimed 'to identify the influence of HIV/AIDS on staff working in general hospitals at district level in rural areas and to explore support required and offered to deal with HIV/AIDS in the workplace'. Its results were to inform strategies to mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on hospital staff. Methods A cross-sectional study with qualitative and quantitative components was implemented during two weeks in September 2005. Data were collected in two government and two faith-based private not-for-profit hospitals purposively selected in rural districts in Uganda's Central Region. Researchers interviewed 237 people using a structured questionnaire and held four focus group discussions and 44 in-depth interviews. Results HIV/AIDS places both physical and, to some extent, emotional demands on health workers. Eighty-six per cent of respondents reported an increased workload, with 48 per cent regularly working overtime, while 83 per cent feared infection at work, and 36 per cent reported suffering an injury in the previous year. HIV-positive staff remained in hiding, and most staff did not want to get tested as they feared stigmatization. Organizational responses were implemented haphazardly and were limited to providing protective materials and the HIV/AIDS-related services offered to patients. Although most staff felt motivated to work, not being motivated was associated with a lack of daily supervision, a lack of awareness on the availability of HIV/AIDS counselling, using antiretrovirals and working overtime. The specific hospital context influenced staff perceptions and experiences. Conclusion HIV/AIDS is a crucially important contextual factor, impacting on working conditions in various ways. Therefore

  3. Community Effectiveness of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Infants (IPTi) in Rural Southern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong Schellenberg, Joanna R. M.; Shirima, Kizito; Maokola, Werner; Manzi, Fatuma; Mrisho, Mwifadhi; Mushi, Adiel; Mshinda, Hassan; Alonso, Pedro; Tanner, Marcel; Schellenberg, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine shows evidence of efficacy in individually randomized, controlled trials. In a large-scale effectiveness study, IPTi was introduced in April 2005 by existing health staff through routine contacts in 12 randomly selected divisions out of 24 in 6 districts of rural southern Tanzania. Coverage and effects on malaria and anemia were estimated through a representative survey in 2006 with 600 children aged 2–11 months. Coverage of IPTi was 47–76% depending on the definition. Using an intention to treat analysis, parasitemia prevalence was 31% in intervention and 38% in comparison areas (P = 0.06). In a “per protocol” analysis of children who had recently received IPTi, parasite prevalence was 22%, 19 percentage points lower than comparison children (P = 0.01). IPTi can be implemented on a large scale by existing health service staff, with a measurable population effect on malaria, within 1 year of launch. PMID:20439954

  4. Assessing preferences for wastewater treatment in a rural area using choice experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genius, Margarita; Menegaki, Angeliki N.; Tsagarakis, Konstantinos P.

    2012-04-01

    In areas that are still not serviced by a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), economic valuation of the benefits derived from its construction should focus not only on those attributes that are linked to the services provided by the plant, such as cleaner environment and the possibility of reuse, but also on those attributes that are linked to its existence such as possible landscape and odor effects. This paper presents a choice modeling (CM) application that elicits the value of the attributes of a WWTP, where the latter are given by odor and landscape effects, jobs created, water quality, irrigation applications of the produced recycled water, and the additional charging. The results show that for rural populations such as farmers' communities, the potential increase of irrigated agricultural land is the main driver of willingness to pay while concerns over possible odor effects are also important. In addition, ignoring possible correlations across subsets of alternatives and variance heterogeneity would lead to substantial overestimation of willingness to pay.

  5. Community effectiveness of intermittent preventive treatment for infants (IPTi) in rural southern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Armstrong Schellenberg, Joanna R M; Shirima, Kizito; Maokola, Werner; Manzi, Fatuma; Mrisho, Mwifadhi; Mushi, Adiel; Mshinda, Hassan; Alonso, Pedro; Tanner, Marcel; Schellenberg, David M

    2010-05-01

    Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in infants (IPTi) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine shows evidence of efficacy in individually randomized, controlled trials. In a large-scale effectiveness study, IPTi was introduced in April 2005 by existing health staff through routine contacts in 12 randomly selected divisions out of 24 in 6 districts of rural southern Tanzania. Coverage and effects on malaria and anemia were estimated through a representative survey in 2006 with 600 children aged 2-11 months. Coverage of IPTi was 47-76% depending on the definition. Using an intention to treat analysis, parasitemia prevalence was 31% in intervention and 38% in comparison areas (P = 0.06). In a "per protocol" analysis of children who had recently received IPTi, parasite prevalence was 22%, 19 percentage points lower than comparison children (P = 0.01). IPTi can be implemented on a large scale by existing health service staff, with a measurable population effect on malaria, within 1 year of launch. PMID:20439954

  6. A novel technology to improve drinking water quality using natural treatment methods in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mbogo, Shaaban Aman

    2008-03-01

    It is estimated that one billion people worldwide do not have access to treated drinking water. This paper reports on an investigation into the potential of indigenous or natural water treatment methods as alternatives to conventional chemical water treatment methods. The seeds of five natural plant species--Vigna unguiculata, Phaseolus mungo, Glycine max, Pisum sativam, and Arachis hypogea--were evaluated for the removal of turbidity, and their efficiency was compared with that of alum. The use of a solar energy-saving method to disinfect drinking water--leaving it to heat under the sun to reduce bacteria colonies--also was evaluated, The study revealed that for raw water with turbidity of 482 nephelometric turbidity units, coagulation with seed extracts from natural plant species reduced natural turbidity by 96.7 to 100 percent when the seed extract was used as the primary coagulant and by 100 percent when it was used as a coagulant aid. The study showed further that natural coagulants were as effective as commercial alum [Al2(SO4)3] and even superior for clarification because the optimum dosage was low compared with that of alum. Leaving samples of water clarified by natural coagulants on a black-painted roof for 8 hours achieved up to 100 percent bacteria kill. PMID:18348392

  7. Aspirin can aid bandage as the best treatment for leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    2016-05-27

    Best practice for venous leg ulcers is a firm graduated compression bandage to reduce venous hypertension, aid venous return and reduce peripheral oedema. Sadly, many healed ulcers recur within three months, possibly due to prolonged inflammatory response. PMID:27231076

  8. Limiting Cumulative HIV Viremia Copy-Years by Early Treatment Reduces Risk of AIDS and Death

    PubMed Central

    Walker, A. Sarah; Suthar, Amitabh B.; Sabin, Caroline; Bucher, Heiner C.; Jarrin, Inma; Moreno, Santiago; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Porter, Kholoud; Ford, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Viremia copy-years (VCY), a time-updated measure of cumulative HIV exposure, predicts AIDS/death; although its utility in deciding when to start combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) remains unclear. We aimed to assess the impact of initiating versus deferring cART on risk of AIDS/death by levels of VCY both independent of and within CD4 cell count strata ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter. Methods: Using Concerted Action on Seroconversion to AIDS and Death in Europe (CASCADE) data, we created a series of nested “trials” corresponding to consecutive months for individuals ≥16 years at seroconversion after 1995 who were cART-naive and AIDS-free. Pooling across all trials, time to AIDS/death by CD4, and VCY strata was compared in those initiating vs. deferring cART using Cox models adjusted for: country, sex, risk group, seroconversion year, age, time since last HIV-RNA, and current CD4, VCY, HIV-RNA, and mean number of previous CD4/HIV-RNA measurements/year. Results: Of 9353 individuals, 5312 (57%) initiated cART and 486 (5%) acquired AIDS/died. Pooling CD4 strata, risk of AIDS/death associated with initiating vs. deferring cART reduced as VCY increased. In patients with high CD4 cell counts, ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter, there was a trend for a greater reduction for those initiating vs. deferring with increasing VCY (P = 0.09), with the largest benefit in the VCY ≥100,000 copy-years/mL group [hazard ratio (95% CI) = 0.41 (0.19 to 0.87)]. Conclusions: For individuals with CD4 ≥500 cells per cubic millimeter, limiting the cumulative HIV burden to <100,000 copy-years/mL through cART may reduce the risk of AIDS/death. PMID:27116045

  9. Reasons for Schizophrenia Patients Remaining out of Treatment: Results from a Prospective Study in a Rural South Indian Community

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Channaveerachari Naveen; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Suresha, Kudumallige Krishnappa; Venkatesh, Basappa K.; Kishorekumar, Kengeri V.; Arunachala, Udupi; Gangadhar, Bangalore N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A few studies have examined the factors associated with schizophrenia patients remaining untreated in India. Materials and Methods: We identified 184 schizophrenia patients in a rural community, offered the treatment with antipsychotics and followed them up in their Primary Health Centers for 1-year. Twenty-nine (15.8%) patients remained untreated at both the baseline and 1-year follow-up despite our best attempts to keep them under the treatment umbrella. They were interviewed in detail regarding the reasons for remaining untreated. This group was compared with another group of patients (n = 69) who had stopped the treatment at baseline but were successfully brought under the treatment umbrella throughout the 1-year follow-up period. Results: The reasons for remaining untreated were (n; %): (a) Unsatisfactory improvement with previous treatment attempts (19; 65.5%), (b) poor bond between the patients and the families (6; 20.7%), (c) active symptoms not allowing any treatment efforts from the family members (6; 20.7%), (d) magico-religious beliefs about the illness and its treatment (4; 13.8%), (e) poor social support (3; 10.3%), (f) adverse effects of the medications (2; 6.9%), and (g) perception of recovery and cure (1; 3.4%). For many patients, a constellation of these reasons was responsible for them remaining untreated. In contrast, the common reasons for those who restarted medications to have stopped the treatment at some time were the lack of awareness, the need to continue medications (47; 68.1%), and the financial constraints (28; 40.6%). Conclusion: The predominant reason for schizophrenia patients not remaining on the treatment in this rural community was the families’ lack of faith in antipsychotic treatment. Provision of comprehensive treatment package including medical, psychosocial and rehabilitative services, and sensitizing the community about benefits of the treatment may help in ensuring that all patients with psychosis receive the

  10. First aid for dental trauma caused by sports activities: state of knowledge, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Emerich, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Jan

    2010-05-01

    In view of the widespread lack of knowledge of first aid procedures in cases of dental trauma, this article describes the current state of knowledge and highlights the need for education of those likely to witness or be victims of dental trauma while practising sports. Dental and oral injuries, the commonest type of orofacial injuries, are often sustained by athletes playing contact sports; indeed, they represent the most frequent type of sporting injury. Studies of a large group of children and adults have shown that as many as 31% of all orofacial injuries are caused by sporting activities. Furthermore, current literature on the subject emphasizes that awareness of appropriate triage procedures following dental trauma is unsatisfactory. Delay in treatment is the single most influential factor affecting prognosis. What should we know and, more importantly, what should we do? Immediate replantation of an avulsed tooth is the best treatment option at the site of the accident. If replantation is impossible, milk is the preferred transport medium for the avulsed tooth. There is a general low level of awareness about the need for prompt triage of traumatic dental injuries sustained in sports, despite their relative frequency. When a cohort of Swiss basketball players was interviewed, only half were aware that an avulsed tooth could be replanted. Cheap, commercially available tooth storage devices containing an isotonic transport medium (so-called 'Save-a-Tooth boxes'), can maintain the viability of an avulsed tooth for up to 72 hours, prior to replantation. More readily available storage media such as milk, sterile saline or even saliva may be used, but knowledge of this information is rare among sports participants. For example, just 6.6% of the Swiss basketball players interviewed were aware of the 'Tooth Rescue box' products. Sporting organizations seem to offer very little information about sports-related risks or preventive strategies for orodental trauma. Having

  11. Screening and evaluation of polymers as flocculation aids for the treatment of aquacultural effluents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebeling, J.M.; Rishel, K.L.; Sibrell, P.L.

    2005-01-01

    As environmental regulations become more stringent, environmentally sound waste management and disposal are becoming increasingly more important in all aquaculture operations. One of the primary water quality parameters of concern is the suspended solids concentration in the discharged effluent. For example, EPA initially considered the establishment of numerical limitations for only one single pollutant: total suspended solids (TSS). For recirculation systems, the proposed TSS limitations would have applied to solids polishing or secondary solids removal technology. The new rules and regulations from EPA (August 23, 2004) require only qualitative TSS limits, in the form of solids control best management practices (BMP), allowing individual regional and site specific conditions to be addressed by existing state or regional programs through NPDES permits. In recirculation systems, microscreen filters are commonly used to remove the suspended solids from the process water. Further concentration of suspended solids from the backwash water of the microscreen filter could significantly reduce quantity of discharge water. And in some cases, the backwash water from microscreen filters needs to be further concentrated to minimize storage volume during over wintering for land disposal or other final disposal options. In addition, this may be required to meet local, state, and regional discharge water quality. The objective of this research was an initial screening of several commercially available polymers routinely used as coagulation-flocculation aids in the drinking and wastewater treatment industry and determination of their effectiveness for the treatment of aquaculture wastewater. Based on the results of the initial screening, a further evaluation of six polymers was conducted to estimate the optimum polymer dosage for flocculation of aquaculture microscreen effluent and overall solids removal efficiency. Results of these evaluations show TSS removal was close to 99

  12. Western health practitioners' view about African traditional health practitioners' treatment and care of people living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Summerton, J V

    2006-08-01

    African traditional health practitioners are an important source of health care for many South Africans. Thus, they are a health resource in this society. However, the integration of traditional health practitioners into the mainstream of health care is a complex process. Various factors contribute to this complexity, including the skepticism and reservation with which some western health practitioners view traditional health practitioners. This paper highlights the perceived strengths and weaknesses of the traditional healing system for people living with HIV/AIDS, as perceived by western health practitioners. The use of traditional practitioners as a choice of health care is attributed to both the strengths and weaknesses of this system of health care. The strength of the traditional healing system is in its sharing of the worldview and belief system of its users, it being an alternative to an inefficient western health care system (official system), privacy and absence of time limitations per consultation, treating patients psychologically, and scientifically unexplained physiological relief of the symptoms of specific illnesses. The perceived weaknesses of the traditional healing system include harmful treatment regimens, especially for people living with HIV/AIDS; prolonging the seeking of appropriate health care when traditional remedies fail to produce the desired effect; destroying interpersonal relationships of people living with HIV/AIDS through witchcraft accusations; psychological torment caused by the belief that HIV/AIDS can be cured by traditional remedies/intervention; and increasing the workload of western practitioners who are requested by patients to conduct multiple HIV tests after undergoing various traditional treatment regimens to cure HIV/AIDS. It is recommended that traditional practitioners be encouraged to adapt harmful traditional healing practices to the benefit of their patients in a non-judgemental and non-critical manner. In addition

  13. Pentecostalism and AIDS treatment in Mozambique: creating new approaches to HIV prevention through anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, James

    2011-01-01

    Pentecostal fervor has rapidly spread throughout central and southern Mozambique since the end of its protracted civil war in the early 1990s. In the peri-urban bairros and septic fringes of Mozambican cities African Independent Churches (AICs) with Pentecostal roots and mainstream Pentecostals can now claim over half the population as adherents. Over this same period another important phenomenon has coincided with this church expansion: the AIDS epidemic. Pentecostalism and HIV have travelled along similar vectors and been propelled by deepening inequality. Recognising this relationship has important implications for HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment strategies. The striking overlap between high HIV prevalence in peri-urban populations and high Pentecostal participation suggests that creative strategies, to include these movements in HIV/AIDS programming, may influence the long-term success of HIV care and the scale-up of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) across the region. The provision of ART has opened up new possibilities for engaging with local communities, especially Pentecostals and AICS, who are witnessing the immediate benefits of ARV therapy. Expanded treatment may be the key to successful prevention as advocates of a comprehensive approach to the epidemic have long argued. PMID:21892893

  14. Mass HIV Treatment and Sex Disparities in Life Expectancy: Demographic Surveillance in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Jacob; Rosen, Sydney; Chimbindi, Natsayi; Haber, Noah; Herbst, Kobus; Mutevedzi, Tinofa; Tanser, Frank; Pillay, Deenan; Bärnighausen, Till

    2015-01-01

    Background Women have better patient outcomes in HIV care and treatment than men in sub-Saharan Africa. We assessed—at the population level—whether and to what extent mass HIV treatment is associated with changes in sex disparities in adult life expectancy, a summary metric of survival capturing mortality across the full cascade of HIV care. We also determined sex-specific trends in HIV mortality and the distribution of HIV-related deaths in men and women prior to and at each stage of the clinical cascade. Methods and Findings Data were collected on all deaths occurring from 2001 to 2011 in a large population-based surveillance cohort (52,964 women and 45,688 men, ages 15 y and older) in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Cause of death was ascertained by verbal autopsy (93% response rate). Demographic data were linked at the individual level to clinical records from the public sector HIV treatment and care program that serves the region. Annual rates of HIV-related mortality were assessed for men and women separately, and female-to-male rate ratios were estimated in exponential hazard models. Sex-specific trends in adult life expectancy and HIV-cause-deleted adult life expectancy were calculated. The proportions of HIV deaths that accrued to men and women at different stages in the HIV cascade of care were estimated annually. Following the beginning of HIV treatment scale-up in 2004, HIV mortality declined among both men and women. Female adult life expectancy increased from 51.3 y (95% CI 49.7, 52.8) in 2003 to 64.5 y (95% CI 62.7, 66.4) in 2011, a gain of 13.2 y. Male adult life expectancy increased from 46.9 y (95% CI 45.6, 48.2) in 2003 to 55.9 y (95% CI 54.3, 57.5) in 2011, a gain of 9.0 y. The gap between female and male adult life expectancy doubled, from 4.4 y in 2003 to 8.6 y in 2011, a difference of 4.3 y (95% CI 0.9, 7.6). For women, HIV mortality declined from 1.60 deaths per 100 person-years (95% CI 1.46, 1.75) in 2003 to 0.56 per 100 person

  15. Difficulties facing healthcare workers in the era of AIDS treatment in Lesotho.

    PubMed

    Koto, Masebeo Veronica; Maharaj, Pranitha

    2016-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected by the AIDS pandemic and Lesotho is no exception. In many countries, healthcare workers are at the forefront of the fight against AIDS. This study explores the difficulties facing healthcare workers in Lesotho using a combination of qualitative methods--focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. The findings suggest that healthcare workers are afraid of contracting HIV from their patients and this affects their delivery of services. In addition, the results revealed that poor infrastructure and shortage of supplies at the facilities hinder healthcare workers from performing their duties effectively. The other concern was the heavy workload and severe time constraints which puts enormous stress on healthcare workers. Stigma and discrimination emerged as major problems for healthcare workers. Addressing the challenges facing healthcare workers is essential in effectively managing the AIDS pandemic facing the continent. PMID:27128878

  16. Leveraging HIV Treatment to End AIDS, Stop New HIV Infections, and Avoid the Cost of Inaction

    PubMed Central

    Sidibé, Michel; Zuniga, José M.; Montaner, Julio

    2014-01-01

    We have the tools at our disposal to significantly bend AIDS-related morbidity and mortality curves and reduce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence. It is thus essential to redouble our efforts to reach the goal of placing 15 million people on life-saving and -enhancing antiretroviral therapy (ART) by 2015. In reaching this milestone, we can write a new chapter in the history of global health, demonstrating that a robust, multidimensional response can succeed against a complex pandemic that presents as many social and political challenges as it does medical ones. This milestone is also critical to advance our ultimate goal of ending AIDS by maximizing the therapeutic and preventive effects of ART, which translates into a world in which AIDS-related deaths and new HIV infections are exceedingly rare. PMID:24926030

  17. "Conditional Scholarships" for HIV/AIDS Health Workers: Educating and Retaining the Workforce to Provide Antiretroviral Treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa. NBER Working Paper No. 13396

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.

    2007-01-01

    Without large increases in the number of health workers to treat HIV/AIDS (HAHW), most developing countries will be unable to achieve universal coverage with antiretroviral treatment (ART), leading to large numbers of potentially avoidable deaths among people living with HIV/AIDS. We use Markov Monte Carlo microsimulation to estimate the expected…

  18. Ivermectin Treatment and Sanitation Effectively Reduce Strongyloides stercoralis Infection Risk in Rural Communities in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Forrer, Armelle; Khieu, Virak; Schindler, Christian; Schär, Fabian; Marti, Hanspeter; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Strongyloides stercoralis is the only soil-transmitted helminth with the ability to replicate within its host, leading to long-lasting and potentially fatal infections. It is ubiquitous and its worldwide prevalence has recently been estimated to be at least half that of hookworm. Information on the epidemiology of S. stercoralis remains scarce and modalities for its large-scale control are yet to be determined. Methodology/Principal Findings A community-based two-year cohort study was conducted among the general population in a rural province in North Cambodia. At each survey, participants infected with S. stercoralis were treated with a single oral dose of ivermectin (200μg/kg BW). Diagnosis was performed using a combination of the Baermann method and Koga agar plate culture on two stool samples. The cohort included participants from eight villages who were either positive or negative for S. stercoralis at baseline. Mixed logistic regression models were employed to assess risk factors for S. stercoralis infection at baseline and re-infection at follow-up. A total of 3,096 participants were examined at baseline, revealing a S. stercoralis prevalence of 33.1%. Of these participants, 1,269 were followed-up over two years. Re-infection and infection rates among positive and negative participants at baseline were 14.4% and 9.6% at the first and 11.0% and 11.5% at the second follow-up, respectively. At follow-up, all age groups were at similar risk of acquiring an infection, while infection risk significantly decreased with increasing village sanitation coverage. Conclusions/Significance Chemotherapy-based control of S. stercoralis is feasible and highly beneficial, particularly in combination with improved sanitation. The impact of community-based ivermectin treatment on S. stercoralis was high, with over 85% of villagers remaining negative one year after treatment. The integration of S. stercoralis into existing STH control programs should be considered

  19. Kenya AIDS Indicator Surveys 2007 and 2012: Implications for Public Health Policies for HIV Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Maina, William K.; Kim, Andrea A.; Rutherford, George W.; Harper, Malayah; K’Oyugi, Boniface O.; Sharif, Shahnaaz; Kichamu, George; Muraguri, Nicholas M.; Akhwale, Willis; De Cock, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    AIDS Indicator Surveys are standardized surveillance tools used by countries with generalized HIV epidemics to provide, in a timely fashion, indicators for effective monitoring of HIV. Such data should guide responses to the HIV epidemic, meet program reporting requirements, and ensure comparability of findings across countries and over time. Kenya has conducted 2 AIDS Indicator Surveys, in 2007 (KAIS 2007) and 2012–2013 (KAIS 2012). These nationally representative surveys have provided essential epidemiologic, socio-demographic, behavioral, and biologic data on HIV and related indicators to evaluate the national HIV response and inform policies for prevention and treatment of the disease. We present a summary of findings from KAIS 2007 and KAIS 2012 and the impact that these data have had on changing HIV policies and practice. PMID:24732817

  20. Effects of Viewing an Evidence-Based Video Decision Aid on Patients’ Treatment Preferences for Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Jon D.; Spratt, Kevin F.; Blood, Emily A.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Weinstein, James N.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis within a large clinical trial Objective To evaluate the changes in treatment preference before and after watching a video decision aid as part of an informed consent process. Summary of Background Data A randomized trial with a similar decision aid in herniated disc patients had shown decreased rate of surgery in the video group, but the effect of the video on expressed preferences is not known. Methods Subjects enrolling in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) with intervertebral disc herniation (IDH), spinal stenosis (SPS), or degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) at thirteen multidisciplinary spine centers across the US were given an evidence-based videotape decision aid viewed prior to enrollment as part of informed consent. Results Of the 2505 patients, 86% (n=2151) watched the video and 14% (n=354) did not. Watchers shifted their preference more often than non-watchers(37.9% vs. 20.8%, p < 0.0001) and more often demonstrated a strengthened preference (26.2% vs. 11.1%, p < 0.0001). Among the 806 patients whose preference shifted after watching the video, 55% shifted toward surgery (p=0.003). Among the 617 who started with no preference, after the video 27% preferred non-operative care, 22% preferred surgery, and 51% remained uncertain. Conclusion After watching the evidence-based patient decision aid (video) used in SPORT, patients with specific lumbar spine disorders formed and/or strengthened their treatment preferences in a balanced way that did not appear biased toward or away from surgery. PMID:21358485

  1. Patient reports of symptoms and their treatment at three palliative care projects servicing individuals with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Karus, Daniel; Raveis, Victoria H; Alexander, Carla; Hanna, Barbara; Selwyn, Peter; Marconi, Katherine; Higginson, Irene

    2005-11-01

    Self-reports of 32 symptoms and their treatments were obtained from patients of three palliative care programs that provide services to seriously ill HIV patients (>or=95% AIDS) in Alabama (n=47), Baltimore (n=91), and New York City (n=117). On average, patients reported 10.9 (SD=7.6) to 12.7 (SD=6.2) symptoms. Pain, lack of energy, and worrying were reported by a majority of patients at all sites, often with a high level of associated distress. For only four symptoms (pain, nausea, difficulty swallowing, and mouth sores) did half or more of patients at all sites experiencing the symptom also report treatment. Less than a third of patients experiencing 12 symptoms (five of six comprising a psychological subscale) reported treatment. Results show that despite the availability of more efficacious treatments, many HIV/AIDS patients continue to experience significant physical and psychological symptomatology. Many of those experiencing symptoms, however, do not perceive their symptoms as being treated. PMID:16310615

  2. Awareness and perceptions on prevention, first aid and treatment of snakebites among Sri Lankan farmers: a knowledge practice mismatch?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Snakebite is a global health problem associated with high morbidity and mortality. In Sri Lanka, snakebite is mainly an occupational health hazard associated with farming. Understanding awareness and perceptions in risk populations on the preventive measures, first aid and treatment for snakebite becomes pivotal in designing snakebite prevention and control programs. Using an investigator assisted self completed questionnaire, we assessed the awareness and perceptions of 176 part-time and full-time, Chena and paddy farmers from three dry zone districts of Sri Lanka where agriculture is the main economic activity. Findings High percentages of the participants were aware of practices that minimize snakebites in houses and outside, available treatments and most of the recommended first aid measures. Western medical treatment was preferred by the vast majority of the farmers over the traditional treatment. Conclusion Some of the protective measures that the farmers were aware of are not practiced generally in Sri Lanka, suggesting a knowledge-practice mismatch. We suggest studies to understand the effects of socioeconomic and cultural determinants on snakebite prevention in Sri Lanka. PMID:24847375

  3. Clinical epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in China from 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Shen, Yinzhong; Jiang, Xiaofei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiaoming; Lu, Hongzhou

    2014-02-01

    This study retrospectively analyzed Chinese publicly reported data on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). The HIV/AIDS morbidity (1/100,000) and mortality (1/100,000) rates in China continually increased from 0.23 and 0.06 in 2004 to 1.53 and 0.69 in 2011, respectively. The AIDS case fatality rate decreased yearly from 53.57% in 2008 to 45.11% in 2011, and the fatality rate in rural areas (0.25-0.42%) was higher than that in cities (0.13-0.22%). The number of HIV/AIDS patients discharged from city-level hospitals increased from 329 in 2004 to 7,266 in 2011, and this number was higher than the number of similar patients discharged from county-level (rural) hospitals (the number of HIV/AIDS patients increased from 252 in 2004 to 5,957 in 2011). The factors contributing to these trends include: enhanced physician HIV/AIDS education regarding diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, testing, and treatment; improved safety of blood collection and use; and improved management of HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, HIV/AIDS prevention and control in rural areas of China is the key to reducing HIV transmission and mortality in China. PMID:24647113

  4. Patterns of geohelminth infection, impact of albendazole treatment and re-infection after treatment in schoolchildren from rural KwaZulu-Natal/South-Africa

    PubMed Central

    Saathoff, Elmar; Olsen, Annette; Kvalsvig, Jane D; Appleton, Chris C

    2004-01-01

    Background Geohelminth infection is a major health problem of children from rural areas of developing countries. In an attempt to reduce this burden, the Department of Health of the province of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) established in 1998 a programme for helminth control that aimed at regularly treating primary school children for schistosomiasis and intestinal helminths. This article describes the baseline situation and the effect of treatment on geohelminth infection in a rural part of the province. Methods Grade 3 schoolchildren from Maputaland in northern KZN were examined for infections with hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Trichuris trichiura, treated twice with 400 mg albendazole and re-examined several times over one year after the first treatment in order to assess the impact of treatment and patterns of infection and re-infection. Results The hookworm prevalence in the study population (83.2%) was considerably higher than in other parts of the province whereas T. trichiura and especially A. lumbricoides prevalences (57.2 and 19.4%, respectively) were much lower than elsewhere on the KZN coastal plain. Single dose treatment with albendazole was very effective against hookworm and A. lumbricoides with cure rates (CR) of 78.8 and 96.4% and egg reduction rates (ERR) of 93.2 and 97.7%, respectively. It was exceptionally ineffective against T. trichiura (CR = 12.7%, ERR = 24.8%). Re-infection with hookworm and A. lumbricoides over 29 weeks after treatment was considerable but still well below pre-treatment levels. Conclusion High geohelminth prevalences and re-infection rates in the study population confirm the need for regular treatment of primary school children in the area. The low effectiveness of single course albendazole treatment against T. trichiura infection however demands consideration of alternative treatment approaches. PMID:15310401

  5. A Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Depression in Rural American Indian Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Listug-Lunde, Lori; Vogeltanz-Holm, Nancy; Collins, John

    2013-01-01

    Rural American Indian (AI) middle school students with depressive symptoms who participated in a culturally modified version of the Adolescent Coping with Depression (CWD-A) course (n = 8) reported significant improvement in depressive symptoms at post-intervention and at 3-month follow-up. There was also a nonsignificant but clinically relevant…

  6. Volunteerism or Labor Exploitation? Harnessing the Volunteer Spirit to Sustain AIDS Treatment Programs in Urban Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Based on ethnographic research in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, this paper describes NGO efforts to encourage AIDS care volunteers to eschew material returns for their labor and instead reflect on the goodness of sacrificing to promote the survival of people living with HIV/AIDS. Consensus analysis of motivational survey data collected from a sample of AIDS care volunteers (n=110) suggests that they strongly share a sacrificial and prosocial motivational model. These results may be explained by several factors, including the efforts of the organizations to shape volunteers’ motivations, the self-selection of volunteers, positive reinforcement in seeing one’s patients become healthy, and social desirability bias. In-depth interviews examining the motivations and behaviors of volunteers reveal a more complicated picture: even ostensibly devoted and altruistic volunteers strongly question their service commitments. The complexity and ambivalence of volunteers’ motivations reflect the profound uncertainty that they face in achieving improved socioeconomic status for themselves and their families amid widespread unemployment and sharply rising food prices. Their desires for economic opportunities explain why local NGOs exert so much effort to shape and sustain—and yet fail to completely control—their motivations. This recasts economically-insecure volunteers’ consent to donate their labor as a process of negotiation with their organizers. Future research should explore how models of health care volunteerism and volunteer motivations are shaped by individual and collective experiences in political-economic context. PMID:24077802

  7. American Foundation for AIDS Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Press Corporate Support amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research Research Overview Research Grants Research Accomplishments Scientific ... Archive TREAT Asia TREAT Asia About TREAT Asia AIDS in Asia Research and Treatment Education and AIDS ...

  8. [Direct hearing aid provision by ENT specialists: Recommendations for prevention and treatment of complications after taking ear impressions].

    PubMed

    Caffier, Ph P; Sedlmaier, B; Hölzl, M

    2009-07-01

    In times of budgeting, rising costs and monetary losses, an increasing number of ENT specialists considers the hearing system sector due to the distinct undersupply and the expected demographic development to be a market of the future and appropriate to enlarge their field of competence. Exact prevalence of direct hearing aid provision by German otorhinolaryngologists as well as its complication rate are not well-known. Retrospectively, all patients were evaluated who presented at our department with complications in the context of outpatient direct hearing aid supply within the last 3 years. Inappropriate fitting contains the danger of malformed or displaced ear impressions with various injury patterns comprising the external auditory canal, tympanic membrane and ossicular chain. Practical advices for prevention of complications include the accurate modeling and placement of sufficient impression pads behind the second bend of the auditory canal, using an adequate type of impression material as well as performing the correct application procedures. Recommendations for diagnostic patterns and treatment of complications after taking ear impressions are presented, the differences between German "traditional" and "direct" hearing aid provision are critically discussed. PMID:19579285

  9. Successful treatment of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and disseminated intravascular coagulation secondary to histoplasmosis in a patient with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nieto, John Fredy; Gómez, Sandra Milena; Moncada, Diana Carolina; Serna, Lina María; Hidrón, Alicia Inés

    2015-01-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is an uncommon syndrome that results from an uncontrolled activation of macrophages and lymphocytes resulting in the compromise of multiple organs that is potentially fatal without timely treatment. It can be hereditary or a secondary result of infectious processes, neoplasms or autoimmune conditions. We present the case of a patient with HIV/AIDS who developed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis as well as disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with histoplasmosis and who was successfully treated with amphotericin B, steroids and transitory dialytic support. PMID:27622618

  10. Learning about HIV/AIDS in Uganda: Digital Resources and Language Learner Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Bonny; Jones, Shelley; Ahimbisibwe, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    While the HIV/AIDS epidemic has wrought havoc in the lives of millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa, access to information about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of the disease remains a challenge for many, and particularly for young people. This article reports on an action research study undertaken in a rural Ugandan village in 2006.…

  11. Antibiotics in Wastewater of a Rural and an Urban Hospital before and after Wastewater Treatment, and the Relationship with Antibiotic Use-A One Year Study from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Lien, La Thi Quynh; Hoa, Nguyen Quynh; Chuc, Nguyen Thi Kim; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Minh; Phuc, Ho Dang; Diwan, Vishal; Dat, Nguyen Thanh; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby

    2016-01-01

    Hospital effluents represent an important source for the release of antibiotics and antibiotic resistant bacteria into the environment. This study aims to determine concentrations of various antibiotics in wastewater before and after wastewater treatment in a rural hospital (60 km from the center of Hanoi) and in an urban hospital (in the center of Hanoi) in Vietnam, and it aims to explore the relationship between antibiotic concentrations in wastewater before wastewater treatment and quantities of antibiotics used in the rural hospital, over a period of one year in 2013. Water samples were collected using continuous sampling for 24 h in the last week of every month. The data on quantities of antibiotics delivered to all inpatient wards were collected from the Pharmacy department in the rural hospital. Solid-phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were used for chemical analysis. Significant concentrations of antibiotics were present in the wastewater both before and after wastewater treatment of both the rural and the urban hospital. Ciprofloxacin was detected at the highest concentrations in the rural hospital's wastewater (before treatment: mean = 42.8 µg/L; after treatment: mean = 21.5 µg/L). Metronidazole was detected at the highest concentrations in the urban hospital's wastewater (before treatment: mean = 36.5 µg/L; after treatment: mean = 14.8 µg/L). A significant correlation between antibiotic concentrations in wastewater before treatment and quantities of antibiotics used in the rural hospital was found for ciprofloxacin (r = 0.78; p = 0.01) and metronidazole (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). PMID:27314366

  12. Antibiotics in Wastewater of a Rural and an Urban Hospital before and after Wastewater Treatment, and the Relationship with Antibiotic Use—A One Year Study from Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Lien, La Thi Quynh; Hoa, Nguyen Quynh; Chuc, Nguyen Thi Kim; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Minh; Phuc, Ho Dang; Diwan, Vishal; Dat, Nguyen Thanh; Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby

    2016-01-01

    Hospital effluents represent an important source for the release of antibiotics and antibiotic resistant bacteria into the environment. This study aims to determine concentrations of various antibiotics in wastewater before and after wastewater treatment in a rural hospital (60 km from the center of Hanoi) and in an urban hospital (in the center of Hanoi) in Vietnam, and it aims to explore the relationship between antibiotic concentrations in wastewater before wastewater treatment and quantities of antibiotics used in the rural hospital, over a period of one year in 2013. Water samples were collected using continuous sampling for 24 h in the last week of every month. The data on quantities of antibiotics delivered to all inpatient wards were collected from the Pharmacy department in the rural hospital. Solid-phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were used for chemical analysis. Significant concentrations of antibiotics were present in the wastewater both before and after wastewater treatment of both the rural and the urban hospital. Ciprofloxacin was detected at the highest concentrations in the rural hospital’s wastewater (before treatment: mean = 42.8 µg/L; after treatment: mean = 21.5 µg/L). Metronidazole was detected at the highest concentrations in the urban hospital’s wastewater (before treatment: mean = 36.5 µg/L; after treatment: mean = 14.8 µg/L). A significant correlation between antibiotic concentrations in wastewater before treatment and quantities of antibiotics used in the rural hospital was found for ciprofloxacin (r = 0.78; p = 0.01) and metronidazole (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). PMID:27314366

  13. Evolution of Antiretroviral Drug Costs in Brazil in the Context of Free and Universal Access to AIDS Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Amy S; Fonseca, Elize M; Bastos, Francisco I; Gruskin, Sofia; Salomon, Joshua A

    2007-01-01

    Background Little is known about the long-term drug costs associated with treating AIDS in developing countries. Brazil's AIDS treatment program has been cited widely as the developing world's largest and most successful AIDS treatment program. The program guarantees free access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for all people living with HIV/AIDS in need of treatment. Brazil produces non-patented generic antiretroviral drugs (ARVs), procures many patented ARVs with negotiated price reductions, and recently issued a compulsory license to import one patented ARV. In this study, we investigate the drivers of recent ARV cost trends in Brazil through analysis of drug-specific prices and expenditures between 2001 and 2005. Methods and Findings We compared Brazil's ARV prices to those in other low- and middle-income countries. We analyzed trends in drug expenditures for HAART in Brazil from 2001 to 2005 on the basis of cost data disaggregated by each ARV purchased by the Brazilian program. We decomposed the overall changes in expenditures to compare the relative impacts of changes in drug prices and drug purchase quantities. We also estimated the excess costs attributable to the difference between prices for generics in Brazil and the lowest global prices for these drugs. Finally, we estimated the savings attributable to Brazil's reduced prices for patented drugs. Negotiated drug prices in Brazil are lowest for patented ARVs for which generic competition is emerging. In recent years, the prices for efavirenz and lopinavir–ritonavir (lopinavir/r) have been lower in Brazil than in other middle-income countries. In contrast, the price of tenofovir is US$200 higher per patient per year than that reported in other middle-income countries. Despite precipitous price declines for four patented ARVs, total Brazilian drug expenditures doubled, to reach US$414 million in 2005. We find that the major driver of cost increases was increased purchase quantities of six

  14. The role of HIV testing, counselling, and treatment in coping with HIV/AIDS in Uganda: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Nyanzi-Wakholi, Barbara; Lara, Antonieta Medina; Watera, Christine; Munderi, Paula; Gilks, Charles; Grosskurth, Heiner

    2009-07-01

    HIV/AIDS has had a devastating impact at individual, household and community levels. This qualitative research investigates the role of HIV voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) and treatment in enabling HIV-positive Ugandans to cope with this disease. Twelve predetermined focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted; six with men and six with women. Half of the men and women's groups were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and half were not. An FGD was held with the health care providers administering ART. Testing for HIV was perceived as soliciting a death warrant. Participants affirmed that the incentive for testing was the possibility of accessing free ART. They described experiencing gender-variant stigma and depression on confirming their HIV status and commended the role of counselling in supporting them to adopt positive living. For those receiving ART, counselling reinforced treatment adherence. The findings also revealed gender differences in treatment adherence strategies. ART was described to reduce disease symptoms and restore physical health allowing them to resume their daily activities. Additionally, ART was preferred over traditional herbal treatment because it had clear dosages, expiry dates and was scientifically manufactured. Those that were not receiving ART bore myths and misconceptions about the effectiveness and side effects of ART, delaying the decision to seek treatment. Stigma and the attached concern of HIV/AIDS-related swift death, is a major barrier for VCT. Based on this study's findings, ensuring the provision of quality assured and gender conscious VCT and ART delivery services will enhance positive living and enforce compliance to ART programmes. PMID:20024747

  15. Improving childhood malaria treatment and referral practices by training patent medicine vendors in rural south-east Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five years of age in Nigeria. Most of the early treatments for fever and malaria occur through self-medication with anti-malarials bought over-the-counter (OTC) from untrained drug vendors. Self-medication through drug vendors can be ineffective, with increased risks of drug toxicity and development of drug resistance. Global malaria control initiatives highlights the potential role of drug vendors to improve access to early effective malaria treatment, which underscores the need for interventions to improve treatment obtained from these outlets. This study aimed to determine the feasibility and impact of training rural drug vendors on community-based malaria treatment and advice with referral of severe cases to a health facility. Methods A drug vendor-training programme was carried out between 2003 and 2005 in Ugwuogo-Nike, a rural community in south-east Nigeria. A total of 16 drug vendors were trained and monitored for eight months. The programme was evaluated to measure changes in drug vendor practice and knowledge using exit interviews. In addition, home visits were conducted to measure compliance with referral. Results The intervention achieved major improvements in drug selling and referral practices and knowledge. Exit interviews confirmed significant increases in appropriate anti-malarial drug dispensing, correct history questions asked and advice given. Improvements in malaria knowledge was established and 80% compliance with referred cases was observed during the study period, Conclusion The remarkable change in knowledge and practices observed indicates that training of drug vendors, as a means of communication in the community, is feasible and strongly supports their inclusion in control strategies aimed at improving prompt effective treatment of malaria with referral of severe cases. PMID:19930561

  16. Access to Treatment for Diabetes and Hypertension in Rural Cambodia: Performance of Existing Social Health Protection Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Bigdeli, Maryam; Jacobs, Bart; Men, Chean Rithy; Nilsen, Kristine; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases (NCD) pose challenges to Cambodia’s health system. Medicines for NCD are on the National Essential Medicines List but no clinical guidelines support their utilization. Two social health protection schemes aimed at the informal sector population exist (Health Equity Funds and Insurance) together with two disease-specific interventions (a Peer Educator Network and Chronic Diseases Clinics) targeted at NCD patients. This study examines performance of these various schemes in relation to NCD. Methods Cross-sectional household survey among 709 individuals self-reporting diabetes and/or hypertension in three geographical locations in rural Cambodia using a structured questionnaire investigating diagnostic and treatment pathways, health seeking behaviour, health expenditures, and financial coping mechanisms. Results Two third of respondents with NCD were female and 55% did not belong to any scheme. The majority (59%) were diagnosed in the private sector and only 56% were on allopathic treatment that was mainly sought in the private sector (49%). Outpatient treatment cost was higher in the private sector and when using multiple providers of care. The majority were indebted, 11% due to health-related expenses. Contrary to social health protection schemes, disease-specific interventions offered better access to allopathic treatment and provided medicines in accordance with NEML. Conclusion The benefit packages of existing social health protection schemes and services in the public health sector should be adjusted to cater for the needs of people living with NCD in rural Cambodia. Initiatives that offer active disease management strategies and promote patients and community participation appear more successful in increasing treatment adherence and decreasing the risk of financial hardship. PMID:26815916

  17. Treatment of Dermatological Conditions Associated with HIV/AIDS: The Scarcity of Guidance on a Global Scale

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Suchismita; Evans, Rachel; Maurer, Toby; Muhe, Lulu M.; Freeman, Esther E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Skin diseases associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In resource-limited settings, nondermatologists and lay health care providers on the front line of HIV care provide much of the treatment for these conditions. Objective. To evaluate guidelines for treatment of HIV-related skin conditions and assess their accessibility, comprehensiveness, and quality of evidence employed. Methods. A review was undertaken of all national and society guidelines which included treatment information on the ten highest burden HIV-related skin conditions. The search strategy included gray and peer-reviewed literature. Results. Of 430 potential guidelines, 86 met inclusion criteria, and only 2 were written specifically to address HIV-related skin diseases as a whole. Treatment information for HIV-related skin conditions was embedded within guidelines written for other purposes, primarily HIV/AIDs treatment guidelines (49%). Development of guidelines relied either partially or completely on expert opinion (62%). Only 16% of guidelines used gradation of evidence quality and these were primarily from high-income countries (p = 0.001). Limitations. Due to the nature of gray literature, not all guidelines may have been identified. Conclusion. This review highlights the need for evidence-based summary guidelines that address treatment for HIV-related skin conditions in an accessible format. PMID:27242923

  18. Treatment of Dermatological Conditions Associated with HIV/AIDS: The Scarcity of Guidance on a Global Scale.

    PubMed

    Paul, Suchismita; Evans, Rachel; Maurer, Toby; Muhe, Lulu M; Freeman, Esther E

    2016-01-01

    Background. Skin diseases associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In resource-limited settings, nondermatologists and lay health care providers on the front line of HIV care provide much of the treatment for these conditions. Objective. To evaluate guidelines for treatment of HIV-related skin conditions and assess their accessibility, comprehensiveness, and quality of evidence employed. Methods. A review was undertaken of all national and society guidelines which included treatment information on the ten highest burden HIV-related skin conditions. The search strategy included gray and peer-reviewed literature. Results. Of 430 potential guidelines, 86 met inclusion criteria, and only 2 were written specifically to address HIV-related skin diseases as a whole. Treatment information for HIV-related skin conditions was embedded within guidelines written for other purposes, primarily HIV/AIDs treatment guidelines (49%). Development of guidelines relied either partially or completely on expert opinion (62%). Only 16% of guidelines used gradation of evidence quality and these were primarily from high-income countries (p = 0.001). Limitations. Due to the nature of gray literature, not all guidelines may have been identified. Conclusion. This review highlights the need for evidence-based summary guidelines that address treatment for HIV-related skin conditions in an accessible format. PMID:27242923

  19. Integrating Water Treatment into Antenatal Care: Impact on Use of Maternal Health Services and Household Water Treatment by Mothers-Rural Uganda, 2013.

    PubMed

    Matanock, Almea; Anderson, Tara; Ayers, Tracy; Likicho, Lilian; Wamimbi, Richard; Lu, Xin; Emeetai, Thomas; Kakande, Celia; Mutabazi, Miriam; Quick, Robert

    2016-05-01

    To increase maternal health service use and household water treatment (HWT), free water treatment kits were provided at first antenatal care (ANC) visits and free water treatment sachet refills were provided at follow-up ANC visits, delivery, and postnatal visits in 46 health facilities in rural Uganda. We evaluated the impact by surveying 226 women in the initiative (intervention group) and 207 women who received ANC before the initiative began (comparison group). There was no differences in the percentages of intervention and comparison group women with ≥ 4 ANC visits; however, a higher percentage of intervention group women reported treating their drinking water (31.7% versus 19.7%, P = 0.01), and had free chlorine residual in stored water (13.5% versus 3.4%, P = 0.02) than comparison group women. The intervention did not appear to motivate increased maternal health service use, but demonstrated improvements in HWT. PMID:27001758

  20. Comparative analysis of non-adherence to medication treatment for systemic arterial hypertension in urban and rural populations 1

    PubMed Central

    Magnabosco, Patricia; Teraoka, Eliana Cavalari; de Oliveira, Edward Meirelles; Felipe, Elisangela Aparecida; Freitas, Dayana; Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the indexes and the main factors associated with non-adherence to medication treatment for systemic arterial hypertension between urban and rural areas. METHOD: analytical study based on an epidemiological survey with a sample of 247 hypertensive residents of rural and urban areas, with application of a socio-demographic and economic questionnaire, and treatment adherence assessment. The Pearson's Chi-square test was used and the odds ratio (OD) was calculated to analyze the factors related to non-adherence. RESULTS: the prevalence of non-adherence was 61.9% and it was higher in urban areas (63.4%). Factors significantly associated with non-adherence were: male gender (OR=1.95; 95% CI 1.08-3.50), age 20-59 years old (OR=2.51; 95% CI 1.44-4.39), low economic status (OR=1.95; 95% CI 1.09-3.47), alcohol consumption (OR=5.92, 95% CI 1.73-20.21), short time of hypertension diagnosis (OR=3.07; 95% CI 1.35-6.96) and not attending the health service for routine consultations (OR=2.45; 1.35-4.42). CONCLUSION: the socio-demographic/economic characteristics, lifestyle habits and how to relate to health services were the factors that presented association with non-adherence regardless of the place of residence. PMID:25806627

  1. A novel anoxic-aerobic biofilter process using new composite packing material for the treatment of rural domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pan, L T; Han, Y

    2016-01-01

    A pilot scale experiment was conducted to evaluate the characteristics of contaminants removal in a continuously two-stage biological process composed of an anoxic biofilter (AF) and an biological aerated filter (BAF). This novel process was developed by introducing new composite packing material (MZF) into bioreactors to treat rural domestic wastewater. A comparative study conducted by the same process with ceramsite as packing material under the same conditions showed that a MZF system with a Fe proportion in the packing material performed better in chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (average 91.5%), ammonia (NH4(+)-N) removal (average 98.3%), total nitrogen (TN) removal (average 64.8%) and total phosphorus (TP) removal (average 90%). After treatment of the MZF system, the concentrations of COD, NH4(+)-N, TN and TP in effluent were 20.3 mg/L, 0.5 mg/L, 11.5 mg/L and 0.3 mg/L, respectively. The simultaneously high efficiencies of nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal were achieved by the coupling effects of biological and chemical processes in the MZF system. The results of this study showed that the application of MZF might be a favorable choice as packing material in biofilters for treatment of rural domestic wastewater. PMID:27191571

  2. Dividuality, masculine respectability and reputation: how masculinity affects men's uptake of HIV treatment in rural eastern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Siu, Godfrey E; Seeley, Janet; Wight, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    There is increasing evidence in SSA that once infected with HIV men are disadvantaged compared to women in terms of uptake of treatment. In Uganda fewer men are on treatment, they tend to initiate treatment later, are difficult to retain on treatment and have a higher mortality while on treatment. This article discusses how men's response to HIV infection relates to their masculinity. We conducted participant observation and in-depth interviews with 26 men from a rural setting in eastern Uganda, in 2009-2010. They comprised men receiving HIV treatment, who had dropped treatment or did not seek it despite testing HIV positive, who had not tested but suspected infection, and those with other symptoms unrelated to HIV. Thematic analysis identified recurrent themes and variations across the data. Men drew from a range of norms to fulfil the social and individual expectations of being sufficiently masculine. The study argues that there are essentially two forms of masculinity in Mam-Kiror, one based on reputation and the other on respectability, with some ideals shared by both. Respectability was endorsed by 'the wider society', while reputation was endorsed almost entirely by men. Men's treatment seeking behaviours corresponded with different masculine ideologies. Family and societal expectations to be a family provider and respectable role model encouraged treatment, to regain and maintain health. However, reputational concern with strength and the capacity for hard physical work, income generation and sexual achievement discouraged uptake of HIV testing and treatment since it meant acknowledging weakness and an 'HIV patient' identity. Men's 'dividuality' allowed them to express different masculinities in different social contexts. We conclude that characteristics associated with respectable masculinity tend to encourage men's uptake of HIV treatment while those associated with reputational masculinity tend to undermine it. PMID:23726215

  3. [Establish proposal of diagnosis and treatment of traditional Chinese medicine in AIDS patients with recurrent oral ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Pan, Ju-Hua; Huang, Shi-Jing; Zheng, Jun; Wu, Wei; Xue, Liu-Hua

    2013-08-01

    The pathogenesis of acquired immune deficiency syndrome-associated recurrent oral ulcerations (AIDS-ROU) remained obscure and these was no specific treatment for it. Syndrome differentiation in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) focus on integral regulation and has an advantage of the disease that etiology and pathogenesis remain obscure. A draft of Chinese medicine diagnosis and treatment standard procedure for AIDS-ROU was established by literature retrieval and peer review. Two questionnaires were carried out to investigate the confirmation and advice of in-group specialist to key points of the draft including diagnosis, treatment and nursing. Then the procedures were revised accordingly. The preliminary results showed the recovery rate of complete questionnaires in the 1st survey was 96%. Specialists confirmed more on outline, case history and physical examinations, syndrome differentiation of hyperactivity of fire due to Yin deficiency syndrome (HFYDS), treatment of heat accumulated in heart and spleen syndrome (HAHSS) and HFYDS, treatment of western medicine and nursing. They held different opinions on incidence, treatment of deficiency of spleen-QI and stomach-QI syndrome (DSSS) and criterion of therapeutical evaluation. Cronbach coefficient alpha (CCA) was 0.998 and split-half reliability R was 0.91. Recovery rate of complete questionnaires in 2nd survey was 100%. Specialists confirmed more on outline, etiology and pathogenesis, case history and physical examination, auxiliary examination, diagnostic criteria, syndrome differentiation and treatment of HAHSS and HFYDS. They held different opinions on syndrome differentiation and treatment of intermingled cold and heat syndrome and DSSS, nursing and the other therapies. CCA was 0.428 and split-half reliability R was 0.96. Coefficient of variations of the 2nd survey were less than those of the 1st survey, which mean coordination was improved. Each single item in two surveys contributed less difference in

  4. Factors associated with a delay in seeking HIV/AIDS treatment in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Zarifa; Silva, Rebeca S; Villela, Wilza

    2015-04-01

    This quantitative cross-sectional study of HIV/AIDS patients (N = 1,520) in São Paulo evaluated factors associated with a delay in seeking care. Analysis included Chi square tests and multiple logistic regression. Care was sought at the AIDS stage in 56.7 % (861) of patients, and 48.2 % (732) had a CD4 count ≤350 cells/mm(3); 9 % (136) delayed seeking care for 6 months or more after a positive HIV test. Women sought medical care earlier after testing (odds ratio (OR) = 1.79; P = 0.0227), but were already symptomatic (OR = 1.90; P = 0.0004). Partners of seropositive patients (OR = 3.92; P = 0.0000) also sought care symptomatic. Reasons for late presentation for care were non-acceptance of HIV diagnosis (OR = 24.56; P = 0.0000), treatment refusal (OR = 55.34; P = 0.0000), and physical disability (OR = 1.90; P = 0.0414). Necessary strategies for HIV treatment and prevention include improved education and access to services. PMID:25210003

  5. Experiences of Power and Violence in Mexican Men Attending Mutual-Aid Residential Centers for Addiction Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Verduzco, Ignacio; Marín-Navarrete, Rodrigo; Romero-Mendoza, Martha; Tena-Suck, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Fundamental elements of hegemonic masculinity such as power and violence are analyzed through characteristics of 12-step programs and philosophy immersed in Mutual-Aid Residential Centers for Addiction Treatment (CRAMAAs). CRAMAAs are a culturally specific form of substance abuse treatment in Mexico that are characterized by control and violence. Fifteen interviews were carried out with men of varied sociodemographic characteristics, and who resided in at least two of these centers. Results identify that power is expressed through drug abuse and leads them to subsequent biopsychosocial degradation. Residency in CRAMAAs is motivated by women, but men do not seek the residency and are usually admitted unwillingly. Power through violence is carried out inside CRAMAAs where men are victims of abuse. From a 12-step philosophy, this violence is believed to lead them to a path of recovery but instead produces feelings of anger and frustration. The implications of these centers on Mexican public health are discussed. PMID:25585860

  6. 42 CFR 412.108 - Special treatment: Medicare-dependent, small rural hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Its geographic classification changes. (iii) An MDH must report to the fiscal intermediary if it... receives the hospital's request and all other necessary information. (iii) The intermediary determination... the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume...

  7. 42 CFR 412.108 - Special treatment: Medicare-dependent, small rural hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of beds increases to more than 100. (B) Its geographic classification changes. (iii) An MDH must... days from the date it receives the hospital's request and all other necessary information. (iii) The... affecting § 412.108, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of...

  8. 42 CFR 412.108 - Special treatment: Medicare-dependent, small rural hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of beds increases to more than 100. (B) Its geographic classification changes. (iii) An MDH must... days from the date it receives the hospital's request and all other necessary information. (iii) The... affecting § 412.108, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of...

  9. 42 CFR 412.108 - Special treatment: Medicare-dependent, small rural hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of beds increases to more than 100. (B) Its geographic classification changes. (iii) An MDH must... days from the date it receives the hospital's request and all other necessary information. (iii) The... affecting § 412.108, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of...

  10. Primary Care Provider Views About Usefulness and Dissemination of a Web-Based Depression Treatment Information Decision Aid

    PubMed Central

    Westmacott, Robin; Walker, John R; Vardanyan, Gohar

    2016-01-01

    Background Decisions related to mental health are often complex, problems often remain undetected and untreated, information unavailable or not used, and treatment decisions frequently not informed by best practice or patient preferences. Objective The objective of this paper was to obtain the opinions of health professionals working in primary health care settings about a Web-based information decision aid (IDA) for patients concerning treatment options for depression and the dissemination of the resources in primary care settings. Methods Participants were recruited from primary care clinics in Winnipeg and Ottawa, Canada, and included 48 family physicians, nurses, and primary care staff. The study design was a qualitative framework analytic approach of 5 focus groups. Focus groups were conducted during regular staff meetings, were digitally recorded, and transcripts created. Analysis involved a content and theme analysis. Results Seven key themes emerged including the key role of the primary care provider, common questions about treatments, treatment barriers, sources of patient information, concern about quality and quantity of available information, positive opinions about the IDA, and disseminating the IDA. The most common questions mentioned were about medication and side effects and alternatives to medication. Patients have limited access to alternative treatment options owing to cost and availability. Conclusions Practitioners evaluated the IDA positively. The resources were described as useful, supportive of providers’ messages, and accessible for patients. There was unanimous consensus that information needs to be available electronically through the Internet. PMID:27277709

  11. Nonextraction treatment of severe crowding with the aid of corticotomy-assisted orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Aljhani, Ali S; Zawawi, Khalid H

    2012-01-01

    THIS PAPER ILLUSTRATES THE COMBINED NONEXTRACTION ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT WITH THE CORTICOTOMY TECHNIQUE IN AN ADULT PATIENT (AGE: 25 years and 3 months) with severely crowded arches to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time. Both her upper lateral incisors were congenitally absent and both upper central incisors' roots were short. Initial fixed orthodontic appliances (bidimensional) were bonded and one week later buccal and lingual corticotomy with alveolar augmentation procedure in the maxilla and mandible was performed. Orthodontic activation to level and align and unravel the crowding was performed every two weeks. The total treatment time was 8 months with no adverse effects observed at the end of active treatment. The addition of the decortication procedure to the conventional orthodontic therapy decreased the duration of treatment significantly. Successful alignment of both arches with ideal overbite and overjet as well as adequate occlusion was achieved. PMID:22848854

  12. Nonextraction Treatment of Severe Crowding with the Aid of Corticotomy-Assisted Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Aljhani, Ali S.; Zawawi, Khalid H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper illustrates the combined nonextraction orthodontic treatment with the corticotomy technique in an adult patient (age: 25 years and 3 months) with severely crowded arches to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time. Both her upper lateral incisors were congenitally absent and both upper central incisors' roots were short. Initial fixed orthodontic appliances (bidimensional) were bonded and one week later buccal and lingual corticotomy with alveolar augmentation procedure in the maxilla and mandible was performed. Orthodontic activation to level and align and unravel the crowding was performed every two weeks. The total treatment time was 8 months with no adverse effects observed at the end of active treatment. The addition of the decortication procedure to the conventional orthodontic therapy decreased the duration of treatment significantly. Successful alignment of both arches with ideal overbite and overjet as well as adequate occlusion was achieved. PMID:22848854

  13. Understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment and care in rural Tanzania: the ACCESS Programme

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, Manuel W; Iteba, Nelly; Makemba, Ahmed; Mshana, Christopher; Lengeler, Christian; Obrist, Brigit; Schulze, Alexander; Nathan, Rose; Dillip, Angel; Alba, Sandra; Mayumana, Iddy; Khatib, Rashid A; Njau, Joseph D; Mshinda, Hassan

    2007-01-01

    Background Prompt access to effective treatment is central in the fight against malaria. However, a variety of interlinked factors at household and health system level influence access to timely and appropriate treatment and care. Furthermore, access may be influenced by global and national health policies. As a consequence, many malaria episodes in highly endemic countries are not treated appropriately. Project The ACCESS Programme aims at understanding and improving access to prompt and effective malaria treatment and care in a rural Tanzanian setting. The programme's strategy is based on a set of integrated interventions, including social marketing for improved care seeking at community level as well as strengthening of quality of care at health facilities. This is complemented by a project that aims to improve the performance of drug stores. The interventions are accompanied by a comprehensive set of monitoring and evaluation activities measuring the programme's performance and (health) impact. Baseline data demonstrated heterogeneity in the availability of malaria treatment, unavailability of medicines and treatment providers in certain areas as well as quality problems with regard to drugs and services. Conclusion The ACCESS Programme is a combination of multiple complementary interventions with a strong evaluation component. With this approach, ACCESS aims to contribute to the development of a more comprehensive access framework and to inform and support public health professionals and policy-makers in the delivery of improved health services. PMID:17603898

  14. Transforming Australia's HIV prevention and treatment efforts to achieve an AIDS-free generation: the United Nations Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS and the Melbourne Declaration 'Action on HIV'.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Bill

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses Australia's response to the 2011 United Nations Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS in the context of recent ground-breaking advances in HIV prevention and treatment. Australia's progress in responding to these developments is examined and compared with that of eight other countries in Asia and the Pacific. The implications of the 2012 Melbourne Declaration 'Action on HIV' is also discussed as a vehicle for generating advocacy to revolutionise Australia's HIV response and to urge Australia's leadership in achieving an 'AIDS-free generation'. PMID:24438763

  15. Dental Caries and Their Treatment Needs in 3-5 Year Old Preschool Children in a Rural District of India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Devanand; Momin, Rizwan K; Mathur, Ayush; Srinivas, Kavuri Teja; Jain, Ankita; Dommaraju, Neelima; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental problems in the preschool children are neglected by their parents as the deciduous teeth are going to shed off, and hence considered to be of no importance and more of economic burden if attended to them. Aims: This study was to determine the caries prevalence in preschool children (3-5-year-old) of rural Moradabad district, to analyze the specific pattern of dental caries experience in this population and to assess the treatment needs among them. Material and Methods: Children within the age group of 3-5 years attending Anganwadi centers of rural Moradabad district were included in the study. Caries diagnosis was based on decayed, extracted, filled surface (defs) and the treatment needs were recorded using World Health Organization (WHO) oral health assessment form 1997. Results: Out of 1,500 children examined, 48.7% males and 52.6% females did not require any treatment. The mean decayed, extracted, filled teeth (deft) value was found to be significantly high in 5-year-old participants when compared to 3-year-old participants (P < 0.01). Majority of the children required one surface filling followed by two surface fillings, caries arresting sealant care, extraction, crown bridge element, pulp care, and space maintainer. Conclusion: The most common pattern was pit and fissure, then maxillary anterior pattern, posterior proximal pattern, and posterior buccal lingual smooth surface pattern. The mean deft value was higher in males as compared to females. There is a greater need for oral health education among parents and teachers. PMID:25973401

  16. Microbiological Evaluation of Household Drinking Water Treatment in Rural China Shows Benefits of Electric Kettles: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Alasdair; Tao, Yong; Luo, Qing; Zhong, Gemei; Romm, Jeff; Colford, John M.; Ray, Isha

    2015-01-01

    Background In rural China ~607 million people drink boiled water, yet little is known about prevailing household water treatment (HWT) methods or their effectiveness. Boiling, the most common HWT method globally, is microbiologically effective, but household air pollution (HAP) from burning solid fuels causes cardiovascular and respiratory disease, and black carbon emissions exacerbate climate change. Boiled water is also easily re-contaminated. Our study was designed to identify the HWT methods used in rural China and to evaluate their effectiveness. Methods We used a geographically stratified cross-sectional design in rural Guangxi Province to collect survey data from 450 households in the summer of 2013. Household drinking water samples were collected and assayed for Thermotolerant Coliforms (TTC), and physicochemical analyses were conducted for village drinking water sources. In the winter of 2013–2104, we surveyed 120 additional households and used remote sensors to corroborate self-reported boiling data. Findings Our HWT prevalence estimates were: 27.1% boiling with electric kettles, 20.3% boiling with pots, 34.4% purchasing bottled water, and 18.2% drinking untreated water (for these analyses we treated bottled water as a HWT method). Households using electric kettles had the lowest concentrations of TTC (73% lower than households drinking untreated water). Multilevel mixed-effects regression analyses showed that electric kettles were associated with the largest Log10TTC reduction (-0.60, p<0.001), followed by bottled water (-0.45, p<0.001) and pots (-0.44, p<0.01). Compared to households drinking untreated water, electric kettle users also had the lowest risk of having TTC detected in their drinking water (risk ratio, RR = 0.49, 0.34–0.70, p<0.001), followed by bottled water users (RR = 0.70, 0.53–0.93, p<0.05) and households boiling with pots (RR = 0.74, 0.54–1.02, p = 0.06). Conclusion As far as we are aware, this is the first HWT-focused study in

  17. Community perceptions of malaria and malaria treatment behaviour in a rural district of Ghana: implications for artemisinin combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) was introduced in Ghana as the first line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in 2004. We report the perceptions of malaria and malaria treatment behaviour, the community awareness of and perceptions about AS-AQ two years after the introduction of this ACT treatment for malaria. Methods Two surveys were conducted; a cross-sectional survey of 729 randomly selected household heads (urban-362, rural-367) and 282 women with children < 5 years (urban-121, rural-161) was conducted in 2006. A district wide survey was conducted in 2007 to assess awareness of AS-AQ. These were complemented with twenty-eight focus group discussions (FGDs) and 16 key informant interviews (KII) among community members and major stakeholders in the health care delivery services. All nine (9) health facilities and five (5) purposively selected drug stores were audited in order to identify commonly used anti-malarials in the study area at the time of the survey. Results Majority of respondents ( > 75%) in the sampled survey mentioned mosquito bites as the cause of malaria. Other causes mentioned include environmental factors (e.g. dirty surroundings) and standing in the sun. Close to 60% of the household heads and 40% of the care-givers interviewed did not know about AS-AQ. The community respondents who knew about and had ever taken AS-AQ perceived it to be a good drug; although they mentioned they had experienced some side effects including headaches and body weakness. Co-blistered AS-AQ was available in all the government health facilities in the study area. Different formulations of ACTs were however found in urban chemical shops but not in rural chemical stores where monotherapy antimalarials were predominant. Conclusion The knowledge of fever as a symptom of malaria is high among the study population. The awareness of AS-AQ therapy and its side-effect was low in the study area. Community education and sensitization, targeting all categories

  18. The Rural Physician and Myocardial Infarction: Part 2: The Hospital Phase of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Black, Douglas P.

    1984-01-01

    A critical review of the literature reveals several facts which are important in helping the rural physician decide where and how patients with myocardial infarction should be treated. The effectiveness of coronary care units has not been well established, even for patients admitted during the early phase of the disease; they do not benefit the majority of patients admitted five or more hours after the onset of symptoms. Transporting patients over relatively long distances during the early phase results in increased mortality. The survival rates for patients treated in small hospitals is quite comparable to that of patients treated in coronary care units. The majority of rural patients with myocardial infarction are therefore more appropriately treated in a small local hospital than by being transferred to a coronary care unit. Those coronary care units which have been established in small hospitals do not appear to have reduced mortality. Patients with myocardial infarction who are being treated in small hospitals should be observed carefully, but electronic monitoring should be used only when there is a specific indication. PMID:21279063

  19. Health services for HIV/AIDS, HCV, and sexually transmitted infections in substance abuse treatment programs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lawrence S; Kritz, Steven; Goldsmith, R Jeffrey; Bini, Edmund J; Robinson, Jim; Alderson, Donald; Rotrosen, John

    2007-01-01

    The National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network conducted this study to determine the availability of and factors associated with infection-related health services in substance abuse treatment settings. In a cross-sectional descriptive design, state policies, reimbursement for providers, state level of priority, and treatment program characteristics were studied via written surveys of administrators of substance abuse treatment programs and of state health and substance abuse departments. Data from health departments and substance abuse agencies of 48 states and from 269 substance abuse treatment programs revealed that human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related services are more frequent than hepatitis C virus or sexually transmitted infection-related services, and that nonmedical services are more frequent than medical services. While the availability of infection-related health services is associated with medical staffing patterns, addiction pharmacotherapy services, and state priorities, reimbursement was the most significant determining factor. These findings suggest that greater funding of these health services in substance abuse treatment settings, facilitated by supportive state policies, represents an effective response to the excess morbidity and mortality of these substance use-related infections. PMID:17639646

  20. HIV stigma among substance abusing people living with HIV/AIDS: implications for HIV treatment.

    PubMed

    Levi-Minzi, Maria A; Surratt, Hilary L

    2014-08-01

    HIV-related stigma has a major impact on quality of life and health among people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA). This study examines demographic, mental health, behavioral, contextual, and HIV care-related correlates of HIV stigma among 503 substance abusing PLWHA. Stigma was measured with the HIV Internalized Stigma Measure which has four subscales: stereotypes about HIV, self-acceptance, disclosure concerns, and social relationships. Severe substance dependence (55.3%) and depression (54.7%) were associated with higher HIV stigma across all domains. 49.9% of the sample reported antiretroviral (ARV) medication diversion (the unlawful sale and trading of ARV medications); diverters endorsed significantly higher stigma related to disclosure. 54.1% of the sample reported ≥95% ARV adherence; these individuals reported significantly lower stigma for self-acceptance, disclosure, and social relationships. Multivariate linear regression showed that depression and social support demonstrated significant main effects across stigma domains. Findings suggest that interventions to decrease HIV related stigma may be an important component of initiatives to increase engagement in HIV care. PMID:24983302

  1. Implementation science for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Schackman, Bruce R

    2010-12-01

    Implementation science is the scientific study of methods to promote the integration of research findings and evidence-based interventions into health care policy and practice and hence to improve the quality and effectiveness of health services and care. Implementation science is distinguished from monitoring and evaluation by its emphasis on the use of the scientific method. The origins of implementation science include operations research, industrial engineering, and management science. Today, implementation science encompasses a broader range of methods and skills including decision science and operations research, health systems research, health outcomes research, health and behavioral economics, epidemiology, statistics, organization and management science, finance, policy analysis, anthropology, sociology, and ethics. Examples of implementation science research are presented for HIV prevention (prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, male circumcision) and HIV and drug use (syringe distribution, treating drug users with antiretroviral therapy and opioid substitution therapy). For implementation science to become an established field in HIV/AIDS research, there needs to be better coordination between funders of research and funders of program delivery and greater consensus on scientific research approaches and standards of evidence. PMID:21045596

  2. Report and policy brief from the 4th Africa Conference on Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research: innovations in access to prevention, treatment and care in HIV/AIDS, Kisumu, Kenya, 29 April - 3 May 2007.

    PubMed

    Setswe, G; Peltzer, K; Banyini, M; Skinner, D; Seager, J; Maile, S; Sedumedi, S; Gomis, D; van der Linde, I

    2007-08-01

    About 520 delegates from all over Africa and 21 countries attended the conference. This report and policy brief summarises the key findings and suggested policy options that emerged from rapporteur reports of conference proceedings including the following themes: (1) Orphans and vulnerable children, (2) Treatment, (3) Prevention, (4) Gender and male involvement, (5) Male circumcision, (6) People living with HIV/AIDS, (7) Food and nutrition, (8) Socioeconomics, and (9) Politics/policy. Two (11.8%) of the 17 OVC projects from the three countries were classified as best practice interventions. Of the 83 abstracts that were accepted at the conference, only 7 (8.4%) were dealing with antiretroviral therapy (ART). There has been tremendous effort by various organisations to provide information about prevention of HIV/AIDS. Information received by adolescents has been effective in increasing their knowledge, but without positive sexual behaviour change. The conference noted the contribution of gender discrimination and violence to the HIV epidemic and the different risks that men and women face in relation to the epidemic. Social scientists need to study the deep cultural meanings attached to male circumcision among different ethnic groups to be able to guide the debate on the latest biomedical findings on the protective effect of circumcision against HIV. Palliative care and support is crucial for coping among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in order to deal with medical and psychological issues. Results from several countries have helped researchers to explore alternative ways of examining poverty in the context of HIV and AIDS. Policy frameworks which are likely to succeed in combating HIV/AIDS need to be updated to cover issues of access, testing, disclosure and stigma. In general, the conference was successful in identifying innovations in access to prevention, treatment and care in HIV/AIDS. PMID:18071616

  3. Evaluation of Membrane Ultrafiltration and Residual Chlorination as a Decentralized Water Treatment Strategy for Ten Rural Healthcare Facilities in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Huttinger, Alexandra; Dreibelbis, Robert; Roha, Kristin; Ngabo, Fidel; Kayigamba, Felix; Mfura, Leodomir; Moe, Christine

    2015-10-01

    There is a critical need for safe water in healthcare facilities (HCF) in low-income countries. HCF rely on water supplies that may require additional on-site treatment, and need sustainable technologies that can deliver sufficient quantities of water. Water treatment systems (WTS) that utilize ultrafiltration membranes for water treatment can be a useful technology in low-income countries, but studies have not systematically examined the feasibility of this technology in low-income settings. We monitored 22 months of operation of 10 WTS, including pre-filtration, membrane ultrafiltration, and chlorine residual disinfection that were donated to and operated by rural HCF in Rwanda. The systems were fully operational for 74% of the observation period. The most frequent reasons for interruption were water shortage (8%) and failure of the chlorination mechanism (7%). When systems were operational, 98% of water samples collected from the HCF taps met World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for microbiological water quality. Water quality deteriorated during treatment interruptions and when water was stored in containers. Sustained performance of the systems depended primarily on organizational factors: the ability of the HCF technician to perform routine servicing and repairs, and environmental factors: water and power availability and procurement of materials, including chlorine and replacement parts in Rwanda. PMID:26516883

  4. Evaluation of Membrane Ultrafiltration and Residual Chlorination as a Decentralized Water Treatment Strategy for Ten Rural Healthcare Facilities in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Huttinger, Alexandra; Dreibelbis, Robert; Roha, Kristin; Ngabo, Fidel; Kayigamba, Felix; Mfura, Leodomir; Moe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    There is a critical need for safe water in healthcare facilities (HCF) in low-income countries. HCF rely on water supplies that may require additional on-site treatment, and need sustainable technologies that can deliver sufficient quantities of water. Water treatment systems (WTS) that utilize ultrafiltration membranes for water treatment can be a useful technology in low-income countries, but studies have not systematically examined the feasibility of this technology in low-income settings. We monitored 22 months of operation of 10 WTS, including pre-filtration, membrane ultrafiltration, and chlorine residual disinfection that were donated to and operated by rural HCF in Rwanda. The systems were fully operational for 74% of the observation period. The most frequent reasons for interruption were water shortage (8%) and failure of the chlorination mechanism (7%). When systems were operational, 98% of water samples collected from the HCF taps met World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for microbiological water quality. Water quality deteriorated during treatment interruptions and when water was stored in containers. Sustained performance of the systems depended primarily on organizational factors: the ability of the HCF technician to perform routine servicing and repairs, and environmental factors: water and power availability and procurement of materials, including chlorine and replacement parts in Rwanda. PMID:26516883

  5. Orthodontic treatment of an anterior openbite with the aid of corticotomy procedure: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Aljhani, Ali S.; Aldrees, Abdullah M.

    2010-01-01

    This case report illustrates the orthodontic treatment combined with the corticotomy technique in an adult patient to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time. The patient was a 22-year-old woman with an anterior open bite and flared and spaced upper and lower incisors. First, fixed orthodontic appliances (bidimensional edgewise brackets) were bonded, and a week later buccal and lingual corticotomy with alveolar augmentation procedure in the maxillary arch from the first molar to the contralateral first molar, and from canine to canine in the mandibular arch was performed. Orthodontic therapy proceeded with frequent activation of the appliances to retract the incisors every 2 weeks. The total treatment time was 5 months and no adverse effects were observed at the end of active treatment. The addition of the decortication procedure to the conventional orthodontic therapy decreased the duration of treatment significantly. Successful closure of the anterior open bite with adequate overbite and interdigitation of the teeth were achieved. PMID:24151417

  6. Orthodontic treatment of an anterior openbite with the aid of corticotomy procedure: Case report.

    PubMed

    Aljhani, Ali S; Aldrees, Abdullah M

    2011-04-01

    This case report illustrates the orthodontic treatment combined with the corticotomy technique in an adult patient to accelerate tooth movement and shorten the treatment time. The patient was a 22-year-old woman with an anterior open bite and flared and spaced upper and lower incisors. First, fixed orthodontic appliances (bidimensional edgewise brackets) were bonded, and a week later buccal and lingual corticotomy with alveolar augmentation procedure in the maxillary arch from the first molar to the contralateral first molar, and from canine to canine in the mandibular arch was performed. Orthodontic therapy proceeded with frequent activation of the appliances to retract the incisors every 2 weeks. The total treatment time was 5 months and no adverse effects were observed at the end of active treatment. The addition of the decortication procedure to the conventional orthodontic therapy decreased the duration of treatment significantly. Successful closure of the anterior open bite with adequate overbite and interdigitation of the teeth were achieved. PMID:24151417

  7. Understanding Sustained Retention in HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment: a Synthetic Review.

    PubMed

    Roy, Monika; Czaicki, Nancy; Holmes, Charles; Chavan, Saurabh; Tsitsi, Apollo; Odeny, Thomas; Sikazwe, Izukanji; Padian, Nancy; Geng, Elvin

    2016-06-01

    Sustained retention represents an enduring and evolving challenge to HIV treatment programs in Africa. We present a theoretical framework for sustained retention borrowing from ecologic principles of sustainability and dynamic adaptation. We posit that sustained retention from the patient perspective is dependent on three foundational principles: (1) patient activation: the acceptance, prioritization, literacy, and skills to manage a chronic disease condition, (2) social normalization: the engagement of a social network and harnessing social capital to support care and treatment, and (3) livelihood routinization: the integration of care and treatment activities into livelihood priorities that may change over time. Using this framework, we highlight barriers specific to sustained retention and review interventions addressing long-term, sustained retention in HIV care with a focus on Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27188300

  8. Barriers and Incentives to Orphan Care in a Time of AIDS and Economic Crisis: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Caregivers in Rural Zimbabwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Brian H.; Phillips, Carl V.; Matinhure, Nelia; Goodman, Karen J.; McCurdy, Sheryl A; Johnson, Cary A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Africa is in an orphan-care crisis. In Zimbabwe, where one-fourth of adults are HIV-positive and one-fifth of children are orphans, AIDS and economic decline are straining society's ability to care for orphans within their extended families. Lack of stable care is putting thousands of children at heightened risk of malnourishment,…

  9. Use of medicines and adherence to standard treatment guidelines in rural community health centers, Timor-Leste.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Michiyo; Okumura, Junko; Aoyama, Atsuko; Suryawati, Sri; Porter, John

    2015-03-01

    The use of medicines and nurses'/midwives' adherence to standard treatment guidelines (STGs) were examined in Timor-Leste during the early stage of the nation's new health system development. A cross-sectional study was conducted as the quantitative element of mixed methods research. Retrospective samples from patient registration books and prospective observations were obtained in 20 randomly selected rural community health centers. The medicines use indicators, in particular the level of injection use, in Timor-Leste did not suggest overprescription. Prescribers with clinical nurse training prescribed significantly fewer antibiotics than those without such training (P < .01). The adjusted odds ratio of prescribing adherence for clinical nurse training, after accounting for confounders and prescriber clustering, was 6.6 (P < .01). STGs for nonphysician health professionals at the primary health care level have potential value in basic health care delivery, including appropriate use of medicines, in resource-limited communities when strategically developed and introduced. PMID:22548774

  10. The association of HIV/AIDS treatment side effects with health status, work productivity, and resource use.

    PubMed

    daCosta DiBonaventura, Marco; Gupta, Shaloo; Cho, Michelle; Mrus, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Due to stable incidence and improved survival rates, there are an increasing number of patients living with HIV/AIDS in the USA. Although highly effective, current antiretroviral therapies are associated with a variety of side effects. The role side effects play on health outcomes has not been fully examined. The current study assessed the association of medication side effects with (1) self-assessed health status; (2) work productivity and activity impairment; and (3) healthcare resource utilization. Data were from a cross-sectional patient-reported survey fielded in the USA using a dual methodology of Internet and paper questionnaires. A total of 953 patients living with HIV/AIDS who were currently taking a medication for their condition were included in the analyses. The most frequent side effects reported by patients were fatigue (70.72%), diarrhea (62.96%), insomnia (58.97%), dizziness (52.78%), neuropathy (52.68%), joint pain (52.36%), nausea (51.63%), and abdominal pain (50.37%). The presence of each side effect was associated with reduced self-assessed health status, increased productivity loss, increased activity impairment, and increased healthcare resource use. Controlling for CD4 cell counts in regression modeling did little to diminish the impact of side effects. Although not all side effects were associated with all outcomes, every side effect was associated with worse health status, some measure of increased work productivity loss, and/or some measure of increased healthcare resource use. Patients are living longer with HIV and, therefore, spending a greater length of time on treatment. The results of the current study suggest that many of these patients are experiencing a wide array of side effects from these therapies. These side effects have demonstrated a profound association with self-assessed health, work productivity, and healthcare resource use. Improved management of these side effects or development of treatments with a better side effect

  11. HIV/AIDS Competent Households: Interaction between a Health-Enabling Environment and Community-Based Treatment Adherence Support for People Living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Masquillier, Caroline; Wouters, Edwin; Mortelmans, Dimitri; van Wyk, Brian; Hausler, Harry; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    In the context of severe human resource shortages in HIV care, task-shifting and especially community-based support are increasingly being cited as potential means of providing durable care to chronic HIV patients. Socio-ecological theory clearly stipulates that–in all social interventions–the interrelatedness and interdependency between individuals and their immediate social contexts should be taken into account. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) seldom live in isolation, yet community-based interventions for supporting chronic HIV patients have largely ignored the social contexts in which they are implemented. Research is thus required to investigate such community-based support within its context. The aim of this study is to address this research gap by examining the way in which HIV/AIDS competence in the household hampers or facilitates community-based treatment adherence support. The data was analyzed carefully in accordance with the Grounded Theory procedures, using Nvivo 10. More specifically, we analyzed field notes from participatory observations conducted during 48 community-based treatment adherence support sessions in townships on the outskirts of Cape Town, transcripts of 32 audio-recorded in-depth interviews with PLWHA and transcripts of 4 focus group discussions with 36 community health workers (CHWs). Despite the fact that the CHWs try to present themselves as not being openly associated with HIV/AIDS services, results show that the presence of a CHW is often seen as a marker of the disease. Depending on the HIV/AIDS competence in the household, this association can challenge the patient’s hybrid identity management and his/her attempt to regulate the interference of the household in the disease management. The results deepen our understanding of how the degree of HIV/AIDS competence present in a PLWHA’s household affects the manner in which the CHW can perform his or her job and the associated benefits for the patient and his

  12. HIV/AIDS Competent Households: Interaction between a Health-Enabling Environment and Community-Based Treatment Adherence Support for People Living with HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Masquillier, Caroline; Wouters, Edwin; Mortelmans, Dimitri; van Wyk, Brian; Hausler, Harry; Van Damme, Wim

    2016-01-01

    In the context of severe human resource shortages in HIV care, task-shifting and especially community-based support are increasingly being cited as potential means of providing durable care to chronic HIV patients. Socio-ecological theory clearly stipulates that-in all social interventions-the interrelatedness and interdependency between individuals and their immediate social contexts should be taken into account. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) seldom live in isolation, yet community-based interventions for supporting chronic HIV patients have largely ignored the social contexts in which they are implemented. Research is thus required to investigate such community-based support within its context. The aim of this study is to address this research gap by examining the way in which HIV/AIDS competence in the household hampers or facilitates community-based treatment adherence support. The data was analyzed carefully in accordance with the Grounded Theory procedures, using Nvivo 10. More specifically, we analyzed field notes from participatory observations conducted during 48 community-based treatment adherence support sessions in townships on the outskirts of Cape Town, transcripts of 32 audio-recorded in-depth interviews with PLWHA and transcripts of 4 focus group discussions with 36 community health workers (CHWs). Despite the fact that the CHWs try to present themselves as not being openly associated with HIV/AIDS services, results show that the presence of a CHW is often seen as a marker of the disease. Depending on the HIV/AIDS competence in the household, this association can challenge the patient's hybrid identity management and his/her attempt to regulate the interference of the household in the disease management. The results deepen our understanding of how the degree of HIV/AIDS competence present in a PLWHA's household affects the manner in which the CHW can perform his or her job and the associated benefits for the patient and his/her household

  13. Determinants of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp) utilization in a rural town in Western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria infection in pregnancy is a major risk factor for maternal and child death, and substantially increases the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth and low birthweight. The aim of this study therefore is to assess the prevalence and determinants of Intermittent preventive treatment of Malaria [IPTp] utilization by pregnant women in a rural town in Western Nigeria. Methods This study is an analytical cross-sectional study. All pregnant women that were due for delivery and were attending the three primary health care center in Sagamu town, Nigeria within a 2 months period were recruited into the study. A semi- structured questionnaire was used to collect relevant information. Results A total of 255 pregnant women were recruited into the study. The mean age of respondents was 28.07 ± 5.12 years. The mean parity and booking age was 2.7 ± 1.67 and 4.42 ± 1.7 months respectively. The prevalence of Malaria attack in the last 3 months was 122(47.8%). Only 107/255 (40.4%) practice IPTp for malaria prevention during the current pregnancy, with only 14.6% of them taking the second dose during pregnancy as recommended. Chloroquine [27.1%] was the most frequently used medication for the treatment of Malaria in Pregnancy. Early booking age [OR = 1.11, C.I = 0.61–2.01], adverse last pregnancy outcome [OR = 1.23, C.I = 0.36–4.22], and parity [OR = 1.87, C.I = 0.25–16.09] were not statistically significantly associated with IPTp utilization. The only predictor of IPTp use was the knowledge of prophylaxis for malaria prevention [OR = 2.47, C.I = 1.06–3.52] using multivariate analysis. Conclusion The study concludes that most women who attend ANC in rural areas in Nigeria do not receive IPTp as expected. A major determinant of utilization of IPTp among the study population was the knowledge of prophylaxis for malaria prevention. This study highlights the importance of health education of the pregnant women in

  14. Village-Randomized Clinical Trial of Home Distribution of Zinc for Treatment of Childhood Diarrhea in Rural Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Feikin, Daniel R.; Bigogo, Godfrey; Audi, Allan; Pals, Sherri L.; Aol, George; Mbakaya, Charles; Williamson, John; Breiman, Robert F.; Larson, Charles P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Zinc treatment shortens diarrhea episodes and can prevent future episodes. In rural Africa, most children with diarrhea are not brought to health facilities. In a village-randomized trial in rural Kenya, we assessed if zinc treatment might have a community-level preventive effect on diarrhea incidence if available at home versus only at health facilities. Methods We randomized 16 Kenyan villages (1,903 eligible children) to receive a 10-day course of zinc and two oral rehydration solution (ORS) sachets every two months at home and 17 villages (2,241 eligible children) to receive ORS at home, but zinc at the health–facility only. Children’s caretakers were educated in zinc/ORS use by village workers, both unblinded to intervention arm. We evaluated whether incidence of diarrhea and acute lower respiratory illness (ALRI) reported at biweekly home visits and presenting to clinic were lower in zinc villages, using poisson regression adjusting for baseline disease rates, distance to clinic, and children’s age. Results There were no differences between village groups in diarrhea incidence either reported at the home or presenting to clinic. In zinc villages (1,440 children analyzed), 61.2% of diarrheal episodes were treated with zinc, compared to 5.4% in comparison villages (1,584 children analyzed, p<0.0001). There were no differences in ORS use between zinc (59.6%) and comparison villages (58.8%). Among children with fever or cough without diarrhea, zinc use was low (<0.5%). There was a lower incidence of reported ALRI in zinc villages (adjusted RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46–0.99), but not presenting at clinic. Conclusions In this study, home zinc use to treat diarrhea did not decrease disease rates in the community. However, with proper training, availability of zinc at home could lead to more episodes of pediatric diarrhea being treated with zinc in parts of rural Africa where healthcare utilization is low. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00530829

  15. Rural treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema: applying the evidence to achieve success with failure.

    PubMed

    Bosomworth, John

    2008-01-01

    Rural management of acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema should be based on avoidance of adverse outcomes such as in-hospital mortality, the need for intensive care unit care, and the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation. Current evidence suggests that early noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure and early aggressive preload reduction with intravenous nitroglycerin are first-line interventions. Afterload reduction with sublingual captopril, with or without nitroglycerin, improves outcomes and is a second-line intervention. Furosemide is associated with adverse outcomes when used alone and should be given only after vasodilator therapy as a third-line intervention. Inotropes should be used only with demonstrably poor perfusion as they do not improve outcomes and may indeed be associated with increased mortality. Concurrent vasodilator therapy should be considered as soon as possible. Morphine should not be used as it is associated with adverse outcomes. If sedation is desirable, benzodiazepines should be considered. PMID:18796257

  16. High dose intravitreal foscarnet in the treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis in AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Llopis, M; España, E; Muñoz, G; Navea, A; Chipont, E; Cano, J; Menezo, J L; Romero, F J

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerance of high dose intravitreal foscarnet for cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients with AIDS was studied. Foscarnet in a dose of 2400 micrograms was injected directly into the vitreous of 11 patients (15 eyes). Five patients had active retinitis (eight eyes, 53.3%), and received a 3 week induction therapy of six injections as the first step. Six patients had initial inactive retinitis (seven eyes, 46.7%), and received only maintenance therapy which consisted of a weekly injection. The main indications for intravitreal therapy were: myelosuppression, kidney toxicity, catheter related sepsis, or refusal of intravenous therapy. The patients were followed for a mean period of 16 weeks (range 8-28 weeks) and received a total of 304 injections. Vitreous foscarnet levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. After a 3 week course of induction therapy, complete resolution of the active retinitis was seen in 62.5% (5/8 cases), while 37.5% (3/8 cases) had partial resolution. No cases failed to respond or progress. The rate of relapse on maintenance therapy was 33% (five of 15 eyes) by 20 weeks, and two of these eyes did not respond to reinduction and progressed in involvement of the macula or optic nerve. Neither important local complications nor intraocular drug toxicity were observed. Vitreous foscarnet levels in two different patients were 896 mumol/l and 74.9 mumol/l at 22 3/4 hours and 42 1/2 hours after the injection. Intravitreal foscarnet appears to be a safe, effective, and useful alternative in patients with intolerance to intravenous and viral therapy. PMID:8123619

  17. The feasibility of a holistic wellness program for HIV/AIDS patients residing in a voluntary inpatient treatment program.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Vanessa

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the feasibility of an ongoing holistic wellness program in a residential facility treating persons with HIV/AIDS. The goal was to create a voluntary, four week holistic wellness intensive within the established inpatient behavioral health treatment program. Participants were given practicable holistic self care tools to effectively manage HIV related symptoms, general medical issues, addiction, depression, stress and anxiety. The program incorporated evidence-based holistic activities including yoga, therapeutic dance, meditation, Reiki, and reflective journaling. Narrative survey results and post-program evaluation support that an ongoing holistic wellness program within the existing treatment model is feasible and could have numerous potential beneficial effects. This project clearly exemplified the ideal opportunity for holistic nurses to implement innovative holistic interventions within the current healthcare delivery system. It is the author's observation that future studies with a larger participant group to further examine measurable benefits can lend valuable information and insight into the future development of holistic wellness programs for residential treatment facilities. PMID:23686463

  18. Column experiment on activation aids and biosurfactant application to the persulphate treatment of chlorophene-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Bolobajev, J; Öncü, N Bilgin; Viisimaa, M; Trapido, M; Balcıoğlu, I; Goi, A

    2015-01-01

    An innovative strategy integrating the use of biosurfactant (BS) and persulphate activated by chelated iron for the decontamination of soil from an emerging pollutant chlorophene was studied in laboratory down-flow columns along with other persulphate activation aids including combined application of persulphate and hydrogen peroxide, and persulphate activation with sodium hydroxide. Although BS addition improved chlorophene removal by the persulphate treatment, the addition of chelated iron did not have a significant influence. Combined application of persulphate with hydrogen peroxide resulted in a significant (p≤.05) overall improvement of chlorophene removal compared with treatment with persulphate only. The highest removal rate (71%) of chlorophene was achieved with the base-activated persulphate, but only in the upper part (of 0.0-3.5 cm in depth) of the column. The chemicals at the applied dosages did not substantially influence the Daphnia magna toxicity of the effluent. Dehydrogenase activity (DHA) measurements indicated no substantial changes in the microbial activity during the persulphate treatment. The highest oxygen consumption and a slight increase in DHA were observed with the BS addition. The combined application of persulphate and BS at natural soil pH is a promising method for chlorophene-contaminated soil remediation. Hydroquinone was identified among the by-products of chlorophene degradation. PMID:25514136

  19. Perceived social support, hopefulness, and emotional regulations as mediators of the relationship between enacted stigma and post-traumatic growth among children affected by parental HIV/AIDS in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Li, Xiaoming; Tu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Guoxiang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some previous studies have revealed a negative impact of enacted stigma on post-traumatic growth (PTG) of children affected by HIV/AIDS, but little is known about protective psychological factors that can mitigate the effect of enacted stigma on children's PTG. This study aims to examine the mediating effects of perceived social support, hopefulness, and emotional regulation on the relationship between enacted stigma and PTG among HIV-affected children. Cross-sectional data were collected from 790 children affected by parental HIV (382 girls, 408 boys) aged 6–17 years in 2012 in rural central China. Multiple regression was conducted to test the mediation model. The study found that the experience of enacted stigma had a negative effect on PTG among children affected by HIV/AIDS. Emotional regulation together with hopefulness and perceived social support mediated the impact of enacted stigma on PTG. Perceived social support, hopefulness, and emotional regulation offer multiple levels of protection that can mitigate the impact of enacted stigma on PTG. Results suggest that future psychological intervention programs should seek strategies to reduce the stigmatizing experience of these children and promote children's level of PTG, and health professionals should also emphasize the development of these protective psychological factors. PMID:26899475

  20. Differences in Late-Stage Diagnosis, Treatment, and Colorectal Cancer-Related Death between Rural and Urban African Americans and Whites in Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Robert B.; Markossian, Talar W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Disparities in health outcomes due to a diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been reported for a number of demographic groups. This study was conducted to examine the outcomes of late-stage diagnosis, treatment, and cancer-related death according to race and geographic residency status (rural vs urban). Methods: This study utilized…

  1. Hearing aid or tinnitus masker: which one is the best treatment for blast-induced tinnitus? The results of a long-term study on 974 patients.

    PubMed

    Jalilvand, Hamid; Pourbakht, Akram; Haghani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to explore whether a hearing aid or noise generator would be an effective audiological treatment for blast-induced chronic tinnitus. The amount of satisfaction from different hearing devices (hearing aid, noise generator, or both) during different time periods (1, 6, 12 and 24 months after fitting) was assessed. The 974 subjects enrolled in this study were Iran-Iraq war veterans, suffering from tinnitus for at least 2 years. About 84% of the subjects preferred just a hearing aid. Only 2.7% chose the noise generator, and the others preferred to use both devices. There were no significant differences between the hearing thresholds of the 3 groups. The satisfaction score for the hearing aid and combined devices increased by time but decreased for the noise generator. There was no correlation between the satisfaction score and parameters such as hearing thresholds, audiogram configuration and tinnitus pitch. We concluded that, compared with a noise generator, the most long-lasting treatment for blast-induced tinnitus is a hearing aid. The possible cause for such a performance is probably the recovery of the auditory function and neuroplasticity through the hearing aid. PMID:25924663

  2. Delivering Community Services in Rural Communities: Problems and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Allan

    This paper examines specific problems facing community service delivery in rural Australia and efforts to overcome these deficiencies. The generic term "rural" is advantageous in that it delineates particular problems facing rural communities, aids in resource allocation, raises public awareness of rural disadvantage, and provides an understanding…

  3. Safe Treatment of Seizures in the Setting of HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Birbeck, Gretchen L.

    2013-01-01

    OPINION STATEMENT HIV+ patients are at increased risk for developing seizures due to the vulnerability of the central nervous system to HIV-associated diseases, immune dysfunction and metabolic disturbances. In patients with acute seizures, standard protocols still apply with urgent seizure cessation being the priority. Management of the person with established epilepsy who contracts HIV is challenging, but the decision to initiate chronic antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy in an HIV+ patient is also difficult. Chronic treatment guidelines emphasize the interactions between AEDs and antiretroviral (ARV) medications, but provide no explicit advice regarding when to initiate an AED, what medication to select, and/or the duration of treatment. Epidemiologic data regarding seizure recurrence risk in HIV+ individuals is not available. The risk of further seizures likely depends upon the underlying etiology for the seizure(s) and patients’ immune status and may be increased by the use of efavirenz (an ARV). The issues for consideration include AED-ARV interactions, organ dysfunction, seizure type, and drug side effects which may worsen or be confused with symptoms of HIV and/or epilepsy. Co-administration of enzyme inducing (EI)-AEDs and ARVs can result in virological failure, breakthrough seizure activity, AED toxicity and/or ARV toxicity. Where available, the AED of choice in HIV+ patients is levetiracetam due to its broad spectrum activity, ease of use, minimal drug interactions, and favorable side effect profile. Lacosamide, gabapentin, and pregabalin are also favored choices in patients with partial onset seizures and/or those failing levetiracetam. Where newer AEDs are not available, valproic acid may be the treatment of choice in terms of an AED which will not cause enzyme induction-associated ARV failure, but its side effect profile causes other obvious problems. In resource-limited settings (RLS) where only EI-AEDs are available, there are no good treatment

  4. [The Spanish AIDS Study Group and Spanish National AIDS Plan (GESIDA/Secretaría del Plan Nacional sobre el Sida) recommendations for the treatment of tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals (Updated January 2013)].

    PubMed

    Rivero, Antonio; Pulido, Federico; Caylá, Joan; Iribarren, José A; Miró, José M; Moreno, Santiago; Pérez-Camacho, Inés

    2013-12-01

    This consensus document was prepared by an expert panel of the Grupo de Estudio de Sida (GESIDA [Spanish AIDS Study Group]) and the Plan Nacional sobre el Sida (PNS [Spanish National AIDS Plan]). The document updates current guidelines on the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected individuals contained in the guidelines on the treatment of opportunistic infections published by GESIDA and PNS in 2008. The document aims to facilitate the management and treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in Spain, and includes specific sections and recommendations on the treatment of drug-sensitive TB, multidrug-resistant TB, and extensively drug-resistant TB, in this population. The consensus guidelines also make recommendations on the treatment of HIV-infected patients with TB in special situations, such as chronic liver disease, pregnancy, kidney failure, and transplantation. Recommendations are made on the timing and initial regimens of antiretroviral therapy in patients with TB, and on immune reconstitution syndrome in HIV-infected patients with TB who are receiving antiretroviral therapy. The document does not cover the diagnosis of TB, diagnosis/treatment of latent TB, or treatment of TB in children. The quality of the evidence was evaluated and the recommendations graded using the approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation Working Group. PMID:23541879

  5. APPROACHES TO JUVENILE DELINQUENCY PREVENTION AND TREATMENT IN RURAL SETTINGS. RURAL AND SMALL-TOWN DELINQUENCY--NEW UNDERSTANDING AND APPROACHES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHAFER, WALTER E.

    ALTHOUGH THERE IS A LOWER DELINQUENCY RATE IN RURAL AREAS, THE PROBLEM OF DELINQUENCY IS OF MAJOR CONCERN. THE NATURE OF DELINQUENT ACTS IS USUALLY IN THE FORM OF MINOR BURGLARY, TRESPASSING, AND GENERAL MISCONDUCT, WHILE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DELINQUENTS INCLUDE LACK OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT, NEGATIVE ATTITUDES TOWARD SELF AND COMMUNITY, CHOICE…

  6. Neurobehavioral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus/AIDS: Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elyse J; Thames, April D

    2016-02-01

    Behavioral disorders are common in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The differential includes preexisting psychiatric diseases, substance abuse, direct effects of HIV infection, opportunistic infection, and the adverse effects of medical therapies. Many patients have more than one contributing or comorbid problem to explain these behavioral changes. The differential should always include consideration of psychosocial, genetic, and medical causes of disease. Treatment strategies must take into account the coadministration of antiretroviral therapy and the specific neurologic problems common in patients infected with HIV. PMID:26613994

  7. PET/Computed Tomography in Breast Cancer: Can It Aid in Developing a Personalized Treatment Design?

    PubMed

    Suresh Malapure, Sumeet; Das, Kalpa Jyoti; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-07-01

    PET with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging has significantly improved the management of breast cancer. FDG, however, is not tumor-specific and various image interpretation pitfalls may occur due to false-positive and false-negative causes of FDG uptake. PET/CT imaging with more specific radiopharmaceuticals may provide useful information about the pathophysiology in such cases. In the present article, we reviewed the use of whole-body FDG-PET/CT and (18)F-16α-17β-Fluoroestradiol PET/CT imaging to determine if these can be used to develop personalized treatment design for the better management of breast cancer. PMID:27321033

  8. Improved Completion Rates and Characterization of Drug Reactions with an Intensive Chagas Disease Treatment Program in Rural Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Tornheim, Jeffrey A.; Lozano Beltran, Daniel F.; Gilman, Robert H.; Castellon, Mario; Solano Mercado, Marco A.; Sullca, Walter; Torrico, Faustino; Bern, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease treatment is limited by drug availability, adverse side effect profiles of available medications, and poor adherence. Methods Adult Chagas disease patients initiating 60-days of benznidazole were randomized to weekly or twice-weekly evaluations of medication adherence and screening for adverse drug events (ADEs). Mid-week evaluations employed phone-based evaluations. Adherence was measured by self-report, pill counts with intentional over-distribution, and Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS). Prospective data were compared to historical controls treated with benznidazole at the same hospital. Results 162 prospective patients were compared to 172 historical patients. Pill counts correlated well with MEMS data (R = 0.498 for 7-day intervals, R = 0.872 for intervals >7 days). Treatment completion rates were higher among prospective than historical patients (82.1% vs. 65.1%), primarily due to lower abandonment rates. Rates of ADEs were lower among prospective than historical patients (56.8% vs. 66.9%). Twice-weekly evaluations increased identification of mild ADEs, prompting higher suspension rates than weekly evaluations. While twice-weekly evaluations identified ADEs earlier, they did not reduce incidence of moderate or severe ADEs. Many dermatologic ADEs were moderately severe upon presentation (35.6%), were not reduced by use of antihistamines, occurred among adult patients of all ages, and occurred throughout treatment, rather than the first few weeks alone. Conclusions Intensive management improved completion and identified more ADEs, but did not reduce moderate or severe ADEs. Risk of dermatologic ADEs cannot be reduced by selecting younger adults or monitoring only during the first few weeks of treatment. Pill counts and phone-based encounters are reliable tools for treatment programming in rural Bolivia. PMID:24069472

  9. AIDS and chemical dependency: special issues and treatment barriers for gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Cabaj, R P

    1989-01-01

    Because gay and bisexual men continue to be the largest at-risk group for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related conditions, the special role of substance abuse, and not just intravenous drug abuse, must be understood in order to provide adequate services and prevention. Gay men and women appear to have a higher incidence of substance abuse than the general population. Genetic, biochemical, societal, and cultural factors may all contribute to this increase, especially the overwhelming impact of societal homophobia. To address the treatment barriers to gay and bisexual men seeking or needing treatment for HIV-related conditions, chemical dependence or both, the gay community should be seen like any other minority community. The social and cultural norms of this widely varied community should be studied: the socialization of being gay in mainstream society, including the awareness of being different; the coming-out process; and dealing with internalized homophobia need to be understood. In addition, the resistance or anxiety health care providers may feel in working with gay or bisexual men or with HIV-related conditions should be addressed. PMID:2621509

  10. Clinical effectiveness of dolutegravir in the treatment of HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Huda; Das, Archik; Das, Satyajit

    2015-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI), which has now been licensed to be used in different countries including the UK. Earlier studies have demonstrated that DTG when used with nucleoside backbone in treatment-naïve and - experienced patients has been well tolerated and demonstrated virological suppression comparable to other INSTIs and superiority against other first-line agents, including efavirenz and boosted protease inhibitors. Like other INSTIs, DTG uses separate metabolic pathways compared to other antiretrovirals and is a minor substrate for CYP-450. It does not appear to have a significant interaction with drugs, which uses the CYP-450 system. Nonetheless, it uses renal solute transporters that may potentially inhibit the transport of other drugs and can have an effect on the elimination of other drugs. However, the impact of this mechanism appears to be very minimal and insignificant clinically. The side effect profiles of DTG are similar to raltegravir and have been found to be well tolerated. DTG has a long plasma half-life and is suitable for once daily use without the need for a boosting agent. DTG has all the potential to be used as a first-line drug in combination with other nucleoside backbones, especially in the form of a single tablet in combination with abacavir and lamivudine. The purpose of this review article is to present the summary of the available key information about the clinical usefulness of DTG in the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:26491363

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Reduced Doses of Ritonavir (RTV) Plus Saquinavir (SQV) in the Treatment of AIDS Patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brites; Alcântara; Mosqueira; Gimbo; Pedroso; Pedral-Sampaio

    1999-06-01

    The use of reduced doses of Ritonavir (RIT) and Saquinavir (SQV) is considered a potent alternative in treating patients infected by HIV-1. We tested a combination of 300mg of RIT plus 600mg of SQV, twice daily, in association with two reverse transcriptase inhibitors to treat AIDS patients for a period of 6 months. Evaluation of HIV-1 RNA plasma levels, CD4+/CD8+ cell count and biochemical/hematological parameters (liver enzymes, serum electrolytes, creatinin, blood glucose, uric acid, white blood cell count, platelet count, and hemoglobin level) were performed after 30, 90 and 180 days of therapy. Clinical failure and adverse reactions were also recorded in order to assess safety and efficacy of the treatment. A total of 30 AIDS patients (25 male; 5 female) were enrolled in the study. Eight patients discontinued the therapy due to intolerance, 2 patients presented clinical failure (onset of AIDS-defining events during the study period), 2 patients werc excluded due to protocol violation. Five patients tolerated only a lower dose of RIT (400mg/day). Patients who completed 6 months of therapy had a drop in viral load from 4.8+/-.7 log(10) median 4.9 log) to 3.4 +/- 1.0 log(10) (median 2.6 log), and an increase in CD4+ count from 109 +/- 86cells/ml (median 84cells/ml) to 249+/- 114 cells/ml (median 265 cells/ml), compared to baseline values. However, patients who used a lower dose of RIT (400mg/day) had a less impressive drop in viral load values (mean 0.6 log(10) NA copies/ml) when compared with those using the 600mg/day of the drug (mean 2.4 log(10)). The percentage of patients presenting undetectable levels of HIV-1 RNA in plasma was quite different for the 2 groups: 92% of patients with a viral load <400 RNA copies/ ml were using 600mg of RIT. The combination of reduced doses of RIT and SQV reduced viral load >1.0 log(10) after 6 months in 83% of study patients. The dose of 600mg/day of RIT was morc effective in reducing viral load than 400mg/day, but was less

  12. Obstacles for Rural American Indians Seeking Alcohol, Drug, or Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Bonnie; Oetzel, John; Lucero, Julie; Jiang, Yizhou; Novins, Douglas K.; Manson, Spero; Beals, Janette

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with 4 clusters of obstacles (self-reliance, privacy issues, quality of care, and communication and trust) to mental health and substance abuse treatment in 3 treatment sectors for residents of 3 reservations in the United States. Participants (N = 3,084) disclosed whether they had…

  13. Concordance of Patient-Physician Obesity Diagnosis and Treatment Beliefs in Rural Practice Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, Andrea Charbonneau; Greiner, K. Allen; Born, Wendi; Hall, Sandra; Rhode, Paula C.; James, Aimee S.; Nollen, Nicole; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Although clinical guidelines recommend routine screening and treatment for obesity in primary care, lack of agreement between physicians and patients about the need for obesity treatment in the primary care setting may be an unexplored factor contributing to the obesity epidemic. Purpose and Methods: To better understand this dynamic, we…

  14. Challenges to Implementing Opioid Substitution Therapy in Ukrainian Prisons: Personnel Attitudes Toward Addiction, Treatment, and People With HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Polonsky, Maxim; Azbel, Lyuba; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Taxman, Faye S.; Grishaev, Evgeny; Dvoryak, Sergey; Altice, Frederick L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ukraine is experiencing one of the most volatile HIV epidemics globally, fueled primarily by people who inject drugs (PWIDs), and a parallel incarceration epidemic. Opioid substitution therapy (OST) is internationally recognized as one of the most effective forms of treatment for opioid dependence and is among the most effective HIV prevention strategies available, yet efforts to adopt it in Ukraine’s Criminal Justice System (CJS) have been thwarted. Methods To understand the reluctance of the Ukrainian CJS to adopt OST despite the overwhelming evidence pointing to its health benefits and improved criminal justice outcomes, we conducted the first survey of Ukrainian prison administrative, medical and custodial staff (N=243) attitudes towards addiction in general, OST, and people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in representative regions of Ukraine. Results Results revealed that Ukrainian CJS workers’ attitudes toward OST, PLWHA, and drug addiction were universally negative, but differed substantially along geographic and occupational lines. Whereas geographic and cultural proximity to the European Union drove positive attitudes in the west, in the southern region we observed an identifiability effect, as workers who worked directly with prisoners held the most positive attitudes. We also found that knowledge mediated the effect of drug intolerance on OST attitudes. Conclusion In Ukraine, adoption of OST is more influenced by ideological biases and prejudices than by existing scientific evidence. By elucidating existing attitudes among CJS personnel, this assessment will help direct subsequent interventions to address the barriers to implementing evidence-based HIV prevention treatments. PMID:25620732

  15. Impact of HIV comprehensive care and treatment on serostatus disclosure among Cameroonian patients in rural district hospitals.

    PubMed

    Suzan-Monti, Marie; Kouanfack, Charles; Boyer, Sylvie; Blanche, Jérôme; Bonono, Renée-Cécile; Delaporte, Eric; Carrieri, Patrizia M; Moatti, Jean-Paul; Laurent, Christian; Spire, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed to analyze the rate of disclosure to relatives and friends over time and to identify factors affecting disclosure among seropositive adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in rural district hospitals in the context of decentralized, integrated HIV care and task-shifting to nurses in Cameroon. Stratall was a 24-month, randomized, open-label trial comparing the effectiveness of clinical monitoring alone with laboratory plus clinical monitoring on treatment outcomes. It enrolled 459 HIV-infected ART-naive adults in 9 rural district hospitals in Cameroon. Participants in both groups were sometimes visited by nurses instead of physicians. Patients with complete data both at enrolment (M0) and at least at one follow-up visit were included in the present analysis. A mixed Poisson regression was used to estimate predictors of the evolution of disclosure index over 24 months (M24).The study population included 385 patients, accounting for 1733 face-to-face interviews at follow-up visits from M0 to M24. The median [IQR] number of categories of relatives and friends to whom patients had disclosed was 2 [1]-[3] and 3 [2]-[5] at M0 and M24 (p-trend<0.001), respectively. After multiple adjustments, factors associated with disclosure to a higher number of categories of relatives and friends were as follows: having revealed one's status to one's main partner, time on ART, HIV diagnosis during hospitalization, knowledge on ART and positive ratio of follow-up nurse-led to physician-led visits measuring task-shifting. ART delivered in the context of decentralized, integrated HIV care including task-shifting was associated with increased HIV serological status disclosure. PMID:23383117

  16. [Clinical studies and treatment of Karposi's sarcoma of the head and neck in AIDS patients].

    PubMed

    Bujía, J; Riederer, A; Zietz, C; Vogl, T; Wilmes, E

    1993-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is the major neoplastic disease of HIV-infected patients in the head and neck regions. A clinical study realized at Ludwig-Maximilians University, München, uncover 25 homosexuals with KS out of 135 HIB-positive patients. Six of them showed a KS as initial manifestation of the syndrome. The KS was found principally in the palate (22 cases), oropharynx (12) and skin of the neck (11). Symptoms like swallowing or breathing problems occurred in nodular lesions of the mouth, pharynx or larynx, but no in the maculous type. Local laser and/or systemic (retrovir, interferon, chemotherapy) treatment was performed. CO2 and Nd:YAG laser-therapy showed a regression of the tumors and thus an improvement of quality of life could be achieved. PMID:8317635

  17. Antimicrobial therapy for the treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS patients: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Jo; Bhagani, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    The widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has entirely changed the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and dramatically reduced the rates of opportunistic infections (OI). However, OI continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in both developed countries, where presentation with advanced HIV infection is common, and also in developing countries where ART is less widely available. Evidence to direct OI guidelines is partly limited by the fact that many large-scale studies date from the pre-ART era and more recent studies are sometimes poorly powered due to the falling rates of OI. Treatment of OI is now known to be as much about antimicrobials as about immune reconstitution with ART, and recent studies help guide the timing of initiation of ART in different infections. OI have also become complicated by the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome phenomenon which may occur once successful immune recovery begins. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has long been one of the most important antibiotics in the treatment and prevention of OI and remains paramount. It has a broad spectrum of activity against Pneumocystis jiroveci, toxoplasmosis, and bacterial infections and has an important role to play in preventing life-threatening OI. New advances in treating OI are coming from a variety of quarters: in cytomegalovirus eye disease, the use of oral rather than intravenous drugs is changing the face of therapy; in cryptococcal meningitis, improved drug formulations and combination therapy is improving clearance rates and reducing drug toxicities; and in gut disease, the possibility of rapid immune restitution with ART is replacing the need for antimicrobials against cryptosporidia and microsporidia. PMID:22096404

  18. Rural Aging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... Websites & Tools Maps Funding & Opportunities Events Models and Innovations About This Guide Rural Health > Topics & States > Topics ...

  19. Community perceptions of repeat HIV-testing: experiences of the ANRS 12249 Treatment as Prevention trial in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Zuma, Thembelihle; Chikovore, Jeremiah; Gillespie, Natasha; Grant, Merridy; Iwuji, Collins; Larmarange, Joseph; McGrath, Nuala; Lert, France; Imrie, John

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the ANRS 12249 Treatment as Prevention (TasP) trial, we investigated perceptions of regular and repeat HIV-testing in rural KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa), an area of very high HIV prevalence and incidence. We conducted two qualitative studies, before (2010) and during the early implementation stages of the trial (2013-2014), to appreciate the evolution in community perceptions of repeat HIV-testing over this period of rapid changes in HIV-testing and treatment approaches. Repeated focus group discussions were organized with young adults, older adults and mixed groups. Repeat and regular HIV-testing was overall well perceived before, and well received during, trial implementation. Yet community members were not able to articulate reasons why people might want to test regularly or repeatedly, apart from individual sexual risk-taking. Repeat home-based HIV-testing was considered as feasible and convenient, and described as more acceptable than clinic-based HIV-testing, mostly because of privacy and confidentiality. However, socially regulated discourses around appropriate sexual behaviour and perceptions of stigma and prejudice regarding HIV and sexual risk-taking were consistently reported. This study suggests several avenues to improve HIV-testing acceptability, including implementing diverse and personalised approaches to HIV-testing and care, and providing opportunities for antiretroviral therapy initiation and care at home. PMID:27421048

  20. 34 CFR Appendix to Subpart K of... - Determinations Under Section 8009 of the Act-Methods of Calculations for Treatment of Impact Aid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determinations Under Section 8009 of the Act-Methods of Calculations for Treatment of Impact Aid Payments Under State Equalization Programs Appendix to Subpart K of... Act Pt. 222, Subpt. K, App. Appendix to Subpart K of Part 222—Determinations Under Section 8009 of...

  1. 34 CFR Appendix to Subpart K of... - Determinations Under Section 8009 of the Act-Methods of Calculations for Treatment of Impact Aid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determinations Under Section 8009 of the Act-Methods of Calculations for Treatment of Impact Aid Payments Under State Equalization Programs Appendix to Subpart K of... Act Pt. 222, Subpt. K, App. Appendix to Subpart K of Part 222—Determinations Under Section 8009 of...

  2. Thyroid cancer patient perceptions of radioactive iodine treatment choice: Follow‐up from a decision‐aid randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Straus, Sharon; Rodin, Gary; Heus, Lineke; Brierley, James D.; Tsang, Richard W.; Rotstein, Lorne; Ezzat, Shereen; Segal, Phillip; Gafni, Amiram; Thorpe, Kevin E.; Goldstein, David P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patient decision aids (P‐DAs) inform medical decision making, but longer term effects are unknown. This article describes extended follow‐up from a thyroid cancer treatment P‐DA trial. METHODS In this single‐center, parallel‐design randomized controlled trial conducted at a Canadian tertiary/quaternary care center, early‐stage thyroid cancer patients from a P‐DA trial were contacted 15 to 23 months after randomization/radioactive iodine (RAI) decision making to evaluate longer term outcomes. It was previously reported that the use of the computerized P‐DA in thyroid cancer patients considering postsurgical RAI treatment significantly improved medical knowledge in comparison with usual care alone. The P‐DA and control groups were compared for the following outcomes: feeling informed about the RAI treatment choice, decision satisfaction, decision regret, cancer‐related worry, and physician trust. In a subgroup of 20 participants, in‐depth interviews were conducted for a qualitative analysis. RESULTS Ninety‐five percent (70 of 74) of the original population enrolled in follow‐up at a mean of 17.1 months after randomization. P‐DA users perceived themselves to be significantly more 1) informed about the treatment choice (P = .008), 2) aware of options (P = .009), 3) knowledgeable about treatment benefits (P = .020), and 4) knowledgeable about treatment risks/side effects (P = .001) in comparison with controls. There were no significant group differences in decision satisfaction (P = .142), decision regret (P = .199), cancer‐related worry (P = .645), mood (P = .211), or physician trust (P = .764). In the qualitative analysis, the P‐DA was perceived to have increased patient knowledge and confidence in decision making. CONCLUSIONS The P‐DA improved cancer survivors’ actual and long‐term perceived medical knowledge with no adverse effects. More research on the long‐term outcomes of P

  3. Patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ntabaye, M K; Scheutz, F; Poulsen, S

    1998-10-01

    Emergency oral health care, as conceived in Tanzania, is an on-demand service provided at a rural health center or dispensary by a Rural Medical Aide. The service includes: simple tooth extraction under local anesthesia, draining of abscesses, control of acute oral infection with appropriate drug therapy, first aid for maxillo-facial trauma, and recognition of oral conditions requiring patient referral for further care at the district or regional hospital dental clinic. The objective of the present study was to describe patient satisfaction with emergency oral health care services in rural Tanzania and determine the relative importance of factors influencing patient satisfaction. The study was carried out as a cross-sectional interview survey between April 1993 and May 1994 using a patient satisfaction questionnaire in rural villages in the Rungwe district of Tanzania. It included 206 patients aged 18 years or more who had received emergency oral health care between April 1993 and March 1994. Overall, 92.7% of the respondents reported that they were satisfied with the service. Patients who were married, had no formal education and lived more than 3 km from the dispensary were more likely to be satisfied with treatment. In a logistic regression model, a good working atmosphere at the dispensary, a good relationship between care provider and patients (art of care) and absence of post-treatment complications significantly influenced patient satisfaction with odds ratios of 10.3, 17.4 and 6.2, respectively. PMID:9792119

  4. Physiotherapy intervention as a complementary treatment for people living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Pullen, Sara D; Chigbo, Nnenna Nina; Nwigwe, Emmanuel Chukwudi; Chukwuka, Chinwe J; Amah, Christopher Chim; Idu, Stanley C

    2014-01-01

    Background The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy has dramatically extended the life expectancy of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Despite this increased longevity, HIV disease and its pharmacological treatment can cause long-term and acute health complications, many of which can be treated successfully by physiotherapy. The purpose of this paper is to report the effect of a 12-week rehabilitation program on several health-related markers in a 43-year-old woman living with HIV. Methods This case study examined the effect of a 12-week exercise and manual therapy intervention on morphology, pain, cardiopulmonary fitness, strength, neurological balance, immune markers (CD4 cell count), and quality of life in a 43-year-old woman living with HIV. Results The results showed complete elimination of pain and shortness of breath on exertion. There was also a reduction in resting heart rate, waist circumference, exercise duration, muscle strength, and endurance. The patient showed an increase in peak expiratory flow rate, maximal heart rate attained, upper arm, forearm, and thigh circumference, and CD4+ cell count. The patient also showed improvements in the quality of life domains of general health, pain, energy/fatigue, social and physical functioning, and emotional well-being. Conclusion Physiotherapy interventions consisting of exercise and manual therapy appear beneficial in several areas as an adjunct therapy in HIV management. PMID:24936132

  5. Advanced thermal hydrolysis: optimization of a novel thermochemical process to aid sewage sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Abelleira, Jose; Pérez-Elvira, Sara I; Portela, Juan R; Sánchez-Oneto, Jezabel; Nebot, Enrique

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this work was to study in depth the behavior and optimization of a novel process, called advanced thermal hydrolysis (ATH), to determine its utility as a pretreatment (sludge solubilization) or postreatment (organic matter removal) for anaerobic digestion (AD) in the sludge line of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). ATH is based on a thermal hydrolysis (TH) process plus hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) addition and takes advantage of a peroxidation/direct steam injection synergistic effect. On the basis of the response surface methodology (RSM) and a modified Doehlert design, an empirical second-order polynomial model was developed for the total yield of: (a) disintegration degree [DD (%)] (solubilization), (b) filtration constant [F(c) (cm(2)/min)] (dewaterability), and (c) organic matter removal (%). The variables considered were operation time (t), temperature reached after initial heating (T), and oxidant coefficient (n = oxygen(supplied)/oxygen(stoichiometric)). As the model predicts, in the case of the ATH process with high levels of oxidant, it is possible to achieve an organic matter removal of up to 92%, but the conditions required are prohibitive on an industrial scale. ATH operated at optimal conditions (oxygen amount 30% of stoichiometric, 115 °C and 24 min) gave promising results as a pretreatment, with similar solubilization and markedly better dewaterability levels in comparison to those obtained with TH at 170 °C. The empirical validation of the model was satisfactory. PMID:22463756

  6. Diabetes Treatment as "Homework": Consequences for Household Knowledge and Health Practices in Rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jannie; Bahendeka, Silver K; Bygbjerg, Ib C; Meyrowitsch, Dan W; Whyte, Susan R

    2016-04-01

    Background Health professionals assign diabetes patients "homework" in that they give them instructions on how to manage diabetes, recognizing that most diabetes care takes place in the home setting. We studied how homework is practiced and whether knowledge and behavioral practices related to diabetes self-management diffuse from patients to their housemates.Method This mixed-methods study combined quantitative data from a household survey including 90 rural Ugandan households (50% had a member with type 2 diabetes [T2D]) with qualitative data from health facilities and interviews with 10 patients with T2D. Focus for data collection was knowledge and practices related to diabetes homework. A generalized mixed model was used to analyze quantitative data, while content analysis was used for qualitative data analysis.Results Patients with T2D generally understood the diabetes homework assignments given by health professionals and carried out their homework with support from housemates. Although adherence to recommended diet was variable, housemates were likely to eat a healthier diet than if no patient with T2D lived in the household. Knowledge related to diabetes homework diffused from the patients to housemates and beyond to neighbors and family living elsewhere. Knowledge about primary prevention of T2D was almost absent among health staff, patients, and relatives.Conclusions Homework practices related to T2D improve diabetes-related knowledge and may facilitate healthy eating in nondiabetic housemates. These findings suggest that having a chronic disease in the household provides an opportunity to improve health in the entire household and address the lack of knowledge about prevention of T2D. PMID:27037141

  7. From PALSA PLUS to PALM PLUS: adapting and developing a South African guideline and training intervention to better integrate HIV/AIDS care with primary care in rural health centers in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Only about one-third of eligible HIV/AIDS patients receive anti-retroviral treatment (ART). Decentralizing treatment is crucial to wider and more equitable access, but key obstacles are a shortage of trained healthcare workers (HCW) and challenges integrating HIV/AIDS care with other primary care. This report describes the development of a guideline and training program (PALM PLUS) designed to integrate HIV/AIDS care with other primary care in Malawi. PALM PLUS was adapted from PALSA PLUS, developed in South Africa, and targets middle-cadre HCWs (clinical officers, nurses, and medical assistants). We adapted it to align with Malawi's national treatment protocols, more varied healthcare workforce, and weaker health system infrastructure. Methods/Design The international research team included the developers of the PALSA PLUS program, key Malawi-based team members and personnel from national and district level Ministry of Health (MoH), professional associations, and an international non-governmental organization. The PALSA PLUS guideline was extensively revised based on Malawi national disease-specific guidelines. Advice and input was sought from local clinical experts, including middle-cadre personnel, as well as Malawi MoH personnel and representatives of Malawian professional associations. Results An integrated guideline adapted to Malawian protocols for adults with respiratory conditions, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and other primary care conditions was developed. The training program was adapted to Malawi's health system and district-level supervision structure. PALM PLUS is currently being piloted in a cluster-randomized trial in health centers in Malawi (ISRCTN47805230). Discussion The PALM PLUS guideline and training intervention targets primary care middle-cadre HCWs with the objective of improving HCW satisfaction and retention, and the quality of patient care. Successful adaptations are feasible, even across health systems as different as those of

  8. Tele-ECG and 24-hour physician support over telephone for rural doctors can help early treatment of acute myocardial infarction in rural areas.

    PubMed

    Vivek, Chauhan; Vikrant, Kanwar

    2016-04-01

    We observed that many patients of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were reaching our hospital out of the 12 hour window period for thrombolysis. This led to poor patient outcomes. There were multiple reasons for the delay, prominent among them was lack of diagnostic facilities in the rural health care centers. We therefore planned a Tele-Electrocardiography (Tele-ECG) based pilot project in Kangra District of Himachal Pradesh in India, which was funded by the Indian Council of Medical Research. The intention was to reduce the pre-hospital delay in AMI by enabling the rural doctors of Kangra using Tele-ECG facility and a 24-hour physician support to manage patients of AMI. We did a baseline knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) assessment study of the doctors in our intervention centers to understand their needs. The data obtained through the KAP study was an eye opener for us and justifies the need for a Tele-ECG facility for rural doctors in India. PMID:26187625

  9. Computer-aided patch planning for treatment of complex coarctation of the aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietdorf, Urte; Riesenkampff, Eugénie; Kuehne, Titus; Huebler, Michael; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Wolf, Ivo

    2009-02-01

    Between five and eight percent of all children born with congenitally malformed hearts suffer from coarctations of the aorta. Some severe coarctations can only be treated by surgical repair. Untreated, this defect can cause serious damage to organ development or even lead to death. Patch repair requires open surgery. It can affect patients of any age: newborns with severe coarctation and/or hypoplastic aortic arch as well as older patients with late diagnosis of coarctation of the aorta. Another patient group are patients of varying age with re-coarctation of the aorta or hypoplastic aortic arch after surgical and/or interventional repair. If anatomy is complex and interventional treatment by catheterization, balloon angioplasty or stent placement is not possible, surgery is indicated. The choice of type of surgery depends not only on the given anatomy but also on the experience the surgical team has with each method. One surgical approach is patch repair. A patch of a suitable shape and size is sewed into the aorta to expand the aortic lumen at the site of coarctation. At present, the shape and size of the patch are estimated intra-operatively by the surgeon. We have developed a software application that allows planning of the patch pre-operatively on the basis of magnetic resonance angiographic data. The application determines the diameter of the coarctation and/or hypoplastic segment and constructs a patch proposal by calculating the difference to the normal vessel diameter pre-operatively. Evaluation of MR angiographic datasets from 12 test patients with different kinds of aortic arch stenosis shows a divergence of only (1.5+/-1.2) mm in coarctation diameters between manual segmentations and our approach, with comparable time expenditure. Following this proposal the patch can be prepared and adapted to the patient's anatomy pre-operatively. Ideally, this leads to shorter operation times and a better long-term outcome with a reduced rate of residual stenosis and

  10. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Understanding HIV/AIDS AIDS was first reported in the United States in ... and has since become a major worldwide epidemic. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or ...

  11. The Effectiveness of a Multifocal Training to Improve the Treatment of Chromoblastomycosis in Rural Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Santmyire, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Madagascar has the highest number of cases of chromoblastomycosis in the world, but the areas of highest incidence have limited affordable access and knowledge of first line medications to treat this long-term fungal infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue. The impact of a multifocal training targeting medical doctors who live in the area of the country with the highest prevalence of this disease has not been clearly reported. The purpose of this project was to determine the effect of a multifocal training on chromoblastomycosis for Malagasy medical doctors in the SAVA (Sambava, Andapa, Vohemar, and Antalaha) province of Madagascar (in the country's northeast) about diagnosis, staging, patient education poster, and treatment options of chromoblastomycosis versus common treatment practices to increase participant's knowledge and utilization of current treatment recommendations for chromoblastomycosis. Medical doctors in the SAVA province of Madagascar enrolled in the multifocal trainings. PMID:27524747

  12. 42 CFR 412.102 - Special treatment: Hospitals located in areas that are reclassified from urban to rural as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... are reclassified from urban to rural as a result of a geographic redesignation. 412.102 Section 412...: Hospitals located in areas that are reclassified from urban to rural as a result of a geographic... additional amount that equals two-thirds of the difference between the urban standardized amount...

  13. 42 CFR 412.102 - Special treatment: Hospitals located in areas that are reclassified from urban to rural as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... are reclassified from urban to rural as a result of a geographic redesignation. 412.102 Section 412...: Hospitals located in areas that are reclassified from urban to rural as a result of a geographic... additional amount that equals two-thirds of the difference between the urban standardized amount...

  14. 42 CFR 412.102 - Special treatment: Hospitals located in areas that are reclassified from urban to rural as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... are reclassified from urban to rural as a result of a geographic redesignation. 412.102 Section 412...: Hospitals located in areas that are reclassified from urban to rural as a result of a geographic... additional amount that equals two-thirds of the difference between the urban standardized amount...

  15. 42 CFR 412.102 - Special treatment: Hospitals located in areas that are reclassified from urban to rural as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... are reclassified from urban to rural as a result of a geographic redesignation. 412.102 Section 412...: Hospitals located in areas that are reclassified from urban to rural as a result of a geographic... additional amount that equals two-thirds of the difference between the urban standardized amount...

  16. Rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by people living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral treatment in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ayiga, Natal

    2012-09-01

    Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has been recognized as one of the methods for reducing the risk of HIV transmission, and access to this is being rapidly expanded. However, in a generalized HIV epidemic, ART could increase unprotected sex by people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs). This paper assessed the rates and predictors of consistent condom-use by sexually-active PHAs after initiating ART. The study used cross-sectional data on sexual behaviour of 269 sexually-active ART-experienced individuals (95 males and 174 females) aged 18 years and above. The results revealed that 65% (70% of men and 61% of women) used condom consistently after initiating ART. Consistent use of condom was more likely if PHAs had secondary- or tertiary-level education and had more than one sex partner in the 12 months preceding the study. However, PHAs were less likely to have used condom consistently if they worked in the informal and formal sectors, belonged to the medium- and high-income groups, and were married. PHAs, who were on ART for less than 1 year and 1-2 year(s), had a good self-perception of health, had a sexual partner who was HIV-negative or a partner with unknown HIV status, and desired to bear children, were also less likely to have used condom consistently. The paper concluded that, although the majority of PHAs consistently used condom, there was potential for unprotected sex by PHAs on ART. PMID:23082629

  17. Collective consciousness and its pathologies: understanding the failure of AIDS control and treatment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Rodrick M; Fullilove, Mindy T; Fullilove, Robert E; Wallace, Deborah N

    2007-01-01

    We address themes of distributed cognition by extending recent formal developments in the theory of individual consciousness. While single minds appear biologically limited to one dynamic structure of linked cognitive submodules instantiating consciousness, organizations, by contrast, can support several, sometimes many, such constructs simultaneously, although these usually operate relatively slowly. System behavior remains, however, constrained not only by culture, but by a developmental path dependence generated by organizational history, in the context of market selection pressures. Such highly parallel multitasking--essentially an institutional collective consciousness--while capable of reducing inattentional blindness and the consequences of failures within individual workspaces, does not eliminate them, and introduces new characteristic malfunctions involving the distortion of information sent between workspaces and the possibility of pathological resilience--dysfunctional institutional lock-in. Consequently, organizations remain subject to canonical and idiosyncratic failures analogous to, but more complicated than, those afflicting individuals. Remediation is made difficult by the manner in which pathological externalities can write images of themselves onto both institutional function and corrective intervention. The perspective is applied to the failure of AIDS control and treatment in the United States. PMID:17324268

  18. Collective consciousness and its pathologies: Understanding the failure of AIDS control and treatment in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Rodrick M; Fullilove, Mindy T; Fullilove, Robert E; Wallace, Deborah N

    2007-01-01

    We address themes of distributed cognition by extending recent formal developments in the theory of individual consciousness. While single minds appear biologically limited to one dynamic structure of linked cognitive submodules instantiating consciousness, organizations, by contrast, can support several, sometimes many, such constructs simultaneously, although these usually operate relatively slowly. System behavior remains, however, constrained not only by culture, but by a developmental path dependence generated by organizational history, in the context of market selection pressures. Such highly parallel multitasking – essentially an institutional collective consciousness – while capable of reducing inattentional blindness and the consequences of failures within individual workspaces, does not eliminate them, and introduces new characteristic malfunctions involving the distortion of information sent between workspaces and the possibility of pathological resilience – dysfunctional institutional lock-in. Consequently, organizations remain subject to canonical and idiosyncratic failures analogous to, but more complicated than, those afflicting individuals. Remediation is made difficult by the manner in which pathological externalities can write images of themselves onto both institutional function and corrective intervention. The perspective is applied to the failure of AIDS control and treatment in the United States. PMID:17324268

  19. Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Co-Infections in People Living with HIV/AIDS: Systematic Review with Implications for using HIV Treatments for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Pellowski, Jennifer; Turner, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted co-infections increase HIV infectiousness through local inflammatory processes. The prevalence of STI among people living with HIV/AIDS has implications for containing the spread of HIV in general and the effectiveness of HIV treatments for prevention in particular. Methods A systematic review of studies examining STI co-infections in people living with HIV/AIDS. The review focuses on STI contracted after becoming HIV infected. Electronic database and manual searches located clinical and epidemiological studies of STI that increase HIV infectiousness. Results Thirty seven studies of STI-HIV co-infection prevalence were located. Studies of adults living with HIV/AIDS from developed and developing countries reported STI rates for 46 different samples (33 samples had clinical/laboratory confirmed STI). The overall mean point-prevalence for confirmed STI was16.3% (SD = 16.4), and median 12.4% STI prevalence in people living with HIV/AIDS. The most common STI studied were Syphilis with median 9.5% prevalence, gonorrhea 9.5%, Chlamydia 5%, and Trichamoniasis 18.8% prevalence. STI prevalence was greatest at the time of HIV diagnosis, reflecting the role of STI in HIV transmission. Prevalence of STI among individuals receiving HIV treatment was not appreciably different from untreated persons. Conclusions The prevalence of STI in people infected with HIV suggests that STI co-infections could undermine efforts to use HIV treatments for prevention by increasing genital secretion infectiousness. PMID:21330572

  20. Bioenergy systems report: The AID (Agency for International Development) approach. Using agricultural and forestry wastes for the production of energy in support of rural development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    The Biomass Energy Systems and Technology project (BEST) seeks to integrate natural resources, private sector expertise, and financial support in order to convert biomass into marketable energy products at existing agro-processing facilities. This report documents BEST's approach to biomass promotion and includes sections on: the rationale for the project's commodity focus (sugar cane, rice, and wood); the relevant U.S. biomass experience with rice, cane, and wood residues, etc., which BEST draws upon; A.I.D.'s experience in the field application of rice, wood, and cane residue bioenergy systems; economic analyses of biomass systems (using examples from Indonesia and Costa Rica); research initiatives to develop off-season fuels for sugar mills, advanced biomass conversion systems, and energy efficiency in sugar factories; and the environmental aspects of biomass (including its ability to be used without increasing global warming).

  1. [Enteric parasites and AIDS in Haiti: utility of detection and treatment of intestinal parasites in family members].

    PubMed

    Raccurt, C P; Pannier Stockman, C; Eyma, E; Verdier, R I; Totet, A; Pape, J W

    2006-10-01

    Intestinal parasites and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are major health problems in Haiti. Both entities are known to interact strongly with cell-mediated immunity. The purpose of this study undertaken in Port-au-Prince, Haiti was to evaluate the risk of enteric parasite transmission between HIV-infected patients and family members. Routine examination of stool specimens for parasites was conducted in 90 HIV-infected undergoing treatment for intestinal disorders due mainly to Cryptosporidium sp. (62%) and 123 healthy family member volunteers. A stool sample preserved in 10% formalin solution was examined to detect protozoa (MIF, modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain, Uvibio fluorescence technique, Weber stain) and helminth ova (Bailenger technique). In addition to Cryptosporidium sp., 14 parasitic species were identified: 6 Rhizopoda, 3 Flagellata (including Giardia duodenalis), 1 Coccidia (Cyclospora cayetanensis), 3 Nematoda (mainly Ascaris lumbricoides) and 1 Cestoda (Hymenolepis nana). This is the first time that 5 protozoa, i.e., Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba hartmanni, E. polecki, Chilomastix mesnili, and Enteromonas hominis, have been reported in Haiti. As expected, enteric parasites were less common in HIV-infected subjects undergoing medical treatment (11.1%) than in uninfected family members (41.5%) (p = 0.0000). Multiple intestinal parasitism (infection by 2 to 4 parasites) was observed in 19.5% of family members. The findings of this study indicate that detecting and treating intestinal parasites in subjects living in close contact with HIV-infected patients as well as informing family members of the importance of personal hygiene in Haiti are highly recommended measures to preserve the health of AIDS patients. PMID:17201290

  2. Rural Sewage Treatment by using Combined Process of Multi-layer Bio-filter and Constructed Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xudong; Paul, Etienne; Qiu, Jiangping; Roustan, Michel; Wisniewski, Christelle; Mauviot, Patrice

    2010-11-01

    A combined process of multi-layer bio-filter and constructed wetland has been used to treat the rural sewage in eastern China. The capacity of the system was 60 m3/d, the hydraulic loading rate (HLR) of the bio-filter and the constructed wetland was 4.0 m3/(m3ṡd) and 0.50 m3/(m3ṡd), respectively. The system has been operated automatically for 2 years. The results showed that the average concentrations of COD, NH4+-N, TN and TP in the effluent were 58.2, 8.1, 12.1 and 0.9 mg/L with the removal efficiency of 79.2%, 62.8%, 55.1% and 77.1% respectively, which could meet the first grade of Chinese national pollutants discharge standard for municipal wastewater treatment plant (GB 18918-2002). The track studies showed that the organic pollutants were mainly removed in the first 4 layers and the ammonia was mainly removed in the 4th˜6th layers of the filter. It was observed that the COD removal efficiency in the whole system decreased from 84.6% to 73.3% following the sequences of summer, autumn, spring and winter. Comparing with traditional techniques, the combined process could provide a higher nitrogen and phosphorus removal capacity.

  3. Declining prevalence of probable depression among patients presenting for antiretroviral therapy in rural Uganda: the role of early treatment initiation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Brian T; Weiser, Sheri D; Boum, Yap; Haberer, Jessica E; Kembabazi, Annet; Hunt, Peter W; Martin, Jeffrey N; Mocello, A Rain; Bangsberg, David R; Tsai, Alexander C

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about trends in depression at antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in low- and middle-income countries. We used data from an ongoing cohort of treatment-naïve PLHIV in rural Uganda to estimate secular trends in depression among PLHIV at ART initiation. We fitted linear regression models with depression symptom severity as the outcome variable and year of cohort entry (2005-2012) as the explanatory variable, adjusting for socio-demographic variables and assessing physical health score, body mass index (BMI), and CD4 count as potential mediators of a secular trend in depression symptom severity. There was a statistically significant negative association between year of entry and depression symptom severity, suggesting a 3.1 % relative decline in the mean depression symptom severity score at ART initiation in each year of study recruitment after the first year. This trend remained statistically significant after inclusion of baseline socio-demographic characteristics to the model and appeared to be driven by improved physical health scores, but not CD4 count or BMI. PMID:24788780

  4. NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043) HIV/AIDS Community Mobilization (CM) to Promote Mobile HIV Voluntary Counseling and Testing (MVCT) in Rural Communities in Northern Thailand: Modifications by Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kawichai, Surinda; Celentano, David; Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai; Wichajarn, Monjun; Pancharoen, Kanokporn; Chariyalertsak, Chonlisa; Visrutaratana, Surasing; Khumalo-Sakutukwa, Gertrude; Sweat, Michael; Chariyalertsak, Suwat

    2012-01-01

    Project Accept is a RCT designed to test the efficacy of community mobilization (CM), mobile voluntary counseling and testing (MVCT), and post-test support services (PTSS) in reducing HIV incidence in three African countries and Thailand. The intervention started in rural areas, northern Thailand in January 2006. CM initially included door-to-door visits during the daytime, small group discussions and joining organized meetings and followed by MVCT. In February 2007, CM strategy using HIV/AIDS “edutainment” (education and entertainment) during evening hours was introduced. After edutainment was initiated, the number of participants increased substantially. VCT uptake increased from 18 to 28 persons/day on average (t test; t = 7.87 P < 0.0001). Edutainment especially motivated younger people, as the median age of VCT clients decreased from 38 to 35 years old (median test; z = 6.74, P < 0.0001). Providing free MVCT in community settings along with edutainment during evening hours increased VCT uptake and was particularly attractive to younger adults. PMID:22170382

  5. Video observations of treatment administration to children on antiretroviral therapy in rural KwaZulu-Natal.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    For children younger than five years, caregivers are responsible for the measurement and administration of antiretroviral medication doses to children. Failure to adhere to the regimen as prescribed may lead to high viral loads (VLs), immune suppression and ultimately drug resistance. In the content of this study, adherence refers to adequate dosing of the medication by a caregiver. Acquired drug resistance to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is prevalent amongst children in South Africa, and poor adherence to the dosing regimen by caregivers may be associated with this problem. In this qualitative study, we purposively recruited 33 caregiver-child dyads from the Hlabisa HIV Treatment and Care Programme database. Children were divided into three groups based on their VL at the time of recruitment. Children with a VL ≥ 400 cps/ml were grouped as unsuppressed (n = 11); children with a VL ≤ 400 cps/ml were grouped as suppressed (n = 12); and children with no VL data were grouped as newly initiated (n = 10). Caregiver-child dyads were visited at their households twice to document, by means of video recording, how treatment was administered to the child. Observational notes and video recordings were entered into ATLAS.ti v 7 and analysed thematically. Results were interpreted through the lens of Ecological Systems Theory and the information-motivation-behavioural skills model was used to understand and reflect on several of the factors influencing adherence within the child's immediate environment as identified in this study. Thematic video analysis indicated context- and medication-related factors influencing ART adherence. Although the majority of children in this sample took their medicine successfully, caregivers experienced several challenges with the preparation and administration of the medications. In the context of emerging drug resistance, efforts are needed to carefully monitor caregiver knowledge of treatment administration by

  6. Video observations of treatment administration to children on antiretroviral therapy in rural KwaZulu-Natal

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For children younger than five years, caregivers are responsible for the measurement and administration of antiretroviral medication doses to children. Failure to adhere to the regimen as prescribed may lead to high viral loads (VLs), immune suppression and ultimately drug resistance. In the content of this study, adherence refers to adequate dosing of the medication by a caregiver. Acquired drug resistance to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is prevalent amongst children in South Africa, and poor adherence to the dosing regimen by caregivers may be associated with this problem. In this qualitative study, we purposively recruited 33 caregiver–child dyads from the Hlabisa HIV Treatment and Care Programme database. Children were divided into three groups based on their VL at the time of recruitment. Children with a VL ≥ 400 cps/ml were grouped as unsuppressed (n = 11); children with a VL ≤ 400 cps/ml were grouped as suppressed (n = 12); and children with no VL data were grouped as newly initiated (n = 10). Caregiver–child dyads were visited at their households twice to document, by means of video recording, how treatment was administered to the child. Observational notes and video recordings were entered into ATLAS.ti v 7 and analysed thematically. Results were interpreted through the lens of Ecological Systems Theory and the information–motivation–behavioural skills model was used to understand and reflect on several of the factors influencing adherence within the child’s immediate environment as identified in this study. Thematic video analysis indicated context- and medication-related factors influencing ART adherence. Although the majority of children in this sample took their medicine successfully, caregivers experienced several challenges with the preparation and administration of the medications. In the context of emerging drug resistance, efforts are needed to carefully monitor caregiver knowledge of treatment

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Puncturing and Bloodletting at Twelve Hand Jing Points to Treat Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning as Adjunct to First Aid Treatment: A Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ying; Pan, Xingfang; Zhang, Sai; Jin, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Dongqiang; Han, Dexin; Wang, Guirong; Hu, Qunliang; Kang, Jingqing; Ding, Shasha; Yang, Yi; Bu, Huaien; Guo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning (ACOP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. Twelve Hand Jing Points (THJP) have been believed to be effective to treat all kinds of emergency calls in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for more than 3000 years. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of THJP in curing acute carbon monoxide poisoning in first aid treatment. This paper reports the protocol of the trial. Methods/Design. This RCT is a multicenter, randomized, controlled study undergoing in China. The compliant patients are divided into the bloodletting group and standard of care group. With first aid treatments given to both of the groups, the bloodletting group is bleeding at THJP upon being hospitalized. Primary outcomes and secondary outcomes will be measured and compared between these two groups. Before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours after treatment, patients' basic vital signs and state of consciousness were observed. Before treatment and 1 and 4 hours after treatment, carboxyhemoglobin concentration in venous blood samples was detected. Discussion. The objective of this study is to provide convincing evidence to clarify the efficacy and safety of THJP for early treatment of acute carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:26339271

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Puncturing and Bloodletting at Twelve Hand Jing Points to Treat Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning as Adjunct to First Aid Treatment: A Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ying; Pan, Xingfang; Zhang, Sai; Jin, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Dongqiang; Han, Dexin; Wang, Guirong; Hu, Qunliang; Kang, Jingqing; Ding, Shasha; Yang, Yi; Bu, Huaien; Guo, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning (ACOP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many countries. Twelve Hand Jing Points (THJP) have been believed to be effective to treat all kinds of emergency calls in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for more than 3000 years. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is designed to evaluate the effectiveness of THJP in curing acute carbon monoxide poisoning in first aid treatment. This paper reports the protocol of the trial. Methods/Design. This RCT is a multicenter, randomized, controlled study undergoing in China. The compliant patients are divided into the bloodletting group and standard of care group. With first aid treatments given to both of the groups, the bloodletting group is bleeding at THJP upon being hospitalized. Primary outcomes and secondary outcomes will be measured and compared between these two groups. Before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 30 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours after treatment, patients' basic vital signs and state of consciousness were observed. Before treatment and 1 and 4 hours after treatment, carboxyhemoglobin concentration in venous blood samples was detected. Discussion. The objective of this study is to provide convincing evidence to clarify the efficacy and safety of THJP for early treatment of acute carbon monoxide poisoning. PMID:26339271

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Former Commercial Plasma/Blood Donors in Rural Shanxi Province, China: The China Integrated Programs for Research on AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Han-zhu; Yang, Zhongmin; Shi, Xiaoming; Gao, Jianhua; Xu, Cuiling; Wang, Lan; Zhou, Kai; Cui, Yan; Zheng, Xiwen; Wu, Zunyou; Lu, Fan; Lai, Shenghan; Vermund, Sten H.; Shao, Yiming; Wang, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Background Unsafe practices during illegal plasma donation in the late 1980s and early 1990s spread blood-borne infections in central China. Methods A cross-sectional survey of a random sample of 538 adult residents of 12 villages in rural Shanxi Province, where there had been an illegal commercial plasma-collection center, was conducted in 2003. Structured questionnaires were administered, and blood samples were tested for hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies. Results HCV seroprevalence rates were 8.2% in all subjects, 27.7% in former commercial plasma/blood donors, and 2.6% in nondonors. Selling blood or plasma was the strongest independent predictor of HCV seropositivity (odds ratio [OR], 14.4 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 7.1–31.6]). A history of blood transfusion was also independently associated with HCV seropositivity (OR, 8.3 [95% CI, 2.1–32.0]). Plasma donors had a higher risk of being HCV seropositive than did whole-blood donors (OR, 7.6 [95% CI, 2.9–20.9]), and female donors had a lower risk than did male donors (OR, 0.32 [95% CI, 0.12–0.80]). The strength of the association between selling blood and HCV seropositivity was weaker when plasma donors were excluded (OR, 8.0 vs. 14.4). Conclusions Unsafe practices during illegal plasma donation led to a high risk of HCV seropositivity for donors during the 1980s and 1990s. Failure to screen for HCV increased the risk of seropositivity for transfusion recipients during this same period. China has taken steps to halt illegal plasma collection and to improve blood-banking methods. However, there will be an ongoing challenge to care for patients with HCV infection, even as its incidence decreases. PMID:16235166

  10. Cutaneous acanthamoebiasis in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Torno, M S; Babapour, R; Gurevitch, A; Witt, M D

    2000-02-01

    Acanthamoeba is a recognized pathogen in the immunocompromised patient, commonly presenting as chronic or subacute encephalitis. However, cutaneous disease in the absence of CNS involvement is increasingly recognized, especially in the setting of chronic, nonhealing skin lesions in the patient with AIDS. We describe a patient with AIDS and cutaneous acanthamoebiasis and review our experience with treatment and diagnosis. PMID:10640931

  11. How medical ethical principles are applied in treatment with artificial insemination by donors (AID) in Hunan, China: effective practice at the Reproductive and Genetic Hospital of CITIC-Xiangya

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Lu, G

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the efficiency of application of medical ethics principles in the practice of artificial insemination by donors (AID) in China, in a culture characterised by traditional ethical values and disapproval of AID. The paper presents the ethical approach to AID treatment as established by the Reproduction and Genetics Hospital of CITIC-Xiangya (CITIC Hunan-Yale Approach) in the central southern area of China against the social ethical background of China and describes its general features. The CITIC-Xiangya Approach facilitates the implementation of ethical relations between clinicians and patients participating in AID treatment procedures in Hunan-Yale. PMID:15923480

  12. A decision aid for considering indomethacin prophylaxis vs. symptomatic treatment of PDA for extreme low birth weight infants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Decision Aids (DA) are well established in various fields of medicine. It can improve the quality of decision-making and reduce decisional conflict. In neonatal care, and due to scientific equipoise, neonatologists caring for extreme low birth weight (ELBW) infants are in need to elicit parents' preferences with regard to the use of indomethacin therapy in ELBW infants. We aimed to develop a DA that elicits parents' preferences with regard to indomethacin therapy in ELBW infants. Methods We developed a DA for the use of the indomethacin therapy in ELBW infants according to the Ottawa Decision Support Framework. The development process involved parents, neonatologists, DA developers and decision making experts. A pilot testing with healthy volunteers was conducted through an evaluation questionnaire, a knowledge scale, and a validated decisional conflict scale. Results The DA is a computer-based interactive tool. In the first part, the DA provides information about patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) as a disease, the different treatment options, and the benefits and downsides of using indomethacin therapy in preterm infants. In the second part, it coaches the parent in the decision making process through clarifying values and preferences. Volunteers rated 10 out of 13 items of the DA positively and showed significant improvement on both the knowledge scale (p = 0.008) and the decisional conflict scale (p = 0.008). Conclusion We have developed a computer based DA to assess parental preferences with regard to indomethacin therapy in preterm infants. Future research will involve measurement of parental preferences to guide and augment the clinical decisions in current neonatal practice. PMID:21888665

  13. Computer aided identification of sodium channel blockers in the clinical treatment of epilepsy using molecular docking tools

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Uzma; Akka, Jyothy; Hinore, Jitendra Singh; Girdhar, Amandeep; Bandaru, Srinivas; Sumithnath, Tharaparambil Gangadharan; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Munshi, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Phenytoin (PHT) and Carbamazepine (CBZ) are excellent sodium channel blockers administered in clinical treatment of epileptic seizures. However, the narrow therapeutic range and limited pharmacokinetics of these drugs have raised serious concerns in the proper management of epilepsy. To overcome this, the present study attempts to identify a candidate molecule with superior pharmacological profile than PHT and CBZ through In silico approaches. PHT and CBZ served as query small molecules for Tanimoto based similarity search with a threshold of 95% against PubChem database. Aided by MolDock algorithm, high affinity similar compound against each query was retrieved. PHT and CBZ and their respective similar were further tested for toxicity profiles, LC 50 values and biological activity. Compounds, NSC403438 and AGN-PC-0BPCBP respectively similar to PHT and CBZ demonstrated higher affinity to sodium channel protein than their respective leads. Of particular relevance, NSC403438 demonstrated highest binding affinity bestowed with least toxicity, better LC 50 values and optimal bioactivity. NSC403438 was further mapped for its structure based pharmacophoric features. In the study, we report NSC403438 as potential sodium channel blocker as a better candidate than PHT and CBZ which can be put forth for pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies. Abbreviations AEDs - Antiepileptic drugs, BLAST - Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, CBZ - Carbamazepine, GEFS+ - Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, GPCR - G Protein Coupled Receptor, Nav - Sodium channel with specific voltage conduction, PDB - Protein Data Bank, PHT - Phenytoin, PIR - Protein Information resources, SAVES - Structural Analysis and Verification Server, VGSC - Voltage-gated Sodium channels. PMID:25914447

  14. Traditional medicine for the rich and knowledgeable: challenging assumptions about treatment-seeking behaviour in rural and peri-urban Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, Rikke Stamp; Pouliot, Mariève

    2016-01-01

    Traditional medicine is commonly assumed to be a crucial health care option for poor households in developing countries. However, little research has been done in Asia to quantify the reliance on traditional medicine and its determinants. This research contributes to filling in this knowledge gap using household survey data collected from 571 households in three rural and peri-urban sites in Nepal in 2012. Questions encompassed household socioeconomic characteristics, illness characteristics, and treatment-seeking behaviour. Treatment choice was investigated through bivariate analyses. Results show that traditional medicine, and especially self-treatment with medicinal plants, prevail as treatment options in both rural and peri-urban populations. Contrarily to what is commonly assumed, high income is an important determinant of use of traditional medicine. Likewise, knowledge of medicinal plants, age, education, gender and illness chronicity were also significant determinants. The importance of self-treatment with medicinal plants should inform the development of health policy tailored to people’s treatment-seeking behaviour. PMID:26130610

  15. Reversal of brain metabolic abnormalities following treatment of AIDS dementia complex with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine): a PET-FDG study

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, A.; Berg, G.; Di Chiro, G.; Cohen, R.M.; Yarchoan, R.; Pizzo, P.A.; Broder, S.; Eddy, J.; Fulham, M.J.; Finn, R.D.

    1989-05-01

    Brain glucose metabolism was evaluated in four patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia complex using (/sup 18/F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET) scans at the beginning of therapy with 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT, zidovudine), and later in the course of therapy. In two patients, baseline, large focal cortical abnormalities of glucose utilization were reversed during the course of therapy. In the other two patients, the initial PET study did not reveal pronounced focal alterations, while the post-treatment scans showed markedly increased cortical glucose metabolism. The improved cortical glucose utilization was accompanied in all patients by immunologic and neurologic improvement. PET-FDG studies can detect cortical metabolic abnormalities associated with AIDS dementia complex, and may be used to monitor the metabolic improvement in response to AZT treatment.

  16. Evaluation of waste activated sludge as a coagulant aid for the treatment of industrial wastewater containing mixed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Sriwiriyarat, Tongchai; Jangkorn, Siriprapha

    2009-04-01

    Wastewater generated by the industry manufacturing detergents and various kinds of consumer products normally contains very high contents of mixed surfactants, organic matters expressed as chemical oxygen demand (COD), and phosphates that must be treated prior to discharge to the aquatic environment. In this study, jar-test experiments were conducted to evaluate the waste activated sludge (WAS) as a coagulation aid in the coagulation-flocculation process with ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate as a coagulant for the treatment of wastewater collected from the aforementioned industry. The WAS was selected because of its adsorption capability of anionic surfactants and its availability from the wastage stream of biological wastewater treatment process. The effective dosages of both coagulants with and without the WAS additions were determined in this study. Without the WAS addition, the concentrations of 800 mg/L aluminum sulfate at the optimum pH value of 8 and 2208 mg/L ferric chloride at the optimum pH value of 12 were the optimum chemical dosages. It appears that aluminum sulfate was more effective than ferric chloride based on the chemical dosage and removal efficiency. The turbidity, suspended particles, anionic surfactants, COD, and phosphates removal efficiencies of aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride under the optimum dosage were 95.6, 88.2, 78.4, 73.5, 47.3% and 98.8, 92.0, 72.7, 67.5, 53.1%, respectively. The addition of 200 mg/L WAS was sufficient to reduce the optimum dosages of both chemicals by 200 mg/L. The cationic surfactant existing in the wastewater worked as a flocculating agent leading to the flocculation of waste activated sludge resulting in the enmeshment of the suspended particles and colloids on which the COD, anionic surfactants, and phosphates were adsorbed. However, the substances removal efficiencies of ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate were slightly enhanced and reduced, respectively. It is possibly explained that the settling time

  17. The Unchecked HIV/AIDS Crisis in Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Hrostowski, Susan; Camp, Alexandria

    2015-01-01

    While the population of the southern United States is only 37% of the country's total, this region is experiencing 50% of new HIV diagnoses and 46% of new AIDS diagnoses. Specifically, Mississippi has the highest rates of new infection, the most AIDS deaths, the greatest number of people living with HIV/AIDS, and the fewest resources. Mississippi has the highest death rate in the country: 32.9 per 1,000. A Mississippian with HIV/AIDS is almost twice as likely to die as the average American with the virus (SHARP Report, 2010). Compounding the problem are government policy issues, such as disproportionate program funding; socio-economic issues, such as widespread poverty, housing insecurity, and the lack of access to care; and cultural issues, such as homophobia and social stigma. These factors are reflected in this study which examines the needs of people living with HIV/AIDS in a southern, rural county of Mississippi. From a representative sample of 218 HIV positive individuals, researchers identified the levels of need for housing, transportation, medical care, mental health care, substance abuse treatment, and education. The author discusses the reciprocal influences of these needs and HIV, the need for policy changes at the state and federal levels, and the need for resources that both support people living with HIV/AIDS and curb the rate of new infections. PMID:25985289

  18. AIDS is your business.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sydney; Simon, Jonathon; Vincent, Jeffrey R; MacLeod, William; Fox, Matthew; Thea, Donald M

    2003-02-01

    If your company operates in a developing country, AIDS is your business. While Africa has received the most attention, AIDS is also spreading swiftly in other parts of the world. Russia and Ukraine had the fastest-growing epidemics last year, and many experts believe China and India will suffer the next tidal wave of infection. Why should executives be concerned about AIDS? Because it is destroying the twin rationales of globalization strategy-cheap labor and fast-growing markets--in countries where people are heavily affected by the epidemic. Fortunately, investments in programs that prevent infection and provide treatment for employees who have HIV/AIDS are profitable for many businesses--that is, they lead to savings that outweigh the programs' costs. Due to the long latency period between HIV infection and the onset of AIDS symptoms, a company is not likely to see any of the costs of HIV/AIDS until five to ten years after an employee is infected. But executives can calculate the present value of epidemic-related costs by using the discount rate to weigh each cost according to its expected timing. That allows companies to think about expenses on HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programs as investments rather than merely as costs. The authors found that the annual cost of AIDS to six corporations in South Africa and Botswana ranged from 0.4% to 5.9% of the wage bill. All six companies would have earned positive returns on their investments if they had provided employees with free treatment for HIV/AIDS in the form of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), according to the mathematical model the authors used. The annual reduction in the AIDS "tax" would have been as much as 40.4%. The authors' conclusion? Fighting AIDS not only helps those infected; it also makes good business sense. PMID:12577655

  19. AIDS and economic disruption.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G S

    1996-10-01

    Child and adult mortality increases in Cameroon due to AIDS will cause life expectancy to fall by as many as 8 years, from just over 50 to just over 40 years. The social consequences of AIDS include grieving, stigmatizing, and the large-scale disruption of family and community structures. Widows and widowers due to AIDS mortality are affected differently from each other, with the widows of men who have died from AIDS facing potential sociocultural and economic hardship. The economic consequences of AIDS in Bamenda and elsewhere in Cameroon will occur mainly through the epidemic's impact upon the size and quality of the labor force. By killing a significant number of male and female workers aged 15-60 years, AIDS will reduce the size and growth rate of the labor force. Despite, rapid population growth, labor is a relatively scarce factor of agricultural production in Cameroon. The spread of HIV in rural areas, combined with the intensity and scarcity of agricultural labor, suggests that AIDS will have an impact upon production and per capita incomes, and increase the already high rates of hunger and absolute poverty. In the context of HIV/AIDS, young people must be empowered to make informed decisions about sex. Adolescents are most at risk because they tend to experiment more than married couples and have many sex partners. Sexual activity begins as early as age 8 years and penetrative sex at age 13 or earlier. The author considers the factors which encourage adolescents to engage in sexual activities. PMID:12293251

  20. Scaling-Up Access to Antiretroviral Therapy for Children: A Cohort Study Evaluating Care and Treatment at Mobile and Hospital-Affiliated HIV Clinics in Rural Zambia

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Janneke H.; Moss, William J.; Hamangaba, Francis; Munsanje, Bornface; Sutcliffe, Catherine G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Travel time and distance are barriers to care for HIV-infected children in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Decentralization of care is one strategy to scale-up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), but few programs have been evaluated. We compared outcomes for children receiving care in mobile and hospital-affiliated HIV clinics in rural Zambia. Methods Outcomes were measured within an ongoing cohort study of HIV-infected children seeking care at Macha Hospital, Zambia from 2007 to 2012. Children in the outreach clinic group received care from the Macha HIV clinic and transferred to one of three outreach clinics. Children in the hospital-affiliated clinic group received care at Macha HIV clinic and reported Macha Hospital as the nearest healthcare facility. Results Seventy-seven children transferred to the outreach clinics and were included in the analysis. Travel time to the outreach clinics was significantly shorter and fewer caretakers used public transportation, resulting in lower transportation costs and fewer obstacles accessing the clinic. Some caretakers and health care providers reported inferior quality of service provision at the outreach clinics. Sixty-eight children received ART at the outreach clinics and were compared to 41 children in the hospital-affiliated clinic group. At ART initiation, median age, weight-for-age z-scores (WAZ) and CD4+ T-cell percentages were similar for children in the hospital-affiliated and outreach clinic groups. Children in both groups experienced similar increases in WAZ and CD4+ T-cell percentages. Conclusions HIV care and treatment can be effectively delivered to HIV-infected children at rural health centers through mobile ART teams, removing potential barriers to uptake and retention. Outreach teams should be supported to increase access to HIV care and treatment in rural areas. PMID:25122213

  1. Successful Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes among HIV/TB Coinfected Patients Down-Referred from a District Hospital to Primary Health Clinics in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Karen B.; Moll, Anthony P.; Friedland, Gerald H.; Shenoi, Sheela V.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV and tuberculosis (TB) coinfection remains a major public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Integration and decentralization of HIV and TB treatment services are being implemented, but data on outcomes of this strategy are lacking in rural, resource-limited settings. We evaluated TB treatment outcomes in TB/HIV coinfected patients in an integrated and decentralized system in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods We retrospectively studied a cohort of HIV/TB coinfected patients initiating treatment for drug-susceptible TB at a district hospital HIV clinic from January 2012-June 2013. Patients were eligible for down-referral to primary health clinics(PHCs) for TB treatment completion if they met specific clinical criteria. Records were reviewed for patients’ demographic, baseline clinical and laboratory information, past HIV and TB history, and TB treatment outcomes. Results Of 657(88.7%) patients, 322(49.0%) were female, 558(84.9%) were new TB cases, and 572(87.1%) had pulmonary TB. After TB treatment initiation, 280(42.6%) were down-referred from the district level HIV clinic to PHCs for treatment completion; 377(57.4%) remained at the district hospital. Retained patients possessed characteristics indicative of more severe disease. In total, 540(82.2%) patients experienced treatment success, 69(10.5%) died, and 46(7.0%) defaulted. Down-referred patients experienced higher treatment success, and lower mortality, but were more likely to default, primarily at the time of transfer to PHC. Conclusion Decentralization of TB treatment to the primary care level is feasible in rural South Africa. Treatment outcomes are favorable when patients are carefully chosen for down-referral. Higher mortality in retained patients reflects increased baseline disease severity while higher default among down-referred patients reflects failed linkage of care. Better linkage mechanisms are needed including improved identification of potential defaulters, increased

  2. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  3. Rural Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckley, Betty; Hitchings, Jim

    1971-01-01

    A course in rural studies, as part of the Home Economics curriculum at Worcester College of Education, provides students with the opportunity to grow their own vegetables and flowers, look after livestock, and experience a rural environment. (RY)

  4. Implications of Land Policy and Rural Development in Botswana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milazi, Dominic

    1988-01-01

    Examines land tenure alteration in relation to rural development programs in Botswana. Development efforts have had a class differentiated effect, aiding the relatively well-off cattle owners, but ignoring the small crop producers. A rural development strategy that benefits all rural groups must contain measures specifically tailored to each. (DHP)

  5. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... type and degree of loss. Are there different styles of hearing aids? Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Behind-the- ... the ear canal and are available in two styles. The in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid is ...

  6. Rural Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jess

    To be scientific, rural sociology must have a distinctive conceptual basis; therefore, defining "rural" has long been a major concern of rural sociologists. Recently faced with similar problems, political economists have revitalized the field of urban sociology by looking beyond the city to the social production of spatial forms under capitalism.…

  7. [Rural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Sherry Freeland, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on rural education focuses on the unique characteristics and problems of rural schools, and discusses how the "top down" and "one size fits all" nature of the last decade of reforms has not taken these into account. To better address the situation of rural and small schools, various strategies are offered that involve distance…

  8. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  9. [Local food mixtures for the treatment of protein-calorie malnutrition in the Mondongo, Zaire rural health center].

    PubMed

    Kalissa, V; Monziba, B

    1993-01-01

    Protein-calorie malnutrition is found in environments characterized by ignorance, illiteracy, poverty, poor hygiene, and absence of food processing industries. At the Mondongo rural health center in Zaire, malnourished children are not rare, although they live in an environment rich in the foods necessary for growth and development. Parents are poorly informed about the desirable age at weaning, the nutritional requirements of weaned infants, and appropriate diet and food preparation for weaned children. The income of local residents does not permit purchase of imported foods. Children must thus be nourished with local foods. Manifestations of protein-calorie malnutrition range from slight retardation of growth to serious disease, including marasmus and kwashiorkor. Among 337 children studied in Mondongo, 66 (19.5%) were seriously malnourished, with upper arm circumferences of less than 13 cm, or weight being 60% of normal weight for their age. 81 children (21%) had moderate malnutrition, with are circumferences of barely 15 cm, or weight for age 60-80% of normal. 190 children were adequately nourished, with arm circumferences of at least 16 cm and weight over 80% of normal for their age. The most frequent consumed foods in Mondongo are manioc, rice, plantains, maize, peanuts eaten as snacks between meals, soybeans (still in the stage of introduction and not well accepted), fruits, palm oil, and some vegetables. Chicken and eggs are widely consumed. There are not dishes especially prepared for newly weaned children. A formula for a weaning food called Mariso proposed by a group of researchers in 1984 was found to be poorly accepted because it included soybeans, which are not widely available or well accepted. Two mixtures more appropriate to local realities were developed. Mariche combines maize, rice, and locally harvested and smoked caterpillars, while mariop combines maize, rice, and eggs. The mixtures can be stored for short periods in ordinary containers in a

  10. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) during the early months of treatment in rural Zambia: influence of demographic characteristics and social surroundings of patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Around 70% of those living with HIV in need of treatment accessed antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Zambia by 2009. However, sustaining high levels of adherence to ART is a challenge. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors associated with ART adherence during the early months of treatment in rural Zambia. Methods This is a field based observational longitudinal study in Mumbwa district, which is located 150 km west of Lusaka, the capital of Zambia. Treatment naive patients aged over 15 years, who initiated treatment during September-November 2010, were enrolled. Patients were interviewed at the initiation and six weeks later. The treatment adherence was measured according to self-reporting by the patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictive factors associated with the adherence. Results Of 157 patients, 59.9% were fully adherent to the treatment six weeks after starting ART. According to the multivariable analysis, full adherence was associated with being female [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR), 3.3; 95% Confidence interval (CI), 1.2-8.9], having a spouse who were also on ART (AOR, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.5-13.1), and experience of food insufficiency in the previous 30 days (AOR, 5.0; 95% CI, 1.8-13.8). Some of the most common reasons for missed doses were long distance to health facilities (n = 21, 53.8%), food insufficiency (n = 20, 51.3%), and being busy with other activities such as work (n = 15, 38.5%). Conclusions The treatment adherence continues to be a significant challenge in rural Zambia. Social supports from spouses and people on ART could facilitate their treatment adherence. This is likely to require attention by ART services in the future, focusing on different social influences on male and female in rural Zambia. In addition, poverty reduction strategies may help to reinforce adherence to ART and could mitigate the influence of HIV infection for poor patients and those who fall into poverty after

  11. IMPROVING HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH IN POOR RURAL COMMUNITIES: INVESTIGATING THE POTENTIAL FOR SUSTAINABLE HOUSEHOLD DRINKING WATER TREATMENT IN CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research will elucidate the most relevant behaviors and beliefs among groups and households with regard to HWT adoption. For the research community, the results of this study will add to the very limited knowledge and data on HWT in rural China. Furthermore, the findin...

  12. Fire Protection for Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagevig, William A.

    Fire protection in rural Alaskan communities depends on individual home fire prevention and protection rather than on the services offered by a centralized fire department. Even when help is summoned to extinguish a blaze, aid does not come in the form of a cadre of highly trained firefighters; it comes instead from whomever happens to be in the…

  13. [Epidemiology of AIDS].

    PubMed

    1988-02-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that some 300,000 AIDS cases will be diagnosed by the end of 1988. As of December 1987, 128 countries had reported a total of 72,000 cases, about half the number of cases that actually occurred. The WHO estimates that some 5-10 million persons are already infected with HIV, so that the number of AIDS cases will increase rapidly for the next 5 years at least. The number of cases reported in Africa increased considerably in 1987, reflecting greater awareness of AIDS and greater efforts at control. By late 1987 WHO was working actively with over 100 countries to combat AIDS. An expert meeting organized by the WHO Special Program to Combat AIDS recommended to governments and prison administrators that condoms be provided to inmates and that treatment programs be provided for intravenous drug addicts. Prison personnel should receive education about HIV infection and AIDS. Incarceration policies, especially for drug addicts, should be reviewed in light of the AIDS epidemic. An estimated average of 10% of the 270,000 prisoners enumerated in 17 European countries are believed to be HIV positive, but the proportion increases to 26% in the highest risk countries. The proportion of seropositive subjects in general exceeds that in the total population. Prison and health officials will be obliged to assign increasing resources to AIDS in prisons in the years to come. PMID:3201571

  14. Correlates of Social Exclusion and Negative Labeling and Devaluation of People Living with HIV/AIDS in Rural Settings: Evidence from a General Household Survey in Zambézia Province, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Mukolo, Abraham; Blevins, Meridith; Victor, Bart; Vaz, Lara M. E.; Sidat, Mohsin; Vergara, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased HIV/AIDS knowledge and access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) have been hypothesized to decrease HIV stigma. However, stigma persists as a barrier to HIV services uptake. We studied the relationship between stigma, knowledge and attitudes towards HIV and its treatment, and confidence in the legal system (legal rights certitude). Methods We analyzed data from a household survey of 3749 randomly sampled female heads of households in 259 enumeration areas across 14 districts of Zambézia Province, Mozambique. The questionnaire included questions about beliefs, attitudes and behavior towards PLWHA, HIV transmission knowledge, treatment-related beliefs, and legal rights certitude. Factor analysis distinguished two stigma constructs: Negative labeling and devaluation (NLD) and social exclusion (SoE). Multivariable linear regression was used to determine the association between stigma, knowledge of HIV/AIDS, treatment-related beliefs, and legal rights certitude, while controlling for variance in socio-demographics. Results A 4-point increase in knowledge about HIV transmission was associated with more than a 3 unit decrease in NLD and SoE stigma scores (p<0.001). Given HIV transmission knowledge, a 25-point increase in legal rights certitude was associated with a 4.62 unit drop in NLD stigma (p<0.001); we did not detect an association between legal rights certitude and SoE stigma. Knowing at least one HIV positive person was associated with lower SoE (−3.17, 95% CI: −5.78, −0.56); no association with NLD (p = 0.1) was detected. ART efficacy belief was associated with higher NLD and lower SoE (2.90 increase and 6.94 decrease, respectively; p≤0.001). Conclusion Increasing knowledge about HIV transmission and access to ART are likely to reduce stigma, but neither of the two is a panacea. Raising community awareness of the legal rights of PLWHA might improve the efficacy of stigma reduction efforts. Strategies that focus on specific domains

  15. Disparities in late stage diagnosis, treatment, and breast cancer-related death by race, age, and rural residence among women in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Markossian, Talar W; Hines, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the outcomes of late stage breast cancer diagnosis, receiving first course treatment, and breast cancer-related death by race, age, and rural/urban residence in Georgia. The authors used cross-sectional and follow-up data (1992-2007) for Atlanta and Rural Georgia cancer registries that are part of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (N = 23,500 incident breast cancer cases in non-Hispanic whites or non-Hispanic African Americans). Multilevel modeling and Cox proportional hazard models revealed that compared to whites, African American women had significantly increased odds of late stage diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] = 2.08, p = 0.0001) and unknown tumor stage (OR = 1.27, p = 0.0001), decreased odds of receiving radiation (OR = 0.93, p = 0.041) or surgery (OR = 0.50, p = 0.0001), and increased risk of death following breast cancer diagnosis (hazard rate ratio [HR] = 1.50, p = 0.0001). Increased age was significantly associated with the odds of late/unknown stage at diagnosis, worse treatment, and survival. Women residing in rural areas had significantly decreased odds of receiving radiation and surgery with radiation (OR = 0.59, p = 0.0001), and for receiving breast-conserving surgery compared to mastectomy (OR = 0.73, p = 0.005). Factors affecting each level of the breast cancer continuum are distinct and should be examined separately. Efforts are needed to alleviate disparities in breast cancer outcomes in hard-to-reach populations. PMID:22591230

  16. Abolishing Fees at Health Centers in the Context of Community Case Management of Malaria: What Effects on Treatment-Seeking Practices for Febrile Children in Rural Burkina Faso?

    PubMed Central

    Druetz, Thomas; Fregonese, Federica; Bado, Aristide; Millogo, Tieba; Kouanda, Seni; Diabaté, Souleymane; Haddad, Slim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burkina Faso started nationwide community case management of malaria (CCMm) in 2010. In 2011, health center user fees for children under five were abolished in some districts. Objective To assess the effects of concurrent implementation of CCMm and user fees abolition on treatment-seeking practices for febrile children. Methods This is a natural experiment conducted in the districts of Kaya (CCMm plus user fees abolition) and Zorgho (CCMm only). Registry data from 2005 to 2014 on visits for malaria were collected from all eight rural health centers in the study area. Annual household surveys were administered during malaria transmission season in 2011 and 2012 in 1,035 randomly selected rural households. Interrupted time series models were fitted for registry data and Fine and Gray’s competing risks models for survey data. Results User fees abolition in Kaya significantly increased health center use by eligible children with malaria (incidence rate ratio for intercept change = 2.1, p <0.001). In 2011, in Kaya, likelihood of health center use for febrile children was three times higher and CHW use three times lower when caregivers knew services were free. Among the 421 children with fever in 2012, the delay before visiting a health center was significantly shorter in Kaya than in Zorgho (1.46 versus 1.79 days, p <0.05). Likelihood of visiting a health center on the first day of fever among households <2.5km or <5 km from a health center was two and three times higher in Kaya than in Zorgho, respectively (p <0.001). Conclusions User fees abolition reduced visit delay for febrile children living close to health centers. It also increased demand for and use of health center for children with malaria. Concurrently, demand for CHWs’ services diminished. User fees abolition and CCMm should be coordinated to maximize prompt access to treatment in rural areas. PMID:26501561

  17. Deregulation and the Structure of Rural Financial Markets. Rural Development Research Report Number 75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milkove, Daniel L.; Sullivan, Patrick J.

    Changes in rural financial markets as affected by bank deregulation have a potential impact on rural educational finance, specifically, financial aid programs for students and schools. Banking legislation and regulation changes have aimed to strengthen the industry and to provide consumers with more services and more choices among providers.…

  18. Effective Schooling in Rural Africa Report 4: Frequently Asked Questions about Effective Schooling in Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC. Human Development Network.

    The challenges of making rural schools more effective vary with different types of rural conditions. But typically these challenges might include any of the following: teacher shortages, lack of facilities, isolation, HIV/AIDS and related social stigma, war crises and displaced populations, multigrade and shift teaching, administration of small…

  19. [Awareness of HIV/AIDS hazards in the youth from Southern Podlasie compared with the state of knowledge in the general population of Poland].

    PubMed

    Huk-Wieliczuk, Elzbieta B

    2002-01-01

    Southern Podlasie is a specific region as regards HIV/AIDS hazards for its geographical position (border zone) as well as social problems (high level of unemployment). The aim of the research was to find out the level of knowledge of rural youth on the subject of risk factors and ways of spreading HIV as well as AIDS clinic. 405 students aged 15-17 (197 males and 208 females) that attend chosen rural schools on the territory of Southern Podlasie were questioned. The method of diagnostic poll was employed in the research using the questionnaire "HIV/AIDS knowledge and beliefs" from international studies on school youth health preservation (HBSC)--the supervisor of the project in Poland is professor B. Woynarowska). The research has shown different levels of knowledge of rural youth on the subject of HIV/AIDS. There were still many false opinions among the people questioned about the ways of HIV infection. Despite considerable knowledge about the ways of reducing the risk of HIV infection, there was low level of knowledge concerning AIDS treatment compared with the results of nationwide survey, there were fewer correct answers in our study group. It is the duty of schools, parents and mass media to provide the youth with relevant information on the subject of HIV/AIDS. Only systematic education in this domain can protect the infected persons and their partners or children against the consequences of ignoring the disease. PMID:15002230

  20. ‘Dented’ and ‘Resuscitated’ masculinities: The impact of HIV diagnosis and/or enrolment on antiretroviral treatment on masculine identities in rural eastern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Godfrey E.; Wight, Daniel; Seeley, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is limited research on the impact of HIV or its treatment on men's identity construction and gender roles in sub-Saharan Africa. Based on in-depth research with 26 men in rural Uganda, this article discusses men's vulnerabilities and shifting gender relations and sense of masculinity resulting from HIV infection or enrolment on treatment in eastern Uganda. The findings suggest two broad categories of masculinity: respectable and reputational. HIV infection and illness dented masculinity as men lost authority within the domestic sphere. A weakened provider role and over-reliance on wives and children undermined masculinity as family head, and social sanctioning of their sexual activity, undermined conventional masculine identities predicted on reputation. However, treatment led to a more reflexive approach to demonstrating masculinity, increased attentiveness to health and restored hope to father children free of HIV, resuscitating respectable masculinities. The balance between eroded and restored masculinity varied between men by their treatment history, age, family composition and state of health. HIV support agencies need to pay attention to the way HIV and antiretroviral treatment (ART) influence men's perception of their masculinity and support them to overcome the anxieties about dented or eroded masculinity, while building on the positive ways in which treatment restores masculinity to support men's adherence to HIV treatment. In particular, there is a need to support men's engagement in productive activities that bring income so that men can regain their provider roles following ART and restore their respectability in both the public and the domestic sphere. PMID:25444303

  1. 'Dented' and 'resuscitated' masculinities: the impact of HIV diagnosis and/or enrolment on antiretroviral treatment on masculine identities in rural eastern Uganda.

    PubMed

    Siu, Godfrey E; Wight, Daniel; Seeley, Janet

    2014-01-01

    There is limited research on the impact of HIV or its treatment on men's identity construction and gender roles in sub-Saharan Africa. Based on in-depth research with 26 men in rural Uganda, this article discusses men's vulnerabilities and shifting gender relations and sense of masculinity resulting from HIV infection or enrolment on treatment in eastern Uganda. The findings suggest two broad categories of masculinity: respectable and reputational. HIV infection and illness dented masculinity as men lost authority within the domestic sphere. A weakened provider role and over-reliance on wives and children undermined masculinity as family head, and social sanctioning of their sexual activity, undermined conventional masculine identities predicted on reputation. However, treatment led to a more reflexive approach to demonstrating masculinity, increased attentiveness to health and restored hope to father children free of HIV, resuscitating respectable masculinities. The balance between eroded and restored masculinity varied between men by their treatment history, age, family composition and state of health. HIV support agencies need to pay attention to the way HIV and antiretroviral treatment (ART) influence men's perception of their masculinity and support them to overcome the anxieties about dented or eroded masculinity, while building on the positive ways in which treatment restores masculinity to support men's adherence to HIV treatment. In particular, there is a need to support men's engagement in productive activities that bring income so that men can regain their provider roles following ART and restore their respectability in both the public and the domestic sphere. PMID:25444303

  2. Program ACTIVE II: Design and Methods for a Multi-Center Community-Based Depression Treatment for Rural and Urban Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Mary; Shubrook, Jay; Schwartz, Frank; Hornsby, W. Guyton; Pillay, Yegan; Saha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depression affects one in four adults with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and is associated with worsened diabetes complications, increased health care costs and early mortality. Rural and low-income urban areas, including the Appalachian region, represent an epicenter of the T2DM epidemic. Program ACTIVE II is a comparative effectiveness treatment trial designed to test whether a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and community-based exercise (EXER) will offer greater improvements in diabetes and depression outcomes compared to individual treatment approaches and usual care (UC). The secondary aims are to assess changes in cardiovascular risk factors across groups and to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of predicted incidence of cardiovascular complications across groups. Methods The study is a 2-by-2 factorial randomized controlled trial consisting of 4 treatment groups: CBT alone, EXER alone, combination of CBT and EXER, and UC. Adults with T2DM for > 1 year and who meet DSM-IVTR criteria for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) are eligible to participate at two rural Appalachian sites (southeastern Ohio and West Virginia) and one urban site (Indianapolis). This type II behavioral translation study uses a community-engaged research (CEnR) approach by incorporating community fitness centers and mental health practices as interventionists. Conclusions This is the first study to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of combined CBT and exercise in the treatment of depression using community-based intervention delivery. This approach may serve as a national model for expanding depression treatment for patients with T2DM.

  3. Costs and Cost-Effectiveness of Hypertension Screening and Treatment in Adults with Hypertension in Rural Nigeria in the Context of a Health Insurance Program

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Mark D.; Bolarinwa, Oladimeji A.; Sanya, Emmanuel O.; Kolo, Philip M.; Adenusi, Peju; Agbede, Kayode; van Eck, Diederik; Tan, Siok Swan; Akande, Tanimola M.; Redekop, William; Schultsz, Constance; Gomez, Gabriela B.

    2016-01-01

    Background High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for death and disability in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We evaluated the costs and cost-effectiveness of hypertension care provided within the Kwara State Health Insurance (KSHI) program in rural Nigeria. Methods A Markov model was developed to assess the costs and cost-effectiveness of population-level hypertension screening and subsequent antihypertensive treatment for the population at-risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) within the KSHI program. The primary outcome was the incremental cost per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted in the KSHI scenario compared to no access to hypertension care. We used setting-specific and empirically-collected data to inform the model. We defined two strategies to assess eligibility for antihypertensive treatment based on 1) presence of hypertension grade 1 and 10-year CVD risk of >20%, or grade 2 hypertension irrespective of 10-year CVD risk (hypertension and risk based strategy) and 2) presence of hypertension in combination with a CVD risk of >20% (risk based strategy). We generated 95% confidence intervals around the primary outcome through probabilistic sensitivity analysis. We conducted one-way sensitivity analyses across key model parameters and assessed the sensitivity of our results to the performance of the reference scenario. Results Screening and treatment for hypertension was potentially cost-effective but the results were sensitive to changes in underlying assumptions with a wide range of uncertainty. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the first and second strategy respectively ranged from US$ 1,406 to US$ 7,815 and US$ 732 to US$ 2,959 per DALY averted, depending on the assumptions on risk reduction after treatment and compared to no access to antihypertensive treatment. Conclusions Hypertension care within a subsidized private health insurance program may be cost-effective in rural Nigeria and public-private partnerships such as the KSHI

  4. Kansas Tree Program Aids Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullins, William S.

    1973-01-01

    Since State and Extension Forestry at Kansas State University received specific funding from the U.S. Forest Service for community forestry programs, the university has received requests for assistance from more than 200 Kansas towns. (GB)

  5. Occurrence, removal and environmental risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in rural wastewater treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Vymazal, Jan; Březinová, Tereza; Koželuh, Milan; Kule, Lumír; Huang, Jingang; Chen, Zhongbing

    2016-10-01

    Rural communities in central and eastern Europe usually use constructed wetlands (CWs) to treat domestic wastewater. Effluents from these systems are regularly discharged to receiving water, resulting in a potential transfer of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) from sewage to the aquatic environment. In this study, the seasonal occurrence, removal and risk assessment of 32 multi-class PPCPs were investigated in three CWs from the village of south Bohemia, Czech Republic. Among the PPCPs considered, 25 compounds were detected in sewage influent, and ibuprofen, caffeine and paracetamol were the most commonly detected PPCPs. The removal efficiencies of PPCPs in the rural CWs exhibited large variability with 11-100% for anti-inflammatories, 37-99% for β-blockers and 18-95% for diuretics. The statistical results revealed significant correlations between removal efficiencies of six PPCPs and conventional water quality parameters. The ecotoxicological assessment study revealed that most of the PPCPs (except ibuprofen) in the effluent yielded low aquatic risk. This study suggested that constructed wetlands could be effective for removing PPCPs and reducing environmental risk of PPCPs discharged from rural communities into surface water systems. PMID:27342641

  6. AIDS activists arrested in India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R

    2000-05-27

    Health activists in India are outraged over the arrests of 11 AIDS activists belonging to the nongovernmental organization (NGO) Sahyog. These AIDS activists were charged with obscenity and rioting. Rioting broke out when the local print media published details of a report entitled ¿AIDS and Us¿ that was produced by Sahyog in Hindi. The report tackled prevalent sexual practices, very low level of awareness, and other risk factors related to contracting HIV infection or developing AIDS in the rural areas of the Almora district. Critics charged the activists with destroying the image of the people of the region, portraying them as promiscuous and practicing high-risk sexual behavior. Consequently, Sahyog issued a statement of apology and promised to withdraw the report, but the district administration still banned their work in the area. Several NGOs also feel that the presentation of the report should have been more cautious. PMID:10827034

  7. New Mexico AIDS InfoNet

    MedlinePlus

    ... English Español | Spanish नेपाली | Nepali About the AIDS InfoNet The AIDS InfoNet is an educational project ... site visitor and her/his healthcare provider. The AIDS InfoNet provides current information on HIV/AIDS treatment ...

  8. Assessing the Consistency and Microbiological Effectiveness of Household Water Treatment Practices by Urban and Rural Populations Claiming to Treat Their Water at Home: A Case Study in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Huaylinos, Maria L.; Gil, Ana; Lanata, Claudio; Clasen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Household water treatment (HWT) can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently by vulnerable populations. Over 1.1 billion people report treating their water prior to drinking it. These estimates, however, are based on responses to household surveys that may exaggerate the consistency and microbiological performance of the practice—key factors for reducing pathogen exposure and achieving health benefits. The objective of this study was to examine how HWT practices are actually performed by households identified as HWT users, according to international monitoring standards. Methods and Findings We conducted a 6-month case study in urban (n = 117 households) and rural (n = 115 households) Peru, a country in which 82.8% of households report treating their water at home. We used direct observation, in-depth interviews, surveys, spot-checks, and water sampling to assess water treatment practices among households that claimed to treat their drinking water at home. While consistency of reported practices was high in both urban (94.8%) and rural (85.3%) settings, availability of treated water (based on self-report) at time of collection was low, with 67.1% and 23.0% of urban and rural households having treated water at all three sampling visits. Self-reported consumption of untreated water in the home among adults and children <5 was common and this was corroborated during home observations. Drinking water of self-reported users was significantly better than source water in the urban setting and negligible but significantly better in the rural setting. However, only 46.3% and 31.6% of households had drinking water <1 CFU/100 mL at all follow-up visits. Conclusions Our results raise questions about the usefulness of current international monitoring of HWT practices and their usefulness as a proxy indicator for drinking water quality. The lack of consistency and sub-optimal microbiological effectiveness also

  9. Financial Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Mary A.

    This workbook assists college and vocational school bound American Indian students in determining their financial needs and in locating sources of financial aid. A checklist helps students assess the state of their knowledge of financial programs; a glossary defines terms pertinent to the realm of financial aid (i.e., graduate study programs,…

  10. Insecticide-treated nets and treatment service: a trial using public and private sector channels in rural United Republic of Tanzania.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser-Hurt, N.; Lyimo, E. O.

    1998-01-01

    The Rotary Net Initiative, implemented in Kilombero District, southern United Republic of Tanzania, allowed us to explore different sales channels for the distribution of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) and the insecticide treatment service in a rural area of very high malaria transmission. Several types of ITNs were promoted and sold through different channels in the public and private sector, i.e. hospital pharmacy, mother and child health (MCH) clinic, net committee, village health workers and retail shops. The ITNs were sold for US$ 5.0-9.2, with profit margins of 9-16%. Net treatment cost US$ 0.33, with commission fees of 75%. Net transport and treatment were partially subsidized. Some outlets established their own fund by ITN sales. Sales of nets and treatments were seasonal, and certain net types were preferred. Demand for insecticide treatment was generally low. Changes in net coverage were assessed in two villages. A range of outlet features were compared qualitatively. Our experience supports suggestions that ITN technology should be delivered through MCH care services and demonstrates that specific promotion and innovation are necessary to achieve substantial net treatment levels. A large-scale ITN project in the same area and other ITN studies should lead to better understanding of ITN implementation at the population level. PMID:10191557

  11. Determinants of the risk of dying of HIV/AIDS in a rural South African community over the period of the decentralised roll-out of antiretroviral therapy: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Paul; Collinson, Mark A.; Madhavan, Sangeetha; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa; Gómez-Olivé, Francesc Xavier; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen M.; Hargreaves, James; Byass, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral treatment (ART) has significantly reduced HIV mortality in South Africa. The benefits have not been experienced by all groups. Here we investigate the factors associated with these inequities. Design This study was located in a rural South African setting and used data collected from 2007 to 2010, the period when decentralised ART became available. Approximately one-third of the population were of Mozambican origin. There was a pattern of repeated circular migration between urban areas and this community. Survival analysis models were developed to identify demographic, socioeconomic, and spatial risk factors for HIV mortality. Results Among the study population of 105,149 individuals, there were 2,890 deaths. The HIV/TB mortality rate decreased by 27% between 2007–2008 and 2009–2010. For other causes of death, the reduction was 10%. Bivariate analysis found that the HIV/TB mortality risk was lower for: those living within 5 km of the Bhubezi Community Health Centre; women; young adults; in-migrants with a longer period of residence; permanent residents; and members of households owning motorised transport, holding higher socioeconomic positions, and with higher levels of education. Multivariate modelling showed, in addition, that those with South Africa as their country of origin had an increased risk of HIV/TB mortality compared to those with Mozambican origins. For males, those of South African origin, and recent in-migrants, the risk of death associated with HIV/TB was significantly greater than that due to other causes. Conclusions In this community, a combination of factors was associated with an increased risk of dying of HIV/TB over the period of the roll-out of ART. There is evidence for the presence of barriers to successful treatment for particular sub-groups in the population, which must be addressed if the recent improvements in population-level mortality are to be maintained. PMID:25416322

  12. Rural Health Information Hub

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... rural project examples in Rural Health Models and Innovations and proven strategies for strong rural programs with ...

  13. Rural Agrobusiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treillon, Roland; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This publication describes the formation and evolution of rural agribusiness (RA) in the southern hemisphere as a precondition for improving the lives of families in rural communities, and focuses on RA endeavors created by development projects in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. After a short introduction, the first section of this study…

  14. Rural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Kathy

    Designed as a resource for rural adult basic education (ABE) program planners, this guidebook describes model linkage strategies between ABE and job placement as well as ABE and job training services that are targeted to rural Americans. The following topics are addressed in the guide: key linkage strategies (community advisory councils,…

  15. Rural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouk, Ullik, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This journal issue is devoted to the theme topic "Rural Education." The first article, "Science is Everywhere," by Chris Taylor, presents a project which uses local experts as an integral part of the school's science curriculum. "Better Teachers, Better Readers" by Scott Steen describes a system of strategic reading used in rural Wisconsin school…

  16. Rural Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goetz, Kathy, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This "special focus" journal issue consists of 13 individual articles on the theme of rural family programs relating to school, health services, church, and other institutions. It includes: (1) "Towards a Rural Family Policy" (Judith K. Chynoweth and Michael D. Campbell); (2) "Montana: Council for Families Collaborates for Prevention (Jean…

  17. Novel Synthetic Polyamines Are Effective in the Treatment of Experimental Microsporidiosis, an Opportunistic AIDS-Associated Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Cyrus J.; Weiss, Louis M.; Lane, Schenella; Frydman, Benjamin; Valasinas, Aldonia; Reddy, Venodhar; Sun, Jerry S.; Marton, Laurence J.; Khan, Imitiaz A.; Moretto, Magali; Yarlett, Nigel; Wittner, Murray

    2002-01-01

    Microsporidia are eukaryotic obligate intracellular protists that are emerging pathogens in immunocompromised hosts, such as patients with AIDS or patients who have undergone organ transplantation. We have demonstrated in vitro and in vivo that synthetic polyamine analogs are effective antimicrosporidial agents with a broad therapeutic window. CD8-knockout mice or nude mice infected with the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi were cured when they were treated with four different novel polyamine analogs at doses ranging from 1.25 to 5 mg/kg of body weight/day for a total of 10 days. Cured animals demonstrated no evidence of parasitemia by either PCR or histologic staining of tissues 30 days after untreated control animals died. PMID:11751111

  18. Pilot Randomized Trial of Collaborative Behavioral Treatment for Chronic Pain and Depression in Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Uebelacker, Lisa A; Weisberg, Risa B; Herman, Debra S; Bailey, Genie L; Pinkston-Camp, Megan M; Garnaat, Sarah L; Stein, Michael D

    2016-08-01

    In this pilot study, we assessed feasibility and acceptability of a behavior therapy intervention for pain and depressive symptoms in persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH). We randomly assigned 23 participants to HIV-PASS (HIV-Pain and Sadness Study) or a health education control arm for 3 months. On average, participants attended more than 5 sessions (of 7 possible) in both arms. Qualitative data suggest HIV-PASS participants understood key messages and made concrete behavioral changes. HIV-PASS was associated with effects in the expected direction for three of four outcomes, including the primary outcome (pain-related interference with functioning). Findings suggest that HIV-PASS is promising. PMID:27115400

  19. 27 CFR 24.243 - Filtering aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Filtering aids. 24.243... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine § 24.243 Filtering aids. Inert fibers, pulps, earths, or similar materials, may be used as filtering aids in the cellar treatment...

  20. 27 CFR 24.243 - Filtering aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Filtering aids. 24.243... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine § 24.243 Filtering aids. Inert fibers, pulps, earths, or similar materials, may be used as filtering aids in the cellar treatment...

  1. 27 CFR 24.243 - Filtering aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Filtering aids. 24.243... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine § 24.243 Filtering aids. Inert fibers, pulps, earths, or similar materials, may be used as filtering aids in the cellar treatment...

  2. 27 CFR 24.243 - Filtering aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Filtering aids. 24.243... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine § 24.243 Filtering aids. Inert fibers, pulps, earths, or similar materials, may be used as filtering aids in the cellar treatment...

  3. 27 CFR 24.243 - Filtering aids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Filtering aids. 24.243... OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine § 24.243 Filtering aids. Inert fibers, pulps, earths, or similar materials, may be used as filtering aids in the cellar treatment...

  4. Hearing Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Food and Drug Administration Staff FDA permits marketing of new laser-based hearing aid with potential ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  5. Teaching Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, W. Robert, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Provides evaluations of several aids for teaching chemistry. Included are The Use of Chemical Abstracts, Practical Technical Writing, Infrared Spectroscopy Programs, and a film titled "You Can't Go Back." (RH)

  6. 42 CFR 412.102 - Special treatment: Hospitals located in areas that are changing from urban to rural as a result...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... are changing from urban to rural as a result of a geographic redesignation. 412.102 Section 412.102...: Hospitals located in areas that are changing from urban to rural as a result of a geographic redesignation. An urban hospital that was part of an MSA, but was redesignated as rural as a result of the...

  7. Severe personality disorder, treatment engagement and the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012: what you need to know

    PubMed Central

    McRae, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Empirical research has demonstrated a link between legal coercion and treatment engagement following conviction among those with severe personality disorder. Legal coercive pressures were often applied by the Indeterminate Sentence for Public Protection (IPP), until it was replaced by the Extended Determinate Sentence by the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012. In this paper, it is proposed that use of the new determinate sentence will lessen motivation for treatment engagement. One effect of treatment refusal may be greater reliance by the Secretary of State for Justice on his jurisdiction to transfer prisoners due for release to secure hospital transfers under the Mental Health Act 1983. Not only will this risk posturing undermine the principal aim of the Offender Personality Disorder Implementation Pathway to improve treatment engagement among the target group, it will also have negative implications for medical practitioners working in secure forensic hospitals. To demonstrate what is at stake, the paper briefly recapitulates empirical findings familiar to readers of the journal, before drawing on original unpublished data. PMID:27499706

  8. Psychosocial consequences for children experiencing parental loss due to HIV/AIDS in central China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoxiang; Li, Xiaoming; Kaljee, Linda; Zhang, Liying; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Junfeng; Lin, Danhua; Lin, Xiuyun; Stanton, Bonita

    2009-06-01

    Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 47 children (ages 8-17 years) experiencing the loss of one or both parents due to HIV/AIDS in two rural counties of central China. Findings in this study reveal that the families of the children orphaned by AIDS had experienced financial burdens because of treatment costs for sick parents and loss of labor in the household. The majority of the participants reported some level of stigmatization because of their parents' HIV status. The participants described feelings of sadness, fear, anxiety, anger, loneliness, low self-esteem, social withdrawal, and sleep problems. Implications for intervention programs include the need for psychological support and special counseling services, more public education with accurate knowledge about HIV/AIDS to decrease stigma and discrimination, and financial programs to decrease economic and caregiving burdens for these children. PMID:19437169

  9. Time to HAART Initiation after Diagnosis and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in Patients with AIDS in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Caro-Vega, Yanink; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Wolff, Marcelo; Cortes, Claudia P.; Padgett, Denis; Carriquiry, Gabriela; Fink, Valeria; Jayathilake, Karu; Person, Anna K.; McGowan, Catherine; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Since 2009, earlier initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) after an opportunistic infection (OI) has been recommended based on lower risks of death and AIDS-related progression found in clinical trials. Delay in HAART initiation after OIs may be an important barrier for successful outcomes in patients with advanced disease. Timing of HAART initiation after an OI in “real life” settings in Latin America has not been evaluated. Methods Patients in the Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV Epidemiology (CCASAnet) ≥18 years of age at enrolment, from 2001–2012 who had an OI before HAART initiation were included. Patients were divided in an early HAART (EH) group (those initiating within 4 weeks of an OI) and a delayed HAART (DH) group (those initiating more than 4 weeks after an OI). All patients with an AIDS-defining OI were included. In patients with more than one OI the first event reported was considered. Calendar trends in the proportion of patients in the EH group (before and after 2009) were estimated by site and for the whole cohort. Factors associated with EH were estimated using multivariable logistic regression models. Results A total of 1457 patients had an OI before HAART initiation and were included in the analysis: 213 from Argentina, 686 from Brazil, 283 from Chile, 119 from Honduras and 156 from Mexico. Most prevalent OI were Tuberculosis (31%), followed by Pneumocystis pneumonia (24%), Invasive Candidiasis (16%) and Toxoplasmosis (9%). Median time from OI to HAART initiation decreased significantly from 5.7 (interquartile range [IQR] 2.8–12.1) weeks before 2009 to 4.3 (IQR 2.0–7.1) after 2009 (p<0.01). Factors associated with starting HAART within 4 weeks of OI diagnosis were lower CD4 count at enrolment (p-<0.001), having a non-tuberculosis OI (p<0.001), study site (p<0.001), and more recent years of OI diagnosis (p<0.001). Discussion The time from diagnosis of an OI to HAART initiation has

  10. Dual purpose recovered coagulant from drinking water treatment residuals for adjustment of initial pH and coagulation aid in electrocoagulation process.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Ahn, Kyu-Hong

    2016-07-01

    The present study is focused on the application of recovered coagulant (RC) by acidification from drinking water treatment residuals for both adjusting the initial pH and aiding coagulant in electrocoagulation. To do this, real cotton textile wastewater was used as a target pollutant, and decolorization and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency were monitored. A preliminary test indicated that a stainless steel electrode combined with RC significantly accelerated decolorization and COD removal efficiencies, by about 52% and 56%, respectively, even at an operating time of 5 min. A single electrocoagulation system meanwhile requires at least 40 min to attain the similar removal performances. Subsequently, the interactive effect of three independent variables (applied voltage, initial pH, and reaction time) on the response variables (decolorization and COD removal) was evaluated, and these parameters were statistically optimized using the response surface methodology. Analysis of variance showed a high coefficient of determination values (decolorization, R(2) = 0.9925 and COD removal, R(2) = 0.9973) and satisfactory prediction second-order polynomial quadratic regression models. Average decolorization and COD removal of 89.52% and 94.14%, respectively, were achieved, corresponding to 97.8% and 98.1% of the predicted values under statistically optimized conditions. The results suggest that the RC effectively played a dual role of both adjusting the initial pH and aiding coagulant in the electrocoagulation process. PMID:26593378

  11. Anti-HIV drug development: structural features and limitations of present day drugs and future challenges in the successful HIV/AIDS treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Garima; Singh, Ramendra K

    2013-01-01

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), an immuno-compromized condition, a sequel to untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inviting several life-threatening diseases, has become one of the most fatal disorders in the recent past because of HIV strain variance due to mutations, passive latency and reservoirs helping in replenishing and reviving the HIV-1 proviral DNA. Scientific efforts have led to the discovery of several effective drugs against HIV and lowered the morbidity and mortality all over the world. However, despite availability of a good number of anti-HIV drugs, the problem, for the foreseeable reasons, stands out as the most chronic disease due to the less tolerability and low accessibility of drugs, life-long expensive treatment, and above all, the emergence of drug resistant viral strains. This review dwells upon HIV infection and its proliferation inside the host system, drug targets, different types of drugs, their structural features and mode of interaction with viral targets and drug regimens. It further focuses on topics of latest interest regarding drug development, fixed dose combinations (FDCs), the limitations of present day drugs with their structural features along with their pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics and the challenges in finding a permanent cure for HIV/AIDS. PMID:23092282

  12. HIV and AIDS: Know the Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe HIV and AIDS: Know the Facts Treatments Work, but Prevention Is ... than 30 years since a disease now called AIDS was first recognized in the United States. Back ...

  13. Vocal local versus pharmacological treatments for pain management in tubal ligation procedures in rural Kenya: a non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vocal local (VL) is a non-pharmacological pain management technique for gynecological procedures. In Africa, it is usually used in combination with pharmacological analgesics. However, analgesics are associated with side-effects, and can be costly and subject to frequent stock-outs, particularly in remote rural settings. We compared the effectiveness of VL + local anesthesia + analgesics (the standard approach), versus VL + local anesthesia without analgesics, on pain and satisfaction levels for women undergoing tubal ligations in rural Kenya. Methods We conducted a site-randomised non-inferiority trial of 884 women receiving TLs from 40 Marie Stopes mobile outreach sites in Kisii and Machakos Districts. Twenty sites provided VL + local anesthesia + analgesics (control), while 20 offered VL + local anesthesia without additional analgesics (intervention). Pain was measured using a validated 11-point Numeric Rating Scale; satisfaction was measured using 11-point scales. Results A total of 461 women underwent tubal ligations with VL + local anesthesia, while 423 received tubal ligations with VL + local anesthesia + analgesics. The majority were aged ≥30 years (78%), and had >3 children (99%). In a multivariate analysis, pain during the procedure was not significantly different between the two groups. The pain score after the procedure was significantly lower in the intervention group versus the control group (by 0.40 points; p = 0.041). Satisfaction scores were equally high in both groups; 96% would recommend the procedure to a friend. Conclusion VL + local anesthesia is as effective as VL + local anesthesia + analgesics for pain management during tubal ligation in rural Kenya. Avoiding analgesics is associated with numerous benefits including cost savings and fewer issues related to the maintenance, procurement and monitoring of restricted opioid drugs, particularly in remote low-resource settings

  14. Simultaneously bio treatment of textiles and food industries effluent at difference ratios with the aid of e-beam radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Selambakkannu, Sarala; Ting, Teo Ming; Shariff, Jamaliah

    2012-09-01

    The combination of irradiation and biological technique was used to study COD, BOD5 and colour removal of textiles effluent in the presence of food industry wastewater at two different ratios. Two biological treatment system, the first consisting a mix of unirradiated textile and food industry wastewater and the second a mix of irradiated textile wastewater and food industry wastewater were operated in parallel. The experiment was conducted by batch. For the first batch the ratio was use for textile wastewater and food industry wastewater in biological treatment was 1:1. Meanwhile, for the second batch the ratio used for textile wastewater and food industry wastewater in biological treatment was 1:2. The results obtained for the first and second batch varies from each other. After irradiation, COD reduce in textile wastewater for the both batches are roughly 29% - 33% from the unirradiated wastewater. But after undergoing the biological treatment the percentage of COD reduction for first batch and second batch was 62.1% and 80.7% respectively. After irradiation the BOD5 of textile wastewater reduced by 22.2% for the first batch and 55.1% for the second batch. But after biological treatment, the BOD5 value for the first batch was same as its initial, 36mg/l and 40.4mg/l for the second batch. Colour had decreased from 899.5 ADMI to 379.3 ADMI after irradiation and decrease to 109.3 after undergoes biological treatment for the first batch. Meantime for the batch two, colour had decreased from 1000.44 ADMI to 363.40 ADMI after irradiation and dropped to 79.20 ADMI after biological treatment. The experiment show that 1:2 ratio show better reduction on COD, BOD5 and colour, compared to the ratio of 1:1.

  15. Successful treatment with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    NAGAI, Yuya; MORI, Minako; INOUE, Daichi; KIMURA, Takaharu; SHIMOJI, Sonoko; TOGAMI, Katsuhiro; TABATA, Sumie; MATSUSHITA, Akiko; NAGAI, Kenichi; Imai, Yukihiro; Takafuta, Toshiro; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2009-11-01

    A 62-year-old man was diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection while suffering from recurrent herpes zoster infection. Laboratory examination revealed CD4(+) lymphocyte count 16 cells/mul and HIV loading 150,000 copies/ml at presentation. In addition, he had multiple lymph node swelling. Histologic diagnosis of a biopsied lymph node was diffuse, large, B cell-type malignant lymphoma. The karyotype of the lymphoma cells was t(8;14)(q24;q32), which was confirmed by G-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization. Positron emission tomography (PET)-combined CT scanning revealed systemic extranodal tumors involving the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and bone marrow. The clinical stage of the lymphoma was IVB and the international prognosis index was categorized as high. Complete remission (CR) of the lymphoma was obtained after 2 courses of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisolone) chemotherapy and 4 subsequent courses of rituximab-combined CHOP (R-CHOP). Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was started at the initiation of CHOP. Because of the poor prognosis of AIDS-related lymphoma, he received autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with the MEAM protocol (ranimustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan) as a conditioning procedure without a severe infectious episode. He remains in CR 24 months after the transplantation. PMID:20009441

  16. Are social support and HIV coping strategies associated with lower depression in adults on antiretroviral treatment? Evidence from rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Yeji, Francis; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Newell, Marie-Louise; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Hosegood, Victoria; Bärnighausen, Till

    2014-01-01

    We assess depression rates and investigate whether depression among HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) is associated with social support and HIV coping strategies in rural South Africa (SA). The study took place in a decentralised public-sector ART programme in a poor, rural area of KwaZulu-Natal, SA, with high-HIV prevalence and high-ART coverage. The 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ12), validated in this setting, was used to assess depression in 272 adults recently initiated on ART. Estimates of depression prevalence ranged from 33% to 38%, depending on the method used to score the GHQ12. Instrumental social support (providing tangible factors for support, such as financial assistance, material goods or services), but not emotional social support (expressing feelings, such as empathy, love, trust or acceptance, to support a person), was significantly associated with lower likelihood of depression [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52-0.81, P < 0.001], when controlling for sex, age, marital status, education, household wealth and CD4 cell count. In addition, using "avoidance of people" as a strategy to cope with HIV was associated with an almost three times higher odds of depression (aOR = 2.79, CI: 1.34-5.82, P = 0.006), whereas none of the other five coping strategies we assessed was significantly associated with depression. In addition to antidepressant drug treatment, interventions enhancing instrumental social support and behavioural therapy replacing withdrawal behaviours with active HIV coping strategies may be effective in reducing the burden of depression among patients on ART. PMID:24991994

  17. Early Diagnosis, Treatment and Follow-Up of Cystic Echinococcosis in Remote Rural Areas in Patagonia: Impact of Ultrasound Training of Non-Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Del Carpio, Mario; Hugo Mercapide, Carlos; Salvitti, Juan Carlos; Uchiumi, Leonardo; Sustercic, José; Panomarenko, Hector; Moguilensky, Jorge; Herrero, Eduardo; Talmon, Gabriel; Volpe, Marcela; Araya, Daniel; Mujica, Guillermo; Calabro, Arnoldo; Mancini, Sergio; Chiosso, Carlos; Luis Labanchi, Jose; Saad, Ricardo; Goblirsch, Sam; Brunetti, Enrico; Larrieu, Edmundo

    2012-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a chronic, complex and neglected disease caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. The effects of this neglect have a stronger impact in remote rural areas whose inhabitants have no chances of being diagnosed and treated properly without leaving their jobs and travelling long distances, sometimes taking days to reach the closest referral center. Background In 1980 our group set up a control program in endemic regions with CE in rural sections of Rio Negro, Argentina. Since 1997, we have used abdominopelvic ultrasound (US) as a screening method of CE in school children and determined an algorithm of treatment. Objectives To describe the training system of general practitioners in early diagnosis and treatment of CE and to evaluate the impact of the implementation of the field program. Materials and Methods In 2000, to overcome the shortage of radiologists in the area, we set up a short training course on Focused Assessment with Sonography for Echinococcosis (FASE) for general practitioners with no previous experience with US. After the course, the trainees were able to carry out autonomous ultrasound surveys under the supervision of the course faculty. From 2000 to 2008, trainees carried out 22,793 ultrasound scans in children from 6 to 14 years of age, and diagnosed 87 (0.4%) new cases of CE. Forty-nine (56.4%) were treated with albendazole, 29 (33.3%) were monitored expectantly and 9 (10.3%) were treated with surgery. Discussion The introduction of a FASE course for general practitioners allowed for the screening of CE in a large population of individuals in remote endemic areas with persistent levels of transmission, thus overcoming the barrier of the great distance from tertiary care facilities. The ability of local practitioners to screen for CE using US saved the local residents costly travel time and missed work and proved to be an efficacious and least expensive intervention tool for both the community and health

  18. An assessment of felt needs and expectations of people living with HIV/AIDS seeking treatment at NGOs in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Megharita M; Garg, Suneela; Nath, Anita; Gupta, Vimal K

    2015-03-01

    People living with HIV/AIDS (PLHAs) continue to face stigma and discrimination in society. The felt needs of PLHAs can be met by means of a comprehensive, holistic, and integrated approach by the concerned sectors. This study included 100 PLHAs admitted at 3 care homes run by nongovernmental organizations in New Delhi. As many as 22% of the patients had been diagnosed with pulmonary Koch's. Unemployment rates were found to increase after disease onset. Majority were satisfied with the medical treatment and overall care provided at these centers. About 25% expressed that they would like the government to provide them with suitable jobs. Less than one third (30%) of the PLHAs expressed satisfaction with their family life whereas the rest yearned for love and acceptance from society. Study findings highlight the important role of nongovernmental organizations and stresses on the need for a holistic approach toward the care of these people. PMID:19443873

  19. "Volunteers are not paid because they are priceless": community health worker capacities and values in an AIDS treatment intervention in urban Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Maes, Kenneth

    2015-03-01

    This article analyzes community health workers' (CHW) capacities for empathic service within an AIDS treatment program in Addis Ababa. I show how CHWs' capacities to build relationships with stigmatized people, reconcile family disputes, and confront death draw on a constellation of values, desires, and emotions encouraged by CHWs' families and religious teachings. I then examine the ways in which the capacities of CHWs were valued by the institutions that deployed them. NGO and government officials recognized that empathic care was crucial to both saving and improving the quality of people's lives. These institutional actors also defended a policy of not financially remunerating CHWs, partly by constructing their capacities as so valuable that they become "priceless" and therefore only remunerable with immaterial satisfaction. Positive change within CHW programs requires ethnographic analysis of how CHWs exercise capacities for empathic care as well as consideration of how global health institutions value these capacities. PMID:25257547

  20. [AIDS: "We will win"].

    PubMed

    Chabrier, H

    1989-11-13

    An international colloquium on AIDS held near Paris from October 26-28, 1989, unlike the World Conference on AIDS in Montreal the year before, was able to find reasons for optimism. Significant progress was reported in immunotherapy and in chemotherapy. Successful experiments in vaccinating monkeys against the AIDS virus were reported from the US, France, and Zaire. Time is needed to prove the efficacy of the vaccines because of the slow development in AIDS. A vaccine is being tested by Jonas Salk and collaborators in 75 seropositive volunteers who do not yet show full blown disease but who have very low levels of T4 lymphocytes. Plans are underway for a larger test on 500 seropositive patients at different stages of infection. According to Salk, the new chemical and logical approach toward AIDS will allow combinations of immunotherapy and chemotherapy to destroy the virus. R. Gallo of France listed as accomplishments of the past year a better understanding of the virus, improved case management techniques, increased ability to control Kaposi's sarcoma, considerable progress in the search for a vaccine, and detection of immune proteins that affect the virus. New biological markers permit establishment of correlations between cellular modifications and the progress of the disease as well as the precise effects of treatment. The new immune system drugs immuthiol and DDI are expected to reach the market soon. Patients very soon will be able to receive less toxic alternative treatments, which can be combined for greater efficacy once their toxic interactions are understood. PMID:12342689