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Sample records for aids-related diffuse small

  1. mTOR activity in AIDS-related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Perez, Julio A.; Preziosi, Michael; King, Charles C.; Jones, George A.; Jain, Sonia; Sun, Xiaoying; Reid, Erin G.; VandenBerg, Scott; Wang, Huan-You

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients infected with HIV have a significantly increased risk of developing non–Hodgkin lymphomas despite the widespread use of HAART. To investigate mTOR pathway activity in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma AR-DLBCL, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the presence of the phosphorylated 70 ribosomal S6 protein-kinase (p70S6K), an extensively studied effector of mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) and the phosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog (pPTEN), a negative regulator of mTORC1 pathway. Materials and methods We evaluated tissue samples from 126 patients with AR-DLBCL. Among them, 98 samples were from tissue microarrays (TMAs) supplied by the Aids and Cancer Specimen Resource (ACSR), the remaining 28 samples were from cases diagnosed and treated at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). The presence of p70S6K was evaluated with two antibodies directed against the combined epitopes Ser235/236 and Ser240/244, respectively; and additional monoclonal anti-bodies were used to identify pPTEN and phosphorylated proline-rich Akt substrate of 40kDa (pPRAS40). The degree of intensity and percentage of cells positive for p70S6K and pPTEN were assessed in all the samples. In addition, a subgroup of 28 patients from UCSD was studied to assess the presence of pPRAS40, an insulin-regulated activator of the mTORC1. The expression of each of these markers was correlated with clinical and histopathologic features. Results The majority of the patients evaluated were males (88%); only two cases (1.6%) were older than 65 years of age. We found high levels of both p70S6K-paired epitopes studied, 48% positivity against Ser235/236 (44% in ACSR and 64% in UCSD group), and 86% positivity against Ser240/244 (82% in ACSR and 100% in UCSD group). We observed more positive cells and stronger intensity with epitope Ser240/244 in comparison to Ser235/236 (p<0.0001). The degree of intensity and percentage of cells positive

  2. Gene Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Plasmablastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Effusion Lymphoma; HIV Infection; AIDS Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  3. Population Density and AIDS-Related Stigma in Large-Urban, Small-Urban, and Rural Communities of the Southeastern USA.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth; Katner, Harold; Banas, Ellen; Kalichman, Moira

    2017-02-11

    AIDS stigmas delay HIV diagnosis, interfere with health care, and contribute to mental health problems among people living with HIV. While there are few studies of the geographical distribution of AIDS stigma, research suggests that AIDS stigmas are differentially experienced in rural and urban areas. We conducted computerized interviews with 696 men and women living with HIV in 113 different zip code areas that were classified as large-urban, small-urban, and rural areas in a southeast US state with high-HIV prevalence. Analyses conducted at the individual level (N = 696) accounting for clustering at the zip code level showed that internalized AIDS-related stigma (e.g., the sense of being inferior to others because of HIV) was experienced with greater magnitude in less densely populated communities. Multilevel models indicated that after adjusting for potential confounding factors, rural communities reported greater internalized AIDS-related stigma compared to large-urban areas and that small-urban areas indicated greater experiences of enacted stigma (e.g., discrimination) than large-urban areas. The associations between anticipated AIDS-related stigma (e.g., expecting discrimination) and population density at the community-level were not significant. Results suggest that people living in rural and small-urban settings experience greater AIDS-related internalized and enacted stigma than their counterparts living in large-urban centers. Research is needed to determine whether low-density population areas contribute to or are sought out by people who experienced greater AIDS-related stigma. Regardless of causal directions, interventions are needed to address AIDS-related stigma, especially among people in sparsely populated areas with limited resources.

  4. Treatment Option Overview (AIDS Related-Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  5. Stages of AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  6. Treatment Options for AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  7. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment Childhood NHL Treatment Research AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  8. SMALL-SCALE ANISOTROPIES OF COSMIC RAYS FROM RELATIVE DIFFUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, Markus; Mertsch, Philipp

    2015-12-10

    The arrival directions of multi-TeV cosmic rays show significant anisotropies at small angular scales. It has been argued that this small-scale structure can naturally arise from cosmic ray scattering in local turbulent magnetic fields that distort a global dipole anisotropy set by diffusion. We study this effect in terms of the power spectrum of cosmic ray arrival directions and show that the strength of small-scale anisotropies is related to properties of relative diffusion. We provide a formalism for how these power spectra can be inferred from simulations and motivate a simple analytic extension of the ensemble-averaged diffusion equation that can account for the effect.

  9. Diffusion of small molecules into medaka embryos improved by electroporation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diffusion of small molecules into fish embryos is essential for many experimental procedures in developmental biology and toxicology. Since we observed a weak uptake of lithium into medaka eggs we started a detailed analysis of its diffusion properties using small fluorescent molecules. Results Contrary to our expectations, not the rigid outer chorion but instead membrane systems surrounding the embryo/yolk turned out to be the limiting factor for diffusion into medaka eggs. The consequence is a bi-phasic uptake of small molecules first reaching the pervitelline space with a diffusion half-time in the range of a few minutes. This is followed by a slow second phase (half-time in the range of several hours) during which accumulation in the embryo/yolk takes place. Treatment with detergents improved the uptake, but strongly affected the internal distribution of the molecules. Testing electroporation we could establish conditions to overcome the diffusion barrier. Applying this method to lithium chloride we observed anterior truncations in medaka embryos in agreement with its proposed activation of Wnt signalling. Conclusions The diffusion of small molecules into medaka embryos is slow, caused by membrane systems underneath the chorion. These results have important implications for pharmacologic/toxicologic techniques like the fish embryo test, which therefore require extended incubation times in order to reach sufficient concentrations in the embryos. PMID:23815821

  10. Aids-Related Cancers in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbulaiteye, Sam M.

    2014-07-01

    Thank you Professor Zichichi for inviting me to give a talk about AIDS-related cancers in Africa. Let me begin by congratulating the team that organized the 46th Session of the Erice International Seminar Series, whose theme is THE ROLE OF SCIENCE IN THE THIRD MILLENIUM. I also congratulate the scientists from 38 countries who are attending these seminars. They are perpetuating the principle of SCIENCE WITHOUT SECRETS in the true spirit espoused by Archimedes, Galileo, and Fermi. It is a wonderful honor for me to be here to shed some light on the health impacts of the HIV epidemic in the area of cancer...

  11. The Turbulent Flow in Diffusers of Small Divergence Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gourzhienko, G. A.

    1947-01-01

    The turbulent flow in a conical diffuser represents the type of turbulent boundary layer with positive longitudinal pressure gradient. In contrast to the boundary layer problem, however, it is not necessary that the pressure distribution along the limits of the boundary layer(along the axis of the diffuser) be given, since this distribution can be obtained from the computation. This circumstance, together with the greater simplicity of the problem as a whole, provides a useful basis for the study of the extension of the results of semiempirical theories to the case of motion with a positive pressure gradient. In the first part of the paper,formulas are derived for the computation of the velocity and.pressure distributions in the turbulent flow along, and at right angles to, the axis of a diffuser of small cone angle. The problem is solved.

  12. Functional imaging of small tissue volumes with diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2006-03-01

    Imaging of dynamic changes in blood parameters, functional brain imaging, and tumor imaging are the most advanced application areas of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). When dealing with the image reconstruction problem one is faced with the fact that near-infrared photons, unlike X-rays, are highly scattered when they traverse biological tissue. Image reconstruction schemes are required that model the light propagation inside biological tissue and predict measurements on the tissue surface. By iteratively changing the tissue-parameters until the predictions agree with the real measurements, a spatial distribution of optical properties inside the tissue is found. The optical properties can be related to the tissue oxygenation, inflammation, or to the fluorophore concentration of a biochemical marker. If the model of light propagation is inaccurate, the reconstruction process will lead to an inaccurate result as well. Here, we focus on difficulties that are encountered when DOT is employed for functional imaging of small tissue volumes, for example, in cancer studies involving small animals, or human finger joints for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the currently employed image reconstruction methods rely on the diffusion theory that is an approximation to the equation of radiative transfer. But, in the cases of small tissue volumes and tissues that contain low scattering regions diffusion theory has been shown to be of limited applicability Therefore, we employ a light propagation model that is based on the equation of radiative transfer, which promises to overcome the limitations.

  13. Frequency domain fluorescence diffuse tomography of small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Anna G.; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Plehanov, Vladimir I.; Balalaeva, Irina V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Kleshnin, Michail S.

    2007-05-01

    Fluorescent compounds for selective cancer cell marking are used for development of novel medical diagnostic methods, investigation of the influence of external factors on tumor growth, regress and metastasis. Only special tools for turbid media imaging, such as optical diffusion tomography permit noninvasive monitoring of fluorescent-labeled tumor alterations deep in animal tissue. In this work, the results of preliminary experiments utilizing frequency-domain fluorescent diffusion tomography (FD FDT) experimental setup in small animal are presented. Low-frequency modulated light (1 kHz) from Nd:YAG laser with second harmonic generation at the wavelength of 532 nm was used in the setup. The transilluminative planar configuration was used in the setup. A series of model experiments has been conducted and show good agreement between theoretical and experimental fluorescence intensity. Models of deep tumors were created by two methods: (1) glass capsules containing fluorophore solution were inserted into esophagus of small animals to simulate marked tumors; (2) a suspension of transfected HEΚ293-Turbo-RFP cells was subcutaneously injected to small animal. The conducted experiments have shown that FD FDT allows one to detect the presence of labeled tumor cells in small animals, to determine the volume of an experimental tumor, to perform 3D tumor reconstruction, as well as to conduct monitoring investigations. The obtained results demonstrate the potential capability of the FD FDT method for noninvasive whole-body imaging in cancer studies, diagnostics and therapy.

  14. Prevalence of microsporidiosis due to Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon (Septata) intestinalis among patients with AIDS-related diarrhea: determination by polymerase chain reaction to the microsporidian small-subunit rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Coyle, C M; Wittner, M; Kotler, D P; Noyer, C; Orenstein, J M; Tanowitz, H B; Weiss, L M

    1996-11-01

    Microsporidia are emerging as opportunistic pathogens in patients with AIDS. Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon (Septata) intestinalis have been implicated in enteric infections in AIDS patients with chronic diarrhea, a wasting syndrome, and malabsorption. We used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and primers that amplify the conserved regions of the small-subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA) gene of E. bieneusi and E. intestinalis in tissue specimens from HIV-infected patients with and without diarrhea to examine the association between microsporidia and diarrhea in patients with AIDS. Tissue specimens were obtained from 68 patients with AIDS and diarrhea (mean CD4 lymphocyte count, 21/mm3) and 43 AIDS patients without diarrhea (mean CD4 lymphocyte count, 60/mm3). By means of PCR with use of the SSU-rRNA primers specific for E. bieneusi and E. intestinalis, we found that 44% of patients with diarrhea were infected with microsporidia, whereas only 2.3% of the patients without diarrhea were infected with microsporidia (P < .001). There was a clear association between the presence of microsporidia and diarrhea. In addition, the SSU-rRNA primers proved to be sensitive and specific when used in this clinical setting.

  15. Diffusion of Small Solute Particles in Viscous Liquids: Cage Diffusion, a Result of Decoupling of Solute-Solvent Dynamics, Leads to Amplification of Solute Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sayantan; Nandi, Manoj K; Mandal, Arkajit; Sarkar, Sucharita; Bhattacharyya, Sarika Maitra

    2015-08-27

    We study the diffusion of small solute particles through solvent by keeping the solute-solvent interaction repulsive and varying the solvent properties. The study involves computer simulations, development of a new model to describe diffusion of small solutes in a solvent, and also mode coupling theory (MCT) calculations. In a viscous solvent, a small solute diffuses via coupling to the solvent hydrodynamic modes and also through the transient cages formed by the solvent. The model developed can estimate the independent contributions from these two different channels of diffusion. Although the solute diffusion in all the systems shows an amplification, the degree of it increases with solvent viscosity. The model correctly predicts that when the solvent viscosity is high, the solute primarily diffuses by exploiting the solvent cages. In such a scenario the MCT diffusion performed for a static solvent provides a correct estimation of the cage diffusion.

  16. Small and Large Molecules in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Huang, Jane

    2014-06-01

    Although molecules with a wide range of sizes exist in dense clouds (e.g. H(C≡C)_nC≡N with n = 0 - 5), molecules identified in diffuse clouds are all small ones. Since the initial discovery of CH, CN, and CH^+, all molecules detected in the optical region are diatomics except for H_3^+ in the infrared and C_3 in the visible. Radio observations have been limited up to triatomic molecules except for H_2CO and the ubiquitous C_3H_2. The column densities of all molecules are less than 1014 cm-2 with the two exceptions of CO and H_3^+ as well as CH and C_2 in a few special sightlines. Larger molecules with many carbon atoms have been searched for but have not been detected. On the other hand, the observations of a great many diffuse interstellar bands (380 toward HD 204827 and 414 toward HD 183143) with equivalent widths from 1 to 5700 m Å indicate high column densities of many heavy molecules. If an electronic transition dipole moment of 1 Debye is assumed, the observed equivalent widths translate to column densities from 5 × 1011 cm-2 to 3 × 1015 cm-2. It seems impossible that these large molecules are formed from chemical reactions in space from small molecules. It is more likely that they are fragments of aggregates, perhaps mixed aromatic/aliphatic organic nanoparticles (MAONS). MAONS and their large fragment molecules are stable against photodissociation in the diffuse ISM because the energy of absorbed photons is divided into statistical distributions of vibrational energy and emitted in the infrared rather than breaking a chemical bond. We use a simple Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory to estimate the molecular size required for the stabilization. Snow, T. P. & McCall, B. J. 2006, ARA&A, 44 367 Hobbs, L. M., York, D. G., Snow, T. P., Oka, T., Thorburn, J. A., et al. 2008, ApJ, 680 1256 Hobbs, L. M., York, D. G., Thorburn, J. A., Snow, T. P., Bishof, M., et al. 2009, ApJ, 705 32 Kwok, S. & Zhang, S. 2013, ApJ, 771 5 Freed, K. F., Oka, T., & Suzuki, H

  17. A Temporal Model of Technology Diffusion into Small Firms in Wales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Brychan; Packham, Gary; Miller, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Discusses technology diffusion through formal and informal networks. Develops a model that includes channels and mechanisms involved in transferring technology into innovative small businesses. The model depicts influences that increase or slow the rate of diffusion. (SK)

  18. A microfluidic method to measure small molecule diffusion in hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephanie M; Litzenberger, Andrew L; Ellenberger, Anne E; Maneval, James E; Jablonski, Erin L; Vogel, Brandon M

    2014-02-01

    Drug release from a fluid-contacting biomaterial is simulated using a microfluidic device with a channel defined by solute-loaded hydrogel; as water is pumped through the channel, solute transfers from the hydrogel into the water. Optical analysis of in-situ hydrogels, characterization of the microfluidic device effluent, and NMR methods were used to find diffusion coefficients of several dyes (model drugs) in poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) hydrogels. Diffusion coefficients for methylene blue and sulforhodamine 101 in PEG-DA calculated using the three methods are in good agreement; both dyes are mobile in the hydrogel and elute from the hydrogel at the aqueous channel interface. However, the dye acid blue 22 deviates from typical diffusion behavior and does not release as expected from the hydrogel. Importantly, only the microfluidic method is capable of detecting this behavior. Characterizing solute diffusion with a combination of NMR, optical and effluent methods offer greater insight into molecular diffusion in hydrogels than employing each technique individually. The NMR method made precise measurements for solute diffusion in all cases. The microfluidic optical method was effective for visualizing diffusion of the optically active solutes. The optical and effluent methods show potential to be used to screen solutes to determine if they elute from a hydrogel in contact with flowing fluid. Our data suggest that when designing a drug delivery device, analyzing the diffusion from the molecular level to the device level is important to establish a complete picture of drug elution, and microfluidic methods to study such diffusion can play a key role.

  19. Patterns of gallium-67 scintigraphy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the AIDS related complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.; Bekerman, C.; Weinstein, R.; Bennett, C.; Ryo, U.; Pinsky, S.

    1987-07-01

    Thirty-two patients with AIDS related complex (ARC) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) underwent /sup 67/Ga scans as part of their evaluation. Three patterns of /sup 67/Ga biodistribution were found: lymph node uptake alone; diffuse pulmonary uptake; normal scan. Gallium-67 scans were useful in identifying clinically occult Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in seven of 15 patients with ARC who were asymptomatic and had normal chest radiographs. Gallium scans are a useful ancillary procedure in the evaluation of patients with ARC or AIDS.

  20. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Larsh, A.E.

    1981-10-01

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm/sup 2/ and a thickness of 100 ..mu..m. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 150/sup 0/K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs.

  1. A diffusive information preservation method for small Knudsen number flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fei, Fei; Fan, Jing

    2013-06-15

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is a powerful particle-based method for modeling gas flows. It works well for relatively large Knudsen (Kn) numbers, typically larger than 0.01, but quickly becomes computationally intensive as Kn decreases due to its time step and cell size limitations. An alternative approach was proposed to relax or remove these limitations, based on replacing pairwise collisions with a stochastic model corresponding to the Fokker–Planck equation [J. Comput. Phys., 229, 1077 (2010); J. Fluid Mech., 680, 574 (2011)]. Similar to the DSMC method, the downside of that approach suffers from computationally statistical noise. To solve the problem, a diffusion-based information preservation (D-IP) method has been developed. The main idea is to track the motion of a simulated molecule from the diffusive standpoint, and obtain the flow velocity and temperature through sampling and averaging the IP quantities. To validate the idea and the corresponding model, several benchmark problems with Kn ∼ 10{sup −3}–10{sup −4} have been investigated. It is shown that the IP calculations are not only accurate, but also efficient because they make possible using a time step and cell size over an order of magnitude larger than the mean collision time and mean free path, respectively.

  2. A diffusive information preservation method for small Knudsen number flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fei; Fan, Jing

    2013-06-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is a powerful particle-based method for modeling gas flows. It works well for relatively large Knudsen (Kn) numbers, typically larger than 0.01, but quickly becomes computationally intensive as Kn decreases due to its time step and cell size limitations. An alternative approach was proposed to relax or remove these limitations, based on replacing pairwise collisions with a stochastic model corresponding to the Fokker-Planck equation [J. Comput. Phys., 229, 1077 (2010); J. Fluid Mech., 680, 574 (2011)]. Similar to the DSMC method, the downside of that approach suffers from computationally statistical noise. To solve the problem, a diffusion-based information preservation (D-IP) method has been developed. The main idea is to track the motion of a simulated molecule from the diffusive standpoint, and obtain the flow velocity and temperature through sampling and averaging the IP quantities. To validate the idea and the corresponding model, several benchmark problems with Kn ˜ 10-3-10-4 have been investigated. It is shown that the IP calculations are not only accurate, but also efficient because they make possible using a time step and cell size over an order of magnitude larger than the mean collision time and mean free path, respectively.

  3. The small ice cap instability in diffusive climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    Simple climate models which invoke diffusive heat transport and ice cap albedo feedback have equilibrium solutions with no stable ice cap smaller than a radius of about 20 deg on a great circle. Attention is presently given to a solution of this phenomenon which is physically appealing. The ice-free solution has a thermal minimum, and if the minimum temperature is just above the critical value for ice formation, then the artificial addition of a patch of ice leads to a widespread depression of the temperature below the critical freezing temperature. A second stable solution will then exist whose spatial extent is determined by the range of the influence function of a point sink of heat, due to the albedo shift in the patch.

  4. Computation of Rate Constants for Diffusion of Small Ligands to and from Buried Protein Active Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, P-H; De Sancho, D; Best, R B; Blumberger, J

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of ligands to actives sites of proteins is essential to enzyme catalysis and many cellular signaling processes. In this contribution we review our recently developed methodology for calculation of rate constants for diffusion and binding of small molecules to buried protein active sites. The diffusive dynamics of the ligand obtained from molecular dynamics simulation is coarse grained and described by a Markov state model. Diffusion and binding rate constants are then obtained either from the reactive flux formalism or by fitting the time-dependent population of the Markov state model to a phenomenological rate law. The method is illustrated by applications to diffusion of substrate and inhibitors in [NiFe] hydrogenase, CO-dehydrogenase, and myoglobin. We also discuss a recently developed sensitivity analysis that allows one to identify hot spots in proteins, where mutations are expected to have the strongest effects on ligand diffusion rates.

  5. Epigenetic regulation of HIV, AIDS, and AIDS-related malignancies.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Although epigenetics is not a new field, its implications for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) research have not been explored fully. To develop therapeutic and preventive approaches against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and AIDS, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of interaction between the virus and the host, involvement of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, characterization of viral reservoirs, and factors influencing the latency of the virus. Both methylation of viral genes and histone modifications contribute to initiating and maintaining latency and, depending on the context, triggering viral gene repression or expression. This chapter discusses progress made at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), recommendations from the International AIDS Society Scientific Working Group on HIV Cure, and underlying epigenetic regulation. A number of epigenetic inhibitors have shown potential in treating AIDS-related malignancies. Epigenetic drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and their implications for the eradication of HIV/AIDS and AIDS-related malignancies also are discussed.Past and current progress in developing treatments and understanding the molecular mechanisms of AIDS and HIV infection has greatly improved patient survival. However, increased survival has been coupled with the development of cancer at higher rates than those observed among the HIV/AIDS-negative population. During the early days of the AIDS epidemic, the most frequent AIDS-defining malignancies were Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Now, with increased survival as the result of widespread use in the developed world of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), non-AIDS defining cancers (i.e., anal, skin, and lung cancers, and Hodgkin disease) are on the increase in HIV-infected populations. The current status of AIDS-related malignancies also is discussed.

  6. Photodynamic therapy for treatment of AIDS-related mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, Vanessa G.

    1992-06-01

    Since 1975, Phase I/II studies have demonstrated the successfulness of hematoporphyrin derivative photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of various malignancies of the skin, eye, bladder, lung, and head and neck. Moreover, in 1981 two cases of traditional Western cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma (TKS) have been treated with photodynamic therapy with both early and late complete response. To date, attempts to cure and palliation of the more aggressive AIDS-related oral Kaposi's sarcoma with conventional radiation, chemotherapy or immunotherapy, or surgical excision have been limited and often associated with debilitating mucositis and further immunosuppression. Certain aspects of photodynamic therapy may be efficacious for treatment of mucocutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma: (1) the selective retention of hematoporphyrin derivative by neoplastic lesions (endothelial cell tumors); (2) a tumor- specific cytotoxic agent (i.e., free oxygen radical); (3) absence of systemic toxicity from immunosuppression; (4) the potential for retreatment without increasing side effects; and (5) porphyrin-mediated photoinactivation of enveloped viruses. Herein presented are seven cases of AIDS-related KS (EKS) with diffuse, superficial, and nodular mucocutaneous lesions treated with dihematoporphyrin derivative and photodynamic therapy with subsequent dramatic early partial and complete responses.

  7. The Impact of Multiple AIDS-Related Bereavement in the Gay Male Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Carrie A.; Lease, Suzanne H.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the issue of AIDS-related loss and the correlative epidemic of AIDS-related bereavement. Notes that individuals are considered particularly susceptible to such bereavement when loss is multiple, as is often the case in the gay male population. Reviews the research exploring the impact of AIDS-related loss and suggests counseling…

  8. Transport- and diffusion-based optical tomography in small domains: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kui; Bal, Guillaume; Hielscher, Andreas H

    2007-09-20

    We compare reconstructions based on the radiative transport and diffusion equations in optical tomography for media of small sizes. While it is well known that the diffusion approximation is less accurate to describe light propagation in such media, it has not yet been shown how this inaccuracy affects the images obtained with model-based iterative image reconstructions schemes. Using synthetic nondifferential data we calculate the error in the reconstructed images of optical properties as functions of source modulation frequency, noise level in measurement, and diffusion extrapolation length. We observe that the differences between diffusion and transport reconstructions are large when high modulation frequencies and noise-free data are used in the reconstructions. When the noise in data reaches a certain level, approximately 12% in our simulations, the differences between diffusion- and transport-based reconstructions become almost indistinguishable. Given that state-of-the-art optical imaging systems operate at much lower noise levels, the benefits of transport-based reconstructions of small imaging domains can be realized with most of the currently available systems. However, transport-based reconstructions are considerably slower than diffusion-based reconstructions.

  9. Diffusion of small molecules in a chitosan/water gel determined by proton localized NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    García-Aparicio, Carlos; Quijada-Garrido, Isabel; Garrido, Leoncio

    2012-02-15

    Proton localized NMR spectroscopy (MRS) has been applied to study the diffusion of three small molecules, caffeine, theophylline and caprolactam, in chitosan gels with different concentration of water. This technique allows the non-destructive monitorization of diffusant concentration as a function of time and location. Concentration profiles were compared with theoretical curves based on solutions of Fick's diffusion equation for the best fitting, with the appropriate boundary conditions. The measured concentration profiles show a good agreement with the Fickian law. Values of the diffusion coefficients D ranging from 6.1×10(-6) to 3.4×10(-6)cm(2)s(-1) depending on chitosan concentration and type of diffusant molecule were determined. In addition, measurements of diffusion coefficients at equilibrium conditions with proton pulsed field gradient NMR methods supported the observed Fickian behavior and showed values of D in excellent agreement with those determined by proton MRS. All these facts demonstrate that proton MRS is an appropriate method for investigating diffusion process in complex systems, such as polymer gels.

  10. Intravenous Chemotherapy or Oral Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage III-IV HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma

  11. [Successful treatment with hyper-CVAD and highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) for AIDS-related Burkitt lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhito; Nakazato, Tomonori; Sanada, Yukinari; Mihara, Ai; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Kurai, Hanako; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Sachiko; Kakimoto, Tsunayuki

    2010-03-01

    A 38-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of continuous fever and right facial palsy. He was diagnosed as HIV positive. Abdominal CT scan showed a large mass in the ascending colon. Gallium scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake in the ascending colon. Colonoscopy was performed and histological examination of the colon tumor revealed Burkitt's lymphoma (BL). He received highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) and his facial palsy improved. Because CD4 count was significantly low at 31/microl, he was treated with dose-adjusted EPOCH (DA-EPOCH) combined with HAART. Although the tumor was decreased in size by DA-EPOCH, we changed to the combination of hyper-CVAD/MTX-Ara-C alternating therapy with HAART in order to increase dose intensity. Six cycles of hyper-CVAD/MTX-Ara-C were performed and complete remission was obtained. In the HAART era, the survival of patients with AIDS-related diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) improved dramatically, whereas the survival of similarly treated patients with AIDS-related BL remained poor. Our case suggests that intensive chemotherapy with hyper-CVAD/MTX-Ara-C combined with HAART may be well tolerated and effective in AIDS-related BL.

  12. Small Crowders Slow Down Kinesin-1 Stepping by Hindering Motor Domain Diffusion.

    PubMed

    Sozański, Krzysztof; Ruhnow, Felix; Wiśniewska, Agnieszka; Tabaka, Marcin; Diez, Stefan; Hołyst, Robert

    2015-11-20

    The dimeric motor protein kinesin-1 moves processively along microtubules against forces of up to 7 pN. However, the mechanism of force generation is still debated. Here, we point to the crucial importance of diffusion of the tethered motor domain for the stepping of kinesin-1: small crowders stop the motor at a viscosity of 5 mPa·s-corresponding to a hydrodynamic load in the sub-fN (~10^{-4} pN) range-whereas large crowders have no impact even at viscosities above 100 mPa·s. This indicates that the scale-dependent, effective viscosity experienced by the tethered motor domain is a key factor determining kinesin's functionality. Our results emphasize the role of diffusion in the kinesin-1 stepping mechanism and the general importance of the viscosity scaling paradigm in nanomechanics.

  13. Global small solutions to a tropical climate model without thermal diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Renhui

    2016-02-01

    We obtain the global well-posedness of classical solutions to a tropical climate model with only the dissipation of the first baroclinic model of the velocity (-ηΔv) under small initial data. This model is a modified version of the original system derived by Frierson-Majda-Pauluis in Frierson et al. [Commun. Math. Sci. 2, 591-626 (2004)]. The main difficulty is the absence of thermal diffusion. To overcome it, we exploit the structure of the equations coming from the coupled terms, dissipation term, and damp term. Then, we find the hidden thermal diffusion. In addition, based on the Littlewood-Paley theory, we establish a generalized commutator estimate, which may be applied to other partial differential equations.

  14. The small-voxel tracking algorithm for simulating chemical reactions among diffusing molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Daniel T.; Seitaridou, Effrosyni; Gillespie, Carol A.

    2014-12-01

    Simulating the evolution of a chemically reacting system using the bimolecular propensity function, as is done by the stochastic simulation algorithm and its reaction-diffusion extension, entails making statistically inspired guesses as to where the reactant molecules are at any given time. Those guesses will be physically justified if the system is dilute and well-mixed in the reactant molecules. Otherwise, an accurate simulation will require the extra effort and expense of keeping track of the positions of the reactant molecules as the system evolves. One molecule-tracking algorithm that pays careful attention to the physics of molecular diffusion is the enhanced Green's function reaction dynamics (eGFRD) of Takahashi, Tănase-Nicola, and ten Wolde [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 2473 (2010)]. We introduce here a molecule-tracking algorithm that has the same theoretical underpinnings and strategic aims as eGFRD, but a different implementation procedure. Called the small-voxel tracking algorithm (SVTA), it combines the well known voxel-hopping method for simulating molecular diffusion with a novel procedure for rectifying the unphysical predictions of the diffusion equation on the small spatiotemporal scale of molecular collisions. Indications are that the SVTA might be more computationally efficient than eGFRD for the problematic class of non-dilute systems. A widely applicable, user-friendly software implementation of the SVTA has yet to be developed, but we exhibit some simple examples which show that the algorithm is computationally feasible and gives plausible results.

  15. Measuring HIV/AIDS-Related Stigma across South Africa: A Versatile and Multidimensional Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Edward A.; Miller, Jacqueline A.; Newsome, Valerie; Sofolahan, Yewande A.; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma is critical in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Although national campaigns and prevention programs have been implemented across South Africa to address this critical concern, assessing the impact of these initiatives is difficult as it requires that measurement of HIV/AIDS-related stigma is uniform and comparable…

  16. Pd Diffusion on MgO(100): The Role of Defects and Small Cluster Mobilit.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lijun; Henkelman, Graeme A.; Campbell, Charles T.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2006-02-09

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Density functional theory is used to explore the energy landscape of Pd atoms adsorbed on the terrace of MgO(10 0) and at oxygen vacancy sites. Saddle point finding methods reveal that small Pd clusters diffuse on the terrace in interesting ways. The monomer and dimer diffuse via single atom hops between oxygen sites with barriers of 0.34 eV and 0.43 eV respectively. The trimer and tetramer, however, form 3D clusters by overcoming a 2D–3D transition barrier of less than 60 meV. The trimer diffuses along the surface either by a walking or flipping motion, with comparable barriers of ca. 0.5 eV. The tetramer rolls along the terrace with a lower barrier of 0.42 eV. Soft rotational modes at the saddle point lead to an anomalously high prefactor of 1.3 · 1014 s!1 for tetramer diffusion. This prefactor is two order of magnitude higher than for monomer diffusion, making the tetramer the fastest diffusing species on the terrace at all temperatures for which diffusion is active (above 200 K). Neutral oxygen vacancy sites are found to bind Pd monomers with a 2.63 eV stronger binding energy than the terrace. A second Pd atom, however, binds to this trapped monomer with a smaller energy of 0.56 eV, so that dimers at defects dissociate on a time scale of milliseconds at room temperature. Larger clusters bind more strongly at defects. Trimers and tetramers dissociate from monomer-bound-defects at elevated temperatures of ca. 600 K. These species are also mobile on the terrace, suggesting they are important for the ripening observed at P600 K during Pd vapor deposition on MgO(100) by Haas et al. [G. Haas, A. Menck, H. Brune, J.V. Barth, J.A. Venables, K. Kern, Phys. Rev. B 61 (2000) 11105].

  17. Small effect of water on upper mantle rheology based on silicon self-diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, H.; Wiedenbeck, M.; Yamazaki, D.; Katsura, T.

    2012-12-01

    Water has been considered to significantly affect the mantle dynamics. In particular, experimental deformation studies [1-4] claimed that even small amount of water enhanced the creep in olivine by orders of magnitude. However, we note that their results are experimental artifact due to a number of limitations: e.g., unavoidable grain boundary sliding when polycrystalline samples were used; limited ranges of water contents due to the limited pressures; several orders higher stress and strain rate than those in nature. High temperature creep of silicate minerals is controlled by silicon self-diffusion. Therefore, measurement of silicon self-diffusion coefficients (DSi) in minerals, which can be performed without these limitations, is an independent way to study the mantle rheology. In this study, we measured DSi in Mg end-member of olivine, namely, forsterite, as a function of water content (CH2O) across a wide range, and concluded that effect of water on upper mantle rheology is very small. Forsterite single crystals were doped with <1 to ~800 μg/g of water at 1600 K, 8 GPa using talc+brucite water sources and graphite buffer. The CH2O in the samples were controlled by the ratio of water sources to graphite. The water doped samples were polished, deposited with 500 nm 29Si enriched Mg2SiO4 thin films, and annealed at 8 GPa, 1600 or 1800 K for diffusion with the same proportion of water sources, which successfully made constant values of CH2O during diffusion annealing. The diffusion profiles were obtained by SIMS. CH2O in the samples were determined by FT-IR before and after diffusion, and also examined by SIMS. Our results yield a relationship: DSi ∝ (CH2O)1/3. This is explained by defect chemistry, where DSi∝[VSi‧‧‧‧]×[VO●●]∝(CH2O)2/3×(CH2O)-1/3=(CH2O)1/3 under the charge neutrality condition of [(OH)O●]=2[VMg‧‧] because both Si and O vacancies are needed for Si ions to diffuse. The water contents exponent (1/3) determined in this study

  18. A rebreathing method for measuring lung volume, diffusing capacity and cardiac output in conscious small animals.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Johnson, Robert L; Hsia, Connie C W

    2005-04-15

    We developed a multiple gas rebreathing technique for measuring lung diffusing capacity (DL(CO)), lung volume (V(L)) and cardiac output simultaneously in conscious spontaneously breathing small animals. Lung volume was measured from the dilution of methane (CH4) or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and verified independently by a helium washout technique. Cardiac output and DL(CO) were estimated from the uptake of acetylene and carbon monoxide, respectively. We tested guinea pigs at two levels of alveolar oxygen tension in order to estimate membrane diffusing capacity and pulmonary capillary blood volume by the Roughton-Forster technique. Results show that measured DL(CO) are consistent with reported values in anesthetized guinea pigs as well as with allometric comparison across species. Lung volume estimated from SF6 dilution agreed closely with that estimated independently from helium washout; however, lung volume estimated from CH4 dilution was systematically lower due to the addition of endogenously produced CH4 to the rebreathing system. We conclude that this technique can be used to measure resting lung function in conscious unsedated small animals.

  19. Study of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge among junior high-school students in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Y; Shi, R; Li, S; Xu, G; Huang, H

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the HIV/AIDS-related knowledge among junior high-school students in Shanghai, China, and the factors influencing this knowledge. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 20 middle schools of two districts by a cluster-stratified selection procedure in Shanghai, China. The 2432 sampled students, aged from 11.1 to 16.7 years, completed a self-administered questionnaire of HIV/AIDS prevention. The results showed that the overall correct rate of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge was 62%. Using multivariable logistic regression analysis, we found that the main factors influencing HIV/AIDS-related knowledge among junior high school students were the type of school (odds ratio [OR] = 1.641), age (OR = 1.727), whether the student was a single child in the family (OR = 1.389), whether the student had previous HIV/AIDS-related education experience (OR = 2.003) and whether the student had ever discussed HIV/AIDS with their parents (OR = 1.282). The results indicate that HIV/AIDS-related knowledge among Shanghai junior high school students is not high enough, and more attention needs to be paid to enhance HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, especially among younger students from common type schools without HIV/AIDS-related education experience. We encourage Chinese parents to get involved in their children's HIV/AIDS prevention education.

  20. A Model for Occupational Safety and Health Intervention Diffusion to Small Businesses

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Raymond C.; Cunningham, Thomas R.; Schulte, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Smaller businesses differ from their larger counterparts in having higher rates of occupational injuries and illnesses and fewer resources for preventing those losses. Intervention models developed outside the United States have addressed the resource deficiency issue by incorporating intermediary organizations such as trade associations. Methods This paper extends previous models by using exchange theory and by borrowing from the diffusion of innovations model. It emphasizes that occupational safety and health (OSH) organizations must understand as much about intermediary organizations as they do about small businesses. OSH organizations (“initiators”) must understand how to position interventions and information to intermediaries as added value to their relationships with small businesses. Examples from experiences in two midwestern states are used to illustrate relationships and types of analyses implied by the extended model. Results The study found that intermediary organizations were highly attuned to providing smaller businesses with what they want, including OSH services. The study also found that there are opinion leader organizations and individual champions within intermediaries who are key to decisions and actions about OSH programming. Conclusions The model places more responsibility on both initiators and intermediaries to develop and market interventions that will be valued in the competitive small business environment where the resources required to adopt each new business activity could always be used in other ways. The model is a candidate for empirical validation, and it offers some encouragement that the issue of sustainable OSH assistance to small businesses might be addressed. PMID:24115112

  1. [AIDS related lymphomas: Histopathological subtypes and association with Epstein Barr virus and Human Herpes virus type-8].

    PubMed

    Corti, Marcelo; de Dios Soler, Marcela; Bare, Patricia; Villafañe, María F; De Tezanos Pinto, Miguel; Perez Bianco, Raúl; Narbaitz, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) of the B-cell type are the second most common neoplasm among patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS. Here, we evaluated 48 cases of AIDS-related lymphomas (ARL) diagnosed at the Histopathological Division of the Instituto de Investigaciones Hematológicas of the National Academy of Medicine. Five were females and 43 were males with a median of age of 37 years at the time of the diagnosis. Micrometer sections were prepared and stained with hematoxilin-eosin; immunohistochemical examination for the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was carried out in 48/48 cases. Additionally, biotinilated oligonucleotides were used to determine the presence of DNA of the Human Herpes virus type-8 (HHV-8) in 14/14 biopsy smears corresponding to plasmablastic lymphomas (PL). All were fenotype B cell lymphomas with an aggressive course and advanced neoplasm disease at the time of diagnosis. Virological findings showed the strong association between EBV and AIDS-related NHL. According to the histopathological subtype, the EBV genome was detected in 16/21 (76%) diffuse large B cell lymphomas, 1/3 Burkitt lymphoma and 3/4 (75%) of primary central nervous system lymphomas. Globally, EBV genome was detected in 20/28 NHL of this series. Detection of HHV-8 was negative in all cases of PL. Hodgkin lymphoma were more frequent in males 18/20 (90%), with an aggressive clinical course and a significant predominance of the subtypes associated with worse prognosis (90% of cases). We detected a significant association between EBV and HL (90% of cases). We consider that all cases of AIDS related lymphomas should be assessed for the presence of EBV because its presence may play a role in the prognosis.

  2. Radiation pressure of standing waves on liquid columns and small diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, David B.; Marr-Lyon, Mark J.; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L.

    2002-11-01

    The radiation pressure of standing ultrasonic waves in air is demonstrated in this investigation to influence the dynamics of liquid columns and small flames. With the appropriate choice of the acoustic amplitude and wavelength, the natural tendency of long columns to break because of surface tension was suppressed in reduced gravity [M. J. Marr-Lyon, D. B. Thiessen, and P. L. Marston, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2293-2296 (2001); 87(20), 9001(E) (2001)]. Evaluation of the radiation force shows that narrow liquid columns are attracted to velocity antinodes. The response of a small vertical diffusion flame to ultrasonic radiation pressure in a horizontal standing wave was observed in normal gravity. In agreement with our predictions of the distribution of ultrasonic radiation stress on the flame, the flame is attracted to a pressure antinode and becomes slightly elliptical with the major axis in the plane of the antinode. The radiation pressure distribution and the direction of the radiation force follow from the dominance of the dipole scattering for small flames. Understanding radiation stress on flames is relevant to the control of hot fluid objects. [Work supported by NASA.

  3. Evidence of improved small airways function after azithromycin treatment in diffuse panbronchiolitis.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Shane; Verbanck, Sylvia; Schuermans, Daniel; Vanden Berghe, Bram; Vanderhelst, Eef; Vincken, Walter

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old never-smoker was diagnosed with diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) and was started on 250 mg azithromycin twice weekly. Over a 16-month observation period, lung function was assessed monthly, including a dedicated small airways test, the multiple breath nitrogen washout (MBW) with indices S(cond) and S(acin) of ventilation heterogeneity at the level of the conductive and acinar air spaces, respectively. Baseline measurements indicated moderate airway obstruction, air trapping and considerable dysfunction of the small airways around the acinar entrance. Treatment resulted in excellent symptomatic improvement paralleled by marked improvements in FEV(1), FVC, RV/TLC, S(cond) and S(acin); by contrast, there were no consistent changes in FEF(75) or TL(CO). While improvements were such that S(cond) fell within normal limits after 5 months, S(acin) remained abnormal even after 16 months of treatment. This suggests a distinct acinar structural abnormality in DPB that cannot be reversed by azithromycin.

  4. Traditional beliefs about the cause of AIDS and AIDS-related stigma in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, S C; Simbayi, L

    2004-07-01

    AIDS-related stigmas are pervasive in some segments of South African society and stigmas can impede efforts to promote voluntary counselling and testing and other HIV-AIDS prevention efforts. The current study examined associations among the belief that AIDS is caused by spirits and supernatural forces, AIDS-related knowledge and AIDS-related stigmas. A street intercept survey with 487 men and women living in a Black township in Cape Town, South Africa showed that 11% (n=54) believed that AIDS is caused by spirits and supernatural forces, 21% (n=105) were unsure if AIDS is caused by spirits and the supernatural, and 68% (n=355) did not believe that AIDS is caused by spirits and supernatural forces. Multiple logistic regression analyses controlling for participant age, gender, years of education and survey venue showed that people who believed HIV-AIDS is caused by spirits and the supernatural demonstrated significantly more misinformation about AIDS and were significantly more likely to endorse repulsion and social sanction stigmatizing beliefs against people living with HIV-AIDS. However, nearly all associations between beliefs that AIDS is caused by spirits and AIDS stigmas were non-significant when logistic regressions were repeated with AIDS-related knowledge included as a control variable. This finding suggests that relationships between traditional beliefs about the cause of HIV-AIDS and AIDS stigmas are mediated by AIDS-related knowledge. AIDS education efforts are urgently needed to reach people who hold traditional beliefs about AIDS to remedy AIDS stigmas.

  5. Approaches for quantifying and managing diffuse phosphorus exports at the farm/small catchment scale.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Richard W; Nash, David; George, Anja; Wang, Q J; Duncan, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Quantifying and managing diffuse P losses from small catchments or at the farm scale requires detailed knowledge of farming practices and their interaction with catchment processes. However, detailed knowledge may not be available and hence modeling is required. This paper demonstrates two approaches to developing tools that assist P losses from New Zealand or Australian dairy farms. The first is largely empirical and separates sources of P within a paddock into soil, fertilizer, dung, and treading impacts (including damage to grazed pasture). This information is combined with expert knowledge of hydrological processes and potential point sources (e.g., stream crossings) to create a deterministic model that can be used to evaluate the most cost and labor efficient method of mitigating P losses. For instance, in one example, 45% of annual P lost was attributed to the application of superphosphate just before a runoff event for which a mitigation strategy could be to use a less water soluble P fertilizer. The second approach uses a combination of interviews, expert knowledge and relationships to develop a Bayesian Network that describes P exports. The knowledge integration process helped stakeholders develop a comprehensive understanding of the problem. The Network, presented in the form of a "cause and effect", diagram provided a simple, visual representation of current knowledge that could be easily applied to individual circumstances and isolate factors having the greatest influence on P loss. Both approaches demonstrate that modeling P losses and mitigation strategies does not have to cover every process or permutation and that a degree of uncertainty can be handled to create a working model of P losses at a farm or small catchment scale.

  6. Relating the diffusion of small ligands in human neuroglobin to its structural and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Bocahut, Anthony; Bernad, Sophie; Sebban, Pierre; Sacquin-Mora, Sophie

    2009-12-17

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a recently discovered member of the globin family, is overexpressed in the brain tissues over oxygen deprivation. Unlike more classical globins, such as myoglobin and hemoglobin, it is characterized by a hexacoordinated heme, and its physiological role is still unknown, despite the numerous investigations made on the protein in recent years. Another important specific feature of human Ngb is the presence of two cysteine residues (Cys46 and Cys55), which are known to form an intramolecular disulfide bridge. Since previous work on human Ngb reported that its ligand binding properties could be controlled by the coordination state of the Fe(2+) atom (in the heme moiety) and the redox state of the thiol groups, we choose to develop a simulation approach combining coarse-grain Brownian dynamics and all-atom molecular dynamics and metadynamics. We have studied the diffusion of small ligands (CO, NO, and O(2)) in the globin internal cavity network for various states of human Ngb. Our results show how the structural and mechanical properties of the protein can be related to the ligand migration pathway, which can be extensively modified when changing the thiol's redox state and the iron's coordination state. We suggest that ligand binding is favored in the pentacoordinated species bearing an internal disulfide bridge.

  7. Photoacoustic tomography guided diffuse optical tomography for small-animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yihan; Gao, Feng; Wan, Wenbo; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiao

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a biomedical imaging technology for noninvasive visualization of spatial variation about the optical properties of tissue, which can be applied to in vivo small-animal disease model. However, traditional DOT suffers low spatial resolution due to tissue scattering. To overcome this intrinsic shortcoming, multi-modal approaches that incorporate DOT with other imaging techniques have been intensively investigated, where a priori information provided by the other modalities is normally used to reasonably regularize the inverse problem of DOT. Nevertheless, these approaches usually consider the anatomical structure, which is different from the optical structure. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging imaging modality that is particularly useful for visualizing lightabsorbing structures embedded in soft tissue with higher spatial resolution compared with pure optical imaging. Thus, we present a PAT-guided DOT approach, to obtain the location a priori information of optical structure provided by PAT first, and then guide DOT to reconstruct the optical parameters quantitatively. The results of reconstruction of phantom experiments demonstrate that both quantification and spatial resolution of DOT could be highly improved by the regularization of feasible-region information provided by PAT.

  8. Advective-diffusive motion on large scales from small-scale dynamics with an internal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaele; Aurell, Erik

    2016-06-01

    We consider coupled diffusions in n -dimensional space and on a compact manifold and the resulting effective advective-diffusive motion on large scales in space. The effective drift (advection) and effective diffusion are determined as a solvability conditions in a multiscale analysis. As an example, we consider coupled diffusions in three-dimensional space and on the group manifold SO(3) of proper rotations, generalizing results obtained by H. Brenner [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 80, 548 (1981), 10.1016/0021-9797(81)90214-9]. We show in detail how the analysis can be conveniently carried out using local charts and invariance arguments. As a further example, we consider coupled diffusions in two-dimensional complex space and on the group manifold SU(2). We show that although the local operators may be the same as for SO(3), due to the global nature of the solvability conditions the resulting diffusion will differ and generally be more isotropic.

  9. Impact of Confinement and Interfaces on Glass Transition Temperature, Fragility and Small Molecule Diffusivity in Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tian

    observed. When the effect of confinement on fragility increases by employing linear polymer with a higher value of m bulk, the effect of confinement on Tg also increases. When the effect of confinement on fragility is negligible, as with dense PS brushes, it is also negligible on Tg. The effect of confinement on translational diffusion of small-molecule tracers was studied in thin PS films using fluorescence spectroscopy via a Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process or an acid-enhanced fluorescence process. Tracers included an organic dye molecule 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl) anthracene (BPEA) and an organic acid p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate (pTSA), the latter of potential use in lithography. Substantial reductions in diffusivity were observed with both BPEA and pTSA. For example, the BPEA diffusivity was reduced by 80 - 90% in a 100-nm-thick PS film compared to that in bulk-like PS films, when measured close to Tg.

  10. Measurement of Small Molecule Diffusion in Carbon Dioxide Swollen Polymers using Fluorescence Nonradiative Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, James; Gupta, Ravi; Ramachandrarao, Vijay

    2001-03-01

    Diffusion coefficients of molecular probes in CO2-swollen polystyrene films were measured in situ using high-pressure fluorescence nonradiative energy transfer (NRET). Specifically, the diffusivities of decacyclene and BPEA (9,10- bis phenyl ethnyl Anthracene), relatively large fluorescence acceptor probes, were determined in real time using pyrene-labeled polystyrene as the corresponding energy donor in carbon dioxide-plasticized films. Decacyclene diffusivities were measured at 65 and 80 C and carbon dioxide pressures ranging from 62 to 144 bar, conditions near and well above the previously reported, solvent-depressed glass transition of polystyrene. Decacyclene diffusivity shows an increase of over 5 orders of magnitude upon CO2 sorption relative to the PS glass at ambient pressure and equivalent temperatures. BPEA exhibits similar behavior but diffuses about an order of magnitude faster than decacyclene in CO2 plasticized polystyrene under similar conditions.

  11. Child Abuse and Aids-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior among Adolescents in Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slonim-Nevo, Vered; Mukuka, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To research the correlation between physical and sexual abuse by family members and AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and behavior among urban and rural adolescents in Zambia. Sample: The sample comprises 3,360 adolescents, aged 10-19, from urban and rural Zambia; 2,160 of them attended school, while 1,200 of them did…

  12. Exploring AIDS-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors of Female Mexican Migrant Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organista, Pamela Balls; Organista, Kurt C.; Soloff, Pearl R.

    1998-01-01

    AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors were assessed among female migrant laborers (N=32). Results are reported regarding knowledge and beliefs about AIDS transmission, knowledge and beliefs about condom use, and actual use of condoms. Needs for health education and services, sexual power, and other implications of findings are…

  13. Combined system of fluorescence diffuse optical tomography and microcomputed tomography for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoquan; Gong, Hui; Quan, Guotao; Deng, Yong; Luo, Qingming

    2010-05-01

    We developed a dual-modality system that combines fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) and flat panel detector-based microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) to simultaneously reveal molecular and structural information in small animals. In fDOT, a 748 nm diode laser was used as an excitation source, while a cooled charge coupled device camera was adopted to collect transmission fluorescence. In micro-CT, a flat panel detector based on amorphous silicon, with active area of 13×13 cm2, and a microfocus x-ray tube were used. The fDOT system was mounted orthogonally to the micro-CT and the projection images were acquired without rotation of the sample, which is different from the method used for micro-CT alone. Both the finite element method and the algebraic reconstruction technique were used to reconstruct images from the fDOT. Phantom data showed that the resolution of the fDOT system was about 3 mm at an imaging depth of 7 mm. Quantitative error was no more than 5% and imaging sensitivity for 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-etramethylindotricarbocyanine iodide bis-oleate (DiR-BOA) was estimated to be higher than 100 nM at a depth of 7 mm. Calculations of the phantom's center of mass showed that the location accuracy of fDOT was about 0.7 mm. We applied a Feldkamp algorithm to reconstruct the micro-CT image. By measuring the presampled modulation transfer function with a 30 μm tungsten thread, we estimated that the micro-CT has a resolution of 5 mm-1 when the field of view was 6.5 cm. Our results indicate the uniformity of the transaxial micro-CT image and the contrast-to-noise ratio was measured as 1.95 for a radiation dose of 1 cGy. A non-image-based method was employed for merging images from the two imaging modalities. A nude mouse with DiR-BOA, imaged ex vivo, was used to validate the feasibility of the dual-modality system.

  14. Chronic diarrhea associated with high serum level of immunoglobulin A and diffuse infiltration of plasma cell in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junwen; Chen, Shuijiao; Chen, Linlin; Ouyang, Miao; Li, Fujun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Chronic diarrhea in adult patients due to various causes is very common in clinic, but patient suffering with mal-absorption due to immunoproliferative small intestinal disease was rarely reported in China. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: A 35-year-old female presented with more than three years history of chronic diarrhea, rickets, high serum value of immunoglobulin A protein, and anemia. Bone marrow aspiration suggested that the patient was in a sideropenic and megalobastic anemia stage. Duodenal and ileac biopsies revealed atrophy and blunting villi. The bowel lamina propria was infiltrated with slightly increased intraepithelial lymphocytes and mainly with diffuse plasma cells. The following enzyme labeling immunohistochemistry results were strongly positive to alpha-heavy-chain. Computed tomography manifested she had diffuse thickening of small intestine wall. At last a diagnosis of immunoproliferative small intestinal disease was made. Interventions and Outcomes: On the first month, the patient was treated with vitamin D supplements, calcium, magnesium, potassium, iron, folic acid, mecobalamin replacements and microflora probiotics. The patient frequency of water diarrhea alleviated slightly, but her weight loss, anxiety neurosis and other disorders were still severe. After taking with prednisone (40 mg per day, and gradually reduced to the lowest dose) for another month, the symptoms was gradually subsided. Lessons: The study shows that immunohistochemical staining for alpha-heavy chain proteins should be completed on small intestine biopsy specimens if the patient is suspected a diagnosis of immunoproliferative small intestinal disease. PMID:28151917

  15. Acculturation, alcohol consumption and AIDS-related risky sexual behavior among African American women.

    PubMed

    Hines, A M; Snowden, L R; Graves, K L

    1998-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between acculturation, alcohol consumption and AIDS-related risky sexual behavior in a national probability sample of 533 African American women. Results indicated that women who were the heaviest drinkers were also the least acculturated. However, women most likely to engage in risky sexual behavior, including having multiple partners, being nonmonogamous or in a nonmonogamous relationship, and being nonmonogamous or in a nonmonogamous relationship and not using a condom consistently, were high in acculturation rather than low. Alcohol use proved related to risky sexual behavior when considered in conjunction with respondents' level of acculturation. Women at risk for contracting AIDS were not low acculturated African American women who drank heavily, but high acculturated African American women. Findings from this study extend our understanding of risk and contain implications for research and prevention efforts in the area of alcohol use and AIDS-related sexual behavior among African American women.

  16. Mirtazapine and mefloquine therapy for non-AIDS-related progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Epperla, Narendranath; Medina-Flores, Rafael; Mazza, Joseph J; Yale, Steven H

    2014-12-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an opportunistic infection of the human nervous system caused by the JC virus. We report what is, to the best of our knowledge, the second reported case using a combination of mefloquine and mirtazapine in a patient with non-AIDS-related PML with a good clinical outcome. Conversely, the recent trial of mefloquine in 21 patients with AIDS and 3 without AIDS failed to show a reduction of JC viral DNA levels in the cerebral spinal fluid. However, the positive clinical response seen in our patient after the initiation of this combination therapy suggests that further studies in the form of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of non-AIDS-related PML are warranted.

  17. Social disparities, communication inequalities, and HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and attitudes in India.

    PubMed

    Ackerson, Leland K; Ramanadhan, Shoba; Arya, Monisha; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2012-10-01

    Promoting awareness, increasing knowledge, and eliminating stigma is important for stopping the spread of HIV/AIDS. The relation of social determinants and communication inequalities with HIV/AIDS-related cognitive processes has not been studied previously in India. Gender-stratified Poisson regression models of 123,459 women and 73,908 men in the 2005-2006 National Family Health Survey were used to calculate relative risk estimates and 95% confidence intervals for these associations. Results indicated that there are significant inequalities in mass media use among different social classes. Education and wealth are strongly and positively associated with awareness of HIV/AIDS and knowledge about prevention and transmission of AIDS and negatively associated with HIV/AIDS-related stigma. These associations attenuated when use of various mass media types were added to the models with television showing the strongest effect. Mass media may be helpful in reducing social disparities in HIV/AIDS outcomes.

  18. Thermal Diffusion Dynamic Behavior of Two-Dimensional Ag-SMALL Clusters on Ag(1 1 1) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakirur-Rehman; Hayat, Sardar Sikandar

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the thermal diffusion behavior of small two-dimensional Ag-islands on Ag(1 1 1) surface has been explored using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The approach is based on semi-empirical potentials. The key microscopic processes responsible for the diffusion of Ag1-5 adislands on Ag(1 1 1) surface are identified. The hopping and zigzag concerted motion along with rotation are observed for Ag one-atom to three-atom islands while single-atom and multi-atom processes are revealed for Ag four-atom and five-atom islands, during the diffusion on Ag(1 1 1) surface. The same increasing/decreasing trend in the diffusion coefficient and effective energy barrier is observed in both the self learning kinetic Monte Carlo (SLKMC) and MD calculations, for the temperature range of 300-700 K. An increase in the value of effective energy barrier is noticed with corresponding increase in the number of atoms in Ag-adislands. A reasonable linear fit is observed for the diffusion coefficient for studied temperatures (300, 500 and 700 K). For the observed diffusion mechanisms, our findings are in good agreement with ab initio density-functional theory (DFT) calculations for Al/Al(1 1 1) while the energy barrier values are in same range as the experimental values for Cu/Ag(1 1 1) and the theoretical values using ab initio DFT supplemented with embedded-atom method for Ag/Ag(1 1 1).

  19. Trends in AIDS incidence and AIDS-related mortality in British Columbia between 1981 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D.; Lourenço, Lillian; Yip, Benita; Hogg, Robert S.; Phillips, Peter; Montaner, Julio S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Appropriate use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can markedly decrease the risk of progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and of premature mortality. We aimed to characterize the trends between 1981 and 2013 in AIDS-defining illnesses (ADIs) and in the number AIDS-related deaths in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Methods We included data of 3550 HIV-positive individuals, aged 19 years or older, from different administrative databases in BC. We estimated the relative risk of developing an ADI over time using a Negative Binomial model, and we investigated trends in the percentage of all deaths associated with AIDS using generalized additive models. Findings The number of ADIs has decreased dramatically to its lowest level in 2013. The peak of the AIDS epidemic in BC happened in 1994 with 696 ADIs being reported (rate 42 ADIs per 100 person-years). Since 1997, the number of ADIs decreased from 253 (rate 7 per 100 person-years) to 84 cases in 2013 (rate 1 per 100 person-years) (p-value equals to zero for the trend in the number of ADIs). We have also shown that out of 22 ADIs considered, only PCP maintained its prominent ranking (albeit with much reduced overall prevalence). Finally, we observed that over time very few deaths were related to AIDS-related causes, especially in the most recent years. Interpretation We showed that the number of new ADIs and AIDS-related mortality have been decreasing rapidly over time in BC. These results provide further evidence that integrated comprehensive free programs that facilitate testing, and deliver treatment and care to this population can be effective in markedly decreasing AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, thus suggesting that controlling and eventually ending AIDS is possible. Funding The British Columbia Ministry of Health, the US National Institutes of Health, the US National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, and the Michael Institute for

  20. A numerical study of the steady scalar convective diffusion equation for small viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, M. B.; Rose, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    A time-independent convection diffusion equation is studied by means of a compact finite difference scheme and numerical solutions are compared to the analytic inviscid solutions. The correct internal and external boundary layer behavior is observed, due to an inherent feature of the scheme which automatically produces upwind differencing in inviscid regions and the correct viscous behavior in viscous regions.

  1. Konjac glucomannan and konjac glucomannan/xanthan gum mixtures as excipients for controlled drug delivery systems. Diffusion of small drugs.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Manceñido, Felipe; Landin, Mariana; Lacik, Igor; Martínez-Pacheco, Ramón

    2008-02-12

    Konjac glucomannan (KGM), alone or in combination with xanthan gum (XG), was evaluated as main component of systems capable of controlling the diffusion of small molecules with a view of their use in drug delivery. To provide the study with enough general character, KGM batches were obtained from the three main areas of excipient harmonization (Europe, USA and Japan). The rheological evaluation at physiological temperature of KGM (0.5%, w/v) aqueous dispersions, with or without XG at different ratios, showed significant variability among the three KGMs owing to differences in the acetylation degree. The Japanese and European varieties of KGM synergically interact with XG giving rise to gel formation; the synergism being maximum at a 1:1 ratio. By contrast, the American KGM does not show such effect forming only viscous solutions. Drug diffusion coefficients of theophylline and diltiazem HCl, with different molecular size and net charge, were evaluated in systems containing KGM/XG ratio 1:1. KGM/XG systems were more efficient than the XG alone dispersion for controlling drug diffusion of small molecules because of the gel formation. These results point out the potential of mixtures of some KGM types with XG to develop delivery systems capable of maintaining physical integrity and drug release control for up to 8-h period.

  2. Diffusion of small clusters on metal (100) surfaces: Exact master-equation analysis for lattice-gas models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.R.; Evans, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Exact results are presented for the surface diffusion of small two-dimensional clusters, the constituent atoms of which are commensurate with a square lattice of adsorption sites. Cluster motion is due to the hopping of atoms along the cluster perimeter with various rates. We apply the formalism of Titulaer and Deutch [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 77}, 472 (1982)], which describes evolution in reciprocal space via a linear master equation with dimension equal to the number of cluster configurations. We focus on the regime of rapid hopping of atoms along straight close-packed edges, where certain subsets of configurations cycle rapidly between each other. Each such subset is treated as a single quasiconfiguration, thereby reducing the dimension of the evolution equation, simplifying the analysis, and elucidating limiting behavior. We also discuss the influence of concerted atom motions on the diffusion of tetramers and larger clusters. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. A fast SPAD-based small animal imager for early-photon diffuse optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Mu, Ying; Niedre, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Photon scatter is the dominant light transport process in biological tissue and is well understood to degrade imaging performance in near-infrared diffuse optical tomography. Measurement of photons arriving at early times following a short laser pulse is considered to be an effective method to improve this limitation, i.e. by systematically selecting photons that have experienced fewer scattering events. Previously, we tested the performance of single photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) in measurement of early transmitted photons through diffusive media and showed that it outperformed photo-multiplier tube (PMT) systems in similar configurations, principally due to its faster temporal response. In this paper, we extended this work and developed a fast SPAD-based time-resolved diffuse optical tomography system. As a first validation of the instrument, we scanned an optical phantom with multiple absorbing inclusions and measured full time-resolved data at 3240 scan points per axial slice. We performed image reconstruction with very early-arriving photon data and showed significant improvements compared to time-integrated data. Extension of this work to mice in vivo and measurement of time-resolved fluorescence data is the subject of ongoing research.

  4. Pd diffusion on MgO(1 0 0): The role of defects and small cluster mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lijun; Henkelman, Graeme; Campbell, Charles T.; Jónsson, Hannes

    2006-03-01

    Density functional theory is used to explore the energy landscape of Pd atoms adsorbed on the terrace of MgO(1 0 0) and at oxygen vacancy sites. Saddle point finding methods reveal that small Pd clusters diffuse on the terrace in interesting ways. The monomer and dimer diffuse via single atom hops between oxygen sites with barriers of 0.34 eV and 0.43 eV respectively. The trimer and tetramer, however, form 3D clusters by overcoming a 2D-3D transition barrier of less than 60 meV. The trimer diffuses along the surface either by a walking or flipping motion, with comparable barriers of ca. 0.5 eV. The tetramer rolls along the terrace with a lower barrier of 0.42 eV. Soft rotational modes at the saddle point lead to an anomalously high prefactor of 1.3 × 10 14 s -1 for tetramer diffusion. This prefactor is two order of magnitude higher than for monomer diffusion, making the tetramer the fastest diffusing species on the terrace at all temperatures for which diffusion is active (above 200 K). Neutral oxygen vacancy sites are found to bind Pd monomers with a 2.63 eV stronger binding energy than the terrace. A second Pd atom, however, binds to this trapped monomer with a smaller energy of 0.56 eV, so that dimers at defects dissociate on a time scale of milliseconds at room temperature. Larger clusters bind more strongly at defects. Trimers and tetramers dissociate from monomer-bound-defects at elevated temperatures of ca. 600 K. These species are also mobile on the terrace, suggesting they are important for the ripening observed at ⩾600 K during Pd vapor deposition on MgO(1 0 0) by Haas et al. [G. Haas, A. Menck, H. Brune, J.V. Barth, J.A. Venables, K. Kern, Phys. Rev. B 61 (2000) 11105].

  5. Morphologic studies of lymphocyte nuclei in follicular and diffuse mixed small- and large-cell (lymphocytic-histiocytic) lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dardick, I; Caldwell, D R; Moher, D; Jabi, M

    1988-08-01

    Twelve examples of mixed small- and large-cell lymphoma (eight follicular, one follicular and diffuse, and three diffuse) were investigated morphometrically using plastic-embedded tissue in order to study nuclear characteristics of lymphocyte populations in this form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and to test morphologic bases for current NHL classification systems. This study illustrates that there are many inaccuracies, illusions, and misconceptions in the morphologic criteria currently used to classify mixed small- and large-cell lymphoma. A principal finding was that lymphocyte nuclear profiles in mixed-cell lymphomas tend to be smaller in size (P less than .005) and more irregular in shape (P = .0001) than the morphologically similar counterparts in germinal centers of lymph nodes with reactive hyperplasia. Intercase comparison of mixed small- and large-cell lymphomas revealed a considerable range of mean nuclear area values, some of which were within the size range of normal, small lymphocytes. At the magnifications used for morphometric assessment, a high proportion of lymphocyte nuclear profiles had shallow invaginations, but only a limited number of profiles (4% to 14%) had deep (cleaved) indentations. Contrary to current definitions for this subtype of NHL, lymphocytes with "small" nuclei had the same proportion of the nuclear diameter occupied by nuclear invaginations as lymphocytes with "large" nuclei and, in fact, mean nuclear invagination depth was shallower in "small" nuclei than in "large" nuclei. Furthermore, regardless of whether it is nuclear area or shape that is evaluated, lymphocytes in mixed-cell lymphoma do not separate into two populations of small-cleaved and large noncleaved cells. Morphometry reveals that only four of the 12 examples of mixed small- and large-cell lymphoma had a proportion of the lymphocytes in the size range of fully transformed germinal center lymphocytes that exceeded 25%, and none of the cases approached 50% even

  6. Binding energies and spatial structures of small carrier complexes in monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides via diffusion Monte Carlo

    DOE PAGES

    Mayers, Matthew Z.; Berkelbach, Timothy C.; Hybertsen, Mark S.; ...

    2015-10-09

    Ground-state diffusion Monte Carlo is used to investigate the binding energies and intercarrier radial probability distributions of excitons, trions, and biexcitons in a variety of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide materials. We compare these results to approximate variational calculations, as well as to analogous Monte Carlo calculations performed with simplified carrier interaction potentials. Our results highlight the successes and failures of approximate approaches as well as the physical features that determine the stability of small carrier complexes in monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenide materials. In conclusion, we discuss points of agreement and disagreement with recent experiments.

  7. A time-resolved multi-wavelength fluorescence diffuse optical tomography system for small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montcel, Bruno; Chabrier, Renee; Poulet, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    A tomographic approach, relying on diffuse near infrared photons to image the optical properties of tissues and the inner distribution of fluorescent probes is described. The method should improve the spatial resolution and quantification of fluorescence signals, thanks to multiple-projection acquisitions and to a reconstruction procedure using the principles of diffuse optical tomography. The scanner assembled uses picosecond laser diodes, an eight-anode photo-multiplier tube (PMT) and time-correlated single photon counting. Two sets of laser heads, each operating at four wavelengths, are fitted with furcated optical fibers, providing two sequential sources of light positioned on the animal or object studied. Multimode optical fibers are used to detect light at eight output points on the animal or object. These fibers are connected to the PMT, with an air-gap allowing the insertion of an optical filter to reject the excitation wavelength. The light sources and detectors can be rotated to increase the number of projections recorded. For the reconstruction process, the coordinates of the body surface of the animal to be imaged are necessary. These are acquired by interferometry, using a conoscope and an XY scanning system, before the animal is entered in the scanner. The profiles measured at the excitation wavelengths are used to compute absorption and reduced scattering images and perfusion/oxygenation images of the animal. Fluorescence images, free from diffusion and absorption artefacts, can then be computed with a-priori knowledge of the optical images of the animal. The scanner, its performances and images of light-scattering and fluorescent phantoms are presented.

  8. Diffusion of Small-Scale Density Irregularities during Equatorial Spread F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-28

    CODE 0230 C. BAGETT o1CY ATTN DRSEL-PL-ENV ri. .60E Olcy ATTN CODE 81 K. tASTMN OlCY ,ATTN J. r , LEY DIRECTOR NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY COMMANDER...ATTN CODE 7550 tL{-1Olcy ATTN CODE 7580OlCY ATTN DE.jD-RB R . WILLIAMS 01CY ATTN CODE 755101JCY A’FTN m F. WIMENITZ 0Icy AT O 75 01C r Olcy ATTN CODE ...Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375. (Continues) 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on r *eers *Id* it necesary and Identify by’ block number) Diffusive decay Time

  9. Older female caregivers and HIV/AIDS-related secondary stigma in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Ogunmefun, Catherine; Gilbert, Leah; Schatz, Enid

    2011-03-01

    South Africa's HIV/AIDS epidemic poses a major public health threat with multi-faceted harmful impacts and 'socially complex' outcomes. While some outcomes relate to structural issues, others stem from society's attitudinal milieu. Due to negative attitudes toward People Living with HIV/AIDS, stigmatisation mars their own experience and often extends to those close to them, in particular their caregivers. Many of the caregivers in South Africa are older women; thus, older women are the focus of this paper, which aims to examine HIV/AIDS-related stigma from their perspective. This paper explores secondary stigma as a socio-cultural impact of HIV/AIDS through repeated semistructured interviews with 60 women aged 50-75 in the MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Unit research site (Agincourt), many of whom had cared for a family member with HIV/AIDS. Respondents' narratives reveal that many older persons attribute high rates of death in their community to young persons' lack of respect for societal norms and traditions. The findings illustrate the forms and expressions of HIV/AIDS-related secondary stigma and their impacts on older female caregivers. The types of secondary stigma experienced by the respondents include physical stigma in the form of isolation and separation from family members; social stigma in the form of voyeurism and social isolation; and verbal stigma in the form of being gossiped about, finger-pointing and jeering at them. Despite mixed reports about community responses toward infected and affected people, HIV/AIDS-related stigma remains a cause for concern, as evidenced by the reports of older women in this study.

  10. Low-cost compact diffuse speckle contrast flowmeter using small laser diode and bare charge-coupled-device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chong; Seong, Myeongsu; Morgan, Joshua Paul; Mazdeyasna, Siavash; Kim, Jae Gwan; Hastings, Jeffrey Todd; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    We report a low-cost compact diffuse speckle contrast flowmeter (DSCF) consisting of a small laser diode and a bare charge-coupled-device (CCD) chip, which can be used for contact measurements of blood flow variations in relatively deep tissues (up to ˜8 mm). Measurements of large flow variations by the contact DSCF probe are compared to a noncontact CCD-based diffuse speckle contrast spectroscopy and a standard contact diffuse correlation spectroscopy in tissue phantoms and a human forearm. Bland-Altman analysis shows no significant bias with good limits of agreement among these measurements: 96.5%±2.2% (94.4% to 100.0%) in phantom experiments and 92.8% in the forearm test. The relatively lower limit of agreement observed in the in vivo measurements (92.8%) is likely due to heterogeneous reactive responses of blood flow in different regions/volumes of the forearm tissues measured by different probes. The low-cost compact DSCF device holds great potential to be broadly used for continuous and longitudinal monitoring of blood flow alterations in ischemic/hypoxic tissues, which are usually associated with various vascular diseases.

  11. Application of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Parameters to Detect Change in Longitudinal Studies in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeestraten, Eva Anna; Benjamin, Philip; Lambert, Christian; Lawrence, Andrew John; Williams, Owen Alan; Morris, Robin Guy; Barrick, Thomas Richard; Markus, Hugh Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is the major cause of vascular cognitive impairment, resulting in significant disability and reduced quality of life. Cognitive tests have been shown to be insensitive to change in longitudinal studies and, therefore, sensitive surrogate markers are needed to monitor disease progression and assess treatment effects in clinical trials. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is thought to offer great potential in this regard. Sensitivity of the various parameters that can be derived from DTI is however unknown. We aimed to evaluate the differential sensitivity of DTI markers to detect SVD progression, and to estimate sample sizes required to assess therapeutic interventions aimed at halting decline based on DTI data. We investigated 99 patients with symptomatic SVD, defined as clinical lacunar syndrome with MRI confirmation of a corresponding infarct as well as confluent white matter hyperintensities over a 3 year follow-up period. We evaluated change in DTI histogram parameters using linear mixed effect models and calculated sample size estimates. Over a three-year follow-up period we observed a decline in fractional anisotropy and increase in diffusivity in white matter tissue and most parameters changed significantly. Mean diffusivity peak height was the most sensitive marker for SVD progression as it had the smallest sample size estimate. This suggests disease progression can be monitored sensitively using DTI histogram analysis and confirms DTI’s potential as surrogate marker for SVD. PMID:26808982

  12. Combining Diffusion NMR and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Enables Precise Measurements of Polymer Chain Compression in a Crowded Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Swomitra; He, Lilin; Hamilton, William A.; Yethiraj, Arun; Yethiraj, Anand

    2017-03-01

    The effect of particles on the behavior of polymers in solution is important in a number of important phenomena such as the effect of "crowding" proteins in cells, colloid-polymer mixtures, and nanoparticle "fillers" in polymer solutions and melts. In this Letter, we study the effect of spherical inert nanoparticles (which we refer to as "crowders") on the diffusion coefficient and radius of gyration of polymers in solution using pulsed-field-gradient NMR and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), respectively. The diffusion coefficients exhibit a plateau below a characteristic polymer concentration, which we identify as the overlap threshold concentration c⋆. Above c⋆, in a crossover region between the dilute and semidilute regimes, the (long-time) self-diffusion coefficients are found, universally, to decrease exponentially with polymer concentration at all crowder packing fractions, consistent with a structural basis for the long-time dynamics. The radius of gyration obtained from SANS in the crossover regime changes linearly with an increase in polymer concentration, and must be extrapolated to c⋆ in order to obtain the radius of gyration of an individual polymer chain. When the polymer radius of gyration and crowder size are comparable, the polymer size is very weakly affected by the presence of crowders, consistent with recent computer simulations. There is significant chain compression, however, when the crowder size is much smaller than the polymer radius gyration.

  13. Combining Diffusion NMR and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Enables Precise Measurements of Polymer Chain Compression in a Crowded Environment.

    PubMed

    Palit, Swomitra; He, Lilin; Hamilton, William A; Yethiraj, Arun; Yethiraj, Anand

    2017-03-03

    The effect of particles on the behavior of polymers in solution is important in a number of important phenomena such as the effect of "crowding" proteins in cells, colloid-polymer mixtures, and nanoparticle "fillers" in polymer solutions and melts. In this Letter, we study the effect of spherical inert nanoparticles (which we refer to as "crowders") on the diffusion coefficient and radius of gyration of polymers in solution using pulsed-field-gradient NMR and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), respectively. The diffusion coefficients exhibit a plateau below a characteristic polymer concentration, which we identify as the overlap threshold concentration c^{⋆}. Above c^{⋆}, in a crossover region between the dilute and semidilute regimes, the (long-time) self-diffusion coefficients are found, universally, to decrease exponentially with polymer concentration at all crowder packing fractions, consistent with a structural basis for the long-time dynamics. The radius of gyration obtained from SANS in the crossover regime changes linearly with an increase in polymer concentration, and must be extrapolated to c^{⋆} in order to obtain the radius of gyration of an individual polymer chain. When the polymer radius of gyration and crowder size are comparable, the polymer size is very weakly affected by the presence of crowders, consistent with recent computer simulations. There is significant chain compression, however, when the crowder size is much smaller than the polymer radius gyration.

  14. Diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the small intestine with damage to nerve plexus. A cause of intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Arista-Nasr, J; González-Romo, M; Keirns, C; Larriva-Sahd, J

    1993-08-01

    We describe the clinicopathologic characteristics of three patients with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and malabsorption. The patients were young women (average age, 25 years) who presented with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss that led to extreme inanition and death in two patients despite multiple treatment schemes. The evolution of the process averaged 8 years. No case manifested evidence of malignant lymphoproliferative progression. Histologically, a diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate that affected all the layers of the intestinal wall was observed in full-thickness biopsy specimens. The proliferating lymphocytes were small and mixed with mature plasma cells that proved to be polyclonal on immunohistochemical analysis. An outstanding finding in all three cases was extensive damage to submucosal and myenteric nerve plexus associated with a lymphoid infiltrate. Quantification of the myenteric plexus by using immunohistochemical and morphometric techniques also revealed a marked reduction in their number. We concluded that diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the small intestine associated with damage to the intestinal nerve plexus constitutes a specific disorder that is different from other diseases that produce intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  15. Diffusion approximation with polarization and resonance effects for the modelling of seismic waves in strongly scattering small-scale media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margerin, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the multiple scattering of seismic waves by a collection of randomly distributed point scatterers. The theory assumes that the energy envelopes are smooth, but does not require perturbations to be small, thereby allowing the modelling of strong, resonant scattering. The correlation tensor of seismic coda waves recorded at a three-component sensor is decomposed into a sum of eigenmodes of the elastodynamic multiple scattering (Bethe-Salpeter) equation. For a general moment tensor excitation, a total number of four modes is necessary to describe the transport of seismic waves polarization. Their spatio-temporal dependence is given in closed analytical form. Two additional modes transporting exclusively shear polarizations may be excited by antisymmetric moment tensor sources only. The general solution converges towards an equipartition mixture of diffusing P and S waves which allows the retrieval of the local Green's function from coda waves. The equipartition time is obtained analytically and the impact of absorption on Green's function reconstruction is discussed. The process of depolarization of multiply scattered waves and the resulting loss of information is illustrated for various seismic sources. It is shown that coda waves may be used to characterize the source mechanism up to lapse times of the order of a few mean free times only. In the case of resonant scatterers, a formula for the diffusivity of seismic waves incorporating the effect of energy entrapment inside the scatterers is obtained. Application of the theory to high-contrast media demonstrates that coda waves are more sensitive to slow rather than fast velocity anomalies by several orders of magnitude. Resonant scattering appears as an attractive physical phenomenon to explain the small values of the diffusion constant of seismic waves reported in volcanic areas.

  16. Tumor characterization in small animals using magnetic resonance-guided dynamic contrast enhanced diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; Thayer, Dave; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2011-10-01

    We present a magnetic resonance (MR)-guided near-infrared dynamic contrast enhanced diffuse optical tomography (DCE-DOT) system for characterization of tumors using an optical contrast agent (ICG) and a MR contrast agent [Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)] in a rat model. Both ICG and Gd-DTPA are injected and monitored simultaneously using a combined MRI-DOT system, resulting in accurate co-registration between two imaging modalities. Fisher rats bearing R3230 breast tumor are imaged using this hybrid system. For the first time, enhancement kinetics of the exogenous contrast ICG is recovered from the DCE-DOT data using MR anatomical a priori information. As tumors grow, they undergo necrosis and the tissue transforms from viable to necrotic. The results show that the physiological changes between viable and necrotic tissue can be differentiated more accurately based on the ICG enhancement kinetics when MR anatomical information is utilized.

  17. Fungal infections in patients with AIDS and AIDS-related complex.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, K; Meyer, R D

    1986-01-01

    Persons with AIDS are predisposed to a variety of previously rare bacterial and fungal infections. Improvement in the quality and duration of survival of AIDS patients depends on the efficacy of treatment for these infections. Between 58-81% of AIDS patients contract fungal infections at some time, and 10-20% of AIDS patients die as a direct consequence of such infections. Oral candidiasis, commonly known as thrush, is the most common fungal infection among AIDS and AIDS Related Complex patients, occurring in 80-90% of cases. In a recent U.S. study, 59% of persons with oral candidiasis who were at high risk of contracting AIDS went on to develop Kaposi's sarcoma and other life- threatening infections. The most common life-threatening fungal infection experienced by AIDS patients is cryptococcosis, a disease occurring among 6% of American AIDS patients and having a mortality rate of 17% during initial infections and 75-100% on relapse. Other opportunistic infections associated with AIDS and AIDS Related Complex are bronchial candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, disseminated histoplasmosis, and disseminated coccidioidomycosis. All are treatable but eradication i s difficult and relapse common.

  18. Multi-modal molecular diffuse optical tomography system for small animal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, James A.; Basevi, Hector R. A.; Frampton, Jon; Styles, Iain B.; Dehghani, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    A multi-modal optical imaging system for quantitative 3D bioluminescence and functional diffuse imaging is presented, which has no moving parts and uses mirrors to provide multi-view tomographic data for image reconstruction. It is demonstrated that through the use of trans-illuminated spectral near infrared measurements and spectrally constrained tomographic reconstruction, recovered concentrations of absorbing agents can be used as prior knowledge for bioluminescence imaging within the visible spectrum. Additionally, the first use of a recently developed multi-view optical surface capture technique is shown and its application to model-based image reconstruction and free-space light modelling is demonstrated. The benefits of model-based tomographic image recovery as compared to 2D planar imaging are highlighted in a number of scenarios where the internal luminescence source is not visible or is confounding in 2D images. The results presented show that the luminescence tomographic imaging method produces 3D reconstructions of individual light sources within a mouse-sized solid phantom that are accurately localised to within 1.5mm for a range of target locations and depths indicating sensitivity and accurate imaging throughout the phantom volume. Additionally the total reconstructed luminescence source intensity is consistent to within 15% which is a dramatic improvement upon standard bioluminescence imaging. Finally, results from a heterogeneous phantom with an absorbing anomaly are presented demonstrating the use and benefits of a multi-view, spectrally constrained coupled imaging system that provides accurate 3D luminescence images. PMID:24954977

  19. Separation of small metabolites and lipids in spectra from biopsies by diffusion-weighted HR-MAS NMR: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Diserens, G; Vermathen, M; Precht, C; Broskey, N T; Boesch, C; Amati, F; Dufour, J-F; Vermathen, P

    2015-01-07

    High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) NMR allows metabolic characterization of biopsies. HR-MAS spectra from tissues of most organs show strong lipid contributions that are overlapping metabolite regions, which hamper metabolite estimation. Metabolite quantification and analysis would benefit from a separation of lipids and small metabolites. Generally, a relaxation filter is used to reduce lipid contributions. However, the strong relaxation filter required to eliminate most of the lipids also reduces the signals for small metabolites. The aim of our study was therefore to investigate different diffusion editing techniques in order to employ diffusion differences for separating lipid and small metabolite contributions in the spectra from different organs for unbiased metabonomic analysis. Thus, 1D and 2D diffusion measurements were performed, and pure lipid spectra that were obtained at strong diffusion weighting (DW) were subtracted from those obtained at low DW, which include both small metabolites and lipids. This subtraction yielded almost lipid free small metabolite spectra from muscle tissue. Further improved separation was obtained by combining a 1D diffusion sequence with a T2-filter, with the subtraction method eliminating residual lipids from the spectra. Similar results obtained for biopsies of different organs suggest that this method is applicable in various tissue types. The elimination of lipids from HR-MAS spectra and the resulting less biased assessment of small metabolites have potential to remove ambiguities in the interpretation of metabonomic results. This is demonstrated in a reproducibility study on biopsies from human muscle.

  20. Handedness- and hemisphere-related differences in small-world brain networks: a diffusion tensor imaging tractography study.

    PubMed

    Li, Meiling; Chen, Heng; Wang, Junping; Liu, Feng; Long, Zhiliang; Wang, Yifeng; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Zhang, Jiang; Yu, Chunshui; Chen, Huafu

    2014-03-01

    Previous behavioral and scanning studies have suggested that handedness is associated with differences in brain morphology as well as in anatomical and functional lateralization. However, little is known about the topological organization of the white matter (WM) structural networks related to handedness. We employed diffusion tensor imaging tractography to investigate handedness- and hemisphere-related differences in the topological organization of the human cortical anatomical network. After constructing left hemispheric/right hemispheric weighted structural networks in 32 right-handed and 24 left-handed healthy individuals, we analyzed the networks by graph theoretic analysis. We found that both the right and left hemispheric WM structural networks in the two groups possessed small-world attributes (high local clustering and short paths between nodes), findings which are consistent with recent results from whole-brain structural networks. In addition, the right hemisphere tended to be more efficient than the left hemisphere, suggesting a high efficiency of general information processing in the right hemisphere. Finally, we found that the right-handed subjects had significant asymmetries in small-world properties (normalized clustering coefficient γ, normalized path length λ, and small-worldness σ), while left-handed subjects had fewer asymmetries. Our findings from large-scale brain networks aid in understanding the structural substrates underlying handedness-related and hemisphere-related differences in cognition and behavior.

  1. Gas exchange dependency on diffusion coefficient: direct /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He comparisons in a small lake

    SciTech Connect

    Torgersen, T.; Mathieu, G.; Hesslein, R.H.; Broecker, W.S.

    1982-01-20

    A direct field comparison was conducted to determine the dependency of gas exchange coefficient (k/sub x/) on the diffusion coefficient (D/sub x/). The study also sought to confirm the enhanced vertical exchange properties of limnocorrals and similar enclosures. Gas exchange coefficients for /sup 222/Rn and /sup 3/He were determined in a small northern Ontario lake, using a /sup 226/Ra and /sup 3/H spike to gain the necessary precision. The results indicate that the gas exchange coefficient is functionally dependent on the diffusion coefficient raised to the 1.22/sub -35//sup + > 12/ power (k/sub x/ = f(D/sub x//sup 1.22)), clearly supporting the stagnant film model of gas exchange. Limnocorrals were found to have gas exchange rates up to 1.7 times higher than the whole lake in spite of the observation of more calm surface conditions in the corral than in the open lake. 33 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  2. Dissecting diffusive and advective motion in colloidal sedimentation by multi-speckle Ultra-Small-Angle XPCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Johannes; Narayanan, Theyencheri

    In colloidal suspensions internal or external fields can induce directed motions of particles in addition to Brownian diffusion. Here, gradients in temperature or chemical potential, shear flow as well as gravity can act as an external field. Examples for internal motions can be found in synthetic self-propelling particles and microorganisms, generally coined as active matter. We present multi-speckle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy measurements in the Ultra-Small-Angle scattering range which probes an expanded length scale comparable to DLS and optical microscopy. To demonstrate the advanced capabilities, we show measurements probing the motions within a settling suspension of sub-micron sized silica particles. A global fitting procedure has been applied to separate the diffusive and advective contributions to the particle dynamics. With this, macroscopic parameters such as the sedimentation velocity can be probed on a microscopic level in highly opaque and concentrated systems, which are in general difficult to access for optical investigations. This procedure may prove its value for investigating various kinds of non-equilibrium systems.

  3. Diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the small bowel associated with common variable immunodeficiency and giardiasis: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Olmez, Sehmus; Aslan, Mehmet; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Bulut, Gulay; Dulger, Ahmet Cumhur

    2014-05-01

    Diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia (DNLH) of the intestine is an extremely rare lymphoproliferative disorder of uncertain etiology. Typically, numerous polypoid nodules composed of hyperplastic benign lymphoid tissue are present in the small and/or large intestinal mucosa. DNLH has been observed in association with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). A 38-years-old man was admitted to our clinic due to dyspeptic complaints. An upper gastrointestinal system endoscopic examination revealed DNLH in the duodenum. A biopsy specimen showed the presence of nodular lymphoid hyperplasia and a Giardia lamblia infection in the duodenum. CVID was suspected, and the diagnosis was established by demonstrating a significant reduction in the serum gamma-globulin levels. DNLH is a rare benign condition with regards to diagnosis and treatment of unknown etiology. In patients with DNLH, screening for the immune deficiencies is being important in addition to histopathological examinations.

  4. Orphanhood by AIDS-Related Causes and Child Mental Health: A Developmental Psychopathology Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Carla; Jardin, Charles; Marais, Lochner; Boivin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    While the number of new HIV infections has declined, the number of orphans as a result of AIDS-related deaths continues to increase. The aim of this paper was to systematically review empirical research on the mental health of children affected by HIV/AIDS in the developing world, specifically with an eye on developing a theoretical framework to guide intervention and research. Articles for review were gathered by following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta Analyses (PRISMA standards), reviewed and then organized and synthesized with a Developmental Psychopathology framework. Results showed that the immediate and longterm effects of AIDS orphanhood are moderated by a number of important risk and protective factors that may serve as strategic targets for intervention. Research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:27668289

  5. Understanding and Addressing AIDS-Related Stigma: From Anthropological Theory to Clinical Practice in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Arachu; Farmer, Paul

    2005-01-01

    For the past several years, diverse and often confused concepts of stigma have been invoked in discussions on AIDS. Many have argued compellingly that AIDS-related stigma acts as a barrier to voluntary counseling and testing. Less compelling are observations regarding the source of stigma or its role in decreasing interest in HIV care. We reviewed these claims as well as literature from anthropology, sociology, and public health. Preliminary data from research in rural Haiti suggest that the introduction of quality HIV care can lead to a rapid reduction in stigma, with resulting increased uptake of testing. Rather than stigma, logistic and economic barriers determine who will access such services. Implications for scale-up of integrated AIDS prevention and care are explored. PMID:15623859

  6. Effects of Smoking on Non-AIDS-Related Morbidity in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Daniel K.; Kaner, Robert J.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking has many adverse health consequences. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection smoke at very high rates, and many of the comorbidities associated with smoking in the general population are more prevalent in this population. It is likely that a combination of higher smoking rates along with an altered response to cigarette smoke throughout the body in persons with HIV infection leads to increased rates of the known conditions related to smoking. Several AIDS-defining conditions associated with smoking have been reviewed elsewhere. This review aims to summarize the data on non-AIDS-related health consequences of smoking in the HIV-infected population and explore evidence for the potential compounding effects on chronic systemic inflammation due to HIV infection and smoking. PMID:23572487

  7. Emission from small dust particles in diffuse and molecular cloud medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, J. P.; Desert, X.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) observations of the whole galaxy has shown that long wavelength emission (100 and 60 micron bands) can be explained by thermal emission from big grains (approx 0.1 micron) radiating at their equilibrium temperature when heated by the InterStellar Radiation Field (ISRF). This conclusion has been confirmed by continuum sub-millimeter observations of the galactic plane made by the EMILIE experiment at 870 microns (Pajot et al. 1986). Nevertheless, shorter wavelength observations like 12 and 25 micron IRAS bands, show an emission from the galactic plane in excess with the long wavelength measurements which can only be explained by a much hotter particles population. Because dust at equilibrium cannot easily reach high temperatures required to explain this excess, this component is thought to be composed of very small dust grains or big molecules encompassing thermal fluctuations. Researchers present here a numerical model that computes emission, from Near Infrared Radiation (NIR) to Sub-mm wavelengths, from a non-homogeneous spherical cloud heated by the ISRF. This model fully takes into account the heating of dust by multi-photon processes and back-heating of dust in the Visual/Infrared Radiation (VIS-IR) so that it is likely to describe correctly emission from molecular clouds up to large A sub v and emission from dust experiencing temperature fluctuations. The dust is a three component mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, very small grains, and classical big grains with independent size distributions (cut-off and power law index) and abundances.

  8. Understanding Internalized HIV/AIDS-Related Stigmas in the Dominican Republic: A Short Report

    PubMed Central

    Hampanda, Karen

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS-related stigmas can become internalized, resulting in declines in physical and mental health. Pathways to internalized HIV-related stigma (IS), characterized by persistently negative, self-abasing thoughts, are not well established among women living with HIV/AIDS (WLWHA) in the Dominican Republic (DR). Identifying factors involved in self-directed shaming and blaming is important, given the high HIV prevalence in the DR’s most vulnerable populations. The present study sheds light on factors involved in negative and self-abasing thoughts in WLWHA in the DR by examining the relationship between depression, perceived HIV-related stigma from the community (PSC), perceived HIV-related stigma from family (PSF) and IS. The Internalized AIDS-Related Stigma Scale (IA-RSS), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Short Depression Scale (CES-D 10), and an instrument designed to measure perceived HIV-related stigma from the community and family was administered to 233 WLWHA in Puerto Plata, DR. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and ordered multiple logistic regression. Results showed that depression (OR=1.60; p<0.05), PSC (OR=3.68; p<0.001), and PSF (OR=1.60; p<0.01) were positively associated with IS. These findings indicate that IS-reducing interventions should address HIV-related depression. Additionally, HIV-related treatment and care services should work with WLWHA to adopt healthier attitudes about how community members view people living with HIV/AIDS in the Dominican Republic. PMID:26466239

  9. Circulating Mediators of Inflammation and Immune Activation in AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nolen, Brian M.; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Bream, Jay H.; Jenkins, Frank J.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Lokshin, Anna E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the most common AIDS-related malignancy in developed countries. An elevated risk of developing NHL persists among HIV-infected individuals in comparison to the general population despite the advent of effective antiretroviral therapy. The mechanisms underlying the development of AIDS-related NHL (A-NHL) are not fully understood, but likely involve persistent B-cell activation and inflammation. Methods This was a nested case-control study within the ongoing prospective Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS). Cases included 47 HIV-positive male subjects diagnosed with high-grade B-cell NHL. Controls were matched to each case from among participating HIV-positive males who did not develop any malignancy. Matching criteria included time HIV+ or since AIDS diagnosis, age, race and CD4+ cell count. Sera were tested for 161 serum biomarkers using multiplexed bead-based immunoassays. Results A subset of 17 biomarkers, including cytokines, chemokines, acute phase proteins, tissue remodeling agents and bone metabolic mediators was identified to be significantly altered in A-NHL cases in comparison to controls. Many of the biomarkers included in this subset were positively correlated with HIV viral load. A pathway analysis of our results revealed an extensive network of interactions between current and previously identified biomarkers. Conclusions These findings support the current hypothesis that A-NHL develops in the context of persistent immune stimulation and inflammation. Further analysis of the biomarkers identified in this report should enhance our ability to diagnose, monitor and treat this disease. PMID:24922518

  10. THE ABUNDANCE OF C{sub 3}H{sub 2} AND OTHER SMALL HYDROCARBONS IN THE DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Liszt, Harvey; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Cordiner, Martin; Gerin, Maryvonne

    2012-07-10

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, observed in diverse environments ranging from diffuse to molecular dark clouds and strong photon-dominated regions near H II regions. Recently, two broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 4881 A and 5450 A were attributed to the linear version of propynylidene l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, a species whose more stable cyclic conformer c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} has been widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium at radio wavelengths. This attribution has already been criticized on the basis of indirect plausibility arguments because the required column densities are quite large, N(l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2})/E{sub B-V} =4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} mag{sup -1}. Here we present new measurements of N(l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}) based on simultaneous 18-21 GHz Very Large Array absorption profiles of cyclic and linear C{sub 3}H{sub 2} taken along sight lines toward extragalactic radio-continuum background sources with foreground Galactic reddening E{sub B-V} = 0.1-1.6 mag. We find that N(l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2})/N(c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}) Almost-Equal-To 1/15-1/40 and N(l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2})/E{sub B-V} Almost-Equal-To (2 {+-} 1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} mag{sup -1}, so that the column densities of l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} needed to explain the DIBs are some three orders of magnitude higher than what is observed. We also find N(C{sub 4}H)/E{sub B-V} <1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} mag{sup -1} and N(C{sub 4}H{sup -})/E{sub B-V} <1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} mag{sup -1} (3{sigma}). Using available data for CH and C{sub 2}H we compare the abundances of small hydrocarbons in diffuse and dark clouds as a guide to their ability to contribute as DIB carriers over a wide range of conditions in the interstellar medium.

  11. Combining Diffusive Shock Acceleration with Acceleration by Contracting and Reconnecting Small-scale Flux Ropes at Heliospheric Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.; Khabarova, O. V.

    2016-08-01

    Computational and observational evidence is accruing that heliospheric shocks, as emitters of vorticity, can produce downstream magnetic flux ropes and filaments. This led Zank et al. to investigate a new paradigm whereby energetic particle acceleration near shocks is a combination of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) with downstream acceleration by many small-scale contracting and reconnecting (merging) flux ropes. Using a model where flux-rope acceleration involves a first-order Fermi mechanism due to the mean compression of numerous contracting flux ropes, Zank et al. provide theoretical support for observations that power-law spectra of energetic particles downstream of heliospheric shocks can be harder than predicted by DSA theory and that energetic particle intensities should peak behind shocks instead of at shocks as predicted by DSA theory. In this paper, a more extended formalism of kinetic transport theory developed by le Roux et al. is used to further explore this paradigm. We describe how second-order Fermi acceleration, related to the variance in the electromagnetic fields produced by downstream small-scale flux-rope dynamics, modifies the standard DSA model. The results show that (i) this approach can qualitatively reproduce observations of particle intensities peaking behind the shock, thus providing further support for the new paradigm, and (ii) stochastic acceleration by compressible flux ropes tends to be more efficient than incompressible flux ropes behind shocks in modifying the DSA spectrum of energetic particles.

  12. Simulation of Ultra-Small MOSFETs Using a 2-D Quantum-Corrected Drift-Diffusion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegal, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Connor S.; Yu, Zhiping; Ancona, Mario G.; Dutton, Robert W.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The continued down-scaling of electronic devices, in particular the commercially dominant MOSFET, will force a fundamental change in the process of new electronics technology development in the next five to ten years. The cost of developing new technology generations is soaring along with the price of new fabrication facilities, even as competitive pressure intensifies to bring this new technology to market faster than ever before. To reduce cost and time to market, device simulation must become a more fundamental, indeed dominant, part of the technology development cycle. In order to produce these benefits, simulation accuracy must improve markedly. At the same time, device physics will become more complex, with the rapid increase in various small-geometry and quantum effects. This work describes both an approach to device simulator development and a physical model which advance the effort to meet the tremendous electronic device simulation challenge described above. The device simulation approach is to specify the physical model at a high level to a general-purpose (but highly efficient) partial differential equation solver (in this case PROPHET, developed by Lucent Technologies), which then simulates the model in 1-D, 2-D, or 3-D for a specified device and test regime. This approach allows for the rapid investigation of a wide range of device models and effects, which is certainly essential for device simulation to catch up with, and then stay ahead of, electronic device technology of the present and future. The physical device model used in this work is the density-gradient (DG) quantum correction to the drift-diffusion model [Ancona, Phys. Rev. B 35(5), 7959 (1987)]. This model adds tunneling and quantum smoothing of carrier density profiles to the drift-diffusion model. We used the DG model in 1-D and 2-D (for the first time) to simulate both bipolar and unipolar devices. Simulations of heavily-doped, short-base diodes indicated that the DG quantum

  13. The effects of two AIDS risk-reduction interventions on heterosexual college women's AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes and condom use.

    PubMed

    Ploem, C; Byers, E S

    1997-01-01

    An intervention combining AIDS information with condom eroticization, condom normalization, and communication skills training was found to increase both AIDS-related knowledge and condom use among Canadian college students. 112 unmarried female undergraduates (mean age, 18 years) were randomly assigned to this combination intervention (n = 49), an information-only intervention (n = 44), or a pre-test/post-test control group (n = 19). 80% of students had engaged in vaginal intercourse and 14% in anal intercourse. 84% of coitally active women had engaged in unprotected intercourse in the past year and 48% had not used condoms consistently with any sexual partner. Condom use in the pre-intervention period was associated with positive attitudes toward the method and the perception that condom use was normative among peers. One month after the interventions, both the combination and information groups, but not controls, showed an increase over baseline in AIDS-related knowledge. However, among the 36 students who were coitally active in the 1-month periods before and after the intervention, only the combination intervention was associated with increased condom use. In the combination group, the percentage of episodes of intercourse protected by condoms increased from an average of 21.8% in the month preceding the study to 50% during the 4-week follow-up period. Due to the small sample size and design of the study, it was not possible to determine which component of the multifaceted educational intervention was most responsible for this change.

  14. HIV/AIDS related knowledge among school-going adolescents from the Middle East and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Boneberger, Anja; Rückinger, Simon; Guthold, Regina; Kann, Laura; Riley, Leanne

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this secondary analysis was to present cross-national data about HIV/AIDS related knowledge among 13- to 15-year-old school-going adolescents from the Middle East and North Africa. Data from 23673 school-going adolescents from seven countries (Jordan, Lebanon, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Morocco, Oman, Tunisia and United Arab Emirates) that undertook the Global School-Based Student Health Survey between 2004 and 2008 were analysed. HIV/AIDS related knowledge varied significantly between countries and gender. Research for this sensitive topic is scarce in this region. In addition, schools could be among the many key players for HIV/AIDS education.

  15. Women's voices: attitudes and behaviors of female Ghanaian sex workers regarding HIV prevention and AIDS-related stigma.

    PubMed

    Raingruber, Bonnie; Uwazie, Ernest; Bowie, Sylvester

    2010-08-01

    Attitudes and behaviors of sex workers have a pivotal influence on the spread of AIDS. A qualitative descriptive study was undertaken to elicit Ghanaian female sex workers' perspectives regarding effective methods of HIV prevention, sources of AIDS-related stigma, and challenges associated with sex work. Women described that: (1) sex work is hard; (2) they felt God would protect their health; (3) staying safe is both a gift and a priority; (4) sex work allows for autonomy; and (5) AIDS-related stigma is very real. To design effective prevention programs it is necessary to consider the culture and perspectives of those who will be served.

  16. [Successful discontinuation of antifungal secondary prophylaxis in AIDS-related cryptococcosis].

    PubMed

    Negroni, R; Helou, S H; López Daneri, G; Robles, A M; Arechavala, A I; Bianchi, M H

    2004-01-01

    The clinical and laboratory data of 22 patients with AIDS related cryptococcosis who were able to interrupt antifungal secondary prophylaxis after HAART administration, are presented. They were 14 males and 8 females, between 15 and 50 years old (X: 34 years old). All patients presented fever and severe deterioration of their general health status, and 19 exhibited a meningeal syndrome. At the start of antifungal treatment, 59% of the cases presented < 50 CD4+ cells/microl, the median viral burden was 134,804 RNA copies/ml and the median titer of serum cryptococcal antigen was 1/3,000. Amphotericin B by intravenous route, (0.7 mg/kg/day) or fluconazole (600 to 800 mg/day) were given as a treatment of the initial episode, up to CSF cultures negativization. Oral fluconazole (200 mg/day) or intravenous amphotericin B, 50 mg twice a week, were given as a secondary prophylaxis. The secondary prophylaxis was interrupted when the patients had received HAART for an average lapse of 19 months (6 to 36 months) and the median CD4+ cell count was 249/microl. The follow up after secondary prophylaxis discontinuation lasted for a median lapse of 22 months. These data seem to show that secondary prophylaxis is not necessary when the patient are clinically asymptomatic and the CD4+ cell counts are above 150/microl.

  17. AIDS as social construction: text mining of AIDS-related information in the Italian press.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Andrea; Giacchetta, Agnese; Langher, Viviana

    2016-09-01

    Given the relevance of AIDS as a public health problem in the Italian context and of the role of mass media in the social construction of the phenomenon, the aim of the present study is twofold: (1) to explore the main AIDS-related themes in the Italian popular press; (2) to analyse the temporal trends of AIDS representations over the last decades. For the research, we decided to consult Italian newspaper articles produced between 1985 and 1990 and between 2005 and 2010 using the archives of the main two national newspapers (La Repubblica and Corriere della Sera), resulting in an overall sample of 446 newspaper articles. A computer-aided content analysis allowed the detection of five different thematic domains (clusters), respectively focused on: Medical care (7.47%), Family support (37.03%), Science and religion debate (27%), Social exclusion (17.6%) and Healthcare policies (10.9%). These thematic domains are conceived along two main latent dimensions (factors) which explain 72.47% of the data variance which respectively deal with: (1) Attitudes towards people with AIDS (care versus avoidance) and (2) Social mandate on AIDS (powerlessness versus control). The study results also reveal the potential evolution of representations of people with AIDS over time: from stigmatised subjects who represent a risk for the entire society within a climate of social control to people progressively symbolised as frail subjects that need to be taken care of.

  18. AIDS-related illness trajectories in Mexico: findings from a qualitative study in two marginalized communities.

    PubMed

    Castro, R; Orozco, E; Eroza, E; Manca, M C; Hernández, J J; Aggleton, P

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes findings from a recent study examining how people affected directly and indirectly by the HIV/AIDS epidemic cope with HIV-related illness in Mexico. One-hundred-and-thirteen in-depth interviews were conducted with key informants in two contrasting communities: Ciudad Netzahualcóyotl (an economically marginalized community) and the gay community in Mexico City (a sexually marginalized community). This paper describes the AIDS-related wellness/illness careers or trajectories followed by individuals in both communities, and identifies critical points for material and emotional intervention. This career comprises four stages: (1) life before infection; (2) life surrounding the discovery of seropositivity; (3) living as an HIV-positive person; and (4) facing death. Comparisons are drawn between the processes of adjustment and coping found in both communities. In Ciudad Netzahualcóyotl, wellness/illness careers are closely linked to prevailing poverty and oppression, as well as the sense of urgency in which local people live their lives. In the case of the gay community, wellness/illness careers are associated with the intolerance and social repression faced by homosexual men. The paper concludes by suggesting possible interventions to improve the lives of people with HIV/AIDS in Mexico today.

  19. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus in non-AIDS related lymphomas occurring in body cavities.

    PubMed Central

    Cesarman, E.; Nador, R. G.; Aozasa, K.; Delsol, G.; Said, J. W.; Knowles, D. M.

    1996-01-01

    DNA sequences belonging to the recently discovered Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), now provisionally designated human herpesvirus 8, have been previously identified in an uncommonly occurring subset of AIDS-related lymphomas, referred to as body-cavity-based lymphomas (BCBLs), which present as lymphomatous effusions. Pyothorax-associated lymphomas (PALS) are non-Hodgkin's lymphomas that arise in the pleural cavity after long-standing pleural inflammation resulting from therapeutic artificial pneumothorax or from tuberculosis pleuritis. Although PALs present as solid tumor masses, they are otherwise similar to BCBLs in that they also are B cell lymphomas, usually exhibit immunoblastic morphology, and contain Epstein-Barr virus. We investigated whether KSHV sequences are present in 2 BCBLs in patients without AIDS and 12 in Japanese and 2 French PALs. The 2 BCBLs were positive for KSHV sequences, whereaas all 14 PALs were KSHV negative. This finding strongly suggests that BCBLs and PALs are distinct clinicopathological entities and further strengthens the association between the presence of KSHV and an effusion phenotype. Based on these findings, we propose replacing the term body-cavity-based lymphoma with the term primary effusion lymphoma, which describes these non-Hodgkin's lymphomas more accurately and avoids confusion with other lymphomas that may occur in the body cavities, such as the PALs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8686762

  20. Simulation of Ultra-Small MOSFETs Using a 2-D Quantum-Corrected Drift-Diffusion Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Yu, Zhiping; Dutton, Robert W.; Ancona, Mario G.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    We describe an electronic transport model and an implementation approach that respond to the challenges of device modeling for gigascale integration. We use the density-gradient (DG) transport model, which adds tunneling and quantum smoothing of carrier density profiles to the drift-diffusion model. We present the current implementation of the DG model in PROPHET, a partial differential equation solver developed by Lucent Technologies. This implementation approach permits rapid development and enhancement of models, as well as run-time modifications and model switching. We show that even in typical bulk transport devices such as P-N diodes and BJTs, DG quantum effects can significantly modify the I-V characteristics. Quantum effects are shown to be even more significant in small, surface transport devices, such as sub-0.1 micron MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, we find that quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. The inclusion of quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel MOSFETs due to the gate capacitance correction.

  1. Characterization of dopant diffusion within semiconducting polymer and small-molecule films using infrared-active vibrational modes and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maliakal, Ashok J

    2013-09-11

    Understanding dopant diffusion within organic and polymeric semiconductors is of great importance toward the development of organic photovoltaic and electronic devices, many of which require layered structures with controlled doping profiles (e.g., p-n and p-i-n structures). The current paper demonstrates a new method to determine the diffusion and permeability coefficients for dopant diffusion within polymeric and small-molecule organic semiconductors using attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy and taking advantage of the intense IR-active vibrational bands created when dopants such as iodine accept charge from a semiconducting polymer to generate polaronic species. The diffusion and permeability coefficients for iodine within poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) are determined to be 2.5×10(-11)±1.2×10(-11) cm2/s and 2.4×10(-8)±1.2×10(-8) cm2/s·atm, respectively. The approach is applied to P3HT/PCBM (1:1 mass ratio) films, and the diffusion and permeability coefficients through these composite films are determined to be 7.8×10(-11)±2.8×10(-11) cm2/s and 4.8×10(-8)±1.3×10(-8) cm2/s·atm, respectively. Finally, the approach is extended to determining iodine diffusion within the polycrystalline semiconductor tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) in a bilayer film with P3HT, and the diffusion coefficient of iodine through TPP is determined to be 7.1×10(-14)±1.1×10(-14) cm2/s. Although the current paper determines diffusion and permeability for the dopant iodine, this approach should be applicable to a wide array of dopants and polymeric and small-molecule semiconductors of interest in photovoltaic and electronic applications.

  2. HIV/AIDS Related Stigma and Discrimination against PLWHA in Nigerian Population

    PubMed Central

    Bulgiba, Awang; Oche, Oche Mansur; Adekunjo, Felix Oluyemi

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS remain a major public health concern in Nigeria. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) face not only personal medical problems but also social problems associated with the disease such as stigma and discriminatory attitudes. This study provides an insight into HIV/AIDS related stigma and discrimination against PLWHA in Nigeria. Methods The data for this study was extracted from the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey conducted by the National Population Commission. All men and women aged 15–49 years, permanent residents and visitors of the households were eligible for the interview. Several questionnaires were used in the survey, some covering questions on HIV/AIDS. Results A total of 56 307 men and women aged 15–49 years participated in this national survey. About half of the population in Nigeria have HIV stigma. Younger persons, men, those without formal education and those within poor wealth index are more likely to have stigma towards PLWHA. In addition, married people are more likely to have stigma on PLWHA and are more likely to blame PLWHA for bringing the disease to the community. Also about half of the population discriminates against PLWHA. However, those with higher levels of education and those from higher wealth index seem to be more compassionate towards PLWHA. About 70% in the population are willing to care for relative with AIDS, even more so among those with higher level of education. Conclusion There is a high level of HIV stigma and discrimination against PLWHA in the Nigerian population. Education seems to play a major role in the society with respect to HIV stigma and discrimination against PLWHA. Educating the population with factual information on HIV/AIDS is needed to reduce stigma and discrimination towards PLWHA in the community. PMID:26658767

  3. Knowledge, attitude, and practice of HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination reduction among nursing students in southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Farotimi, Adekunbi A; Nwozichi, Chinomso Ugochukwu; Ojediran, Tolulope D

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the reported obstacles to the achievement of universal access to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) prevention, treatment, care, and support programs includes stigma and discrimination from health workers, particularly nurses. Since nursing students would become future practising nurses and are most likely exposed to caring for people living with HIV/AIDS (PL WHA) during their training, it is of great importance to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of student nurses toward the reduction of HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination. Materials and Methods: A descriptive survey research design was used. A total of 150 nursing students were selected using the simple random sampling technique of fish bowl method with replacement. Data were obtained using a self-administered (33-item) validated questionnaire to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of student nurses with regard to HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination reduction strategies. Reliability of the tool was tested using Cronbach alpha (R) yielding a reliability value of 0.72. Data collected were analyzed with descriptive statistics of frequencies and percentages. Results: Majority (76.0%) of the respondents were females and 82.7% were married. Respondents were found to have high knowledge (94.0%) of strategies for reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination. Also, 64% had moderate discriminatory attitude, 74% engaged in low discriminatory practice, while 26% engaged in high discriminatory practice. Conclusions: Student nurses had adequate knowledge about strategies for reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination; negative discriminatory attitude toward PLWHA and some form of discriminatory practices exist in participants’ training schools. It is, therefore, recommended that an educational package on reduction of HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination be developed and implemented for the participants. PMID:26793257

  4. Detection of polyomavirus simian virus 40 tumor antigen DNA in AIDS-related systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilchez, Regis A.; Lednicky, John A.; Halvorson, Steven J.; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Butel, Janet S.

    2002-01-01

    Systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (S-NHL) is a common malignancy during HIV infection, and it is hypothesized that infectious agents may be involved in the etiology. Epstein-Barr virus DNA is found in <40% of patients with AIDS-related S-NHL, suggesting that other oncogenic viruses, such as polyomaviruses, may play a role in pathogenesis. We analyzed AIDS-related S-NHL samples, NHL samples from HIV-negative patients, peripheral blood leukocytes from HIV-infected and -uninfected patients without NHL, and lymph nodes without tumors from HIV-infected patients. Specimens were examined by polymerase chain reaction analysis with use of primers specific for an N-terminal region of the oncoprotein large tumor antigen ( T-ag ) gene conserved among all three polyomaviruses (simian virus 40 [SV40], JC virus, and BK virus). Polyomavirus T-ag DNA sequences, proven to be SV40-specific, were detected more frequently in AIDS-related S-NHL samples (6 of 26) than in peripheral blood leukocytes from HIV-infected patients (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 69; p =.0001), NHL samples from HIV-negative patients (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 10; p =.09), or lymph nodes (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 7; p =.16). Sequences of C-terminal T-ag DNA from SV40 were amplified from two AIDS-related S-NHL samples. Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences were detected in 38% (10 of 26) AIDS-related S-NHL samples, 50% (5 of 10) HIV-negative S-NHL samples, and 57% (4 of 7) lymph nodes. None of the S-NHL samples were positive for both Epstein-Barr virus DNA and SV40 DNA. Further studies of the possible role of SV40 in the pathogenesis of S-NHL are warranted.

  5. Computed tomography-guided time-domain diffuse fluorescence tomography in small animals for localization of cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tichauer, Kenneth M; Holt, Robert W; Samkoe, Kimberley S; El-Ghussein, Fadi; Gunn, Jason R; Jermyn, Michael; Dehghani, Hamid; Leblond, Frederic; Pogue, Brian W

    2012-07-17

    Small animal fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) can be a powerful tool for preclinical drug discovery and development studies. However, light absorption by tissue chromophores (e.g., hemoglobin, water, lipids, melanin) typically limits optical signal propagation through thicknesses larger than a few millimeters. Compared to other visible wavelengths, tissue absorption for red and near-infrared (near-IR) light absorption dramatically decreases and non-elastic scattering becomes the dominant light-tissue interaction mechanism. The relatively recent development of fluorescent agents that absorb and emit light in the near-IR range (600-1000 nm), has driven the development of imaging systems and light propagation models that can achieve whole body three-dimensional imaging in small animals. Despite great strides in this area, the ill-posed nature of diffuse fluorescence tomography remains a significant problem for the stability, contrast recovery and spatial resolution of image reconstruction techniques and the optimal approach to FMI in small animals has yet to be agreed on. The majority of research groups have invested in charge-coupled device (CCD)-based systems that provide abundant tissue-sampling but suboptimal sensitivity, while our group and a few others have pursued systems based on very high sensitivity detectors, that at this time allow dense tissue sampling to be achieved only at the cost of low imaging throughput. Here we demonstrate the methodology for applying single-photon detection technology in a fluorescence tomography system to localize a cancerous brain lesion in a mouse model. The fluorescence tomography (FT) system employed single photon counting using photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and information-rich time-domain light detection in a non-contact conformation. This provides a simultaneous collection of transmitted excitation and emission light, and includes automatic fluorescence excitation exposure control, laser referencing, and co

  6. Measurement of the surface effect of a small scattering object in a highly scattering medium by use of diffuse photon-pairs density wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jheng-Syong; Yu, Li-Ping; Chou, Chien

    2016-06-01

    The surface effect close to the boundary of a small light-scattering object in a highly scattering medium is experimentally demonstrated. This is the first attempt to measure the surface effect of a small spherical scattering object in 1% intralipid solution by use of developed diffuse photon-pairs density wave (DPPDW) in terms of the amplitude and phase detection. Theoretically, the surface effect of a small scattering object in turbid media is localized close to the boundary according to the perturbation theory, concerning an inhomogeneous distribution of the diffusion coefficient in the frequency-domain diffusion equation. Hence, an improvement of the spatial resolution of the image via an inverse algorithm, which relates to detection sensitivity of localization to the boundary of the image object in a multiple scattering medium, is anticipated. In this study, we demonstrate that DPPDW is able to sense the surface effect of a 2-mm spherical scattering object in 1% intralipid solution, with high sensitivity. Subsequently, an improvement of spatial resolution of imaging in turbid media by using DPPDW in comparison with conventional diffuse photon density wave (DPDW) using inverse algorithm is discussed.

  7. An Integrated Intervention for Increasing Clinical Nurses' Knowledge of HIV/AIDS-Related Occupational Safety.

    PubMed

    He, Liping; Lu, Zhiyan; Huang, Jing; Zhou, Yiping; Huang, Jian; Bi, Yongyi; Li, Jun

    2016-11-07

    Background: Approximately 35 new HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus, HIV) cases and at least 1000 serious infections are transmitted annually to health care workers. In China, HIV prevalence is increasing and nursing personnel are encountering these individuals more than in the past. Contaminated needle-stick injuries represent a significant occupational burden for nurses. Evidence suggests that nurses in China may not fully understand HIV/AIDS (Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS) and HIV-related occupational safety. At this time, universal protection precautions are not strictly implemented in Chinese hospitals. Lack of training may place nurses at risk for occupational exposure to blood-borne pathogens. Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of integrated interventions on nurses' knowledge improvement about reducing the risk of occupationally acquired HIV infection. Methods: We audited integrated interventions using 300 questionnaires collected from nurses at the Affiliated Hospital of Xiangnan University, a public polyclinic in Hunan Province. The intervention studied was multifaceted and included appropriate and targeted training content for hospital, department and individual levels. After three months of occupational safety integrated interventions, 234 participants who completed the program were assessed. Results: Of the subjects studied, 94.3% (283/300) were injured one or more times by medical sharp instruments or splashed by body fluids in the last year and 95.3% considered their risk of occupational exposure high or very high. After the intervention, awareness of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge improved significantly (χ² = 86.34, p = 0.00), and correct answers increased from 67.9% to 82.34%. Correct answers regarding risk perception were significantly different between pre-test (54.4%) and post-test (66.6%) (χ² = 73.2, p = 0.00). When coming into contact with patient body fluids and blood only 24.0% of subjects used gloves regularly. The pre

  8. Soot formation and temperature structure in small methane-oxygen diffusion flames at subcritical and supercritical pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyun I.; Guelder, Oemer L.

    2010-06-15

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the characteristics of laminar methane-oxygen diffusion flames up to 100 atmospheres. The influence of pressure on soot formation and on the structure of the temperature field was investigated over the pressure range of 10-90 atmospheres in a high-pressure combustion chamber using a non-intrusive, line-of-sight spectral soot emission diagnostic technique. Two distinct zones characterized the appearance of a methane and pure oxygen diffusion flame: an inner luminous zone similar to the methane-air diffusion flames, and an outer diffusion flame zone which is mostly blue. The flame height, marked by the visible soot radiation emission, was reduced by over 50% over the pressure range of 10-100 atmospheres. Between 10 and 40 atmospheres, the soot levels increased with increasing pressure; however, above 40 atmospheres the soot concentrations decreased with increasing pressure. (author)

  9. Slow-down or speed-up of inter- and intra-cluster diffusion of controversial knowledge in stubborn communities based on a small world network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    Diffusion of knowledge is expected to be huge when agents are open minded. The report concerns a more difficult diffusion case when communities are made of stubborn agents. Communities having markedly different opinions are for example the Neocreationist and Intelligent Design Proponents (IDP), on one hand, and the Darwinian Evolution Defenders (DED), on the other hand. The case of knowledge diffusion within such communities is studied here on a network based on an adjacency matrix built from time ordered selected quotations of agents, whence for inter- and intra-communities. The network is intrinsically directed and not necessarily reciprocal. Thus, the adjacency matrices have complex eigenvalues; the eigenvectors present complex components. A quantification of the slow-down or speed-up effects of information diffusion in such temporal networks, with non-Markovian contact sequences, can be made by comparing the real time dependent (directed) network to its counterpart, the time aggregated (undirected) network, - which has real eigenvalues. In order to do so, small world networks which both contain an odd number of nodes are studied and compared to similar networks with an even number of nodes. It is found that (i) the diffusion of knowledge is more difficult on the largest networks; (ii) the network size influences the slowing-down or speeding-up diffusion process. Interestingly, it is observed that (iii) the diffusion of knowledge is slower in IDP and faster in DED communities. It is suggested that the finding can be "rationalized", if some "scientific quality" and "publication habit" is attributed to the agents, as common sense would guess. This finding offers some opening discussion toward tying scientific knowledge to belief.

  10. Direct and indirect effects of enablers on HIV testing, initiation and retention in antiretroviral treatment and AIDS related mortality

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background An enabling environment is believed to have significant and critical effects on HIV and AIDS program implementation and desired outcomes. This paper estimates the paths, directionality, and direct and indirect associations between critical enablers with antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage and to AIDS-related mortality. Methods Frameworks that consider the role of enablers in HIV and AIDS programs were systematically reviewed to develop a conceptual model of interaction. Measurements for constructs of the model were pooled from the latest publicly available data. A hypothetical model, including latent/unobserved factors and interaction of enablers, program activities and outcomes, was analyzed cross-sectionally with structural equation modeling. Coefficients of the model were used to estimate the indirect associations of enablers to treatment coverage and the subsequent associated impact on AIDS related mortality. Findings The model’s fit was adequate (RMSEA = 0·084, 90% CI [0·062, 0·104]) and the indirect effects of enablers on outcomes were measured. Enablers having significant associations with increased ART coverage were social/financial protection, governance, anti-discrimination, gender equality, domestic AIDS spending, testing service delivery, and logistics. Interpretation Critical enablers are significantly correlated to outcomes like ART coverage and AIDS related mortality. Even while this model does not allow inference on causality, it provides directionality and magnitude of the significant associations. PMID:28225790

  11. Creating Social Spaces to Tackle AIDS-Related Stigma: Reviewing the Role of Church Groups in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Skovdal, M.; Gibbs, A.

    2012-01-01

    An expanding body of literature explores the role of African church groups in facilitating or hindering the support of people living with AIDS and challenging or contributing to HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Treating church groups as social spaces in which HIV/AIDS-related stigma may potentially be challenged, we systematically review this literature, identifying five themes that highlight the complex and contradictory role of the church as a potential agent of health-enhancing social change. In many ways the church perpetuates HIV/AIDS-related stigma through (i) moralistic attitudes and (ii) its reinforcement of conservative gender ideologies. However some churches have managed move towards action that makes a more positive contribution to HIV/AIDS management through (iii) promoting various forms of social control for HIV prevention, (iv) contributing to the care and support of the AIDS-affected and (v) providing social spaces for challenging stigmatising ideas and practices. We conclude that church groups, including church leadership, can play a key role in facilitating or hindering the creation of supportive social spaces to challenge stigma. Much work remains to be done in developing deeper understandings of the multi-layered factors that enable some churches, but not others, to respond effectively to HIV/AIDS. PMID:20668927

  12. Salvage Therapy for Refractory Aids-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Hugo; Parino, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    A 27-year-old male patient presented with speech disorders and multiple brain masses on MRI evaluation. He tested positive for HIV. A sterotactic biopsy diagnosed primary central nervous system lymphoma (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma). After two cycles of high-dose metotrexate (HD-MTX-)-based chemotherapy, the tumor progressed. He underwent whole brain radiotherapy achieving complete response. Six cycles of consolidating immunochemotherapy with rituximab-temozolomide were administered after radiation. Forty-three months after remission, he has not recurred and his neurological status is optimal. Younger HIV patients with refractory PCNSL and preserved immune function can face salvage therapy successfully achieving long term remissions with no remarkable neurotoxicity. PMID:23029628

  13. Salvage therapy for refractory AIDS-related primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Hugo; Parino, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    A 27-year-old male patient presented with speech disorders and multiple brain masses on MRI evaluation. He tested positive for HIV. A sterotactic biopsy diagnosed primary central nervous system lymphoma (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma). After two cycles of high-dose metotrexate (HD-MTX-)-based chemotherapy, the tumor progressed. He underwent whole brain radiotherapy achieving complete response. Six cycles of consolidating immunochemotherapy with rituximab-temozolomide were administered after radiation. Forty-three months after remission, he has not recurred and his neurological status is optimal. Younger HIV patients with refractory PCNSL and preserved immune function can face salvage therapy successfully achieving long term remissions with no remarkable neurotoxicity.

  14. Effects of small-scale, high intensity inlet turbulence on flow in a two-dimensional diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, J. A.; Gonzalez, G.

    1984-01-01

    The flow through a 2D experimental diffuser with channel width 2.60 cm and divergence angle (2 theta) 9 or 20 deg is investigated experimentally for inlet Reynolds number 78,300 and velocity 43.9 m/s, with and without vertical rods to generate inlet turbulence in excess of the limits defined by Hoffmann (1981) and Hoffmann and Gonzales (1983). Measurements are obtained using a thermal wall-flow-direction probe and a single hot-wire velocity probe, and the results are presented graphically. Significant increases in the pressure-recovery coefficient of the diffuser (10 percent at 9 deg and 22 percent at 20 deg) are attributed to the action of turbulence to reduce distortion and delay separation, thus creating an altered flow condition with symmetrical velocity profiles.

  15. Clinical Analysis of Five Cases of AIDS-related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Shubo; Xu, Na; Li, Zhongkun; Li, Na; Xia, Hong; Ren, Hongtao; Bao, Huizheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Secondary malignancy is a major life-threatening complication facing patients afflicted with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study aimed to retrospectively review clinical features and treatment course of five patients with AIDS-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma (A-NHL) in Jilin Tumor Hospital. Methods: Five A-NHL patients were retrospectively and consecutively hospitalized at our oncological unit between January 2012 and June 2014. All patients received pre-emptive highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and chemotherapy, and were subsequently followed up at the outpatient clinic. All five patients were male, aged 27–53 years, and afflicted with A-NHL involving upper jaw, right inguinal region, right-side gingiva, mediastinum, or right-side neck. Histology showed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 3) or plasmablastic lymphoma (n = 2). Results: Two patients achieved complete remission after HAART and chemotherapy, whereas other three patients required a second-line treatment, with two achieving stable disease and one dying within a follow-up period of 0.5−2 years. Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that A-NHL is a disease often diagnosed in the middle-to-late stages, with diverse clinical manifestations and short overall survival. In the cases reviewed in this study, HAART in combination with standard dose or high-dose chemotherapy, HAART and molecular targeted chemotherapy was administered, and these treatments proved to be effective for improving the prognosis of these patients. Moreover, the CD4+ cell count was important for determining the prognosis of patients. PMID:28083067

  16. Framing, agenda setting, and disease phobia of AIDS-related coverage in the South Korean mass media.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo

    2013-01-01

    There has been little research on the concrete role of the press in discourses on AIDS. This study investigated the AIDS discourses created by the major media. In particular, from the perspective of the agenda-setting theory, it examines differences in the framing of AIDS-related news depending on the political orientation and news sources of the press. This study analyzed the thematic frames and news sources implied by AIDS-related coverage. The 2 major media representing conservatism and progressivism were selected as the objects of analysis. As for the search engine for content analysis, the Korean Integrated Newspaper Database System was used, and 151 articles containing "AIDS" or "HIV" over 5 years from January 2005 to December 2010 were analyzed. According to the results of the analysis, there were the 6 following frames: aid/support, accident, human rights, risk, prevention, and biomedicine. Whereas the conservative press in South Korea continued to frame AIDS in the traditional way, the progressive press tended relatively more often to attempt new agenda setting, from the perspective of human rights and inequality. However, both newspaper companies tended mostly to select experts as the sources of AIDS news, thus continuing to exclude infectees and civil and society organizations.

  17. Ethnobotanical Study of Plants Used in the Management of HIV/AIDS-Related Diseases in Livingstone, Southern Province, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Chinsembu, Kazhila C.

    2016-01-01

    Faced with critical shortages of staff, long queues, and stigma at public health facilities in Livingstone, Zambia, persons who suffer from HIV/AIDS-related diseases use medicinal plants to manage skin infections, diarrhoea, sexually transmitted infections, tuberculosis, cough, malaria, and oral infections. In all, 94 medicinal plant species were used to manage HIV/AIDS-related diseases. Most remedies are prepared from plants of various families such as Combretaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, and Lamiaceae. More than two-thirds of the plants (mostly leaves and roots) are utilized to treat two or more diseases related to HIV infection. Eighteen plants, namely, Achyranthes aspera L., Lannea discolor (Sond.) Engl., Hyphaene petersiana Klotzsch ex Mart., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Capparis tomentosa Lam., Cleome hirta Oliv., Garcinia livingstonei T. Anderson, Euclea divinorum Hiern, Bridelia cathartica G. Bertol., Acacia nilotica Delile, Piliostigma thonningii (Schumach.) Milne-Redh., Dichrostachys cinerea (L.) Wight and Arn., Abrus precatorius L., Hoslundia opposita Vahl., Clerodendrum capitatum (Willd.) Schumach., Ficus sycomorus L., Ximenia americana L., and Ziziphus mucronata Willd., were used to treat four or more disease conditions. About 31% of the plants in this study were administered as monotherapies. Multiuse medicinal plants may contain broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. However, since widely used plants easily succumb to the threats of overharvesting, they need special protocols and guidelines for their genetic conservation. There is still need to confirm the antimicrobial efficacies, pharmacological parameters, cytotoxicity, and active chemical ingredients of the discovered plants. PMID:27069489

  18. Recruiting Chinese American adolescents to HIV/AIDS-related research: a lesson learned from a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hui; Salman, Ali; Wang, Fan

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to report identified barriers and challenges experienced in the recruiting process of Chinese American adolescents to a cross-sectional HIV/AIDS-related study. Snowball sampling method was used to recruit Chinese American adolescents from Chinese American communities in a U.S. Midwestern state. Barriers and challenges to recruitment were reviewed and analyzed from Chinese cultural perspectives in the hope of aiding researchers and health care providers understand and facilitate future recruitment of Chinese Americans for HIV/AIDS prevention studies. Barriers to recruitment were found related to the taboo topic of sexual issues in Chinese culture, unawareness and denial of HIV/AIDS risks, authoritarian parenting style in Chinese culture, and the required active consents. Facilitating factors of recruiting Chinese American adolescents to future HIV/AIDS prevention research or intervention programs are discussed. Information provided in this article may increase nurses' awareness of various barriers that they might encounter when they conduct research or address HIV/AIDS-related topics of Chinese American adolescents.

  19. Eradication of HCV and non-liver-related non-AIDS-related events in HIV/HCV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, Juan; Rodríguez-Castellano, Elena; Carrero, Ana; Von Wichmann, Miguel A; Montero, Marta; Galindo, María J; Mallolas, Josep; Crespo, Manuel; Téllez, María J; Quereda, Carmen; Sanz, José; Barros, Carlos; Tural, Cristina; Santos, Ignacio; Pulido, Federico; Guardiola, Josep M; Rubio, Rafael; Ortega, Enrique; Montes, María L; Jusdado, Juan J; Gaspar, Gabriel; Esteban, Herminia; Bellón, José M; González-García, Juan

    2017-01-21

    We assessed non-liver-related non-AIDS-related (NLR-NAR) events and mortality in a cohort of HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with interferon and ribavirin between 2000 and 2008. The censoring date was May 31, 2014. Cox regression analysis was performed to assess the adjusted hazard rate (HR) of overall death in responders and non-responders. Fine and Gray regression analysis was conducted to determine the adjusted sub-hazard rate (sHR) of NLR deaths and NLR-NAR events considering death as the competing risk. The NLR-NAR events analyzed included diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, cardiovascular events, NLR-NAR cancer, bone events, and non-AIDS-related infections. The variables for adjustment were age, sex, prior AIDS, HIV-transmission category, nadir CD4+ T-cell count, antiretroviral therapy, HIV-RNA, liver fibrosis, HCV genotype, and exposure to specific anti-HIV drugs. Of the 1,625 patients included, 592 (36%) had a sustained viral response (SVR). After a median five-year follow-up, SVR was found to be associated with a significant decrease in the hazard of diabetes mellitus (sHR 0.57 [95% CI, 0.35 - 0.93] P= .024) and decline in the hazard of chronic renal failure close to the threshold of significance (sHR 0.43 [95% CI, 0.17 - 1.09], P=.075).

  20. Insights into Surface Interactions between Metal Organic Frameworks and Gases during Transient Adsorption and Diffusion by In-Situ Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Dumée, Ludovic F.; He, Li; Hodgson, Peter; Kong, Lingxue

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of molecular gas sieving materials with specific affinities for a single gas species and able to store large quantities of materials at a low or atmospheric pressure is desperately required to reduce the adverse effects of coal and oil usage in carbon capture. Fundamental understanding of the dynamic adsorption of gas, the diffusion mechanisms across thin film membranes, and the impact of interfaces play a vital role in developing these materials. In this work, single gas permeation tests across micro-porous membrane materials, based on metal organic framework crystals grown on the surface of carbon nanotubes (ZiF-8@CNT), were performed for the first time in-situ at the Australian Synchrotron on the small angle X-ray scattering beamline in order to reveal molecular sieving mechanisms and gas adsorption within the material. The results show that specific chemi-sorption of CO2 across the ZiF-8 crystal lattices affected the morphology and unit cell parameters, while the sieving of other noble or noble like gases across the ZiF-8@CNT membranes was found to largely follow Knudsen diffusion. This work demonstrates for the first time a novel and effective technique to assess molecular diffusion at the nano-scale across sub-nano-porous materials by probing molecular flexibility across crystal lattice and single cell units. PMID:27598211

  1. A completely noninvasive method of dissolved oxygen monitoring in disposable small-scale cell culture vessels based on diffusion through permeable vessel walls.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Priyanka A; Ge, Xudong; Kostov, Yordan; Rao, Govind

    2014-01-01

    Disposable cell culture vessels are extensively used at small scales for process optimization and validation, but they lack monitoring capabilities. Optical sensors that can be easily adapted for use in small-scale vessels are commercially available for pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), and dissolved carbon dioxide (DCO2 ). However, their use has been limited due to the contamination and compatibility issues. We have developed a novel solution to these problems for DO monitoring. Oxygen diffusion through permeable vessel wall can be exploited for noninvasive monitoring. An optical oxygen sensor can be placed outside the oxygen permeable vessel wall thereby allowing oxygen diffusing through the vessel wall to be detected by the sensor. This way the sensor stays separate from the cell culture and there are no concerns about contaminants or leachants. Here we implement this method for two cell culture devices: polystyrene-made T-75 tissue culture flask and fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP)-made Vuelife(®) cell culture bag. Additionally, mammalian and microbial cell cultures were performed in Vuelife(®) cell culture bags, proving that a sensor placed outside can be used to track changes in cell cultures. This approach toward noninvasive monitoring will help in integrating cell culture vessels with sensors in a seamless manner.

  2. AIDS-related opportunistic mycoses seen in a tertiary care hospital in North India.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Anupriya; Kaur, Ravinder; Agarwal, Satish Kumar; Jain, Shyama; Bhalla, Preena

    2007-08-01

    Sixty symptomatic confirmed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive adult patients, of both sexes, suspected of having a fungal infection were taken as a study population, and the clinicomycological profile was correlated with the immunological status of the patients with particular reference to CD4 counts. Relevant samples were collected and subjected to direct microscopy, fungal culture and serology. CD4 counts were determined by flow cytometry. Patients belonged to the age group of 17-65 years, with a male : female ratio of 4.8 : 1. Heterosexuality was the commonest mode of transmission. Candidiasis was the most common diagnosis (41.7 %), followed by cryptococcosis (10.0 %), and pneumocystinosis and aspergillosis (8.3 % each). Two cases of histoplasmosis were also diagnosed. A low mean CD4 count of <200 cells microl(-1) was seen with most fungal infections. A total of 73 % of patients belonged to World Health Organization (WHO) stage 4, while 23.33 % belonged to stage 3. Thirty one patients (51.67 %) belonged to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stage C3. Various fungal infections correlated well with the mean CD4 counts. It was difficult to correlate statistically WHO and CDC staging because of the small sample size. However, it was possible to assess to a limited extent the possibility of using clinical diagnosis to predict the status of progression of HIV infection in a resource-poor outpatient setting.

  3. Human Exportin-1 is a Target for Combined Therapy of HIV and AIDS Related Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Boons, Eline; Vanstreels, Els; Jacquemyn, Maarten; Nogueira, Tatiane C; Neggers, Jasper E; Vercruysse, Thomas; van den Oord, Joost; Tamir, Sharon; Shacham, Sharon; Landesman, Yosef; Snoeck, Robert; Pannecouque, Christophe; Andrei, Graciela; Daelemans, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Infection with HIV ultimately leads to advanced immunodeficiency resulting in an increased incidence of cancer. For example primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma with very poor prognosis that typically affects HIV infected individuals in advanced stages of immunodeficiency. Here we report on the dual anti-HIV and anti-PEL effect of targeting a single process common in both diseases. Inhibition of the exportin-1 (XPO1) mediated nuclear transport by clinical stage orally bioavailable small molecule inhibitors (SINE) prevented the nuclear export of the late intron-containing HIV RNA species and consequently potently suppressed viral replication. In contrast, in CRISPR-Cas9 genome edited cells expressing mutant C528S XPO1, viral replication was unaffected upon treatment, clearly demonstrating the anti-XPO1 mechanism of action. At the same time, SINE caused the nuclear accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein as well as inhibition of NF-κB activity in PEL cells resulting in cell cycle arrest and effective apoptosis induction. In vivo, oral administration arrested PEL tumor growth in engrafted mice. Our findings provide strong rationale for inhibiting XPO1 as an innovative strategy for the combined anti-retroviral and anti-neoplastic treatment of HIV and PEL and offer perspectives for the treatment of other AIDS-associated cancers and potentially other virus-related malignancies.

  4. AIDS-Related Stigma and Mental Disorders among People Living with HIV: A Cross-Sectional Study in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Siyan; Chhoun, Pheak; Suong, Samedy; Thin, Kouland; Brody, Carinne; Tuot, Sovannary

    2015-01-01

    Background AIDS-related stigma and mental disorders are the most common conditions in people living with HIV (PLHIV). We therefore conducted this study to examine the association of AIDS-related stigma and discrimination with mental disorders among PLHIV in Cambodia. Methods A two-stage cluster sampling method was used to select 1,003 adult PLHIV from six provinces. The People Living with HIV Stigma Index was used to measure stigma and discrimination, and a short version of general health questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used to measure mental disorders. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted. Results The reported experiences of discrimination in communities in the past 12 months ranged from 0.8% for reports of being denied health services to 42.3% for being aware of being gossiped about. Internal stigma was also common ranging from 2.8% for avoiding going to a local clinic and/or hospital to 59.6% for deciding not to have (more) children. The proportions of PLHIV who reported fear of stigma and discrimination ranged from 13.9% for fear of being physically assaulted to 34.5% for fear of being gossiped about. The mean score of GHQ-12 was 3.2 (SD = 2.4). After controlling for several potential confounders, higher levels of mental disorders (GHQ-12≥ 4) remained significantly associated with higher levels of experiences of stigma and discrimination in family and communities (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.4–2.6), higher levels of internal stigma (AOR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2–2.3), and higher levels of fear of stigma and discrimination in family and communities (AOR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1–2.2). Conclusions AIDS-related stigma and discrimination among PLHIV in Cambodia are common and may have potential impacts on their mental health conditions. These findings indicate a need for community-based interventions to reduce stigma and discrimination in the general public and to help PLHIV to cope with this situation. PMID:25806534

  5. Topotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Children With Meningeal Cancer That Has Not Responded to Previous Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-20

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Leptomeningeal Metastases; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Specificity of anti-lymphocyte antibodies in sera from patients with AIDS-related complex (ARC) and healthy homosexuals.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R Q; Johnson, E A; Donnelly, R P; Lavia, M F; Tsang, K Y

    1988-01-01

    The presence and specificity of anti-lymphocyte antibodies (ALA) was investigated in sera from male homosexuals with AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) as well as healthy homosexuals. Individuals in the healthy homosexual group had no detectable antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Antibodies reactive with normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells were detected by Western blot analysis in sera from both groups of homosexuals. Of those individuals whose sera contained ALA, 71% of ARC patients and 83% of healthy homosexuals had antibodies recognizing a 73 kilodalton (kD) molecule. ALA present in ARC sera reacted with CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes while little reactivity with B cells was observed. Our results indicate that ALA appear in homosexuals prior to HIV infection and are reactive primarily with T lymphocytes. A 73 kD structure associated with the T cell membrane is frequently the target for these antibodies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3052941

  7. Altered natural history of AIDS-related opportunistic infections in the era of potent combination antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M A; French, M

    1998-01-01

    Since potent HIV protease inhibitor drugs became widely available in early 1996, many HIV clinical specialists have noted a marked decrease in the occurrence of AIDS-related opportunistic infections, and some specialists have reported unusual clinical presentations and manifestations of previously common opportunistic infections. In this article, we will review (1) the available data regarding recent trends in AIDS-related opportunistic infections incidence and manifestations, (2) clinical and immunologic evidence that potent combination antiretroviral therapy can alter the natural history of these opportunistic infections, and (3) the implications of these findings for current patient management practice and future clinical and immunologic research. As a preface to this review, however, it is important to acknowledge that any evaluation of the potential benefit of potent combination antiretroviral therapy in reducing the risk of serious opportunistic infections can be confounded by the concomitant use of prophylactic antimicrobial agents co-administered to prevent specific opportunistic infections. For example, it is standard clinical practice to administer trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (or another agent if trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole cannot be tolerated) to patients with an absolute CD4 lymphocyte count < 200 cells/microliters, unexplained chronic fever or a history of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Similarly, specific antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with absolute CD4 counts < 50 cells/microliters is also a widely recommended guideline. Although the relative efficacies of specific antimicrobial prophylaxis regimens in preventing the most common life- and sight-threatening opportunistic infectious complications of AIDS [Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), disseminated MAC infection, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis] are now well established, these relative efficacies were established in

  8. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in 3.0 Tesla Breast MRI: Diagnostic Performance and Tumor Characterization Using Small Subregions vs. Whole Tumor Regions of Interest

    PubMed Central

    Arponent, Otso; Sudah, Mazen; Masarwah, Amro; Taina, Mikko; Rautiainen, Suvi; Könönen, Mervi; Sironen, Reijo; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Sutela, Anna; Hakumäki, Juhana; Vanninen, Ritva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values are increasingly reported in breast MRI. As there is no standardized method for ADC measurements, we evaluated the effect of the size of region of interest (ROI) to diagnostic utility and correlation to prognostic markers of breast cancer. Methods This prospective study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Board; the need for written informed consent for the retrospective analyses of the breast MRIs was waived by the Chair of the Hospital District. We compared diagnostic accuracy of ADC measurements from whole-lesion ROIs (WL-ROIs) to small subregions (S-ROIs) showing the most restricted diffusion and evaluated correlations with prognostic factors in 112 consecutive patients (mean age 56.2±11.6 years, 137 lesions) who underwent 3.0-T breast MRI. Results Intra- and interobserver reproducibility were substantial (κ = 0.616–0.784; Intra-Class Correlation 0.589–0.831). In receiver operating characteristics analysis, differentiation between malignant and benign lesions was excellent (area under curve 0.957–0.962, cut-off ADC values for WL-ROIs: 0.87×10−3 mm2s-1; S-ROIs: 0.69×10−3 mm2s-1, P<0.001). WL-ROIs/S-ROIs achieved sensitivities of 95.7%/91.3%, specificities of 89.5%/94.7%, and overall accuracies of 89.8%/94.2%. In S-ROIs, lower ADC values correlated with presence of axillary metastases (P = 0.03), high histological grade (P = 0.006), and worsened Nottingham Prognostic Index Score (P<0.05). In both ROIs, ADC values correlated with progesterone receptors and advanced stage (P<0.01), but not with HER2, estrogen receptors, or Ki-67. Conclusions ADC values assist in breast tumor characterization. Small ROIs were more accurate than whole-lesion ROIs and more frequently associated with prognostic factors. Cut-off values differed significantly depending on measurement procedure, which should be recognized when comparing results from the literature. Instead of using a whole lesion covering ROI, a

  9. Diffuse X-ray emission from the NGC 2300 group of galaxies - Implications for dark matter and galaxy evolution in small groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulchaey, John S.; Davis, David S.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Burstein, David

    1993-01-01

    The discovery of diffuse X-ray emission from the NGC 2300 group of galaxies using the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter is reported. The gas distributions is roughly symmetric and extends to a radius of at least 0.2/h(50) Mpc. A Raymond-Smith hot plasma model provides an excellent fit the X-ray spectrum with a best-fit value temperature of 0.9 + -/15 or - 0.14 keV and abundance 0.06 + 0/.12 or - 0.05 solar. The assumption of gravitational confinement leads to a total mass of the group of 3.0 + 0.4 or - 0.5 x 10 exp 13 solar. Baryons can reasonably account for 4 percent of this mass, and errors could push this number not higher than 10-15 percent. This is one of the strongest pieces of evidence that dark matter dominates small groups such as this one. The intragroup medium in this system has the lowest metal abundance yet found in diffuse gas in a group or cluster.

  10. Severe Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Small Pericardial Effusion, and Diffuse Late Gadolinium Enhancement by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Suspecting Cardiac Amyloidosis: Endomyocardial Biopsy Reveals an Unexpected Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Nina P.; Giusca, Sorin; Klingel, Karin; Nunninger, Peter; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy can be related to a multitude of cardiac disorders, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), cardiac amyloidosis, and hypertensive heart disease. Although the presence of LV hypertrophy is generally associated with poorer cardiac outcomes, the early differentiation between these pathologies is crucial due to the presence of specific treatment options. The diagnostic process with LV hypertrophy requires the integration of clinical evaluation, electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography, biochemical markers, and if required CMR and endomyocardial biopsy in order to reach the correct diagnosis. Here, we present a case of a patient with severe LV hypertrophy (septal wall thickness of 23 mm, LV mass of 264 g, and LV mass index of 147 g/m2), severely impaired longitudinal function, and preserved radial contractility (ejection fraction = 55%), accompanied by small pericardial effusion and diffuse late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Due to the imaging findings, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy, such as cardiac amyloidosis, was suspected. However, amyloid accumulation was excluded by endomyocardial biopsy, which revealed the presence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in an advanced hypertensive heart disease. PMID:27247807

  11. Study of white matter at the centrum semiovale level with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging in cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, L A; Ling, X Y; Li, C; Zhang, S J; Chi, G B; Xu, A D

    2014-04-08

    White matter lesion (WML) in magnetic resonance imaging is commonly observed in patients with cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), but the pathological mechanism of WML in SVD is still unclear. We observed the metabolism and microscopic anatomy of white matter in SVD patients. Twelve subjects clinically diagnosed with SVD and 6 normal control subjects were examined with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The white matter at the centrum semiovale level was selected as the region of interest (ROI). The ROI metabolism parameters, including N-acetyl-l-aspartic acid (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline (Cho) were measured by MRS. Microscopic parameters such as mean diffusion (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in ROI were obtained by DTI. Compared with the normal control group, bilateral MD values in the SVD group were significantly elevated, whereas bilateral FA values in SVD were decreased, but the difference was not statistically significant. Additionally, NAA/Cho, Cho/Cr, and NAA/Cr showed no significant statistical differences. Our study suggests that the mechanisms of the SVD cognitive impairment are related to damage of the white matter structures rather than to brain metabolism.

  12. Noise characteristics of centrifugal blower with low solidity cascade diffuser (Noise reduction by means of small groove located at LSD blade leading tip)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tengen; Ishida, Masahiro; Sakaguchi, Daisaku; Koba, Yu

    2009-12-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the blade tip-groove of the low solidity cascade diffuser (LSD) on the blower characteristic and the noise generated by the LSD. The small grooves were set up at the root and/or tip near the leading edge of the LSD blade. In order to clarify the mechanism of noise increase due to LSD and also to reduce the noise, the relationships between the noise increase based on the LSD, the LSD performance and the secondary flow formed additionally by the tip-groove were investigated experimentally as well as numerically, especially analyzing flow behaviors in the LSD in view points of flow separation on the suction surface of the LSD blade and the secondary flow on the side walls. By reducing the stagnation region smaller near the root and/or tip of the LSD blade leading edge, the secondary flow behavior changes remarkably around the LSD blade, as a result, the noise level and the blower characteristics vary. It can be concluded that, by means of a small tip-groove located only at the shroud side near the LSD blade leading edge, the noise generated by the LSD can be reduced without deteriorations of the LSD performance and the blower characteristics as well.

  13. HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and behaviors among rural married migrant women in Shandong Province, China: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Song, Yapei; Kang, Dianmin; Wang, Guoyong; Wei, Chongyi; Tao, Xiaorun; Huang, Tao; Qian, Yuesheng; Zhu, Tiwen; Yang, Shan; Yu, Shaoqi; Wang, Hong; Ma, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Migrant women in China are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS. This study described HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and behaviors among married migrant women in Shandong province in comparison to non-migrant local women and identified factors associated with HIV testing history and extramarital sex among married migrant women. A probability-based sample of 1,076 migrant and 1,195 local women were included in the analyses. Compared to local women, married migrant women had lower levels of HIV/AIDS knowledge and were more likely to have had premarital sex, extramarital sex, history of sexually transmitted diseases, and drug use. Less than a quarter of migrant women used condoms consistently in extramarital sex. Only 31.0 % of married migrant women had ever tested for HIV, and the rate of premarital HIV testing was very low. Multivariable analysis showed that married migrant women with a history of extramarital sex were more likely to be from Yunnan province, be living in Yantai city, be in their first marriage, have lower family income, have poor relationship with spouses, use drug, have a history of sexually transmitted diseases, and have lower social support. Our findings provide further evidence that married migrant women are at higher risk for HIV infection and that targeted interventions need to be developed for this population.

  14. Bone marrow histopathology in the diagnostic evaluation of splenic marginal-zone and splenic diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma: a reliable substitute for spleen histopathology?

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Maurilio; Kanellis, George; Pouliou, Evi; Baliakas, Panagiotis; Scarfò, Lydia; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Doglioni, Claudio; Bikos, Vasilis; Dagklis, Antonis; Anagnostopoulos, Achilles; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Papadaki, Theodora

    2012-11-01

    Primary splenic small B-cell lymphomas mostly comprise the distinct entity of splenic marginal-zone lymphoma (SMZL) and the provisional category of splenic lymphoma/leukemia unclassifiable, mainly represented by the hairy cell leukemia variant and splenic diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma (SDRL). Until recently, histopathologic examination of splenectomy specimens was considered mandatory for the diagnosis of SMZL. However, nowadays, mainly because of advances in chemoimmunotherapy, splenectomy is performed much less frequently. We evaluated the diagnostic efficacy of bone marrow biopsy (BMB) histopathology in the diagnostic approach toward SMZL and SDRL and tested whether it may serve as a substitute for spleen histopathology in the differential diagnosis between these 2 entities. To this end, we conducted a paired assessment of BMB and spleen diagnostic samples from 46 cases with a diagnosis of SMZL (n=32) or SDRL (n=14) based on spleen histopathology. We demonstrate that detailed immunohistopathologic BMB evaluation offers adequate evidence for the confirmation of these entities and their differential diagnosis from other small B-cell lymphoma histotypes. Notably, the immunophenotypical profile of SMZL and SDRL was identical in both BMB and spleen specimens for 21 evaluated markers. Paired assessment of BMB and spleen specimens did not identify discriminating patterns of BMB infiltration, cytology, and/or immunohistology between SMZL and SDRL. Accordingly, bone marrow histopathology contributes significantly in confirming the diagnosis of SMZL and SDRL. However, presently it is not possible to distinguish SMZL from SDRL on the basis of BMB evaluation alone; hence, histopathologic examination of the spleen remains the "gold standard" approach.

  15. Non-small cell lung cancer: Whole-lesion histogram analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient for assessment of tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion and pleural invasion

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Naoko; Doai, Mariko; Usuda, Katsuo; Uramoto, Hidetaka

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Investigating the diagnostic accuracy of histogram analyses of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for determining non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor grades, lymphovascular invasion, and pleural invasion. Materials and methods We studied 60 surgically diagnosed NSCLC patients. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was performed in the axial plane using a navigator-triggered single-shot, echo-planar imaging sequence with prospective acquisition correction. The ADC maps were generated, and we placed a volume-of-interest on the tumor to construct the whole-lesion histogram. Using the histogram, we calculated the mean, 5th, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles of ADC, skewness, and kurtosis. Histogram parameters were correlated with tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion, and pleural invasion. We performed a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis to assess the diagnostic performance of histogram parameters for distinguishing different pathologic features. Results The ADC mean, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles showed significant differences among the tumor grades. The ADC mean, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles were significant histogram parameters between high- and low-grade tumors. The ROC analysis between high- and low-grade tumors showed that the 95th percentile ADC achieved the highest area under curve (AUC) at 0.74. Lymphovascular invasion was associated with the ADC mean, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th percentiles, skewness, and kurtosis. Kurtosis achieved the highest AUC at 0.809. Pleural invasion was only associated with skewness, with the AUC of 0.648. Conclusions ADC histogram analyses on the basis of the entire tumor volume are able to stratify NSCLCs' tumor grade, lymphovascular invasion and pleural invasion. PMID:28207858

  16. Longitudinal Effects of Coping on Outcome in a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Group Intervention for HIV-Positive Adults with AIDS-Related Bereavement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Nathan B.; Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Ghebremichael, Musie; Zhang, Heping; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the longitudinal effects of coping on outcome one year following completion of a randomized, controlled trial of a group coping intervention for AIDS-related bereavement. Bereaved HIV-positive participants (N = 267) were administered measures of grief, psychiatric distress, quality of life, and coping at baseline,…

  17. The Unfinished Nature of Rights-Informed HIV- and AIDS-Related Education: An Analysis of Three School-Based Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miedema, Esther; Maxwell, Claire; Aggleton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, there has been growing investment in concepts of rights in the areas of HIV prevention, care and treatment, including HIV- and AIDS-related education delivered in schools. Despite this increasing commitment to the notion of rights, few efforts appear to have been made to understand the varying conceptions of rights that…

  18. With and With"out": The Bereavement Experiences of Gay Men Who Have Lost a Partner to Non-AIDS-Related Causes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornjatkevyc, Nina L.; Alderson, Kevin G.

    2011-01-01

    This study gives voice to the experiences of gay men who have lost a partner to non-AIDS-related causes, a subject that has received little attention in the psychological literature. Interviews were conducted with 8 gay men. An analysis informed by hermeneutic phenomenology generated themes and contextualized meanings regarding the participants'…

  19. Efficacy and safety of Stealth liposomal doxorubicin in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. The International SL-DOX Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, F. D.; Goldstein, D.; Goos, M.; Jablonowski, H.; Stewart, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    The utility of current chemotherapeutic regimens in the treatment of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma (AIDS-KS) is often compromised by both limited efficacy and substantial toxicity. Pegylated (Stealth) liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride (SL-DOX) has been demonstrated specifically to deliver high concentrations of doxorubicin to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesions. This phase II study was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SL-DOX in the treatment of moderate to severe AIDS-KS. Patients were treated biweekly with 10, 20, or 40 mg m-2 SL-DOX. Tumour response was assessed according to AIDS Clinical Trials Groups (ACTG) criteria before each cycle. Best response was determined for 238 patients and was achieved after a mean of 2.3 cycles (range 1-20). Fifteen patients (6.3%) had a complete response to SL-DOX, 177 (74.4%) had a partial response, 44 (18.5%) had stable disease and two (0.8%) had disease progression. SL-DOX was well tolerated: ten patients discontinued therapy because of adverse events, in four cases because of neutropenia. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia occurred after 281 of 2023 cycles (13.9%) but involved 137 of 240 patients (57.1%) for whom data were available. SL-DOX has substantial activity in AIDS-KS. Best response is typically seen after fewer than three cycles of chemotherapy and in some cases may be prolonged. The most important adverse event is neutropenia, which occurs after a minority of cycles but which may occur in over half of all patients. PMID:8611437

  20. HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination: accounts of HIV-positive Caribbean people in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Moji; Elam, Gillian; Gerver, Sarah; Solarin, Ijeoma; Fenton, Kevin; Easterbrook, Philippa

    2008-09-01

    This paper explores the effects of HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination (HASD) on HIV-positive Caribbean people in the Caribbean and the UK. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were held with a purposively selected group of 25 HIV-positive people of Caribbean origin, using primary selection criteria of sex, age, sexuality and country of birth. Interviews with respondents revealed that they are keenly aware of the stigma surrounding HIV/AIDS, which some attribute to a particularly Caribbean combination of fear of contamination, homophobia, and ignorance, reinforced by religious beliefs. In fact, religion serves a double role: underpinning stigma and assisting in coping with HIV. HASD has usually occurred where respondents have lost or do not have control over disclosure. Compared to UK-born respondents, the accounts of Caribbean-born respondents, most of whom were born in Jamaica, include more reports of severe HASD, particularly violence and employment discrimination. All respondents mobilise a variety of strategies in order to avoid HASD, which have implications for their social interactions and emotional well being. While some manage to avoid the "spoiled identity" of the stigmatised, thereby creating their own understandings of HIV infection, these may remain individual-level negotiations. HASD affects HIV-positive Caribbean people at home and in the diaspora in a variety of ways: emotionally, mentally, financially, socially and physically. Interventions specifically addressing stigma and discrimination must be formulated for the UK's Caribbean population. Tackling stigma and discrimination requires more than education; it requires "cultural work" to address deeply entrenched notions of sexuality.

  1. High titer anti-HIV antibody reactivity associated with a paraprotein spike in a homosexual male with AIDS related complex.

    PubMed

    Ng, V L; Hwang, K M; Reyes, G R; Kaplan, L D; Khayam-Bashi, H; Hadley, W K; McGrath, M S

    1988-05-01

    We observed a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected homosexual male with AIDS related complex (ARC) who had a serum globulin level of 80 g/L. Serum protein electrophoresis revealed a gamma globulin fraction of 40 g/L, of which 50% (20 g/L) was contained within a paraprotein spike, comprised predominantly of IgG kappa. This patient also had high titer anti-HIV antibodies in his serum, which were Western blot reactive at a final dilution of 1:500,000, and recognized gp120env, p66pol, p55gag, p53pol, p41gag, and p24gag. Because paraproteins in the past have been shown to be directed against specific antigens, we purified this patient's paraprotein using a modified high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-hydroxylapatite procedure and tested the purified paraprotein for anti-HIV antibody activity. The purified paraprotein retained anti-HIV antibody activity to a final dilution of 1:100,000, and recognized p66pol, p55gag, p53pol, p41gag, and p24gag. The recognition of both "gag" and "pol" gene products suggested that the purified paraprotein might not be monoclonal in origin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) demonstrated that the purified paraprotein contained at least two immunoglobulin light chain species (Mol wt 30 to 33 Kd). Affinity chromatography of the purified paraprotein using a p24-Sepharose 4B matrix separated the "gag" and "pol" antibody activities. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement analysis of a bone marrow aspirate (which contained 15% plasma cells) failed to reveal a clonal population of immunoglobulin producing cells. We conclude that this patient's paraprotein accounted for most of the anti-HIV activity present in whole serum, and that this paraprotein was not monoclonal in origin.

  2. Diffusion and nucleation in multilayer growth of PTCDI-C8 studied with in situ X-ray growth oscillations and real-time small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykov, Anton; Bommel, Sebastian; Wolf, Christopher; Pithan, Linus; Weber, Christopher; Beyer, Paul; Santoro, Gonzalo; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Kowarik, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    We study nucleation and multilayer growth of the perylene derivative PTCDI-C8 and find a persistent layer-by-layer growth, transformation of island shapes, and an enhancement of molecular diffusivity in upper monolayers (MLs). These findings result from the evaluation of the ML-dependent island densities, obtained by in situ real-time grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering measurements and simultaneous X-ray growth oscillations. Complementary ex situ atomic force microscopy snapshots of different growth stages agree quantitatively with both X-ray techniques. The rate and temperature-dependent island density is analyzed using different mean-field nucleation models. Both a diffusion limited aggregation and an attachment limited aggregation model yield in the first two MLs the same critical nucleus size i, similar surface diffusion attempt frequencies in the 1019-1020 s-1 range, and a decrease of the diffusion barrier Ed in the 2nd ML by 140 meV.

  3. A multi-view time-domain non-contact diffuse optical tomography scanner with dual wavelength detection for intrinsic and fluorescence small animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Eric; Pichette, Julien; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2012-06-01

    We present a non-contact diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scanner with multi-view detection (over 360°) for localizing fluorescent markers in scattering and absorbing media, in particular small animals. It relies on time-domain detection after short pulse laser excitation. Ultrafast time-correlated single photon counting and photomultiplier tubes are used for time-domain measurements. For light collection, seven free-space optics non-contact dual wavelength detection channels comprising 14 detectors overall are placed around the subject, allowing the measurement of time point-spread functions at both excitation and fluorescence wavelengths. The scanner is endowed with a stereo camera pair for measuring the outer shape of the subject in 3D. Surface and DOT measurements are acquired simultaneously with the same laser beam. The hardware and software architecture of the scanner are discussed. Phantoms are used to validate the instrument. Results on the localization of fluorescent point-like inclusions immersed in a scattering and absorbing object are presented. The localization algorithm relies on distance ranging based on the measurement of early photons arrival times at different positions around the subject. This requires exquisite timing accuracy from the scanner. Further exploiting this capability, we show results on the effect of a scattering hetereogenity on the arrival time of early photons. These results demonstrate that our scanner provides all that is necessary for reconstructing images of small animals using full tomographic reconstruction algorithms, which will be the next step. Through its free-space optics design and the short pulse laser used, our scanner shows unprecedented timing resolution compared to other multi-view time-domain scanners.

  4. NOTCH1, TP53, and MAP2K1 Mutations in Splenic Diffuse Red Pulp Small B-cell Lymphoma Are Associated With Progressive Disease.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Daniel; Navarro, Alba; Martinez-Trillos, Alejandra; Molina-Urra, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Farre, Blanca; Salaverria, Itziar; Nadeu, Ferran; Enjuanes, Anna; Clot, Guillem; Costa, Dolors; Carrio, Ana; Villamor, Neus; Colomer, Dolors; Martinez, Antonio; Bens, Susanne; Siebert, Reiner; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Beà, Sílvia; Matutes, Estella; Campo, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Splenic diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma (SDRPL) is considered an indolent neoplasm and its pathogenesis is not well known. We investigated the molecular characteristics of 19 SDRPL patients, 5 of them with progressive disease. IGHV genes were mutated in 9/13 (69%). Cytogenetic and molecular studies identified complex karyotypes in 2 cases, and IGH rearrangements in 3, with PAX5 and potentially TCL1 as partners in each one of them. Copy number arrays showed aberrations in 69% of the tumors, including recurrent losses of 10q23, 14q31-q32, and 17p13 in 3, and 9p21 in 2 cases. Deletion of 7q31.3-q32.3 was present in only 1 case and no trisomies 3 or 18 were detected. NOTCH1 and MAP2K1 were mutated in 2 cases each, whereas BRAF, TP53, and SF3B1 were mutated each in single cases. No mutations were found in NOTCH2 or MYD88. Four of the 5 patients with aggressive disease had mutations in NOTCH1 (2 cases), TP53 (1 case), and MAP2K1 (1 case). The progression-free survival of patients with mutated genes was significantly shorter than in the unmutated (P=0.011). These findings show that SDRPL share some mutated genes but not chromosomal alterations, with other splenic lymphomas, that may confer a more aggressive behavior.

  5. Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy With Rituximab in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Other Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Plasmablastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Grade 3b Follicular Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  6. Estimation of optimal b-value sets for obtaining apparent diffusion coefficient free from perfusion in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Karki, Kishor; Hugo, Geoffrey D; Ford, John C; Olsen, Kathryn M; Saraiya, Siddharth; Groves, Robert; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2015-10-21

    The purpose of this study was to determine optimal sets of b-values in diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) for obtaining monoexponential apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) close to perfusion-insensitive intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model ADC (ADCIVIM) in non-small cell lung cancer. Ten subjects had 40 DW-MRI scans before and during radiotherapy in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Respiratory triggering was applied to the echo-planar DW-MRI with TR ≈ 4500 ms, TE  =  74 ms, eight b-values of 0-1000 μs μm(-2), pixel size  =  1.98 × 1.98 mm(2), slice thickness  =  6 mm, interslice gap  =  1.2 mm, 7 axial slices and total acquisition time ≈6 min. One or more DW-MRI scans together covered the whole tumour volume. Monoexponential model ADC values using various b-value sets were compared to reference-standard ADCIVIM values using all eight b-values. Intra-scan coefficient of variation (CV) of active tumour volumes was computed to compare the relative noise in ADC maps. ADC values for one pre-treatment DW-MRI scan of each of the 10 subjects were computed using b-value pairs from DW-MRI images synthesized for b-values of 0-2000 μs μm(-2) from the estimated IVIM parametric maps and corrupted by various Rician noise levels. The square root of mean of squared error percentage (RMSE) of the ADC value relative to the corresponding ADCIVIM for the tumour volume of the scan was computed. Monoexponential ADC values for the b-value sets of 250 and 1000; 250, 500 and 1000; 250, 650 and 1000; 250, 800 and 1000; and 250-1000 μs μm(-2) were not significantly different from ADCIVIM values (p > 0.05, paired t-test). Mean error in ADC values for these sets relative to ADCIVIM were within 3.5%. Intra-scan CVs for these sets were comparable to that for ADCIVIM. The monoexponential ADC values for other sets-0-1000; 50-1000; 100-1000; 500-1000; and 250 and 800 μs μm(-2) were significantly different from the ADCIVIM values. From Rician noise

  7. Estimation of optimal b-value sets for obtaining apparent diffusion coefficient free from perfusion in non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karki, Kishor; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Ford, John C.; Olsen, Kathryn M.; Saraiya, Siddharth; Groves, Robert; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine optimal sets of b-values in diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) for obtaining monoexponential apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) close to perfusion-insensitive intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model ADC (ADCIVIM) in non-small cell lung cancer. Ten subjects had 40 DW-MRI scans before and during radiotherapy in a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Respiratory triggering was applied to the echo-planar DW-MRI with \\text{TR}≈ 4500 ms, TE  =  74 ms, eight b-values of 0-1000 μs μm-2, pixel size  =  1.98× 1.98 mm2, slice thickness  =  6 mm, interslice gap  =  1.2 mm, 7 axial slices and total acquisition time ≈6 min. One or more DW-MRI scans together covered the whole tumour volume. Monoexponential model ADC values using various b-value sets were compared to reference-standard ADCIVIM values using all eight b-values. Intra-scan coefficient of variation (CV) of active tumour volumes was computed to compare the relative noise in ADC maps. ADC values for one pre-treatment DW-MRI scan of each of the 10 subjects were computed using b-value pairs from DW-MRI images synthesized for b-values of 0-2000 μs μm-2 from the estimated IVIM parametric maps and corrupted by various Rician noise levels. The square root of mean of squared error percentage (RMSE) of the ADC value relative to the corresponding ADCIVIM for the tumour volume of the scan was computed. Monoexponential ADC values for the b-value sets of 250 and 1000; 250, 500 and 1000; 250, 650 and 1000; 250, 800 and 1000; and 250-1000 μs μm-2 were not significantly different from ADCIVIM values (p>0.05 , paired t-test). Mean error in ADC values for these sets relative to ADCIVIM were within 3.5%. Intra-scan CVs for these sets were comparable to that for ADCIVIM. The monoexponential ADC values for other sets—0-1000 50-1000 100-1000 500-1000 and 250 and 800 μs μm-2 were significantly different from the ADCIVIM values. From Rician noise simulation

  8. The Impact of Diffusion-Weighted MRI on the Definition of Gross Tumor Volume in Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Jelden, Michael; Kremp, Stephanie; Jagoda, Philippe; Stroeder, Jonas; Khreish, Fadi; Ezziddin, Samer; Buecker, Arno; Rübe, Christian; Schneider, Guenther K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study was designed to evaluate diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) vs. PET-CT of the thorax in the determination of gross tumor volume (GTV) in radiotherapy planning of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and Methods Eligible patients with NSCLC who were supposed to receive definitive radio(chemo)therapy were prospectively recruited. For MRI, a respiratory gated T2-weighted sequence in axial orientation and non-gated DWI (b = 0, 800, 1,400 and apparent diffusion coefficient map [ADC]) were acquired on a 1.5 Tesla scanner. Primary tumors were delineated on FDG-PET/CT (stGTV) and DWI images (dwGTV). The definition of stGTV was based on the CT and visually adapted to the FDG-PET component if indicated (e.g., in atelectasis). For DWI, dwGTV was visually determined and adjusted for anatomical plausibility on T2w sequences. Beside a statistical comparison of stGTV and dwGTB, spatial agreement was determined with the “Hausdorff-Distance” (HD) and the “Dice Similarity Coefficient” (DSC). Results Fifteen patients (one patient with two synchronous NSCLC) were evaluated. For 16 primary tumors with UICC stages I (n = 4), II (n = 3), IIIA (n = 2) and IIIB (n = 7) mean values for dwGTV were significantly larger than those of stGTV (76.6 ± 84.5 ml vs. 66.6 ± 75.2 ml, p<0.01). The correlation of stGTV and dwGTV was highly significant (r = 0.995, p<0.001). Yet, some considerable volume deviations between these two methods were observed (median 27.5%, range 0.4–52.1%). An acceptable agreement between dwGTV and stGTV regarding the spatial extent of primary tumors was found (average HD: 2.25 ± 0.7 mm; DC 0.68 ± 0.09). Conclusion The overall level of agreement between PET-CT and MRI based GTV definition is acceptable. Tumor volumes may differ considerably in single cases. DWI-derived GTVs are significantly, yet modestly, larger than their PET-CT based counterparts. Prospective studies to assess the safety and efficacy of DWI

  9. Study on effectiveness of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for relapsed or refractory AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Dong Ta; Shi, Chun Mei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Jing Ze; Liang, Jian Gang

    2012-11-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) remains the second most common malignant complication in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Even though NHL is commonly chemosensitive to primary treatment, failure or relapse still occurs in a large number of patients. We conducted this retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine, dexamethasone, and cisplatin (GDP) for relapsed or refractory AIDS-related NHL (AIDS-NHL). Forty-eight patients with relapsed or refractory AIDS-NHL were treated with intravenous combination chemotherapy with GDP. The overall objective response rate was 54.1% (95% confidence interval, CI, 40.1-68.3%), with 10 complete responses and 16 partial responses. The 2-year overall survival rate (OS) was 70.8% (95% CI 58.0-83.7%), and the 5-year OS was 41.7% (95% CI 27.7-55.6%). The 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) was 37.5% (95% CI 23.8-51.2%), and the 5-year PFS was 25.0% (95% CI 12.8-37.3%). The median progression-free survival was 8.8 months (95% CI 0-20.3 months), and the median overall survival was 40.6 months (95% CI 22.6-58.6 months). Patients with B cell tumors who relapsed but had no B symptoms were clinical stage I/II, had infiltration fewer than two extranodal sites, had CD4⁺ counts >200 cells/μL, and had lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) less than the upper limit of normal benefited from GDP. The level of LDH had a significant impact on the response rate to chemotherapy with GDP (P = 0.015). Myelosuppression was the main side effect; the incidence of grade 3-4 anemia was 8.3%; leukopenia, 37.5%; and thrombocytopenia, 48.3%. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables for OS and PFS. This study confirms that GDP is an effective and safe salvage regimen in relapsed or refractory AIDS-NHL, was associated with modest declines in CD4⁺ lymphocyte counts, and did not promote HIV-1 viral replication.

  10. Autograft HIV-DNA load predicts HIV-1 peripheral reservoir after stem cell transplantation for AIDS-related lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zanussi, Stefania; Bortolin, Maria Teresa; Pratesi, Chiara; Tedeschi, Rosamaria; Basaglia, Giancarlo; Abbruzzese, Luciano; Mazzucato, Mario; Spina, Michele; Vaccher, Emanuela; Tirelli, Umberto; Rupolo, Maurizio; Michieli, Mariagrazia; Di Mascio, Michele; De Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a widely used procedure for AIDS-related lymphomas, and it represents an opportunity to evaluate strategies curing HIV-1 infection. The association of autograft HIV-DNA load with peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoir before ASCT and its contribution in predicting HIV-1 reservoir size and stability during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) after transplantation are unknown. Aiming to obtain information suggesting new functional cure strategies by ASCT, we retrospectively evaluated HIV-DNA load in autograft and in peripheral blood before and after transplantation in 13 cART-treated HIV-1 relapse/refractoring lymphoma patients. Among them seven discontinued cART after autograft infusion. HIV-DNA was evaluated by a sensitive quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After debulking chemotherapy/mobilization, the autograft HIV-1 reservoir was higher than and not associated with the peripheral HIV-1 reservoir at baseline [median 215 HIV-DNA copies/10(6) autograft mononuclear cells, range 13-706 vs. 82 HIV-DNA copies/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), range 13-479, p = 0.03]. After high dose chemotherapy and autograft infusion, HIV-DNA levels reached a plateau between month 6 and 12 of follow-up. No association was found between peripheral HIV-DNA levels at baseline and after infusion in both cART interrupting and not interrupting patients. Only in the last subgroup, a stable significant linear association between autograft and peripheral blood HIV-1 reservoir emerged from month 1 (R(2) = 0.84, p = 0.01) to month 12 follow-up (R(2) = 0.99, p = 0.0005). In summary, autograft HIV-1 reservoir size could be influenced by the mobilization phase and predicts posttransplant peripheral HIV-1 reservoir size in patients on continuous cART. These findings could promote new research on strategies reducing the HIV-1 reservoir by using the ASCT procedure.

  11. Joint derivation method for determining optical properties based on steady-state spatially resolved diffuse reflectance measurement at small source-detector separations and large reduced albedo range: theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenzhi; Fan, Ying; Zhao, Huijuan; Xu, Kexin

    2012-06-01

    Accurate determination of the optical properties (the absorption coefficient μ(a) and the reduced scattering coefficient μ(s) (')) of tissues is very important in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Optical diffusion theory is frequently used as the forward model for describing the photon transfer in media with large reduced albedos (a(')) and in large source-detector separations (SDS). Several other methods (PN approximation, hybrid diffusion-P3 approximation) have also been published that describe photon transfer in media with low a(') or small SDSs. We studied the theoretical models for the steady-state spatially resolved diffuse reflectance measurement to accurately determine μ(a) and μ(s) (') at large a(') range but small SDSs. Instead of using a single model, a joint derivation method is proposed. The developed method uses one of the best aforementioned theoretical methods separately in five ranges of a(') determined from several forward models. In the region of small SDSs (the range between 0.4 and 8 mm) and large a(') range (between 0.5 and 0.99), the best theoretical derivation model was determined. The results indicate that the joint derivation method can improve the derivation accuracy and that a(') range can be determined by the steady-state spatially resolved diffuse reflectance measurement.

  12. Development of EBV-encoded small RNA targeted PCR to classify EBV positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewang; Park, Min; Lee, Min Ho; Woo, Hyun Jun; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Yang, Ji Yeong; Eom, Yong-Bin; Kim, Sa-Hyun; Yoo, Changyoung; Kim, Jong-Bae

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly has been included in the 2008 WHO classification of lymphoma as a new provisional entity. EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly is newly classified due to the main occurrence usually in patients of older than 50-year-old. This study was performed in 91 DLBCL patients from January 2002 to December 2012 in Catholic university of St. Vincent Hospital. Age distribution of the patients was 14~87-year-old. Specimens were collected from lymph nodes (n = 45) and extra-lymph nodes (n = 46). EBV encoded small RNA1 in situ hybridization (EBER1-ISH) known as a standard method for the diagnosis of DLBCL. In this study, nested PCR of DNA polymerase gene and EBER PCR were conducted to detect EBV. Presence of EBV was indicated in 3 samples (3.30%) by EBER-ISH, 26 samples (28.57%) by nPCR, and 3 samples (3.30%) by EBER PCR. The concordant results were obtained from EBER1-ISH and EBER PCR. Two samples were classified as EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly among 91 DLBCL patients. Previously, the incidence rate of DLBCL of the elderly in Asia has been reported as 5~11%, but the result in this study showed a slightly lower incidence rate. To our knowledge, this is the first report on EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly in Suwon area, Korea. EBER1-ISH and EBER PCR developed in this study may be helpful in classification of EBV-positive DLBCL of the elderly in future.

  13. Drastic change of phase interference by small diffusion of heavy-mass electrode atoms in carbon nanotubes and phase switching device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Junji; Takesue, Izumi; Hasegawa, Tetsuro

    2001-07-01

    We slightly diffuse atoms of electrode materials into one end of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), grown using nanoporous alumina membranes. Diffusion of the light-mass materials (carbon and aluminum) lead to weak localization in Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillation, consistent with past reports. In contrast, we find that diffusion of heavy-mass materials (gold and platinum) at the volume ratio of only about 5% change this weak localization to antilocalization. It is understood by a drastic change of the phase interference caused by the injection of spin-flipped electrons due to spin-orbit interaction in the diffusion region, in the entire part of the MWNTs. We also propose an electron-wave phase switching circuit using this effect.

  14. Combining land use information and small stream sampling with PCR-based methods for better characterization of diffuse sources of human fecal pollution.

    PubMed

    Peed, Lindsay A; Nietch, Christopher T; Kelty, Catherine A; Meckes, Mark; Mooney, Thomas; Sivaganesan, Mano; Shanks, Orin C

    2011-07-01

    Diffuse sources of human fecal pollution allow for the direct discharge of waste into receiving waters with minimal or no treatment. Traditional culture-based methods are commonly used to characterize fecal pollution in ambient waters, however these methods do not discern between human and other animal sources of fecal pollution making it difficult to identify diffuse pollution sources. Human-associated quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods in combination with low-order headwatershed sampling, precipitation information, and high-resolution geographic information system land use data can be useful for identifying diffuse source of human fecal pollution in receiving waters. To test this assertion, this study monitored nine headwatersheds over a two-year period potentially impacted by faulty septic systems and leaky sanitary sewer lines. Human fecal pollution was measured using three different human-associated qPCR methods and a positive significant correlation was seen between abundance of human-associated genetic markers and septic systems following wet weather events. In contrast, a negative correlation was observed with sanitary sewer line densities suggesting septic systems are the predominant diffuse source of human fecal pollution in the study area. These results demonstrate the advantages of combining water sampling, climate information, land-use computer-based modeling, and molecular biology disciplines to better characterize diffuse sources of human fecal pollution in environmental waters.

  15. Individual attitudes and perceived social norms: Reports on HIV/AIDS-related stigma among service providers in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Liang, Li-Jung; Wu, Zunyou; Lin, Chunqing; Wen, Yi

    2009-01-01

    This study examined HIV/AIDS-related stigma among Chinese service providers by comparing their personal attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS with their perception of social norms related to people living with HIV/AIDS. We randomly selected three provincial hospitals, four city/prefecture hospitals, 10 county hospitals, 18 township health clinics, and 54 village clinics from Yunnan, China. Doctors and nurses were randomly sampled proportionally to the doctor-nurse ratio of each hospital or clinic. Lab technicians were over-sampled in order to include an adequate representation in the analysis. A total of 1,101 service providers participated in a voluntary, anonymous survey where demographic characteristics, individual attitude and perceived social norms toward people living with HIV/AIDS, discrimination intent at work, general prejudicial attitude and knowledge on HIV/AIDS were measured. A majority of the sample demonstrated a similarity between their personal views and what they thought most people in society believe. Multiple logistic regressions revealed that participants who were younger or reported personal contact with people living with HIV/AIDS were significantly more likely to report personal attitudes toward the population that were more liberal than their perceived social norms. Holding a more liberal personal attitude toward people living with HIV/AIDS than perceived social norms was significantly and negatively related to the level of discrimination intent at work, perceived discrimination at interpersonal level and the level of general prejudicial attitude toward people living with HIV/AIDS. Results underscored the importance of understanding social norms and personal attitudes in studying HIV-related stigma and called for the incorporation of existing human capital into future HIV stigma reduction programs. Cette étude a examiné le VIH/SIDA lié à stigmatisation parmi les agences chinoises fournissant des soins en comparant leurs attitudes

  16. Effect of media use on HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and condom use in sub-Saharan Africa: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo; Arya, Monisha; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the level of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and the degree of condom use varies by socioeconomic status (SES). However, there is limited research on the effect of mass media use on HIV/AIDS-related cognitive and behavioral outcomes in low-income countries and how it might influence the association between SES and HIV-related outcomes. We investigated the moderating effect of media use on the relationship between SES and HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and condom use in sub-Saharan Africa in terms of communication inequalities. Cross-sectional data from the Demographic Health Surveys from 13 sub-Saharan countries (2004-10) were pooled. Gender-stratified multivariable poisson regression of 151,209 women and 68,890 men were used to calculate adjusted relative ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the associations between SES, media use, HIV-related outcomes, and condom use. We found significant disparities in mass media use among people from different SES groups as well as among countries. Education and wealth are strongly and positively associated with awareness of HIV/AIDS and knowledge about transmission and prevention of HIV/AIDS and are significantly associated with condom use. These associations are attenuated when the use of various types of mass media is added to the models, with newspapers showing the strongest effect. The findings of this study suggest that media use has the potential to blunt the impact of socioeconomic status though not completely eliminate it. Thus, we need to pay attention to reducing communication inequalities among social groups and countries to moderate the effect of wealth and SES on HIV/AIDS.

  17. Combining Land Use Information and Small Stream Sampling with PCR-Based Methods for Better Characterization of Diffuse Sources of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffuse sources of human fecal pollution allow for the direct discharge of waste into receiving waters with minimal or no treatment. Traditional culture-based methods are commonly used to characterize fecal pollution in ambient waters, however these methods do not discern between...

  18. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  19. Successful administration of aggressive chemotherapy concomitant to tuberculostatic and highly active antiretroviral therapy in a patient with AIDS-related Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, C; Wyen, C; Hoffmann, C; Fätkenheuer, G

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of AIDS-related malignant lymphoma (ARL) remains a therapeutic challenge. There are concerns not only about infectious and haematological complications in HIV-infected patients during intensive chemotherapy, but also about potential interactions between chemotherapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Current data on patients treated concomitantly with intensive chemotherapy and HAART are limited, and no data exist on patients with ARL suffering from active opportunistic infections. We report the case of a 38-year-old man with advanced HIV-1 infection, pulmonary tuberculosis and Burkitt's lymphoma. Intensive chemotherapy was administered in parallel with tuberculostatic therapy and HAART. Six months later, the patient achieved not only a complete remission of Burkitt's lymphoma and sustained viral suppression, but also a full recovery from tuberculosis. This case report provides some useful observations on the successful application of intensive chemotherapy in addition to tuberculostatic therapy and HAART in HIV-infected patients.

  20. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  1. WE-G-18C-02: Estimation of Optimal B-Value Set for Obtaining Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Free From Perfusion in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Karki, K; Hugo, G; Ford, J; Saraiya, S; Weiss, E; Olsen, K; Groves, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) is increasingly being investigated for radiotherapy planning and response assessment. Selection of a limited number of b-values in DW-MRI is important to keep geometrical variations low and imaging time short. We investigated various b-value sets to determine an optimal set for obtaining monoexponential apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) close to perfusion-insensitive intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) model ADC (ADCIVIM) in nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods: Seven patients had 27 DW-MRI scans before and during radiotherapy in a 1.5T scanner. Respiratory triggering was applied to the echo-planar DW-MRI with TR=4500ms approximately, TE=74ms, pixel size=1.98X1.98mm{sub 2}, slice thickness=4–6mm and 7 axial slices. Diffusion gradients were applied to all three axes producing traceweighted images with eight b-values of 0–1000μs/μm{sup 2}. Monoexponential model ADC values using various b-value sets were compared to ADCIVIM using all b-values. To compare the relative noise in ADC maps, intra-scan coefficient of variation (CV) of active tumor volumes was computed. Results: ADCIVIM, perfusion coefficient and perfusion fraction for tumor volumes were in the range of 880-1622 μm{sup 2}/s, 8119-33834 μm{sup 2}/s and 0.104–0.349, respectively. ADC values using sets of 250, 800 and 1000; 250, 650 and 1000; and 250–1000μs/μm{sup 2} only were not significantly different from ADCIVIM(p>0.05, paired t-test). Error in ADC values for 0–1000, 50–1000, 100–1000, 250–1000, 500–1000, and three b-value sets- 250, 500 and 1000; 250, 650 and 1000; and 250, 800 and 1000μs/μm{sup 2} were 15.0, 9.4, 5.6, 1.4, 11.7, 3.7, 2.0 and 0.2% relative to the reference-standard ADCIVIM, respectively. Mean intrascan CV was 20.2, 20.9, 21.9, 24.9, 32.6, 25.8, 25.4 and 24.8%, respectively, whereas that for ADCIVIM was 23.3%. Conclusion: ADC values of two 3 b-value sets

  2. HIV and AIDS related knowledge, sources of information, and reported need for further education among dental students in Sudan- a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Elwalid Fadul; Åstrøm, Anne Nordrehaug; David, Jamil; Ali, Rouf Wahab

    2008-01-01

    Background Information on the HIV and AIDS-related knowledge among dental students provides a crucial foundation for efforts aimed at developing an appropriate dental curriculum on HIV and AIDS, and for attracting the attention of dental school educators towards the subject. Purposes Focusing on a census of dental students attending their 3rd, 4th and 5th study year at publicly – and privately funded dental faculties in Khartoum, this study aimed to assess the prevalence and socio-economic correlates of dental students' knowledge, sources of information and reported need for further education related to HIV and AIDS. Methods At the time of the survey (March–May 2007), the total number of dental students registered was 782 of which 642 (response rate 82%, mean age 21.7 year, 72% girls) completed anonymous self-administered questionnaires in supervised class room settings. Results A total of 49% and 86% had correct sum scores with respect to knowledge of transmission through contamination and through shaking hands and eating, respectively. About half the dental students recognized a need for further education across HIV related issues, varying from 75% (basic HIV/AIDS related issues) to 84% (patient management). Only 38% of the students had correct sum scores regarding various occupational groups at risk for contacting HIV and AIDS. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that compared to privately funded dental school students, publicly funded dental school students were less likely to have correct knowledge about modes of HIV transmission (OR = 0.6) and occupational risk groups (OR = 0.6) and to have received information from lectures/health care workers (OR = 0.5). Conclusion Students attending privately funded schools were more knowledgeable about various HIV related issues than students from publicly funded schools. About half of the students investigated had received HIV/AIDS information from various sources and reported need for further education

  3. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  4. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  5. The dynamics of the production of AIDS-related stigma among pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Simone; Villela, Wilza; Fraga, Livia; Soares, Priscilla; Pinho, Adriana

    2016-12-15

    The study analyses the relationship between AIDS-related stigma and the processes of discrimination prior to diagnosis among pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS. The fieldwork involved interviews about the life trajectories of 29 pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS, recruited at two AIDS services in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The analysis revealed that before HIV diagnosis, social and gender inequalities experienced by these women reduced their access to material and symbolic goods that could have enhanced educational and career prospects and their ability and autonomy to exercise sexual and reproductive rights. Being diagnosed with HIV triggered fear of moral judgment and of breakdown in social and family support networks. Given these fears, pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS opt for concealment of the diagnosis. It is necessary for health services, NGOs and government agencies to work together to face the factors that fuel stigma, such as socioeconomic and gender inequalities, taboos and prejudices related to sexuality, and also develop actions to enable women to redefine the meaning of the disease.

  6. Diffusion of innovative agricultural production systems for sustainable development of small islands: A methodological approach based on the science of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Guiseppe; Butera, Federico M.

    1992-09-01

    In order to develop small islands, not only must a vital agricultural system be maintained, but the range of opportunities for tourism must be increased with respect to both the seaside and the environmental features of the rural landscape. As an alternative to the traditional and economically declining ones, many innovative production processes can be identified, but their success depends on their interaction with the physical, biological, economic and social environment. In order to identify the main nodes and the most critical interactions, so as to increase the probability of success of a new productive process, a methodological approach based on the science of complexity is proposed for the cultivation of capers ( Capparis spinosa L.) on the island of Pantelleria. The methodology encompasses the identification of actors and factors involved. the quantitative evaluation of their interactions with the different stages of the productive process, and a quasiquantitative evaluation of the probability that the particular action will be performed successfully. The study of “traditional,” “modernized,” and “modernized-sustainable” processes, shows that the modernized-sustainable process offers mutually reinforcing opportunities in terms of an integrated development of high-quality agricultural products and the enhancement of environmental features, in conjunction with high-efficiency production techniques, in conjunction with high-efficiency production techniques, in a way that suits the development of Pantelleria. There is a high probability of failure, however, as a result of the large number of critical factors. Nevertheless, the present study indicates which activities will enhance the probability of successful innovation in the production process.

  7. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  8. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  9. Re-validation of the Van Rie HIV/AIDS-related stigma scale for use with people living with HIV in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Aaron M; Audet, Carolyn M; Earnshaw, Valerie A; Owens, Jared; McGowan, Catherine C; Wallston, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    There is little consensus about which of the many validated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) stigma scales should be regularly used, with few being re-validated in different contexts or evaluated for how they compare to other, existing HIV stigma scales. The purpose of this exploratory study was to re-validate the Van Rie HIV/AIDS-Related Stigma Scale, originally validated in Thailand and using a third-person wording structure, for use with people living with HIV in the United States. Adult HIV clinic patients completed a survey including the Berger and Van Rie scales, and measures of social support and depression. Eighty-five of 211 (40%) eligible participants provided data for both stigma scales. Exploratory factor analyses identified three factors to the Van Rie scale: Loss of Social Relationships (new subscale), Managing HIV Concealment (new subscale), and Perceived Community Stigma (original subscale). These subscales were moderately inter-related (r = 0.51 to 0.58) with acceptable to excellent reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.69 to 0.90). The Van Rie subscales were also moderately inter-correlated with the Berger subscales (r = 0.44 to 0.76), had similar construct validity, and tended to have higher mean stigma scores when compared with Berger subscales that were conceptually most similar. The revised Van Rie HIV-related Stigma Scale demonstrates good validity and internal consistency, offering a valid measure of HIV stigma with a three-factor structure. The third-person wording may be particularly suitable for measuring stigmatizing attitudes during an individual's transition from at-risk and undergoing HIV testing to newly diagnosed, a time when experiences of discrimination and processing issues of disclosure have not yet occurred. The stigma mechanisms for individuals making this transition have not been well explored. These scenarios, combined with the observed non-response to the Berger Enacted Stigma subscale items (a surprise finding), highlight

  10. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  11. Diffusion in random networks

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Duan Z.; Padrino, Juan C.

    2017-06-01

    The ensemble averaging technique is applied to model mass transport by diffusion in random networks. The system consists of an ensemble of random networks, where each network is made of pockets connected by tortuous channels. Inside a channel, fluid transport is assumed to be governed by the one-dimensional diffusion equation. Mass balance leads to an integro-differential equation for the pocket mass density. The so-called dual-porosity model is found to be equivalent to the leading order approximation of the integration kernel when the diffusion time scale inside the channels is small compared to the macroscopic time scale. As a test problem,more » we consider the one-dimensional mass diffusion in a semi-infinite domain. Because of the required time to establish the linear concentration profile inside a channel, for early times the similarity variable is xt$-$1/4 rather than xt$-$1/2 as in the traditional theory. We found this early time similarity can be explained by random walk theory through the network.« less

  12. Radiation-stimulated diffusion in Al-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiv, A.; Fuks, D.; Munitz, A.; Zenou, V.; Moiseenko, N.

    A di-vacancy low-temperature diffusion is proposed to explain diffusion-controlled processes in Al-Si alloys responsible for neutron-induced silicon precipitation. Ab initio calculations of potential barriers for Si atom hopping in aluminium lattice showed that in the case of di-vacancy diffusion, they are small compared with that of mono-vacancy diffusion. The low temperature diffusivity of mono-vacancies is too small to account for the measured Si diffusivities in aluminium. The dependencies of radiation-stimulated diffusion on the neutron flux and on the temperature are obtained and can be used for the experimental verification of the developed model.

  13. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  14. Tracer diffusion in silica inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Cherdhirankorn, Thipphaya; Retsch, Markus; Jonas, Ulrich; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2010-06-15

    We employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the diffusion of small fluorescence tracers in liquid filled silica inverse opals. The inverse opals consisted of a nanoporous silica scaffold spanning a hexagonal crystal of spherical voids of 360 nm diameter connected by circular pores of 70 nm diameter. The diffusion of Alexa Fluor 488 in water and of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) in toluene was studied. Three diffusion modes could be distinguished: (1) Free diffusion limited by the geometric constraints given by the inverse opal, where, as compared to the free solution, this diffusion is slowed down by a factor of 3-4, (2) slow diffusion inside the nanoporous matrix of the silica scaffold, and (3) diffusion limited by adsorption. On the length scale of the focus of a confocal microscope of roughly 400 nm diffusion was non-Fickian in all cases.

  15. Inhibition of proliferation and survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells by a small-molecule inhibitor of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc13-Uev1A

    PubMed Central

    Pulvino, Mary; Liang, Yue; Oleksyn, David; DeRan, Michael; Van Pelt, Elise; Shapiro, Joel; Sanz, Ignacio; Chen, Luojing

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, remains a partially curable disease. Genetic alterations affecting components of NF-κB signaling pathways occur frequently in DLBCL. Almost all activated B cell–like (ABC) DLBCL, which is the least curable group among the 3 major subtypes of this malignancy, and a substantial fraction of germinal center B cell–like (GCB) DLBCL exhibit constitutive NF-κB pathway activity. It has been demonstrated that ABC-DLBCL cells require such activity for proliferation and survival. Therefore, inhibition of NF-κB activation in DLBCL may provide an efficient and targeted therapy. In screening for small-molecule compounds that may inhibit NF-κB activation in DLBCL cells, we identified a compound, NSC697923, which inhibits the activity of the ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzyme Ubc13-Uev1A. NSC697923 impedes the formation of the Ubc13 and ubiquitin thioester conjugate and suppresses constitutive NF-κB activity in ABC-DLBCL cells. Importantly, NSC697923 inhibits the proliferation and survival of ABC-DLBCL cells and GCB-DLBCL cells, suggesting the Ubc13-Uev1A may be crucial for DLBCL growth. Consistently, knockdown of Ubc13 expression also inhibited DLBCL cell survival. The results of the present study indicate that Ubc13-Uev1A may represent a potential therapeutic target in DLBCL. In addition, compound NSC697923 may be exploited for the development of DLBCL therapeutic agents. PMID:22791293

  16. Inhibition of proliferation and survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells by a small-molecule inhibitor of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc13-Uev1A.

    PubMed

    Pulvino, Mary; Liang, Yue; Oleksyn, David; DeRan, Michael; Van Pelt, Elise; Shapiro, Joel; Sanz, Ignacio; Chen, Luojing; Zhao, Jiyong

    2012-08-23

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, remains a partially curable disease. Genetic alterations affecting components of NF-κB signaling pathways occur frequently in DLBCL. Almost all activated B cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, which is the least curable group among the 3 major subtypes of this malignancy, and a substantial fraction of germinal center B cell-like (GCB) DLBCL exhibit constitutive NF-κB pathway activity. It has been demonstrated that ABC-DLBCL cells require such activity for proliferation and survival. Therefore, inhibition of NF-κB activation in DLBCL may provide an efficient and targeted therapy. In screening for small-molecule compounds that may inhibit NF-κB activation in DLBCL cells, we identified a compound, NSC697923, which inhibits the activity of the ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzyme Ubc13-Uev1A. NSC697923 impedes the formation of the Ubc13 and ubiquitin thioester conjugate and suppresses constitutive NF-κB activity in ABC-DLBCL cells. Importantly, NSC697923 inhibits the proliferation and survival of ABC-DLBCL cells and GCB-DLBCL cells, suggesting the Ubc13-Uev1A may be crucial for DLBCL growth. Consistently, knockdown of Ubc13 expression also inhibited DLBCL cell survival. The results of the present study indicate that Ubc13-Uev1A may represent a potential therapeutic target in DLBCL. In addition, compound NSC697923 may be exploited for the development of DLBCL therapeutic agents.

  17. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Geometry-induced asymmetric diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Robert S.; Packard, Norman; Schröter, Matthias; Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-01-01

    Past work has shown that ions can pass through a membrane more readily in one direction than the other. We demonstrate here in a model and an experiment that for a mixture of small and large particles such asymmetric diffusion can arise solely from an asymmetry in the geometry of the pores of the membrane. Our deterministic simulation considers a two-dimensional gas of elastic disks of two sizes diffusing through a membrane, and our laboratory experiment examines the diffusion of glass beads of two sizes through a metal membrane. In both experiment and simulation, the membrane is permeable only to the smaller particles, and the asymmetric pores lead to an asymmetry in the diffusion rates of these particles. The presence of even a small percentage of large particles can clog a membrane, preventing passage of the small particles in one direction while permitting free flow of the small particles in the other direction. The purely geometric kinetic constraints may play a role in common biological contexts such as membrane ion channels. PMID:17522257

  19. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  20. The speed of Arnold diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthymiopoulos, C.; Harsoula, M.

    2013-05-01

    A detailed numerical study is presented of the slow diffusion (Arnold diffusion) taking place around resonance crossings in nearly integrable Hamiltonian systems of three degrees of freedom in the so-called ‘Nekhoroshev regime’. The aim is to construct estimates regarding the speed of diffusion based on the numerical values of a truncated form of the so-called remainder of a normalized Hamiltonian function, and to compare them with the outcomes of direct numerical experiments using ensembles of orbits. In this comparison we examine, one by one, the main steps of the so-called analytic and geometric parts of the Nekhoroshev theorem. Thus: (i) we review and implement an algorithm Efthymiopoulos (2008) [45] for Hamiltonian normalization in multiply resonant domains which is implemented as a computer program making calculations up to a high normalization order. (ii) We compute the dependence of the optimal normalization order on the small parameter ɛ in a specific model and compare the result with theoretical estimates on this dependence. (iii) We examine in detail the consequences of assuming simple convexity conditions for the unperturbed Hamiltonian on the geometry of the resonances and on the phase space structure around resonance crossings. (iv) We discuss the dynamical mechanisms by which the remainder of the optimal Hamiltonian normal form drives the diffusion process. Through these steps, we are led to two main results: (i) We construct in our concrete example a convenient set of variables, proposed first by Benettin and Gallavotti (1986) [12], in which the phenomenon of Arnold diffusion in doubly resonant domains can be clearly visualized. (ii) We determine, by numerical fitting of our data, the dependence of the local diffusion coefficient D on the size ‖R‖ of the optimal remainder function, and we compare this with a heuristic argument based on the assumption of normal diffusion. We find a power law D∝‖, where the constant b has a small positive

  1. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  2. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  3. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  4. Diffusion in porous crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2012-04-21

    The design and development of many separation and catalytic process technologies require a proper quantitative description of diffusion of mixtures of guest molecules within porous crystalline materials. This tutorial review presents a unified, phenomenological description of diffusion inside meso- and micro-porous structures. In meso-porous materials, with pore sizes 2 nm < d(p) < 50 nm, there is a central core region where the influence of interactions of the molecules with the pore wall is either small or negligible; meso-pore diffusion is governed by a combination of molecule-molecule and molecule-pore wall interactions. Within micro-pores, with d(p) < 2 nm, the guest molecules are always under the influence of the force field exerted with the wall and we have to reckon with the motion of adsorbed molecules, and there is no "bulk" fluid region. The characteristics and physical significance of the self-, Maxwell-Stefan, and Fick diffusivities are explained with the aid of data obtained either from experiments or molecular dynamics simulations, for a wide variety of structures with different pore sizes and topology. The influence of adsorption thermodynamics, molecular clustering, and segregation on both magnitudes and concentration dependences of the diffusivities is highlighted. In mixture diffusion, correlations in molecular hops have the effect of slowing-down the more mobile species. The need for proper modeling of correlation effects using the Maxwell-Stefan formulation is stressed with the aid of examples of membrane separations and catalytic reactors.

  5. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  6. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  7. Effects of Diffusive Property Heterogeneity on Effective MatrixDiffusion Coefficient for Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingqi; Liu, Hui-hai; Zhou, Quanlin; Finsterle, Stefan

    2005-08-16

    Heterogeneities of diffusion properties are likely toinfluence the effective matrix diffusion coefficient determined fromtracer breakthrough curves. The objectives of this study are (1) toexamine if it is appropriate to use a single, effective matrix diffusioncoefficient to predict breakthrough curves in a fractured formation, (2)to examine if a postulated scale dependence of the effective matrixdiffusion coefficient is caused by heterogeneity in diffusion properties,and (3) to examine whether multirate diffusion results in the previouslyobserved time dependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient.The results show that the use of a single effective matrix diffusioncoefficient is appropriate only if the interchannel and intrachannelvariability of diffusion properties is small. The scale dependence of theeffective matrix diffusion coefficient is not caused by the studied typesof heterogeneity. Finally, the multirate diffusion process does notresult in the time dependence of the effective matrix diffusioncoefficient. oefficient is appropriate only if the inter- andintrachannel variability of diffusion properties is small. The scaledependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is not caused byeither type of the studied heterogeneity. Finally, the multi-ratediffusion process does not result in the time dependence of the effectivematrix diffusion coefficient.

  8. Overexpression of MicroRNAs from the miR-17-92 Paralog Clusters in AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Dharma R.; Li, Xinmin; Jamieson, Beth D.; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2011-01-01

    Background Individuals infected by HIV are at an increased risk for developing non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (AIDS-NHL). In the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era, there has been a significant decline in the incidence of AIDS-associated primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). However, only a modest decrease in incidence has been reported for other AIDS-NHL subtypes. Thus, AIDS-NHLs remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV infected individuals. Recently, much attention has been directed toward the role of miRNAs in cancer, including NHL. Several miRNAs, including those encoded by the miR-17-92 polycistron, have been shown to play significant roles in B cell tumorigenesis. However, the role of miRNAs in NHL in the setting of HIV infection has not been defined. Methodology/Principal Findings We used quantitative realtime PCR to assess the expression of miRNAs from three different paralog clusters, miR-17-92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25 in 24 cases of AIDS-NHLs representing four tumor types, Burkitt's lymphoma (BL, n = 6), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, n = 8), primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, n = 5), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, n = 5). We also used microarray analysis to identify a differentiation specific miRNA signature of naïve, germinal center, and memory B cell subsets from tonsils (n = 4). miRNAs from the miR-17-92 paralog clusters were upregulated by B cells, specifically during the GC differentiation stage. We also found overexpression of these miRNA clusters in all four AIDS-NHL subtypes. Finally, we also show that select miRNAs from these clusters (miR-17, miR-106a, and miR-106b) inhibited p21 in AIDS-BL and DLBCL cases, thus providing a mechanistic role for these miRNAs in AIDS-NHL pathogenesis. Conclusion Dysregulation of miR-17-92 paralog clusters is a common feature of AIDS-associated NHLs. PMID:21698185

  9. Diffusion in Altered Tonalite Sample Using Time Domain Diffusion Simulations in Tomographic Images Combined with Lab-scale Diffusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voutilainen, M.; Sardini, P.; Togneri, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Timonen, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this work an effect of rock heterogeneity on diffusion was investigated. Time domain diffusion simulations were used to compare behavior of diffusion in homogeneous and heterogeneous 3D media. Tomographic images were used as heterogeneous rock media. One altered tonalite sample from Sievi, Finland, was chosen as test case for introduced analysis procedure. Effective diffusion coefficient of tonalite sample was determined with lab-scale experiments and the same coefficient was used also for homogeneous media. Somewhat technically complicated mathematical solution for analysis of through diffusion experiment is shortly described. Computed tomography (CT) is already quite widely used in many geological, petrological, and paleontological applications when the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the material is of interest, and is an excellent method for gaining information especially about its heterogeneity, grain size, or porosity. In addition to offering means for quantitative characterization, CT provides a lot of qualitative information [1]. A through -diffusion laboratory experiment using radioactive tracer was fitted using the Time Domain Diffusion (TDD) method. This rapid particle tracking method allows simulation of the heterogeneous diffusion based on pore-scale images and local values of diffusivities [2]. As a result we found out that heterogeneity has only a small effect to diffusion coefficient and in-diffusion profile for used geometry. Also direction dependency was tested and was found to be negligible. Whereas significant difference between generally accepted value and value obtained from simulations for constant m in Archie’s law was found. [1] Voutilainen, M., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Sardini, P., and Timonen, J., (2010). On pore-space characterization of an altered tonalite by X-ray µCT and the 14C-PMMA method (in progress). [2] Sardini, P., Robinet, J., Siitari-Kauppi, M., Delay, F., and Hellmuth, K-H, (2007). On direct simulation of heterogeneous

  10. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOEpatents

    Oborny, Michael C.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2008-07-15

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  11. Diffusion in Brain Extracellular Space

    PubMed Central

    Syková, Eva; Nicholson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Diffusion in the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is constrained by the volume fraction and the tortuosity and a modified diffusion equation represents the transport behavior of many molecules in the brain. Deviations from the equation reveal loss of molecules across the blood-brain barrier, through cellular uptake, binding or other mechanisms. Early diffusion measurements used radiolabeled sucrose and other tracers. Presently, the real-time iontophoresis (RTI) method is employed for small ions and the integrative optical imaging (IOI) method for fluorescent macromolecules, including dextrans or proteins. Theoretical models and simulations of the ECS have explored the influence of ECS geometry, effects of dead-space microdomains, extracellular matrix and interaction of macromolecules with ECS channels. Extensive experimental studies with the RTI method employing the cation tetramethylammonium (TMA) in normal brain tissue show that the volume fraction of the ECS typically is about 20% and the tortuosity about 1.6 (i.e. free diffusion coefficient of TMA is reduced by 2.6), although there are regional variations. These parameters change during development and aging. Diffusion properties have been characterized in several interventions, including brain stimulation, osmotic challenge and knockout of extracellular matrix components. Measurements have also been made during ischemia, in models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and in human gliomas. Overall, these studies improve our conception of ECS structure and the roles of glia and extracellular matrix in modulating the ECS microenvironment. Knowledge of ECS diffusion properties are valuable in contexts ranging from understanding extrasynaptic volume transmission to the development of paradigms for drug delivery to the brain. PMID:18923183

  12. Macromolecule diffusion and confinement in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mika, Jacek T; Poolman, Bert

    2011-02-01

    We review recent observations on the mobility of macromolecules and their spatial organization in live bacterial cells. We outline the major fluorescence microscopy-based methods to determine the mobility and thus the diffusion coefficients (D) of molecules, which is not trivial in small cells. The extremely high macromolecule crowding of prokaryotes is used to rationalize the reported lower diffusion coefficients as compared to eukaryotes, and we speculate on the nature of the barriers for diffusion observed for proteins (and mRNAs) in vivo. Building on in vitro experiments and modeling studies, we evaluate the size dependence of diffusion coefficients for macromolecules in vivo, in case of both water-soluble and integral membrane proteins. We comment on the possibilities of anomalous diffusion and provide examples where the macromolecule mobility may be limiting biological processes.

  13. Diffuse inelastic scattering of atoms from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J.R.; Celli, V.

    1989-02-15

    We consider the large-angle diffuse scattering of thermal-energy atoms by defects or adsorbates on a surface. We obtain the Debye-Waller factor for the thermal attenuation of the incoherent elastic peak. When the Debye exponent is small, the diffuse inelastic contribution is dominated by the single-phonon exchange, and is proportional to the frequency distribution function of the defect or adsorbate. We discuss its magnitude compared to the multiphonon background.

  14. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  15. Diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of tungsten hexafluoride

  16. Reduce Confusion about Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebrank, Mary R.

    1997-01-01

    Presents activities that allow students to explore the fundamental but poorly understood concept of diffusion by appealing to their kinesthetic senses first, then challenging their analytical skills as they try to deduce the mathematical principle involved. Presents a computer simulation of diffusion and discusses diffusion's limitations and…

  17. Diffusion Strategy Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, James R.; Sanders, John R.

    A methodology is presented for planning and managing the spread of educational innovations. The first portion of the guide develops a theoretical framework for diffusion which summarizes and capitalizes on the latest marketing and on the latest marketing and diffusion research findings. Major stages in the diffusion paradigm discussed include…

  18. A Student Diffusion Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Pearson, Bryan

    2017-02-01

    Diffusion is a truly interdisciplinary topic bridging all areas of STEM education. When biomolecules are not being moved through the body by fluid flow through the circulatory system or by molecular motors, diffusion is the primary mode of transport over short distances. The direction of the diffusive flow of particles is from high concentration toward low concentration.

  19. Handbook on atmospheric diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Basic meteorological concepts are covered as well as plume rise, source effects, and diffusion models. Chapters are included on cooling tower plumes and urban diffusion. Suggestions are given for calculating diffusion in special situations, such as for instantaneous releases over complex terrain, over long distances, and during times when chemical reactions or dry or wet deposition are important. (PSB)

  20. Diffusion and transport coefficients in synthetic opals

    SciTech Connect

    Sofo, J. O.; Mahan, G. D.

    2000-07-15

    Opals are structures composed of close-packed spheres in the size range of nano to micrometers. They are sintered to create small necks at the points of contact. We have solved the diffusion problem in such structures. The relation between the diffusion coefficient and the thermal and electrical conductivity is used to estimate the transport coefficients of opal structures as a function of the neck size and the mean free path of the carriers. The theory presented is also applicable to the diffusion problem in other periodic structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  1. Diffusion of spherical particles in microcavities.

    PubMed

    Imperio, A; Padding, J T; Briels, W J

    2011-04-21

    The diffusive motion of a colloidal particle trapped inside a small cavity filled with fluid is reduced by hydrodynamic interactions with the confining walls. In this work, we study these wall effects on a spherical particle entrapped in a closed cylinder. We calculate the diffusion coefficient along the radial, azimuthal, and axial direction for different particle positions. At all locations the diffusion is smaller than in a bulk fluid and it becomes anisotropic near the container's walls. We present a simple model which reasonably well describes the simulation results for the given dimensions of the cylinder, which are taken from the recent experimental work.

  2. Ambipolar diffusion in complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Losseva, T V; Popel, S I; Yu, M Y; Ma, J X

    2007-04-01

    A self-consistent model of the ambipolar diffusion of electrons and ions in complex (dusty) plasmas accounting for the local electric fields, the dust grain charging process, and the interaction of the plasma particles with the dust grains and neutrals is presented. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the interaction of the electrons and ions with the dust grains as well as with the neutrals are investigated. It is shown that increase of the dust density leads to a reduction of the diffusion scale length, and this effect is enhanced at higher electron densities. The dependence of the diffusion scale length on the neutral gas pressure is found to be given by a power law, where the absolute value of the power exponent decreases with increase of the dust density. The electric field gradient and its effects are shown to be significant and should thus be taken into account in studies of complex plasmas with not very small dust densities. The possibility of observing localized coherent dissipative nonlinear dust ion-acoustic structures in an asymmetrically discharged double plasma is discussed.

  3. ANALYTIC FORMS OF THE PERPENDICULAR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT IN NRMHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.

    2015-02-01

    In the past different analytic limits for the perpendicular diffusion coefficient of energetic particles interacting with magnetic turbulence were discussed. These different limits or cases correspond to different transport modes describing how the particles are diffusing across the large-scale magnetic field. In the current paper we describe a new transport regime by considering the model of noisy reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We derive different analytic forms of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, and while we do this, we focus on the aforementioned new transport mode. We show that for this turbulence model a small perpendicular diffusion coefficient can be obtained so that the latter diffusion coefficient is more than hundred times smaller than the parallel diffusion coefficient. This result is relevant to explain observations in the solar system where such small perpendicular diffusion coefficients have been reported.

  4. AIDS-related mycoses: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gordon D; Meintjes, Graeme; Kolls, Jay K; Gray, Clive; Horsnell, William; Achan, Beatrice; Alber, Gottfried; Aloisi, Maria; Armstrong-James, Darius; Beale, Mathew; Bicanic, Tihana; Black, John; Bohjanen, Paul; Botes, Angela; Boulware, David R; Brown, Gordon; Bunjun, Rubina; Carr, William; Casadevall, Arturo; Chang, Christina; Chivero, Ernest; Corcoran, Craig; Cross, Anna; Dawood, Halima; Day, Jeremy; De Bernardis, Flavia; De Jager, Veronique; De Repentigny, Louis; Denning, David; Eschke, Maria; Finkelman, Malcolm; Govender, Nelesh; Gow, Neil; Graham, Lisa; Gryschek, Ronaldo; Hammond-Aryee, Kenneth; Harrison, Tom; Heard, Neil; Hill, Melanie; Hoving, J Claire; Janoff, Edward; Jarvis, Joseph; Kayuni, Sekeleghe; King, Karin; Kolls, Jay; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Lalloo, David G; Letang, Emilio; Levitz, Stuart; Limper, Andrew; Longley, Nicky; Machiridza, Tendai Rodney; Mahabeer, Yesholata; Martinsons, Neil; Meiring, Susan; Meya, David; Miller, Robert; Molloy, Sile; Morris, Lynn; Mukaremera, Liliane; Musubire, Abdu K; Muzoora, Conrad; Nair, Amy; Nakiwala Kimbowa, Justine; Netea, Mihai; Nielsen, Kirsten; O'hern, Jennifer; Okurut, Samuel; Parker, Arifa; Patterson, Tom; Pennap, Grace; Perfect, John; Prinsloo, Chrisna; Rhein, Joshua; Rolfes, Melissa A; Samuel, Catherine; Schutz, Charlotte; Scriven, James; Sebolai, Olihile M; Sojane, Katlego; Sriruttan, Charlotte; Stead, David; Steyn, Annica; Thawer, Narjis K; Thienemann, Friedrich; Von Hohenberg, Maximilian; Vreulink, Jo-marie; Wessels, Jeannette; Wood, Kathryn; Yang, Yun-liang

    2014-03-01

    The contribution of fungal infections to the morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected individuals is largely unrecognized. A recent meeting highlighted several priorities that need to be urgently addressed, including improved epidemiological surveillance, increased availability of existing diagnostics and drugs, more training in the field of medical mycology, and better funding for research and provision of treatment, particularly in developing countries.

  5. Mobility aid-related accidents in children.

    PubMed

    2012-02-01

    During the period 1991-2008, more than 63 000 children were examined in US emergency rooms following an accident related to a mobility aid: 40% of the children were less than 10 years old; 60% of the accidents occurred at home; and 4.4% of the children were hospitalised. Wheelchairs were the devices most often involved (67%), followed by crutches and walkers. Most accidents involving children under 10 years old were linked to a walker or wheelchair, and mainly resulted in head injuries. Most of the accidents in older children involved crutches and caused lower-limb sprains. In practice, the correct use of mobility aids should be explained to parents and children, and information given about the circumstances most likely to lead to accidents. Children using these devices should be supervised if necessary.

  6. Diagnosis of AIDS-Related Intestinal Parasites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-20

    evaluated, only anecdotal success has been reported. In at least three trials, spiramycin , previously the most promising agent, has now been shown to... spiramycin , were ineffective. The patient received the hyperimmune colostrum by direct duodenal infusion, and during infusion, the patient’s fecal output...J Gastro 1086; 81:456-458. 11. Moskovitz BL, Stanton TL, Kusmierek JJE. Spiramycin therapy for cryptosporidial diarrhoea in imrnunocompromised

  7. Diagnosis of AIDS-Related Intestinal Parasites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-20

    nosocomial outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have been recorded from Italy, South Africa, and Argentina . In the first, six patients on a bone marrow...examination; this was considered consistent with hospital spread (32). in a renal transplant unit in Buenos Aires, Argentina , 11 of 14 patients with acute...Peruvian Per-Urban Shanty Town (Pueblo joven ) (submitted). Significance: In a field setting, ELISA testing offers a cheap, quick and reliable diagnostic

  8. Dentistry and HIV/AIDS related stigma

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo, Jesus Eduardo; Treviño, Ana Cecilia; Violant, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze HIV/AIDS positive individual’s perception and attitudes regarding dental services. METHODS One hundred and thirty-four subjects (30.0% of women and 70.0% of men) from Nuevo León, Mexico, took part in the study (2014). They filled out structured, analytical, self-administered, anonymous questionnaires. Besides the sociodemographic variables, the perception regarding public and private dental services and related professionals was evaluated, as well as the perceived stigma associated with HIV/AIDS, through a Likert-type scale. The statistical evaluation included a factorial and a non-hierarchical cluster analysis. RESULTS Social inequalities were found regarding the search for public and private dental professionals and services. Most subjects reported omitting their HIV serodiagnosis and agreed that dentists must be trained and qualified to treat patients with HIV/AIDS. The factorial analysis revealed two elements: experiences of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments and feelings of concern regarding the attitudes of professionals or their teams concerning patients’ HIV serodiagnosis. The cluster analysis identified three groups: users who have not experienced stigma or discrimination (85.0%); the ones who have not had those experiences, but feel somewhat concerned (12.7%); and the ones who underwent stigma and discrimination and feel concerned (2.3%). CONCLUSIONS We observed a low percentage of stigma and discrimination in dental appointments; however, most HIV/AIDS patients do not reveal their serodiagnosis to dentists out of fear of being rejected. Such fact implies a workplace hazard to dental professionals, but especially to the very own health of HIV/AIDS patients, as dentists will not be able to provide them a proper clinical and pharmaceutical treatment. PMID:26538100

  9. Diagnosis of AIDS-Related Intestinal Parasites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-07

    Peru), Claudio F. Lanata (Instituto de Investigacion Nutricional , Lima, Peru) and Irene Perez-Schael (Instituto de Biomedicina, Caracas, Venezuela) (15...above) and Homero Martinez, M.D., Instituto National de la Nutricion , Mexico City. In this study, 53 children with at least one microscopic stool

  10. Self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional version of the generalized Smoluchowski equation is used to analyze the time (or distance) dependent self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins in concentrated membrane systems. This equation provides a well established starting point for descriptions of the diffusion of particles that interact through both direct and hydrodynamic forces; in this initial work only the effects of direct interactions are explicitly considered. Data describing diffusion in the presence of hard-core repulsions, soft repulsions, and soft repulsions with weak attractions are presented. The effect that interactions have on the self-diffusion coefficient of a real protein molecule from mouse liver gap junctions is also calculated. The results indicate that self diffusion is always inhibited by direct interactions; this observation is interpreted in terms of the caging that will exist at finite protein concentration. It is also noted that, over small distance scales, the diffusion coefficient is determined entirely by the very strong Brownian forces; therefore, as a function of displacement the self-diffusion coefficient decays (rapidly) from its value at infinite dilution to its steady-state interaction-averaged value. The steady-state self-diffusion coefficient describes motion over distance scales that range from approximately 10 nm to cellular dimensions and is the quantity measured in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. The short-ranged behavior of the diffusion coefficient is important on the interparticle-distance scale and may therefore influence the rate at which nearest-neighbor collisional processes take place. The hard-disk theoretical results presented here are in excellent agreement with lattice Monte-Carlo results obtained by other workers. The concentration dependence of experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of antibody-hapten complexes bound to the membrane surface is consistent with that predicted by the theory. The

  11. Handheld Diffusion Test Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photo shows the Handheld Diffusion Test Cell (HH-DTC) apparatus flown on the Space Shuttle. Similar cells (inside the plastic box) will be used in the Observable Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus (OPCGA) to be operated aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The principal investigator is Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine. Each individual cell comprises two sample chambers with a rotating center section that isolates the two from each other until the start of the experiment and after it is completed. The cells are made from optical-quality quartz glass to allow photography and interferometric observations. Each cell has a small light-emitting diode and lens to back-light the solution. In protein crystal growth experiments, a precipitating agent such as a salt solution is used to absorb and hold water but repel the protein molecules. This increases the concentration of protein until the molecules nucleate to form crystals. This cell is one of 96 that make up the experiment module portion of the OPCGA.

  12. Hereditary Diffuse Infiltrating Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Schedler, Katharina J E; Traine, Peter G; Lohmann, Dietmar R; Haritoglou, Christos; Metz, Klaus A; Rodrigues, Eduardo B

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is one of the most common childhood cancers. The diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma is a rare subtype of this neoplasm. The majority of cases of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma are unilateral and occur sporadically. Herein we report on a family with three children affected by retinoblastoma, among them one girl with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. This girl was diagnosed at the age of 8 years with a unilateral diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. By contrast, the two brothers became clinically apparent in the first 2 years of life with bilateral retinoblastoma. The parents were clinically unremarkable. Genetic analysis of RB1 gene was performed. The girl with diffuse infiltrating RB was found to be heterozygous for an oncogenic mutation in the RB1 gene that was also carried by both brothers and the father of the family. These results show that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma can develop on the background of a hereditary predisposition to retinoblastoma.

  13. Gaseous diffusion system

    DOEpatents

    Garrett, George A.; Shacter, John

    1978-01-01

    1. A gaseous diffusion system comprising a plurality of diffusers connected in cascade to form a series of stages, each of said diffusers having a porous partition dividing it into a high pressure chamber and a low pressure chamber, and means for combining a portion of the enriched gas from a succeeding stage with a portion of the enriched gas from the low pressure chamber of each stage and feeding it into one extremity of the high pressure chamber thereof.

  14. Phase singularity diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaojun; Lockerman, Yitzchak; Genack, Azriel Z

    2014-06-01

    We follow the trajectories of phase singularities at nulls of intensity in the speckle pattern of waves transmitted through random media as the frequency of the incident radiation is scanned in microwave experiments and numerical simulations. Phase singularities are observed to diffuse with a linear increase of the square displacement 〈R2〉 with frequency shift. The product of the diffusion coefficient of phase singularities in the transmitted speckle pattern and the photon diffusion coefficient through the random medium is proportional to the square of the effective sample length. This provides the photon diffusion coefficient and a method for characterizing the motion of dynamic material systems.

  15. Inpainting using airy diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorduy Hernandez, Sara

    2015-09-01

    One inpainting procedure based on Airy diffusion is proposed, implemented via Maple and applied to some digital images. Airy diffusion is a partial differential equation with spatial derivatives of third order in contrast with the usual diffusion with spatial derivatives of second order. Airy diffusion generates the Airy semigroup in terms of the Airy functions which can be rewritten in terms of Bessel functions. The Airy diffusion can be used to smooth an image with the corresponding noise elimination via convolution. Also the Airy diffusion can be used to erase objects from an image. We build an algorithm using the Maple package ImageTools and such algorithm is tested using some images. Our results using Airy diffusion are compared with the similar results using standard diffusion. We observe that Airy diffusion generates powerful filters for image processing which could be incorporated in the usual packages for image processing such as ImageJ and Photoshop. Also is interesting to consider the possibility to incorporate the Airy filters as applications for smartphones and smart-glasses.

  16. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  17. Random walks models with intermediate fractional diffusion asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saichev, Alexander I.; Utkin, Sergei G.

    2004-05-01

    Random walk process was investigated with PDF of random time intervals similar to fractional exponential law on small times and to regular exponential law on long times. Generalized fractional Kolmogorov-Feller equation was derived for such kind of process. Asymptotics of its PDF in the long time limit and for intermediate times were found. They obey standard diffusion law or fractional diffusion law respectively. Exact solutions of mentioned equations were numerically calculated, demonstrating crossover of fractional diffusion law into the linear one.

  18. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  19. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Matthew A.; Swope, David M.; Grimes, David

    2012-01-01

    Background It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion. Methods This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method). It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB). Results Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others. Discussion Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected. PMID:23440162

  20. Investigating Diffusion with Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jon S.; Windelborn, Augden F.

    2013-01-01

    The activities described here allow students to explore the concept of diffusion with the use of common equipment such as computers, webcams and analysis software. The procedure includes taking a series of digital pictures of a container of water with a webcam as a dye slowly diffuses. At known time points, measurements of the pixel densities…

  1. The Diffusion of Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earabino, Gerard J.; Heyl, G. Christopher; Percorini, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    New ideas encounter obstacles on way to becoming products. Report examines process by which new ideas become products, processes, or accepted standards. Sequence of events called "the diffusion of innovation." Focuses on development of material processing in low gravity as case study in diffusion of innovation.

  2. Cosmology with matter diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Calogero, Simone; Velten, Hermano E-mail: velten@cce.ufes.br

    2013-11-01

    We construct a viable cosmological model based on velocity diffusion of matter particles. In order to ensure the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor in the presence of diffusion, we include a cosmological scalar field φ which we identify with the dark energy component of the universe. The model is characterized by only one new degree of freedom, the diffusion parameter σ. The standard ΛCDM model can be recovered by setting σ = 0. If diffusion takes place (σ > 0) the dynamics of the matter and of the dark energy fields are coupled. We argue that the existence of a diffusion mechanism in the universe may serve as a theoretical motivation for interacting models. We constrain the background dynamics of the diffusion model with Supernovae, H(z) and BAO data. We also perform a perturbative analysis of this model in order to understand structure formation in the universe. We calculate the impact of diffusion both on the CMB spectrum, with particular attention to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe signal, and on the matter power spectrum P(k). The latter analysis places strong constraints on the magnitude of the diffusion mechanism but does not rule out the model.

  3. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hughto, J.; Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2011-07-15

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions ''hop'' in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter {Gamma}=175 to Coulomb parameters up to {Gamma}=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  4. Diffusion in Coulomb crystals.

    PubMed

    Hughto, J; Schneider, A S; Horowitz, C J; Berry, D K

    2011-07-01

    Diffusion in Coulomb crystals can be important for the structure of neutron star crusts. We determine diffusion constants D from molecular dynamics simulations. We find that D for Coulomb crystals with relatively soft-core 1/r interactions may be larger than D for Lennard-Jones or other solids with harder-core interactions. Diffusion, for simulations of nearly perfect body-centered-cubic lattices, involves the exchange of ions in ringlike configurations. Here ions "hop" in unison without the formation of long lived vacancies. Diffusion, for imperfect crystals, involves the motion of defects. Finally, we find that diffusion, for an amorphous system rapidly quenched from Coulomb parameter Γ=175 to Coulomb parameters up to Γ=1750, is fast enough that the system starts to crystalize during long simulation runs. These results strongly suggest that Coulomb solids in cold white dwarf stars, and the crust of neutron stars, will be crystalline and not amorphous.

  5. Combustor diffuser interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Ram; Thorp, Daniel

    1986-01-01

    Advances in gas turbine engine performance are achieved by using compressor systems with high stage loading and low part count, which result in high exit Mach numbers. The diffuser and combustor systems in such engines should be optimized to reduce system pressure loss and to maximize the engine thrust-to-weight ratio and minimize length. The state-of-the-art combustor-diffuser systems do not meet these requirements. Detailed understanding of the combustor-diffuser flow field interaction is required for designing advanced gas turbine engines. An experimental study of the combustor-diffuser interaction (CDI) is being conducted to obtain data for the evaluation and improvement of analytical models applicable to a wide variety of diffuser designs. The CDI program consists of four technical phases: Literature Search; Baseline Configuration; Parametric Configurations; and Performance Configurations. Phase 2 of the program is in progress.

  6. A Simple Refraction Experiment for Probing Diffusion in Ternary Mixtures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coutinho, Cecil A.; Mankidy, Bijith D.; Gupta, Vinay K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion is a fundamental phenomenon that is vital in many chemical processes such as mass transport in living cells, corrosion, and separations. We describe a simple undergraduate-level experiment based on Weiner's Method to probe diffusion in a ternary aqueous mixture of small molecular-weight molecules. As an illustration, the experiment…

  7. Helium diffusion in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amidon, W. H.; Cherniak, D. J.; Watson, E. B.; Hobbs, D.

    2013-12-01

    The abundance and large grain size of carbonate minerals make them a potentially attractive target for 4He thermochronology and 3He cosmogenic dating, although the diffusive properties of helium in carbonates remain poorly understood. This work characterizes helium diffusion in calcite and dolomite to better understand the crystal-chemical factors controlling He transport and retentivity. Slabs of cleaved natural calcite and dolomite, and polished sections of calcite cut parallel or normal to c, were implanted with 3He at 3 MeV with a dose of 5x1015/cm2. Implanted carbonates were heated in 1-atm furnaces, and 3He distributions following diffusion anneals were profiled with Nuclear Reaction Analysis using the reaction 3He(d,p)4He. For 3He transport normal to cleavage surfaces in calcite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation over the temperature range 78-300°C: Dcalcite = 9.0x10-9exp(-55 × 6 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. Diffusion in calcite exhibits marked anisotropy, with diffusion parallel to c about two orders of magnitude slower than diffusion normal to cleavage faces. He diffusivities for transport normal to the c-axis are similar in value to those normal to cleavage surfaces. Our findings are broadly consistent with helium diffusivities from step-heating measurements of calcite by Copeland et al. (2007); these bulk degassing data may reflect varying effects of diffusional anisotropy. Helium diffusion normal to cleavage surfaces in dolomite is significantly slower than diffusion in calcite, and has a much higher activation energy for diffusion. For dolomite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for He diffusion over the temperature range 150-400°C: Ddolomite = 9.0x10-8exp(-92 × 9 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1. The role of crystallographic structure in influencing these differences among diffusivities was evaluated using the maximum aperture approach of Cherniak and Watson (2011), in which crystallographic structures are sectioned along possible diffusion

  8. Thorium Diffusion in Monazite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Diffusion of thorium has been characterized in synthetic monazite under dry conditions. The synthetic monazites (either pure CePO4, NdPO4, or a mixed LREE phosphate containing Ce, Nd, and Sm) were grown via a Na2CO3-MoO3 flux method. The source of diffusant for the experiments were either synthesized ThSiO4 or CaTh(PO4)2 powders. Experiments were performed by placing source and monazite in Pt capsules and annealing capsules in 1 atm furnaces for times ranging from 10 days to a few hours, at temperatures from 1400 to 1550C. The Th distributions in the monazite were profiled by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). The following Arrhenius relation was obtained for diffusion in monazite: DSm = 7.2x103 exp(-814 kJ mol-1/RT) m2sec-1 The diffusivity of Th was similar for monazites containing a single REE and the mixed LREE phosphates. Th diffusion was also similar for experiments run using the Th silicate and Ca-Th phosphate sources, suggesting that the substitutional mechanism for Th in monazite, i.e, Th+4 + Si+4 for REE+3 + P+5 with the ThSiO4 source, and Th+4 + Ca+2 for 2REE+3 with the CaTh(PO4)2 source, does not significantly affect Th diffusivities, and that Th is likely the rate-limiting species. Th diffusion in monazite is about 4 orders of magnitude slower than Pb diffusion (Cherniak et al., 2004). This contrasts with findings of Gardes et al. (2005) who determined that Pb, Th and REE diffusivities in monazite are similar. Th diffusion in zircon (Cherniak et al., 1997) is about an order of magnitude slower than in monazite, but with similar activation energy for diffusion. The smaller diffusivities in zircon may be a consequence of the larger disparity in size between Th and the Zr site in zircon as compared with Th and the REE site in monazite. Nonetheless, Th is essentially immobile in monazite with respect to exchange by volume diffusion under most geologic conditions; these findings may have implications for containment of high- level actinide

  9. Tungsten diffusion in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    De Luca, A.; Texier, M.; Burle, N.; Oison, V.; Pichaud, B.; Portavoce, A.; Grosjean, C.

    2014-01-07

    Two doses (10{sup 13} and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}) of tungsten (W) atoms were implanted in different Si(001) wafers in order to study W diffusion in Si. The samples were annealed or oxidized at temperatures between 776 and 960 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and defect formation was studied by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. W is shown to reduce Si recrystallization after implantation and to exhibit, in the temperature range investigated, a solubility limit close to 0.15%–0.2%, which is higher than the solubility limit of usual metallic impurities in Si. W diffusion exhibits unusual linear diffusion profiles with a maximum concentration always located at the Si surface, slower kinetics than other metals in Si, and promotes vacancy accumulation close to the Si surface, with the formation of hollow cavities in the case of the higher W dose. In addition, Si self-interstitial injection during oxidation is shown to promote W-Si clustering. Taking into account these observations, a diffusion model based on the simultaneous diffusion of interstitial W atoms and W-Si atomic pairs is proposed since usual models used to model diffusion of metallic impurities and dopants in Si cannot reproduce experimental observations.

  10. Isotope effect of mercury diffusion in air

    PubMed Central

    Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Esser, Bradley K.; Williams, Ross W.; Hunt, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and reducing impacts from mercury sources in the environment remains a considerable challenge and requires process based models to quantify mercury stocks and flows. The stable isotope composition of mercury in environmental samples can help address this challenge by serving as a tracer of specific sources and processes. Mercury isotope variations are small and result only from isotope fractionation during transport, equilibrium, and transformation processes. Because these processes occur in both industrial and environmental settings, knowledge of their associated isotope effects is required to interpret mercury isotope data. To improve the mechanistic modeling of mercury isotope effects during gas phase diffusion, an experimental program tested the applicability of kinetic gas theory. Gas-phase elemental mercury diffusion through small bore needles from finite sources demonstrated mass dependent diffusivities leading to isotope fractionation described by a Rayleigh distillation model. The measured relative atomic diffusivities among mercury isotopes in air are large and in agreement with kinetic gas theory. Mercury diffusion in air offers a reasonable explanation of recent field results reported in the literature. PMID:24364380

  11. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  12. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  13. Size of diffusion pore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1988-01-01

    The diffusion pore of the outer membrane of Alcaligenes faecalis was shown to be substantially smaller than the Escherichia coli porin pore. In experiments with intact cells, pentoses and hexoses penetrated into the NaCl-expanded periplasm, whereas saccharides of Mr greater than 342 did not. Cells treated with 0.5 M saccharides of Mr greater than 342 weighed 33 to 38% less than cells treated with isotonic solution, suggesting that these saccharides do not permeate through the outer membrane. The diffusion rates of various solutes through the liposome membranes reconstituted from the Mr-43,000 outer membrane protein showed the following characteristics. (i) The relative diffusion rates of pentoses, hexoses, and methylhexoses appeared to be about 1.0, 0.6, and negligibly small, respectively. (ii) The diffusion rate of glucose appeared to be about 1/10th that with the E. coli B porin. (iii) The diffusion rate of gluconic acid was five to seven times higher than that of glucose. (iv) The diffusion rates of beta-lactam antibiotics appeared to be 40 to less than 10% of those with the E. coli B porin. Images PMID:2835003

  14. Impurity diffusion in transition-metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, N.L.

    1982-06-01

    Intrinsic tracer impurity diffusion measurements in ceramic oxides have been primarily confined to CoO, NiO, and Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/. Tracer impurity diffusion in these materials and TiO/sub 2/, together with measurements of the effect of impurities on tracer diffusion (Co in NiO and Cr in CoO), are reviewed and discussed in terms of impurity-defect interactions and mechanisms of diffusion. Divalent impurities in divalent solvents seem to have a weak interaction with vacancies whereas trivalent impurities in divalent solvents strongly influence the vacancy concentrations and significantly reduce solvent jump frequencies near a trivalent impurity. Impurities with small ionic radii diffuse more slowly with a larger activation energy than impurities with larger ionic radii for all systems considered in this review. Cobalt ions (a moderate size impurity) diffuse rapidly along the open channels parallel to the c-axis in TiO/sub 2/ whereas chromium ions (a smaller-sized impurity) do not. 60 references, 11 figures.

  15. Diffusion with varying drag; the runaway problem

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    The motion of electrons in an ionized plasma of electrons and ions in an external electric field is studied. A probability distribution function describes the electron motion and is a solution of a Fokker-Planck equation. In zero field, the solution approaches an equilibrium Maxwellian. For arbitrarily small field, electrons overcome the diffusive effects and are freely accelerated by the field. This is the electron-runaway phenomenon. The electric field is treated as a small perturbation. Various diffusion coefficients are considered for the one dimensional problem, and the runaway current is determined as a function of the field strength. Diffusion coefficients, non-zero on a finite interval are examined. Some non-trivial cases of these can be solved exactly in terms of known special functions. The more realistic case where the diffusion coeffient decays with velocity are then considered. To determine the runaway current, the equivalent Schroedinger eigenvalue problem is analyzed. The smallest eigenvalue is shown to be equal to the runaway current. Using asymptotic matching, a solution can be constructed which is then used to evaluate the runaway current. The runaway current is exponentially small as a function of field strength. This method is used to extract results from the three dimensional problem.

  16. Hydrogen diffusion and trapping in nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louthan, M. R., Jr.; Donovan, J. A.; Caskey, G. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of hydrogen transport in pure polycrystalline nickel foils and rods at 300-550 K shows that both trapping and short-circuit diffusion are present and have small yet significant effects on permeation, evolution, and absorption. Both effects appear to be associated primarily with the dislocation substructure of nickel. Relations describing hydrogen transport in nickel are obtained using the data on deuterium permeation, tritium absorption, and outgassing in pure polycrystalline nickel together with earlier measurements of diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen isotopes.

  17. Discovery of Diffuse Aurora on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiepen, A.; Schneider, N. M.; Jain, S. K.; Deighan, J.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Evans, J. S.; Stevens, M. H.; Larson, D.; Mitchell, D.; Montmessin, F.; Chaffin, M. H.; McClintock, W. E.; Clarke, J. T.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-10-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS, McClintock et al., 2014) onboard the MAVEN spacecraft has discovered diffuse aurora in Mars'northern hemisphere spanning a wide range of geographic latitudes and longitudes (Figure 1). This widespread aurora differs from the small auroral patches discovered by the SPICAM instrument onboard the Mars Express spacecraft (Bertaux et al., 2005; Leblanc et al., 2008; Gérard et al., submitted; Soret et al., submitted) restricted to regions of crustal magnetic fields in the southern hemisphere. Furthermore, the northern diffuse aurora appears to peak at altitudes below 100 km, while the crustal field aurora peaked around 120 km.

  18. Mastocytosis, diffuse cutaneous (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This is a picture of diffuse, cutaneous mastocytosis. Abnormal collections of cells in the skin (mast cells) produce this rash. Unlike bullous mastocytosis, rubbing will not lead to formation of blisters ( ...

  19. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation.

    PubMed

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework.

  20. Novel Diffusivity Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser

    2001-01-01

    A common-path interferometer (CPI) system was developed to measure the diffusivity of liquid pairs. The CPI is an optical technique that can be used to measure changes in the gradient of the refraction index of transparent materials. This system uses a shearing interferometer that shares the same optical path from a laser light source to the final imaging plane. Hence, the molecular diffusion coefficient of liquids can be determined using the physical relations between changes in the optical path length and the liquid phase properties. The data obtained with this interferometer were compared with similar results from other techniques and demonstrated that the instrument is superior in measuring the diffusivity of miscible liquids while keeping the system very compact and robust. CPI can also be used for studies in interface dynamics and other diffusion-dominated-process applications.

  1. Factorized Diffusion Map Approximation

    PubMed Central

    Amizadeh, Saeed; Valizadegan, Hamed; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion maps are among the most powerful Machine Learning tools to analyze and work with complex high-dimensional datasets. Unfortunately, the estimation of these maps from a finite sample is known to suffer from the curse of dimensionality. Motivated by other machine learning models for which the existence of structure in the underlying distribution of data can reduce the complexity of estimation, we study and show how the factorization of the underlying distribution into independent subspaces can help us to estimate diffusion maps more accurately. Building upon this result, we propose and develop an algorithm that can automatically factorize a high dimensional data space in order to minimize the error of estimation of its diffusion map, even in the case when the underlying distribution is not decomposable. Experiments on both the synthetic and real-world datasets demonstrate improved estimation performance of our method over the standard diffusion-map framework. PMID:25309676

  2. Diffusion of eccentric microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Pulak K; Li, Yunyun; Marchesoni, Fabio; Li, Baowen

    2016-02-21

    We model the two-dimensional diffusive dynamics of an eccentric artificial microswimmer in a highly viscous medium. We assume that the swimmer's propulsion results from an effective force applied to a center distinct from its center of mass, both centers resting on a body's axis parallel to its average self-propulsion velocity. Moreover, we allow for angular fluctuations of the velocity about the body's axis. We prove, both analytically and numerically, that the ensuing active diffusion of the swimmer is suppressed to an extent that strongly depends on the model parameters. In particular, the active diffusion constant undergoes a transition from a quadratic to a linear dependence on the self-propulsion speed, with practical consequences on the interpretation of the experimental data. Finally, we extend our model to describe the diffusion of chiral eccentric swimmers.

  3. Simulations of singlet exciton diffusion in organic semiconductors: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorgaard, Josiah A.; Kose, Muhammet Erkan

    2014-12-22

    Our review describes the various aspects of simulation strategies for exciton diffusion in condensed phase thin films of organic semiconductors. Several methods for calculating energy transfer rate constants are discussed along with procedures for how to account for energetic disorder. Exciton diffusion can be modelled by using kinetic Monte-Carlo methods or master equations. Recent literature on simulation efforts for estimating exciton diffusion lengths of various conjugated polymers and small molecules are introduced. Moreover, these studies are discussed in the context of the effects of morphology on exciton diffusion and the necessity of accurate treatment of disorder for comparison of simulation results with those of experiment.

  4. Guide tube flow diffuser

    SciTech Connect

    Berringer, R.T.; Myron, D.L.

    1980-11-04

    A nuclear reactor upper internal guide tube has a flow diffuser integral with its bottom end. The guide tube provides guidance for control rods during their ascent or descent from the reactor core. The flow diffuser serves to divert the upward flow of reactor coolant around the outside of the guide tube thereby limiting the amount of coolant flow and turbulence within the guide tube, thus enhancing the ease of movement of the control rods.

  5. Advanced manufacturing: Technology diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tesar, A.

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we examine how manufacturing technology diffuses rom the developers of technology across national borders to those who do not have the capability or resources to develop advanced technology on their own. None of the wide variety of technology diffusion mechanisms discussed in this paper are new, yet the opportunities to apply these mechanisms are growing. A dramatic increase in technology diffusion occurred over the last decade. The two major trends which probably drive this increase are a worldwide inclination towards ``freer`` markets and diminishing isolation. Technology is most rapidly diffusing from the US In fact, the US is supplying technology for the rest of the world. The value of the technology supplied by the US more than doubled from 1985 to 1992 (see the Introduction for details). History shows us that technology diffusion is inevitable. It is the rates at which technologies diffuse to other countries which can vary considerably. Manufacturers in these countries are increasingly able to absorb technology. Their manufacturing efficiency is expected to progress as technology becomes increasingly available and utilized.

  6. Diffusion in natural ilmenite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenhouse, Iona; O'Neill, Hugh; Lister, Gordon

    2010-05-01

    Diffusion rates in natural ilmenite of composition Fe0.842+ Fe0.163+Mn0.07Mg0.01Ti 0.92O3 from the Vishnevye Mountains (Urals, Russia) have been measured at 1000° C. Experiments were carried out in a one atmosphere furnace with oxygen fugacity controlled by flow of a CO-CO2 gas mixture, over a period of four hours. The diffusant source was a synthetic ilmenite (FeTiO3) powder doped with trace amounts of Mg, Co, Ni, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Al, Cr, Ga and Y. Since, the natural ilmenite crystal contained Mn it was also possible to study diffusion of Mn from the ilmenite crystal. The experiments were analysed using the electron microprobe and scanning laser ablation ICP-MS. Diffusion profiles were measured for Al, Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Ga, and Y. Diffusion of Cr, Hf, Zr, V, Nb and Ta was too slow to allow diffusion profiles to be accurately measured for the times and temperatures studied so far. The preliminary results show that diffusion in ilmenite is fast, with the diffusivity determined in this study on the order of 10-13 to 10-16 m2s-1. For comparison, Chakraborty (1997) found interdiffusion of Fe and Mg in olivine at 1000° C on the order of 10-17 to 10-18m2s-1 and Dieckmann (1998) found diffusivity of Fe, Mg, Co in magnetite at 1200° C to be on the order of 10-13 to 10-14 m2s-1. The order in which the diffusivity of the elements decreases is Mn > Co > Mg ≥ Ni > Al ≥ Y ≥ Ga, that is to say that Mn diffuses the fastest and Ga the slowest. Overall, this study intends to determine diffusion parameters such as frequency factor, activation energy and activation volume as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. This research is taking place in the context of a larger study focusing on the use of the garnet-ilmenite system as a geospeedometer. Examination of the consequences of simultaneous diffusion of multiple elements is a necessity if we are to develop an understanding of the crystal-chemical controls on diffusion (cf Spandler & O'Neill, in press). Chakraborty

  7. Chemical effect on diffusion in intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Ting

    With the trend of big data and the Internet of things, we live in a world full of personal electronic devices and small electronic devices. In order to make the devices more powerful, advanced electronic packaging such as wafer level packaging or 3D IC packaging play an important role. Furthermore, ?-bumps, which connect silicon dies together with dimension less than 10 ?m, are crucial parts in advanced packaging. Owing to the dimension of ?-bumps, they transform into intermetallic compound from tin based solder after the liquid state bonding process. Moreover, many new reliability issues will occur in electronic packaging when the bonding materials change; in this case, we no longer have tin based solder joint, instead, we have intermetallic compound ?-bumps. Most of the potential reliability issues in intermetallic compounds are caused by the chemical reactions driven by atomic diffusion in the material; thus, to know the diffusivities of atoms inside a material is significant and can help us to further analyze the reliability issues. However, we are lacking these kinds of data in intermetallic compound because there are some problems if used traditional Darken's analysis. Therefore, we considered Wagner diffusivity in our system to solve the problems and applied the concept of chemical effect on diffusion by taking the advantage that large amount of energy will release when compounds formed. Moreover, by inventing the holes markers made by Focus ion beam (FIB), we can conduct the diffusion experiment and obtain the tracer diffusivities of atoms inside the intermetallic compound. We applied the technique on Ni3Sn4 and Cu3Sn, which are two of the most common materials in electronic packaging, and the tracer diffusivities are measured under several different temperatures; moreover, microstructure of the intermetallic compounds are investigated to ensure the diffusion environment. Additionally, the detail diffusion mechanism was also discussed in aspect of diffusion

  8. New Chorus Diffusion Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Kersten, Tobias; Glauert, Sarah A.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Boscher, Daniel; Sicard, Angelica; Maget, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Whistler mode chorus waves play a major role in the loss and acceleration of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts. While high time resolution satellite data show that these waves are highly structured in frequency and time, at present their effects on the electron distribution can only be assessed on a global scale by using quasi-linear diffusion theory. Here we present new quasi-linear diffusion coefficients for upper and lower band chorus waves for use in global radiation belt models. Using data from DE 1 CRRES, Cluster 1, Double Star TC1 and THEMIS, we have constructed a database of wave properties and used this to construct new diffusion coefficients for L* = 1.5 to 10 in steps of 0.5, 10 latitude bins between 0o and 60o ,8 bins in MLT and 5 levels of geomagnetic activity as measured by Kp. We find that the peak frequency of lower band chorus is close to 0.2 fce, which is lower than that used in previous models. The combined upper and lower band chorus diffusion shows structure that should result in an energy dependent pitch angle anisotropy, particularly between 1 keV and 100 keV. The diffusion rates suggest that wave-particle interactions should still be very important outside geostationary orbit, out to at least L* = 8. We find significant energy diffusion near 1 keV near the loss cone, consistent with wave growth. By including the new chorus diffusion matrix into the BAS radiation belt (BRB) model we compare the effects on the evolution of the radiation belts against previous models.

  9. Numerical discretization for nonlinear diffusion filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustaffa, I.; Mizuar, I.; Aminuddin, M. M. M.; Dasril, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear diffusion filters are famously used in machine vision for image denoising and restoration. This paper presents a study on the effects of different numerical discretization of nonlinear diffusion filter. Several numerical discretization schemes are presented; namely semi-implicit, AOS, and fully implicit schemes. The results of these schemes are compared by visual results, objective measurement e.g. PSNR and MSE. The results are also compared to a Daubechies wavelet denoising method. It is acknowledged that the two preceding scheme have already been discussed in literature, however comparison to the latter scheme has not been made. The semi-implicit scheme uses an additive operator splitting (AOS) developed to overcome the shortcoming of the explicit scheme i.e., stability for very small time steps. Although AOS has proven to be efficient, from the nonlinear diffusion filter results with different discretization schemes, examples shows that implicit schemes are worth pursuing.

  10. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  11. Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju Hyung; Kim, Se Hoon; Kim, Eui Hyun; Kang, Seok-Gu; Chang, Jong Hee

    2015-04-01

    Primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliomatosis (PDLG) is a rare condition with a fatal outcome, characterized by diffuse infiltration of the leptomeninges by neoplastic glial cells without evidence of primary tumor in the brain or spinal cord parenchyma. In particular, PDLG histologically diagnosed as gliosarcoma is extremely rare, with only 2 cases reported to date. We report a case of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. A 68-year-old man presented with fever, chilling, headache, and a brief episode of mental deterioration. Initial T1-weighted post-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement without a definite intraparenchymal lesion. Based on clinical and imaging findings, antiviral treatment was initiated. Despite the treatment, the patient's neurologic symptoms and mental status progressively deteriorated and follow-up MRI showed rapid progression of the disease. A meningeal biopsy revealed gliosarcoma and was conclusive for the diagnosis of primary diffuse leptomeningeal gliosarcomatosis. We suggest the inclusion of PDLG in the potential differential diagnosis of patients who present with nonspecific neurologic symptoms in the presence of leptomeningeal involvement on MRI.

  12. Multidimensional diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topgaard, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Principles from multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, and in particular solid-state NMR, have recently been transferred to the field of diffusion MRI, offering non-invasive characterization of heterogeneous anisotropic materials, such as the human brain, at an unprecedented level of detail. Here we revisit the basic physics of solid-state NMR and diffusion MRI to pinpoint the origin of the somewhat unexpected analogy between the two fields, and provide an overview of current diffusion MRI acquisition protocols and data analysis methods to quantify the composition of heterogeneous materials in terms of diffusion tensor distributions with size, shape, and orientation dimensions. While the most advanced methods allow estimation of the complete multidimensional distributions, simpler methods focus on various projections onto lower-dimensional spaces as well as determination of means and variances rather than actual distributions. Even the less advanced methods provide simple and intuitive scalar parameters that are directly related to microstructural features that can be observed in optical microscopy images, e.g. average cell eccentricity, variance of cell density, and orientational order - properties that are inextricably entangled in conventional diffusion MRI. Key to disentangling all these microstructural features is MRI signal acquisition combining isotropic and directional dimensions, just as in the field of multidimensional solid-state NMR from which most of the ideas for the new methods are derived.

  13. Diffuser for wellhead isolation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Surjaatmadja, J.B.

    1981-04-21

    An improved diffuser for a wellhead isolation tool which employs a combination of angles in its bore. This improvement reduces the incidence of erosion caused by the flow of fluids through the diffuser, in both the well production tubing adjacent the end of the diffuser and in the diffuser itself.

  14. Positron diffusion in Si

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G.; Vehanen, A.; Schultz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    Positron diffusion in Si(100) and Si(111) has been studied using a variable energy positron beam. The positron diffusion coefficient is found to be D/sub +/ = 2.7 +- 0.3 cm/sup 2//sec using a Makhov-type positron implantation profile, which is demonstrated to fit the data more reliably than the more commonly applied exponential profile. The diffusion related parameter, E/sub 0/, which results from the exponential profile, is found to be 4.2 +- 0.2 keV, significantly longer than previously reported values. A drastic reduction in E/sub 0/ is found after annealing the sample at 1300 K, showing that previously reported low values of E/sub 0/ are probably associated with the thermal history of the sample.

  15. Cesium diffusion in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.B. III; Davis, W. Jr.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on diffusion of /sup 137/Cs in five types of graphite were performed. The document provides a completion of the report that was started and includes a presentation of all of the diffusion data, previously unpublished. Except for data on mass transfer of /sup 137/Cs in the Hawker-Siddeley graphite, analyses of experimental results were initiated but not completed. The mass transfer process of cesium in HS-1-1 graphite at 600 to 1000/sup 0/C in a helium atmosphere is essentially pure diffusion wherein values of (E/epsilon) and ..delta..E of the equation D/epsilon = (D/epsilon)/sub 0/ exp (-..delta..E/RT) are about 4 x 10/sup -2/ cm/sup 2//s and 30 kcal/mole, respectively.

  16. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.; Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-08-10

    1. The method of testing the separation efficiency of porous permeable membranes which comprises causing a stream of a gaseous mixture to flow into contact with one face of a finely porous permeable membrane under such conditions that a major fraction of the mixture diffuses through the membrane, maintaining a rectangular cross section of the gaseous stream so flowing past said membrane, continuously recirculating the gas that diffuses through said membrane and continuously withdrawing the gas that does not diffuse through said membrane and maintaining the volume of said recirculating gas constant by continuously introducing into said continuously recirculating gas stream a mass of gas equivalent to that which is continuously withdrawn from said gas stream and comparing the concentrations of the light component in the entering gas, the withdrawn gas and the recirculated gas in order to determine the efficiency of said membrane.

  17. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  18. Universal Scaling of Polymer Diffusion in Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jihoon; Hore, Michael J. A.; Meth, Jeffrey S.; Clarke, Nigel; Winey, Karen I.; Composto, Russell J.

    2013-03-01

    The tracer diffusion of deuterated polystyrene (dPS) is measured in a polystyrene (PS) nanocomposite containing hard and soft silica nanoparticles (NPs). The soft NPs are grafted with a PS brush (87 kg/mol). The matrix for both NPs is PS (160 kg/mol). The diffusion coefficients for dPS (23 - 1,866 kg/mol) decrease as the hard and soft NP volume fractions increase. To accurately determine the interparticle distances (ID) relevant to each dPS (M) diffusing through the PS(160k):soft NP matrix, self consistent field theory and small angle neutron scattering studies were performed; both theory and experiment show that short dPS chains can deeply penetrate the brush, whereas longer dPS chains only penetrate the periphery and mainly remain in the matrix. The reduced diffusion coefficient (D/D0), plotted against the confinement parameter, namely ID relative to tracer size (2Rg), collapses onto a master curve independent of NP type. These experiments demonstrate that polymer diffusion in nanocomposites is captured by the confinement parameter over an extremely wide range of ID/2Rg and, hopefully, motivate new models to capture the dynamics in confined (ID/2Rg < 10) regimes.

  19. [Diffuse traumatic cerebral injuries in children].

    PubMed

    Sganzerla, E P; Massei, R; De Santis, A; Guerra, P; Tiberio, F; Parma, A; Villani, R; Trazzi, R

    1989-04-01

    A consecutive series of 41 patients aged less than 16 and admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery of the University of Milan in the period 1977-1978 following serious cranioencephalic trauma with Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) less than or equal to 7, duration of coma longer than 24 h and CT picture of diffuse lesion has been examined. These patients account for 5% of the paediatric cranial traumas observed in the same period and 66% of those in a state of coma. The CT picture made it possible to split patients into 3 groups: a) those without visible cerebral lesions and with subarachnoid and cisternal spaces present; b) those with small hyperdense lesions due to intraparenchymal or median/paramedian subcortical shearing lesions; c) those with marked constriction or absence of the 3rd ventricle and of the perimesencephalic cisterns. The first two pictures (a, b) were considered to be the expression of diffuse axonal damage, the last (c) of diffuse cerebral swelling. Intracranial pressure was monitored in about 50% of patients. The overall outcome of the series was favourable in more than 68% of cases with total mortality of 26.8%. Analysis of individual tomographic categories, however, showed that whereas the group of patients with diffuse axonal lesion presented nil mortality, those with diffuse cerebral swelling had 52% mortality owing to the onset of refractory intracranial hypertension.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Restricted Transport in Small Pores

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John L.; Quinn, John A.

    1974-01-01

    The basic hydrodynamic equations governing transport in submicron pores are reexamined. Conditions necessary for a simplified, one-dimensional treatment of the diffusion/convection process are established. Steric restrictions and Brownian motion are incorporated directly into the resulting model. Currently available fluid mechanical results are used to evaluate an upper limit on hindered diffusion; this limit is valid for small particle-to-pore ratios. Extensions of the analysis are shown to depend on numerical solutions of the related hydrodynamic problem, that of asymmetrical particle motion in a bounded fluid. PMID:4813157

  1. [Microbial diffusion and antibiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vilain, R

    1982-01-01

    Cleaning leg ulcers depends on tissular and microbial enzymes, the production of which depends on good vascularization. When an aetiological treatment is started, the microbes ensure sufficient cleaning, leading to granulation and epidermization. Antibiotherapy is pointless. Sometimes it can be detrimental, replacing a natural growth with alien strains which cause diffusion. Very exceptionally, a short course of antibiotherapy may be necessary to cope with signs of diffusion, usually signifying a Group A streptococcal infection, with seasonal recrudescence. The Blue Pus Microbe has no special pathological significance. It merely indicates that the case has become chronic.

  2. Hydrogen diffusion in Zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingrin, Jannick; Zhang, Peipei

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen mobility in gem quality zircon single crystals from Madagascar was investigated through H-D exchange experiments. Thin slices were annealed in a horizontal furnace flushed with a gas mixture of Ar/D2(10%) under ambient pressure between 900 ° C to 1150 ° C. FTIR analyses were performed on oriented slices before and after each annealing run. H diffusion along [100] and [010] follow the same diffusion law D = D0exp[-E /RT], with log D0 = 2.24 ± 1.57 (in m2/s) and E = 374 ± 39 kJ/mol. H diffusion along [001] follows a slightly more rapid diffusion law, with log D0 = 1.11 ± 0.22 (in m2/s) and E = 334 ± 49 kJ/mol. H diffusion in zircon has much higher activation energy and slower diffusivity than other NAMs below 1150 ° C even iron-poor garnets which are known to be among the slowest (Blanchard and Ingrin, 2004; Kurka et al. 2005). During H-D exchange zircon incorporates also deuterium. This hydration reaction involves uranium reduction as it is shown from the exchange of U5+ and U4+ characteristic bands in the near infrared region during annealing. It is the first time that a hydration reaction U5+ + OH- = U4+ + O2- + 1/2H2, is experimentally reported. The kinetics of deuterium incorporation is slightly slower than hydrogen diffusion, suggesting that the reaction is limited by hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen isotopic memory of zircon is higher than other NAMs. Zircons will be moderately retentive of H signatures at mid-crustal metamorphic temperatures. At 500 ° C, a zircon with a radius of 300 μm would retain its H isotopic signature over more than a million years. However, a zircon is unable to retain this information for geologically significant times under high-grade metamorphism unless the grain size is large enough. Refrences Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2004) Hydrogen diffusion in Dora Maira pyrope. Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 31, 593-605. Kurka, A., Blanchard, M. and Ingrin, J. (2005) Kinetics of hydrogen extraction and deuteration in

  3. Diffusion measurements by microscopic NMR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ronald A.; Brown, Truman R.

    Proton NMR images of the brains of living mice with voxel sizes as small as 80 × 80 × 500 μm were acquired at 9.3 T by the 2D FT spin-echo method. Using gradients of 3.75 G/cm, images with pixel dimensions below 50 μm were of low sensitivity because of degradation of the echo due to diffusion and flow. In the absence of bulk flow, this decrease in image intensity as image pixel size is decreased can be used to measure the local self-diffusion coefficient of water ( DH 2O ) in small samples. By this method, DH 2O at 22°C was estimated to be 2.59, 2.13, 1.59, and 0.84 × 10 -5 cm 2/s in pure water, 10% gelatin, mouse skeletal muscle, and rat liver, respectively.

  4. Oxygen diffusion in vanadium-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    de Avillez, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental study of transport and equilibrium properties of oxygen in vanadium-based alloys was made by EMF measurements on solid electrolytic cells over the temperature range of 873 to 1423/sup 0/K. The oxygen diffusion in vanadium was not significantly modified by small additions of Ti, Cr, Ni, Nb and Ta. The increase in the activation energy for oxygen diffusion in the V-based alloys containing Cr, Ni, Nb and Ta probably reflects the effect of these substitutional solutes on the activity coefficient of oxygen. The oxygen activity was increased by the addition of 1 at % of Cr, Ni and Nb, and decreased by the addition of Ti and Ta. However, the effects in the alloys containing Nb and Ta are very small.

  5. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Zachara, John M.

    2011-12-01

    Rigorous numerical description of multispecies diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication in imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multispecies diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl [U(VI)] species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multispecies diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multispecies U(VI) diffusion under a steady state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that for multispecies U(VI) diffusion under transient chemical conditions, a fully coupled diffusion model could be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model when the diffusion coefficient for each chemical component was properly selected. The component-based diffusion model considers the difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be enforced, if necessary, by adding a secondary migration term resulting from model simplification. The effect of ion activity coefficient gradients on multispecies diffusion is also discussed. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford 300A

  6. Delta-doping in diffusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénière, François; Chaplain, René; Gauneau, Marcel; Reddy, Viswanatha; Régrény, André

    1993-12-01

    The δ-doping where the dopant is confined on the length-scale of the lattice constant provides perfectly ideal conditions to study the atomic transport processes. We have studied MBE-grown GaAs samples δ-doped with Si and Al layers. Long time diffusion anneals have been performed in the temperature range 550 800 °C. The distribution profiles are examined by SIMS-profiling. We obtain Si diffusion coefficients in good agreement with the other recent studies using different techniques (rapid thermal annealing, capacitance-voltage profiling, sandwiched diffusion source). This contrasts with the earlier measurements based on diffusion of implanted dopants which were much more widely spread. We conclude that the more accurate data allowed with the δ-doping show that the diffusion coefficient is an intrinsic parameter provided that the amount of dopant and the dislocation density are kept sufficiently small. Le dopage-delta, où le dopant est confiné à l'échelle du paramètre du réseau, fournit les conditions parfaitement idéales pour étudier les processus de transport atomique. Nous avons étudié des échantillons de GaAs obtenus par épitaxie par jet moléculaire dopés par des couches-delta de Si et Al. Des traitements de diffusion de longue durée ont été réalisés dans l'intervalle de température 550 à 800°C. Les profils de distribution sont examinés par spectrométrie d'émission d'ions secondaires. Nous obtenons des coefficients de diffusion de Si en bon accord avec les autres études récentes utilisant des techniques différentes (traitement thermique ultrarapide, profil de distribution par la méthode capacité-voltage, diffusion d'une couche “ sandwich ”). Ceci diffère des mesures antérieures qui, basées sur la diffusion de dopants implantés, étaient beaucoup plus dispersées. Nous concluons que les données plus précises rendues possibles par le dopage-delta montrent que le coefficient de diffusion est un paramètre intrinsèque

  7. Direct measurement of effective diffusion coefficients in nanochannels using steady-state dispersion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Nicolas F. Y.; Bertsch, Arnaud; Todorova, Mina; Renaud, Philippe

    2007-11-01

    We present a method to measure effective diffusion coefficients of fluorescently labeled molecules inside a nanofluidic system. Molecules with small diffusion coefficients show a larger lateral dispersion than highly diffusive species, which is counterintuitive. We performed measurements with wheat germ agglutinin proteins and obtained an effective diffusion coefficient which is four orders of magnitude lower than its free diffusion coefficient. Our technique which is a direct and relatively simple measurement of the effective diffusion coefficients inside nanochannels of well controlled dimensions could help fundamental studies in membranes and separation sciences.

  8. Nanocrystal diffusion doping.

    PubMed

    Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Barrows, Charles J; Erickson, Christian S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2013-09-25

    A diffusion-based synthesis of doped colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals is demonstrated. This approach involves thermodynamically controlled addition of both impurity cations and host anions to preformed seed nanocrystals under equilibrium conditions, rather than kinetically controlled doping during growth. This chemistry allows thermodynamic crystal compositions to be prepared without sacrificing other kinetically trapped properties such as shape, size, or crystallographic phase. This doping chemistry thus shares some similarities with cation-exchange reactions, but proceeds without the loss of host cations and excels at the introduction of relatively unreactive impurity ions that have not been previously accessible using cation exchange. Specifically, we demonstrate the preparation of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se (0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.2) nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, unprecedentedly high Mn(2+) content, and very large magneto-optical effects by diffusion of Mn(2+) into seed CdSe nanocrystals grown by hot injection. Controlling the solution and lattice chemical potentials of Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) allows Mn(2+) diffusion into the internal volumes of the CdSe nanocrystals with negligible Ostwald ripening, while retaining the crystallographic phase (wurtzite or zinc blende), shape anisotropy, and ensemble size uniformity of the seed nanocrystals. Experimental results for diffusion doping of other nanocrystals with other cations are also presented that indicate this method may be generalized, providing access to a variety of new doped semiconductor nanostructures not previously attainable by kinetic routes or cation exchange.

  9. Water vapor diffusion membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F., Jr.; Smith, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The program is reported, which was designed to define the membrane technology of the vapor diffusion water recovery process and to test this technology using commercially available or experimental membranes. One membrane was selected, on the basis of the defined technology, and was subjected to a 30-day demonstration trial.

  10. Osmosis and Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    OsmoBeaker is a CD-ROM designed to enhance the learning of diffusion and osmosis by presenting interactive experimentation to the student. The software provides several computer simulations that take the student through different scenarios with cells, having different concentrations of solutes in them.

  11. Diffusion on Cu surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    1993-01-01

    Understanding surface diffusion is essential in understanding surface phenomena, such as crystal growth, thin film growth, corrosion, physisorption, and chemisorption. Because of its importance, various experimental and theoretical efforts have been directed to understand this phenomena. The Field Ion Microscope (FIM) has been the major experimental tool for studying surface diffusion. FIM have been employed by various research groups to study surface diffusion of adatoms. Because of limitations of the FIM, such studies are only limited to a few surfaces: nickel, platinum, aluminum, iridium, tungsten, and rhodium. From the theoretical standpoint, various atomistic simulations are performed to study surface diffusion. In most of these calculations the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) along with the molecular static (MS) simulation are utilized. The EAM is a semi-empirical approach for modeling the interatomic interactions. The MS simulation is a technique for minimizing the total energy of a system of particles with respect to the positions of its particles. One of the objectives of this work is to develop the EAM functions for Cu and use them in conjunction with the molecular static (MS) simulation to study diffusion of a Cu atom on a perfect as well as stepped Cu(100) surfaces. This will provide a test of the validity of the EAM functions on Cu(100) surface and near the stepped environments. In particular, we construct a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model and calculate the migration energies of an atom on a terrace, near a ledge site, near a kink site, and going over a descending step. We have also calculated formation energies of an atom on the bare surface, a vacancy in the surface, a stepped surface, and a stepped-kink surface. Our results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  12. A Mathematical Model of Diffusion-Limited Gas Bubble Dynamics in Tissue with Varying Diffusion Region Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. Srini; Gerth, Wayne A.; Powell, Michael R.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A three-region mathematical model of gas bubble dynamics has been shown suitable for describing diffusion-limited dynamics of more than one bubble in a given volume of extravascular tissue. The model is based on the dynamics of gas exchange between a bubble and a well-stirred tissue region through an intervening unperfused diffusion region previously assumed to have constant thickness and uniform gas diffusivity. As a result, the gas content of the diffusion region remains constant as the volume of the region increases with bubble growth, causing dissolved gas in the region to violate Henry's law. Earlier work also neglected the relationship between the varying diffusion region volume and the fixed total tissue volume, because only cases in which the diffusion region volume is a small fraction of the overall tissue volume were considered. We herein extend the three-region model to correct these theoretical inconsistencies by allowing both the thickness and gas content of the diffusion region to vary during bubble evolution. A postulated difference in gas diffusivity between an infinitesimally thin layer at the bubble surface and the remainder of the diffusion region leads to variation in diffusion region gas content and thickness during bubble growth and resolution. This variable thickness, differential diffusivity (VTDD) model can yield bubble lifetimes considerably longer than those yielded by earlier three-region models for given model and decompression parameters, and meets a need for theoretically consistent but relatively simple bubble dynamics models for use in studies of decompression sickness (DCS) in human subjects, Keywords: decompression sickness, gas diffusion in tissue, diffusivity

  13. Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian; Jensen, R. V. Skougaard; Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K.; Larsen, A. Nylandsted

    2010-10-04

    Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

  14. Least-squares streamline diffusion finite element approximations to singularly perturbed convection-diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarov, R D; Vassilevski, P S

    1999-05-06

    In this paper we introduce and study a least-squares finite element approximation for singularly perturbed convection-diffusion equations of second order. By introducing the flux (diffusive plus convective) as a new unknown, the problem is written in a mixed form as a first order system. Further, the flux is augmented by adding the lower order terms with a small parameter. The new first order system is approximated by the least-squares finite element method using the minus one norm approach of Bramble, Lazarov, and Pasciak [2]. Further, we estimate the error of the method and discuss its implementation and the numerical solution of some test problems.

  15. Spring 2014 Internship Diffuser Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laigaie, Robert T.; Ryan, Harry M.

    2014-01-01

    showed different data dependent on section. Section 1 strains were small, and were in the range of 50 to 150 microstrain, which would result in stresses from 1.45 to 4.35 ksi. The yield stress of the material, A-285 Grade C Steel, is 29.7 ksi. Section 4 strain gages showed much higher values with strains peaking at 1600 microstrain. This strain corresponds to a stress of 46.41 ksi, which is in excess of the yield stress, but below the ultimate stress of 55 to 75 ksi. The decreased accelerations and strain in Section 1, and the increased accelerations and strain in Sections 3 and 4 verified the computer simulation prediction of increased plume oscillations in the lower sections of the diffuser. Hot-Fire Test 2 ran for a duration of 125 seconds. The engine operated at a slightly higher power level than Hot-Fire Test 1 for the initial 35 seconds of the test. After 35 seconds the power level was lowered to Hot-Fire Test 1 levels. The acceleration and strain data for Hot-Fire Test 2 was similar during the initial part of the test. However, just prior to the engine being lowered to the Hot-Fire Test 1 power level, the strain gage data in Section 4 showed a large decrease to strains near zero microstrain from their peak at 1500 microstrain. Future work includes further strain and acceleration data analysis and evaluation.

  16. Hydrodynamic theory of diffusion in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    Detailed numerical simulations of multicomponent plasmas require tractable expressions for species diffusion fluxes, which must be consistent with the given plasma current density J{sub q} to preserve local charge neutrality. The common situation in which J{sub q} = 0 is referred to as ambipolar diffusion. The use of formal kinetic theory in this context leads to results of formidable complexity. We derive simple tractable approximations for the diffusion fluxes in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas by means of a generalization of the hydrodynamical approach used by Maxwell, Stefan, Furry, and Williams. The resulting diffusion fluxes obey generalized Stefan-Maxwell equations that contain driving forces corresponding to ordinary, forced, pressure, and thermal diffusion. The ordinary diffusion fluxes are driven by gradients in pressure fractions rather than mole fractions. Simplifications due to the small electron mass are systematically exploited and lead to a general expression for the ambipolar electric field in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity. We present a self-consistent effective binary diffusion approximation for the diffusion fluxes. This approximation is well suited to numerical implementation and is currently in use in our LAVA computer code for simulating multicomponent thermal plasmas. Applications to date include a successful simulation of demixing effects in an argon-helium plasma jet, for which selected computational results are presented. Generalizations of the diffusion theory to finite electrical conductivity and nonzero magnetic field are currently in progress.

  17. Investigation of hexane diffusion in HDPE particulates for drying applications

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, J.S.; Krishnan, C.; Incavo, J.A.; Jain, V.; Rueter, W.L.

    1996-10-01

    Diffusion of n-hexane in high-density polyethylene (HDPE) particulates was studied by nitrogen purging of a hexane-permeated HDPE sample in a small glass cell. By monitoring the decrease in hexane concentration in the cell exit gas, the diffusivity of hexane in HDPE was obtained. The method does not require any alteration of the original HDPE specimen and allows both the intrinsic and effective diffusivities to be determined. Intrinsic diffusion data measured for HDPE powder and pellets using this method were compared with those from HDPE sheets to show the unique diffusion characteristics of the powder. Experimental results at various purge flows revealed that the effective hexane diffusivity in the HDPE powder increased with gas purge velocity before reaching a plateau representing the intrinsic diffusivity. The low effective diffusivity values at low purge velocities can be attributed to particle agglomeration in the powder. The effective diffusivity data for unaltered powder samples have great practical significance in characterizing industrial powder dryers.

  18. Light-element diffusion in Mg using first-principles calculations: Anisotropy and elastodiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ravi; Trinkle, Dallas R.

    2016-08-01

    The light-elemental solutes B, C, N, and O can penetrate the surface of Mg alloys and diffuse during heat treatment or high temperature application, forming undesirable compounds. We investigate the diffusion of these solutes by determining their stable interstitial sites and the interpenetrating network formed by these sites. We use density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the site energies, migration barriers, and attempt frequencies for these networks to inform our analytical model for bulk diffusion. Due to the nature of the networks, O diffuses isotropically, while B, C, and N diffuse anisotropically. We compute the elastodiffusion tensor which quantifies changes in diffusivity due to small strains that perturb the diffusion network geometry and the migration barriers. The DFT-computed elastic dipole tensor which quantifies the change in site energies and migration barriers due to small strains is used as an input to determine the elastodiffusion tensor. We employ the elastodiffusion tensor to determine the effect of thermal strains on interstitial diffusion and find that B, C, and N diffusivity increases on crystal expansion, while O diffusivity decreases. From the elastodiffusion and compliance tensors we calculate the activation volume of diffusion and find that it is positive and anisotropic for B, C, and N diffusion, whereas it is negative and isotropic for O diffusion.

  19. Gas Diffusion in Polyethylene Terepthalate By Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Simon; Adolf, David

    2006-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the diffusion of small penetrants through PET have been performed utilising the anisotropic united atom model [1] and a virtual liquid technique. [2] The accuracy and reliability of these two approaches has been assessed in terms of the improvement in equation of state behaviour and of diffusion co-efficients and solubilities. The effect of the diffusion of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and oxygen on the local dynamics of PET have been investigated as a result. Attention has been focused on the dual mode effect [3] observed during mixed gas diffusion. [1] Molecular dynamics calculation of the equation of state of alkanes, J. Chem. Phys. 93, 6 (1990) [2] Kikuchi, Kuwajima, Fukada, Novel method to estimate the solubility of small molecules in cis-polyisoprene by molecular dynamics simulations, J. Chem. Phys, 115, 13 (2001) [3] Lewis, Duckett, Ward, Fairclough, Ryan, The barrier properties of polyethylene terephthalate to mixtures of oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, Polymer, 1631, 44 (2003)

  20. Unsteady planar diffusion flames: Ignition, travel, burnout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fendell, F.; Wu, F.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, a thin planar diffusion flame is created and thenceforth travels so that the flame is situated at all times at an interface at which the hydrogen and oxygen meet in stoichiometric proportion. If the initial amount of hydrogen is deficient relative to the initial amount of oxygen, then the planar flame will travel further and further into the half volume initially containing hydrogen, until the hydrogen is (virtually) fully depleted. Of course, when the amount of residual hydrogen becomes small, the diffusion flame is neither vigorous nor thin; in practice, the flame is extinguished before the hydrogen is fully depleted, owing to the finite rate of the actual chemical-kinetic mechanism. The rate of travel of the hydrogen-air diffusion flame is much slower than the rate of laminar flame propagation through a hydrogen-air mixture. This slow travel facilitates diagnostic detection of the flame position as a function of time, but the slow travel also means that the time to burnout (extinction) probably far exceeds the testing time (typically, a few seconds) available in earth-sited facilities for microgravity-environment experiments. We undertake an analysis to predict (1) the position and temperature of the diffusion flame as a function of time, (2) the time at which extinction of the diffusion flame occurs, and (3) the thickness of quench layers formed on side walls (i.e., on lateral boundaries, with normal vectors parallel to the diffusion-flame plane), and whether, prior to extinction, water vapor formed by burning will condense on these cold walls.

  1. Diffusion in Immiscible Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this program is to measure the diffusion coefficients for molten Pb in Zn in the immiscible liquid-phase region. Diffusion couples of pure Pb and Zn were prepared using a shear cell. These have been placed in graphite crucibles and encapsulated in stainless steel cartridges and are awaiting the next Materials Experiment Assembly (MEA) flight opportunity. In flight, one couple will be soaked for 40 minutes at 440 deg C (just above the monotectic temperature) and the second couple will be soaked for 40 minutes 820 deg C (just above the consolute temperature). After the soak both samples will be rapidly quenched by flowing He to minimize redistribution of the immiscible phases. Post flight compositional analysis will be accomplished using X-ray fluorescence in the scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Amosphous diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolawa, E.; So, F. C. T.; Nicolet, M-A.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous W-Zr and W-N alloys were investigated as diffusion barriers in silicon metallization schemes. Data were presented showing that amorphous W-Zr crystallizes at 900 C, which is 200 C higher than amorphous W-Ni films, and that both films react with metallic overlayers at temperatures far below the crystllization temperature. Also, W-N alloys (crystalline temperature of 600 C) were successfully incorporated as a diffusion barrier in contact structures with both Al and Ag overlayers. The thermal stability of the electrical characteristics of shallow n(+)p junctions significantly improved by incorporating W-N layers in the contact system. One important fact demonstated was the critical influence of the deposition parameters during formation of these carriers.

  3. Nonlocal electrical diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Escobar-Jiménez, R. F.; Olivares-Peregrino, V. H.; Benavides-Cruz, M.; Calderón-Ramón, C.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis and modeling of the electrical diffusion equation using the fractional calculus approach. This alternative representation for the current density is expressed in terms of the Caputo derivatives, the order for the space domain is 0<β≤1 and for the time domain is 0<γ≤2. We present solutions for the full fractional equation involving space and time fractional derivatives using numerical methods based on Fourier variable separation. The case with spatial fractional derivatives leads to Levy flight type phenomena, while the time fractional equation is related to sub- or super diffusion. We show that the mathematical concept of fractional derivatives can be useful to understand the behavior of semiconductors, the design of solar panels, electrochemical phenomena and the description of anomalous complex processes.

  4. Magnetic diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    The diffuse scattering of neutrons from magnetic materials provides unique and important information regarding the spatial correlations of the atoms and the spins. Such measurements have been extensively applied to magnetically ordered systems, such as the ferromagnetic binary alloys, for which the observed correlations describe the magnetic moment fluctuations associated with local environment effects. With the advent of polarization analysis, these techniques are increasingly being applied to study disordered paramagnetic systems such as the spin-glasses and the diluted magnetic semiconductors. The spin-pair correlations obtained are essential in understanding the exchange interactions of such systems. In this paper, we describe recent neutron diffuse scattering results on the atom-pair and spin-pair correlations in some of these disordered magnetic systems. 56 refs.

  5. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    PubMed

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  6. Turbo fluid machinery and diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1984-01-01

    The general theory behind turbo devices and diffusers is explained. Problems and the state of research on basic equations of flow and experimental and measuring methods are discussed. Conventional centrifugation-type compressor and fan diffusers are considered in detail.

  7. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  8. [The diffusion of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Ramiro-H, Manuel; Cruz-A, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Between August 19 and 21, the Feria del Libro de las Ciencias de la Salud (Healthcare Book Fair) took place in the Palacio de Medicina in Mexico City. Archives of Medical Research, Revista Médica del IMSS, and Saber IMSS, three of the main instruments of knowledge diffusion of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, assisted to this book fair, which was organized by the Facultad de Medicina of UNAM.

  9. Peridynamic thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Oterkus, Selda; Madenci, Erdogan; Agwai, Abigail

    2014-05-15

    This study presents the derivation of ordinary state-based peridynamic heat conduction equation based on the Lagrangian formalism. The peridynamic heat conduction parameters are related to those of the classical theory. An explicit time stepping scheme is adopted for numerical solution of various benchmark problems with known solutions. It paves the way for applying the peridynamic theory to other physical fields such as neutronic diffusion and electrical potential distribution.

  10. Double Diffusive Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Bruce; Lee, Brace

    2008-11-01

    Sour gas flares attempt to dispose of deadly H2S gas through combustion. What does not burn rises as a buoyant plume. But the gas is heavier than air at room temperature, so as the rising gas cools eventually it becomes negatively buoyant and descends back to the ground. Ultimately, our intent is to predict the concentrations of the gas at ground level in realistic atmospheric conditions. As a first step towards this goal we have performed laboratory experiments examining the structure of a steady state plume of hot and salty water that rises buoyantly near the source and descends as a fountain after it has cooled sufficiently. We call this a double-diffusive plume because its evolution is dictated by the different (turbulent) diffusivities of heat and salt. A temperature and conductivity probe measures both the salinity and temperature along the centreline of the plume. The supposed axisymmetric structure of the salinity concentration as it changes with height is determined by light-attenuation methods. To help interpret the results, a theory has been successfully adapted from the work of Bloomfield and Kerr (2000), who developed coupled equations describing the structure of fountains. Introducing a new empirical parameter for the relative rates of turbulent heat and salt diffusion, the predictions are found to agree favourably with experimental results.

  11. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  12. The ThermalDiffusion class

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.

    2014-10-01

    The ThermalDiffusion class was created to simulate one-dimensional thermal diffusion across one or more material layers. Each layer is assumed to have constant conductivity K and diffusivity κ . Interface conductance between layers may be specified. Internal heating as a function of position and time is also supported. The ThermalDiffusion class is included in the SMASH package [1] as part of the PDE (Partial Differential Equation) subpackage.

  13. Modeling the role of diffusion coefficients on Turing instability in a reaction-diffusion prey-predator system.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, B; Bhattacharyya, R

    2006-02-01

    The paper is concerned with the effect of variable dispersal rates on Turing instability of a non-Lotka-Volterra reaction-diffusion system. In ecological applications, the dispersal rates of different species tends to oscillate in time. This oscillation is modeled by temporal variation in the diffusion coefficient with large as well as small periodicity. The case of large periodicity is analyzed using the theory of Floquet multipliers and that of the small periodicity by using Hill's equation. The effect of such variation on the resulting Turing space is studied. A comparative analysis of the Turing spaces with constant diffusivity and variable diffusivities is performed. Numerical simulations are carried out to support analytical findings.

  14. Small Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... more emphasis on careers for women, more effective methods of contraception, and the rising cost of rearing and educating children. There are some very clear benefits to having a small family; Each child receives more parental attention and educational advantages, which generally raise her self- ...

  15. Diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema treated by lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Matta, Reva; Matta, Judy; Hage, Pierre; Nassif, Yolla; Mansour, Nabil; Diab, Nabil

    2011-10-01

    Persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema is a rare condition that occurs in preterm infants on mechanical ventilation, characterized by abnormal accumulation of air in the pulmonary interstitium, due to disruption of the basement membrane. Diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema is observed when small cysts are noted in all lobes of the lung. The management of infants suffering from diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema varies according to severity and stability of the patient, being either conservative treatment or aggressive surgical treatment by pneumonectomy. We report a case of an unstable patient with diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema successfully treated by lobectomy as a form of conservative surgical approach.

  16. Collisional diffusion in a torus with imperfect magnetic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.

    1983-03-01

    A Hamiltonian forumlation of the guiding-center drift equations is used to investigate the modification of neoclassical diffusion for low collisonality in a toroidal magnetic field with partially destroyed magnetic surfaces. The magnetic field is assumed to be given by the small perturbation of an axisymmetric system. The results are applicable to particle diffusion in realistic confinement systems, midway between axisymmetric and purely stochastic ones. Significant enhancement of electron diffusion over neoclassical rates is found. This increase can be accounted for by the contributions due to the first few island chains in the Fibonacci sequence generated by the zero-order islands, and by associated stochastic domains.

  17. A Mapping method for mixing with diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Conor P.; Christov, Ivan C.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2012-11-01

    We present an accurate and efficient computational method for solving the advection-diffusion equation in time-periodic chaotic flows. The method uses operator splitting which allows advection and diffusion steps to be treated independently. Taking advantage of flow periodicity, the advection step is solved with a mapping method, and diffusion is added discretely after each iteration of the advection map. This approach allows for a ``composite'' mapping matrix to be constructed for an entire period of a chaotic advection-diffusion process, which provides a natural approach to the spectral analysis of mixing. To test the approach, we consider the two-dimensional time-periodic sine flow. When compared to the exact solution for this simple velocity field, the operator splitting method exhibits qualitative agreement (overall concentration structure) for large time steps and is quantitatively accurate (average and maximum error) for small time steps. We extend the operator splitting approach to three-dimensional chaotic flows. Funded by NSF Grant CMMI-1000469. Present affiliation: Princeton University. Supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047.

  18. Color image diffusion using adaptive bilateral filter.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Ann Heng, Pheng

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach to diffuse color images based on the bilateral filter. Real image data has a level of uncertainty that is manifested in the variability of measures assigned to pixels. This uncertainty is usually interpreted as noise and considered an undesirable component of the image data. Image diffusion can smooth away small-scale structures and noise while retaining important features, thus improving the performances for many image processing algorithms such as image compression, segmentation and recognition. The bilateral filter is noniterative, simple and fast. It has been shown to give similar and possibly better filtering results than iterative approaches. However, the performance of this filter is greatly affected by the choose of the parameters of filtering kernels. In order to remove noise and maintain the significant features on images, we extend the bilateral filter by introducing an adaptive domain spread into the nonlinear diffusion scheme. For color images, we employ the CIE-Lab color system to describe input images and the filtering process is operated using three channels together. Our analysis shows that the proposed method is more suitable for preserving strong edges on noisy images than the original bilateral filter. Empirical results on both nature images and color medical images confirm the novel method's advantages, and show it can diffuse various kinds of color images correctly and efficiently.

  19. The metallicity of diffuse intrahalo light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Chris W.; Bullock, James S.; Zentner, Andrew R.

    2008-12-01

    We make predictions for the metallicity of diffuse stellar components in systems ranging from small spiral galaxies to rich galaxy clusters. We extend the formalism of Purcell, Bullock & Zentner, in which diffuse stellar mass is produced via galaxy disruption, and we convolve this result with the observed mass-metallicity relation for galaxies in order to analyse the chemical abundance of intrahalo light (IHL) in host haloes with virial mass 1010.5 <= Mhost <= 1015Msolar. We predict a steep rise of roughly 2 dex in IHL metallicity from the scales of small to large spiral galaxies. In terms of the total dynamical mass Mhost of the host systems under consideration, we predict diffuse light metallicities ranging from ZIHL <~ -2.5 for Mhost ~ 1011Msolar to ZIHL ~ -1.0 for Mhost ~ 1012Msolar. In larger systems, we predict a more shallow rise in this trend with ZIHL ~ -0.4 for Mhost ~ 1013Msolar, increasing to ZIHL ~ 0.1 for Mhost ~ 1015Msolar. This behaviour is coincident with a narrowing of the intrahalo metallicity distribution as host mass increases. The observable distinction in surface brightness between old, metal-poor IHL stars and more metal rich, dynamically younger tidal streams is of crucial importance when estimating the chemical abundance of an intrahalo population with multiple origins.

  20. In vivo diffusion MRS investigation of non-water molecules in biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Cao, Peng; Wu, Ed X

    2017-03-01

    Diffusion MRS of non-water molecules offers great potential in directly revealing various tissue microstructures and physiology at both cellular and subcellular levels. In brain, (1) H diffusion MRS has been demonstrated as a new tool for probing normal tissue microstructures and their pathological changes. In skeletal muscle, (1) H diffusion MRS could characterize slow and restricted intramyocellular lipid diffusion, providing a sensitive marker for metabolic alterations, while (31) P diffusion MRS can measure ATP and PCr diffusion, which may reflect the capacity of cellular energy transport, complementing the information from frequently used (31) P MRS in muscle. In intervertebral disk, (1) H diffusion MRS can directly monitor extracellular matrix integrity by quantifying the mobility of macromolecules such as proteoglycans and collagens. In tumor tissue, (13) C diffusion MRS could probe intracellular glycolytic metabolism, while (1) H diffusion MRS may separate the spectrally overlapped lactate and lipid resonances. In this review, recent diffusion MRS studies of these biologically relevant non-water molecules under normal and diseased conditions will be presented. Technical considerations for diffusion MRS experiments will be discussed. With advances in MRI hardware and diffusion methodology, diffusion MRS of non-water molecules is expected to provide increasingly valuable and biologically specific information on tissue microstructures and physiology, complementing the traditional diffusion MRI of small and ubiquitous water molecules. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the phenomenon of hindered diffusion of coal macromolecules in idealized porous media. Tasks towards this objective include: Construct a diffusion cell with ideal pore structure for determination of diffusion coefficients, prepare and characterize ideal porous membranes, perform model compound experiments to calibrate and test diffusion apparatus and methodology, prepare and characterize coal macromolecules, and analyze data to evaluate the diffusional behavior of coal macromolecules. This report describes work on the hindered diffusion of tetraphenylporphine and asphaltene. 18 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10-100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS.

  3. Diffusion tensor MR microscopy of tissues with low diffusional anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Bajd, Franci; Mattea, Carlos; Stapf, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Diffusion tensor imaging exploits preferential diffusional motion of water molecules residing within tissue compartments for assessment of tissue structural anisotropy. However, instrumentation and post-processing errors play an important role in determination of diffusion tensor elements. In the study, several experimental factors affecting accuracy of diffusion tensor determination were analyzed. Materials and methods Effects of signal-to-noise ratio and configuration of the applied diffusion-sensitizing gradients on fractional anisotropy bias were analyzed by means of numerical simulations. In addition, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance microscopy experiments were performed on a tap water phantom and bovine articular cartilage-on-bone samples to verify the simulation results. Results In both, the simulations and the experiments, the multivariate linear regression of the diffusion-tensor analysis yielded overestimated fractional anisotropy with low SNRs and with low numbers of applied diffusion-sensitizing gradients. Conclusions An increase of the apparent fractional anisotropy due to unfavorable experimental conditions can be overcome by applying a larger number of diffusion sensitizing gradients with small values of the condition number of the transformation matrix. This is in particular relevant in magnetic resonance microscopy, where imaging gradients are high and the signal-to-noise ratio is low. PMID:27247550

  4. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10–100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS. PMID:24089741

  5. Diffusion in the extracellular space in brain and tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkman, A. S.

    2013-08-01

    Diffusion of solutes and macromolecules in the extracellular space (ECS) in brain is important for non-synaptic intercellular communication, extracellular ionic buffering, and delivery of drugs and metabolites. Diffusion in tumor ECS is important for delivery of anti-tumor drugs. The ECS in brain comprises ˜20% of brain parenchymal volume and contains cell-cell gaps down to ˜50 nm. We have developed fluorescence methods to quantify solute diffusion in the ECS, allowing measurements deep in solid tissues using microfiberoptics with micron tip size. Diffusion through the tortuous ECS in brain is generally slowed by ˜3-5-fold compared with that in water, with approximately half of the slowing due to tortuous ECS geometry and half due to the mildly viscous extracellular matrix (ECM). Mathematical modeling of slowed diffusion in an ECS with reasonable anatomical accuracy is in good agreement with experiment. In tumor tissue, diffusion of small macromolecules is only mildly slowed (<3-fold slower than in water) in superficial tumor, but is greatly slowed (>10-fold) at a depth of few millimeters as the tumor tissue becomes more compact. Slowing by ECM components such as collagen contribute to the slowed diffusion. Therefore, as found within cells, cellular crowding and highly tortuous transport can produce only minor slowing of diffusion in the ECS.

  6. Nitric oxide diffusion rate is reduced in the aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoping; Srinivasan, Parthasarathy; Collard, Eric; Grajdeanu, Paula; Zweier, Jay L; Friedman, Avner

    2008-03-01

    Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) plays important physiological roles in the body. As a small diatomic molecule, NO has been assumed to freely diffuse in tissues with a diffusion rate similar to that in water. However, this assumption has not been tested experimentally. In this study, a modified Clark-type NO electrode attached with a customized aorta holder was used to directly measure the flux of NO diffusion across the aortic wall at 37 degrees C. Experiments were carefully designed for accurate measurements of the apparent NO diffusion coefficient D and the partition coefficient alpha in the aortic wall. A mathematical model was presented for analyzing experimental data. It was determined that alpha = 1.15 +/- 0.11 and D = 848 +/- 45 mum(2)/s (n = 12). The NO diffusion coefficient in the aortic wall is nearly fourfold smaller than the reported diffusion coefficient in solution at 37 degrees C, indicating that NO diffusion in the vascular wall is no longer free, but markedly dependent on the environment in the tissue where these NO molecules are. These results imply that the NO diffusion rate in the vascular wall may be upregulated and downregulated by certain physiological and/or pathophysiological processes affecting the composition of tissues.

  7. Accelerated stochastic diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbaczewski, Piotr

    1990-07-01

    We give a purely probabilistic demonstration that all effects of non-random (external, conservative) forces on the diffusion process can be encoded in the Nelson ansatz for the second Newton law. Each random path of the process together with a probabilistic weight carries a phase accumulation (complex valued) weight. Random path summation (integration) of these weights leads to the transition probability density and transition amplitude respectively between two spatial points in a given time interval. The Bohm-Vigier, Fenyes-Nelson-Guerra and Feynman descriptions of the quantum particle behaviours are in fact equivalent.

  8. Cation diffusion in titanomagnetites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, R.; McCallister, R. H.; Harrison, H. R.

    1984-02-01

    Interdiffusion couple experiments were performed with titanomagnetite single crystals at 1,000°C, 1,100° C and 1,200° C in various buffered atmospheres. The dependence of the interdiffusion coefficient on oxygen fugacity, composition and temperature was interpreted in terms of point defect structure. Estimates of the cation tracer diffusivities indicate that Fe migrates via a point defect mechanism, involving mixed tetrahedral-octahedral site jumps, with an activation energy of 33 Kcal/mole; whereas Ti migration is one to two orders of magnitude slower, is restricted to octahedral sites and has an activation energy of 60 Kcal/mole.

  9. Diffusion in quantum geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcagni, Gianluca

    2012-08-01

    The change of the effective dimension of spacetime with the probed scale is a universal phenomenon shared by independent models of quantum gravity. Using tools of probability theory and multifractal geometry, we show how dimensional flow is controlled by a multiscale fractional diffusion equation, and physically interpreted as a composite stochastic process. The simplest example is a fractional telegraph process, describing quantum spacetimes with a spectral dimension equal to 2 in the ultraviolet and monotonically rising to 4 towards the infrared. The general profile of the spectral dimension of the recently introduced multifractional spaces is constructed for the first time.

  10. Diffusion in silicon isotope heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Silvestri, Hughes Howland

    2004-01-01

    The simultaneous diffusion of Si and the dopants B, P, and As has been studied by the use of a multilayer structure of isotopically enriched Si. This structure, consisting of 5 pairs of 120 nm thick natural Si and 28Si enriched layers, enables the observation of 30Si self-diffusion from the natural layers into the 28Si enriched layers, as well as dopant diffusion from an implanted source in an amorphous Si cap layer, via Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). The dopant diffusion created regions of the multilayer structure that were extrinsic at the diffusion temperatures. In these regions, the Fermi level shift due to the extrinsic condition altered the concentration and charge state of the native defects involved in the diffusion process, which affected the dopant and self-diffusion. The simultaneously recorded diffusion profiles enabled the modeling of the coupled dopant and self-diffusion. From the modeling of the simultaneous diffusion, the dopant diffusion mechanisms, the native defect charge states, and the self- and dopant diffusion coefficients can be determined. This information is necessary to enhance the physical modeling of dopant diffusion in Si. It is of particular interest to the modeling of future electronic Si devices, where the nanometer-scale features have created the need for precise physical models of atomic diffusion in Si. The modeling of the experimental profiles of simultaneous diffusion of B and Si under p-type extrinsic conditions revealed that both species are mediated by neutral and singly, positively charged Si self-interstitials. The diffusion of As and Si under extrinsic n-type conditions yielded a model consisting of the interstitialcy and vacancy mechanisms of diffusion via singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral vacancies. The simultaneous diffusion of P and Si has been modeled on the basis of neutral and singly negatively charged self-interstitials and neutral and singly

  11. DIOS: the diffuse intergalactic oxygen surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, T.; Ishida, M.; Sasaki, S.; Ishisaki, Y.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Fujimoto, R.; Takei, Y.; Tawara, Y.; Furuzawa, A.; Suto, Y.; Yoshikawa, Y.; Kawayara, H.; Kawai, N.; Tsuru, T. G.; Matsushita, K.; Kitayama, T.

    2006-06-01

    We present our proposal for a small X-ray mission DIOS (Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor), consisting of a 4-stage X-ray telescope and an array of TES microcalorimeters, cooled with mechanical coolers, with a total weight of about 400 kg. The mission will perform survey observations of warm-hot intergalactic medium using OVII and OVIII emission lines, with the energy coverage up to 1.5 keV. The wide field of view of about 50' diameter, superior energy resolution close to 2 eV FWHM, and very low background will together enable us a wide range of science for diffuse X-ray sources. We briefly describe the design of the satellite, performance of the subsystems and the expected results.

  12. Atomistic understanding of diffusion kinetics in nanocrystals from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Jiang; Gao, Guo-Jie J.; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the grain size effect on diffusion in nanocrystals has been hampered by the difficulty of measuring diffusion directly in experiments. Here large-scale atomistic modeling is applied to understand the diffusion kinetics in nanocrystals. Enhanced short-circuit diffusivity is revealed to be controlled by the rule of mixtures for grain-boundary diffusion and lattice diffusion, which can be accurately described by the Maxwell-Garnett equation instead of the commonly thought Hart equation, and the thermodynamics of pure grain-boundary self-diffusion is not remarkably affected by varying grain size. Experimentally comparable Arrhenius parameters with atomic detail validate our results. We also propose a free-volume diffusion mechanism considering negative activation entropy and small activation volume. These help provide a fundamental understanding of how the activation parameters depend on size and the structure-property relationship of nanostructured materials from a physical viewpoint.

  13. Adsorption and diffusion of argon confined in ordered and disordered microporous carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joshua D.; Palmer, Jeremy C.; Liu, Ying-Chun; Roussel, Thomas J.; Brennan, John K.; Gubbins, Keith E.

    2010-06-01

    We use a combination of grand canonical Monte Carlo and microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption and diffusion of argon at 77 K and 120 K confined in previously generated models of a disordered bituminous coal-based carbon, BPL, and an ordered carbon replica of Faujasite zeolite (C-FAU). Both materials exhibit a maximum in the diffusion coefficient as well as anomalous (sub-diffusive) behavior in the mean-squared displacements at short times at some relative pressures. In BPL, the anomalous diffusion occurs at low relative pressures, due to the trapping of argon atoms in small pores. In C-FAU, the anomalous diffusion occurs at high relative pressures, due to competitive diffusion of atoms traveling through windows and constrictions which interconnect the pores. All diffusion eventually tends to Fickian diffusion at longer times.

  14. Cosmic Diffuse Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James M.

    1999-01-01

    The final analysis of the COMPTEL cosmic diffuse flux analysis is summarized in the accompanying figure. It shows the intensity of the cosmic diffuse flux spectrum measured jointly between the Virgo region and the South Galactic pole. This spectrum represents flux per unit solid angle over the range of 0.8 to 30 MeV. It contains the first positive measurement of the flux above 10 MeV. The spectrum merges smoothly with that measured with the EGRET instrument, starting at 30 MeV. It also merges smoothly with the latest results of the HEAO-1 measurements. However, the spectrum below is softer than the spectrum above the COMPTEL energy band. In the COMPTEL energy band there must exist a change in spectral shape as the source objects or processes change from the lower energy regime to the higher energy regime. The details of the analysis and the implications and meanings of the results are spelled out in the thesis of Dr. Cheenu Kappadath which is enclosed.

  15. The diffusion of microfinance.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Abhijit; Chandrasekhar, Arun G; Duflo, Esther; Jackson, Matthew O

    2013-07-26

    To study the impact of the choice of injection points in the diffusion of a new product in a society, we developed a model of word-of-mouth diffusion and then applied it to data on social networks and participation in a newly available microfinance loan program in 43 Indian villages. Our model allows us to distinguish information passing among neighbors from direct influence of neighbors' participation decisions, as well as information passing by participants versus nonparticipants. The model estimates suggest that participants are seven times as likely to pass information compared to informed nonparticipants, but information passed by nonparticipants still accounts for roughly one-third of eventual participation. An informed household is not more likely to participate if its informed friends participate. We then propose two new measures of how effective a given household would be as an injection point. We show that the centrality of the injection points according to these measures constitutes a strong and significant predictor of eventual village-level participation.

  16. Apparatus for diffusion separation

    DOEpatents

    Nierenberg, William A.

    1976-08-10

    1. A diffuser separator apparatus which comprises a plurality of flow channels in a single stage, each of said channels having an inlet port and an outlet port and a constant cross sectional area between said ports, at least a portion of the defining surface of each of said channels being a diffusion separation membrane, and each of said channels having a different cross sectional area, means for connecting said channels in series so that each successive channel of said series has a smaller cross sectional area than the previous channel of said series, a source of gaseous mixture, individual means for flowing said gaseous mixture to the inlet port of each of said channels, gas receiving and analyzing means, individual means for flowing gas passing from each of said outlet ports and means for flowing gas passing through said membranes to said receiving and analyzing means, and individual means for connecting the outlet port of each channel with the inlet port of the channel having the next smaller cross sectional area.

  17. Diffusing obesity myths.

    PubMed

    Ramos Salas, X; Forhan, M; Sharma, A M

    2014-06-01

    Misinformation or myths about obesity can lead to weight bias and obesity stigma. Counteracting myths with facts and evidence has been shown to be effective educational tools to increase an individuals' knowledge about a certain condition and to reduce stigma.The purpose of this study was to identify common obesity myths within the healthcare and public domains and to develop evidence-based counterarguments to diffuse them. An online search of grey literature, media and public health information sources was conducted to identify common obesity myths. A list of 10 obesity myths was developed and reviewed by obesity experts and key opinion leaders. Counterarguments were developed using current research evidence and validated by obesity experts. A survey of obesity experts and health professionals was conducted to determine the usability and potential effectiveness of the myth-fact messages to reduce weight bias. A total of 754 individuals responded to the request to complete the survey. Of those who responded, 464 (61.5%) completed the survey. All 10 obesity myths were identified to be deeply pervasive within Canadian healthcare and public domains. Although the myth-fact messages were endorsed, respondents also indicated that they would likely not be sufficient to reduce weight bias. Diffusing deeply pervasive obesity myths will require multilevel approaches.

  18. A simple flow analysis of diffuser-getter-diffuser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Howard, D. W.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition. (authors)

  19. FLOW ANALYSIS OF DIFFUSER-GETTER-DIFFUSER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; Dave W. Howard, D

    2007-07-24

    Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition.

  20. Sucrose diffusion in aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of sugar in aqueous solution is important both in nature and in technological applications, yet measurements of diffusion coefficients at low water content are scarce. We report directly measured sucrose diffusion coefficients in aqueous solution. Our technique utilises a Raman isotope tracer method to monitor the diffusion of non-deuterated and deuterated sucrose across a boundary between the two aqueous solutions. At a water activity of 0.4 (equivalent to 90 wt% sucrose) at room temperature, the diffusion coefficient of sucrose was determined to be approximately four orders of magnitude smaller than that of water in the same material. Using literature viscosity data, we show that, although inappropriate for the prediction of water diffusion, the Stokes–Einstein equation works well for predicting sucrose diffusion under the conditions studied. As well as providing information of importance to the fundamental understanding of diffusion in binary solutions, these data have technological, pharmaceutical and medical implications, for example in cryopreservation. Moreover, in the atmosphere, slow organic diffusion may have important implications for aerosol growth, chemistry and evaporation, where processes may be limited by the inability of a molecule to diffuse between the bulk and the surface of a particle. PMID:27364512

  1. Characterizing non-Gaussian diffusion by using generalized diffusion tensors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlei; Bammer, Roland; Acar, Burak; Moseley, Michael E

    2004-05-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is known to have a limited capability of resolving multiple fiber orientations within one voxel. This is mainly because the probability density function (PDF) for random spin displacement is non-Gaussian in the confining environment of biological tissues and, thus, the modeling of self-diffusion by a second-order tensor breaks down. The statistical property of a non-Gaussian diffusion process is characterized via the higher-order tensor (HOT) coefficients by reconstructing the PDF of the random spin displacement. Those HOT coefficients can be determined by combining a series of complex diffusion-weighted measurements. The signal equation for an MR diffusion experiment was investigated theoretically by generalizing Fick's law to a higher-order partial differential equation (PDE) obtained via Kramers-Moyal expansion. A relationship has been derived between the HOT coefficients of the PDE and the higher-order cumulants of the random spin displacement. Monte-Carlo simulations of diffusion in a restricted environment with different geometrical shapes were performed, and the strengths and weaknesses of both HOT and established diffusion analysis techniques were investigated. The generalized diffusion tensor formalism is capable of accurately resolving the underlying spin displacement for complex geometrical structures, of which neither conventional DTI nor diffusion-weighted imaging at high angular resolution (HARD) is capable. The HOT method helps illuminate some of the restrictions that are characteristic of these other methods. Furthermore, a direct relationship between HOT and q-space is also established.

  2. Apparent diffusion profile estimation from high angular resolution diffusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descoteaux, Maxime; Angelino, Elaine; Fitzgibbons, Shaun; Deriche, Rachid

    2006-03-01

    High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) has recently been of great interest to characterize non-Gaussian diffusion process. In the white matter of the brain, this occurs when fiber bundles cross, kiss or diverge within the same voxel. One of the important goal is to better describe the apparent diffusion process in these multiple fiber regions, thus overcoming the limitations of classical diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). In this paper, we design the appropriate mathematical tools to describe noisy HARDI data. Using a meaningful modified spherical harmonics basis to capture the physical constraints of the problem, we propose a new regularization algorithm to estimate a smoother and closer diffusivity profile to the true diffusivities without noise. We exploit properties of the spherical harmonics to define a smoothing term based on the Laplace-Beltrami for functions defined on the unit sphere. An additional contribution of the paper is the derivation of the general transformation taking the spherical harmonics coefficients to the high order tensor independent elements. This allows the careful study of the state of the art high order anisotropy measures computed from either spherical harmonics or tensor coefficients. We analyze their ability to characterize the underlying diffusion process. We are able to recover voxels with isotropic, single fiber anisotropic and multiple fiber anisotropic diffusion. We test and validate the approach on diffusion profiles from synthetic data and from a biological rat phantom.

  3. Diffusive evolution of experimental braided rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitz, M. D.; Lajeunesse, E.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Limare, A.; Metivier, F.; Devauchelle, O.

    2012-12-01

    Braided rivers are complex systems in which a network of ephemeral, interacting channels continually migrate to create a rapidly changing landscape, with activity on a range of scales from channel to network organization. A previously proposed formulation in the literature has described the macroscopic behavior of braided rivers with a relationship between sediment flux and system slope that has the form of diffusion. This deterministic relationship has yet to be shown to be a true expression of stastistical diffusion on the macroscopic scale that results from stochastic behavior at the unit scale. We present results of a set of ~1m-scale experiments of braided rivers forming over a bed of monodisperse glass beads, designed to quantify both the characteristics of individual channels and the statistics of the system, and to test the extent to which statistical diffusion is applicable to braided rivers. Our data consist of repeat high-resolution topography scans, which provide data on both topographic relief and water depth values. The experiments evolve from an initial flat bed, allowing us to study the approach of the system to a steady state. We find that, although channels migrate rapidly, they have stable, self-similar geometries organized to a critical Shields stress criterion, which suggests that the timescale of channel geometry organization is small compared to dynamic channel timescales. Analysis of the channel network through time shows a decorrelation that is random and memoryless, and which occurs over time and space scales that yield a diffusivity estimate consistent with the deterministic theoretical prediction. Further investigation shows that many aspects of the system dynamics can be directly described with this diffusional framework. The timescale to equilibrium slope and topographic steady state, the rate at which correlation lengthscales increase through time, and the dependence of the equilibrium slope on sediment flux can all be described with

  4. Osmosis and diffusion conceptual assessment.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kathleen M; Williams, Kathy S; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified from the previously published Diffusion and Osmosis Diagnostic Test (DODT) and some newly developed items. The ODCA, a validated instrument containing fewer items than the DODT and emphasizing different content areas within the realm of osmosis and diffusion, better aligns with our curriculum. Creation of the ODCA involved removal of six DODT item pairs, modification of another six DODT item pairs, and development of three new item pairs addressing basic osmosis and diffusion concepts. Responses to ODCA items testing the same concepts as the DODT were remarkably similar to responses to the DODT collected from students 15 yr earlier, suggesting that student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis remains elusive.

  5. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  6. Effects of Defects on Hydrogen Diffusion in NbC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehinia, Iman; Mastorakos, Ioannis; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2017-04-01

    Exceptional mechanical and physical properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides make them good coating-material candidates for extreme corrosive environments such as oil and natural gas wells. However, existence of small pores, pinholes and columnar structures of these ceramics significantly affect their resistance to corrosion, as pore sites would accelerate the diffusion of corrosive media into the substrate. In this research, molecular dynamics atomistic simulations are employed to investigate the effects of the isolated vacancies and the columnar structure on the diffusion rate of H atoms in NbC single crystal at various temperatures. Diffusion coefficient (D) of H atoms in NbC increased with C vacancy concentration. At elevated temperatures, the trapping effect of Nb vacancies is less effective when C vacancies are also present, as H atoms gain enough energy to jump back and forth between the C vacancies. Atomistic simulations also showed a jump in diffusion coefficient for cylindrical pore size of larger than 3 Å radius. Furthermore, D increased monotonically with temperature up to 1000 K in the presence of cylindrical pores. Further increase in temperature resulted in a drop in the diffusion coefficient for small pores while the large pores only showed a lower increasing trend in diffusion coefficient with the temperature.

  7. Modified anisotropic diffusion for image smoothing and enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhong; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2001-05-01

    This paper discusses an improved nonlinear filtering approach based on anisotropic diffusion technique. This modified anisotropic diffusion method smooths along curve directions, i.e. the directions of level sets. The upwind scheme for level set is used to solve the diffusion equation. Compared with the conventional anisotropic diffusion, which depends only on the local gradient of intensities of the processed image, this modified scheme overcomes the defect of indefinite edge enhancement associated with Perona-Malik model while depressing noises in a better performance. Moreover, a multi-scale diffusion technique is applied to limit blurring by the presence of edges as measured at the scale of interest, so that accurate information about boundaries of objects could be preserved and small details that fall below the scale of interest be removed. Then an extension into vector-valued diffusion is also presented in this paper, which is capable of smoothing small objects while maintaining boundaries information in vector-valued images. Experiments on gray-scale and color images demonstrate the efficacy of this method in image smoothing as well as image enhancement.

  8. Diffusion of spheres in crowded suspensions of rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyongok; Gapinski, J.; Lettinga, M. P.; Buitenhuis, J.; Meier, G.; Ratajczyk, M.; Dhont, Jan K. G.; Patkowski, A.

    2005-01-01

    Translational tracer diffusion of spherical macromolecules in crowded suspensions of rodlike colloids is investigated. Experiments are done using several kinds of spherical tracers in fd-virus suspensions. A wide range of size ratios L/2a of the length L of the rods and the diameter 2a of the tracer sphere is covered by combining several experimental methods: fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for small tracer spheres, dynamic light scattering for intermediate sized spheres, and video microscopy for large spheres. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is shown to measure long-time diffusion only for relatively small tracer spheres. Scaling of diffusion coefficients with a/ξ, predicted for static networks, is not found for our dynamical network of rods (with ξ the mesh size of the network). Self-diffusion of tracer spheres in the dynamical network of freely suspended rods is thus fundamentally different as compared to cross-linked networks. A theory is developed for the rod-concentration dependence of the translational diffusion coefficient at low rod concentrations for freely suspended rods. The proposed theory is based on a variational solution of the appropriate Smoluchowski equation without hydrodynamic interactions. The theory can, in principle, be further developed to describe diffusion through dynamical networks at higher rod concentrations with the inclusion of hydrodynamic interactions. Quantitative agreement with the experiments is found for large tracer spheres, and qualitative agreement for smaller spheres. This is probably due to the increasing importance of hydrodynamic interactions as compared to direct interactions as the size of the tracer sphere decreases.

  9. Effect of Ionic Diffusion on Extracellular Potentials in Neural Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Halnes, Geir; Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Keller, Daniel; Pettersen, Klas H.; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2016-01-01

    Recorded potentials in the extracellular space (ECS) of the brain is a standard measure of population activity in neural tissue. Computational models that simulate the relationship between the ECS potential and its underlying neurophysiological processes are commonly used in the interpretation of such measurements. Standard methods, such as volume-conductor theory and current-source density theory, assume that diffusion has a negligible effect on the ECS potential, at least in the range of frequencies picked up by most recording systems. This assumption remains to be verified. We here present a hybrid simulation framework that accounts for diffusive effects on the ECS potential. The framework uses (1) the NEURON simulator to compute the activity and ionic output currents from multicompartmental neuron models, and (2) the electrodiffusive Kirchhoff-Nernst-Planck framework to simulate the resulting dynamics of the potential and ion concentrations in the ECS, accounting for the effect of electrical migration as well as diffusion. Using this framework, we explore the effect that ECS diffusion has on the electrical potential surrounding a small population of 10 pyramidal neurons. The neural model was tuned so that simulations over ∼100 seconds of biological time led to shifts in ECS concentrations by a few millimolars, similar to what has been seen in experiments. By comparing simulations where ECS diffusion was absent with simulations where ECS diffusion was included, we made the following key findings: (i) ECS diffusion shifted the local potential by up to ∼0.2 mV. (ii) The power spectral density (PSD) of the diffusion-evoked potential shifts followed a 1/f2 power law. (iii) Diffusion effects dominated the PSD of the ECS potential for frequencies up to several hertz. In scenarios with large, but physiologically realistic ECS concentration gradients, diffusion was thus found to affect the ECS potential well within the frequency range picked up in experimental

  10. Surface modification by subsurface pressure induced diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Claus G.

    2012-01-23

    Polycrystalline Ag, covered with a nm thin siloxane layer, was irradiated with ultraviolet light in vacuum at 500 K. Ag particles of different aspect ratios, 50-1000 nm in size, formed on the surface, including a small fraction of nanorods. Pressurized water vapor bubbles are created in the subsurface region by hydrogen radicals photo-chemically released by the siloxane layer. They provide the driving force for a diffusive material flux along grain boundaries to the surface. This mechanism was modeled and found to agree with the experimental timescale: approximately 300 h are required for a 1000 nm particle to form.

  11. Numerical Computation of Diffusion on a Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Peter; Adalsteinsson, David; Colella, Phillip; Arkin, Adam Paul; Onsum, Matthew

    2005-02-24

    We present a numerical method for computing diffusive transport on a surface derived from image data. Our underlying discretization method uses a Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for computing the volume transport in region consisting of all points a small distance from the surface. We obtain a representation of this region from image data using a front propagation computation based on level set methods for solving the Hamilton-Jacobi and eikonal equations. We demonstrate that the method is second-order accurate in space and time, and is capable of computing solutions on complex surface geometries obtained from image data of cells.

  12. Surface modification by subsurface pressure induced diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Claus G.

    2012-01-01

    Polycrystalline Ag, covered with a nm thin siloxane layer, was irradiated with ultraviolet light in vacuum at 500 K. Ag particles of different aspect ratios, 50-1000 nm in size, formed on the surface, including a small fraction of nanorods. Pressurized water vapor bubbles are created in the subsurface region by hydrogen radicals photo-chemically released by the siloxane layer. They provide the driving force for a diffusive material flux along grain boundaries to the surface. This mechanism was modeled and found to agree with the experimental timescale: approximately 300 h are required for a 1000 nm particle to form.

  13. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  14. Dislocation Diffusion in Metallic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-08

    DATES COVERED (From - To) April 1,2007-March 31, 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dislocation Diffusion in Metallic Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goals of this project were: (1) perform a fundamental study of atomic diffusion along dislocation cores in metals and...alloys, (2) develop new methods for the calculation of dislocation diffusion coefficients as functions of temperature and chemical composition and (3

  15. Multilane driven diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatolo, A. I.; Evans, M. R.; Kafri, Y.; Tailleur, J.

    2016-03-01

    We consider networks made of parallel lanes along which particles hop according to driven diffusive dynamics. The particles also hop transversely from lane to lane, hence indirectly coupling their longitudinal dynamics. We present a general method for constructing the phase diagram of these systems which reveals that in many cases their physics reduce to that of single-lane systems. The reduction to an effective single-lane description legitimizes, for instance, the use of a single TASEP to model the hopping of molecular motors along the many tracks of a single microtubule. Then, we show how, in quasi-2D settings, new phenomena emerge due to the presence of non-zero transverse currents, leading, for instance, to strong ‘shear localization’ along the network.

  16. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles.

  17. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Nonlinear Stochastic Reaction-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Del Razo, Mauricio; Pan, Wenxiao; Qian, Hong; Lin, Guang

    2014-05-30

    The currently existing theory of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is based on the linear fluctuation theory originally developed by Einstein, Onsager, Lax, and others as a phenomenological approach to equilibrium fluctuations in bulk solutions. For mesoscopic reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear chemical reactions among a small number of molecules, a situation often encountered in single-cell biochemistry, it is expected that FCS time correlation functions of a reaction-diffusion system can deviate from the classic results of Elson and Magde [Biopolymers (1974) 13:1-27]. We first discuss this nonlinear effect for reaction systems without diffusion. For nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion systems there are no closed solutions; therefore, stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations are carried out. We show that the deviation is small for a simple bimolecular reaction; the most significant deviations occur when the number of molecules is small and of the same order. Extending Delbrück-Gillespie’s theory for stochastic nonlinear reactions with rapidly stirring to reaction-diffusion systems provides a mesoscopic model for chemical and biochemical reactions at nanometric and mesoscopic level such as a single biological cell.

  18. Lateral Diffusion in an Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Saxton, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    Lateral diffusion of molecules in lipid bilayer membranes can be hindered by the presence of impermeable domains of gel-phase lipid or of proteins. Effective-medium theory and percolation theory are used to evaluate the effective lateral diffusion constant as a function of the area fraction of fluid-phase lipid and the permeability of the obstructions to the diffusing species. Applications include the estimation of the minimum fraction of fluid lipid needed for bacterial growth, and the enhancement of diffusion-controlled reactions by the channeling effect of solid patches of lipid. PMID:7052153

  19. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2009-01-20

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) Enthalpy diffusion preserves the second law. (2) Euler solvers will not produce correct temperatures in mixing regions. (3) Navier-Stokes solvers will only produce correct temperatures if q{sub d} is included. (4) Errors from neglecting enthalpy diffusion are most severe when differences in molecular weights are large. (5) In addition to temperature, enthalpy diffusion affects density, dilatation and other fields in subtle ways. (6) Reacting flow simulations that neglect the term are a dubious proposition. (7) Turbulence models for RANS and LES closures should preserve consistency between energy and species diffusion.

  20. Diffusion in Jammed Particle Packs.

    PubMed

    Bolintineanu, Dan S; Grest, Gary S; Lechman, Jeremy B; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2015-08-21

    Using random walk simulations we explore diffusive transport through monodisperse sphere packings over a range of packing fractions ϕ in the vicinity of the jamming transition at ϕ(c). Various diffusion properties are computed over several orders of magnitude in both time and packing pressure. Two well-separated regimes of normal "Fickian" diffusion, where the mean squared displacement is linear in time, are observed. The first corresponds to diffusion inside individual spheres, while the latter is the long-time bulk diffusion. The intermediate anomalous diffusion regime and the long-time value of the diffusion coefficient are both shown to be controlled by particle contacts, which in turn depend on proximity to ϕ(c). The time required to recover normal diffusion t* scales as (ϕ-ϕ(c))(-0.5) and the long-time diffusivity D(∞)∼(ϕ-ϕ(c))0.5, or D(∞)∼1/t*. It is shown that the distribution of mean first passage times associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles controls both t* and D(∞) in the limit ϕ→ϕ(c).

  1. Perpendicular diffusion of energetic particles in collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shalchi, A.

    2015-01-15

    A fundamental problem in plasma and astrophysics is the interaction between energetic particles and magnetized plasmas. In the current paper, we focus on particle diffusion across the guide magnetic field. It is shown that the perpendicular diffusion coefficient depends only on the parallel diffusion coefficient and the Kubo number. Therefore, one can find four asymptotic limits depending on the values of these two parameters. These regimes are the quasilinear limit, the Kadomtsev and Pogutse limit, the scaling of Rechester and Rosenbluth, and the scaling found by Zybin and Istomin. In the current article, we focus on the Rechester and Rosenbluth scenario because this was not discovered before in the context of collisionless plasmas. Examples and applications are discussed as well. We show that an energy independent ratio of perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients can be found and that this ratio can be very small but also close to unity. This is exactly what one observes in the solar wind.

  2. Dynamics and pattern formation in a cancer network with diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qianqian; Shen, Jianwei

    2015-10-01

    Diffusion is ubiquitous inside cells, and it is capable of inducing spontaneous pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems on a spatially homogeneous domain. In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a diffusive cancer network regulated by microRNA and obtain the condition that the network undergoes a Hopf bifurcation and a Turing pattern bifurcation. In addition, we also develop the amplitude equation of the network model by using Taylor series expansion, multi-scaling and further expansion in powers of a small parameter. As a result of these analyses, we obtain the explicit condition on how the dynamics of the diffusive cancer network evolve. These results reveal that this system has rich dynamics, such as spotted stripe and hexagon patterns. The bifurcation diagram helps us understand the biological mechanism in the cancer network. Finally, numerical simulations confirm our analytical results.

  3. Three-dimensional spatial diffusion in optical molasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, T. W.; Gerz, C.; Furtlehner, C.; Westbrook, C. I.; Phillips, W. D.; Dalibard, J.

    1995-02-01

    We have studied the expansion of a small cloud of85Rb atoms in three-dimensional optical molasses (lin ⊥ lin and σ+ - σ- configurations) and observed diffusive motion. We determined the spatial-diffusion coefficients for various laser intensities and detunings, and compared them (in the case of lin ⊥ lin molasses) to values calculated from friction and momentum-diffusion coefficients of a one-dimensional (1D) theory of laser cooling. The predicted variations of the spatial-diffusion coefficient with laser intensity and detuning are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental data. We found that the minimal value observed experimentally, ≈ 6 × 10-4 cm2/s, lies within a factor of 3 of the 1D theoretical minimum, ≈, 26ħ/ M, where M is the atomic mass.

  4. Simulations of singlet exciton diffusion in organic semiconductors: a review

    DOE PAGES

    Bjorgaard, Josiah A.; Kose, Muhammet Erkan

    2014-12-22

    Our review describes the various aspects of simulation strategies for exciton diffusion in condensed phase thin films of organic semiconductors. Several methods for calculating energy transfer rate constants are discussed along with procedures for how to account for energetic disorder. Exciton diffusion can be modelled by using kinetic Monte-Carlo methods or master equations. Recent literature on simulation efforts for estimating exciton diffusion lengths of various conjugated polymers and small molecules are introduced. Moreover, these studies are discussed in the context of the effects of morphology on exciton diffusion and the necessity of accurate treatment of disorder for comparison of simulationmore » results with those of experiment.« less

  5. Ras Diffusion Is Sensitive to Plasma Membrane Viscosity

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, J. Shawn; Drake, Kimberly R.; Remmert, Catha L.; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2005-01-01

    The cell surface contains a variety of barriers and obstacles that slow the lateral diffusion of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins below the theoretical limit imposed by membrane viscosity. How the diffusion of proteins residing exclusively on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane is regulated has been largely unexplored. We show here that the diffusion of the small GTPase Ras is sensitive to the viscosity of the plasma membrane. Using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we examined the diffusion of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged HRas, NRas, and KRas in COS-7 cells loaded with or depleted of cholesterol, a well-known modulator of membrane bilayer viscosity. In cells loaded with excess cholesterol, the diffusional mobilities of GFP-HRas, GFP-NRas, and GFP-KRas were significantly reduced, paralleling the behavior of the viscosity-sensitive lipid probes DiIC16 and DiIC18. However, the effects of cholesterol depletion on protein and lipid diffusion in cell membranes were highly dependent on the depletion method used. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin slowed Ras diffusion by a viscosity-independent mechanism, whereas overnight cholesterol depletion slightly increased both protein and lipid diffusion. The ability of Ras to sense membrane viscosity may represent a general feature of proteins residing on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. PMID:15923235

  6. Ras diffusion is sensitive to plasma membrane viscosity.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, J Shawn; Drake, Kimberly R; Remmert, Catha L; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2005-08-01

    The cell surface contains a variety of barriers and obstacles that slow the lateral diffusion of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored and transmembrane proteins below the theoretical limit imposed by membrane viscosity. How the diffusion of proteins residing exclusively on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane is regulated has been largely unexplored. We show here that the diffusion of the small GTPase Ras is sensitive to the viscosity of the plasma membrane. Using confocal fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we examined the diffusion of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged HRas, NRas, and KRas in COS-7 cells loaded with or depleted of cholesterol, a well-known modulator of membrane bilayer viscosity. In cells loaded with excess cholesterol, the diffusional mobilities of GFP-HRas, GFP-NRas, and GFP-KRas were significantly reduced, paralleling the behavior of the viscosity-sensitive lipid probes DiIC(16) and DiIC(18). However, the effects of cholesterol depletion on protein and lipid diffusion in cell membranes were highly dependent on the depletion method used. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin slowed Ras diffusion by a viscosity-independent mechanism, whereas overnight cholesterol depletion slightly increased both protein and lipid diffusion. The ability of Ras to sense membrane viscosity may represent a general feature of proteins residing on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane.

  7. Probing the oxidation kinetics of small permalloy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xiaolei; Song, Xiao; Yin, Shiliu; Shirolkar, Mandar M.; Li, Ming; Wang, Haiqian

    2017-02-01

    The oxidation of permalloys is important to apply in a wide range. The oxidation and diffusion mechanisms of small permalloy particles with different Fe content are studied by using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and microstructure characterizations. Fe2O3/(Ni, Fe)3O4 plays a key role in the morphology evolution and diffusion mechanisms of small NiFe particles upon oxidation. The activation energies of grain boundary diffusion for the NiFe alloys increase from 141 kJ/mol to 208 kJ/mol as the Fe content increases from 0 to 50 wt%. We have developed a diffusion process resolved temperature programed oxidation (PR-TPO) analysis method. Three diffusion mechanisms have been recognized by using this method: In addition to the grain boundary diffusion and lattice diffusion, our TGA analysis suggests that the phase conversion from Fe2O3 to (Ni, Fe)3O4 induces diffusion change and affects the diffusion process at the intermediate temperature. Relevant oxidation kinetics and diffusion mechanisms are discussed.

  8. An Integration Factor Method for Stochastic and Stiff Reaction-Diffusion Systems.

    PubMed

    Ta, Catherine; Wang, Dongyong; Nie, Qing

    2015-08-15

    Stochastic effects are often present in the biochemical systems involving reactions and diffusions. When the reactions are stiff, existing numerical methods for stochastic reaction diffusion equations require either very small time steps for any explicit schemes or solving large nonlinear systems at each time step for the implicit schemes. Here we present a class of semi-implicit integration factor methods that treat the diffusion term exactly and reaction implicitly for a system of stochastic reaction-diffusion equations. Our linear stability analysis shows the advantage of such methods for both small and large amplitudes of noise. Direct use of the method to solving several linear and nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion equations demonstrates good accuracy, efficiency, and stability properties. This new class of methods, which are easy to implement, will have broader applications in solving stochastic reaction-diffusion equations arising from models in biology and physical sciences.

  9. An integration factor method for stochastic and stiff reaction–diffusion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ta, Catherine; Wang, Dongyong; Nie, Qing

    2015-08-15

    Stochastic effects are often present in the biochemical systems involving reactions and diffusions. When the reactions are stiff, existing numerical methods for stochastic reaction diffusion equations require either very small time steps for any explicit schemes or solving large nonlinear systems at each time step for the implicit schemes. Here we present a class of semi-implicit integration factor methods that treat the diffusion term exactly and reaction implicitly for a system of stochastic reaction–diffusion equations. Our linear stability analysis shows the advantage of such methods for both small and large amplitudes of noise. Direct use of the method to solving several linear and nonlinear stochastic reaction–diffusion equations demonstrates good accuracy, efficiency, and stability properties. This new class of methods, which are easy to implement, will have broader applications in solving stochastic reaction–diffusion equations arising from models in biology and physical sciences.

  10. Diffusion amid random overlapping obstacles: Similarities, invariants, approximations

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Igor L.; Gao, Fei; Kraikivski, Pavel; Slepchenko, Boris M.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient and accurate numerical techniques are used to examine similarities of effective diffusion in a void between random overlapping obstacles: essential invariance of effective diffusion coefficients (Deff) with respect to obstacle shapes and applicability of a two-parameter power law over nearly entire range of excluded volume fractions (ϕ), except for a small vicinity of a percolation threshold. It is shown that while neither of the properties is exact, deviations from them are remarkably small. This allows for quick estimation of void percolation thresholds and approximate reconstruction of Deff (ϕ) for obstacles of any given shape. In 3D, the similarities of effective diffusion yield a simple multiplication “rule” that provides a fast means of estimating Deff for a mixture of overlapping obstacles of different shapes with comparable sizes. PMID:21513372

  11. Characterizing cosmic inhomogeneity with anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraljic, D.

    2015-08-01

    Dark matter (DM) clustering at the present epoch is investigated from a fractal viewpoint in order to determine the scale where the self-similar scaling property of the DM halo distribution transits to homogeneity. Methods based on well-established `counts-in-cells' as well as new methods based on anomalous diffusion and random walks are investigated. Both are applied to DM haloes of the biggest N-body simulation in the `Dark Sky Simulations' (DS) catalogue and an equivalent randomly distributed catalogue. Results based on the smaller `Millennium Run' (MR) simulation are revisited and improved. It is found that the MR simulation volume is too small and prone to bias to reliably identify the onset of homogeneity. Transition to homogeneity is defined when the fractal dimension of the clustered and random distributions cannot be distinguished within the associated uncertainties. The `counts-in-cells' method applied to the DS then yields a homogeneity scale roughly consistent with previous work (˜150 h-1 Mpc). The characteristic length-scale for anomalous diffusion to behave homogeneously is found to be at about 250 h-1 Mpc. The behaviour of the fractal dimensions for a halo catalogue with the same two-point function as the original but with shuffled Fourier phases is investigated. The methods based on anomalous diffusion are shown to be sensitive to the phase information, whereas the `counts-in-cells' methods are not.

  12. Observations of the diffuse UV radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra are presented for the diffuse UV radiation field between 1250 to 3100 A from eight different regions of the sky, which were obtained with the Johns Hopkins UVX experiment. UVX flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-61C) in January 1986 as part of the Get-Away Special project. The experiment consisted of two 1/4 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometers, covering the spectral range 1250 to 1700 A at 17 A resolution and 1600 to 3100 A at 27 A resolution, respectively, with a field of view of 4 x .25 deg, sufficiently small to pick out regions of the sky with no stars in the line of sight. Values were found for the diffuse cosmic background ranging in intensity from 300 to 900 photons/sq cm/sec/sr/A. The cosmic background is spectrally flat from 1250 to 3100 A, within the uncertainties of each spectrometer. The zodiacal light begins to play a significant role in the diffuse radiation field above 2000 A, and its brightness was determined relative to the solar emission. Observed brightnesses of the zodiacal light in the UV remain almost constant with ecliptic latitude, unlike the declining visible brightnesses, possibly indicating that those (smaller) grains responsible for the UV scattering have a much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering.

  13. A modified version of the combined in-diffusion/abrasive peeling technique for measuring diffusion of strongly sorbing radionuclides in argillaceous rocks: a test study on the diffusion of caesium in Opalinus Clay.

    PubMed

    Van Loon, Luc R; Müller, Werner

    2014-08-01

    A filter free diffusion set-up was developed for measuring the diffusion of strongly sorbing radionuclides in indurated argillaceous rocks such as Opalinus Clay (OPA) that normally disintegrate when contacted with a solution. Small bore cores drilled parallel to the bedding plane and embedded in epoxy resin were found to be stable and could be used for performing in-diffusion measurements. The method was tested with the diffusion of caesium, spiked with caesium-134, in Opalinus Clay. The profile of Cs in the clay sample was determined with a modified version of the abrasive peeling technique. The diffusion parameters obtained for caesium were in fair agreement with those determined earlier using the classical through-diffusion technique where stainless steel filters were used to confine the samples.

  14. Small centrifugal pumps for low thrust rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulbrandsen, N. C.; Furst, R. B.; Burgess, R. M.; Scheer, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical and experimental investigation of low specific speed pumps for potential use as components of propellant feed systems for low thrust rocket engines. Shrouded impellers and open face impellers were tested in volute type and vaned diffuser type pumps. Full- and partial-emission diffusers and full- and partial-admission impellers were tested. Axial and radial loads, head and efficiency versus flow, and cavitation tests were conducted. Predicted performance of two pumps are compared when pumping water and liquid hydrogen. Detailed pressure loss and parasitic power values are presented for two pump configurations. Partial-emission diffusers were found to permit use of larger impeller and diffuser passages with a minimal performance penalty. Normal manufacturing tolerances were found to result in substantial power requirement variation with only a small pressure rise change. Impeller wear ring leakage was found to reduce pump pressure rise to an increasing degree as the pump flowrate was decreased.

  15. Diffuser for intravessels radiation based on plastic fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pich, Justyna; Grobelny, Andrzej; Beres-Pawlik, Elzbieta

    2006-03-01

    Laser radiation is used in such contemporary medicine as: sport medicine, gynecology etc. Because of many radiations inside the system, there is a need of an element, which allows to supply the place of illness with energy. The dimensions of this element are often small and the one that meets these conditions is diffuser.

  16. Experimental Mating of Trapped Vortex Diffusers with Large Area Ratio Thrust Augmentors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    the hump and greatly reduce the desired effect of the cavity. Consequently, the diffuser would not operate properly. It was also found that, due to...differences. Differences In laboratory constraints (wails, ceiling, etc.) can also have a small effect on the ejector flow. 2. TRAPPED VORTEX DIFFUSER...was farther from complete at the smaller lengths. The shift in peak locations seems to be a simple diffuser effect where the flow with the thinnest

  17. Measurements of Transverse Beam Diffusion Rates in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The transverse beam diffusion rate vs. particle oscillation amplitude was measured in the Tevatron using collimator scans. All collimator jaws except one were retracted. As the jaw of interest was moved in small steps, the local shower rates were recorded as a function of time. By using a diffusion model, the time evolution of losses could be related to the diffusion rate at the collimator position. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  18. Selected Dissemination/Diffusion Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Marshall L.

    This analysis of selected diffusion and dissemination methods used by developer-demonstrator projects in the National Diffusion Network discusses strategies under the following headings: managing the project, developing materials, disseminating information, conducting awareness sessions, training personnel, using certified trainers, providing…

  19. Development of a Detonation Diffuser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    reflection of the shock would result in a detonation that runs out of reactants when it encounters the combustion front. Rotating the reflecting surface...FEASIBILITY AND PARAMETER STUDY OF A DETONATION DIFFUSER DISSERTATION Christopher A Stevens, CTR AFIT-DS...States Government. iii AFIT-DS-ENY-14-M-05 FEASIBILITY AND PARAMETER STUDY OF A DETONATION DIFFUSER DISSTERTATION

  20. Preliminary Investigation of Supersonic Diffusers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-05-01

    No. L5D20 This pressure was measured with a large mercury manometer . The total ’head after diffusion can be assumed equal to the static pressure at...of the entering kinetic energy. A mercury manometer was used to measure the difference between the total heads before and after diffusion. ‘J!hesetwo

  1. Consequences of Diffusion of Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Kevin F.

    1979-01-01

    The article traces evolution of diffusion theory; illustrates undesirable consequences in a cross-cultural setting, reviews criticisms of several scholars; considers distributional effects and unanticipated consequences for potential ameliorative impact on diffusion theory; and codifies these factors into a framework for research into consequences…

  2. Demonstrating Diffusion: Why the Confusion?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panizzon, Debra Lee

    1998-01-01

    Examines the principles of diffusion and how it may be confused with convection. Suggests that educators may be misleading students and clouding their understanding of the process. Provides two contemporary examples to explain the process of diffusion and how it differs from convection. (Author/CCM)

  3. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  4. Diffusion in jammed particle packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolintineanu, Dan S.; Silbert, Leonardo E.; Grest, Gary S.; Lechman, Jeremy B.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusive transport in jammed particle packs is of interest for a number of applications, as well as being a potential indicator of structural properties near the jamming point. To this end, we report stochastic simulations of equilibrium diffusion through monodisperse sphere packs near the jamming point in the limit of a perfectly insulating surrounding medium. The time dependence of various diffusion properties is resolved over several orders of magnitude. Two time regimes of expected Fickian diffusion are observed, separated by an intermediate regime of anomalous diffusion. This intermediate regime grows as the particle volume fraction approaches the critical jamming transition. The diffusion behavior is fully controlled by the extent of the contacts between neighboring particles, which in turn depend on proximity to the jamming point. In particular, the mean first passage time associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles is shown to control both the time to recover Fickian diffusion and the long time diffusivity. Scaling laws are established that relate these quantities to the difference between the actual and critical jamming volume fractions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE- AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Kathleen M.; Williams, Kathy S.; Lineback, Jennifer Evarts

    2011-01-01

    Biology student mastery regarding the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis is difficult to achieve. To monitor comprehension of these processes among students at a large public university, we developed and validated an 18-item Osmosis and Diffusion Conceptual Assessment (ODCA). This assessment includes two-tiered items, some adopted or modified…

  6. The Diffusion of New Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ready, Patricia M.

    The life cycle of "new math" is fertile ground for the study of the diffusion of an innovation. New math arrived in 1958 to save the day for America after the Soviet Union launched Sputnik, the first successful space flight in 1957. In a period of 16 years an entire diffusion cycle was completed throughout the entire educational system…

  7. Unsteady Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, Arvind; Berhan, S.; Chernovsky, M.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2001-01-01

    -dimensional; (ii) The spherical diffusion flame completely encloses the soot which is formed on the fuel rich side of the reaction zone. This increases the importance of flame radiation because now both soot and gaseous combustion products co-exist inside the high temperature spherical diffusion flame. (iii) For small fuel injection velocities, as is usually the case for a pyrolyzing solid, the diffusion flame in mu-g around the solid naturally develops spherical symmetry. Thus, spherical diffusion flames are of interest to fires in mu-g and identifying conditions that lead to radiation-induced extinction is important for spacecraft fire safety.

  8. Radiant Extinction Of Gaseous Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berhan, S.; Chernovsky, M.; Atreya, A.; Baum, Howard R.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2003-01-01

    one-dimensional. (ii) The spherical diffusion flame completely encloses the soot which is formed on the fuel rich side of the reaction zone. This increases the importance of flame radiation because now both soot and gaseous combustion products co-exist inside the high temperature spherical diffusion flame. (iii) For small fuel injection velocities, as is usually the case for a pyrolyzing solid, the diffusion flame in :g around the solid naturally develops spherical symmetry. Thus, spherical diffusion flames are of interest to fires in :g and identifying conditions that lead to radiation-induced extinction is important for spacecraft fire safety.

  9. Enthalpy Diffusion in Multicomponent Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, A W

    2008-11-12

    The enthalpy diffusion flux in the multicomponent energy equation is a well known yet frequently neglected term. It accounts for energy changes, associated with compositional changes, resulting from species diffusion. Enthalpy diffusion is important in flows where significant mixing occurs between species of dissimilar molecular weight. The term plays a critical role in preventing local violations of the entropy condition. In simulations of nonpremixed combustion, omission of the enthalpy flux can lead to anomalous temperature gradients, which may cause mixing regions to exceed ignition conditions. The term can also play a role in generating acoustic noise in turbulent mixing layers. Euler solvers that rely on numerical diffusion to mix fluids cannot accurately predict the temperature in mixed regions. On the other hand, Navier-Stokes solvers that incorporate enthalpy diffusion can provide much more accurate results.

  10. Knudsen Diffusion in Silicon Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruener, Simon; Huber, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Measurements on helium and argon gas flow through an array of parallel, linear channels of 12 nm diameter and 200μm length in a single crystalline silicon membrane reveal a Knudsen diffusion type transport from 102 to 107 in Knudsen number Kn. The classic scaling prediction for the transport diffusion coefficient on temperature and mass of diffusing species, DHe∝T, is confirmed over a T range from 40 K to 300 K for He and for the ratio of DHe/DAr∝mAr/mHe. Deviations of the channels from a cylindrical form, resolved with electron microscopy down to subnanometer scales, quantitatively account for a reduced diffusivity as compared to Knudsen diffusion in ideal tubular channels. The membrane permeation experiments are described over 10 orders of magnitude in Kn, encompassing the transition flow regime, by the unified flow model of Beskok and Karniadakis.

  11. Diffusion of polymer gel implants.

    PubMed

    Davis, B K

    1974-08-01

    Crosslinked polyacrylamide and polyvinylpyrrolidone gels have been used to subcutaneously implant (125)I-labeled immunoglobulin, (125)I-labeled luteinizing hormone, (125)I-labeled bovine serum albumin, (125)I-labeled insulin, [(3)H]prostaglandin F(2alpha), and Na(125)I into hamsters. From the rates of absorption of the solutes, their diffusion coefficients were determined. The diffusion coefficients showed a logarithmic dependence on implant polymer concentration and solute molecular weight. Release of the solutes from gel preparations incubated 10 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at 37 degrees revealed a similar relationship between solute diffusion coefficient, molecular weight, and the concentration of polymer. A general equation was derived that gives the expected diffusion coefficient of a substance in a polymer gel from its molecular weight, diffusion coefficient in solvent, and polymer concentration of the gel.

  12. Portable vapor diffusion coefficient meter

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford K.

    2007-06-12

    An apparatus for measuring the effective vapor diffusion coefficient of a test vapor diffusing through a sample of porous media contained within a test chamber. A chemical sensor measures the time-varying concentration of vapor that has diffused a known distance through the porous media. A data processor contained within the apparatus compares the measured sensor data with analytical predictions of the response curve based on the transient diffusion equation using Fick's Law, iterating on the choice of an effective vapor diffusion coefficient until the difference between the predicted and measured curves is minimized. Optionally, a purge fluid can forced through the porous media, permitting the apparatus to also measure a gas-phase permeability. The apparatus can be made lightweight, self-powered, and portable for use in the field.

  13. Heat transfer, diffusion, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm

    1954-01-01

    Although it has long been known that the differential equations of the heat-transfer and diffusion processes are identical, application to technical problems has only recently been made. In 1916 it was shown that the speed of oxidation of the carbon in iron ore depends upon the speed with which the oxygen of the combustion air diffuses through the core of gas surrounding the carbon surface. The identity previously referred to was then used to calculate the amount of oxygen diffusing to the carbon surface on the basis of the heat transfer between the gas stream and the carbon surface. Then in 1921, H. Thoma reversed that procedure; he used diffusion experiments to determine heat-transfer coefficients. Recently Lohrisch has extended this work by experiment. A technically very important application of the identity of heat transfer and diffusion is that of the cooling tower, since in this case both processes occur simultaneously.

  14. Ammonia diffusion through Nalophan™ bags.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Selena; Eusebio, Lidia; Dentoni, Licinia; Capelli, Laura; Del Rosso, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work is to verify the diffusion rate of ammonia through the Nalophan™ film that constitutes the sampling bag, considering storage times ranging from 1 to 26 h. The ammonia decay over time was evaluated using gas-chromatography for the quantification of ammonia concentration inside the bag. The research assesses the roles of both of ammonia and water concentration gradients at the polymeric film interface on the diffusion process. The results show that both the ammonia concentration gradient and, in a less pronounced way, the water concentration gradient are the main 'engines' of ammonia diffusion. Double bags seem to represent a simple solution for preventing ammonia losses during storage. Another interesting result concerns the role of the bag surface on the ammonia diffusion rate: the higher the surface/volume (S/V) ratio, the higher the ammonia diffusion rate through the polymeric film.

  15. Diffuse gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An examination of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma-radiation observed by SAS-2 satellite away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV has shown that it consists of two components. One component is generally correlated with galactic latitudes, the atomic hydrogen column density was deduced from 21 cm measurements, and the continuum radio emission, believed to be synchrotron emission. It has an energy spectrum similar to that in the plane and joins smoothly to the intense radiation from the plane. It is therefore presumed to be of galactic origin. The other component is apparently isotropic, at least on a coarse scale, and has a steep energy spectrum. No evidence is found for a cosmic ray halo surrounding the galaxy in the shape of a sphere or oblate spheroid with galactic dimensions. Constraints for a halo model with significantly larger dimensions are set on the basis of an upper limit to the gamma-ray anisotropy.

  16. Hydrogen diffusion fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Struthers, R.C.

    1987-08-04

    This patent describes a fuel cell comprising; an elongate case; a thin, flat separator part of non-porous, di-electric, hydrogen-permeable material between the ends of and extending transverse the case and defining anode and cathode chambers; a thin, flat anode part of non-porous, electric conductive, hydrogen-permeable metallic material in the anode chamber in flat contacting engagement with and co-extensive with the separator part; a flat, porous, catalytic cathode part in the cathode chamber in contacting engagement with the separator part; hydrogen supply means supplying hydrogen to the anode part within the anode chamber; oxidant gas supply means supplying oxidant gas to the cathode part within the cathode chamber; and, an external electric circuit connected with and between the anode and cathode parts. The anode part absorbs and is permeated by hydrogen supplied to it and diffuses the hydrogen to hydrogen ions and free electrons; the free electrons in the anode part are conducted from the anode part into the electric circuit to perform useful work. The hydrogen ions in the anode part move from the anode part through the separator part and into the cathode part. Free electrons are conducted by the electric circuit into the cathode part. The hydrogen ions, oxidant gas and free electrons in the cathode part react and generate waste, heat and water.

  17. Diffusion in membranes: Toward a two-dimensional diffusion map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Garcia-Sakai, Victoria; Bewley, Robert; Dalgliesh, Robert; Perring, Toby; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been the prime tool for studying molecular diffusion in membranes over relevant nanometer distances. These experiments are essential to our current understanding of molecular dynamics of lipids, proteins and membrane-active molecules. Recently, we presented experimental evidence from X-ray diffraction and quasi-elastic neutron scattering demonstrating that ethanol enhances the permeability of membranes. At the QENS 2014/WINS 2014 conference we presented a novel technique to measure diffusion across membranes employing 2-dimensional quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We present results from our preliminary analysis of an experiment on the cold neutron multi-chopper spectrometer LET at ISIS, where we studied the self-diffusion of water molecules along lipid membranes and have the possibility of studying the diffusion in membranes. By preparing highly oriented membrane stacks and aligning them horizontally in the spectrometer, our aim is to distinguish between lateral and transmembrane diffusion. Diffusion may also be measured at different locations in the membranes, such as the water layer and the hydrocarbon membrane core. With a complete analysis of the data, 2-dimensional mapping will enable us to determine diffusion channels of water and ethanol molecules to quantitatively determine nanoscale membrane permeability.

  18. Inter-diffusion and its correlation with dynamical cross correlation in liquid Ce80Ni20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. L.; Zhong, L. X.; Zhu, C. A.; Zhang, B.

    2017-03-01

    We reported the inter-diffusion coefficients in liquid Ce_{80}Ni_{20} measured by the sliding cell technique. Combined with the self-diffusion data of Ni measured by quasi-elastic neutron scattering in the literature, it was found that the relationship between inter-diffusion and self-diffusion in liquid Ce_{80}Ni_{20} was strongly deviated from the standard Darken equation with an abnormally small dynamical cross correlation factor S (the so called Manning factor) in a range of 0.6-0.8, less than unity in standard systems. Through the calculated distinct diffusion coefficient and its deviation from the standard one, it was discovered that the small S value was directly originated from enhanced distinct diffusion between Ce and Ni atoms and reduced distinct diffusion between Ni and Ni atoms. Because the inter-atomic interaction was not considered in the standard liquids, the present small S factor and intrinsic distinct diffusion coefficients were believed to be resulted from the chemical interaction between Ce and Ni in the liquid. The results provide new evidence of the dynamic cross correlation in liquid diffusion, and thus shed light on the understanding of the correlation between dynamics and structure in liquid alloys.

  19. Interfacial diffusion aided deformation during nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Amit; E, Weinan

    2016-07-01

    Nanoindentation is commonly used to quantify the mechanical response of material surfaces. Despite its widespread use, a detailed understanding of the deformation mechanisms responsible for plasticity during these experiments has remained elusive. Nanoindentation measurements often show stress values close to a material's ideal strength which suggests that dislocation nucleation and subsequent dislocation activity dominates the deformation. However, low strain-rate exponents and small activation volumes have also been reported which indicates high temperature sensitivity of the deformation processes. Using an order parameter aided temperature accelerated sampling technique called adiabatic free energy dynamics [J. B. Abrams and M. E. Tuckerman, J. Phys. Chem. B, 112, 15742 (2008)], and molecular dynamics we have probed the diffusive mode of deformation during nanoindentation. Localized processes such as surface vacancy and ad-atom pair formation, vacancy diffusion are found to play an important role during indentation. Our analysis suggests a change in the dominant deformation mode from dislocation mediated plasticity to diffusional flow at high temperatures, slow indentation rates and small indenter tip radii.

  20. A Device to Emulate Diffusion and Thermal Conductivity Using Water Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanck, Harvey F.

    2005-01-01

    A device designed to emulate diffusion and thermal conductivity using flowing water is reviewed. Water flowing through a series of cells connected by a small tube in each partition in this plastic model is capable of emulating diffusion and thermal conductivity that occurs in variety of systems described by several mathematical equations.

  1. A Simple Educational Method for the Measurement of Liquid Binary Diffusivities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Nicholas P.; de Beer, Martin P.; Williamson, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    A simple low-cost experiment has been developed for the measurement of the binary diffusion coefficients of liquid substances. The experiment is suitable for demonstrating molecular diffusion to small or large undergraduate classes in chemistry or chemical engineering. Students use a cell phone camera in conjunction with open-source image…

  2. Comparison of Student Learning about Diffusion and Osmosis in Constructivist and Traditional Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christianson, Roger G.; Fisher, Kathleen M.

    1999-01-01

    Reports on the effects of constructivist versus traditional teaching approaches on university students' learning about osmosis and diffusion. Students understood diffusion and osmosis more deeply in the constructivist-informed classroom, which used small discussion groups rather than traditional large lecture groups. Suggests ways to improve…

  3. Diffusive instabilities in hyperbolic reaction-diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Zemskov, Evgeny P; Horsthemke, Werner

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-variable reaction-diffusion systems of the hyperbolic type. A linear stability analysis is performed, and the conditions for diffusion-driven instabilities are derived. Two basic types of eigenvalues, real and complex, are described. Dispersion curves for both types of eigenvalues are plotted and their behavior is analyzed. The real case is related to the Turing instability, and the complex one corresponds to the wave instability. We emphasize the interesting feature that the wave instability in the hyperbolic equations occurs in two-variable systems, whereas in the parabolic case one needs three reaction-diffusion equations.

  4. Transdermal diffusion of xenon in vitro using diffusion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhovsky, A.; Petrov, E.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this research was to study the diffusion rate of xenon through guinea pig skin and how viscosity of cosmetic component capryl/capric triglyceride (CCT) facilitates to deliver xenon to surface of skin patches. They were placed in Franz cell for 24 hours and diffusion rate and permeability of xenon were calculated. Thus diffusion rate was 0.031 mg/hour*cm2 and permeability was 0.003 cm/hour. Using Brookfield viscometer it was shown that viscosity of CCT decreased upon increasing xenon concentration. Obtained results can be utilized in developing of new xenon containing drugs for topical administration.

  5. Disturbance-driven Hillslope Diffusion Scales and Values Clarified by Extant Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doane, T.; Furbish, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    In low-relief landscapes, the hillslope diffusion equation approximates the rate of topographic evolution due to disturbance driven sediment transport. Whereas this expression is appealing and performs well, the physical meaning of a hillslope diffusivity remains unclear. Here, a study of the disturbances that redistribute sediment on hillslopes clarifies a physical interpretation. We conceptualize the cumulative hillslope diffusivity, which is a rate constant for topographic degradation at large scales, as the aggregate of all surface disturbing processes. A numerical model that generates pit and mound topography from tree throw events illustrates this idea. Using the diffusion equation, we model the degradation of pits and mounds by all smaller scale disturbances. However, when examined at a larger scale, the effective hillslope diffusivity is composed of the small scale diffusivity plus the effect of tree throw. We also present a method to determine the background hillslope diffusivity using the extant hillslope roughness and rates of roughness production. Numerical simulations show that the variance of the surface roughness of a hillslope as introduced by pit and mound topography reaches a steady state when the rate of variance production (tree throw) is constant. The magnitude of the steady state variance is a function of variance production and decay (small scale diffusivity), so there is an opportunity to determine hillslope diffusivity values if the rates of variance production are known. This method yields estimates of the modern hillslope diffusivity which are useful in problems involving the human and climate change time scales.

  6. Design and performance of family of diffusing scrolls with mixed-flow impeller and vaneless diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W Byron; Bradshaw, Guy R

    1949-01-01

    A family of diffusing scrolls was designed for use with a mixed-flow impeller and a small-diameter vaneless diffuser. The design theory, intended to maintain a uniform pressure around the scroll inlet, permits determination of the position of scroll cross sections of preassigned area by considering the radial variation in fluid density and the effects of friction along the scroll. Inasmuch as the design method leaves the cross-sectional shape undetermined, the effect of certain variations in scroll shape was investigated by studying scrolls having angles of divergence (of the scroll walls downstream of the entrance section) of 24 degrees, 40 degrees, and 80 degrees. A second 80 degree scroll was of asymmetrical construction and a third was plaster-cast instead of sand-cast. Each scroll was tested as a compressor component at actual impeller tip speeds of 700 to 1300 feet per second from full throttle to surge.

  7. Scanning, non-contact, hybrid broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy and diffuse correlation spectroscopy system

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Johannes D.; Mireles, Miguel; Morales-Dalmau, Jordi; Farzam, Parisa; Martínez-Lozano, Mar; Casanovas, Oriol; Durduran, Turgut

    2016-01-01

    A scanning system for small animal imaging using non-contact, hybrid broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy (ncDOS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (ncDCS) is presented. The ncDOS uses a two-dimensional spectrophotometer retrieving broadband (610-900 nm) spectral information from up to fifty-seven source-detector distances between 2 and 5 mm. The ncDCS data is simultaneously acquired from four source-detector pairs. The sample is scanned in two dimensions while tracking variations in height. The system has been validated with liquid phantoms, demonstrated in vivo on a human fingertip during an arm cuff occlusion and on a group of mice with xenoimplanted renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26977357

  8. Macromolecular Diffusion in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gam, Sangah; Meth, Jeff; Zane, Steve; Winey, Karen; Clarke, Nigel; Composto, Russell

    2011-03-01

    Macromolecular diffusion in crowded systems is important in biological and engineered systems. We have studied macromolecular diffusion through a model polymer nanocomposite (PNC) containing phenyl grafted silica nanoparticles (NPs), randomly distributed in a polystyrene matrix. Over a wide range of NP loading and tracer molecular weight (M), the scaling of the diffusion coefficient with M is in excellent agreement with the entropic barrier model (EBM) previously used to describe diffusion of DNA through confined media (e.g., gels and nanopores). To investigate the effect of NP size, diffusion was measured in PNC's with silica NPs having diameters of 28 and 12 nm. The normalized diffusion coefficients (D / D0) plotted against the interparticle separation relative to probe size (i.e., ID/ 2 Rg) collapse on a master curve. Diffusion in a poly(methyl methacrylate):silica NP system was also investigated to understand how attractive interactions (i.e., enthalpy) perturb motion relative to the polystyrene and phenyl-silica NP system which is athermal. Finally, a flux-based model is proposed and compared with experimental results.

  9. Single file diffusion in microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Farrell, Spencer; Brown, Aidan

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the single file diffusion (SFD) of large particles entering a confined tubular geometry, such as luminal diffusion of proteins inside microtubules or flagella. While single-file effects have no effect on particle density, we report significant single-file effects for individually-tracked tracer particle motion. Both exact and approximate ordering statistics of particles entering semi-infinite tubes agree well with our stochastic simulations. Considering initially empty semi-infinite tubes, with particles entering at one end starting from an initial time t = 0 , tracked particles display super-diffusive effective exponents just after they enter the system and trends towards diffusive exponents at later times. Equivalently, if diffusive exponents are assumed the effective diffusivity is reduced at early times and enhanced at later times through a logarithmic factor logN , where N is the number of particles in the tube. When we number each particle from the first (n = 1) to the most recent (n = N), we find good scaling collapse of the effective diffusivity for all n. Techniques that track individual particles, or local groups of particles, such as photo-activation or photobleaching, will exhibit single-file effects.

  10. Cytoplasmic hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed Central

    al-Baldawi, N F; Abercrombie, R F

    1992-01-01

    The apparent cytoplasmic proton diffusion coefficient was measured using pH electrodes and samples of cytoplasm extracted from the giant neuron of a marine invertebrate. By suddenly changing the pH at one surface of the sample and recording the relaxation of pH within the sample, an apparent diffusion coefficient of 1.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7) was measured in the acidic or neutral range of pH (6.0-7.2). This value is approximately 5x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the mobile pH buffers (approximately 8 x 10(-6) cm2/s) and approximately 68x lower than the diffusion coefficient of the hydronium ion (93 x 10(-6) cm2/s). A mobile pH buffer (approximately 15% of the buffering power) and an immobile buffer (approximately 85% of the buffering power) could quantitatively account for the results at acidic or neutral pH. At alkaline pH (8.2-8.6), the apparent proton diffusion coefficient increased to 4.1 +/- 0.8 x 10(-6) cm2/s (N = 7). This larger diffusion coefficient at alkaline pH could be explained quantitatively by the enhanced buffering power of the mobile amino acids. Under the conditions of these experiments, it is unlikely that hydroxide movement influences the apparent hydrogen ion diffusion coefficient. PMID:1617134

  11. Fick's Insights on Liquid Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2004-10-07

    In 1855, Adolph Fick published ''On Liquid Diffusion'', mathematically treating salt movements in liquids as a diffusion process, analogous to heat diffusion. Less recognized is the fact that Fick also provided a detailed account of the implications of salt diffusion to transport through membranes. A careful look at Fick (1855) shows that his conceptualization of molecular diffusion was more comprehensive than could be captured with the mathematical methods available to him, and therefore his expression, referred to as Fick's Law, dealt only with salt flux. He viewed salt diffusion in liquids as a binary process, with salt moving in one way and water moving in the other. Fick's analysis of the consequences of such a binary process operating in a hydrophilic pore in a membrane offers insights that are relevant to earth systems. This paper draws attention to Fick's rationale, and its implications to hydrogeological systems. Fick (1829-1901; Figure 1), a gifted scientist, published the first book on medical physics (Fick, 1858), discussing the application of optics, solid mechanics, gas diffusion, and heat budget to biological systems. Fick's paper is divisible into two parts. The first describes his experimental verification of the applicability of Fourier's equation to liquid diffusion. The second is a detailed discussion of diffusion through a membrane. Although Fick's Law specifically quantifies solute flux, Fick visualized a simultaneous movement of water and stated, ''It is evident that a volume of water equal to that of the salt passes simultaneously out of the upper stratum into the lower.'' (Fick, 1855, p.30). Fick drew upon Fourier's model purely by analogy. He assumed that concentration gradient impelled salt movement, without inquiring why concentration gradient should constitute a driving force. As for water movement, he stated intuitively, ''a force of suction comes into play on each side of the membrane, proportional to the difference of concentration

  12. ALUMINUM IMPURITY DIFFUSION IN MAGNESIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Sarah; Warren, Andrew; Coffey, Kevin; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Todd, Peter J; Sohn, Yong Ho; Klimov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    The Al impurity diffusion in polycrystalline Mg (99.9%) via depth profiling with secondary ion mass spectrometry was studied in the temperature range of 673-573K, utilizing the thin film method and thin film solution to the diffusion equation. Multiple samples were utilized and multiple profiles were obtained to determine statistically confident coefficient with maximum standard deviation of 16%. Activation energy and pre-exponential factor of Al impurity diffusion in Mg was determined as 155 kJ/mole and 3.9 x 10-3 m2/sec.

  13. Study of diffuse light in cD galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheick, Xania Nettie

    1993-01-01

    Conventionally, the gravitational potential of galaxy clusters has been mapped using the galaxies themselves or x-rays as test particles. Using the intra-cluster medium or diffuse light instead has the obvious advantage in sheer number of particles, i.e. better counting statistics. Analysis of diffuse light in two cD clusters (A2670 and A2029) is described. Deep R-band CCD images of these clusters were procured at the KPNO 36 in. and 2.1 m telescopes. On large scales, the diffuse light is well fit by a de Vaucouleurs' profile. This 'smoothness' is surprising in light of current cluster evolution theory which relies on violent interactions among cluster members. Thus we are motivated to study the diffuse light on small scales, expecting a priori to see clumpiness in the medium due to collisional or tidal stripping mechanisms or the affects of dynamical friction. Using a statistical approach, we have determined the source of the diffuse light to be numerous low luminosity objects. The clumpiness of the diffuse light in both clusters is described by auto correlations of the residual images (after diffuse light has been removed). From this analysis, we can determine a spatial scale of the clumps and attempt to place some constraints on the faint end of the cluster luminosity function. For A2670, we compute a differential luminosity function in the cluster center that suggests real differences in the luminosity function within the cluster center from a universal cluster luminosity function. We measure the V-R color of the cD and cluster galaxies and the color gradient across the halo of A2670. In A2029, we find structures associated with five galaxies suggestive of wakes, i.e. the gravitational response of the medium to galactic passage. The apparent lack of significant small-scale structure poses a curious problem for cluster evolution models.

  14. Modeling diffuse reflectance measurements of light scattered by layered tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Shelley B.

    In this dissertation, we first present a model for the diffuse reflectance due to a continuous beam incident normally on a half space composed of a uniform scattering and absorbing medium. This model is the result of an asymptotic analysis of the radiative transport equation for strong scattering, weak absorption and a defined beam width. Through comparison with the diffuse reflectance computed using the numerical solution of the radiative transport equation, we show that this diffuse reflectance model gives results that are accurate for small source-detector separation distances. We then present an explicit model for the diffuse reflectance due to a collimated beam of light incident normally on layered tissues. This model is derived using the corrected diffusion approximation applied to a layered medium, and it takes the form of a convolution with an explicit kernel and the incident beam profile. This model corrects the standard diffusion approximation over all source-detector separation distances provided the beam is sufficiently wide compared to the scattering mean-free path. We validate this model through comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. Then we use this model to estimate the optical properties of an epithelial layer from Monte Carlo simulation data. Using measurements at small source-detector separations and this model, we are able to estimate the absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and anisotropy factor of epithelial tissues efficiently with reasonable accuracy. Finally, we present an extension of the corrected diffusion approximation for an obliquely incident beam. This model is formed through a Fourier Series representation in the azimuthal angle which allows us to exhibit the break in axisymmetry when combined with the previous analysis. We validate this model with Monte Carlo simulations. This model can also be written in the form of a convolution of an explicit kernel with the incident beam profile. Additionally, it can be used to

  15. Time scale of diffusion in molecular and cellular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion is the driver of critical biological processes in cellular and molecular biology. The diverse temporal scales of cellular function are determined by vastly diverse spatial scales in most biophysical processes. The latter are due, among others, to small binding sites inside or on the cell membrane or to narrow passages between large cellular compartments. The great disparity in scales is at the root of the difficulty in quantifying cell function from molecular dynamics and from simulations. The coarse-grained time scale of cellular function is determined from molecular diffusion by the mean first passage time of molecular Brownian motion to a small targets or through narrow passages. The narrow escape theory (NET) concerns this issue. The NET is ubiquitous in molecular and cellular biology and is manifested, among others, in chemical reactions, in the calculation of the effective diffusion coefficient of receptors diffusing on a neuronal cell membrane strewn with obstacles, in the quantification of the early steps of viral trafficking, in the regulation of diffusion between the mother and daughter cells during cell division, and many other cases. Brownian trajectories can represent the motion of a molecule, a protein, an ion in solution, a receptor in a cell or on its membrane, and many other biochemical processes. The small target can represent a binding site or an ionic channel, a hidden active site embedded in a complex protein structure, a receptor for a neurotransmitter on the membrane of a neuron, and so on. The mean time to attach to a receptor or activator determines diffusion fluxes that are key regulators of cell function. This review describes physical models of various subcellular microdomains, in which the NET coarse-grains the molecular scale to a higher cellular-level, thus clarifying the role of cell geometry in determining subcellular function.

  16. Subdiffusion in Membrane Permeation of Small Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Chipot, Christophe; Comer, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Within the solubility–diffusion model of passive membrane permeation of small molecules, translocation of the permeant across the biological membrane is traditionally assumed to obey the Smoluchowski diffusion equation, which is germane for classical diffusion on an inhomogeneous free-energy and diffusivity landscape. This equation, however, cannot accommodate subdiffusive regimes, which have long been recognized in lipid bilayer dynamics, notably in the lateral diffusion of individual lipids. Through extensive biased and unbiased molecular dynamics simulations, we show that one-dimensional translocation of methanol across a pure lipid membrane remains subdiffusive on timescales approaching typical permeation times. Analysis of permeant motion within the lipid bilayer reveals that, in the absence of a net force, the mean squared displacement depends on time as t0.7, in stark contrast with the conventional model, which assumes a strictly linear dependence. We further show that an alternate model using a fractional-derivative generalization of the Smoluchowski equation provides a rigorous framework for describing the motion of the permeant molecule on the pico- to nanosecond timescale. The observed subdiffusive behavior appears to emerge from a crossover between small-scale rattling of the permeant around its present position in the membrane and larger-scale displacements precipitated by the formation of transient voids. PMID:27805049

  17. Subdiffusion in Membrane Permeation of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Chipot, Christophe; Comer, Jeffrey

    2016-11-02

    Within the solubility-diffusion model of passive membrane permeation of small molecules, translocation of the permeant across the biological membrane is traditionally assumed to obey the Smoluchowski diffusion equation, which is germane for classical diffusion on an inhomogeneous free-energy and diffusivity landscape. This equation, however, cannot accommodate subdiffusive regimes, which have long been recognized in lipid bilayer dynamics, notably in the lateral diffusion of individual lipids. Through extensive biased and unbiased molecular dynamics simulations, we show that one-dimensional translocation of methanol across a pure lipid membrane remains subdiffusive on timescales approaching typical permeation times. Analysis of permeant motion within the lipid bilayer reveals that, in the absence of a net force, the mean squared displacement depends on time as t(0.7), in stark contrast with the conventional model, which assumes a strictly linear dependence. We further show that an alternate model using a fractional-derivative generalization of the Smoluchowski equation provides a rigorous framework for describing the motion of the permeant molecule on the pico- to nanosecond timescale. The observed subdiffusive behavior appears to emerge from a crossover between small-scale rattling of the permeant around its present position in the membrane and larger-scale displacements precipitated by the formation of transient voids.

  18. Diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Kenneth M.; Gilbert, Barry L.

    1984-01-01

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  19. Floating-diffusion electrometer with adjustable sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tower, John R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The effective capacitance of the floating diffusion in a floating-diffusion electrometer is modified to adjust electrometer sensitivity. This is done by changing the direct potential applied to a gate electrode proximate to the floating diffusion.

  20. Improved diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, K.M.; Gilbert, B.L.

    A diffuser for augmenting a wind turbine having means for energizing the boundary layer at several locations along the diffuser walls is improved by the addition of a short collar extending radially outward from the outlet of the diffuser.

  1. Collective colloid diffusion under soft two-dimensional confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzuela, S.; Peláez, Raúl P.; Delgado-Buscalioni, R.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a numerical and theoretical investigation of the collective dynamics of colloids in an unbounded solution but trapped in a harmonic potential. Under strict two-dimensional confinement (infinitely stiff trap) the collective colloidal diffusion is enhanced and diverges at zero wave number (like k-1), due to the hydrodynamic propagation of the confining force across the layer. The analytic solution for the collective diffusion of colloids under a Gaussian trap of width δ still shows enhanced diffusion for large wavelengths k δ <1 , while a gradual transition to normal diffusion for k δ >1 . At intermediate and short wavelengths, we illustrate to what extent the hydrodynamic enhancement of diffusion is masked by the conservative forces between colloids. At very large wavelengths, the collective diffusion becomes faster than the solvent momentum transport and a transition from Stokesian dynamics to inertial dynamics takes place. Using our inertial coupling method code (resolving fluid inertia), we study this transition by performing simulations at small Schmidt number. Simulations confirm theoretical predictions for the k →0 limit [Phys. Rev. E 90, 062314 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.062314] showing negative density-density time correlations. However, at finite k simulations show deviations from the theory.

  2. Collective colloid diffusion under soft two-dimensional confinement.

    PubMed

    Panzuela, S; Peláez, Raúl P; Delgado-Buscalioni, R

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a numerical and theoretical investigation of the collective dynamics of colloids in an unbounded solution but trapped in a harmonic potential. Under strict two-dimensional confinement (infinitely stiff trap) the collective colloidal diffusion is enhanced and diverges at zero wave number (like k^{-1}), due to the hydrodynamic propagation of the confining force across the layer. The analytic solution for the collective diffusion of colloids under a Gaussian trap of width δ still shows enhanced diffusion for large wavelengths kδ<1, while a gradual transition to normal diffusion for kδ>1. At intermediate and short wavelengths, we illustrate to what extent the hydrodynamic enhancement of diffusion is masked by the conservative forces between colloids. At very large wavelengths, the collective diffusion becomes faster than the solvent momentum transport and a transition from Stokesian dynamics to inertial dynamics takes place. Using our inertial coupling method code (resolving fluid inertia), we study this transition by performing simulations at small Schmidt number. Simulations confirm theoretical predictions for the k→0 limit [Phys. Rev. E 90, 062314 (2014)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.90.062314] showing negative density-density time correlations. However, at finite k simulations show deviations from the theory.

  3. Damage Detection in Concrete Using Diffuse Ultrasound Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroo, Frederik; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Sabra, Karim

    2010-02-01

    Heterogeneities in concrete caused by the random distribution of aggregate in the cement-paste matrix lead to strong scattering of ultrasonic waves at wavelengths on the order of the aggregate. Use of these high frequencies is necessary to detect damage at an early stage, something that is not possible with conventional ultrasonic methods. The ultrasound energy density in that regime can be described by the diffusion equation. The objective of this research is to develop a quantitative understanding of the effects of additional scattering sources, such as small cracks in the cement-paste matrix, on the parameters of the diffusion equation; these parameters are the diffusion and the dissipation coefficients. Applying diffusion theory, the diffusivity and dissipation coefficients are experimentally determined as functions of frequency using ultrasonic waves. The cuboid shaped samples employed are made of a Portland cement-paste matrix and regular aggregate, such as gravel and sand. The results provide a basic understanding of repeatability and consistency of diffusion measurements, with an emphasis on the nondestructive evaluation of concrete.

  4. Optical measurement of transverse molecular diffusion in a microchannel.

    PubMed Central

    Kamholz, A E; Schilling, E A; Yager, P

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of molecular diffusion is a necessity for the efficient design of most microfluidic devices as well as an important biophysical method in its own right. This study demonstrates the rapid measurement of diffusion coefficients of large and small molecules in a microfluidic device, the T-sensor, by means of conventional epifluorescence microscopy. Data were collected by monitoring the transverse flux of analyte from a sample stream into a second stream flowing alongside it. As indicated by the low Reynolds numbers of the system (< 1), flow is laminar, and molecular transport between streams occurs only by diffusion. Quantitative determinations were made by fitting data with predictions of a one-dimensional model. Analysis was made of the flow development and its effect on the distribution of diffusing analyte using a three-dimensional modeling software package. Diffusion coefficients were measured for four fluorescently labeled molecules: fluorescein-biotin, insulin, ovalbumin, and streptavidin. The resulting values differed from accepted results by an average of 2.4%. Microfluidic system parameters can be selected to achieve accurate diffusion coefficient measurements and to optimize other microfluidic devices that rely on precise transverse transport of molecules. PMID:11259309

  5. Diffusion and the Thermal Stability of Amorphous Copper-Zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelter, Eric Carl

    Measurements have been made of diffusion and thermal relaxation in amorphous Cu(,50)Zr(,50). Samples were prepared by melt-spinning under vacuum. Diffusion measurements were made over the temperature range from 317 to 385 C, using Ag and Au as substitutional impurities, by means of Auger electron spectrometry (AES) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Thermal measurements were made by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) up to 550 C. The diffusion coefficients of Ag and Au in amorphous Cu(,50)Zr(,50) are found to be somewhat higher than, but very close in magnitude to the coefficient of self-diffusion in crystalline Cu at the same temperatures. The activation energies for diffusion in the amorphous alloy are 0.72 to 1.55 eV/atom, much closer to the activation energy for self-diffusion in liquid Cu, 0.42 eV/atom, than that for the crystalline solid, 2.19 eV/atom. The mechanism for diffusion in the amorphous metal is presumably quite different from the monovacancy mechanism dominant in the crystalline solid. The pre-exponential terms are found to be extremely small, on the order of 10('-10) to 10('-11) cm('2)/sec for Ag diffusion. This indicates that diffusion in amorphous Cu(,50)Zr(,50) may involve an extended defect of 10 or more atoms. Analysis of the data in terms of the free -volume model also lends strength to this conclusion and indicates that the glass is composed of liquid-like clusters of 15 to 20 atoms. The initial stage of relaxation in amorphous CuZr occurs with a spectrum of activation energies. The lowest activation energy involved, 0.78 eV/atom, is almost identical to the average activation energy of Ag diffusion in the glass, 0.77 eV/atom, indicating that relaxation occurs primarily through diffusion. The activation energy of crystallization, determined by Kissinger's method, is 3.10 eV/atom. The large difference, on the order of 2.3 eV/atom, between the activation energies of crystallization and diffusion is attributed to the energy

  6. A hybrid continuous-discrete method for stochastic reaction–diffusion processes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Likun; Nie, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic fluctuations in reaction–diffusion processes often have substantial effect on spatial and temporal dynamics of signal transductions in complex biological systems. One popular approach for simulating these processes is to divide the system into small spatial compartments assuming that molecules react only within the same compartment and jump between adjacent compartments driven by the diffusion. While the approach is convenient in terms of its implementation, its computational cost may become prohibitive when diffusive jumps occur significantly more frequently than reactions, as in the case of rapid diffusion. Here, we present a hybrid continuous-discrete method in which diffusion is simulated using continuous approximation while reactions are based on the Gillespie algorithm. Specifically, the diffusive jumps are approximated as continuous Gaussian random vectors with time-dependent means and covariances, allowing use of a large time step, even for rapid diffusion. By considering the correlation among diffusive jumps, the approximation is accurate for the second moment of the diffusion process. In addition, a criterion is obtained for identifying the region in which such diffusion approximation is required to enable adaptive calculations for better accuracy. Applications to a linear diffusion system and two nonlinear systems of morphogens demonstrate the effectiveness and benefits of the new hybrid method. PMID:27703710

  7. Static and Dynamic Effects of Lateral Carrier Diffusion in Semiconductor Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Cheung, Samson H.; Ning, C. Z.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Electron and hole diffusions in the plane of semiconductor quantum wells play an important part in the static and dynamic operations of semiconductor lasers. It is well known that the value of diffusion coefficients affects the threshold pumping current of a semiconductor laser. At the same time, the strength of carrier diffusion process is expected to affect the modulation bandwidth of an AC-modulated laser. It is important not only to investigate the combined DC and AC effects due to carrier diffusion, but also to separate the AC effects from that of the combined effects in order to provide design insights for high speed modulation. In this presentation, we apply a hydrodynamic model developed by the present authors recently from the semiconductor Bloch equations. The model allows microscopic calculation of the lateral carrier diffusion coefficient, which is a nonlinear function of the carrier density and plasma temperature. We first studied combined AC and DC effects of lateral carrier diffusion by studying the bandwidth dependence on diffusion coefficient at a given DC current under small signal modulation. The results show an increase of modulation bandwidth with decrease in the diffusion coefficient. We simultaneously studied the effects of nonlinearity in the diffusion coefficient. To clearly identify how much of the bandwidth increase is a result of decrease in the threshold pumping current for smaller diffusion coefficient, thus an effective increase of DC pumping, we study the bandwidth dependence on diffusion coefficient at a given relative pumping. A detailed comparison of the two cases will be presented.

  8. Isolated diffuse hyperplastic gastric polyposis presenting with severe anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardena, Suriya; Anandacoomaraswamy, Dharshan; Burzyantseva, Olga; Abdullah, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Gastric polyps exist in a wide variety of types, most of which are small and often benign. Discovery of gastric polyps during Endoscopy necessitates biopsies. Case presentation We present a case report of an isolated diffuse hyperplastic gastric polyposis in a 26 years old Hispanic female when she was investigated for profound anemia. The Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed numerous gastric polyps filling the entire stomach. She was treated with near-total gastrectomy and her anemia resolved Conclusion Isolated diffuse hyperplasic gastric polyposis with normal gastrin level is a rare entity and can present with severe anemia. PMID:18755016

  9. Measurement of cesium diffusion coefficients in graphite IG-110

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, L. M.; Brockman, J. D.; Loyalka, S. K.; Robertson, J. D.

    2015-05-01

    An understanding of the transport of fission products in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) is needed for operational safety as well as source term estimations. We have measured diffusion coefficients of Cs in IG-110 by using the release method, wherein we infused small graphite spheres with Cs and measured the release rates using ICP-MS. Diffusion behavior was investigated in the temperature range of 1100-1300 K. We have obtained: DCs = (1.0 ×10-7m2 /s) exp(-1.1 ×105J /mol/RT) and, compared our results with those available in the literature.

  10. A microscale turbine driven by diffusive mass flux.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingcheng; Liu, Rui; Ripoll, Marisol; Chen, Ke

    2015-10-07

    An external diffusive mass flux is shown to be able to generate a mechanical torque on a microscale object based on anisotropic diffusiophoresis. In light of this finding, we propose a theoretical prototype micro-turbine driven purely by diffusive mass flux, which is in strong contrast to conventional turbines driven by convective mass flows. The rotational velocity of the proposed turbine is determined by the external concentration gradient, the geometry and the diffusiophoretic properties of the turbine. This scenario is validated by performing computer simulations. Our finding thus provides a new type of chemo-mechanical response which could be used to exploit existing chemical energies at small scales.

  11. Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jonathan; Staiger, Douglas

    2015-12-01

    We draw on macroeconomic models of diffusion and productivity to explain empirical patterns of survival gains in heart attacks. Using Medicare data for 2.8 million patients during 1986-2004, we find that hospitals rapidly adopting cost-effective innovations such as beta blockers, aspirin, and reperfusion, had substantially better outcomes for their patients. Holding technology adoption constant, the marginal returns to spending were relatively modest. Hospitals increasing the pace of technology diffusion ("tigers") experienced triple the survival gains compared to those with diminished rates ("tortoises"). In sum, small differences in the propensity to adopt effective technology lead to wide productivity differences across hospitals.

  12. Diffusion dominated evaporation in multicomponent lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessling, Dennis; Xie, Qingguang; Harting, Jens

    2017-02-01

    We present a diffusion dominated evaporation model using the popular pseudopotential multicomponent lattice Boltzmann method introduced by Shan and Chen. With an analytical computation of the diffusion coefficients, we demonstrate that Fick's law is obeyed. We then validate the applicability of our model by demonstrating the agreement of the time evolution of the interface position of an evaporating planar film to the analytical prediction. Furthermore, we study the evaporation of a freely floating droplet and confirm that the effect of Laplace pressure is significant for predicting the time evolution of small droplet radii.

  13. Optical Tracking of Anomalous Diffusion Kinetics in Polymer Microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Matthew R.; Vollmer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    In this Letter we propose the use of whispering gallery mode resonance tracking as a label-free optical means to monitor diffusion kinetics in glassy polymer microspheres. Approximate solutions to the governing diffusion equations are derived for the case of slow relaxation and small Stefan number. Transduction of physical changes in the polymer, including formation of a rubbery layer, swelling, and dissolution, into detectable resonance shifts are described using a perturbative approach. Concrete examples of poly(methyl methacrylate) and polystyrene spheres in water are considered.

  14. On nonlinear conservation laws with a nonlocal diffusion term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achleitner, F.; Hittmeir, S.; Schmeiser, C.

    Scalar one-dimensional conservation laws with a nonlocal diffusion term corresponding to a Riesz-Feller differential operator are considered. Solvability results for the Cauchy problem in L are adapted from the case of a fractional derivative with homogeneous symbol. The main interest of this work is the investigation of smooth shock profiles. In the case of a genuinely nonlinear smooth flux function we prove the existence of such travelling waves, which are monotone and satisfy the standard entropy condition. Moreover, the dynamic nonlinear stability of the travelling waves under small perturbations is proven, similarly to the case of the standard diffusive regularisation, by constructing a Lyapunov functional.

  15. Technology Diffusion and Productivity Growth in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Jonathan; Staiger, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We draw on macroeconomic models of diffusion and productivity to explain empirical patterns of survival gains in heart attacks. Using Medicare data for 2.8 million patients during 1986–2004, we find that hospitals rapidly adopting cost-effective innovations such as beta blockers, aspirin, and reperfusion, had substantially better outcomes for their patients. Holding technology adoption constant, the marginal returns to spending were relatively modest. Hospitals increasing the pace of technology diffusion (“tigers”) experienced triple the survival gains compared to those with diminished rates (“tortoises”). In sum, small differences in the propensity to adopt effective technology lead to wide productivity differences across hospitals. PMID:26989267

  16. Measurement of diffusion coefficients from solution rates of bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of solution of a stationary bubble is limited by the diffusion of dissolved gas molecules away from the bubble surface. Diffusion coefficients computed from measured rates of solution give mean values higher than accepted literature values, with standard errors as high as 10% for a single observation. Better accuracy is achieved with sparingly soluble gases, small bubbles, and highly viscous liquids. Accuracy correlates with the Grashof number, indicating that free convection is the major source of error. Accuracy should, therefore, be greatly increased in a gravity-free environment. The fact that the bubble will need no support is an additional important advantage of Spacelab for this measurement.

  17. Fluid diffusion in porous silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Lowell I.

    Fluid motion in porous media has received a great deal of theoretical and experimental attention due to its importance in systems as diverse as ground water aquifers, catalytic processes, and size separation schemes. Often, the motion of interest is the random thermal motion of molecules in a fluid undergoing no net flow. This diffusive motion is particularly important when the size of the pores is nearly the same as the size of the molecules. In this study, fluid diffusion is measured in several varieties of porous silica whose pore structure is determined by the process by which it is made. The samples in this study have porosities (φ, the ratio of the pore volume to the total sample volume) that vary from 0.3 to 0.75 and average pore radii that range from approximately 15 to 120 A. Determining the effect of the pore structure on the diffusion of a liquid in a porous material is complicated by the chemical interactions between the diffusing molecules and the pore surface. In this study, ions in a hydrophilic fluid are used to block the adsorption of the diffusing dye molecules to the hydroxyl groups covering the silica surface. This technique is unlike typical surface treatments of silica in that it does not permanently alter the pore geometry. In this work, fluid diffusion is measured with a transient holographic grating technique where interfering laser beams create a periodic refractive index modulation in the fluid. The diffraction of a third laser off this grating is monitored to determine how quickly the grating relaxes, thereby determining the diffusion coefficient of the molecules in the fluid. Varying the grating periodicity controls the length scale of the diffusion measurement from 1.2 to 100 μm which is much larger than the average pore sizes of the samples. Therefore, over these large scales, we measure 'normal' diffusion, where the mean squared displacement of a diffusing particle varies linearly with time. In one particular type of porous silica

  18. Geometric diffusion of quantum trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    A quantum object can acquire a geometric phase (such as Berry phases and Aharonov–Bohm phases) when evolving along a path in a parameter space with non-trivial gauge structures. Inherent to quantum evolutions of wavepackets, quantum diffusion occurs along quantum trajectories. Here we show that quantum diffusion can also be geometric as characterized by the imaginary part of a geometric phase. The geometric quantum diffusion results from interference between different instantaneous eigenstate pathways which have different geometric phases during the adiabatic evolution. As a specific example, we study the quantum trajectories of optically excited electron-hole pairs in time-reversal symmetric insulators, driven by an elliptically polarized terahertz field. The imaginary geometric phase manifests itself as elliptical polarization in the terahertz sideband generation. The geometric quantum diffusion adds a new dimension to geometric phases and may have applications in many fields of physics, e.g., transport in topological insulators and novel electro-optical effects. PMID:26178745

  19. Diffusion methodology: time to innovate?

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, thousands of diffusion studies have been conducted in numerous disciplines of study including sociology, education, communication, marketing, and pubic health. With few exceptions, these studies have been driven by a methodological approach that has become institutionalized in diffusion research. This approach is characterized by the collection of quantitative data about one innovation gathered from adopters at a single point in time after widespread diffusion has occurred. This dominant approach is examined here in terms of both its strengths and weaknesses and with regard to its contribution to the collective base of understanding the diffusion of innovations. Alternative methodological approaches are proposed and reviewed with consideration for the means by which they may expand the knowledge base.

  20. An effective phase shift diffusion equation method for analysis of PFG normal and fractional diffusions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guoxing

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) diffusion measurement has a lot of applications in NMR and MRI. Its analysis relies on the ability to obtain the signal attenuation expressions, which can be obtained by averaging over the accumulating phase shift distribution (APSD). However, current theoretical models are not robust or require approximations to get the APSD. Here, a new formalism, an effective phase shift diffusion (EPSD) equation method is presented to calculate the APSD directly. This is based on the idea that the gradient pulse effect on the change of the APSD can be viewed as a diffusion process in the virtual phase space (VPS). The EPSD has a diffusion coefficient, K(β)(t)D rad(β)/s(α), where α is time derivative order and β is a space derivative order, respectively. The EPSD equations of VPS are built based on the diffusion equations of real space by replacing the diffusion coefficients and the coordinate system (from real space coordinate to virtual phase coordinate). Two different models, the fractal derivative model and the fractional derivative model from the literature were used to build the EPSD fractional diffusion equations. The APSD obtained from solving these EPSD equations were used to calculate the PFG signal attenuation. From the fractal derivative model the attenuation is exp(-γ(β)g(β)δ(β)Df1t(α)), a stretched exponential function (SEF) attenuation, while from the fractional derivative model the attenuation is Eα,1(-γ(β)g(β)δ(β)Df2t(α)), a Mittag-Leffler function (MLF) attenuation. The MLF attenuation can be reduced to SEF attenuation when α=1, and can be approximated as a SEF attenuation when the attenuation is small. Additionally, the effect of finite gradient pulse widths (FGPW) is calculated. From the fractal derivative model, the signal attenuation including FGPW effect is exp[ -Df1∫0(τ) K(β)(t)dt(α)]. The results obtained in this study are in good agreement with the results in literature. Several expressions that

  1. Diffusion and stochastic island generation in the magnetic field line random walk

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2014-08-10

    The cross-field diffusion of field lines in stochastic magnetic fields described by the 2D+slab model is studied using a semi-analytic statistical approach, the decorrelation trajectory method. We show that field line trapping and the associated stochastic magnetic islands strongly influence the diffusion coefficients, leading to dependences on the parameters that are different from the quasilinear and Bohm regimes. A strong amplification of the diffusion is produced by a small slab field in the presence of trapping. The diffusion regimes are determined and the corresponding physical processes are identified.

  2. Controlling Exciton Diffusion and Fullerene Distribution in Photovoltaic Blends by Side Chain Modification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The influence of crystallinity on exciton diffusion and fullerene distribution was investigated by blending amorphous and semicrystalline copolymers. We measured exciton diffusion and fluorescence quenching in such blends by dispersing fullerene molecules into them. We find that the diffusion length is more than two times higher in the semicrystalline copolymer than in the amorphous copolymer. We also find that fullerene preferentially mixes into disordered regions of the polymer film. This shows that relatively small differences in molecular structure are important for exciton diffusion and fullerene distribution. PMID:26267202

  3. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations.

  4. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Kim, Dong Seop; Nakayashiki, Kenta; Rounsaville, Brian

    2010-09-07

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  5. The sharp-front magnetic diffusion wave of a strong magnetic field diffusing into a solid metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Gu, Zhuo-Wei; Kan, Ming-Xian; Wang, Gang-Hua; Zhao, Jian-Heng; Computational Physics Team

    2016-10-01

    When a mega-gauss magnetic field diffuses into a solid metal, the Joule heat would rise rapidly the temperature of the metal, and the rise of temperature leads to an increase of the metal's resistance, which in turn accelerates the magnetic field diffusion. Those positive feedbacks acting iteratively would lead to an interesting sharp-front magnetic diffusion wave. By assuming that the metal's resistance has an abrupt change from a small value ηS to larger value ηL at some critical temperature Tc, the sharp-front magnetic diffusion wave can be solved analytically. The conditions for the emerging of the sharp-front magnetic diffusion wave are B0 >Bc , ηL /ηS >> 1 , and ηL/ηSB0/-Bc Bc >> 1 , where Bc =√{ 2μ0Jc } , B0 is the vacuum magnetic field strength, and Jc is the critical Joule heat density. The wave-front velocity of the diffusion wave is Vc =ηL/μ0B0/-Bc Bc1/xc , where xc is the depth the wave have propagated in the metal. In this presentation we would like to discuss the derivation of the formulas and its impact to magnetically driven experiments. The work is supported by the Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (No. 2015B0201023).

  6. Classical momentum diffusion in double-delta-kicked particles.

    PubMed

    Stocklin, M M A; Monteiro, T S

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the classical chaotic diffusion of atoms subjected to pairs of closely spaced pulses ("kicks") from standing waves of light (the 2delta-KP ). Recent experimental studies with cold atoms implied an underlying classical diffusion of a type very different from the well-known paradigm of Hamiltonian chaos, the standard map. The kicks in each pair are separated by a small time interval E<1, which together with the kick strength K, characterizes the transport. Phase space for the 2delta-KP is partitioned into momentum "cells" partially separated by momentum-trapping regions where diffusion is slow. We present here an analytical derivation of the classical diffusion for a 2delta-KP including all important correlations which were used to analyze the experimental data. We find an asymptotic (t-->infinity) regime of "hindered" diffusion: while for the standard map the diffusion rate, for K>1 , D approximately K(2)/2[1-2J(2)(K)...] oscillates about the uncorrelated rate D(0)=K(2)/2, we find analytically, that the 2delta-KP can equal, but never diffuses faster than, a random walk rate. We argue this is due to the destruction of the important classical "accelerator modes" of the standard map. We analyze the experimental regime 0.1 less or approximately KE less or approximately 1 , where quantum localization lengths L approximately Planck's (-0.75) are affected by fractal cell boundaries. We find an approximate asymptotic diffusion rate D proportional to K(3)E, in correspondence to a D proportional to K(3) regime in the standard map associated with the "golden-ratio" cantori.

  7. Gibbs Ringing in Diffusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Veraart, Jelle; Fieremans, Els; Jelescu, Ileana O.; Knoll, Florian; Novikov, Dmitry S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study and reduce the effect of Gibbs ringing artifact on computed diffusion parameters. Methods We reduce the ringing by extrapolating the k-space of each diffusion weighted image beyond the measured part by selecting an adequate regularization term. We evaluate several regularization terms and tune the regularization parameter to find the best compromise between anatomical accuracy of the reconstructed image and suppression of the Gibbs artifact. Results We demonstrate empirically and analytically that the Gibbs artifact, which is typically observed near sharp edges in magnetic resonance images, has a significant impact on the quantification of diffusion model parameters, even for infinitesimal diffusion weighting. We find the second order total generalized variation to be a good choice for the penalty term to regularize the extrapolation of the k-space, as it provides a parsimonious representation of images, a practically full suppression of Gibbs ringing, and the absence of staircasing artifacts typical for total variation methods. Conclusions Regularized extrapolation of the k-space data significantly reduces truncation artifacts without compromising spatial resolution in comparison to the default option of window filtering. In particular, accuracy of estimating diffusion tensor imaging and diffusion kurtosis imaging parameters improves so much that unconstrained fits become possible. PMID:26257388

  8. Diffusion MRI in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Reese, Timothy G.; Jackowski, Marcel P.; Bhat, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion MRI provides unique information on the structure, organization, and integrity of the myocardium without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Diffusion MRI in the heart, however, has proven technically challenging because of the intrinsic non‐rigid deformation during the cardiac cycle, displacement of the myocardium due to respiratory motion, signal inhomogeneity within the thorax, and short transverse relaxation times. Recently developed accelerated diffusion‐weighted MR acquisition sequences combined with advanced post‐processing techniques have improved the accuracy and efficiency of diffusion MRI in the myocardium. In this review, we describe the solutions and approaches that have been developed to enable diffusion MRI of the heart in vivo, including a dual‐gated stimulated echo approach, a velocity‐ (M 1) or an acceleration‐ (M 2) compensated pulsed gradient spin echo approach, and the use of principal component analysis filtering. The structure of the myocardium and the application of these techniques in ischemic heart disease are also briefly reviewed. The advent of clinical MR systems with stronger gradients will likely facilitate the translation of cardiac diffusion MRI into clinical use. The addition of diffusion MRI to the well‐established set of cardiovascular imaging techniques should lead to new and complementary approaches for the diagnosis and evaluation of patients with heart disease. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26484848

  9. Diffuse Nodular Lymphoid Hyperplasia of the Intestine Caused by Common Variable Immunodeficiency and Refractory Giardiasis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Hye; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Jieun; Yi, Kijong; Oh, Young-Ha; Kim, Yongsoo

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract is a rare disease characterized by numerous small polypoid nodules in the small intestine, large intestine, or both. It is associated with immunodeficiency and infection, such as Giardia lamblia and Helicobacter pylori. Although diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia associated with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and giardiasis is already known, a few studies have reported a regression of the lymphoid nodules after the eradication of infection. We herein describe a case of diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the intestine associated with CVID and refractory giardiasis that markedly improved after successfully treating giardiasis. PMID:28154271

  10. Diffuse Nodular Lymphoid Hyperplasia of the Intestine Caused by Common Variable Immunodeficiency and Refractory Giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Hye; Han, Dong Soo; Kim, Jieun; Yi, Kijong; Oh, Young-Ha; Kim, Yongsoo

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract is a rare disease characterized by numerous small polypoid nodules in the small intestine, large intestine, or both. It is associated with immunodeficiency and infection, such as Giardia lamblia and Helicobacter pylori. Although diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia associated with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and giardiasis is already known, a few studies have reported a regression of the lymphoid nodules after the eradication of infection. We herein describe a case of diffuse nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the intestine associated with CVID and refractory giardiasis that markedly improved after successfully treating giardiasis.

  11. Relevance of Pore Structure and Diffusion-Accessible Porosity for Calcium-Bromide Diffusion in Na-Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, R. M.; Davis, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Bentonite is an important hydraulic barrier material in many geotechnical applications, such as geosynthetic clay liners at solid waste landfills, or as proposed backfill material in engineered barrier systems at nuclear waste repositories. The limited permeability of bentonite is at least partially the result of its low porosity and the swelling of Na-montmorillonite, its major mineralogical component, in water. Due to these characteristics, the transport of contaminants through bentonite layers is expected to be limited and dominated by diffusion processes. In bentonite, the majority of the connected porosity is associated with montmorillonite particles, which consist of stacks of negatively-charged smectite layers. As a result, compacted smectite has two types of porosities: (1) large pores between clay particles, where diffusion is less affected by electric-double-layer forces, and (2) very thin interlayer spaces within individual clay particles, where diffusion is strongly impacted by surface charge and ionic strength. As diffusion is expected to take place differently in these two volumes, this essentially creates two 'small-scale diffusion pathways', where each may become dominant under different system conditions. Furthermore, for surface-reactive solutes, these two porous regimes differ with regards to surface complexation reactions. Electrostatic and hydration forces only are thought to govern interlayer binding, whereas chemical bonding with surface ligands is dominant for reactions at edge sites of layered clay particles and for iron oxide nanoparticles on outer basal planes. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the relevance of clay pore structure and diffusion-accessible porosity for solute diffusion rates, and hence, contaminant mobility in bentonites. First, we will discuss the effects of chemical solution conditions on montmorillonite properties, such as clay surface charge, diffusion-accessible porosity, clay tortuosity and constrictivity

  12. Photoinduced diffusion molecular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenbaum, Viktor M.; Dekhtyar, Marina L.; Lin, Sheng Hsien; Trakhtenberg, Leonid I.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a Brownian photomotor, namely, the directed motion of a nanoparticle in an asymmetric periodic potential under the action of periodic rectangular resonant laser pulses which cause charge redistribution in the particle. Based on the kinetics for the photoinduced electron redistribution between two or three energy levels of the particle, the time dependence of its potential energy is derived and the average directed velocity is calculated in the high-temperature approximation (when the spatial amplitude of potential energy fluctuations is small relative to the thermal energy). The thus developed theory of photoinduced molecular transport appears applicable not only to conventional dichotomous Brownian motors (with only two possible potential profiles) but also to a much wider variety of molecular nanomachines. The distinction between the realistic time dependence of the potential energy and that for a dichotomous process (a step function) is represented in terms of relaxation times (they can differ on the time intervals of the dichotomous process). As shown, a Brownian photomotor has the maximum average directed velocity at (i) large laser pulse intensities (resulting in short relaxation times on laser-on intervals) and (ii) excited state lifetimes long enough to permit efficient photoexcitation but still much shorter than laser-off intervals. A Brownian photomotor with optimized parameters is exemplified by a cylindrically shaped semiconductor nanocluster which moves directly along a polar substrate due to periodically photoinduced dipole moment (caused by the repetitive excited electron transitions to a non-resonant level of the nanocylinder surface impurity).

  13. Normal and anomalous diffusion in highly confined hard disk fluid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ball, C D; MacWilliam, N D; Percus, J K; Bowles, R K

    2009-02-07

    Monte Carlo simulation is used to study binary mixtures of two-dimensional hard disks, confined to long, narrow, structureless pores with hard walls, in a regime of pore sizes where the large particles exhibit single file diffusion while the small particles diffuse normally. The dynamics of the small particles can be understood in the context of a hopping time, tau(21), that measures the time it takes for a small particle to escape the single file cage formed by its large particle neighbors, and can be linked to the long time diffusion coefficient. We find that tau(21) follows a power law as a function of the reduced pore radius for a wide range of particle size ratios with an exponent, alpha, that is independent of the size ratio, but linearly dependent on the Monte Carlo step size used in the dynamic scheme. The mean squared displacement of the small particles as a function of time exhibits two dynamic crossovers. The first, from normal to anomalous diffusion, occurs at intermediate times then the system returns to normal diffusion in the long time limit. We also find that the diffusion coefficient is related to tau(21) through a power law with exponent beta=-0.5, as predicted by theory. Finally, we show that particle separation in a binary mixture will be optimal at the pore radius that causes the large particles to undergo their transition from normal to anomalous diffusion.

  14. Diffuse mass transport in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, F. G.

    1981-08-01

    Variational methods are used to investigate the problems of diffusive mass transport in a porous medium. Calculations of the effective diffusivities are performed for a model pore structure generated by randomly placed, freely overlapping solid spheres all of the same radius. Effects of the tortuosity of the diffusion paths are considered. Numerical evaluations are used to test some approximate engineering models. For gaseous transition region diffusion the mean free path kinetic theory is used to derive a variational upper bound on the effective transition region diffusivity. For the simultaneous liquid or gas phase Fickian bulk diffusion in the void and Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface, an analytical expression for effective diffusion coefficient is obtained and compared with the usual engineering model of parallel surface and void diffusion. The simultaneous gaseous transition region diffusion in the void and the Fickian surface diffusion on the pore wall surface are examined numerically.

  15. Diffusion of Bacterial Cells in Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Licata, Nicholas A.; Mohari, Bitan; Fuqua, Clay; Setayeshgar, Sima

    2016-01-01

    The chemotaxis signal transduction network regulates the biased random walk of many bacteria in favorable directions and away from harmful ones through modulating the frequency of directional reorientations. In mutants of diverse bacteria lacking the chemotaxis response, migration in classic motility agar, which constitutes a fluid-filled porous medium, is compromised; straight-swimming cells unable to tumble become trapped within the agar matrix. Spontaneous mutations that restore spreading have been previously observed in the enteric bacterium Escherichia coli, and recent work in other bacterial species has isolated and quantified different classes of nonchemotacting mutants exhibiting the same spreading phenotype. We present a theoretical description of bacterial diffusion in a porous medium—the natural habitat for many cell types—which elucidates how diverse modifications of the motility apparatus resulting in a nonzero tumbling frequency allows for unjamming of otherwise straight-swimming cells at internal boundaries and leads to net migration. A unique result of our analysis is increasing diffusive spread with increasing tumbling frequency in the small pore limit, consistent with earlier experimental observations but not captured by previous models. Our theoretical results, combined with a simple model of bacterial diffusion and growth in agar, are compared with our experimental measurements of swim ring expansion as a function of time, demonstrating good quantitative agreement. Our results suggest that the details of the cellular tumbling process may be adapted to enable bacteria to propagate efficiently through complex environments. For engineered, self-propelled microswimmers that navigate via alternating straight runs and changes in direction, these results suggest an optimal reorientation strategy for efficient migration in a porous environment with a given microarchitecture. PMID:26745427

  16. Diffuse panbronchiolitis: role of macrolides in therapy.

    PubMed

    Keicho, Naoto; Kudoh, Shoji

    2002-01-01

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) is characterized by chronic sinobronchial infection and diffuse bilateral micronodular pulmonary lesions consisting of inflammatory cells. Studies on disease etiology point to a genetic predisposition unique to Asians. Early therapy for DPB was largely symptomatic. The advent of macrolide antibiotics, including erythromycin, roxithromycin and clarithromycin, has strikingly changed disease prognosis. Low-dose, long-term macrolide therapy for DPB originated from detailed observations of response to therapy in a single patient. The bactericidal activity of macrolides, particularly erythromycin, is not a significant factor for their clinical efficacy in DPB. Firstly, irrespective of bacterial clearance, clinical improvement is observed in patients treated with erythromycin. Secondly, even in cases with bacterial superinfection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to macrolides, treatment has proved effective. Thirdly, the recommended dosage of macrolides produces peak levels in tissue that are below the minimum inhibitory concentrations for major pathogenic bacteria that colonize the airway. In the last two decades, the possible mechanism underlying the effectiveness of macrolide therapy has been extensively studied. The proposed mechanism of action includes inhibition of excessive mucus and water secretion from the airway epithelium, inhibition of neutrophil accumulation in the large airway, inhibition of lymphocyte and macrophage accumulation around the small airway, and modulation of bacterial virulence. The great success of macrolide therapy in diffuse panbronchiolitis may extend its application to the treatment of other chronic inflammatory disorders. If the anti-inflammatory activity of macrolides is independent of their bactericidal effect, new anti-inflammatory macrolides without antimicrobial activity should be developed to minimize emergence of macrolide-resistant micro-organisms.

  17. Diffuse Gamma Rays Galactic and Extragalactic Diffuse Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Reimer, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Diffuse gamma rays consist of several components: truly diffuse emission from the interstellar medium, the extragalactic background, whose origin is not firmly established yet, and the contribution from unresolved and faint Galactic point sources. One approach to unravel these components is to study the diffuse emission from the interstellar medium, which traces the interactions of high energy particles with interstellar gas and radiation fields. Because of its origin such emission is potentially able to reveal much about the sources and propagation of cosmic rays. The extragalactic background, if reliably determined, can be used in cosmological and blazar studies. Studying the derived average spectrum of faint Galactic sources may be able to give a clue to the nature of the emitting objects.

  18. Josephson phase diffusion in the superconducting quantum interference device ratchet

    SciTech Connect

    Spiechowicz, Jakub; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2015-05-15

    We study diffusion of the Josephson phase in the asymmetric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) subjected to a time-periodic current and pierced by an external magnetic flux. We analyze a relation between phase diffusion and quality of transport characterized by the dc voltage across the SQUID and efficiency of the device. In doing so, we concentrate on the previously reported regime [J. Spiechowicz and J. Łuczka, New J. Phys. 17, 023054 (2015)] for which efficiency of the SQUID attains a global maximum. For long times, the mean-square displacement of the phase is a linear function of time, meaning that diffusion is normal. Its coefficient is small indicating rather regular phase evolution. However, it can be magnified several times by tailoring experimentally accessible parameters like amplitudes of the ac current or external magnetic flux. Finally, we prove that in the deterministic limit this regime is essentially non-chaotic and possesses an unexpected simplicity of attractors.

  19. Diffusion of Sound Waves in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard H.

    1960-01-01

    The directional and frequency diffusion of a plane monochromatic 2 sound wave in statistically homogeneous, isotropic, and stationary turbulence is analyzed theoretically. The treatment is based on the diffusion equation for the energy density of sound waves, using the scattering cross section derived by Kraichnan for the type of turbulence assumed here. A form for the frequency-wave number spectrum of the turbulence is adopted which contains the pertinent parameters of the flow and is adapted to ease of calculation. A new approach to the evaluation of the characteristic period of the flow is suggested. This spectrum is then related to the scattering cross section. Finally, a diffusion equation is derived as a small-angle scattering approximation to the rigorous transport equation. The rate of spread of the incident wave in frequency and direction is calculated, as well as the power spectrum and autocorrelation for the wave.

  20. Turbulent vertical diffusivity in the sub-tropical stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisso, I.; Legras, B.

    2008-02-01

    Vertical (cross-isentropic) mixing is produced by small-scale turbulent processes which are still poorly understood and paramaterized in numerical models. In this work we provide estimates of local equivalent diffusion in the lower stratosphere by comparing balloon borne high-resolution measurements of chemical tracers with reconstructed mixing ratio from large ensembles of random Lagrangian backward trajectories using European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts analysed winds and a chemistry-transport model (REPROBUS). We focus on a case study in subtropical latitudes using data from HIBISCUS campaign. An upper bound on the vertical diffusivity is found in this case study to be of the order of 0.5 m2 s-1 in the subtropical region, which is larger than the estimates at higher latitudes. The relation between diffusion and dispersion is studied by estimating Lyapunov exponents and studying their variation according to the presence of active dynamical structures.

  1. Turbulent vertical diffusivity in the sub-tropical stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisso, I.; Legras, B.

    2007-05-01

    Vertical (cross-isentropic) mixing is produced by small-scale turbulent processes which are still poorly understood and parametrized in numerical models. In this work we provide estimates of local equivalent diffusion in the lower stratosphere by comparing balloon borne high-resolution measurements of chemical tracers with reconstructed mixing ratio from large ensembles of random Lagrangian backward trajectories using European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts analysed winds and a chemistry-transport model (REPROBUS). We have investigated cases in subtropical latitudes using data from HIBISCUS campaign. Upper bound on the vertical diffusivity is found to be of the order of 0.5 m2 s-1 in the subtropical region, which is larger than the estimates at higher latitudes. The relation between diffusion and dispersion is studied by estimating Lyapunov exponents and studying their variation according to the presence of active dynamical structures.

  2. Diffusion of micrometer-sized soft particles in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Benjamin; Aptowicz, Kevin

    We investigate the diffusion of micrometer sized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) gel particles in confinement. The influence of confinement on the transport of small particles is becoming increasingly important for microfluidics and bio-fluidics. Analytical solutions to this problem are limited to very unique geometries or gross approximations. Computational methods have provided more insight into the problem as well as experimental investigations. However, most research has focused on the hard-sphere problem. In this work, we will explore the diffusion of soft particles in confinement. The dynamics of the particles confined between two parallel walls is captured with video-microscopy. In addition, we use a recently developed technique to measurement confinement of particles in-situ with a precision of 1%. This poster will present some preliminary results of how confinement affects the diffusion of these soft particles. We acknowledge support from Grant DMR-1206231.

  3. Measurement and analysis of grain boundary grooving by volume diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, S. C.; Mcfadden, G. B.; Coriell, S. R.; Voorhees, P. W.; Sekerka, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental measurements of isothermal grain boundary grooving by volume diffusion are carried out for Sn bicrystals in the Sn-Pb system near the eutectic temperature. The dimensions of the groove increase with a temporal exponent of 1/3, and measurement of the associated rate constant allows the determination of the product of the liquid diffusion coefficient D and the capillarity length Gamma associated with the interfacial free energy of the crystal-melt interface. The small-slope theory of Mullins is generalized to the entire range of dihedral angles by using a boundary integral formulation of the associated free boundary problem, and excellent agreement with experimental groove shapes is obtained. By using the diffusivity measured by Jordon and Hunt, the present measured values of Gamma are found to agree to within 5 percent with the values obtained from experiments by Gunduz and Hunt on grain boundary grooving in a temperature gradient.

  4. Full time-resolved diffuse fluorescence tomography accelerated with parallelized Fourier-series truncated diffusion approximation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xi; Wang, Bingyuan; Wan, Wenbo; Wang, Yihan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2015-05-01

    Of the three measurement schemes established for diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT), the time-domain scheme is well known to provide the richest information about the distribution of the targeting fluorophore in living tissues. However, the explicit use of the full time-resolved data usually leads to a considerably lengthy time for image reconstruction, limiting its applications to three-dimensional or small-volume imaging. To cope with the adversity, we propose herein a computationally efficient scheme for DFT image reconstruction where the time-dependent photon density is expanded to a Fourier-series and calculated by solving the independent frequency-domain diffusion equations at multiple sampling frequencies with the support of a combined multicore CPU-based coarse-grain and multithread GPU-based fine-grain parallelization strategy. With such a parallelized Fourier-series truncated diffusion approximation, both the time- and frequency-domain inversion procedures are developed and validated for their effectiveness and accuracy using simulative and phantom experiments. The results show that the proposed method can generate reconstructions comparable to the explicit time-domain scheme, with significantly reduced computational time.

  5. Diffusing Wave Spectroscopy Used to Study Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Durian, Douglas J.

    2000-01-01

    The white appearance of familiar objects such as clouds, snow, milk, or foam is due to the random scattering of light by the sample. As we all know, pure water is clear and easily passes a beam of light. However, tiny water droplets, such as those in a cloud, scatter light because the air and water droplet have different indexes of refraction. When many droplets, or scattering sites, are present, the incident light is scattered in random directions and the sample takes on a milky white appearance. In a glass of milk, the scattering is due to small colloidal particles. The white appearance of shaving cream, or foam, is due to the scattering of light at the water-bubble interface. Diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) is a laser light-scattering technique used to noninvasively probe the particle dynamics in systems that strongly scatter light. The technique takes advantage of the diffuse nature of light, which is reflected or transmitted from samples such as foams, dense colloidal suspensions (such as paint and milk), emulsions, liquid crystals, sandpiles, and even biological tissues.

  6. Conditions for a split diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, J.R.

    1997-05-01

    An unusual phenomenon has been observed in a methane jet diffusion flame subjected to axial acoustic forcing. At specific excitation frequencies and amplitudes, the driven flame splits into a central jet and one or two side jets. The splitting is accompanied by a partial detachment of the flame from the nozzle exit, a shortening of the flame by a factor of 2, and a change from the common yellow color of soot radiation to a clear blue flame. Such a phenomenon may be useful for the control of soot production or product species. The splitting is intermittent in time, bifurcating between the split flame and an ordinary single jet diffusion flame. The experiment consists of an unconfined axisymmetric methane jet formed by a short length of 0.4 cm diameter pipe. The pipe is connected to a large plenum surrounding a bass reflex loudspeaker enclosure that provides the excitation. Conditions producing split and bifurcated flames are presented. The drive frequencies required to cause bifurcation correspond to the first two peaks in the system`s frequency response curve. Bifurcating behavior was observed at a wide range of flow rates, ranging from very small flames of Reynolds number 240 up to turbulent lift-off, at Re = 1,000, based on the inner pipe diameter. It was not sensitive to nozzle length, but the details of the nozzle tip, such as orifice or pipe geometry, can affect the frequency range.

  7. Flow interaction of diffuser augmented wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göltenbott, U.; Ohya, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Jamieson, P.

    2016-09-01

    Up-scaling of wind turbines has been a major trend in order to reduce the cost of energy generation from the wind. Recent studies however show that for a given technology, the cost always rises with upscaling, notably due to the increased mass of the system. To reach capacities beyond 10 MW, multi-rotor systems (MRS) have promising advantages. On the other hand, diffuser augmented wind turbines (DAWTs) can significantly increase the performance of the rotor. Up to now, diffuser augmentation has only been applied to single small wind turbines. In the present research, DAWTs are used in a multi-rotor system. In wind tunnel experiments, the aerodynamics of two and three DAWTs, spaced in close vicinity in the same plane normal to a uniform flow, have been analysed. Power increases of up to 5% and 9% for the two and three rotor configurations are respectively achieved in comparison to a stand-alone turbine. The physical dynamics of the flows are analysed on the basis of the results obtained with a stand-alone turbine.

  8. Kramers turnover: From energy diffusion to spatial diffusion using metadynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Pratyush; Berne, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the rate of transition for a particle between two metastable states coupled to a thermal environment for various magnitudes of the coupling strength using the recently proposed infrequent metadynamics approach [P. Tiwary and M. Parrinello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 230602 (2013)]. We are interested in understanding how this approach for obtaining rate constants performs as the dynamics regime changes from energy diffusion to spatial diffusion. Reassuringly, we find that the approach works remarkably well for various coupling strengths in the strong coupling regime, and to some extent even in the weak coupling regime. PMID:27059558

  9. Diffusion of chromium in chrysoberyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yong-Kil; Seo, Jin-Gyo; Park, Jong-Wan

    2009-07-01

    Cr 3+ diffusion in chrysoberyl (BeAl 2O 4) irradiated by H + ions and electrons has been studied and compared with diffusion in non-irradiated samples. Chrysoberyl crystals were irradiated with 6 MeV H + ions to fluencies of 1×10 16 cm -2 for 25 min and with 10 MeV electrons to fluencies of 2×10 17 cm -2 for 1 h. Three different types of samples, which were doped with Cr 3+, were annealed in horizontal alumina tube furnaces by 50 K intervals in the temperature range from 1773 to 1923 K for 200 h. Scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX) was used to measure the diffusion. Arrhenius equations for the diffusion coefficient for Cr 3+ in the temperature range 1773-1923 K were developed: Electron beam irradiated chrysoberyls, Dcr=2.1×10 -5×exp (-482.3±18.2 kJ mol -1/ RT)m 2 s -1 Proton beam irradiated chrysoberyls, Dcr=2.3×10 -3×exp (-545.4±25.0 kJ mol -1/ RT)m 2 s -1 Natural non-irradiated chrysoberyls Dcr=2.2×10 -3×exp (-547.9±36.8 kJ mol -1/ RT)m 2 s -1 The results indicate that the chromium diffuses deepest into the electron beam irradiated chrysoberyls.

  10. Chemical application of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, P. J.; Lester, W. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method gives a stochastic solution to the Schroedinger equation. This approach is receiving increasing attention in chemical applications as a result of its high accuracy. However, reducing statistical uncertainty remains a priority because chemical effects are often obtained as small differences of large numbers. As an example, the single-triplet splitting of the energy of the methylene molecule CH sub 2 is given. The QMC algorithm was implemented on the CYBER 205, first as a direct transcription of the algorithm running on the VAX 11/780, and second by explicitly writing vector code for all loops longer than a crossover length C. The speed of the codes relative to one another as a function of C, and relative to the VAX, are discussed. The computational time dependence obtained versus the number of basis functions is discussed and this is compared with that obtained from traditional quantum chemistry codes and that obtained from traditional computer architectures.

  11. Massively Parallel Simulations of Diffusion in Dense Polymeric Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup, Wilcox, R.T. , Hobbs, J.D. , Ford, D.M.

    1997-11-01

    An original computational technique to generate close-to-equilibrium dense polymeric structures is proposed. Diffusion of small gases are studied on the equilibrated structures using massively parallel molecular dynamics simulations running on the Intel Teraflops (9216 Pentium Pro processors) and Intel Paragon(1840 processors). Compared to the current state-of-the-art equilibration methods this new technique appears to be faster by some orders of magnitude.The main advantage of the technique is that one can circumvent the bottlenecks in configuration space that inhibit relaxation in molecular dynamics simulations. The technique is based on the fact that tetravalent atoms (such as carbon and silicon) fit in the center of a regular tetrahedron and that regular tetrahedrons can be used to mesh the three-dimensional space. Thus, the problem of polymer equilibration described by continuous equations in molecular dynamics is reduced to a discrete problem where solutions are approximated by simple algorithms. Practical modeling applications include the constructing of butyl rubber and ethylene-propylene-dimer-monomer (EPDM) models for oxygen and water diffusion calculations. Butyl and EPDM are used in O-ring systems and serve as sealing joints in many manufactured objects. Diffusion coefficients of small gases have been measured experimentally on both polymeric systems, and in general the diffusion coefficients in EPDM are an order of magnitude larger than in butyl. In order to better understand the diffusion phenomena, 10, 000 atoms models were generated and equilibrated for butyl and EPDM. The models were submitted to a massively parallel molecular dynamics simulation to monitor the trajectories of the diffusing species.

  12. A Diffusion Approach to Study Leadership Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Curt M.; Jean-Marie, Gaetane

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to draw on elements of diffusion theory to understand leadership reform. Many diffusion studies examine the spread of an innovation across social units but the objective is to examine diffusion of a collective leadership model within school units. Specifically, the strength of reform diffusion is tested to account for…

  13. A Short-Duration Gel Diffusion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulcahy, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a gel diffusion experiment that permits the completion of duplicate diffusion runs within a three-hour laboratory session. Information included for the short-duration gel diffusion experiment is the diffusion cell, the experiment, data treatment, and the expected results of the experiment. (Author/DS)

  14. Small Device for Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter (center), president of New Century Pharmaceuticals, and Dr. Joseph Ho (right), vice president, examine a diffusion Controlled Apparatus for Microgravity (DCAM). At left, Dr. John Ruble, a senior scientist, examines some specimens. The plastic DCAM has two chambers joined by a porous plug through which fluids can diffuse at a controlled rate. This allows researchers to mix protein solutions on Earth and load them aboard the Space Shuttle shortly before launch. The diffusion and crystallization processes are already under way, but at such a slow pace that crystals do not start growing before the DCAM is in orbit aboard the Shuttle or a space station. Dozens of DCAM units can be flown in a small volume and require virtually no crew attention. Specimens are returned to Earth for analysis. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  15. Small-Scale Features in Pulsating Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Sarah; Jaynes, Allison N.; Knudsen, David J.; Trondsen, Trond; Lessard, Marc

    2011-01-01

    A field study was conducted from March 12-16, 2002 using a narrow-field intensified CCD camera installed at Churchill, Manitoba. The camera was oriented along the local magnetic zenith where small-scale black auroral forms are often visible. This analysis focuses on such forms occurring within a region of pulsating aurora. The observations show black forms with irregular shape and nonuniform drift with respect to the relatively stationary pulsating patches. The pulsating patches occur within a diffuse auroral background as a modulation of the auroral brightness in a localized region. The images analyzed show a decrease in the brightness of the diffuse background in the region of the pulsating patch at the beginning of the offphase of the modulation. Throughout the off phase the brightness of the diffuse aurora gradually increases back to the average intensity. The time constant for this increase is measured as the first step toward determining the physical process.

  16. Small-scale Features in Pulsating Aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Jaynes, A. N.; Knudsen, D. J.; Trondsen, T.; Lessard, M.

    2011-12-01

    A field study was conducted from March 12-16, 2002 using a narrow-field intensified CCD camera installed at Churchill, Manitoba. The camera was oriented along the local magnetic zenith where small-scale black auroral forms are often visible. This analysis focuses on such forms occurring within a region of pulsating aurora. The observations show black forms with irregular shape and nonuniform drift with respect to the relatively stationary pulsating patches. The pulsating patches occur within a diffuse auroral background as a modulation of the auroral brightness in a localized region. The images analyzed show a decrease in the brightness of the diffuse background in the region of the pulsating patch at the beginning of the 'off' phase of the modulation. Throughout the off phase the brightness of the diffuse aurora gradually increases back to the average intensity. The time constant for this increase is measured as the first step toward determining the physical process.

  17. AIDS-related Pneumocystis jirovecii genotypes in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Solène; Blanchet, Denis; Damiani, Céline; Guéguen, Paul; Virmaux, Michèle; Abboud, Philippe; Guillot, Geneviève; Kérangart, Stéphane; Merle, Cédric; Calderon, Enrique; Totet, Anne; Carme, Bernard; Nevez, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The study described Pneumocystis jirovecii (P. jirovecii) multilocus typing in seven AIDS patients living in French Guiana (Cayenne Hospital) and seven immunosuppressed patients living in Brest, metropolitan France (Brest Hospital). Archival P. jirovecii specimens were examined at the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) locus using a PCR-RFLP technique, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 and ITS 2 and the mitochondrial large subunit rRNA (mtLSUrRNA) gene using PCR and sequencing. Analysis of typing results were combined with an analysis of the literature on P. jirovecii mtLSUrRNA types and ITS haplotypes. A wild DHPS type was identified in six Guianese patients and in seven patients from metropolitan France whereas a DHPS mutant was infected in the remaining Guianese patient. Typing of the two other loci pointed out a high diversity of ITS haplotypes and an average diversity of mtLSUrRNA types in French Guiana with a partial commonality of these haplotypes and types described in metropolitan France and around the world. Combining DHPS, ITS and mtLSU types, 12 different multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were identified, 4 MLGs in Guianese patients and 8 MLGs in Brest patients. MLG analysis allows to discriminate patients in 2 groups according to their geographical origin. Indeed, none of the MLGs identified in the Guianese patients were found in the Brest patients and none of the MLGs identified in the Brest patients were found in the Guianese patients. These results show that in French Guiana (i) PCP involving DHPS mutants occur, (ii) there is a diversity of ITS and mtLSUrRNA types and (iii) although partial type commonality in this territory and metropolitan France can be observed, MLG analysis suggests that P. jirovecii organisms from French Guiana may present specific characteristics.

  18. AIDS-related beliefs and behaviours of Australian university students.

    PubMed

    Turtle, A M; Ford, B; Habgood, R; Grant, M; Bekiaris, J; Constantinou, C; Macek, M; Polyzoidis, H

    1989-04-03

    Parallel questionnaires that enquired into the beliefs and behaviours which related to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were administered by postal survey during August and September 1987 to two separate samples of students. Each sample comprised 300 students who were selected at random, were aged up to 30 years, and at the time were enrolled at The University of Sydney; the response rate was 70%. Results showed a high level of "correctness" of belief about AIDS and safer sexual practices. More than half the population had experienced sexual intercourse during 1987, 25% of whom had experienced sexual intercourse on a casual basis. A marked discrepancy was found between the knowledge of and the performance of safer sexual behaviours, as measured by two sets of key questions, which covered condom use in casual vaginal encounters and enquiry into a casual partner's history with regard to sexual experience, abuse of intravenous drugs and history of blood transfusions. A log-linear regression analysis showed no correlation between scores on the two sets of key questions on knowledge of safer sexual practices and the demographic variables of age, sex, sexual experience or religious commitment. It is suggested that an educational campaign that is directed at the problem of behavioural change will fail to be productive if it is focused narrowly on the knowledge of safer sexual techniques; in addition, it should take into account other attitudinal components, such as the perception of social pressures from peer-groups. Within this particular student population, the most-effective immediate stratagem may be to restructure the perceived personal and peer-group risks.

  19. HGF/c-MET Pathway in AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    targets of virus-encoded microRNAs. Nat Genet . 2009; 41:130–134. 27. Lu F, Stedman W, Yousef M, Renne R, Lieberman PM. Epigenetic regulation of...Department of Molecular Genetics Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA * These authors have contributed equally to this work Correspondence...TIVE-LTC we used in the present study. We assume that different cell-lines with genetic modification may cause varied responses to SnPP treatment

  20. AIDS-related primary Kaposi sarcoma of the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Çelenk, Fatih; Yilmaz, Metin; Asal, Korhan; Ekinci, Özgür; Tokgöz, Nil

    2011-06-01

    Primary nasopharyngeal Kaposi sarcoma is extremely rare, as only 1 case has been previously reported in the literature. We report a new case, which occurred in a 37-year-old man with a known history of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The patient presented with complaints of recurrent epistaxis and postnasal hemorrhage. Endoscopic examination detected a bluish, smooth, firm, nonpulsatile mass in the nasopharyngeal wall. Histopathologic findings on biopsy were consistent with Kaposi sarcoma. The tumor was successfully treated with radiotherapy. Kaposi sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any AIDS patient who presents with recurrent unilateral nasal bleeding.

  1. AIDS-Related Stigma and Health Professionals in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Torres, Yamilette; Cintrón-Bou, Francheska N.; Varas-Díaz, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses an important issue in the AIDS epidemic in Puerto Rico: AIDS stigma among health professionals and health profession students. AIDS stigma has been documented among health services providers such as doctors, nurses, psychologists, and social workers. It has detrimental effects of the services provided and the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The main objective of this study was to explore AIDS stigma manifestations among a sample composed of eighty health professionals and health profession students who participated in in-depth qualitative interviews. Four thematic categories stemmed from the data analysis process. These addressed the following subjects: social manifestations of stigma, stigma manifestations in the workplace, use of sensitive information to control PLWHA, and surveillance of PLWHA. Participants manifested instances of stigmatization they had witnessed in their work and training scenarios. Furthermore, they elaborated on the need to place effective surveillance mechanism on PLWHA in order to control the epidemic. PMID:21423837

  2. Nonlinear Diffusion and Transient Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akira, Igarashi; Lamberto, Rondoni; Antonio, Botrugno; Marco, Pizzi

    2011-08-01

    We investigate both analytically and numerically the concentration dynamics of a solution in two containers connected by a narrow and short channel, in which diffusion obeys a porous medium equation. We also consider the variation of the pressure in the containers due to the flow of matter in the channel. In particular, we identify a phenomenon, which depends on the transport of matter across nano-porous membranes, which we call “transient osmosis". We find that nonlinear diffusion of the porous medium equation type allows numerous different osmotic-like phenomena, which are not present in the case of ordinary Fickian diffusion. Experimental results suggest one possible candidate for transiently osmotic processes.

  3. Load Diffusion in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horgan, Cornelius O.; Simmonds, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    This research has been concerned with load diffusion in composite structures. Fundamental solid mechanics studies were carried out to provide a basis for assessing the complicated modeling necessary for large scale structures used by NASA. An understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of load diffusion in composite subcomponents is essential in developing primary composite structures. Analytical models of load diffusion behavior are extremely valuable in building an intuitive base for developing refined modeling strategies and assessing results from finite element analyses. The decay behavior of stresses and other field quantities provides a significant aid towards this process. The results are also amendable to parameter study with a large parameter space and should be useful in structural tailoring studies.

  4. Water vapor diffusion membranes, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, F. F.; Klein, E.; Smith, J. K.; Eyer, C.

    1976-01-01

    Transport mechanisms were investigated for the three different types of water vapor diffusion membranes. Membranes representing porous wetting and porous nonwetting structures as well as dense diffusive membrane structures were investigated for water permeation rate as a function of: (1) temperature, (2) solids composition in solution, and (3) such hydrodynamic parameters as sweep gas flow rate, solution flow rate and cell geometry. These properties were measured using nitrogen sweep gas to collect the effluent. In addition, the chemical stability to chromic acid-stabilized urine was measured for several of each type of membrane. A technology based on the mechanism of vapor transport was developed, whereby the vapor diffusion rates and relative susceptibility of membranes to fouling and failure could be projected for long-term vapor recovery trials using natural chromic acid-stabilized urine.

  5. Final results of the condors convective diffusion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Convective Diffusion Observed by Remote Sensors (CONDORS) field experiment conducted at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory used innovative techniques to obtain three dimensional mappings of plume concentration fields of oil fog detected by lidar and chaff detected by Doppler radar. It included extensive meteorological measurements and, in 1983, tracer gases measured at a single sampling arc. Final results from ten hours of elevated and surface release data are summarized here. Spatial standard deviations (diffusion coefficients) of chaff and oil agree overall and are consistent at short range with velocity standard deviations and statistical theory predictions. Surface release lateral diffusion is enhanced up to 60% at small distances, consistent with the 1956 Prairie Grass measurements and with larger turbulence velocities and reduced wind speed measured near the surface. Decreased lateral diffusion at small dimensionless averaging times is also noted. Finally, convectively scaled concentrations were plotted versus dimensionless distance and height for oil and for chaff, for each 30-60 min period. Aggregated CONDORS fields compare well with laboratory tank and numerical model simulations.

  6. Determining Pitch-angle Diffusion Coefficients from Test Particle Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivascenko, Alex; Lange, Sebastian; Spanier, Felix; Vainio, Rami

    2016-12-01

    The transport and acceleration of charged particles in turbulent media are topics of great interest in space physics and interstellar astrophysics. These processes are dominated by the scattering of particles off magnetic irregularities. The scattering process itself is usually described by small-angle scattering, with the pitch-angle coefficient {D}μ μ playing a major role. Since the diffusion coefficient {D}μ μ can be determined analytically only for the approximation of quasilinear theory, the determination of this coefficient from numerical simulations has become more important. So far these simulations have yielded particle tracks for small-scale scattering, which can then be interpreted using the running diffusion coefficients. This method has a limited range of validity. This paper presents two new methods that allow for the calculation of the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient from numerical simulations. These methods no longer analyze particle trajectories and instead examine the change of particle distribution functions. It is shown that these methods provide better resolved results and allow for the analysis of strong turbulence. The application of these methods to Monte Carlo simulations of particle scattering and hybrid MHD-particle simulations is presented. Both analysis methods are able to recover the diffusion coefficients used as input for the Monte Carlo simulations and provide better results in MHD simulations, especially for stronger turbulence.

  7. Marmot-Fission-Gas-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders; Matthews, Christopher

    2016-10-22

    The MARMOT-FISSION-GAS-DIFFUSION software solves a coupled set of partial differential equations describing fission gas evolution in UO2 nuclear fuel. It is part of the MARMOT code, which builds on the MOOSE framework. Both the MARMOT code and the MOOSE framework are developed and maintained by Idaho National Laboratory. The model in MARMOT-FISSION-GAS-DIFFUSION consists of a set of continuum reaction-diffusion equations capturing formation and annihilation of defects, reactions between defects, diffusion of defects and segregation of defects to grain boundaries. Defects refer to vacancies and interstitials as well fission gas atoms (Xe) occupying various trap sites such as uranium and oxygen vacancies and interstitials sites. The code can treat a large number of defect types. The model is formulated within the phase field framework to be compatible with other MARMOT kernels. The driving forces for all reactions, diffusion and segregation events are consistently formulated as a variational derivatives of the free energy of the system. The rates of the reactions are controlled by the corresponding kinetic coefficients. The free energy and the kinetic coefficients for UO2 have been parameterized by lower length scale simulations. The code can be used to simulate defect evolution in a prescribed UO2 microstructure as well as to solve defect clustering problems that control effective diffusivities under both thermal and irradiation conditions. It I possible to extend the current UO2 model to other fuel types such as accident tolerant fuels based on the U3Si2 compound. This would obviously require a new set of material properties describing the behavior of defects in U3Si2 rather than UO2. The framework is however designed to be generic.

  8. Diffusion of polyelectrolytes in polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahalkar, Anand; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2015-03-01

    Using dynamic light scattering, we have investigated the diffusion coefficient of sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) in a matrix of poly(acrylamide-co-acrylate) gels. The diffusion coefficient of the probe polyelectrolyte exhibits a crossover behavior from a particle-diffusion to entropic-barrier dominated diffusion, as the molecular weight is increased. The effect of electrostatics, by varying the charge density of the matrix, on probe diffusion constant will be presented.

  9. Improved Dot Diffusion For Image Halftoning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    The dot diffusion method for digital halftoning has the advantage of parallelism unlike the error diffusion method. The method was recently improved...by optimization of the so-called class matrix so that the resulting halftones are comparable to the error diffused halftones . In this paper we will...first review the dot diffusion method. Previously, 82 class matrices were used for dot diffusion method. A problem with this size of class matrix is

  10. Vertical eddy diffusion coefficient from the LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viswanadham, Y. (Principal Investigator); Torsani, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of five stable cases of the smoke plumes that originated in eastern Cabo Frio (22 deg 59'S; 42 deg 02'W), Brazil using LANDSAT imagery is presented for different months and years. From these images the lateral standard deviation (sigma sub y) and the lateral eddy diffusion coefficient (K sub y) are obtained from the formula based on Taylor's theory of diffusion by continuous moment. The rate of kinetic energy dissipation (e) is evaluated from the diffusion parameters sigma sub y and K sub y. Then, the vertical diffusion coefficient (K sub z) is estimated using Weinstock's formulation. These results agree well with the previous experimental values obtained over water surfaces by various workers. Values of e and K sub z show the weaker mixing processes in the marine stable boundary layer. The data sample is apparently to small to include representative active turbulent regions because such regions are so intermittent in time and in space. These results form a data base for use in the development and validation of mesoscale atmospheric diffusion models.

  11. Crustal diffusion of gases out of Mercury and the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    An upper limit to the rate of diffusion of sodium and potassium out of Mercury and the moon was calculated, and the resulting flux was compared to that required to maintain the known exospheres. It was found that diffusion rates are inadequate by 12 orders of magnitude on the moon and 9 orders of magnitude on Mercury for diffusion out of orthoclase minerals. Diffusion will be more rapid out of pure glass by five to six orders of magnitude and out of shocked basalt by an amount depending on the microstructure of the mineral. The observed abundance and distribution of volatiles in small glass spherules on the moon indicates that diffusion is very inefficient after solidification and cooling. At Mercury, the limitation on sodium flux to the atmosphere is shown to be the rate at which new regolith is created. The discrepancy between the observed column abundance of sodium in the Mercurean atmosphere and the known sources may indicate that either Mercury's crust has a larger volatile content than the moon or that a recycling mechanism exists in the Mercurean atmosphere which is not present for the moon.

  12. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Oxygen Diffusion in Ytterbium Disilicate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    Ytterbium disilicate is of interest as a potential environmental barrier coating for aerospace applications, notably for use in next generation jet turbine engines. In such applications, the transport of oxygen and water vapor through these coatings to the ceramic substrate is undesirable if high temperature oxidation is to be avoided. In an effort to understand the diffusion process in these materials, we have performed kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of vacancy-mediated and interstitial oxygen diffusion in Ytterbium disilicate. Oxygen vacancy and interstitial site energies, vacancy and interstitial formation energies, and migration barrier energies were computed using Density Functional Theory. We have found that, in the case of vacancy-mediated diffusion, many potential diffusion paths involve large barrier energies, but some paths have barrier energies smaller than one electron volt. However, computed vacancy formation energies suggest that the intrinsic vacancy concentration is small. In the case of interstitial diffusion, migration barrier energies are typically around one electron volt, but the interstitial defect formation energies are positive, with the result that the disilicate is unlikely to exhibit experience significant oxygen permeability except at very high temperature.

  13. Diffusion doping in quantum dots: bond strength and diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Saha, Avijit; Makkar, Mahima; Shetty, Amitha; Gahlot, Kushagra; A R, Pavan; Viswanatha, Ranjani

    2017-02-23

    Semiconducting materials uniformly doped with optical or magnetic impurities have been useful in a number of potential applications. However, clustering or phase separation during synthesis has made this job challenging. Recently the "inside out" diffusion doping was proposed to be successful in obtaining large sized quantum dots (QDs) uniformly doped with a dilute percentage of dopant atoms. Herein, we demonstrate the use of basic physical chemistry of diffusion to control the size and concentration of the dopants within the QDs for a given transition metal ion. We have studied three parameters; the bond strength of the core molecules and the diffusion coefficient of the diffusing metal ion are found to be important while the ease of cation exchange was not highly influential in the control of size and concentration of the single domain dilute magnetic semiconductor quantum dots (DMSQDs) with diverse dopant ions M(2+) (Fe(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), Mn(2+)). Steady state optical emission spectra reveal that the dopants are incorporated inside the semiconducting CdS and the emission can be tuned during shell growth. We have shown that this method enables control over doping percentage and the QDs show a superior ferromagnetic response at room temperature as compared to previously reported systems.

  14. Optimization of hydraulic turbine diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravec, Prokop; Hliník, Juraj; Rudolf, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic turbine diffuser recovers pressure energy from residual kinetic energy on turbine runner outlet. Efficiency of this process is especially important for high specific speed turbines, where almost 50% of available head is utilized within diffuser. Magnitude of the coefficient of pressure recovery can be significantly influenced by designing its proper shape. Present paper focuses on mathematical shape optimization method coupled with CFD. First method is based on direct search Nelder-Mead algorithm, while the second method employs adjoint solver and morphing. Results obtained with both methods are discussed and their advantages/disadvantages summarized.

  15. Configurational diffusion of coal macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    During this quarter, progress has been made in two areas: (1) preparation of the calibration curve for gel permeation chromatography analysis of coal asphaltene; (2) preliminary measurements of the effective diffusion coefficients of coal asphaltene fractions. A calibration curve was prepared with standard compounds including polystyrenes, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and tetraphenylporphine in GPC analysis. A correlation equation was obtained from the calibration curve to estimate the molecular weights of coal asphaltene fractions. Based on this GPC analysis, effective diffusion coefficients of coal asphaltene fractions were measured.

  16. Diffuse bands versus extinction parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wegner, Walter; Snow, Theodore P.; Sneden, C.; Krelowski, Jacek

    1994-01-01

    All recent available, high quality measurements of the strong diffuse bands 5780 A and 5797 A have been collected. This includes those measurement derived from the authors's recent observations (February, May, and November 1993, taken with a echelle spectrograph) as well as those from a coude spectrograph and from literature. Equivalent widths of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIB's) at 5780 A and 5797 A have been measured on spectrograms. The measured signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) on their own spectrograms ranged from 250 to 500. The Johnson UBV data were used to estimate the color excesses of our targets.

  17. Diffusive mixing and Tsallis entropy

    DOE PAGES

    O'Malley, Daniel; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Cushman, John H.

    2015-04-29

    Brownian motion, the classical diffusive process, maximizes the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. The Tsallis q-entropy, which is non-additive, was developed as an alternative to the classical entropy for systems which are non-ergodic. A generalization of Brownian motion is provided that maximizes the Tsallis entropy rather than the Boltzmann-Gibbs entropy. This process is driven by a Brownian measure with a random diffusion coefficient. In addition, the distribution of this coefficient is derived as a function of q for 1 < q < 3. Applications to transport in porous media are considered.

  18. Minimal model for anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2017-01-01

    A random walk model with a local probability of removal is solved exactly and shown to exhibit subdiffusive behavior with a mean square displacement the evolves as ˜t1 /2 at late times. This model is shown to be well described by a diffusion equation with a sink term, which also describes the evolution of a pressure or temperature field in a leaky environment. For this reason a number of physical processes are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion. The presence of the sink term is shown to change the late time behavior of the field from 1 /t1 /2 to 1 /t3 /2 .

  19. A framework to analyze cerebral mean diffusivity using surface guided diffusion mapping in diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Hun; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Sang-Won; Na, Duk L.; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    The mean diffusivity (MD) value has been used to describe microstructural properties in Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) in cortical gray matter (GM). Recently, researchers have applied a cortical surface generated from the T1-weighted volume. When the DTI data are analyzed using the cortical surface, it is important to assign an accurate MD value from the volume space to the vertex of the cortical surface, considering the anatomical correspondence between the DTI and the T1-weighted image. Previous studies usually sampled the MD value using the nearest-neighbor (NN) method or Linear method, even though there are geometric distortions in diffusion-weighted volumes. Here we introduce a Surface Guided Diffusion Mapping (SGDM) method to compensate for such geometric distortions. We compared our SGDM method with results using NN and Linear methods by investigating differences in the sampled MD value. We also projected the tissue classification results of non-diffusion-weighted volumes to the cortical midsurface. The CSF probability values provided by the SGDM method were lower than those produced by the NN and Linear methods. The MD values provided by the NN and Linear methods were significantly greater than those of the SGDM method in regions suffering from geometric distortion. These results indicate that the NN and Linear methods assigned the MD value in the CSF region to the cortical midsurface (GM region). Our results suggest that the SGDM method is an effective way to correct such mapping errors. PMID:26236180

  20. Spatial Mapping of Translational Diffusion Coefficients Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Mathematical Description

    PubMed Central

    SHETTY, ANIL N.; CHIANG, SHARON; MALETIC-SAVATIC, MIRJANA; KASPRIAN, GREGOR; VANNUCCI, MARINA; LEE, WESLEY

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the theoretical background for diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Molecular diffusion is a random process involving thermal Brownian motion. In biological tissues, the underlying microstructures restrict the diffusion of water molecules, making diffusion directionally dependent. Water diffusion in tissue is mathematically characterized by the diffusion tensor, the elements of which contain information about the magnitude and direction of diffusion and is a function of the coordinate system. Thus, it is possible to generate contrast in tissue based primarily on diffusion effects. Expressing diffusion in terms of the measured diffusion coefficient (eigenvalue) in any one direction can lead to errors. Nowhere is this more evident than in white matter, due to the preferential orientation of myelin fibers. The directional dependency is removed by diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, which then yields a set of three eigenvalues and eigenvectors, representing the magnitude and direction of the three orthogonal axes of the diffusion ellipsoid, respectively. For example, the eigenvalue corresponding to the eigenvector along the long axis of the fiber corresponds qualitatively to diffusion with least restriction. Determination of the principal values of the diffusion tensor and various anisotropic indices provides structural information. We review the use of diffusion measurements using the modified Stejskal–Tanner diffusion equation. The anisotropy is analyzed by decomposing the diffusion tensor based on symmetrical properties describing the geometry of diffusion tensor. We further describe diffusion tensor properties in visualizing fiber tract organization of the human brain. PMID:27441031

  1. Daisy patterns in the passive ring cavity with diffusion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Berre, M.; Patrascu, A. S.; Ressayre, E.; Tallet, A.

    1996-02-01

    Near-field patterns with three to fifteen petals set on a single circle are numerically observed in the ring cavity device. Three to six petal daisies result from usual finite size effects. We point out the non-trivial formation of seven to fifteen petal daisies, with a top-hat input, and a small diffusion term that controls this daisy-type pattern formation, preventing the usual hexagonal structure to be formed.

  2. Thermophotovoltaic Cells on Zinc Diffused Polycrystalline GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Sulima, O.V.; Bett, A.W.; Dutta, P.S.; Ehsani, H.; Gutmann, R.J.

    2000-05-01

    For the first time, it has been demonstrated that thermophotovoltaic cells made of polycrystalline GaSb with small grain sizes (down to 100 x 100 {micro}m) have similar characteristics to the best Zinc diffused single crystal GaSb cells with identified device parameters. The grain boundaries in polycrystalline GaSb do not degrade TPV cell parameters, indicating that such material can be used for high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic cells.

  3. Diffusive limits of nonlinear hyperbolic systems with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Masayoshi

    2016-09-01

    We consider the initial-boundary value problem for a 2-speed system of first-order nonhomogeneous semilinear hyperbolic equations whose leading terms have a small positive parameter. Using energy estimates and a compactness lemma, we show that the diffusion limit of the sum of the solutions of the hyperbolic system, as the parameter tends to zero, verifies the nonlinear parabolic equation of the p-Laplacian type.

  4. Diffusive suppression of AC-Stark shifts in atomic magnetometers

    PubMed Central

    Sulai, I. A.; Wyllie, R.; Kauer, M.; Smetana, G. S.; Wakai, R. T.; Walker, T. G.

    2016-01-01

    In atomic magnetometers, the vector AC-Stark shift associated with circularly polarized light generates spatially varying effective magnetic fields, which limit the magnetometer response and serve as sources of noise. We describe a scheme whereby optically pumping a small subvolume of the magnetometer cell and relying on diffusion to transport polarized atoms allows a magnetometer to be operated with minimal sensitivity to the AC-Stark field. © 2013 Optical Society of America PMID:23503278

  5. Ambipolar diffusion drifts and dynamos in turbulent gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1988-01-01

    Ambipolar drift in turbulent fluids are considered. Using mean-field electrodynamics, a two-scale theory originally used to study hydromagnetic dynamos, it is shown that magnetic fields can be advected by small-scale magnetosonic (compressional) turbulence or generated by Alfvenic (helical) turbulence. A simple dynamo theory is made and is compared with standard theories in which dissipation is caused by turbulent diffusion. The redistribution of magnetic flux in interstellar clouds is also discussed.

  6. New silicon drift detector design for diminishing lateral diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijzen, E. A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Hollander, R. W.

    1993-10-01

    In this paper we present a new drift detector design, which diminishes the effect of lateral diffusion. This is achieved by giving the strips a saw tooth shape. In this way a small electric field in the direction parallel to the surface and perpendicular to the drift direction is established. Therefore the electrons are confined in this direction within the length of one saw tooth. The influences of some important parameters of the saw tooth are discussed.

  7. A mapping method for distributive mixing with diffusion: Interplay between chaos and diffusion in time-periodic sine flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Conor P.; Christov, Ivan C.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2013-05-01

    We present an accurate and efficient computational method for solving the advection-diffusion equation in time-periodic chaotic flows. The method uses operator splitting, which allows the advection and diffusion steps to be treated independently. Taking advantage of flow periodicity, the advection step is solved using a mapping method, and diffusion is "added" discretely after each iteration of the advection map. This approach results in the construction of a composite mapping matrix over an entire period of the chaotic advection-diffusion process and provides a natural framework for the analysis of mixing. To test the approach, we consider two-dimensional time-periodic sine flow. By comparing the numerical solutions obtained by our method to reference solutions, we find qualitative agreement for large time steps (structure of concentration profile) and quantitative agreement for small time steps (low error). Further, we study the interplay between mixing through chaotic advection and mixing through diffusion leading to an analytical model for the evolution of the intensity of segregation with time. Additionally, we demonstrate that our operator splitting mapping approach can be readily extended to three dimensions.

  8. Contributions of Microtubule Dynamic Instability and Rotational Diffusion to Kinetochore Capture.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Robert; Sweezy-Schindler, Oliver; Edelmaier, Christopher; Gergely, Zachary R; Flynn, Patrick J; Montes, Salvador; Crapo, Ammon; Doostan, Alireza; McIntosh, J Richard; Glaser, Matthew A; Betterton, Meredith D

    2017-02-07

    Microtubule dynamic instability allows search and capture of kinetochores during spindle formation, an important process for accurate chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent work has found that microtubule rotational diffusion about minus-end attachment points contributes to kinetochore capture in fission yeast, but the relative contributions of dynamic instability and rotational diffusion are not well understood. We have developed a biophysical model of kinetochore capture in small fission-yeast nuclei using hybrid Brownian dynamics/kinetic Monte Carlo simulation techniques. With this model, we have studied the importance of dynamic instability and microtubule rotational diffusion for kinetochore capture, both to the lateral surface of a microtubule and at or near its end. Over a range of biologically relevant parameters, microtubule rotational diffusion decreased capture time, but made a relatively small contribution compared to dynamic instability. At most, rotational diffusion reduced capture time by 25%. Our results suggest that while microtubule rotational diffusion can speed up kinetochore capture, it is unlikely to be the dominant physical mechanism for typical conditions in fission yeast. In addition, we found that when microtubules undergo dynamic instability, lateral captures predominate even in the absence of rotational diffusion. Counterintuitively, adding rotational diffusion to a dynamic microtubule increases the probability of end-on capture.

  9. DIOS: the diffuse intergalactic oxygen surveyor: status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Ezoe, Y.; Sasaki, S.; Kawahara, H.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Takei, Y.; Ishida, M.; Tawara, Y.; Sakurai, I.; Furuzawa, A.; Suto, Y.; Yoshikawa, K.; Kawai, N.; Fujimoto, R.; Tsuru, T. G.; Matsushita, K.; Kitayama, T.

    2010-07-01

    DIOS (Diffuse Intergalactic Oxygen Surveyor) is a small scientific satellite with a main aim for the search of warm-hot intergalactic medium using redshifted OVII and OVIII lines. The instrument will consist of a 4-stage X-ray telescope and an array of TES microcalorimeters with 256 pixels, cooled with mechanical coolers. Hardware development of DIOS and the expected results are described. Survey observations over about 5° x 5° area will reveal new filamentary structures. DIOS will be proposed to the 3rd mission in JAXA's small satellite series in 2011, aiming for launch around 2016 if it will be selected.

  10. Turbulence reduces magnetic diffusivity in DTS liquid sodium experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, S.; Schaeffer, N.; Nataf, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    Earth, Sun and many other astrophysical bodies produce their own magnetic field by dynamo action, where induction of magnetic field by fluid motion overcomes the Joule dissipation when the magnetic Reynolds number Rm = UL/η is large enough (U and L are characteristic velocity and length-scale and η the magnetic diffusivity). Large scale motion of a conducting medium shearing pre-existing magnetic field lines is a well known process to produce large scale magnetic field by omega-effect. However, such a process cannot sustain a self-excited dynamo and small-scale turbulent motions are usually invoked as the appropriate mechanism to dynamo action. The contribution of turbulent fluctuations to the induction of mean magnetic field is investigated in our liquid sodium spherical Couette experiment, with an imposed magnetic field. Many measurements are used through an inversion technique to obtain a radial profile of alpha and beta effects together with the mean flow at magnetic Reynolds number Rm = 100. It appears that the small scale turbulent fluctuations can be modeled as a strong contribution to the magnetic diffusivity which is negative in the interior region and positive close to the outer shell.Direct numerical simulations of our experiment support these results. The lowering of the effective magnetic diffusivity by small scale fluctuations implies that turbulence can actually help to achieve self-generation of large scale magnetic fields.

  11. Technology Diffusion. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niederhauser, Dale S., Ed.; Strudler, Neal, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on technology diffusion from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: (1) "Faculty Technology Integration Project" (Comfort Akwaji); (2) "If It Is Broke, Then What?" (D. Lynnwood Belvin and Jennifer Leaderer); (3) "Developing Video-Based E-Learning Applications"…

  12. Diffusion brazing of nickel aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Orel, S.V.; Parous, L.C.; Gale, W.F.

    1995-09-01

    NiAl is a promising candidate material for high-temperature applications. However, NiAl suffers from poor low-temperature ductility and toughness. Hence, suitable technologies are required for NiAl to Ni-based alloy joining. In view of the poor low-temperature ductility and strong alumina-forming tendency of NiAl, diffusion brazing seems to be the most suitable technology for joining NiAl to itself and to Ni-based alloys. This paper examines the diffusion brazing of NiAl to Ni using Ni-Si-B interlayers and draws comparisons with previous work by authors on NiAl/Ni-Si-B/NiAl and Ni/Ni-Si-B/Ni diffusion brazing. The progression of micro-structural development in the NiAl/Ni-Si-B/Ni joints is compared with that expected from standard models of the diffusion brazing process in which dissolution of the substrate material, isothermal solidification and solid-state homogenization occur sequentially.

  13. Double-diffusive layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaussinger, Florian; Kupka, Friedrich; Hücker, Sebastian; Egbers, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Double-diffusive convection plays an important role in geo- and astrophysical applications. The special case, where a destabilising temperature gradient counteracts a stabilising solute gradient leads to layering phenomena under certain conditions. Convectively mixed layers sandwiched in diffusive interfaces form a so-called stack. Well-known double-diffusive systems are observed in rift lakes in Africa and even from the coffee drink Latte Macciatto. Stacks of layers are also predicted to occur inside massive stars and inside giant planets. Their dynamics depend on the thermal, the solute and the momentum diffusivities, as well on the ratio of the gradients of the opposing stratifications. Since the layering process cannot be derived from linear stability analysis, the full nonlinear set of equations has to be investigated. Numerical simulations have become feasible for this task, despite the physical processes operate on a vast range of length and time scales, which is challenging for numerical hydrodynamical modelling. The oceanographically relevant case of fresh and salty water is investigated here in further details. The heat and mass transfer is compared with theoretical results and experimental measurements. Additionally, the initial dynamic of layering, the transient behaviour of a stack and the long time evolution are presented using the example of Lake Kivu and the interior of a giant planet.

  14. Diffusion Coatings as Corrosion Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Radoslav; Ignatova-Ivanova, Tsveteslava

    2016-03-01

    Corrosion is the cause of irretrievable loss of huge amounts of metals and alloys. The harmful effects of corrosion can be reduced significantly by applying appropriate methods of corrosion protection. One method to protect metals against corrosion is the formation of diffusion coatings on them. High corrosion resistance is typical for the boride diffusion layers. Aluminothermy is one of the main methods for diffusion saturation of the surface of metal products with various elements, including boron, and under certain conditions with aluminum, too. Samples of steel 45 were put to aluminothermic diffusion saturation with boron in a pressurized steel container at a temperature of 1100K, for 6 hours in powdered aluminothermic mixtures. The content of B2O3 in the starting mixtures decreased from the optimum - 20% to 0%, and the content of Al and the activator - (NH4)2.4BF3 is constant, respectively 7% and 0.5%. Al2O3 was used as filler. The borided samples were tested for corrosion resistance in 10% HCl for 72 hours. The results show that their corrosion resistance depends on the composition of the starting saturating mixture (mainly on the content of B2O3), and respectively on the composition, structure, thickness and degree of adhesion of the layer to the metal base.

  15. Innovation Diffusion: Implications for Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Shena R.

    2009-01-01

    Whether looking at the spread and adoption of an intervention across a community, across multiple units, or within a single unit, an understanding of diffusion theory can help evaluators uncover patterns and impacts that might otherwise be overlooked. The theory alerts evaluators to examine why uptake of an intervention appeared different in…

  16. Nonlinear diffusion and superconducting hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Mayergoyz, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    Nonlinear diffusion of electromagnetic fields in superconductors with ideal and gradual resistive transitions is studied. Analytical results obtained for linear and nonlinear polarizations of electromagnetic fields are reported. These results lead to various extensions of the critical state model for superconducting hysteresis.

  17. Primary diffuse alveolar septal amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Poh, S C; Tjia, T S; Seah, H C

    1975-01-01

    The case is reported of a 61-year-old man with primary diffuse alveolar septal pulmonary amyloidosis. Amyloid infiltration of the heart and other organs was also observed. The clinical findings and laboratory investigations reveal features characteristic of defective gas transfer with pulmonary oedema due to left ventricular failure from myocardial involvement. Images PMID:1179316

  18. Evaluating Technology Transfer and Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozeman, Barry; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Four articles discuss the evaluation of technology transfer and diffusion: (1) "Technology Transfer at the U.S. National Laboratories: A Framework for Evaluation"; (2) "Application of Social Psychological and Evaluation Research: Lessons from Energy Information Programs"; (3) "Technology and Knowledge Transfer in Energy R and D Laboratories: An…

  19. Technology Diffusion. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strudler, Neal, Ed.; Niederhauser, Dale S., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on technology diffusion from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference: (1) "A Response to Technology Integration in Teacher Education for Merit, Tenure, and Promotion" (Cindy L. Anderson and David Starrett); (2) "Online Technical Support…

  20. Polymer Diffusion in Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    Motivated by experiments on fluorescently labeled DNA molecules on a supported lipid bilayer, we have examined theoretically diffusion of polymers in two dimensions. The key experimental finding we focus on is the scaling of the diffusion constant of the center of mass, D˜1/N. This implies that no effective hydrodynamic coupling exists between the diffusing DNA segments in the membrane. We construct our theoretical model using the phenomenological hydrodynamic model of supported membranes proposed by Evans and Sackmann. Our model is based on the pre-averaged Oseen tensor, and is similar to the model of Komura and Seki, but elaborated and extended to take explicit account of self-avoidance. We find that the 1/N scaling of D can be understood as a consequence of membrane hydrodynamics in the presence of a supporting surface. Further experimental consequences of the model, in particular the diffusion constant for DNA in free standing membranes, will also be discussed. This work was supported by the NSF through grants DMR-9984471 and DMR-0403997. JK is a Cottrell Scholar of Research Corporation.