Science.gov

Sample records for aike maar lake

  1. Deciphering lake and maar geometries from seismic refraction and reflection surveys in Laguna Potrok Aike (southern Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, A. C.; De Batist, M.; Niessen, F.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Ariztegui, D.; Haberzettl, T.; Kopsch, C.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2011-04-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a bowl-shaped maar lake in southern Patagonia, Argentina, with a present mean diameter of ~ 3.5 km and a maximum water depth of ~ 100 m. Seismic surveys were carried out between 2003 and 2005 in order to get a deeper knowledge on the lake sediments and the deeper basin geometries. A raytracing model of the Laguna Potrok Aike basin was calculated based on refraction data while sparker data were additionally used to identify the crater-wall discordance and thus the upper outer shape of the maar structure. The combined data sets show a rather steep funnel-shaped structure embedded in the surrounding Santa Cruz Formation that resembles other well-known maar structures. The infill consists of up to 370 m lacustrine sediments underlain by probably volcanoclastic sediments of unknown thickness. The lacustrine sediments show a subdivision into two sub-units: (a) the upper with seismic velocities between 1500 and 1800 m s - 1 , interpreted as unconsolidated muds, and (b) the lower with higher seismic velocities of up to 2350 m s - 1 , interpreted as lacustrine sediments intercalated with mass transport deposits of different lithology and/or coarser-grained sediments. The postulated volcanoclastic layer has acoustic velocities of > 2400 m s - 1 . The lake sediments were recently drilled within the PASADO project in the framework of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). Cores penetrated through lacustrine unconsolidated sediments down to a depth of ~ 100 m below lake floor. This minimal thickness for the unconsolidated and low-velocity lithologies is in good agreement with our raytracing model.

  2. Origin and evolution of the Laguna Potrok Aike maar (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, A. C.; de Batist, M.; Niessen, F.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Ariztegui, D.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2009-04-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike, a maar lake in southern-most Patagonia, is located at about 110 m a.s.l. in the Pliocene to late Quaternary Pali Aike Volcanic Field (Santa Cruz, southern Patagonia, Argentina) at about 52°S and 70°W, some 20 km north of the Strait of Magellan and approximately 90 km west of the city of Rio Gallegos. The lake is almost circular and bowl-shaped with a 100 m deep, flat plain in its central part and an approximate diameter of 3.5 km. Steep slopes separate the central plain from the lake shoulder at about 35 m water depth. At present, strong winds permanently mix the entire water column. The closed lake basin contains a sub saline water body and has only episodic inflows with the most important episodic tributary situated on the western shore. Discharge is restricted to major snowmelt events. Laguna Potrok Aike is presently located at the boundary between the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and the Antarctic Polar Front. The sedimentary regime is thus influenced by climatic and hydrologic conditions related to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and sporadic outbreaks of Antarctic polar air masses. Previous studies demonstrated that closed lakes in southern South America are sensitive to variations in the evaporation/precipitation ratio and have experienced drastic lake level changes in the past causing for example the desiccation of the 75 m deep Lago Cardiel during the Late Glacial. Multiproxy environmental reconstruction of the last 16 ka documents that Laguna Potrok Aike is highly sensitive to climate change. Based on an Ar/Ar age determination, the phreatomagmatic tephra that is assumed to relate to the Potrok Aike maar eruption was formed around 770 ka. Thus Laguna Potrok Aike sediments contain almost 0.8 million years of climate history spanning several past glacial-interglacial cycles making it a unique archive for non-tropical and non-polar regions of the Southern Hemisphere. In particular, variations of

  3. Origin and evolution of the Laguna Potrok Aike maar (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, A. C.; de Batist, M.; Niessen, F.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Ariztegui, D.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2009-04-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike, a maar lake in southern-most Patagonia, is located at about 110 m a.s.l. in the Pliocene to late Quaternary Pali Aike Volcanic Field (Santa Cruz, southern Patagonia, Argentina) at about 52°S and 70°W, some 20 km north of the Strait of Magellan and approximately 90 km west of the city of Rio Gallegos. The lake is almost circular and bowl-shaped with a 100 m deep, flat plain in its central part and an approximate diameter of 3.5 km. Steep slopes separate the central plain from the lake shoulder at about 35 m water depth. At present, strong winds permanently mix the entire water column. The closed lake basin contains a sub saline water body and has only episodic inflows with the most important episodic tributary situated on the western shore. Discharge is restricted to major snowmelt events. Laguna Potrok Aike is presently located at the boundary between the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and the Antarctic Polar Front. The sedimentary regime is thus influenced by climatic and hydrologic conditions related to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and sporadic outbreaks of Antarctic polar air masses. Previous studies demonstrated that closed lakes in southern South America are sensitive to variations in the evaporation/precipitation ratio and have experienced drastic lake level changes in the past causing for example the desiccation of the 75 m deep Lago Cardiel during the Late Glacial. Multiproxy environmental reconstruction of the last 16 ka documents that Laguna Potrok Aike is highly sensitive to climate change. Based on an Ar/Ar age determination, the phreatomagmatic tephra that is assumed to relate to the Potrok Aike maar eruption was formed around 770 ka. Thus Laguna Potrok Aike sediments contain almost 0.8 million years of climate history spanning several past glacial-interglacial cycles making it a unique archive for non-tropical and non-polar regions of the Southern Hemisphere. In particular, variations of

  4. Origin and evolution of the Laguna Potrok Aike maar (Southern Patagonia, Argentina) as revealed by seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, C.; de Batist, M. A.; Niessen, F.; Anselmetti, F.; Ariztegui, D.; Haberzettl, T.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data provide insights into the sedimentary infill and the underlying volcanic structure of Laguna Potrok Aike, a maar lake situated in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field, Southern Patagonia. The lake has a diameter of ~3.5 km, a maximum water depth of ~100 m and a presumed age of ~770 ka. Its sedimentary regime is influenced by climatic and hydrologic conditions related to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and sporadic outbreaks of Antarctic polar air masses. Multiproxy environmental reconstructions of the last 16 ka document that this terminal lake is highly sensitive to climate change. Laguna Potrok Aike has recently become a major focus of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program and was drilled down to 100 m below lake floor in late 2008 within the PASADO project. The sediments are likely to contain a continental record spanning the last ca. 80 kyrs unique in the South American realm. Seismic reflection data show relatively undisturbed, stratified lacustrine sediments at least in the upper ~100 m of the sedimentary infill but are obscured possibly by gas and/or coarser material in larger areas. A model calculated from seismic refraction data reveals a funnel-shaped structure embedded in the sandstone rocks of the surrounding Santa Cruz Formation. This funnel structure is filled by lacustrine sediments of up to 370 m in thickness. These can be separated into two distinct subunits with low acoustic velocities of 1500-1800 m s-1 in the upper subunit pointing at unconsolidated lacustrine muds, and enhanced velocities of 2000-2350 m s-1 in the lower subunit. Below these lacustrine sediments, a unit of probably volcanoclastic origin is observed (>2400 m s-1). This sedimentary succession is well comparable to other well-studied sequences (e.g. Messel and Baruth maars, Germany), confirming phreatomagmatic maar explosions as the origin of Laguna Potrok Aike.

  5. Origin and age of the Lake Nyos maar, Cameroon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockwood, J.P.; Rubin, M.

    1989-01-01

    Lake Nyos occupies a young maar crater in the Precambrian granitic terrane of northwest Cameroon. The lake is partly surrounded by poorly consolidated, ultramafic nodule-bearing pyroclastic surge deposits that were explosively ejected from the Nyos crater at the time of its formation. Radiocarbon dates show that the maar probably formed about 400 years ago. Field evidence suggests that carbon dioxide could have been the principal volatile involved in the formation of the Nyos maar, and that the role of water may have been minor. The formation of the Nyos maar was preceded by a brief period of effusive basaltic volcanism, but the maar itself may have largely formed by cold, 'dry' explosive processes. Carbon dioxide may still be trapped interstitially in a diatreme inferred to underlie Lake Nyos; its gradual release into the waters of Lake Nyos may have set the stage for the tragic gas-release event of August 21, 1986. Only young maar lakes such as Nyos may pose a danger of future lethal gas releases. ?? 1989.

  6. Magnitude, geomorphologic response and climate links of lake level oscillations at Laguna Potrok Aike, Patagonian steppe (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PASADO science Team Kliem, P.; Buylaert, J. P.; Hahn, A.; Mayr, C.; Murray, A. S.; Ohlendorf, C.; Veres, D.; Wastegård, S.; Zolitschka, B.

    2013-07-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a large maar lake located in the semiarid steppe of southern Patagonia known for its Lateglacial and Holocene lake level fluctuations. Based on sedimentary, seismic and geomorphological evidences, the lake level curve is updated and extended into the Last Glacial period and the geomorphological development of the lake basin and its catchment area is interpreted.Abrasion and lake level oscillations since at least ˜50 ka caused concentric erosion of the surrounding soft rocks of the Miocene Santa Cruz Formation and expanded the basin diameter by approximately 1 km. A high lake level and overflow conditions of the lake were dated by luminescence methods and tephra correlation to the early Lateglacial as well as to ˜45 ka. The lowest lake level of record occurred during the mid-Holocene. A further lake level drop was probably prevented by groundwater supply. This low lake level eroded a distinct terrace into lacustrine sediments. Collapse of these terraces probably caused mass movement deposits in the profundal zone of the lake. After the mid-Holocene lake level low stand a general and successive transgression occurred until the Little Ice Age maximum; i.e. ca 40 m above the local groundwater table. Frequent lake level oscillations caused deflation of emerged terraces only along the eastern shoreline due to prevailing westerly winds. Preservation of eolian deposits might be linked to relatively moist climate conditions during the past 2.5 ka.Precisely dated lake level reconstructions in the rain-shadow of the Andes document high Last Glacial and low Holocene lake levels that could suggest increased precipitation during the Last Glacial period. As permafrost in semiarid Patagonia is documented and dated to the Last Glacial period we argue that the frozen ground might have increased surficial runoff from the catchment and thus influenced the water balance of the lake. This is important for investigating the glacial to Holocene latitudinal shift

  7. Magnitude, geomorphologic response and climate links of lake level oscillations at Laguna Potrok Aike, Patagonian steppe (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliem, P.; Buylaert, J. P.; Hahn, A.; Mayr, C.; Murray, A. S.; Ohlendorf, C.; Veres, D.; Wastegård, S.; Zolitschka, B.; The Pasado Science Team

    2013-07-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a large maar lake located in the semiarid steppe of southern Patagonia known for its Lateglacial and Holocene lake level fluctuations. Based on sedimentary, seismic and geomorphological evidences, the lake level curve is updated and extended into the Last Glacial period and the geomorphological development of the lake basin and its catchment area is interpreted. Abrasion and lake level oscillations since at least ˜50 ka caused concentric erosion of the surrounding soft rocks of the Miocene Santa Cruz Formation and expanded the basin diameter by approximately 1 km. A high lake level and overflow conditions of the lake were dated by luminescence methods and tephra correlation to the early Lateglacial as well as to ˜45 ka. The lowest lake level of record occurred during the mid-Holocene. A further lake level drop was probably prevented by groundwater supply. This low lake level eroded a distinct terrace into lacustrine sediments. Collapse of these terraces probably caused mass movement deposits in the profundal zone of the lake. After the mid-Holocene lake level low stand a general and successive transgression occurred until the Little Ice Age maximum; i.e. ca 40 m above the local groundwater table. Frequent lake level oscillations caused deflation of emerged terraces only along the eastern shoreline due to prevailing westerly winds. Preservation of eolian deposits might be linked to relatively moist climate conditions during the past 2.5 ka. Precisely dated lake level reconstructions in the rain-shadow of the Andes document high Last Glacial and low Holocene lake levels that could suggest increased precipitation during the Last Glacial period. As permafrost in semiarid Patagonia is documented and dated to the Last Glacial period we argue that the frozen ground might have increased surficial runoff from the catchment and thus influenced the water balance of the lake. This is important for investigating the glacial to Holocene latitudinal shift

  8. OSL Dating of Maar Lake Sediments (Eifel/Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, E. D.; Sirocko, F.; Frechen, M.; Tsukamoto, S.

    2009-04-01

    OSL Dating of Maar Lake Sediments (Eifel/Germany) Esther D. Schmidt1, Frank Sirocko2, Manfred Frechen1 and Sumiko Tsukamoto1 1Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Department for Geochronology and Isotope Hydrology Hannover/ Germany - esther.schmidt@gga-hannover.de 2University of Mainz/Germany, Institute for Geoscience Keywords: Maar lake sediments, luminescence dating, Eifel/Germany. Sediment cores have been drilled by the ELSA project (Eifel Laminated Sediment Archive) in Eifel dry maar lakes to reconstruct the palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironmental conditions as well as the history of the volcanism in the Eifel/Central Europe during the last glacial cycles (Sirocko et al. 2005). Lake sediments accumulating in relict volcanic craters have undergone continuous deposition since the eruption of the maar volcano, and hence contain unique continuous local records of climate change. The aim of this study is to test the applicability of luminescence dating techniques for the temporal successions of dust storm events. Luminescence dating has been has been significantly improved over recent years and is widely used to establish confident chronologies of glacial/interglacial cycles (Schmidt et al. submitted). Equivalent doses (De) were determined applying the Single Aliquot Regenerative dose (SAR) protocol (Murray and Wintle 2000) using infra red light stimulation for feldspar and blue light stimulation for quartz. In further work other luminescence techniques like thermal transferred OSL (TT-OSL) and Infrared Radiofluorescence (IR-RF) will also be tested on the dust storm events of the maar lake sediments. References Murray, A.S., Wintle, A.G., 2000. Luminescence dating of quartz using an improved single-aliquot regenerative-dose protocol. Radiation Measurements, 32: 57-73. Schmidt, E.D., Machalett, B., Marković, S.B., Tsukamoto, S., Frechen, M., submitted. Luminescence chronology of the upper part of the Stari Slankamen loess sequence (Vojvodina, Serbia

  9. Holocene flood stack from three Eifel maar lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunck, Heiko; Sirocko, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Lacustrine sediments are very sensitive to natural and anthropogenically enviromental changes. Thus, lake sediments are excellent climate archives and can be used for reconstructions of past precipitation and flood events. However, we extend our flood record for MIS 2/3 to the entire Holocene up to recent years to get a complete flood stack for the last 60 000 years. The present study reconstructs paleo floods from event layers in the sediment, of Schalkenmehren Maar (SM3), Ulmen Maar (UM1) and Holzmaar (HM1) combined with recent gauge time-series. All three maar lakes has an inflow by a local stream. Accordingly the sedimentation rate is directly linked to runoff activity and the bioturbation was low so that event layers become visible, but varves are only preserved in lake Holzmaar. The maar sites are situated in the Eifel near to the town of Daun and were drilled in the ELSA (Eifel Laminated Sediment archive) project. The Eifel area is well suited to approximate Central European weather, because modern water level gauge data from Eifel rivers correlate with respective data from the Rhine (Wernli and Pfahl, 2009). Combined sedimentological, paleobotanical and geochemical data received from SM3, UM1 and HM1 builds the foundation of the 14C based chronology. The synchronisation of the record is controlled by tephra time markers and pollen. Both are used to align the main cores of the ELSA project and construct an integrated age model for the last 220 000 years [b2k] (Förster and Sirocko, 2014). For the extension of our MIS 2/3 flood stack we used the Laacher See Tephra (10 900 BC) as marker for the correlation with the Holocene cores. To study the flood events in detail, 10 cm long thin sections were used to distinguish flood layers from distal turbidites. Turbidites have a continuous grain size gradation; the grains size profile of flood events is in contrast characterized by several grain size maxima over the entire layer thickness. A flood event over several

  10. Geomicrobiological investigations in subsaline maar lake sediments over the last 1500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PASADO Science Team Vuillemin, Aurèle; Ariztegui, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Living microorganisms inhabit every environment of the biosphere but only in the last decades their importance governing biochemical cycles in deep sediments has been widely recognized. Most investigations have been accomplished in the marine realm whereas there is a clear paucity of comparable studies in lacustrine sediments. One of the main challenges is to define geomicrobiological proxies that can be used to identify different microbial signals in the sediments. Laguna Potrok Aike, a maar lake located in Southeastern Patagonia, has an annually not stratifying cold water column with temperatures ranging between 4 and 10 °C, and most probably an anoxic water/sediment interface. These unusual features make it a peculiar and interesting site for geomicrobiological studies. Living microbial activity within the sediments was inspected by the first time in a sedimentary core retrieved during an ICDP-sponsored drilling operation. The main goals to study this cold subsaline environment were to characterize the living microbial consortium; to detect early diagenetic signals triggered by active microbes; and to investigate plausible links between climate and microbial populations. Results from a meter long gravity core suggest that microbial activity in lacustrine sediments can be sustained deeper than previously thought due to their adaptation to both changing temperature and oxygen availability. A multi-proxy study of the same core allowed defining past water column conditions and further microbial reworking of the organic fraction within the sediments. Methane content shows a gradual increase with depth as a result of the fermentation of methylated substrates, first methanogenic pathway to take place in the shallow subsurface of freshwater and subsaline environments. Statistical analyses of DGGE microbial diversity profiles indicate four clusters for Bacteria reflecting layered communities linked to the oxidant type whereas three clusters characterize Archaea

  11. Volcanology, history and myths of the Lake Albano maar (Colli Albani volcano, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Benedetti, A. A.; Funiciello, R.; Giordano, G.; Diano, G.; Caprilli, E.; Paterne, M.

    2008-10-01

    The polygenetic Albano maar is the most recent centre of the Colli Albani volcano, located just few kilometres to the south-east of Roma. Presently the maar hosts a 167.5 m deep crater lake, the deepest in Europe. The maar is to be considered quiescent, as phreatic activity is documented throughout the Holocene. This paper illustrates the close relationships between the activity of the maar and the history of settlement in the Roman region as recorded in the geology, archaeology, history and legends of the area. Severe fluctuations of the groundwater table and catastrophic overflows of the Lake Albano from the maar rim had occurred prior to and after the early prehistoric settlements dated in the maar area at the Eneolithic times (ca. III millennium B.C.). Repeated lahars occurred along the northwestern slope of the maar filling in the paleodrainage network and forming a vast plain. Paleohydraulic analyses on fluvial and lahar deposits originated from the Holocene phreatic activity of the Albano maar indicate sediment-water flows in excess of hundreds of cubic metres per second. Absolute age determinations of the paleosoil underlying one of the most recent deposits of the lahar succession at 5800 ± 100 yr B.P. ( 14C CAL) are in perfect agreement with the age of the overlying Eneolithic age settlements. The last catastrophic overflow is described in the Roman literature as a consequence of the anger of Poseidon against the Romans in 398 B.C. for their war against the Etruscans. In 394 B.C. the Romans decided to prevent the repetition of such events by the excavation through the maar crater wall of a 1.5 km long drain tunnel, which is still operational, keeping the lake 70 m below the lowest point of the maar rim. This tunnel drain may be regarded as the first prevention device for volcanic hazard in history and shows an unprecedented development of the engineering technology under the pressure of hazard perception. The surprising and still largely unknown results

  12. Investigating the Formation and Subsurface Structure of a Large Water-Filled Basaltic Maar Volcano Using Constrained Potential Field Modelling, Lake Purrumbete Maar, Newer Volcanics Province.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Hove, J. C.; Ailleres, L.; Betts, P. G.; Cas, R. A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Purrumbete Maar of the Newer Volcanics Province, south-eastern Australia is one of the largest maar volcanoes in the world with a near circular crater up to 2800 m in diameter and hosting a 45 m deep crater lake. Surrounding tephra ring deposits are comprised of cross-bedded fine ash and lapilli-ash deposits typical of efficient subsurface phreatomagmatic eruptive activity. Erupted accessory lithics suggest subsurface phreatomagmatic activity occurred to a depth no greater than 250 m, whilst irregular clast shapes and peperitic textures observed in marl lithics suggest the host rock was poorly consolidated during eruptive activity. To further understand factors controlling Lake Purrumbete Maars immense size, high resolution lake and land-based gravity and magnetic data were collected for use in forward modelling of the subsurface architecture associated with the maar. Collection of gravity data presented a unique challenge due to the nature of measuring small changes in gravitational forces (<1 mGal) associated with the geology of the maar, on an inherently unstable water body. The magnetic anomaly over the maar shows irregular shaped high magnetic anomalies associated with several coalesced eruption points. 2.5-D forward models include five coalesced eruption points and an undulating shallow bowl-shaped diatreme structure, consistent with maars hosted within poorly consolidated sediments. 2.5-D forward models were used to produce a 3-D reference model for property and geometry inversions, to test and optimise the modelled features. Inversions suggest the major vents likely occur to a greater depth than 240 m as suggested in the initial reference model.

  13. Multidisciplinary characterisation of sedimentary processes in a recent maar lake (Lake Pavin, French Massif Central) and implication for natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapron, E.; Albéric, P.; Jézéquel, D.; Versteeg, W.; Bourdier, J.-L.; Sitbon, J.

    2010-09-01

    Sedimentation processes occurring in the most recent maar lake of the French Massif Central (Lake Pavin) are documented for the first time based on high resolution seismic reflection and multibeam bathymetric surveys and by piston coring and radiocarbon dating on a sediment depocentre developed on a narrow sub aquatic plateau. This new data set confirms the mid Holocene age of maar lake Pavin formation at 6970±60 yrs cal BP and highlights a wide range of gravity reworking phenomena affecting the basin. In particular, a slump deposit dated between AD 580-640 remoulded both mid-Holocene lacustrine sediments, terrestrial plant debris and some volcanic material from the northern crater inner walls. Between AD 1200 and AD 1300, a large slide scar mapped at 50 m depth also affected the southern edge of the sub aquatic plateau, suggesting that these gas-rich biogenic sediments (laminated diatomite) are poorly stable. Although several triggering mechanisms can be proposed for these prehistoric sub-aquatic mass wasting deposits in Lake Pavin, we argue that such large remobilisation of gas-rich sediments may affect the gas stability in deep waters of meromictic maar lakes. This study highlights the need to further document mass wasting processes in maar lakes and their impacts on the generation of waves, favouring the development of dangerous (and potentially deadly) limnic eruptions.

  14. The potential for catastrophic dam failure at Lake Nyos maar, Cameroon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockwood, J.P.; Costa, J.E.; Tuttle, M.L.; Nni, J.; Tebor, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    The upper 40 m of Lake Nyos is bounded on the north by a narrow dam of poorly consolidated pyroclastic rocks, emplaced during the eruptive formation of the Lake Nyos maar a few hundred years ago. This 50-m-wide natural dam is structurally weak and is being eroded at an uncertain, but geologically alarming, rate. The eventual failure of the dam could cause a major flood (estimated peak discharge, 17000 m3/s) that would have a tragic impact on downstream areas as far as Nigeria, 108 km away. This serious hazard could be eliminated by lowering the lake level, either by controlled removal of the dam or by construction of a 680-m-long drainage tunnel about 65 m below the present lake surface. Either strategy would also lessen the lethal effects of future massive CO2 gas releases, such as the one that occurred in August 1986. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Climate history of the Southern Hemisphere Westerlies belt during the last glacial-interglacial transition revealed from lake water oxygen isotope reconstruction of Laguna Potrok Aike (52° S, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Lücke, A.; Wissel, H.; Mayr, C.; Enters, D.; Kim, K. Ja; Ohlendorf, C.; Schäbitz, F.; Zolitschka, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Hemisphere Westerlies (SHW) play a crucial role in large-scale ocean circulation and global carbon cycling. Accordingly, the reconstruction of how the latitudinal position and intensity of the SHW belt changed during the last glacial termination is essential for understanding global climatic fluctuations. The southernmost part of the South American continent is the only continental mass intersecting a large part of the SHW belt. However, due to the scarcity of suitable palaeoclimate archives continuous proxy records back to the last glacial are rare in southern Patagonia. Here, we show an oxygen isotope record from cellulose and purified bulk organic matter of submerged aquatic moss shoots from Laguna Potrok Aike (52° S, 70° W), a deep maar lake located in semi-arid, extra-Andean Patagonia, covering the last glacial-interglacial transition (26 000 to 8500 cal BP). Based on the highly significant correlation between oxygen isotope values of modern aquatic mosses and their host waters and abundant well-preserved moss remains in the sediment record a high-resolution reconstruction of the lake water oxygen isotope (δ18Olw-corr) composition is presented. The reconstructed δ18Olw-corr values for the last glacial are ca. 3‰ lower than modern values, which can best be explained by generally cooler air temperatures and changes in the moisture source area, together with the occurrence of permafrost leading to a prolonged lake water residence time. Thus, the overall glacial δ18Olw-corr level until 21 000 cal BP is consistent with a scenario of weakened or absent SHW at 52° S compared to the present. During the last deglaciation, reconstructed δ18Olw-corr values reveal a significant two-step rise describing the detailed response of the lake's hydrological balance to this fundamental climatic shift. Rapid warming is seen as the cause of the first rise of ca. 2&permil, in δ18Olw-corr during the first two millennia of deglaciation (17 600 to 15 600 cal BP

  16. Solar Schwabe cycle signals in varved sediments of maar lakes of the Westeifel volcanic field (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruechmann, C.; Mingram, J.; Negendank, J.; Vos, H.; Zolitschka, B.

    Annually laminated lake deposits possess a great potential for the study of climatic change and the recognition of solar-terrestrial connections. The profiles discussed below are Holocene and Eocene maar lake sediments from Lake Holzmaar and Eckfeld maar lake, both situated in the Eifel volcanic field, Germany. Whereas the sediments of Lake Holzmaar are mainly composed of diatoms, the organic component of the Tertiary oilshales of Eckfeld is dominated by green algae. In both sequences the variations in varve thickness are controlled by biological productivity. Supposing a nonlinear transfer of the solar induced climatic signal by the limnic ecosystem which reacts with maximum productivity during optimal conditions and reduced productivity during years with deviations from the optimum, a detailed analysis of the average phase behaviour of the 11 year solar Schwabe cycle yields phase jumps of half a cycle length at times of optimal conditions. Those times depend on the overlying pattern of secular solar activity fluctuations (Gleissberg and longer cyclicities). The phase pattern of the Schwabe cycle in Lake Holzmaar has been compared with that of other archives, e.g. MSA accumulation rates of Greenland ice (GISP2), for time intervals with optimal time control (10 to 9 ka BP) and led to comparable results. For the time interval analysed, longer cyclicities of solar activity of 229, 500 and 750 years can be deduced from the timing of the phase jumps. The debate about decadal cyclicities in varved sequences of the northern hemisphere, the existence of similar cyclicities depending on nonlinear feedback mechanisms of the ocean/atmosphere circulation has to be excluded. Going back in time, we can observe general changes of the circulation pattern due to changes of the sea/land distribution and the loss of importance of the polar ice accumulation. Next to Lake Holzmaar, Eocene varved sediments can be analysed. First analyses show that the varve thickness variability

  17. Screening bacterial magnetites of the Holocene sediments in the Huguangyan Maar lake, south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, Y.; Zhu, R.; Deng, C.; Han, F.

    2013-12-01

    The Maar lakes are well known as ideal recorders of high-resolution paleo-environmental changes, because of high sedimentary rates and weak physical disturbance. The Huguangyan Maar Lake (21°9' N, 110°17' E) is a meromictic lake located at the tropical region in the Leizhou Peninsula, south China. It has a surface area of 2.3 km^2 and the maximum water depth of ~20 m. In this study surface sediments were collected at different water depth, and a 2 meter gravity core was taken at 13.8 m water depth, which spans the last ~2 kyr. For the 2-m core natural remanent magnetization (NRM), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) and the isothermal remanent magnetizations (IRM) were performed using 2-G Enterprises pass-through high-resolution cryogenic magnetometers. Hysteresis loops, first-order reversal curves (FORCs), and low-temperature zero field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) curves were measured on representative samples. The Verwey transition temperature (Tv) was calculated from the FC curve at the maximum dM/dT while the delta ratio was calculated according to Moskowitz et al. (1993). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations were also conducted on magnetic extracted samples to examine biogenic magnetofossils. The relatively high values of the S-ratios (> 0.9) indicate that low coercivity magnetic particles (likely magnetite) are the dominant mineral in sediments. The selected samples have delta ratios between 1.1 and 1.3. On FORC diagrams samples showed a near close distribution along Bc axis with Bc peaked at ~15 mT and a narrow spread between × 20 mT along Bb axis, indicating of presence of single-domain magnetite with weak magnetic interaction. High-resolution FORC diagrams display a clear central-ridge pattern, indicating presence of magnetite magnetofossils (Egli et al., 2010). In the magnetic extracted samples with high ARM values, detrital titanomagnetite and biogenic elongated prismatic shaped and

  18. Patagonian and Antarctic dust as recorded in the sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberzettl, Torsten; Stopp, Annemarie; Lisé-Pronovost, Agathe; Gebhardt, Catalina; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Kleinhanns, Ilka; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    Although an increasing number of terrestrial paleoclimatic records from southern South America has been published during the last decade, these archives mostly cover the Lateglacial and/or the Holocene. Only little is known about the Patagonian climate before the Last Glacial Maximum. Here, we present a continuous, high-resolution magnetic susceptibility record for the past 48 ka from the maar lake Laguna Potrok Aike (51°58' S, 70°23' W, southern Patagonia, Argentina). Magnetic susceptibility serves as an excellent parameter for the parallelization of sediment cores all over Laguna Potrok Aike including sediment cores taken within the ICDP (International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) project PASADO (Potrok Aike maar lake Sediment Archive Drilling prOject). Additionally, magnetic susceptibility is assumed to be a proxy for dust deposition in this lake. Distinct similarities were found between the independently dated magnetic susceptibility record from Laguna Potrok Aike and the non-sea-salt calcium (nss-Ca) flux from the EPICA Dome C ice core record (75°06'S, 123°24'E) the latter being a proxy for mineral dust deposition in Antarctica [1]. Comparison of the two records and variations in grain size of the Laguna Potrok Aike sediment records indicate a relatively high aeolian activity in southern South America during the glacial period. During the Holocene climatic conditions driving sediment deposition seem to have been more variable and less dominated by wind compared to glacial times. Although the source of the dust found in Antarctic ice cores often has been attributed to Patagonia [2], we present the first evidence for contemporaneity of aeolian deposition in both the target area (Antarctica) and the major source area (Patagonia). Considering the similarities of the two records, magnetic susceptibility might yield the potential for chronological information: transfer of the ice core age model to a lacustrine sediment record. This would be important

  19. Contrasting Holocene vs. Late Pleistocene dynamics of sediment deposition in Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, C.; Gebhardt, C.; Hahn, A.; Kliem, P.; Zolitschka, B.; Science Team

    2010-12-01

    In the maar lake Laguna Potrok Aike (52°S, 70°W; 116 m asl.; diameter: 3.5 km, water depth: 100 m) in southern Patagonia, Argentina, in total 510 m of lacustrine sediments were recovered in the framework of the ICDP project PASADO (Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project). Quadruplicate and triplicate cores down to a maximum depth of 101.5 m below lake floor were taken with a total core recovery of 94.4 % from two drillsites located 700 m apart in the central profundal plain of the lake. Seismic refraction data reveal a funnel-shaped structure originating from phreatomagmatic maar explosions embedded in the sandstone rocks of the surrounding Santa Cruz Formation. The funnel is filled by lacustrine sediments of up to 370 m in thickness with seismic velocities (sv) of 1500-2350 m s-1 which are underlain by a unit of probably volcanoclastic origin (sv >2400 m s-1). Seismic reflection data of the uppermost 100 m of the sediments reveal stratified lacustrine sediments and a rather dynamic development of the lake: on top of pelagic sediments, a desiccation horizon is found, with sand dunes in the eastern part of the lake basin. These are overlain by a series of paleo shorelines documenting the history of lake level rise in this early new lake. While this new lake formed in the central and eastern part of the maar depression, the western part was filled by stacked coarse-grained, delta-type sediments probably deriving from the only inlet that at present is sporadically active. After this early filling of the new lake, a stage of rapid lake level rise is observed in the seismic reflection data. Seismic findings are currently verified by the analyses of a 106.08 m long composite profile created by splicing of the three drilled cores of Site 2. According to a first age model, the sedimentary record from Laguna Potrok Aike reaches back to approx. 56,000 cal. BP and exhibits contrasting lithologies downcore especially in the Pleistocene part of the record

  20. Extreme events in the sedimentary record of maar Lake Pavin: Implications for natural hazards assessment in the French Massif Central

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassiot, Léo; Chapron, Emmanuel; Di Giovanni, Christian; Albéric, Patrick; Lajeunesse, Patrick; Lehours, Anne-Catherine; Meybeck, Michel

    2016-06-01

    A set of sedimentary cores, high resolution swath bathymetry and subbottom profiler data provides new insights on sedimentary processes in meromictic maar Lake Pavin, France. Three sedimentary environments (i.e., littoral, plateau and basin) have been identified in the lake from sediment composition using bulk organic geochemistry and the analysis of hydroacoustic images. Various forms of rapidly deposited layers (RDLs) have been identified and radiocarbon dated. An up to date stratigraphy of sedimentary events matching coeval RDLs across the lake is presented and illustrates a wide range of natural hazards linked to Lake Pavin during the last 2000 years. In AD 600, a sudden lake outburst triggered a slump deposit along with a 9 m lake-level drop that drove shifts in sedimentary organic matter composition. Outside the lake, outburst flood deposits have been described downstream and provide sedimentary evidence for this event. The lake-level drop also favored the generation of gravity reworking processes, as shown by (1) a regional earthquake-triggered large slope failure on the plateau connected to a mass-wasting deposit in the basin dated to AD 1300, and (2) a succession of turbidites in AD 1825 and AD 1860 contemporaneous to two historic earthquakes, suggesting that this lake is sensitive to earthquakes with a minimum epicentral intensity of V. Finally, past observations of lake water color changes in AD 1783 and AD 1936, similar to reports in other meromictic lakes, match iron-rich deposits identified in maar lake sediments and suggest that Lake Pavin could have undergone limnic eruptions.

  1. The Albano Maar Lake high resolution bathymetry and dissolved CO 2 budget (Colli Albani volcano, Italy): Constrains to hazard evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzidei, Marco; Carapezza, Maria Luisa; Esposito, Alessandra; Giordano, Guido; Lelli, Matteo; Tarchini, Luca

    2008-04-01

    The Albano Lake is the deepest volcanic lake in Italy (- 167 m) and fills the youngest maar of the quiescent Colli Albani volcano. The lake has undergone significant level changes and lahar generating overflows occurred about 5800 yrs B.P. and likely in 398 b.C., when Romans excavated a tunnel drain through the maar wall. Hazardous lake rollovers and CO 2 release are still possible because the Albano volcano shows active ground deformation, gas emission and periodic seismic swarms. On November 2005, the first high resolution bathymetric survey of the Albano Lake was performed. Here we present the results provided by a Digital Elevation Model and 2-D and 3-D images of the crater lake floor, which is made by coalescent and partly overlapping craters and wide flat surfaces separated by some evident scarps. Submerged shorelines are identified at depths between - 20 m and - 41 m and indicate the occurrence of significant lake level changes, likely between 7.1 and 4.1 ka. The current lake volume is ~ 447.5 × 10 6 m 3 and the total quantity of dissolved CO 2 is 6850 t estimated by chemical analyses of samples collected on May 2006. A decrease of nearly one order of magnitude of the CO 2 dissolved in the lake water below - 120 m, observed from December 1997 to May 2006 (from 4190 to 465 t respectively), has been attributed to lake water overturn. The observed oscillations of the dissolved CO 2 concentrations justify the efforts of monitoring the chemical and physical characteristics of the lake. At present the quantity of dissolved CO 2 is very far from saturation and Nyos-type events cannot presently occur.

  2. Reconstructing Late Holocene Climate Variability in North East China From Varved Maar Lake Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panizzo, V. N.; Mackay, A. W.; Rioual, P.; Chu, G.; Leng, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    Reconstructing climatic variability over the past c. 2 ka years is recognised as a key PAGES timeframe (focus 2). However few high-resolution records exist from the climate sensitive region of N) China which receives the majority of its precipitation from the east Asian summer monsoon (EASM). Interactions between the EASM and the global climate system have great resonance. Such examples include how the EASM responded to changes in climate over the documented e.g. "Medieval Warm Period" (c. AD 900 - 1300), "Little Ice Age" (c. AD 1350-1850) and recent warming. At present, literature remains contradictory to such environmental changes in NE China over this time-frame due to poor chronological control, low resolution of existing studies and even due to the inexact terminology of these climatic periods. Xiaolongwan Lake (XLW) is a small, closed, maar lake located in the Long Gang Volcanic Field, NE China (42°18'N; 126°19'E). It is at an elevation of 655 m a.s.l. with a maximum depth of 15 m. A varve chronology has been created for a 143 cm composite core (2 cores collected in 2006), and here we present diatoms and organic geochemistry (δ13C, TOC, C/N) evidence for environmental change over the past c. 2 ka years. Results show a gradual change in diatom species, moving from a composition where opportunistic species (e.g. Achnanthidium minutissimum) dominate (between c. 100 BC to 500 years AD) at the beginning of the record to one comprised of benthic/epiphytic species (e.g. Staurosira construens var venter, Punctastriata discoidea, Gomphonema parvulum). The introduction after c. 1850 years AD of the planktonic diatom species, Discotella woltereckii, not previously seen in the record, coincides with recent warming. This may be a response to changing limnological conditions, such as decreasing duration of lake ice-cover. Bulk organic δ13C results conducted on a short core collected from XLW in summer 2007, show that over the past c. 350 years there is a distinct

  3. 40Ar/39Ar laser probe evidence concerning the age and associated hazards of the Lake Nyos Maar, Cameroon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Lockwood, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The waters of Lake Nyos are impounded by a fragile natural dam composed of pyroclastic rocks ejected during the formation of the lake crater (maar). Lateral erosion of this dam has reduced its width from over 500 m to only 45 m. Published whole-rock K-Ar ages of about 100 ka on juvenile basalt from the dam suggests that erosion has been slow and that the dam poses no imminent threat. New apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages of 1.4 to 232 Ma on xenocrystic K-feldspar contained in the basalt show that the xenocrysts, whose source is the 528-Ma crystalline basement, are carriers of inherited radiogenic 40Ar and would cause the whole-rock K-Ar ages to be too old. The best estimate for the age of the maar is provided by a 14C age of 400 ?? 100 yr BP on charcoal from the base of the dam. This young age indicates that the dam is eroding at a relatively rapid rate; its failure, perhaps within a few decades, would result in a major flood and imperil thousands of people living downstream in Cameroon and eastern Nigeria. ?? 1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  4. Origin and transport of CH4 in two maar lakes fed by mantle-derived volatiles (Mt. Vulture volcano, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, Antonio; Cosenza, Paolo; Favara, Rocco; Foresta Martin, Luigi; Galli, Nunzio; Grassa, Fausto; Nuccio, Pasquale Mario; Paternoster, Michele; Riccobono, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    It has been assessed that lakes contribute 6 to 16% to global CH4 emission in atmosphere. Accumulation of CH4 in the water is strongly dependent on the input of gas and the dynamic of the lake's water. Lakes located on tectonically and volcanically active areas (e.g., Kivu, Nyos) generally contain relevant amount of mantle-derived volatiles. This generated an open debate on the origin of CO2 and CH4 in volcanic lakes because the complex bio-geological cycling of these two gases. This study is a part of larger investigation carried out on two maar lakes (LPM and LGM) formed about 140.000 years ago during the last eruption of Mt. Vulture (Italy). In spite of it generally is considered to be extinct, both lakes are characterized by an active inflow of mantle-derived fluids (Caracausi et al., 2013). Although the two lakes are only 150 m apart, their respective dynamics are different being LPM a meromictic lake, while LGM a monomictic one (Caracausi et al., 2013). The stagnant waters of LPM are enriched in CO2 and CH4 but the total gas pressure is below the hydrostatic pressure, so that the transfer of gas towards the surface doesn't occur via bubbles. Vertical profiles at LPM reveal a marked decrease of the dissolved CH4 content in the shallower layers due to aerated water. The amount of CH4 dissolved in LGM water column shows seasonal variations: in autumn it is comparable to that of LPM at the same depth; in winter CH4 is fully released into atmosphere through overturn of waters. C and H isotopes of CH4 clearly indicate in both lakes an active production both by acetoclastic methanogenesis and by CO2 reduction although with different proportions. Historical reports describe intense episodic releases of gases from both lakes occurred up to about 200 years ago. Caracausi et al. (2013) highlight that these events could be caused by a release of mantle-derived CO2 accumulated in the crust or directly linked to magma degassing. In the present study the knowledge gained

  5. A late quaternary record of eolian silt deposition in a maar lake, St. Michael Island, western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Ager, T.A.; Been, J.; Bradbury, J.P.; Dean, W.E.

    2003-01-01

    Recent stratigraphic studies in central Alaska have yielded the unexpected finding that there is little evidence for full-glacial (late Wisconsin) loess deposition. Because the loess record of western Alaska is poorly exposed and not well known, we analyzed a core from Zagoskin Lake, a maar lake on St. Michael Island, to determine if a full-glacial eolian record could be found in that region. Particle size and geochemical data indicate that the mineral fraction of the lake sediments is not derived from the local basalt and is probably eolian. Silt deposition took place from at least the latter part of the mid-Wisconsin interstadial period through the Holocene, based on radiocarbon dating. Based on the locations of likely loess sources, eolian silt in western Alaska was probably deflated by northeasterly winds from glaciofluvial sediments. If last-glacial winds that deposited loess were indeed from the northeast, this reconstruction is in conflict with a model-derived reconstruction of paleowinds in Alaska. Mass accumulation rates in Zagoskin Lake were higher during the Pleistocene than during the Holocene. In addition, more eolian sediment is recorded in the lake sediments than as loess on the adjacent landscape. The thinner loess record on land may be due to the sparse, herb tundra vegetation that dominated the landscape in full-glacial time. Herb tundra would have been an inefficient loess trap compared to forest or even shrub tundra due to its low roughness height. The lack of abundant, full-glacial, eolian silt deposition in the loess stratigraphic record of central Alaska may be due, therefore, to a mimimal ability of the landscape to trap loess, rather than a lack of available eolian sediment. ?? 2003 University of Washington. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rock magnetic studies on sediments from Erlongwan maar lake, Long Gang Volcanic Field, Jilin province, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Ute

    2007-01-01

    Detailed rock magnetic investigations were carried out on two 23-m-long sediment cores from Erlongwan maar lake, NE China. The completely laminated sediment sequence of the lake is interrupted by 410 graded layers with thicknesses between 0.1 and 150 cm. Magnetite of PSD-size was identified as the main magnetic carrier mineral by temperature-dependent measurements of the saturation magnetization and determination of hysteresis parameters. The minerogenic components in the laminated sediments and the graded layers are nearly identical, and their rock magnetic characteristics reflect the prevailing conditions, anoxic or oxic, during deposition. The most reliable criteria for estimating the availability of oxygen is whether an increase in minerogenic influx is linked to a shift in the magnetic grain size spectrum to coarser (oxic) or finer (anoxic) grains. Comparison of different rock magnetic parameters indicative for magnetic grain size and coercitivity revealed, that the S-ratio which is known to reflect the presence of high coercive minerals, is grain size indicative in sediments with a monomineralic magnetic composition.

  7. Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina: the first non-tropical environmental record in South America extending far beyond the Late-Glacial - a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolitschka, B.; Anselmetti, F.; Ariztegui, D.; Corbella, H.; Francus, P.; Gebhardt, C.; Lücke, A.; Ohlendorf, C.; Schäbitz, F.; Pasado Science Team

    2009-04-01

    Within the framework of the ICDP-funded "Potrok Aike maar lake sediment archive drilling project" (PASADO) an international team of scientists carried out interdisciplinary research at the unique mid-Pleistocene (770 ka) maar lake of Laguna Potrok Aike in southern Patagonia (Province of Santa Cruz, Argentina). This lake is very sensitive to variations in southern hemispheric wind and pressure systems and thus holds a unique and continuous lacustrine record of climatic and ecological variability of global significance. Moreover, Southern Patagonia with its many active volcanoes is an ideal location to better understand the regional history of volcanism. These are two challenging geo-scientific themes that need to be tackled, especially as both of them have an increasing socio-economic relevance. Three months of drilling activities that finished last November 2008 were carried out by DOSECC from the drilling platform R/V "Kerry Kelts". More than 500 m of lacustrine sediments were recovered. This sedimentary archive will provide (1) new insights into the processes of regional back arc volcanism within the Pali Aike Volcanic Field itself as well as the more distant explosive volcanism of the Andean mountain chains; and, (2) high-resolution (decadal) quantitative climate and environmental reconstructions supported by multiple dating and stratigraphic correlations. Marine - ice core - terrestrial linkages will be emphasized as well as the incorporation of results from global climate modelling simulations for the last ca. 100 ka. The two drilled sites in the central deep basin of Laguna Potrok Aike have been selected based on four seismic surveys carried out between 2003 and 2005. Sediments were recovered at both drilled sites down to a subbottom depth of slightly more than 100 m using the GLAD800 drill rig with the hydraulic piston corer tool (HPC) at water depths varying between 95 and 100 m. The total core recovery is 94%. On-site core logging with the multi sensor

  8. New palynology-based astronomical and revised 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Eocene maar lake of Messel (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Olaf K.; Wilde, Volker; Mertz, Dieter F.; Riegel, Walter

    2015-04-01

    The annually laminated oil shale from the Eocene maar lake at Messel (Federal State of Hessen, Germany) provides unique paleoenvironmental data for a time interval of ~640 ka during the Paleogene greenhouse phase. As a consequence of orbitally controlled changes in the vegetation in the vicinity of the lake, the lacustrine laminites can now be astronomically tuned. Dating is based on the short eccentricity amplitude modulations of the regional pollen rain and their correlation to the astronomical La2010a/La2010d solutions in combination with a revised 40Ar/39Ar age of a basalt fragment from a lapilli tuff section below the first lacustrine sediments. Depending on different newly suggested ages for the Fish Canyon sanidine used as monitor for neutron irradiation, the age for the eruption at Messel is between 48.27 ± 0.22 and 48.11 ± 0.22 Ma. This allows for the first time the exact correlation of a Paleogene lacustrine sequence to the marine record in Central Europe. The Messel oil shale becomes now slightly older than previously assumed and includes the Ypresian/Lutetian boundary that moves the base of the European Land Mammal Age Geiseltalian (MP 11) into the Lower Eocene. This opens a window for establishing an independent chronostratigraphic framework for Paleogene terrestrial records and their correlation to the marine realm. Furthermore, the study reveals that higher amounts of pollen from "wet" and thermophilous plants indicate less seasonal and more balanced precipitation and slightly higher temperatures during a well-expressed eccentricity minimum.

  9. PASADO - ICDP Deep Drilling at Laguna Potrok Aike (Argentina): A 50 ka Record of Increasing Environmental Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolitschka, Bernd; Anselmetti, Flavio; Ariztegui, Daniel; Francus, Pierre; Gebhardt, Catalina; Kliem, Annette Hahn Pierre; Lücke, Andreas; Ohlendorf, Christian; Schäbitz, Frank; Wastegard, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike, located in the South-Patagonian province of Santa Cruz (52°58'S, 70°23'W), was formed by a volcanic (maar) eruption in the late Quaternary Pali Aike Volcanic Field several hundred thousand years ago. This archive holds a unique record of paleoclimatic and paleoecological variability from a region sensitive to variations in southern hemispheric wind and pressure systems, which provide a significant cornerstone for the understanding of the entire global climate system. Moreover, Laguna Potrok Aike is close to many active volcanoes allowing a better understanding of the history of volcanism in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field as well as in the Andean mountain chain, the latter located in a distance of less than 150 km to the west. Finally, Patagonia is the source region of eolian dust blown from the South American continent into the South Atlantic and onto the Antarctic ice sheet. The currently ongoing global climate change, the thread of volcanic hazards as well as of regional dust storms are of increasing socio-economic relevance and thus challenging scientific themes that are tackled for southernmost South America with an interdisciplinary research approach in the framework of the ICDP-funded "Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project" (PASADO). Using the GLAD800 drilling platform seven holes were drilled in the southern spring of 2008. A total of 510 m of lacustrine sediments were recovered by an international scientific team from the central 100 m deep basin with an excellent core recovery rate of 94.4%. The reference profile with a composite depth of 106 m consists of undisturbed laminated and sand-layered lacustrine silts with an increasing number of coarse gravel layers, turbidites and homogenites with depth. Below 80 m composite depth two mass-movement deposits (10 m and 5 m in thickness) are recorded. These deposits show tilted and distorted layers as well as nodules of fine-grained sediments and randomly distributed gravel

  10. Maar Lake Sediments in the Mediterranean: High-Resolution Archives for Tephra Recording and Paleoenvironmental Reconstruction - a Case Study From Lago Grande di Monticchio (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negendank, J. F.; Wulf, S.; Brauer, A.; Mingram, J.

    2001-12-01

    Maar lake deposits with sedimentation rates of one or two order of magnitude higher than marine records are excellent archives for the preservation of annual laminations (varves) and thus make available information of the past with a high temporal resolution. In the Mediterranean, such archives are known from maar and crater lakes situated within Quaternary volcanic fields of the Italian Peninsula. Because of the vicinity to high-explosive volcanoes - most of them characterised by numerous tephra producing events during the Late Quaternary - sediments of these sites additionally provide considerable potential for tephrochronological and tephrostratigraphical studies. The maar lake Lago Grande di Monticchio (Mt. Vulture, Basilicata) has turned out to be one of the most suitable sites in Europe. On the one hand, intensive sedimentological, geochemical, palynological and palaeomagnetic studies on numerous laminated sediment cores spanning the last 101 kyr have demonstrated the great potential for palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. The results of these studies indicate a highly variable environment during the last glacial / interglacial cycle with numerous short and abrupt changes, that can be correlated to rapid climate changes recognized in ice-core and deep-sea records. For such comparisons independent chronologies are required. Regarding the sediment record of Lago Grande di Monticchio a varve-supported sedimentation rate chronology has been established based on the counting of annual laminations and interpolation of sedimentation rates for non-varved sections. This chronology has been confirmed by a high-resolution tephrochronology, numerous radiocarbon datings and three 40Ar/39Ar datings on prominent tephra layers. In addition to its value as a high-resolution palaeoclimatic archive, the Monticchio record has become a key position for inter-site correlation in the eastern Mediterranean. This is mainly due to the large number of intercalated tephra layers (n=344

  11. Diagenetic effects on magnetic minerals in a Holocene lacustrine sediment core from Huguangyan maar lake, southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xudong; Wang, Yong; Bian, Liu; Shen, Ji

    2016-06-01

    Post-depositional reductive diagenesis usually results in partial or entire cleansing of the pristine palaeomagnetic signal, therefore, its intensity is important to be assessed for sediments that are in the purpose of retrieving palaeomagnetic information. Grain size, rock magnetic and geochemical studies on the entire core, along with scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses for representative samples were carried out on a Holocene sediment core retrieved from the deep water part of Huguangyan maar lake (HGY), southeast China. The pristine magnetic mineral assemblage of the studied core is domianted by superparamagnetic (SP) and stable single domain (SSD) titanomagnetite, and high coercivity minerals are not detectable. Based on down-core variations of the average grain size (MZ), total organic carbon (TOC), detrital elements (Al, Ti, Fe and Mn), and the concentration and mineralogy of magnetic minerals, the studied core could be divided into three subsections. The uppermost subsection is the least affected by diagenesis, with detrital titanomagnetite as the dominant magnetic mineral. This is owing to low TOC contents, but high detrital input generated by weak Asian summer monsoon intensity during the late Holocene. The intermediate subsection shows down-core progressively enhanced dissolution of detrital titanomagnetite, and concomitant formation of authigenic pyrite and siderite, which indicates down-core progressively enhanced diagenesis generated by down-core progressive increasing TOC content, but decreasing detrital input as the result of down-core progressively strengthened Asian summer monsoon intensity. The pristine magnetic mineral assemblage has been profoundly modified in the lowermost subsection. At certain positions of the lowermost subsection, detrital titanomagnetite has been even completely dissolved via diagenesis, giving place to authigenic pyrite and siderite. High TOC content, but low detrital input

  12. Diagenetic effects on magnetic minerals in a Holocene lacustrine sediment core from Huguangyan maar lake, southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xudong; Wang, Yong; Bian, Liu; Shen, Ji

    2016-09-01

    Post-depositional reductive diagenesis usually results in partial or entire cleansing of the pristine palaeomagnetic signal, therefore, its intensity is important to be assessed for sediments that are in the purpose of retrieving palaeomagnetic information. Grain size, rock magnetic and geochemical studies on the entire core, along with scanning electron microscope observations and X-ray diffraction analyses for representative samples were carried out on a Holocene sediment core retrieved from the deep water part of Huguangyan maar lake (HGY), southeast China. The pristine magnetic mineral assemblage of the studied core is domianted by superparamagnetic (SP) and stable single domain titanomagnetite, and high coercivity minerals are not detectable. Based on down-core variations of the average grain size (MZ), total organic carbon (TOC), detrital elements (Al, Ti, Fe and Mn) and the concentration and mineralogy of magnetic minerals, the studied core could be divided into three subsections. The uppermost subsection is the least affected by diagenesis, with detrital titanomagnetite as the dominant magnetic mineral. This is owing to low TOC contents, but high detrital input generated by weak Asian summer monsoon intensity during the late Holocene. The intermediate subsection shows down-core progressively enhanced dissolution of detrital titanomagnetite, and concomitant formation of authigenic pyrite and siderite, which indicates down-core progressively enhanced diagenesis generated by down-core progressive increasing TOC content, but decreasing detrital input as the result of down-core progressively strengthened Asian summer monsoon intensity. The pristine magnetic mineral assemblage has been profoundly modified in the lowermost subsection. At certain positions of the lowermost subsection, detrital titanomagnetite has been even completely dissolved via diagenesis, giving place to authigenic pyrite and siderite. High TOC content, but low detrital input generated from

  13. Core scanning procedures and first characterisation of the 106 m long lacustrine sediment record of Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina (ICDP-project PASADO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, Christian; Enters, Dirk; Gebhardt, Catalina; Hahn, Annette; Kliem, Pierre; Zolitschka, Bernd; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    Drilling operations for the southernmost ICDP project dedicated to terrestrial paleoclimatic reconstruction, the "Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project" (PASADO), were completed in late November 2008. In the maar lake Laguna Potrok Aike (52°S, 70°W; 116 m asl.; diameter: 3.5 km, water depth: 100 m) in southern Patagonia, Argentina in total 510 m of lacustrine sediments have been recoverd using the GLAD800 platform equipped with a CS-1500 drill rig. Quadruplicate and triplicate cores down to a maximum depth of 101.5 m below lake floor have been taken using mainly the hydraulic piston coring tool. Total core recovery was 94,4 % from two drillsites located 700 m apart from each other in the central profundal plane of the lake. In 2009 all cores from Site 2 (southern basin plane) and most cores from Site 1 (central basin plane) were opened, described, documented by digital high resolution photography and scanned with different non-destructive techniques. A 106.08 m long composite profile was constructed for Site 2 based on visual core correlation and was then subsampled completely in consecutive 2 cm thick intervalls. Core scanning was performed in 5 mm steps for all parameters and involved the following techniques: 1) color scanning with a handheld X-rite spectrometer, 2) magnetic susceptibility scanning with a Bartington MS2F-sensor, 3) XRF scanning and X-radiography with an ITRAX core scanner (COX analytical systems) and 4) p-wave velocity/transmission seismograms and gamma ray absorption with a modified Geotek MSCL tool. According to the preliminary age model, the sedimentary record from Laguna Potrok Aike reaches back to OIS 3 and exhibits contrasting lithologies downcore especially in the Pleistocene part of the record. Moreover, first estimates indicate that up to 50% of the record consist of redeposited sediments. To account for these pronounced downcore lithological changes it was necessary to adjust the XRF-scanning parameters (i.e. X

  14. Geochemical insight into differences in the physical structures and dynamics of two adjacent maar lakes at Mt. Vulture volcano (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, A.; Nicolosi, M.; Nuccio, P. M.; Favara, R.; Paternoster, M.; Rosciglione, A.

    2013-05-01

    report on the first geochemical investigation of the Monticchio maar lakes (Mt. Vulture volcano, southern Italy) covering an annual cycle that aimed at understanding the characteristic features of the physical structures and dynamics of the two lakes. We provide the first detailed description of the lakes based on high-resolution conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiles, chemical and isotopic (H and O) compositions of the water, and the amounts of dissolved gases (e.g., He, Ar, CH4, and CO2). The combined data set reveals that the two lakes, which are separated by less than 200 m, exhibit different dynamics: one is a meromictic lake, where the waters are rich in biogenic and mantle-derived gases, while the other is a monomictic lake, which exhibits complete turnover of the water in winter and the release of dissolved gases. Our data strongly suggest that the differences in the dynamics of the two lakes are due to different density profiles affected by dissolved solutes, mainly Fe, which is strongly enriched in the deep water of the meromictic lake. A conceptual model of water balance was constructed based on the correlation between the chemical composition of the water and the hydrogen isotopic signature. Gas-rich groundwaters that feed both of the lakes and evaporation processes subsequently modify the water chemistry of the lakes. Our data highlight that no further potential hazardous accumulation of lethal gases is expected at the Monticchio lakes. Nevertheless, geochemical monitoring is needed to prevent the possibility of vigorous gas releases that have previously occurred in historical time.

  15. Changements climatiques et variations du champ magnetique terrestre dans le sud de la Patagonie (Argentine) depuis 51 200 ans reconstitues a partir des proprietes magnetiques des sediments du lac Laguna Potrok Aike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lise-Pronovost, Agathe

    Rock magnetism is influenced by climate and by the Earth's magnetic field. The goal of this thesis is to use the rock magnetic properties of the long sedimentary sequence from the lake Laguna Potrok Aike (106 m, 51200 cal BP) to derive paleomagnetic and paleoclimatic records in a key area of the Southern Hemisphere that is poorly documented. Laguna Potrok Aike (52°S, 70°W) is located in southeastern Patagonia (Argentina) in the path of the strong Southern Hemisphere westerly winds and in the source area of the dust deposited in Antarctica during Glacial periods. The lake geographical location is therefore ideal to reconstruct past changes in aeolian activity and climate changes in Patagonia. It is also a key location to reconstruct past changes of the geomagnetic field because the Southern Hemisphere is significantly under-documented relative to the Northern Hemisphere. In addition, the proximity of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) as well as the Southern Hemisphere high flux lobes could allow identifying differences in the paleomagnetic field evolution in southern South America relative to the much more documented Northern Hemisphere. For his strong potential to provide high-resolution climatic, aeolian and paleomagnetic records beyond the last climatic transition, the maar lake Laguna Potrok Aike was drilled in the framework of the International scientific Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) for the Potrok Aike maar lake Sediment Archive Drilling prOject (PASADO). In this thesis, high-resolution rock-magnetic and physical properties are used in order to reconstruct paleoclimate and paleomagnetic records from the southernmost part of South America. In the first chapter, the full-vector paleomagnetic record (inclination, declination and relative paleointensity) derived from the sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike. A grain size influence on the relative paleointensity record (NRM/ARM) was corrected using the median destructive field of the natural remanent

  16. Vesicle texture analysis of juvenile pyroclasts from the Pleistocene Lake Purrumbete Maar, Newer Volcanics Province, southern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, S. C.; Cas, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The record of the 50-60 ka Lake Purrumbete maar deposits shows several changes in the eruption style. The facies range from thin dry magmatic scoria layers, to scoriaceous lapilli layers to dry phreatomagmatic lapilli ash and wet phreatomagmatic ash layers. Furthermore abundant basaltic bombs occur within the sequence. This study aims to investigate the role of volatiles and vesicularity of the magma in the phreatomagmatic eruption style, therefore we evaluate the vesicularity, Bubble Number densities (BND) and shape parameter for the different facies and try to understand through comparison with each other the role of vesiculation in phreatomagmatic eruptions. Phreatomagmatic deposits are generally characterised by fine ash fragments (< 65μm), therefore we concentrate on particles smaller then 65μm. Juvenile clasts in BSE images of polished thin sections of fine ash were analysed in terms of vesicularity, and bubble structures. The problem that occurred is that the bubbles were often larger then the preserved juvenile fragments, as a result only parts of the former bubbles are preserved in the cuspate outline of the fragments. To evaluate if the analysis of these bubble fragments reflect the correct shape parameters, vesicularities and BND values, these parameters were calculated for the fine ash particles and compared to the values of larger clasts within the fine ash samples. Furthermore the shape and size of the bubbles were compared as well, to be certain that the bubbles in all clast sizes within one sample were generated prior to fragmentation. BND values, vesicularity and shape parameters were calculated after the method of Shea at al 2011, using the program FOAMS. These parameters were also calculated for juvenile clasts of the more magmatic deposits. The preliminary results show, that the clast vesicularity of the phreatomagmatic samples vary in a wide range from 4 to 60% in the same sample, whereas the vesicularity of the scoriaceous clasts is in a

  17. Deep Drilling at Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina: Recovery of a Paleoclimate Record for the Last Glacial from the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolitschka, B.; Anselmetti, F.; Ariztegui, D.; Corbella, H.; Francus, P.; Gebhardt, C.; Hahn, A.; Kliem, P.; Lücke, A.; Ohlendorf, C.; Schäbitz, F.

    2009-12-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike, located in the South-Patagonian province of Santa Cruz (52°58’S, 70°23’W), was formed 770 ka ago by a volcanic (maar) eruption. Within the framework of the ICDP-funded project PASADO two sites were drilled from September to November 2008 using the GLAD800 drilling platform. A total of 513 m of lacustrine sediments were recovered from the central deep basin by an international team. The sediments hold a unique record of paleoclimatic and paleoecological variability from a region sensitive to variations in southern hemispheric wind and pressure systems and thus significant for the understanding of the global climate system. Moreover, Laguna Potrok Aike is close to many active volcanoes allowing a better understanding of the history of volcanism in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field and in the nearby Andean mountain chain. These challenging scientific themes need to be tackled in a global context as both are of increasing socio-economic relevance. On-site core logging based on magnetic susceptibility data documents an excellent correlation between the quadruplicate holes drilled at Site 1 and between the triplicate holes recovered from Site 2. Also, correlation between both sites located 700 m apart from each other is feasible. After splitting the cores in the lab, a reference profile was established down to a composite depth of 107 m for the replicate cores from Site 2. Sediments consist of laminated and sand-layered lacustrine silts with an increasing number of turbidites and homogenites with depth. Below 80 m composite depth two mass movement deposits (10 m and 5 m in thickness) are recorded. These deposits show tilted and distorted layers as well as nodules of fine grained sediments and randomly distributed gravel. Such features indicate an increased slump activity probably related to lake level fluctuations or seismicity. Also with depth coarse gravel layers are present and point to changes in hydrological conditions in the catchment area

  18. Carbon sources and biogeochemical processes in Monticchio maar lakes, Mt Vulture volcano (southern Italy): New geochemical constrains of active degassing of mantle derived fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracausi, A.; Nuccio, P. M.; Favara, R.; Grassa, F.

    2012-04-01

    Since the catastrophic releases of carbon dioxide from the African volcanic lakes Nyos and Monoun in the 1980s, the scientific community draw attention towards all those crater lakes able to accumulate massive amount of CO2, which could be catastrophically released following overturn of their deep waters. This implies a quantification of the gas accumulation rate into the lakes and the knowledge of recharge processes and their evolution in time. In fact the gaseous recharge in a lake occurs at alarming rates, when an active degassing of hazardous nature volatiles occurs into the lakes and the structure and dynamic of the lake permit the accumulation of gases into the water. The Monticchio lakes, LPM and LGM, occupies two maar craters formed during the last volcanic activity of Mt. Vulture occurred ˜ 140 000 years ago. LPM is a permanently stratified lake, with a thick deep volume of stagnant water and a shallower layer affected by seasonal overturn. On the contrary LGM is a monomittic lake with a complete overturn of the water during winter time. The major dissolved volatiles are methane and CO2. Dissolved helium is in trace amounts and its isotopic signature ranges between 6.1 and 5.3 Ra (Ra is the atmospheric 3He/4He isotopic ratio). These values are within the range of those measured in the olivine fluid inclusions (both of mantle xenoliths and dispersed in the pyroclastics) of LPM maar ejecta. During three years of investigations we observed that dissolved methane in the deep waters of LGM drastically decreases in wintertime as consequence of the complete overturn of the water. The isotopic signature of methane in the deepest portions of LGM (both sediment and water) is quite stable with time and highlights a biogenic origin, being produced both by acetate fermentation and by CO2-reduction in variable proportions. In contrast, a higher contribution of methane produced via CO2 reduction characterizes sediments at shallower depths. At LPM, there is a great

  19. A multi-proxy intercomparison of environmental change in two maar lake records from central Turkey during the last 14 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, C. Neil; Allcock, Samantha L.; Arnaud, Fabien; Dean, Jonathan R.; Eastwood, Warren J.; Jones, Matthew D.; Leng, Melanie J.; Metcalfe, Sarah E.; Malet, Emmanuel; Woodbridge, Jessie; Yiǧitbaşıoǧlu, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    Individual palaeoenvironmental records are a combination of regional-scale (e.g. climatic) and local factors. In order to separate these signals, we compare multiple proxies from two nearby maar lake records, on the assumption that common signals are due to regional-scale forcing. On the other side, we infer that residual signals are likely to be local and site-specific, rather than reflecting regional climate changes. A new core sequence from Nar lake has been dated by varve counting and U-Th as covering the last 13,800 years (Dean et al., 2015; Roberts et al., 2016). Periods of marked dryness are associated with peaks in Mg/dolomite, elevated Diatom-Inferred Electrical Conductivity, an absence of laminated sediments, and low Quercus/chenopod ratios. These conditions occurred during the Late-Glacial stadial, at 4.3-3.7 and 3.2-2.6 ka BP. Wet phases occurred during the early Holocene and again 1.5-0.6 ka, characterised by negative δ18O values, calcite precipitation, high Ca/Sr ratios, a high % of planktonic diatoms, laminated sediments, and high Quercus/chenopod ratios. Comparison with the independently dated record from Eski Acıgöl (Roberts et al., 2001) shows good correspondence for many proxies, especially for δ18O. A ranking of multiple proxies shows the worst correspondence is for clastic lithogenic elements (e.g. Ti flux). Differences between the two lake records are caused by basin infilling at Eski Acıgöl, which fails to register climatic changes during the last 2 ka, and to catchment erosion and increased flux of lithogenic elements into Nar lake; this is catchment-specific and primarily anthropogenic rather than climatic in origin. In separating a regional signal from site-specific "noise", two lakes may therefore be better than one. Dean, J.R. et al. 2015 Eastern Mediterranean hydroclimate over the late glacial and Holocene, reconstructed from the sediments of Nar lake, central Turkey, using stable isotopes and carbonate mineralogy. Quaternary

  20. Atmospheric production signal in 10Be from varved sediments of Lake Meerfelder Maar during the late glacial-early Holocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czymzik, Markus; Adolphi, Florian; Muscheler, Raimund; Brauer, Achim; Mekhaldi, Florian; Martin-Puertas, Celia; Tjallingii, Rik; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2016-04-01

    Beryllium 10 concentrations (10Becon) were measured at 20-year resolution in annually laminated (varved) sediments of Lake Meerfelder Maar (western Germany) covering the late glacial-early Holocene transition 11310-13130 varve years before present. Comparing the 10Becon record to environmental proxy records from the same archive indicates that varying sediment accumulation and composition only slightly modify trends, but do not substantially influence multi-decadal to centennial 10Becon excursions. Corrected for potential environmental biases using multiple-regression analysis, the resulting 10Beatmosphere time-series likely represents an alternative mid-latitude 10Be production record, exhibiting broad similarities but also some differences to radionuclide records as 14C in tree rings and 10Be in polar ice cores. The preservation of the globally common atmospheric production signal in 10Be from varved lake sediments indicates the, to date, largely unexplored potential of these archives for the synchronization to other radionuclide records around the globe, complementing existing solar activity reconstructions and Sun-climate studies.

  1. Environmental magnetic records of core sediments for the past 100 ka from Erhai Lake in China and Sogwipo Maar in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, M.; Hayashida, A.; Yasuda, Y.

    2003-12-01

    In order to detect high-resolution records of environmental changes in East Asia, we made environmental magnetic study of core sediments from Sogwipo Maar in Cheju Island, Korea (9.4 m long), and Erhai Lake in Yunnan Province, China (10.0 m and 42.6 m). Measurements of initial susceptibility (k), natural remanent magnetization (NRM), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) were made by pass-through method using u-channel samples from both cores. Results of AMS radiocarbon dating suggest that the Sogwipo core is dated from 5 ka to 30 ka, and that the upper 16 m of the Erhai core is dated from 2 ka to 30 ka. Variation of NRM intensity of both cores, when normalized by ARM and IRM, showed similarity with paleointensity stack Sint-800 between 15 ka and 100 ka. Variation of magnetic concentration parameters of the Sogwipo core was consistent with lithological changes. In particular, magnetic minerals in the upper part seem to be diluted by increased biogenic productivity after 15 ka. The topmost part of the Erhai core showed rapid downcore decrease of magnetic concentration associated with increase of magnetic grain size, suggesting reductive environment before 3 ka. Negative correlation between magnetic concentration and magnetic grain size may indicate a gradual change in degree of the reductive diagenesis. In both cores, significant increases of ARM susceptibility were observed at several horizons, which can be correlated to interstadial periods of the Dansgarrd-Oeschger cycles. The increase of ARM susceptibility suggests that input of fine magnetic minerals were enhanced under increased precipitation due to activity of the Monsoon activity during the warm periods.

  2. Corrigendum to "Holocene vegetation and climate dynamics of NE China based on the pollen record from Sihailongwan Maar Lake" [Quat. Sci. Rev. 124 (2015) 275-289

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebich, Martina; Rehfeld, Kira; Schlütz, Frank; Tarasov, Pavel E.; Liu, Jiaqi; Mingram, Jens

    2015-10-01

    The authors regret that in the originally published paper, Fig. 5 incorrectly shows the simulated rainfall data in the Xingyun lake area instead of the reconstructed annual rainfall from the pollen data. The correct artwork is provided below.

  3. The Late Quaternary tephrostratigraphy of annually laminated sediments from Meerfelder Maar, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Christine S.; Brauer, Achim; Martín-Puertas, Celia; Blockley, Simon P. E.; Smith, Victoria C.; Tomlinson, Emma L.

    2015-08-01

    The record of Late Quaternary environmental change within the sediments of Meerfelder Maar in the Eifel region of Germany is renowned for its high precision chronology, which is annually laminated throughout the Last Glacial to Interglacial transition (LGIT) and most of the Holocene. Two visible tephra layers are prominent within the floating varve chronology of Meerfelder Maar. An Early Holocene tephra layer, the Ulmener Maar Tephra (∼11,000 varve years BP), provides a tie-line of the Meerfelder Maar record to the varved Holocene record of nearby Lake Holzmaar. The Laacher See Tephra provides another prominent time marker for the late Allerød, ∼200 varve years before the transition into the Younger Dryas at 12,680 varve years BP. Further investigation has now shown that there are also 15 cryptotephra layers within the Meerfelder Maar LGIT-Holocene stratigraphy and these layers hold the potential to make direct comparisons between the Meerfelder Maar record and other palaeoenvironmental archives from across Europe and the North Atlantic. Most notable is the presence of the Vedde Ash, the most widespread Icelandic eruption known from the Late Quaternary, which occurred midway through the Younger Dryas. The Vedde Ash has also been found in the Greenland ice cores and can be used as an isochron around which the GICC05 and Meerfelder Maar annual chronologies can be compared. Near the base of the annual laminations in Meerfelder Maar a cryptotephra is found that correlates to the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff, erupted from Campi Flegrei in southern Italy, 1200 km away. This is the furthest north that the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff has been found, highlighting its importance in the construction of a European-wide tephrostratigraphic framework. The co-location of cryptotephra layers from Italian, Icelandic and Eifel volcanic sources, within such a precise chronological record, makes Meerfelder Maar one of the most important tephrostratotype records for continental Europe

  4. The Late Quaternary tephrostratigraphy of annually laminated sediments from Meerfelder Maar, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Christine S.; Brauer, Achim; Martín-Puertas, Celia; Blockley, Simon P. E.; Smith, Victoria C.; Tomlinson, Emma L.

    2015-08-01

    The record of Late Quaternary environmental change within the sediments of Meerfelder Maar in the Eifel region of Germany is renowned for its high precision chronology, which is annually laminated throughout the Last Glacial to Interglacial transition (LGIT) and most of the Holocene. Two visible tephra layers are prominent within the floating varve chronology of Meerfelder Maar. An Early Holocene tephra layer, the Ulmener Maar Tephra (˜11,000 varve years BP), provides a tie-line of the Meerfelder Maar record to the varved Holocene record of nearby Lake Holzmaar. The Laacher See Tephra provides another prominent time marker for the late Allerød, ˜200 varve years before the transition into the Younger Dryas at 12,680 varve years BP. Further investigation has now shown that there are also 15 cryptotephra layers within the Meerfelder Maar LGIT-Holocene stratigraphy and these layers hold the potential to make direct comparisons between the Meerfelder Maar record and other palaeoenvironmental archives from across Europe and the North Atlantic. Most notable is the presence of the Vedde Ash, the most widespread Icelandic eruption known from the Late Quaternary, which occurred midway through the Younger Dryas. The Vedde Ash has also been found in the Greenland ice cores and can be used as an isochron around which the GICC05 and Meerfelder Maar annual chronologies can be compared. Near the base of the annual laminations in Meerfelder Maar a cryptotephra is found that correlates to the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff, erupted from Campi Flegrei in southern Italy, 1200 km away. This is the furthest north that the Neapolitan Yellow Tuff has been found, highlighting its importance in the construction of a European-wide tephrostratigraphic framework. The co-location of cryptotephra layers from Italian, Icelandic and Eifel volcanic sources, within such a precise chronological record, makes Meerfelder Maar one of the most important tephrostratotype records for continental Europe during

  5. Reconstructing paleoenvironment, eruption mechanism and paleomorphology of the Pliocene Pula maar, (Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, K.; Goth, K.; Martin, U.; Csillag, G.; Suhr, P.

    2008-10-01

    of a combination of syn-eruptive subsidence due to mass deficit in the rigid Triassic dolomite basement caused by the phreatomagmatic explosions as well as post-eruptive subsidence of the crater- and diatreme-filling successions due to diagenetic compaction. The facies in the centre of the maar lake is a soft laminated "alginite" (mainly Botryococcus colonies, diatom frustles, calcium carbonate crystals, clay minerals). In the section exposed in the Pula open cast mine, a single turbiditic layer is present. This layer originated in a landslide, which possibly could have been caused by either syn-eruptive earthquake and/or a sudden post-eruptive subsidence event of the diatreme fill.

  6. Hunting remnants of maar-diatreme-volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroner, Corinna; Kämpf, Horst; Matthes, Heidrun; Jahr, Thomas; Markwart, David; Hermann, Tobias; Mrlina, Jan

    2010-05-01

    In the area of the Rostock-Leipzig-Regensburg fault zone (Germany) several centres of seismic activity are found with seismicity manifesting itself in swarm earthquakes. The occurrence of these earthquakes is globally linked to ascending magma and magmatic fluids. Information is scarce regarding the depth and geometry of the magmatic source, dynamics in the sub-Moho/lower crust region and fluid-tectonic processes in the upper crust in this area. From studies of maar structures located in the seismic active section of the fault zone magma-tectonic phenomena can be reconstructed. For this purpose two relicts of maar volcanoes of different age within a distance of 60 km are investigated by geophysical surveys. Both structures are located in a distance of a few 10 km from recent swarm earthquake centres. The diatreme structure near Ebersbrunn/W-Saxony which is probably of tertiary age is known for several years, the late Quaternary, volcanic palaeo-lake near Mýtina close to the Czech-German border was only recently discovered. Both structures are characterized by distinct gravimetric and magnetic anomalies of about -2 mGal and several 100 nT resp. indicating steeply dipping structures as well as electrical conductivity anomalies. The magnetic total field anomaly of the Ebersbrunn structure has an uncommon rugged appearance. The hypothesis of an origin related to a redistribution of material with high magnetic susceptibility values and saponification of magnetic minerals due to melt water run-off after the last glacial period could not be confirmed. Thus the heterogeneous anomaly character appears to be mainly associated with the degree of weathering of the volcanic material within the diatreme with depth. From 3D gravimetric and magnetic modelling information is gained on geometry and structural composition. Drilling results were used as additional boundary conditions. In both cases modelling reveals an inner zone of significantly reduced density and increased

  7. Structure of the Pliocene Camp dels Ninots maar-diatreme (Catalan Volcanic Zone, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oms, O.; Bolós, X.; Barde-Cabusson, S.; Martí, J.; Casas, A.; Lovera, R.; Himi, M.; Gómez de Soler, B.; Campeny Vall-Llosera, G.; Pedrazzi, D.; Agustí, J.

    2015-11-01

    Maar volcanoes expose shallower or deeper levels of their internal structure as a function of the degree of erosion. In El Camp dels Ninots maar-diatreme (Catalan Volcanic Zone, Spain), the tephra ring has been largely eroded, and the remaining volcanic deposits infilling the diatreme are hidden under a lacustrine sedimentary infill of the crater. The volcano shows hardly any exposure, so its study needs the application of direct (e.g., boreholes) and indirect (shallow geophysics) subsurface exploration techniques. Additionally, this maar-diatreme was built astride two different substrates (i.e., mixed setting) as a result of its location in a normal fault separating Neogene sediments from Paleozoic granites. In order to characterize the internal structure and post-eruption stratigraphy of the maar-diatreme, we did geological studies (mapping, continuous core logging, and description of the tephra ring outcrops) and near-surface geophysics, including nine transects of electric resistivity tomography and a gravity survey. Results show that the deeper part of the diatreme is excavated into granites and is relatively steep and symmetrical. The uppermost diatreme is asymmetrical because of mechanical contrast between granites and Pliocene sands. The maar crater contained a lake permanently isolated from the surrounding relief and was deep enough to host anoxic bottom waters while its margins had shallower waters. These lake conditions preserved the remarkable Pliocene fossil record found in the lacustrine sediments.

  8. Carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of core catcher samples from the ICDP deep drilling at Laguna Potrok Aike (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecke, Andreas; Wissel, Holger; Mayr*, Christoph; Oehlerich, Markus; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    The ICDP project PASADO aims to develop a detailed paleoclimatic record for the southern part of the South American continent from sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike (51°58'S, 70°23'W), situated in the Patagonian steppe east of the Andean cordillera and north of the Street of Magellan. The precursor project SALSA recovered the Holocene and Late Glacial sediment infill of Laguna Potrok Aike and developed the environmental history of the semi-arid Patagonian steppe by a consequent interdisciplinary multi-proxy approach (e.g. Haberzettl et al., 2007). From September to November 2008 the ICDP deep drilling took place and successfully recovered in total 510 m of sediments from two sites resulting in a composite depth of 106 m for the selected main study Site 2. A preliminary age model places the record within the last 50.000 years. During the drilling campaign, the core catcher content of each drilled core run (3 m) was taken as separate sample to be shared and distributed between involved laboratories long before the main sampling party. A total of 70 core catcher samples describe the sediments of Site 2 and will form the base for more detailed investigations on the palaeoclimatic history of Patagonia. We here report on the organic carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of bulk sediment and plant debris of the core catcher samples. Similar investigations were performed for Holocene and Late Glacial sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike revealing insights into the organic matter dynamics of the lake and its catchment as well as into climatically induced hydrological variations with related lake level fluctuations (Mayr et al., 2009). The carbon and nitrogen content of the core catcher fine sediment fraction (<200 µm) is low to very low (around 1 % and 0.1 %, respectively) and requires particular attention in isotope analysis. The carbon isotope composition shows comparably little variation around a value of -26.0 per mil. The positive values of the Holocene and the Late

  9. Paleosecular variation and paleointensity records for the last millennium from southern South America (Laguna Potrok Aike, Santa Cruz, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogorza, C. S. G.; Sinito, A. M.; Ohlendorf, C.; Kastner, S.; Zolitschka, B.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution paleo- and rock magnetic studies were performed on a group of four sediment cores from Laguna Potrok Aike (Santa Cruz, Argentina) representing the time period AD 1300-2000. The rock magnetic analyses show that the main magnetic mineral is (titano)magnetite with a concentration between 0.01 and 0.08%, and a grain size of 4-15 μm. This study is helpful in order to complete the paleosecular variation (PSV) and paleointensity type curves for South America which do not have a detailed record for the last millennium. The comparison with the study carried out for Lake El Trébol shows a very good agreement, supporting that PSV records of south-western Argentina can be developed into a stratigraphic correlation tool on a regional scale.

  10. The formation and evolution of Hule and Río Cuarto maars, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Soto, Gerardo J.; Salani, Flavia M.; Ruiz, Pablo; de Mendoza, Luis Hurtado

    2011-04-01

    to be 4.4 × 10 7 m 3, of which 0.008 m 3 correspond to DRE magma. The Hule and Río Cuarto maars are occupied by lakes and, in the last decades, several lake-overturn events have taken place, with a repeat cycle of six to seven years. The main outcome of these events has been the mass death of fish accompanied by changes in the lake color. In these systems, the hazard related to the possible occurrence of Nyos-type gas eruptions can be considered negligible or very local, but significant for tourists who camp by the lakes.

  11. The Randeck Maar: Facies development and habitat differentiation of a Miocene lacustrine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasser, Michael W.; Kern, Andrea K.

    2015-04-01

    The Randeck Maar in S Germany is a well-known fossil lagerstätte (Early/Middle Miocene, MN5) with exceptionally preserved fossils. Although it is a locally restricted succession of lake sediments with a diameter of only 1200 m and less than 60 m of preserved sediments, it appears to comprise a complex structure with a high scientific potential on a global scale, because the lake sediments and their fossils can provide evidence for the impact of the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO) on the environment and its organisms as well as the ecological interactions between animals and/or plants during that interval. No other European locality provides such a rich insight into an ecosystem that existed during the MMCO. Excavations of Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart provided new insights into the facies types of this maar lake. They showed that a high variety of facies types existed beside the traditional separation into a basal tuffitic development, followed by calcareous and bituminous ('dysodil') laminates, and terminal massive freshwater limestones. Palaeoenvironmental reconstructions are based on the mentioned excavations and re-evaluations of collection material. They show that the Randeck Maar was a typical maar lake with a rich flora and fauna. Based on all plant remains, the IPR vegetational analysis points towards subhumid sclerophyllous forests, suggesting seasonal drought. 380 taxa in all are known thus far, which are dominated by plants (168) and insects (79). The taxonomic re-evaluation combined with palaeoecological considerations allows for the reconstruction of a palaeoenvironmental model. In brief, three main sections can be differentiated for the habitats of the Randeck Maar lake system: (1) Deep- and open-water lake habitats with local and short-termed mass occurrences of insect larvae, amphibians, and/or gastropods, while fish are particularly scarce. The interpretation of the water chemistry is problematic because palaeoenvironmental

  12. [Expression, purification of recombinant cationic peptide AIK in Escherichia coli and its antitumor activity].

    PubMed

    Fan, Fangfang; Sun, Huiying; Xu, Hui; Liu, Jiawei; Zhang, Haiyuan; Li, Yilan; Ning, Xuelian; Sun, Yue; Bai, Jing; Fu, Songbin; Zhou, Chunshui

    2015-12-01

    AIK is a novel cationic peptide with potential antitumor activity. In order to construct the AIK expression vector by Gateway technology, and establish an optimal expression and purification method for recombinant AIK, a set of primers containing AttB sites were designed and used to create the AttB-TEV-FLAG-AIR fusion gene by overlapping PCR. The resulting fusion gene was cloned into the donor vector pDONR223 by attB and attP mediated recombination (BP reaction), then, transferred into the destination vector pDESTl 5 by attL and attR mediated recombination (LR reaction). All the cloning was verified by both colony PCR and DNA sequencing. The BL21 F. coli transformed by the GST-AIR expression plasmid was used to express the GST-AIK fusion protein with IPTG induction and the induction conditions were optimized. GST-AIR fusion protein was purified by glutathione magnetic beads, followed by rTEV cleavage to remove GST tag and MTS assay to test the growth inhibition activity of the recombinant AIR on human leukemia HL-60 cells. We found that a high level of soluble expression of GST-AIK protein (more than 30% out of the total bacterial proteins) was achieved upon 0.1 mmol/L ITPG induction for 4 h at 37 °C in the transformed BL21 F. coli with starting OD₆₀₀ at 1.0. Through GST affinity purification and rTEV cleavage, the purity of the resulting recombinant AIK was greater than 95%. And the MTS assays on HL-60 cells confirmed that the recombinant AIK retains an antitumor activity at a level similar to the chemically synthesized AIK. Taken together, we have established a method for expression and purification of recombinant AIK with a potent activity against tumor cells, which will be beneficial for the large-scale production and application of recombinant AIK in the future. PMID:27093838

  13. OSL dating of a Pleistocene maar: Birket Ram, the Golan heights

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaanan, U.; Porat, N.; Navon, O.; Weinberger, R.; Calvert, A.; Weinstein, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Direct dating of maars and their phreatomagmatic deposits is difficult due to the dominance of lithic (host rock) fragments and glassy particles of the juvenile magma. In this paper we demonstrate that optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating can be successfully used for age determination of phreatomagmatic deposits. We studied the tuff deposit of Birket Ram, a basanitic maar located at the northern edge of the Golan heights on the western Arabian plate. The maar is underlain by a thick section of Pleistocene basalts, and currently hosts a small lake. It is filled by approximately 90m of lacustrine sediments with radiocarbon ages extrapolated to 108ka at the base. OSL was applied to quartz grains extracted from tuffs and paleosols in order to set the time frame of the phreatomagmatism at the site. A maximum age constraint of 179??13ka was determined for a paleosol that underlies the maar ejecta. Quartz grains from two layers in the tuff section yielded a direct age of 129??6ka for the phreatomagmatic eruption. A younger age of 104??7ka, which was determined for a tuff layer underlying a basaltic flow, was attributed to thermal resetting during the lava emplacement. This was confirmed by an 40Ar/39Ar age of 101??3ka determined on the overlying basalt. The internal consistency of the OSL ages and the agreement with the 40Ar/39Ar age determination as well as with previous estimates demonstrates the potential of OSL for maar dating. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Reconstructing paleoenvironmental conditions during the past 50 ka from the biogeochemical record of Laguna Potrok Aike, southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, A.; Rosén, P.; Kliem, P.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2011-12-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC), total inorganic carbon (TIC) and biogenic silica (BSi) assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) are used to reconstruct the environmental history during the past 50kyrs in high resolution from Laguna Potrok Aike. During the Holocene warmer conditions lead to an increased productivity reflected in higher TOC and BSi contents. Calcite precipitation initiated around 9 ka cal. BP probably due to supersaturation induced by lake level lowering. It is assumed that prior to this time period sediments are carbonate-free because high lake-level conditions prevailed. During the Glacial, increased runoff linked to permafrost, precipitation related to stronger cyclonic activity and reduced evaporation have caused higher lake levels. Moreover, during cold glacial conditions lake productivity was low and organic matter mainly of algal or cyanobacterial origin as indicated by generally low TOC and C/N values. During interstadials, such as the Antarctic A-events and the Younger Dryas, TOC contents appear to rise. The glacial C/N ratios and their correlation with TOC concentrations indicate that aquatic moss blooms probably induce these increases in TOC. Aquatic mosses grow if surface water temperatures rise due to warmer climatic conditions and/or development of a lake water stratification. The latter may occur if wind speeds are low and melt water inflow caused higher density gradients. Prevailing permafrost thawing during warmer periods could lead to considerable rises of lake levels, which would contribute to the preservation of organic material. This may explain why higher C/N and TOC values occur at the end of Antarctic A-events. For the uppermost 25 m, the BSi profile shows a high correlation with the TOC profile. In deeper horizons, however, there are indications that the BSi/TOC ratio increased. This part of the record is dominated by mass movement events, which may have supplied nutrients and thus triggered diatom blooms.

  15. Linking microbial assemblages to paleoenvironmental conditions from the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum times in Laguna Potrok Aike sediments, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuillemin, Aurele; Ariztegui, Daniel; Leavitt, Peter R.; Bunting, Lynda

    2014-05-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a closed basin located in the southern hemisphere's mid-latitudes (52°S) where paleoenvironmental conditions were recorded as temporal sedimentary sequences resulting from variations in the regional hydrological regime and geology of the catchment. The interpretation of the limnogeological multiproxy record developed during the ICDP-PASADO project allowed the identification of contrasting time windows associated with the fluctuations of Southern Westerly Winds. In the framework of this project, a 100-m-long core was also dedicated to a detailed geomicrobiological study which aimed at a thorough investigation of the lacustrine subsurface biosphere. Indeed, aquatic sediments do not only record past climatic conditions, but also provide a wide range of ecological niches for microbes. In this context, the influence of environmental features upon microbial development and survival remained still unexplored for the deep lacustrine realm. Therefore, we investigated living microbes throughout the sedimentary sequence using in situ ATP assays and DAPI cell count. These results, compiled with pore water analysis, SEM microscopy of authigenic concretions and methane and fatty acid biogeochemistry, provided evidence for a sustained microbial activity in deep sediments and pinpointed the substantial role of microbial processes in modifying initial organic and mineral fractions. Finally, because the genetic material associated with microorganisms can be preserved in sediments over millennia, we extracted environmental DNA from Laguna Potrok Aike sediments and established 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal clone libraries to better define the use of DNA-based techniques in reconstructing past environments. We focused on two sedimentary horizons both displaying in situ microbial activity, respectively corresponding to the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum periods. Sequences recovered from the productive Holocene record revealed a microbial community adapted to

  16. The Maars of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field: the Example of 'laguna Pizatal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Hernandez-Cardona, A.; Alvarez del Castillo, E.; Godinez, M.

    2013-12-01

    Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (TVF), also known as Los Tuxtlas massif, is a structure of volcanic rocks rising conspicuously in the south-central part of the coastal plains of eastern Mexico. The TVF seems related to the upper cretaceous magmatism of the NW part of the Gulf's margin (e.g. San Carlos and Sierra de Tamaulipas alkaline complexes) rather than to the nearby Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanism in this field began in late Miocene and has continued in historical times, The TVF is composed of 4 large volcanoes (San Martin Tuxtla, San Martin Pajapan, Santa Marta, Cerro El Vigia), at least 365 volcanic cones and 43 maars. In this poster we present the distribution of the maars, their size and depths. These maars span from a few hundred km to almost 1 km in average diameter, and a few meters to several tens of meters in depth; most of them filled with lakes. As an example on the nature of these structures we present our results of the ongoing study of 'Laguna Pizatal or Pisatal' (18° 33'N, 95° 16.4'W, 428 masl) located some 3 km from the village of Reforma, on the western side of San Martin Tuxtla volcano. Laguna Pisatal is a maar some 500 meters in radius and a depth about 40 meters from the surrounding ground level. It is covered by a lake 200 m2 in extent fed by a spring discharging on its western side. We examined a succession of 15 layers on the margins of the maar, these layers are blast deposits of different sizes interbedded by surge deposits. Most of the contacts between layers are irregular; which suggests scouring during deposition of the upper beds. This in turn suggests that the layers were deposited in a rapid series of explosions, which mixed juvenile material with fragments of the preexisting bedrock. We were unable to find the extent of these deposits since the surrounding areas are nowadays sugar cane plantations and the lake has overspilled in several occassions.

  17. Tephra ring interpretation in light of evolving maar-diatreme concepts: Stracciacappa maar (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, G. A.; Sottili, G.; Palladino, D. M.; Taddeucci, J.

    2015-12-01

    Maar-diatreme volcanoes in their simplest form are thought to result primarily from discrete, subsurface phreatomagmatic explosions. Tephra ring deposits around maar craters are commonly interpreted in terms of a framework wherein explosions begin at shallow levels and migrate downward, ejecting progressively deeper-seated lithic clasts that contribute to the tephra rings. Additionally, variations in grain size of the deposits are sometimes inferred to record different degrees of fragmentation, which are in turn related to variations in magma-water ratios at the explosion sites. Recent detailed studies of diatremes and of maar tephra rings suggest a different conceptual model wherein explosions can happen at various vertical and lateral locations within a diatreme during its eruptive lifetime, rather than being limited to simple downward migration. Experiments, numerical modeling, and field data indicate that most explosions deeper than about 200-250 m will not vent to the surface, but instead contribute to mixing within the diatremes. Arrival of deep-seated lithics at the surface is related to this mixing process. Experiments also indicate that explosion phenomena can result in a range of emplacement mechanisms and grain sizes in tephra rings, even in the absence of variations in explosion mechanisms (fragmentation efficiency). Here we document the tephra ring of Stracciacappa maar (central Italy), and interpret its eruption and emplacement history in terms of evolving conceptual models along with a comparison to more traditional interpretations. The Stracciacappa deposits include a range of depositional facies and grain sizes that could be related to different combinations of explosion energy, depth, and crater geometry. Lithic abundances are quite variable, including within individual beds, and are consistent with eruption of debris jet deposits from a diatreme beneath the maar. Because most elements of both conceptual models are viable, the work points to an

  18. Climate induced changes as registered in inorganic and organic sediment components from Laguna Potrok Aike (Argentina) during the past 51 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, A.; Kliem, P.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.; Rosén, P.; Pasado Science Team

    2013-07-01

    Total organic carbon, total inorganic carbon, biogenic silica content and total organic carbon/total nitrogen ratios of the Laguna Potrok Aike lacustrine sediment record are used to reconstruct the environmental history of south-east Patagonia during the past 51 ka in high resolution. High lake level conditions are assumed to have prevailed during the Last Glacial, as sediments are carbonate-free. Increased runoff linked to permafrost and reduced evaporation due to colder temperatures and reduced influence of Southern Hemispheric Westerlies (SHW) may have caused these high lake levels with lake productivity being low and organic matter mainly of algal or cyanobacterial origin. Aquatic moss growth and diatom blooms occurred synchronously with southern hemispheric glacial warming events such as the Antarctic A-events, the postglacial warming following the LGM and the Younger Dryas chronozone. During these times, a combination of warmer climatic conditions with related thawing permafrost could have increased the allochthonous input of nutrients and in combination with warmer surface waters increased aquatic moss growth and diatom production. The SHW were not observed to affect southern Patagonia during the Last Glacial. The Holocene presents a completely different lacustrine system because (a) permafrost no longer inhibits infiltration nor emits meltwater pulses and (b) the positioning of the SHW over the investigated area gives rise to strong and dry winds. Under these conditions total organic carbon, total organic carbon/total nitrogen ratios and biogenic silica cease to be first order productivity indicators. On the one hand, the biogenic silica is influenced by dissolution of diatoms due to higher salinity and pH of the lake water under evaporative stress characterizing low lake levels. On the other hand, total organic carbon and total organic carbon/total nitrogen profiles are influenced by reworked macrophytes from freshly exposed lake level terraces during

  19. Tephra ring interpretation in light of evolving maar-diatreme concepts: Stracciacappa maar (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Greg A.; Sottili, Gianluca; Palladino, Danilo M.; Taddeucci, Jacopo

    2015-12-01

    Maar-diatreme volcanoes in their simplest form are thought to result primarily from discrete, subsurface phreatomagmatic explosions. Tephra ring deposits around maar craters are commonly interpreted in terms of a framework wherein explosions begin at shallow levels and migrate downward, ejecting progressively deeper-seated lithic clasts that contribute to the tephra rings. Additionally, variations in grain size of the deposits are sometimes inferred to record different degrees of fragmentation, which are in turn related to variations in magma-water ratios at the explosion sites. Recent detailed studies of diatremes and of maar tephra rings suggest a different conceptual model wherein explosions can happen at various vertical and lateral locations within a diatreme during its eruptive lifetime, rather than being limited to simple downward migration. Experiments, numerical modeling, and field data indicate that most explosions deeper than about 200-250 m will not vent to the surface, but instead contribute to mixing within the diatremes. Arrival of deep-seated lithics at the surface is related to this mixing process. Experiments also indicate that explosion phenomena can result in a range of emplacement mechanisms and grain sizes in tephra rings, even in the absence of variations in explosion mechanisms (fragmentation efficiency). Here we document the tephra ring of Stracciacappa maar (central Italy), and interpret its eruption and emplacement history in terms of evolving conceptual models along with a comparison to more traditional interpretations. Because most elements of both conceptual models are viable, the work points to an important need to develop criteria to distinguish between the various inferred mechanisms.

  20. Qal'eh Hasan Ali maars, central Iran.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milton, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    This group of some 15 Late Quaternary explosion craters are typical maars, with rims of bedded pyroclastics. In all but the largest crater, the deposits consist entirely of clasts of country rock (granodiorite and Eocene volcanics). The maars were formed by phreatomagmatic explosions, possibly caused by groundwater originating from a major river. The deposits of the largest maar contain up to 20% juvenile fragments of two types. Tephrite clasts have phenocrysts of phlogopite, clinopyroxene, olivine and anorthoclase; the presence of hauyne as a groundmass phase is notable. Cumulate blocks of phlogopite-clinopyroxene rock also occur. The maar field is part of a distinct province of Quaternary alkaline volcanism, related to a major crustal fracture - the N-S-trending Nayband fault.-R.J.S.

  1. Recording of climate and diagenesis through sedimentary DNA and fossil pigments at Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuillemin, Aurèle; Ariztegui, Daniel; Leavitt, Peter R.; Bunting, Lynda; The Pasado Science Team

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic sediments record past climatic conditions while providing a wide range of ecological niches for microorganisms. In theory, benthic microbial community composition should depend on environmental features and geochemical conditions of surrounding sediments, as well as ontogeny of the subsurface environment as sediment degraded. In principle, DNA in sediments should be composed of ancient and extant microbial elements persisting at different degrees of preservation, although to date few studies have quantified the relative influence of each factor in regulating final composition of total sedimentary DNA assemblage. Here geomicrobiological and phylogenetic analyses of a Patagonian maar lake were used to indicate that the different sedimentary microbial assemblages derive from specific lacustrine regimes during defined climatic periods. Two climatic intervals (Mid-Holocene, 5 ka BP; Last Glacial Maximum, 25 ka BP) whose sediments harbored active microbial populations were sampled for a comparative environmental study based on fossil pigments and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The genetic assemblage recovered from the Holocene record revealed a microbial community displaying metabolic complementarities that allowed prolonged degradation of organic matter to methane. The series of Archaea identified throughout the Holocene record indicated an age-related stratification of these populations brought on by environmental selection during early diagenesis. These characteristics were associated with sediments resulting from endorheic lake conditions and stable pelagic regime, high evaporative stress and concomitant high algal productivity. In contrast, sulphate-reducing bacteria and lithotrophic Archaea were predominant in sediments dated from the Last Glacial Maximum, in which pelagic clays alternated with fine volcanic material characteristic of a lake level highstand and freshwater conditions, but reduced water column productivity. Comparison of sedimentary DNA composition

  2. Recording of climate and diagenesis through fossil pigments and sedimentary DNA at Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuillemin, A.; Ariztegui, D.; Leavitt, P. R.; Bunting, L.; Pasado Science Team

    2015-11-01

    Aquatic sediments record past climatic conditions while providing a wide range of ecological niches for microorganisms. Although marine sedimentary microbial assemblages are often defined by their surrounding geochemical conditions, the influence of environmental features upon microbial development and post-depositional survival remains largely unknown in the lacustrine realm. Due to long-term microbial activity, the composition of environmental DNA can be expected to evolve with sediment depth and over time and therefore should reflect both ancient and extant microbial populations, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested using a multiproxy approach. Here geomicrobiological and phylogenetic analyses of a Patagonian maar lake were used to indicate that the different sedimentary microbial assemblages derive from specific lacustrine regimes during defined climatic periods. Two well defined climatic intervals whose sediments harboured active microbial populations and measurable ATP were sampled for a comparative environmental study based on fossil pigments and 16S rRNA gene sequences. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from the Holocene record revealed a microbial community adapted to subsaline conditions actively producing methane during organic matter degradation. These characteristics were associated with sediments resulting from endorheic lake conditions with high evaporative stress and concomitant high algal productivity. Moreover, archaeal clone libraries established throughout the Holocene record indicate an age-related stratification of these populations, consistent with a gradual use of organic substrates after deposition. In contrast, sulphate-reducing bacteria and lithotrophic Archaea were predominant in sediments dated from the Last Glacial Maximum, in which pelagic clays alternated with fine volcanic material characteristic of a lake level highstand and freshwater conditions, but reduced water column productivity. These patterns

  3. Characterizing the eolian sediment component in the lacustrine record of Laguna Potrok Aike (southeastern Patagonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, C.; Gebhardt, C.

    2013-12-01

    Southern South America with its extended dry areas was one of the major sources for dust in the higher latitudes of the southern hemisphere during the last Glacial, as was deduced from fingerprinting of dust particles found in Antarctic ice cores. The amount of dust that was mobilized is mostly related to strength and latitudinal position of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds (SWW). How exactly SWW shifted between glacial and interglacial times and what consequences such shifts had for ocean and atmospheric circulation changes during the last deglaciation is currently under debate. Laguna Potrok Aike (PTA) as a lake situated in the middle of the source area of dust offers the opportunity to arrive at a better understanding of past SWW changes and their associated consequences for dust transport. For this task, a sediment record of the past ~51 ka is available from a deep drilling campaign (PASADO). From this 106 m long profile, 76 samples representing the different lithologies of the sediment sequence were selected to characterize an eolian sediment component. Prior to sampling of the respective core intervals, magnetic susceptibility was measured and the element composition was determined by XRF-scanning on fresh, undisturbed sediment. After sampling and freeze drying, physical, chemical and mineralogical sediment properties were determined before and after separation of each sample into six grainsize classes for each fraction separately. SEM techniques were used to verify the eolian origin of grains. The aim of this approach is to isolate an exploitable fingerprint of the eolian sediment component in terms of their grain size, physical properties, geochemistry and mineralogy. Thereby, the challenging aspect is that such a fingerprint should be based on high-resolution down-core scanning techniques, so time-consuming techniques such as grain-size measurements by laser detection can be avoided. A first evaluation of the dataset indicates that magnetic

  4. A Flood Layer Reconstruction from the Laminated Sediments of Eifel Maar Structures (Germany) during the Last 60 000 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunck, H.; Sirocko, F.

    2015-12-01

    Lake sediments are excellent climate archives and can be used for reconstructions of past precipitation and flood events. However, until now, there is no continous flood record for the entire last 60 000 years for Central Europe. This study reconstructs the history of the main flood events in central Europe from event layers in sediment cores from Holocene Eifel maar lakes and Pleistocene dry maar structures. The cores were drilled in the Eifel region of western Germany. All maars have an inflow by a local stream and the largest flood events and associated suspension injections are nicely visible in the sediment. The specific sedimentation conditions explain the unique possibility to detect all 18 Greenland Interstadials in the total carbon concentration of the analysed maars. The allocation of the core material to all Greenland Interstadials and Stadials enables the exact climatic interpretation of the flood frequency. The stratigraphical concept leads to a classification of Landscape Evolution Zones in the Eifel region, which reconstruct the vegetation and the climate change. This classification is used to discuss the flood event succession concerning environmental changes. To study the past flood events in detail, 10 cm long thin sections were sedimentological and geochemical analysed to distinguish flood layers from turbidites and slumps.Turbidites have a continuous grain size gradation; the grain size profile of flood events is in contrast characterized by several grain size maxima over the entire layer thickness. A flood event over several days shows numerous peaks of intense discharge, which lead to a discontinuous grain size gradient. As a consequence, 233 flood layers over 7.5 mm thickness were detected. The main flood stages are from: 0 - 4000, 11 500 - 17 500, 23 000 - 24 000, 29 000 - 35 000 and 44 000 - 44 500 b2k. Our time-series from the Eifel represents the first highly-resolved chronology for flood events from 60 000 years until present times and

  5. The last Glacial-Interglacial transition in Patagonia, Argentina: the stable isotope record of bulk sedimentary organic matter from Laguna Potrok Aike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PASADO Science Team Zhu, Jiayun; Lücke, Andreas; Wissel, Holger; Müller, Daniela; Mayr, Christoph; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd

    2013-07-01

    An investigation of stable isotope (δ13CTOC and δ15NTN) and elemental parameters (TOC, TN contents and TOC/TN ratios) of bulk organic matter (<200 μm) from sediment cores recovered from the Patagonian lake Laguna Potrok Aike (Argentina) in the framework of the ICDP deep drilling project PASADO provided insights into past changes in lake primary productivity and environmental conditions in South Patagonia throughout the last Glacial-Interglacial transition. Stratigraphically constrained cluster analyses of all proxy parameters suggest four main phases. From ca 26,100 to 17,300 cal. years BP, lacustrine phytoplankton was presumably the predominant organic matter source in an aquatic environment with low primary productivity rates. At around 17,300 cal. years BP, abrupt and distinct shifts of isotopic and elemental values indicate that the lacustrine system underwent a rapid reorganization. Lake primary productivity (phytoplankton and aquatic macrophytes) shows higher levels albeit with large variations during most of the deglaciation until 13,000 cal. years BP. The main causes for this development can be seen in improved growing conditions for primary producers because of deglacial warming in combination with expedient availability of nutrients and likely calm wind conditions. After 13,000 cal. years BP, decreased δ13CTOC values, TOC, TN contents and TOC/TN ratios indicate that the lake approached a new state with reduced primary productivity probably induced by unfavourable growing conditions for primary producers like strengthened winds and reduced nutrient availability. The steady increase in δ15NTN values presumably suggests limitation of nitrate supply for growth of primary producers resulting from a nutrient shortage after the preceding phase with high productivity. Nitrate limitation and consequent decreased lacustrine primary productivity continued into the early Holocene (10,970-8400 cal. years BP) as reflected by isotopic and elemental values.

  6. Origin of maar volcanoes: external water, internal volatiles, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, J.; Schmincke, H.-U.

    2012-04-01

    The origin of maar volcanoes has been interpreted as due to explosive magma-water interaction for more than 40 years (Fisher and Waters 1970; Lorenz 1973 and Fisher and Schmincke 1984). Earlier suspicions that CO2-degassing plays a role in maar formation (Schmincke 1977) are now followed up by re-examining maar deposits of four different compositions in the maar-type locality (Eifel, Germany). These four compositions comprise: (1) melilite-nephelinites (West Eifel), (2) leucitites/nephelinites (West Eifel), (3) Na-rich basanites (West Eifel), and (4) K-rich basanites (East Eifel). At present, we focus on high-resolution stratigraphy, sedimentology, grain-size distribution, component analysis (accidental vs. juvenile clasts), and morphological and textural particle studies, accompanied by standard glass and bulk chemical and mineralogical analyses. Interestingly, maar deposits of highly silica-undersaturated and - by inference - CO2-rich composition (melilite-nephelinites and leucitites/nephelinites) show features contrasting with the classical catalogue of criteria for hydroclastic fragmentation (Fisher and Schmincke 1984). Their deposits are medium- to coarse-grained (MdØ mainly: 2 - 8 mm), mostly moderate- to well-sorted (σØ mainly: 1 - 2.5) and in some cases juvenile-rich (up to 50-70 wt. %). Transport and depositional mechanisms comprise a mixture of surge and fallout differing from the general assumption that maar deposits are dominated by surges. Additionally, features of juvenile clasts of highly silica-undersaturated composition largely differ from the features of "classic" hydroclastic particles (e.g.: dense, blocky, glassy shards). Juvenile clasts of highly silica-undersaturated composition show: (a) round- to semiround morphologies, (b) slight- to moderate vesicularities, (c) near absence of glassy material, (d) abundance of deep-seated xenoliths (mantle and lower crust), (e) agglutinated lava rinds enveloping the mantle- and crust-xenoliths, and (f

  7. The ELSA - Flood - Stack: A reconstruction from the laminated sediments of Eifel Maar structures during the last 60 000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunck, Heiko; Sirocko, Frank; Albert, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Lake sediments are excellent climate archives and can be used for reconstructions of past precipitation and flood events. However, until now, there is no continous flood record for the entire last 60 000 years for Central Europe. This study reconstructs the history of the main flood events in central Europe from event layers in sediment cores from Holocene Eifel maar lakes and Pleistocene dry maar structures. The cores were drilled in the Eifel region of western Germany. All maars have an inflow by a local stream and the largest flood events and associated suspension injections are nicely visible in the sediment. The specific sedimentation conditions explain the unique possibility to detect all 18 Greenland Interstadials in the total carbon concentration of the analysed maars. The allocation of the core material to all Greenland Interstadials and Stadials enables the exact climatic interpretation of the flood frequency. The stratigraphical concept leads to a classification of Landscape Evolution Zones in the Eifel region, which reconstruct the vegetation and the climate change (Sirocko et al., 2015). This classification is used to discuss the flood event succession concerning environmental changes. To study the past flood events in detail, 10 cm long thin sections were sedimentological and geochemical analysed to distinguish flood layers from turbidites and slumps. Turbidites have a continuous grain size gradation; the grains size profile of flood events is in contrast characterized by several grain size maxima over the entire layer thickness. A flood event over several days shows numerous peaks of intense discharge, which lead to a discontinuous grain size gradient. As a consequence, 233 flood layers over 7.5 mm thickness were detected. The main flood stages are from: 0 - 4000, 11 500 - 17 500, 23 000 - 24 000, 29 000 - 35 000 and 44 000 - 44 500 b2k (Brunck et al., 2015). Our time-series from the Eifel represents the first highly-resolved chronology for flood

  8. Remarkable similarity in genome nucleotide sequences between the Schwarz FF-8 and AIK-C measles virus vaccine strains and apparent nucleotide differences in the phosphoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Ito, Chie; Ohgimoto, Shinji; Kato, Seiichi; Sharma, Luna Bhatta; Ayata, Minoru; Komase, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Ihara, Toshiaki; Ogura, Hisashi

    2011-07-01

    The Schwarz FF-8 (FF-8) and AIK-C measles virus vaccine strains are currently used for vaccination in Japan. Here, the complete genome nucleotide sequence of the FF-8 strain has been determined and its genome sequence found to be remarkably similar to that of the AIK-C strain. These two strains are differentiated only by two nucleotide differences in the phosphoprotein gene. Since the FF-8 strain does not possess the amino acid substitutions in the phospho- and fusion proteins which are responsible for the temperature-sensitivity and small syncytium formation phenotypes of the AIK-C strain, respectively, other unidentified common mechanisms likely attenuate both the FF-8 and AIK-C strains.

  9. Evidence of post-eruptive subsidence in the Rincón de Parangueo maar, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda-Gomez, J. J.

    2013-05-01

    Subsidence is almost invariably invoked in the formation models of maar-diatreme systems (MDS); it may occur in all MDS as a syn-eruptive and post-eruptive phenomena (Lorenz, Bull Volcanol 48). Post-eruptive subsidence begins immediately after the end of the eruption and compaction may follow an exponential decrease rate during several tens of millions of years (Suhr et al, Z. dt. Ges. Geowiss. 157/3). Post-eruptive subsidence is attributed to diatreme compaction (Pirrung et al, Sedimentology 55); therefore it must occur in all MDS. Field evidence of post-eruptive subsidence in Quaternary maars is uncommon, a fact that suggests that either post-eruptive subsidence does not occur in all the MDS, or most post-eruptive subsidence develops early in the history of MDS and its structural and sedimentological evidences lie buried under younger deposits in the maar craters. Rincón de Parangueo is a Quaternary (~100 ka?) maar desiccated in the 1980s. Today the lake bottom is exposed; near the shore of the former lake are a large number of structures, which are interpreted as evidence of active subsidence of the crater's bottom. The most conspicuous set of structures are located close to a ring-like topographic scarp up to 15 m high. Along the scarp is exposed a segmented ring fault which affects a calcareous platform formed by stromatolites. In most places the ring fault is an array of step-faults with the downthrown blocks toward the depocenter. These extensional structures are unusual as their displacement is ~1:1 combination of movement perpendicular to the fractures and dip-slip normal displacement. The structural attitude of the laminated mud in the scarp suggests that down-sagging is occurring as the result of piston-like subsidence of the bottom of the crater and down slope movement of cohesive blocks towards the depocenter. A structural map shows open folds and in some places domes caused by upward injection of mud in the area between the topographic scarp and the

  10. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  11. Experimental birth of a maar-diatreme volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P.-S.; White, J. D. L.; Valentine, G. A.; Taddeucci, J.; Sonder, I.; Andrews, R. G.

    2013-06-01

    Maar-diatreme eruptions are hazardous to people and infrastructure, and are also linked to the formation of the kimberlitic variety of diatremes, which is important economically. Processes occurring in the subsurface diatreme and their relation to surface eruptions are not yet well understood. We conducted field-scale experiments using analog materials to shed more light on these processes, especially the formation of the proto-diatreme during the first explosions of a maar eruption. Specifically, a series of buried explosions in a prepared, layered substrate (pad) produced craters, extra-crater deposits and sub-crater deposits analogous to volcanic maar craters, tephra rings and incipient diatremes. Post-explosion substrate excavation revealed that single large explosions produce sub-crater deposits extending nearly to the crater-rim crest. The same energy divided into three blasts, either co-located or at different depths with the same epicenter, produced narrower and sometimes deeper sub-crater deposits even though the final sizes of the craters were similar to that produced by the single large blast. The sub-crater deposits have an upper zone with domains from different substrate depths, and an underlying zone distinguished primarily by being more loosely packed than the original substrate. Videos show surface motion extending beyond the post-shot crater rim, and largely vertical ejection and fallback of material into the footprint of these deposits, especially for the explosions that occurred below optimal depth of burial. We infer that much of the loosely packed material was disassembled, vertically transported to different heights during the explosions, then fell back without significant relative lateral movement of grains. However, subvertical fallback did produce apparent cross-cutting structures in shallow sub-crater deposits. One explosion ejected material from the deepest substrate horizon, but it was redeposited only within the crater and is

  12. The ELSA-Flood-Stack: A reconstruction from the laminated sediments of Eifel maar structures during the last 60 000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunck, H.; Sirocko, F.; Albert, J.

    2016-07-01

    This study reconstructs the main flood phases in central Europe from event layers in sediment cores from Holocene Eifel maar lakes and Pleistocene dry maar structures. These reconstructions are combined with recent gauge time-series to cover the entire precipitation extremes of the last 60 000 years. In general, Eifel maar sediments are perfectly suited for the preservation of event layers since the deep water in the maar lakes is seasonal anoxic and therefore, bioturbation is low. However, the preservation of annual lamination is only preserved in Holzmaar and Ulmener Maar; the other cores are dated by 14C, magnetostratigraphy, tephra markers and ice core tuning. The cores were drilled in the Eifel region of central western Germany, which represents a climatic homogenous region from Belgium to Poland and all across Central Europe. A total of 233 flood layers over 7.5 mm were detected in all analysed cores. The stratigraphic classification of the flood events follows the newly defined Landscape Evolution Zones (LEZ). The strongest events in the Holocene have occurred during LEZ 1 (0-6000 b2k) in the years 658, 2800 and 4100 b2k. Flood layers in the LEZ 2 (6000-10 500 b2k) are not as frequent as during the LEZ 1, nevertheless, the floods cluster between 6000 and 6500 b2k. Twenty flood layers are found in the LEZ 3 (10 500-14 700 b2k); 11 in LEZ 4 (14 700-21 000 b2k); 15 in LEZ 5 (21 000-28 500 b2k); 34 in LEZ 6 (28 500-36 500 b2k); 8 in LEZ 7 (36 500-49 000 b2k); zero in LEZ 8 (49 000-55 000 b2k) and LEZ 9 (55 000-60 000 b2k). The maximum flood phases during the Pleistocene are at 11 500-17 500 (late glacial and Younger Dryas), 23 000-24 000 (before Greenland Interstadial (GI) 2), 29 000-35 000 (especially between GI 5 and 4) and 44 000-44 500 b2k (transition from GI 12 to 11). The variations in flood dynamics are climatically driven and mainly associated with climate transitions and colder periods, combined with light vegetation. It turns out that low vegetation

  13. Late Glacial vegetation reconstruction based on leaf waxes from the Gemündener Maar, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, Lorenz; Lutz, Selina; Zech, Michael; Hepp, Johannes; Sirocko, Frank; Zech, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Lake sediments are valuable archives for the reconstruction of past changes in climate and vegetation. In the present study, we analyse samples from the Gemündener Maar, a lake situated in the western Eiffel, Germany, for their leaf wax composition: In the bottom part of the core, corresponding to the Oldest Dryas (i.e. older than ~15 ka), n-alkanes have a high average chain length (ACL), which points to a vegetation dominated by grass. During the Bölling/Alleröd, a decrease of the ACL can be interpreted as signal of more deciduous trees. During the Younger Dryas (~12.8 to 11.5 ka), the ACL increases again. Trees probably became again less abundant, before finally, the ACL records the return of deciduous trees during the early Holocene. In general, the total concentrations of both, n-alkanes and sugar biomarkers are high enough to measure compound-specific isotopes on n-alkanes (deuterium) and sugars (18-O). Combined, these two isotopes might help to obtain more information about the relative humidity and mean air temperature during the late glacial.

  14. High level triggers for explosive mafic volcanism: Albano Maar, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. K.; Tomlinson, E. L.; Giordano, G.; Smith, V. C.; De Benedetti, A. A.; Roberge, J.; Manning, C. J.; Wulf, S.; Menzies, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    Colli Albani is a quiescent caldera complex located within the Roman Magmatic Province (RMP), Italy. The recent Via dei Laghi phreatomagmatic eruptions led to the formation of nested maars. Albano Maar is the largest and has erupted seven times between ca 69-33 ka. The highly explosive nature of the Albano Maar eruptions is at odds with the predominant relatively mafic (SiO2 = 48-52 wt.%) foiditic (K2O = 9 wt.%) composition of the magma. The deposits have been previously interpreted as phreatomagmatic, however they contain large amounts (up to 30%vol) of deep seated xenoliths, skarns and all pre-volcanic subsurface units. All of the xenoliths have been excavated from depths of up to 6 km, rather than being limited to the depth at which magma and water interaction is likely to have occurred, suggesting an alternative trigger for eruption. High precision geochemical glass and mineral data of fresh juvenile (magmatic) clasts from the small volume explosive deposits indicate that the magmas have evolved along one of two evolutionary paths towards foidite or phonolite. The foiditic melts record ca. 50% mixing between the most primitive magma and Ca-rich melt, late stage prior to eruption. A major result of our study is finding that the generation of Ca-rich melts via assimilation of limestone, may provide storage for significant amounts of CO2 that can be released during a mixing event with silicate magma. Differences in melt evolution are inferred as having been controlled by variations in storage conditions: residence time and magma volume.

  15. Towards the reconstruction of the shallow plumbing system of the Barombi Mbo Maar (Cameroon) Implications for diatreme growth processes of a polygenetic maar volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chako Tchamabé, Boris; Ohba, Takeshi; Kereszturi, Gabor; Németh, Karoly; Aka, Festus Tongwa; Youmen, Dieudonné; Issa; Miyabuchi, Yasuo; Ooki, Seigo; Tanyileke, Gregory; Hell, Joseph Victor

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the mechanisms involved in the formation of maars and their diatreme growth processes has been a subject of contention. While there is no direct evidence of the presence of diatremes beneath most of the young maars, their existence is inferred based on the amount and type of country rocks excavated at different depths and deposited as pyroclastic ejecta around their craters. Properly tracing fragmented country rocks in ejecta to interpret their depths of origin and thus the depths of phreatomagmatic explosions require good and detailed information on the substrate geology that is generally lacking at many maars. As an alternative, this paper explores the role of juvenile components in deposits of a maar for understanding the cratering and growth of diatremes during maar-forming eruptions. Based on field investigations, pyroclast distribution, componentry and grain morphology examinations this study reports on the eruptive mechanisms that led to the formation of the Barombi Mbo Maar (BMM), a polygenetic maar volcano in Cameroon. The BMM consists of three diatremes that formed during distinct eruptive events and coalesced to produce an "amalgamated maar-diatreme". Two end-member types of eruption styles from the "dry" magmatic to the "wet" phreatomagmatic explosions governed the formation of the maar. In total, a minimum of ~ 0.0658 km3 of magma (Dense Rock Equivalent corrected) was ejected based on calculation by applying interpolation techniques on digital elevation models obtained from SRTM30m data corrected by rock textural data collected from the field. The distribution of juvenile clasts throughout the stratigraphic sequence suggests a complex subsurface eruptive process, which originated probably within the uppermost part of the diatreme. From the distribution and morphology of juvenile clasts in the deposits, it is inferred that cratering and country rock excavation during the growth of each of the small diatremes developed mainly from shallow

  16. Assessment of local seismic response of the Stracciacappa maar (Central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscatelli, Massimiliano; Simionato, Maurizio; Gaudiosi, Iolanda; Sottili, Gianluca; Pagliaroli, Alessandro; Sirianni, Pietro; Pileggi, Domenico; Avalle, Alessandra; Giallini, Silvia; Razzano, Roberto; Mancini, Marco; Vignaroli, Gianluca; Piscitelli, Sabatino; Bellanova, Jessica; Calamita, Giuseppe; Perrone, Angela; Lanzo, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we face the definition of a subsoil model aimed at the local seismic response assessment of the Stracciacappa maar (Sabatini Volcanic District, central Italy) (e.g., De Rita and Zanetti, 1986; Marra et al., 2014). The pyroclastic succession of Stracciacappa records two main hydromagmatic eruptive phases ended about 0.09 Ma ago (e.g., Sottili et al., 2010). The preserved crater, with a diameter of about 1500 meters and a crater floor of about 30-40 m, hosted a lake until it was drained in AD 1834. In the framework of the cooperation between CNR IGAG and Italian Department of Civil Protection (DPC) of the Presidency of Council of Ministers (DPC funds 2014), a multidisciplinary approach including detailed stratigraphic and geophysical study has been carried out in the Stracciacappa maar and surrounding areas. New geological map and cross sections illustrate the complex geometric relationships between the thick pyroclastic surge succession, showing diffuse sandwave structures, and even meter-sized lava ballistic. A composite interdigitation between lacustrine and epiclastic debris sediments fills the crater floor. A continuous coring borehole was drilled inside the crater, 45 meters deep from the wellhead, with sampling of undisturbed samples. In addition, four MASW and one SCPTU test were carried out, in order to define the velocity profile of the s-waves within the lacustrine deposits. This Vs profile was then extended at higher depths by using the results of four 2D seismic passive arrays. Moreover, in order to define the resonance frequency of sedimentary covers via the HVSR technique, twenty-eight measurements were carried out with digital sensor Tromino® and seven measurements were performed with a Lennartz® Le-3D/5s sensor with Lennartz Marslite® digitizer. Finally, three electrical resistivity tomography tests, with a total length of about 3500 meters, were carried out with the purpose of constraining the subsoil model. Regarding the non linear

  17. ELSA flood stack for MIS 2-3 from dry maar lakestructure Auel (Eifel/Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunck, Heiko; Sirocko, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Lacustrine sediments are very sensitive to natural and anthropogenically enviromental changes. Thus, lake sediments are excellent climate archives and can be used for reconstructions of past precipitation and flood events. However, until now, there is no continous flood record for the entire last 60 000 years for Central Europe. The present study reconstructs paleo floods from event layers in the sediment, of dry maar lakestructure Auel (Eifel). This silted up basin has an inflow by a local stream. Accordingly the sedimentation rate is directly linked to runoff activity. The bioturbation was low so that event layers become visible, but varves are not preserved. The maar site is near to the town of Gerolstein in the Eifel; the core AU2 was drilled in the ELSA (Eifel Laminated Sediment archive) project and is 123m long. AU2 has the highest sedimentation rate of all ELSA cores, due to abundant fluvial input. The Eifel area is well suited to approximate Central European weather, because modern water level gauge data from Eifel rivers correlate with respective data from the Rhine (Wernli and Pfahl, 2009). Due to the high inflow into the maar, Auel has the highest number of botanical macro remains of all ELSA cores. These specific conditions explain why only in AU2 all 21 Greenland interstadials can be observed in the abundance of wood remains and the organic carbon concentration. In a final stratigraphic step the time series of Corg was tuned to the Greenland ice core chronology to link the central European landscape evolution directly to the Greenland climate curve (Svensson et al., 2008). Combined sedimentological, paleobotanical and geochemical data received from AU2 builds the foundation of the 14C based chronology. The synchronisation of the record with other cores is controlled by tephra time markers and pollen. Both are used to align the main cores of the ELSA project and construct an integrated age model for the last 220 000 years [b2k] (Förster and Sirocko

  18. Maars to calderas: end-members on a spectrum of explosive volcanic depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Danilo; Valentine, Greg; Sottili, Gianluca; Taddeucci, Jacopo

    2015-07-01

    We discuss maar-diatremes and calderas as end-members on a spectrum of negative volcanic landforms (depressions) produced by explosive eruptions (note - we focus on calderas formed during explosive eruptions, recognizing that some caldera types are not related to such activity). The former are dominated by ejection of material during numerous discrete phreatomagmatic explosions, brecciation, and subsidence of diatreme fill, while the latter are dominated by subsidence over a partly evacuated magma chamber during sustained, magmatic volatile-driven discharge. Many examples share characteristics of both, including landforms that are identified as maars but preserve deposits from non-phreatomagmatic explosive activity, and ambiguous structures that appear to be coalesced maars but that also produced sustained explosive eruptions with likely magma reservoir subsidence. A convergence of research directions on issues related to magma-water interaction and shallow reservoir mechanics is an important avenue toward developing a unified picture of the maar-diatreme-caldera spectrum.

  19. Identification of a Buried Late Cenozoic Maar-Diatreme Structure (North Moravia, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šešulka, Vojtěch; Sedláková, Iva; Bábek, OndŘej; PŘichystal, Antonín

    2015-01-01

    The maar-diatreme volcanic structure in the vicinity of the village of Lomnice near the town of Bruntál (North Moravia, Czech Republic) has been investigated using a set of geophysical methods including ground magnetometry, gravimetry and electrical resistivity tomography. The structure was detected by an aerial magnetic survey in the second half of the 20th century. Since its discovery only limited information about this buried structure has been available. The coherence of the magnetic anomaly of 190 nT and Bouguer anomaly of -4.7 mGal indicates a volcanic origin of the structure. The funnel-shaped maar-diatreme structure is filled with lacustrine clay and colluvium of Car-boniferous greywacke, which forms the country rock. The surface diameter of the structure is about 600 m, the depth is more than 400 m. The spatial association with other volcanic centers in the surroundings of the town of Bruntál infers the relative dating of the Lomnice maar. The phreatic eruption and maar-diatreme formation could be an indirect conse-quence of effusive activity of the nearby Velký Roudný volcano. The Lomnice structure is the first Plio-Pleistocene maar-diatreme ever described in North Moravia and Silesia.

  20. Simulating maar-diatreme volcanic systems in bench-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R. G.; White, J. D. L.; Dürig, T.; Zimanowski, B.

    2015-12-01

    Maar-diatreme eruptions are incompletely understood, and explanations for the processes involved in them have been debated for decades. This study extends bench-scale analogue experiments previously conducted on maar-diatreme systems and attempts to scale the results up to both field-scale experimentation and natural volcanic systems in order to produce a reconstructive toolkit for maar volcanoes. These experimental runs produced via multiple mechanisms complex deposits that match many features seen in natural maar-diatreme deposits. The runs include deeper single blasts, series of descending discrete blasts, and series of ascending blasts. Debris-jet inception and diatreme formation are indicated by this study to involve multiple types of granular fountains within diatreme deposits produced under varying initial conditions. The individual energies of blasts in multiple-blast series are not possible to infer from the final deposits. The depositional record of blast sequences can be ascertained from the proportion of fallback sedimentation versus maar ejecta rim material, the final crater size and the degree of overturning or slumping of accessory strata. Quantitatively, deeper blasts involve a roughly equal partitioning of energy into crater excavation energy versus mass movement of juvenile material, whereas shallower blasts expend a much greater proportion of energy in crater excavation.

  1. Spatio-temporal variations in water quality of Nullah Aik-tributary of the river Chenab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Abdul; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Husain, Syed Z

    2008-05-01

    This study reports the spatio-temporal changes in water quality of Nullah Aik, tributary of the Chenab River, Pakistan. Stream water samples were collected at seven sampling sites on seasonal basis from September 2004 to April 2006 and were analyzed for 24 water quality parameters. Most significant parameters which contributed in spatio-temporal variations were assessed by statistical techniques such as Hierarchical Agglomerative Cluster Analysis (HACA), Factor Analysis/Principal Components Analysis (FA/PCA), and Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA). HACA identified three different classes of sites: Relatively Unimpaired, Impaired and Less Impaired Regions on the basis of similarity among different physicochemical characteristics and pollutant level between the sampling sites. DFA produced the best results for identification of main variables for temporal and spatial analysis and separated eight parameters (DO, hardness, sulphides, K, Fe, Pb, Cr and Zn) that accounted 89.7% of total variations of spatial analysis. Temporal analysis using DFA separated six parameters (E.C., TDS, salinity, hardness, chlorides and Pb) that showed more than 84.6% of total temporal variation. FA/PCA identified six significant factors (sources) which were responsible for major variations in water quality dataset of Nullah Aik. The results signify that parameters identified by statistical analyses were responsible for water quality change and suggest the possibility of industrial, municipal and agricultural runoff, parent rock material contamination. The results suggest dire need for proper management measures to restore the water quality of this tributary for a healthy and promising aquatic ecosystem and also highlights its importance for objective ecological policy and decision making process.

  2. Proceedings of the 2nd Columbia River Basalt Symposium: Maar volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, A. C.; Fisher, R. V.

    1971-01-01

    Examination of maar-type volcanic cones, including tuff rings, from more than 40 localities in western North America indicates that water had access to volcano orifices during their activity. The most convincing evidence is the abundance of sideromelane (chilled basaltic glass) or its palagonitic decomposition products in the ejecta. Moreover, the volcanoes which were examined erupted in basins that either contained surface water, or else they grew above highly permeable aquifers at shallow dept. Characteristic features of maar ejecta are continuous thin beds, undulations and antidunes characteristic of base surge stratification, abundant accretionary lapilli or mud-armored rock particles, bedding sags that show soft sediment deformation, and in the subaqueous parts of the maar ramparts, great piles of subtly graded thin lenses of hyaloclastic debris.

  3. Eruptive and structural controls on the evolution of Mexican maar volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, G.; Ort, M. H.

    2013-05-01

    Although monogenetic volcanoes seem to have a very simple eruptive history, the geologic evolution of maar volcanoes is more complex because they involve a fluctuating explosive behavior due to rapid changes in how an ascending magma interacts with a source of external water. Maar volcanoes evolve in different ways depending on several factors such as magma extrusion rate, explosion depth variation, water/magma ratio, increasing cratering, viscosity, as well as characteristics of the country rock and structural features of the regional setting., Three main maar volcano fields, San Luis Potosí, Valle de Santiago and Serdán-Oriental, occur in central Mexico. In the first two fields, a strong tectonic control is evident for the general distribution of the volcanoes, while in the third case, a more local influence of shallow crustal fractures seems to control the migration of the explosion locus, causing elongated or craters shapes. Initial magma extrusion rates may have played an important role in producing different types of maar volcanoes. Also, the location of the explosions within the upper unconsolidated granular aquifer (brown tuff) or the deeper highly-fractured bedrock aquifer may control the efficiency of the explosions. Deepening and lateral migration of explosion loci are commonly observed in maar volcanoes, and lateral migration is strongly controlled by the regional stress regime. Eruptive styles vary from surge- and blast-dominated eruptions to alternating strombolian and vulcanian activity. Some show a drying-upward trend but others change from dry magmatic activity (hawaiian lava flows, followed by strombolian scoria) to highly fragmented hydromagmatic maar-forming explosions, which includes the periodic injection of juvenile material, particularly at the end of the eruptive phase.

  4. Comparison of AIK-C measles vaccine in infants at 6 months with Schwarz vaccine at 9 months: a randomized controlled trial in Ghana.

    PubMed Central

    Nkrumah, F. K.; Osei-Kwasi, M.; Dunyo, S. K.; Koram, K. A.; Afari, E. A.

    1998-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial in a measles endemic area, standard-dose (4.0 log10pfu) AIK-C measles vaccine administered at 6 months of age was compared to standard-dose Schwarz vaccine (3.7log10pfu) given at 9 months. Seroconversion rates at 3 and 6 months after immunization in the two groups were comparable and similar. The geometric mean titres achieved were, however, significantly higher in the Schwarz group (P < 0.05). No immediate serious side-effects were observed with either vaccine. We conclude that standard-dose AIK-C measles vaccine can be recommended for measles immunization in children below 9 months of age, especially in highly endemic and high-risk areas in developing countries. PMID:9803586

  5. Unravelling the collapse mechanisms at a Jurassic caldera of the Chon Aike silicic LIP in Southern Patagonia (47° 15 'S, 71° 40'W), Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sruoga, P.; Japas, S.; Salani, F.; Kleiman, L.; Graffigna, M.

    2008-10-01

    La Peligrosa Caldera is located at Sierra Colorada (47° 15'S, 71° 40' W) in the Chon-Aike silicic LIP. It represents an unique window to understand the eruptive mechanisms that prevailed throughout the ignimbritic flare-up in Southern Patagonia during middle to late Jurassic times. Key pieces of lithologic and structural evidences are taken into account to reconstruct the volcanic structure.

  6. An investigation of volcanic depressions. Part 3: Maars, tuff-rings, tuff-cones, and diatremes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz, V.; Mcbirney, A. R.; Williams, H.

    1970-01-01

    A classification of maars, tuff-rings, tuff-cones, and diatremes is given along with a summary of their lithologic and structural characteristics at the surface and at depth, and their probable manner of formation. Particular emphasis is placed on the roles of fluidization and groundwater.

  7. The ˜ 1245 yr BP Asososca maar: New advances on recent volcanic stratigraphy of Managua (Nicaragua) and hazard implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, Natalia; Avellán, Denis Ramón; Macías, José Luis; Scolamacchia, Teresa; Rodríguez, Dionisio

    2008-10-01

    Asososca maar is located at the western outskirts of Managua, Nicaragua, in the central part of the active, N-S trending and right-lateral Nejapa-Miraflores fault that marks an offset of the Middle America Volcanic Arc. It constitutes one of the ˜ 21 vents aligned along the fault, between the Chiltepe Volcanic Complex to the North and Ticomo vents to the South. Asososca consists of an East-West elongated crater filled by a lake, which is currently used for supplying part of Managua with drinking water (10% of the capital city demand). The crater excavated the previous topography, allowing the observation of a detailed Holocene stratigraphic record that should be taken into account for future hazard analyses. We present a geological map together with the detailed stratigraphy exposed inside and around Asososca crater aided by radiocarbon dating of paleosols. The pre-existing volcanic sequence excavated by Asososca is younger than 12,730 + 255/- 250 yr BP and is capped by the phreato-plinian Masaya Tuff (< 2000 yr BP). The pyroclastic deposits produced by Asososca maar (Asososca Tephra, in this work) display an asymmetric distribution around the crater and overlie the Masaya Tuff. The bulk of the Asososca Tephra is made of several bedsets consisting of massive to crudely stratified beds of blocks and lapilli at the base, and superimposed thinly stratified ash and lapilli beds with dune structures and impact sags. Coarser size-fractions (>- 2 ϕ) are dominated by accidental clasts, including basaltic to basaltic-andesitic, olivine-bearing scoriae lapilli, porphyritic and hypocrystalline andesite blocks and lapilli, altered pumice lapilli and ash, and ignimbrite fragments. Juvenile fragments were only identified in size-fractions smaller than - 1 ϕ in proportions lower than 25%, and consist of black moss-like, fused-shape, and poorly vesiculated, fresh glass fragments of basaltic composition (SiO 2 ˜ 48%). The Asososca Tephra is interpreted as due to the emplacement

  8. Eruptive history of the Barombi Mbo Maar, Cameroon Volcanic Line, Central Africa: Constraints from volcanic facies analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchamabé, Boris; Youmen, Dieudonné; Owona, Sébastien; Issa; Ohba, Takeshi; Németh, Károly; Ngapna, Moussa; Asaah, Asobo; Aka, Festus; Tanyileke, Gregory; Hell, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    his study presents the first and detail field investigations of exposed deposits at proximal sections of the Barombi Mbo Maar (BMM), NE Mt Cameroon, with the aim of documenting its past activity, providing insight on the stratigraphic distribution, depositional process, and evolution of the eruptive sequences during its formation. Field evidence reveals that the BMM deposit is about 126m thick, of which about 20m is buried lowermost under the lake level and covered by vegetation. Based on variation in pyroclastic facies within the deposit, it can be divided into three main stratigraphic units: U1, U2 and U3. Interpretation of these features indicates that U1 consists of alternating lapilli-ash-lapilli beds series, in which fallout derived individual lapilli-rich beds are demarcated by surges deposits made up of thin, fine-grained and consolidated ash-beds that are well-defined, well-sorted and laterally continuous in outcrop scale. U2, a pyroclastic fall-derived unit, shows crudely lenticular stratified scoriaceous layers, in which many fluidal and spindle bombs-rich lapilli-beds are separated by very thin, coarse-vesiculatedash-beds, overlain by a mantle xenolith- and accidental lithic-rich explosive breccia, and massive lapilli tuff and lapillistone. U3 displays a series of surges and pyroclastic fall layers. Emplacement processes were largely controlled by fallout deposition and turbulent diluted pyroclastic density currents under "dry" and "wet" conditions. The eruptive activity evolved in a series of initial phreatic eruptions, which gradually became phreatomagmatic, followed by a phreato-Strombolian and a violent phreatomagmatic fragmentation. A relatively long-time break, demonstrated by a paleosol between U2 and U3, would have permitted the feeding of the root zone or the prominent crater by the water that sustained the next eruptive episode, dominated by subsequent phreatomagmatic eruptions. These preliminary results require complementary studies, such as

  9. Maar-diatreme geometry and deposits: Subsurface blast experiments with variable explosion depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graettinger, A. H.; Valentine, G. A.; Sonder, I.; Ross, P.-S.; White, J. D. L.; Taddeucci, J.

    2014-03-01

    maar-diatreme volcanoes, which have craters cut into preeruption landscapes (maars) underlain by downward-tapering bodies of fragmental material commonly cut by hypabyssal intrusions (diatremes), are produced by multiple subsurface phreatomagmatic explosions. Although many maar-diatremes have been studied, the link between explosion dynamics and the resulting deposit architecture is still poorly understood. Scaled experiments employed multiple buried explosions of known energies and depths within layered aggregates in order to assess the effects of explosion depth, and the morphology and compaction of the host on the distribution of host materials in resulting ejecta, the development of subcrater structures and deposits, and the relationships between them. Experimental craters were 1-2 m wide. Analysis of high-speed video shows that explosion jets had heights and shapes that were strongly influenced by scaled depth (physical depth scaled against explosion energy) and by the presence or absence of a crater. Jet properties in turn controlled the distribution of ejecta deposits outside the craters, and we infer that this is also reflected in the diverse range of deposit types at natural maars. Ejecta were dominated by material that originated above the explosion site, and the shallowest material was dispersed the farthest. Subcrater deposits illustrate progressive vertical mixing of host materials through successive explosions. We conclude that the progressive appearance of deeper-seated material stratigraphically upward in deposits of natural maars probably records the length and time scale for upward mixing through multiple explosions with ejection by shallow blasts, rather than progressive deepening of explosion sites in response to draw down of aquifers.

  10. The ELSA-Vegetation-Stack: Reconstruction of Landscape Evolution Zones (LEZ) from laminated Eifel maar sediments of the last 60,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirocko, F.; Knapp, H.; Dreher, F.; Förster, M. W.; Albert, J.; Brunck, H.; Veres, D.; Dietrich, S.; Zech, M.; Hambach, U.; Röhner, M.; Rudert, S.; Schwibus, K.; Adams, C.; Sigl, P.

    2016-07-01

    Laminated sediment records from several maar lakes and dry maar lakes of the Eifel (Germany) reveal the history of climate, weather, environment, vegetation, and land use in central Europe during the last 60,000 years. The time series of the last 30,000 years is based on a continuous varve counted chronology, the MIS3 section is tuned to the Greenland ice - both with independent age control from 14C dates. Total carbon, pollen and plant macrofossils are used to synthesize a vegetation-stack, which is used together with the stacks from seasonal varve formation, flood layers, eolian dust content and volcanic tephra layers to define Landscape Evolution Zones (LEZ). LEZ 1 encompasses the landscape dynamics of the last 6000 years with widespread human influence. The natural oak and hazel forests of the early Holocene back to 10,500 b2k define LEZ 2. LEZ 3, the late glacial between 10,500 and 14,700 b2k, shows the development of a boreal forest with abundant grass and shallow water biomass in the lakes. The maximum of the last glaciation (LEZ 4: 14,700-23,000 b2k) was characterized by sparse vegetation of moss and characeae. These sediments are generally devoid of clay and sand and reveal no indication of snow-meltwater events. Accordingly, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) must have been extremely arid in central Europe. The sediments of the subsequent LEZ 5 from 23,000-28,500 b2k preserve distinct layers of clay and coarse sand, which indicates running water with clay in suspension and ephemeral coarse-grained fluvial sediment discharge. Abundant Ranunculaceae macroremains (used for 14C dating), insects, moss and fungi sclerotia reflect a tundra environment during a time of frequent strong snowmelt events. Total carbon content, Betula-Pinus pollen and diatoms reach increased concentrations during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 interstadials that occurred between 28,500 and 36,500 b2k (LEZ 6). The entire MIS3 interstadials are well documented in the organic carbon record

  11. Geophysical surveys of the Joya Honda maar (México) and surroundings; volcanic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Loera, Héctor; Aranda-Gómez, José Jorge; Arzate, Jorge A.; Molina-Garza, Roberto Stanley

    2008-03-01

    Joya Honda (JH) is a Quaternary maar excavated in Mesozoic limestone. It is located in central Mexico and belongs to the Ventura volcanic field (VVF), which is composed by cinder cones and maars made of intraplate-type mafic alkalic rocks. Volcanoes in the region form ˜ N20W lineaments, roughly parallel to a regional set of normal faults, but there is no obvious relation between these faults and vent distribution in the exposed geology around the maar. The volcanic rock volume is small in the VVF, and most volcanoes and their products are scattered in a region where outcrops are dominated by limestone. The near-vent tephra associated to the JH maar lies north of the crater. This relation suggests that the crater was formed by directed hydromagmatic explosions and may indicate an inclined volcanic conduit near the surface. The tephra stratigraphy suggests that the initial explosions were relatively dry and the amount of water increased during the maar forming eruption. Therefore, the existing model of the maar-diatreme formation may not be applicable to Joya Honda as it requires the formation of a cone of depression in the aquifer and deepening of the focii of the explosions as the crater and underlying diatreme grew. Thus, it is unlikely that there is a diatreme below Joya Honda. Aeromagnetic data shows a boundary between two regional magnetic domains near the elongated volcanic cluster of the VVF. The boundary is straight, with a distinct kink, from NE- to NW-trend, near JH. The limit between the domains is interpreted as fault contacts between mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks and marine Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. Hence, magma ascent in the area may have been facilitated by fractures near the surface. Magnetic and gravimetric ground surveys show that the anomalies associated with the maar are not centered in the crater, which could be consistent with an inclined volcanic conduit. A magnetic profile measured on exposed limestone across the volcanic lineament failed to

  12. The effects of the host-substrate properties on maar-diatreme volcanoes: experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macorps, Élodie; Graettinger, Alison H.; Valentine, Greg A.; Ross, Pierre-Simon; White, James D. L.; Sonder, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    While the relationship between the host-substrate properties and the formation of maar-diatreme volcanoes have been investigated in the past, it remains poorly understood. In order to establish the effects of the qualitative host-substrate properties on crater depth, diameter, morphological features, and sub-surface structures, we present a comparison of four campaigns of experiments that used small chemical explosives buried in various geological media to simulate the formation of maar-diatremes. Previous results from these experiments have shown that primary variations in craters and sub-surface structures are related to the scaled depth (physical depth divided by cube root of blast energy). Our study reveals that single explosions at optimal scaled depths in stronger host materials create the largest and deepest craters with steep walls and the highest crater rims. For single explosions at deeper than optimal scaled depths, the influence of material strength is less obvious and non-linear for crater depth, and non-existent for crater diameter, within the range of the experiments. For secondary and tertiary blasts, there are no apparent relationships between the material properties and the crater parameters. Instead, the presence of pre-existing craters influences the crater evolution. A general weakening of the materials after successive explosions can be observed, suggesting a possible decrease in the host-substrate influence even at optimal scaled depth. The results suggest that the influence of the host-substrate properties is important only in the early stage of a maar-diatreme (neglecting post-eruptive slumping into the open crater) and decreases as explosion numbers increase. Since maar-diatremes reflect eruptive histories that involve tens to hundreds of individual explosions, the influence of initial substrate properties on initial crater processes could potentially be completely lost in a natural system.

  13. Origin of the Joya Honda maar, San Luis Potosí, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda-Gómez, JoséJorge; Luhr, James F.

    1996-11-01

    Joya Honda is a Quaternary maar of unusual type from the Mexican Basin and Range Province. Its ~ 300-m-deep crater is excavated in Cretaceous limestones. The surrounding tephra deposit, which in places is > 100 m thick, begins with a series of weakly indurated pyroclastic-surge and -fall layers that we interpret as dry-surge deposits. These are overlain by the main sequence of strongly indurated, massive tuff breccias that we interpret as wet-surge deposits. Joya Honda formed subaerially from the interaction of groundwater with rapidly ascending intraplate-type basanitic magma carrying peridotitic mantle xenoliths. Local aquifer characteristics controlled the style of eruption and the nature of the deposits. Groundwater in the limestone-hosted aquifer beneath Joya Honda was apparently contained within solution-enhanced fractures. At the onset of the eruption, magma began to interact with a moderate amount of groundwater, producing the dry-surge deposits, which are typical of deposits found at many maars and tuff rings. As the eruption continued, the crater grew and the hydromagmatic blasts fractured the limestones around the explosion foci. A marked increase in the water/magma ratio of the system followed when a large fracture or a portion of the limestone with enhanced secondary permeability was intersected by the expanding crater. Subsequent phreatomagmatic explosions occurred in a system with groundwater flow rates several orders of magnitude larger than in the initial dry-surge stage. At the maar rim these wet eruptions led to the emplacement of massive tuff breccias through a combination of fallout, surges and mudflows. These steeply dipping tuff breccias are similar to deposits found at many tuff cones. Juvenile clasts in the near-vent deposits show marked upward increases in both hydration (palagonitization) and vesicularity. The increased palagonitization with height in the section appears to be a consequence of the overall increased wetness of the eruption

  14. Titanium and oxygen isotope diffusion in quartz-phenocrysts from a Jurassic rhyolite, Chon Aike Province (Fitz Roy, Patagonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, S.; Putlitz, B.; Baumgartner, L. P.; Escrig, S.; Meibom, A.; Leresche, S.; Vennemann, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanic El Quemado Complex was deposited during the breakup of Gondwana during the Middle and Late Jurassic. It is part of a large silicic igneous province, which includes the Chon Aike Province in Southern Patagonia and related rocks from the Antarctic Peninsula [1]. The Complex consists of rhyolitic and dacitic ignimbrites and air-fall tuffs, intercalated with andesitic to rhyolitic lava flows. New LA-ICPMS U/Pb-dates of zircons from the Fitz Roy area yield ages between 148 and 153Ma. No inherited zircons were found, suggesting that the temperature of 850°C calculated from zircon saturation is a minimum temperature. Lava flows are typically rich in quartz phenocrysts, which preserved magmatic trace element zoning, as revealed by cathodoluminescence (CL): light cores are surrounded by several darker and lighter zones towards the rim. The δ18O-values for quartz of between 11 to 14 ‰ are compatible with a crustal source for the magma and the SIMS analyses of phenocrysts reveal no zoning in O-isotope compositions. High-resolution Ti-profiles were obtained by NanoSIMS with a beam size of ~200 nm and a minimum step size of ~120 nm. Several lines perpendicular to the magmatic zoning of the quartz-phenocrysts were measured. The profiles show sharp changes in the 48Ti/29Si-ratio over a distance of 5 μm, which correlate with CL-intensity changes. The profiles can be used for diffusion chronometry. The distances obtained from NanoSIMS profiles were used to calculate maximum diffusional relaxation times. Assuming a step function as initial condition and extrusion temperatures from zircon saturation of 850°C, we obtain a maximum residence time for the quartz-phenocrysts of 3.5 years. [1] Pankhurst R.J., Riley T.R., Fanning C.M., Kelley S.P., 2000. J. Pet., 41, 605-625.

  15. Relationship between Bajo Pobre and Chon Aike formations (Deseado Massif, Patagonia, Argentina):a melt inclusions study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busà, T.; Bellieni, G.; Fernandez, R.; Hecheveste, H.; Piccirillo, E. M.

    2003-04-01

    The Deseado Massif covers the centre-east of the Santa Cruz Province, in the extra-Andean Patagonia. Although the Deseado Massif is mainly composed of silicic volcanic rocks (Chon Aike Formation, CA; 151.5 ±0.5 - 177.8 ±0.4 Ma), mafic and intermediate volcanites (Bajo Pobre Formation, BP; 152.7 ±0.5 and 164 ±0.3 Ma) outcrop largely in the central part of the Massif. In this paper quarz-trapped melt inclusions (rhyolitic in composition) from selected samples of the BP and the CA are analysed. On the basis of major elements content, for BP the sequence from andesite (BP whole rock) to ryholite (trapped as inclusions in quartz) can be modelled by simple fractional crystallisation of ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase, quartz and apatite. As regards trace elements, a good calculated/measured ratio (around 1 ±0.2) is obtained assuming only a relatively high apatite fractionation. Since the apatite fractionation amount is not acceptable for major elements, the evolution of BP Formation cannot be modelled by a simple process of fractional crystallisation, and a contamination process probably occurred. The sequence from BP to CA cannot be modelled by fractional crystallisation. 30% batch melting of BP andesite (BP whole rock) produces a magma from which the CA ryholites (trapped as inclusions in quartz) can be obtained by Rayleigh fractional crystallisation of ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, quartz, apatite and small amounts of zircon and minor allanite. Since the latter one was not observed in the analysed sample, a contamination process during magma evolution cannot be completely excluded. Finally, on the basis of the different trace elements concentration (Nb anomaly, different content in LILE, B/Be and B/Nb), it is possible to suppose that, at the time of the BP and CA emplacement, a changing in the tectonic setting, from subduction to a lithospheric extension, was active.

  16. Hydrovolcanic evolution of the Joya Prieta maar, San Luis Potosí, northeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila-Harris, P.; Aranda-Gomez, J. J.; Carrasco, G.

    2013-05-01

    The Joya Prieta is a Quaternary maar volcano emplaced at the western sector of the Sierra Madre Oriental fold and thrust belt. The crater is located at the axis of an open Laramide fold with a N20°W axis trend. It is the most easterly structure of the Santo Domingo Group, a cluster of intraplate maars and tuff-rings northeast of San Luis Potosí. A characteristic feature of these maars is that they are emplaced in close relationship with anticlines, exposing impressive inner crater walls of folded strata. In the Joya Prieta maar, the calcareous basement rocks are clearly exposed and unconformably overlain by the volcanic succession. A generalized stratigraphic sequence registers, from base to top, olivine-bearing basalt lava resting unconformably atop El Abra Formation limestone. The lava is overlain by thick and oxidized scoria and spatter agglomerate that grades into a moderately sorted spatter-fall layer with pervasive palagonite alteration. In direct contact with no evidence of reworking, pedogenesis or remobilization, the maar-forming sequence starts with parallel-stratified fall layers of altered basaltic pumice and scoria, with lava and limestone lithic clasts. This fall deposit marks the influx of xenocrystals and xenoliths, widely documented in previous works; they comprise mainly kaersutite mega crystals and spinel lherzolite respectively. The proximal fall deposit is divided into two thick layers by an indurated ash-tuff bed with pellets and single-rimmed accretionary lapilli. The upper layer of this fall deposit passes gradually onto an alternation of lapilli-sized layers with parallel ash-tuff horizons until it grades into cross-stratified, lithic-rich lapilli-tuff. The heterolithologic lapilli tuff is cemented on a fine ash matrix with palagonized juvenile clasts and abundant lava, shale and limestone lithics exhibiting a plethora of lithofacies in the like of parallel-bedded tuff, low-angle cross-bedded tuff and massive strata. This passes gradually

  17. Reconstruction of Landscape Evolution Zones (LEZ) from laminated Eifel maar sediments of the last 60 000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirocko, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Tephra, eolian dust, organic carbon, pollen and botanical macroremains from the dry maar lake structures auf Auel and Dehner are used to synthesize and define Landscape Evolution Zones (LEZ) for the Eifel during the last 60 000 years. LEZ 1-3 reiterate the established succession of vegetation during the Holocene and late glacial. The maximum of the last glaciation (LEZ 4: 14 700 - 23 000 b2k) was characterized by extremely sparse vegetation of some moss and characeae, however, characterized by annual activity of eolian dust. These sediments are generally devoid of clay and sand and reveal no indication of snow-meltwater events; accordingly, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) must have been extremely arid in central Europe. The sediments of the subsequent LEZ 5 from 23 000 ‒ 28 500 b2k preserve however distinct layers of clay and coarse sand, which indicates running water with clay in suspension and ephemeral coarse grained fluvial sediment discharge; abundant Ranunculaceae macroremains (used for 14C dating), insects, moss and fungi sclerotia reflect a tundra environment during a time of frequent strong snow melt events. Total carbon content and Betula-Pinus pollen reach increased concentrations during all MIS 3 interstadials that occurred between 28 500 - 36 500 b2k (LEZ 6). Grass pollen and heliophytes indicate a steppe environment with scattered/patchy trees during the interstadials. The stadial phases of LEZ 6 reveal first activity of eolian dust deflation. The opening of the early MIS 3 forested landscape to a steppe occurred with the LEZ 7 - LEZ 6 transition at 36 500 b2k. This is the time when modern man arrived in central Europe; possibly because the vegetation change must have favoured the spread of horse, which was the favoured hunting prey of the modern humans. Accordingly, we postulate that the migration of the modern humans into central Europe could have been mainly driven by climate and vegetation change. The LEZ 7 encompassing the time interval from 36

  18. Physical experiments of land subsidence within a maar crater: insights for porosity variations and fracture localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerca, M.; Rocha, L.; Carreón-Freyre, D.; Aranda, J.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a series of physical models aiming to reproduce rapid subsidence (at least 25 m in 30 years) observed in the sediments of a maar crater caused by extraction of groundwater in the interconnected adjacent aquifer. The model considered plausible variations in the geometry of the crater basement and the measured rate of groundwater extraction (1 m per year in the time interval from 2005 to 2011) in 15 wells located around the structure. The experiments were built within a rigid plastic bowl in which the sediments and rocks of the maar sequence were modeled using different materials: (a) plasticine for the rigid country rock, (b) gravel for the fractured country rock forming the diatreme fill and, (c) water saturated hollow glass microbeads for the lacustrine sedimentary fill of the crater. Water table was maintained initially at the surface of the sediments and then was allowed to flow through a hole made at the base of the rigid bowl. Water extraction provoked a sequence of gentle deformation, fracturing, and faulting of the surface in all the experiments. Vertical as well as lateral displacements were observed in the surface of the experiments. We discuss the results of 2 representative models. The model results reproduced the main geometry of the ring faults affecting the crater sediments and helps to explain the diversity of structures observed in relation with the diatreme geometry. The surface of the models was monitored continuously with an optical interferometric technique called structured light projection. Images collected at nearly constant time intervals were analyzed using the ZEBRA software and the obtained interferometric pairs permitted to analyze the full field subsidence in the model (submilimetric vertical displacements). The experiments were conducted at a continuous flow rate extraction and show a also a linear subsidence rate. Comparison among the results of the physical models and the fault system associated to

  19. A new ELSA time series of tephra layers and paleobotanical evidence from laminated Eifel maar sediments covering the entire last 120,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirocko, Frank; Knapp, Hannes; Klee, Marlies; Rothacker, Leo; Kromer, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    The ELSA Project has drilled a total of 50 sediment cores (2000 m of laminated lake sediment) from Eifel maar lakes and dry maar structures during the last 15 years. These records have been dated using 7 different methods, including 370 14C dates. Ten records reveal the established palynological succession of trees during the Holocene down to the Laacher See Tephra, which is used for synchronization with seven more recently drilled laminated sediment cores, which all are 14C-dated too and analyzed for tephra, pollen and paleobotanical macroremains. The seven newly established records reveal a continuous MIS2 section with mosses, ostracods and characea oogonia. They show that the 28.000 - 40.000 BP has witnessed an open landscape dominated by grass, but with rhythmic spread of conifer trees following the Greenland interstadial/succession. Seeds of Ranunculae provide excellent material for 14C dating. Even deciduous trees are present in small amounts until 28.000 BP. The time from 48.000 to 40.000 BP is characterized by a pronounced transition from the open landscape to an early MIS3 spruce (Picea) dominated forest during Greenland Interstadial GI17-14. Modern man apparently arrived at the end of this principal vegetation change near 40,000 BP. Volcanic activity in the Eifel had a stable and pronounced recurrence from 55,000 - 30,000 BP every 4000 years, but commenced with the beginning of MIS2. This landscape evolution with a forested early MIS3 is quite different to peat and sediment records from Netherlands/ Northern Germany/Scandinavia/ Poland, but is similar to conditions in parts of Switzerland. We address the early MIS3 forest to the nearby continuously moist soils and warm conditions in the nearby Mosel valley, i.e. on those stands where wine is growing today, and which most likely had served as a local refugia even for deciduous trees during MIS4 and MIS3. The MIS5 sections of the presented ELSA records reach down at least to the beginning of MIS5d near 118

  20. Some aspects of Cenozoic maar sediments in Europe: the source-rock potential and their exceptionally good fossil preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerle, W.

    During the last decade, two particular aspects of maar geology have been reported using Cenozoic examples: (1) the formation of sediments rich in organic matter (hydrocarbon source rocks) and (2) the exceptionally good fossil preservation in maar sediments, which invariably contain a certain amount of volcanogenic material. The periodically high sedimentation rate of maar sediments leads to rapid burial of animal or plant remains. The minute particle size of much volcanic ash, their thixotropic behaviour, and the neoformation of cryptocrystalline silica ensure rapid and complete isolation of organic matter and fossils. These factors impede exchange between the pore water in the sediment and the overlying water body, thus, protecting the organic material against oxidation.

  1. Diffuse gas emissions at the Ukinrek Maars, Alaska: Implications for magmatic degassing and volcanic monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, William C.; Bergfeld, D.; McGimsey, R.G.; Hunt, A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse CO2 efflux near the Ukinrek Maars, two small volcanic craters that formed in 1977 in a remote part of the Alaska Peninsula, was investigated using accumulation chamber measurements. High CO2 efflux, in many places exceeding 1000 g m-2 d-1, was found in conspicuous zones of plant damage or kill that cover 30,000-50,000 m2 in area. Total diffuse CO2 emission was estimated at 21-44 t d-1. Gas vents 3-km away at The Gas Rocks produce 0.5 t d-1 of CO2 that probably derives from the Ukinrek Maars basalt based on similar ??13C values (???-6???), 3He/4He ratios (5.9-7.2 RA), and CO2/3He ratios (1-2 ?? 109) in the two areas. A lower 3He/4He ratio (2.7 RA) and much higher CO2/3He ratio (9 ?? 1010) in gas from the nearest arc-front volcanic center (Mount Peulik/Ugashik) provide a useful comparison. The large diffuse CO2 emission at Ukinrek has important implications for magmatic degassing, subsurface gas transport, and local toxicity hazards. Gas-water-rock interactions play a major role in the location, magnitude and chemistry of the emissions.

  2. Unconventional maar diatreme and associated intrusions in the soft sediment-hosted Mardoux structure (Gergovie, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Greg A.; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2014-03-01

    A Miocene age volcanic-hypabyssal structure comprising volcaniclastic deposits and mafic intrusions is exposed with vertical relief of ˜110 m on the side of Gergovie Plateau (Auvergne, France). Three main volcaniclastic facies are: (1) Fluidal tuff breccia composed of juvenile basalt and sediment clasts with dominantly fluidal shapes, with several combinations of basalt and sediment within individual clasts. (2) Thickly bedded lapilli tuff composed of varying proportions of fine-grained sediment derived from Oligocene-Miocene lacustrine marls and mudstones and basaltic lapilli, blocks, and bombs. (3) Planar-bedded tuff forming thin beds of fine to coarse ash-size sedimentary material and basalt clasts. Intrusive bodies in the thickly bedded lapilli tuff range from irregularly shaped and anastomosing dikes and sills of meters to tens of meters in length, to a main feeder dike that is up to ˜20 m wide, and that flares into a spoon-shaped sill at ˜100 m in diameter and 10-20 m thick in the eastern part of the structure. Volcaniclastic deposits and structural features suggest that ascending magma entrained soft, saturated sediment host material into the feeder dike and erupted fluidal magma and wet sediment via weak, Strombolian-like explosions. Host sediment and erupted material subsided to replace the extracted sediments, producing the growth subsidence structure that is similar to upper diatreme facies in typical maar diatremes but lacks evidence for explosive disruption of diatreme fill. Irregularly shaped small intrusions extended from the main feeder dike into the diatreme, and many were disaggregated due to shifting and subsidence of diatreme fill and recycled via eruption. The Mardoux structure is an "unconventional" maar diatreme in that it was produced mainly by weak explosive activity rather than by violent phreatomagmatic explosions and is an example of complex coupling between soft sediment and ascending magma.

  3. High-resolution past environmental reconstruction in East Asia using annually laminated lake sediments of Lake Megata in northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, K.; Gotanda, K.; Yonenobu, H.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kitagawa, J.; Makohonienko, M.; Schwab, M.; Haraguchi, T.; Yasuda, Y.

    2007-12-01

    37 m-long non-glacial varved sequences were taken from Ichi-no-Megata maar in Oga Peninsula, Akita, northern part of Japan. Ichi-no-Megata maar occupies 0.25 km2 with a maximum water depth of ca. 45.1 m. The shape of lake is a kettle-type basin and the deepest bottom basin is very flat. We took core samples (named IMG06 core) at the center of the lake in November to December in 2006. In order to take completely continuous maar sediment, we drilled three holes and take every sample from each hole which apart only few meters. In this drilling campaign, we can 37 m-long continuous maar sediment except thick volcanic deposits from 26.5 to 31.7m in core. The sedimentological feature of IMG06 core is dominated by thin lamination clay/silt from most top part up to 37 m with turbidites characterized upward fining structure. The SEM image observation of lamination reveals that sponge-like lamina consists of diatom assemblage against dark colored lamina consists of mixture of detritus minerals, clay minerals, and diatom. It means sponge-like lamina deposits during spring season, and later one deposits during another three seasons, and then these thin lamination of IMG06 core could be identified as annual lamination (varves). This interpretation is supported by the correlation of historic event as earthquake and tunnel construction. In this IMG06 core, six volcanic ashes are found and we have also analyzed radiocarbon dating from 38 horizons of the core to use leaf and seeds inter-bedded varves. As the results, the IMG06 core covers from 25,000 to 4,000 14C yr BP with stable sedimentation rates (0.71mm/year).

  4. Diatom responses to limnological and climatic changes at Ribains Maar (French Massif Central) during the Eemian and Early Würm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioual, Patrick; Andrieu-Ponel, Valérie; de Beaulieu, Jacques-Louis; Reille, Maurice; Svobodova, Hélèna; Battarbee, Richard W.

    2007-06-01

    High-resolution diatom analysis was carried out to assess the limnological and climatic changes that took place at Ribains maar (French Massif Central) during the Late Pleistocene (˜131-˜105 ka BP), with a focus on the Eemian interglacial in particular. Numerical analyses were used to show that most of the variability in the fossil diatom assemblages was due to climate independently from the changes in the lake catchment vegetation (as represented by pollen data). Diatom-based quantitative reconstructions of the past limnological conditions, as well as a comprehensive literature review on the auto-ecological requirements for the principal diatom taxa, were used to interpret the record. An absolute time-scale for the sequence was derived by matching the major pollen shifts with the radiometrically dated changes in oxygen isotopes observed in Italian stalagmites. This study shows that at Ribains maar, the transition from the Riss (=Saalian) Glacial to the Eemian interglacial was marked by a gradual increase in the contribution of spring-blooming diatom species, indicating a longer growing season and milder winter/spring conditions at that time. A short cooling event interrupts this trend and may correspond to a stadial. At the start of the Eemian a peak in benthic taxa and the suppression of spring-blooming flora probably reflects the effects of deglaciation on the catchment. During the Eemian interglacial itself three main phases were distinguished within the diatom record. The first phase (˜8000 years in duration) was dominated by Stephanodiscus minutulus, which suggests that intense mixing in the water-column took place during spring. The pollen record was simultaneously dominated by Quercus and Corylus that typify this phase as the climatic optimum of the Eemian. The second phase, almost equal in duration to the first phase (˜7000 years), is generally dominated by Cyclotella taxa and suggests a less productive lake and much reduced period of spring mixing

  5. Microbial abundance in lacustrine sediments: a case study from Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, Jens; Grewe, Sina; Glombitza, Clemens; Kitte, J. Axel

    2015-09-01

    The ICDP "PaleoVan" drilling campaign at Lake Van, Turkey, provided a long (>100 m) record of lacustrine subsurface sedimentary microbial cell abundance. After the ICDP campaign at Potrok Aike, Argentina, this is only the second time deep lacustrine cell counts have been documented. Two sites were cored and revealed a strikingly similar cell distribution despite differences in organic matter content and microbial activity. Although shifted towards higher values, cell counts from Lake Potrok Aike, Argentina, reveal very similar distribution patterns with depth. The lacustrine cell count data are significantly different from published marine records; the most probable cause is differences in sedimentary organic matter composition with marine sediments containing a higher fraction of labile organic matter. Previous studies showed that microbial activity and abundance increase centimetres to metres around geologic interfaces. The finely laminated Lake Van sediment allowed studying this phenomenon on the microscale. We sampled at the scale of individual laminae, and in some depth intervals, we found large differences in microbial abundance between the different laminae. This small-scale heterogeneity is normally overlooked due to much larger sampling intervals that integrate over several centimetres. However, not all laminated intervals exhibit such large differences in microbial abundance, and some non-laminated horizons show large variability on the millimetre scale as well. The reasons for such contrasting observations remain elusive, but indicate that heterogeneity of microbial abundance in subsurface sediments has not been taken into account sufficiently. These findings have implications not just for microbiological studies but for geochemistry as well, as the large differences in microbial abundance clearly show that there are distinct microhabitats that deviate considerably from the surrounding layers.

  6. Microsedimentological characterization using image analysis and μ-XRF as indicators of sedimentary processes and climate changes during Lateglacial at Laguna Potrok Aike, Santa Cruz, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PASADO Science Team Jouve, Guillaume; Francus, Pierre; Lamoureux, Scott; Provencher-Nolet, Laurence; Hahn, Annette; Haberzettl, Torsten; Fortin, David; Nuttin, Laurence

    2013-07-01

    Palaeoclimatic and paleoenvironmental high latitude records in the Southern Hemisphere are scarce compared to the northern counterpart. However, understanding global evolution of environmental systems during sudden climate changes is inseparable from an equivalent knowledge of both Hemispheres. In this context, a high-resolution study of lacustrine sediments from Laguna Potrok Aike, Santa Cruz province, Patagonia, Argentina, was conducted for the Lateglacial period using concurrent X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Scanning electron microscope analyses. Peaks of Ca/Si and Mn, and occurrences of the green alga Phacotus lenticularis have been interpreted as variations in ventilation of the water column from 13.6 to 11.1 ka cal. BP. During this interval, mild climate conditions during the Younger Dryas are characterized by relatively weak westerlies favouring the formation of a stratified water body as indicated by preserved manganese and Ca/Si peaks and high Total Organic Carbon (TOC) values. In this environment, water in the epilimnion can reach sufficiently high temperature to allow P. lenticularis to grow. Colder conditions are marked by peaks in Ca without P. lenticularis and occur during the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR). In this Lateglacial interval, micropumices were also detected in large amount. Image analysis of thin sections allowed the counting and size measurement of detrital particles and micropumices separately. Micropumices significantly influence the iron and titanium content, hence preventing to use them as proxies of detrital input in this interval.

  7. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4) "Spirit Lake"; (5) "Lake Manawa"; (6)…

  8. Integrated geophysical and geological methods to investigate the inner and outer structures of the Quaternary Mýtina maar (W-Bohemia, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flechsig, Christina; Heinicke, Jens; Mrlina, Jan; Kämpf, Horst; Nickschick, Tobias; Schmidt, Alina; Bayer, Tomáš; Günther, Thomas; Rücker, Carsten; Seidel, Elisabeth; Seidl, Michal

    2015-11-01

    The Mýtina maar is the first known Quaternary maar in the Bohemian Massif. Based on the results of Mrlina et al. (J Volcanol Geother Res 182:97-112, 2009), a multiparametric geophysical (electrical resistivity tomography, gravimetry, magnetometry, seismics) and geological/petrochemical research study had been carried out. The interpretation of the data has provided new information about the inner structure of the volcanic complex: (1) specification of the depth of post-volcanic sedimentary fill (up to ~100 m) and (2) magnetic and resistivity signs of one (or two) hidden volcanic structures interpreted as intrusions or remains of a scoria cone. The findings at the outer structure of the maar incorporate the (1) evidence of circular fracture zones outside the maar, (2) detection and distribution of volcanic ejecta and tephra-fall deposits at the surface, and (3) indications from electrical resistivity tomography and gravity data in the area between the Mýtina maar and Železná hůrka scoria cone, interpreted as a palaeovalley, filled by volcaniclastic rocks, and aligned along the strike line (NW-SE) of the Tachov fault zone. These findings are valuable contributions to extend the knowledge about structure of maar volcanoes in general. Because of ongoing active magmatic processes in the north-east part of the Cheb Basin (ca. 15-30 km north of the investigation area), the Mýtina maar-diatreme volcano and surroundings is a suitable key area for research directed to reconstruction of the palaeovolcanic evolution and assessment of possible future hazard potential in the Bohemian Massif.

  9. Late-stage magmatic processes at Albano Maar, Colli Albani, Italy: insights from FTIR analysis of leucites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. K.; Roberge, J.; Smith, V.; Giordano, G.; Tomlinson, E.; Menzies, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The recently erupted Albano Maar, one of the Via dei Laghi phreatomagmatic eruptions of Colli Albani, Italy have eruptive deposits that are K-foiditic (9wt% K2O) and silica under-saturated (48-52wt% SiO2). These compositions suggest the melts are low viscosity [1, 2], but they fuelled very explosive eruptions, namely the widespread large Peperino ignimbrite (phreato-Plinian) deposits. Therefore a question asked by researchers is how could these melts explode and would they, if they had not interacted with groundwater? Experimental work has shown that the melt chemistries at Colli Albani require a volatile saturated system [3]. Consequently the CO2 and H2O content of the melts are critical to understanding the petrogenetic processes at Albano Maar. Since the juvenile tephra clasts exhibit extensive late stage micro-crystallization (mainly leucite), analysis of glass is difficult and not representative as the majority of the volatile components may have exsolved from the melt. Melt inclusions are also commonly recrystallized and often leaky so here we unravel the complex volatile histories of the melts using the abundant leucite crystals, which have been shown to contain magmatic water in recent studies [4]. FTIR analysis of leucite phenocrysts and microcrysts within juvenile tephra clasts (syn-eruptive) of all the erupted units at Albano Maar provide an interesting insight into volatile variations and record a late stage CO2 fluxing event, which would have contributed to the explosive nature of the eruptions. This study has also allowed for an increased understanding of the nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) that crucially record volatile speciation and fluxing in high level magmatic systems. [1] Freda et al., 2006, Bul Vol, 68, pp567-591 [2] Cross et al., 2011 IUGG abs [3] Freda et al., 2008, Lithos, pp397-415 [4] Ventura et al., 2008, Am Min, 93, pp1538-1544

  10. Characterization of potential sources of magnetic anomalies within the crust in a tectonically active region: Amphibolites and migmatites from Potrillo Maar, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, F. S.; Padovanni, E.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to characterize the oxide mineralogy and petrology of samples collected from Potrillo Maar, New Mexico with the goal of explaining the magnetic anamoly that is observed over this region from remote sensing. Potrillo Maar is a diatreme that has brought rocks from all depths in the crust to the surface almost instantaneously. The samples are therefore thought to be representative of the crust as it exists today below this portion of the Rio Grande Rift. It is generally believed that oxide minerals (magnetite, hematite, etc.) are responsible for the magnetic signature of the crust. The samples from Portillo Maar therefore offer a unique opportunity to examine the magnetic mineralogy of the entire crust. The results indicate that the magnetic anamoly observed over Rio Grande Rift may be consequence of the tectonic activity that caused mylonitization of the rocks and allowed the infiltration of oxidizing fluids.

  11. Interannual and orbital-scale climate variability in the early Miocene: Compound-specific D/H records from the Foulden Maar Diatomite, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Andrea, W. J.; Fox, B.; Lee, D.

    2013-12-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle is the most important interannual climate variation on Earth and has far reaching impacts on global climate. However, the behavior of ENSO over orbital timescales and under different global climate states is poorly understood and controversial. It has been proposed that ENSO behaved much differently in the past, perhaps even transitioning toward a permanent El Niño-like state. Our understanding of the ENSO response to orbital variations and the background climate state is incomplete and there are fundamental flaws in our knowledge of this important player in Earth's climate system. Here we present a 100,000-yr long compound-specific hydrogen isotope (D/H) record along with varve thickness data that document southern New Zealand (46°S, 170°E) climate in the early Miocene; the results suggest modulation of ENSO by Earth's orbital changes at precession (~22,000 year) and semiprecession (~11,000 year) timescales. Our data come from analyses of the Foulden Maar Diatomite, an annually laminated sediment sequence from an early Miocene freshwater lake in Otago, New Zealand. The diatomite contains approximately 100,000 dark-light couplets interpreted as biogenic varves, and has exquisite preservation of leaves, flowers, insects, diatom frustules and n-alkanoic acids derived from leaf waxes and algae. D/H records from n-alkanoic acids reveal large variations corresponding to precession (~22,000 yrs) and semi-precession (~11,000 yrs) timescales that reflect large paleohydrological changes. Varve thickness records reveal spectral power that exceeds the 99% confidence limit in the 3 to 7-yr band, and indicate that ENSO was an important driver of interannual climate variability in southern New Zealand during the early Miocene. We propose that the semiprecession-paced hydrologic changes represented by our compound-specific D/H record document the modulation of ENSO by variations in Earth's orbital configuration; specifically, that

  12. High-frequency paleoclimate signals from Foulden Maar, Waipiata Volcanic Field, southern New Zealand: An Early Miocene varved lacustrine diatomite deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindqvist, Jon K.; Lee, Daphne E.

    2009-12-01

    A freshwater diatomite deposit near Dunedin, South Island, New Zealand provides an exceptional archive of mid-latitude, seasonal climate variation during latest Oligocene-early Early Miocene time. The diatomite accumulated in a small ~ 1.5 km diameter maar-floored lake that formed during basaltic volcanism. Except for exposures of basanite dated at 23.2 Ma by 40Ar/ 39Ar, and remnants of a Paleogene sandstone and conglomerate cover, the diatomite body is surrounded by Otago Schist. Geophysical profiles indicate that the total diatomaceous sediment thickness may exceed 100 m. Two depositional facies are described from 15.5 m of weakly-consolidated fresh diatomite accessible in two pits. A thinly laminated facies, comprising 60% of the section, consists of dark brown and white couplets of average thickness 0.5 mm. Both brown and white laminae are composed essentially of frustules of a single pennate diatom, along with 1-2% of siliceous sponge spicules. Dark laminae also contain abundant 5-7.5 µm diameter siliceous chrysophycean stomatocysts and organic matter. Decalcified complete skeletons of Galaxias, a southern hemisphere group of freshwater or diadromous fish, are found throughout. Diverse well-preserved leaves, some with attached scale insects, are dominated by Lauraceae. Rare flowers are also present. Trace fossils preserved in the laminated comprise 1-1.5 mm wide pale diatomaceous strings of probable faecal origin, and isolated 20-40 mm diameter sand lenses interpreted as faecal remains of swimming waterfowl. The second diatomite facies group comprises dark brown speckled beds, interpreted as sediment gravity flows. Up to 14 cm thick and interspersed throughout the study section, they incorporate abundant laminated diatomite flecks and leaves, and minor woody plant matter and terrigenous silt. Almost all are capped by 1-8 mm of white diatomite that is interpreted as post-flow fall-out of resuspended diatom frustules. Associated breccia and swirly beds up to 8

  13. The Prodigies of The Albano Lake During Roman Age and Natural Hazard Assessment At Roma, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funiciello, R.; Giordano, G.; de Rita, D.

    Roma is built just 20 km to the northwest of the Pleistocene Colli Albani volcano, but is believed not exposed to relevant natural hazards, except for the Tiber river flood- ings, and local amplification of seismic waves from distal earthquakes. This belief has generally induced modern historians and geologists to discard as SmythologicalT the & cedil;many references to natural prodigies that are reported by many Roman-age historians. Recent studies have demonstrated that the Albano maar, the youngest volcanic cen- tre of the Colli Albani volcano and presently filled by a 175 m deep lake, protracted its activity to the Holocene triggering several catastrophic lahar events, likely related to lake withdrawal, the deposits of which are exposed to the southwest of Roma and reach its periphery. This finding youngs the history of the volcano and makes it rele- vant to pre-historic settlements, which ScarefullyT avoided the Albano maar slopes up & cedil;to the Bronze age. What is still unknown, though, is whether the lake experienced such fluctuations and overspills during historic times. Several Roman authors such as Ti- tus Livius, Dionigi d'Alicarnasso, Plutarco, Germanico, and many others wrote about the then well known 398 BC prodigious event, when, during the war between Roma and the Etruscan city of Veio, the gods anger caused the sudden rise and overspill of the Albano lake, reported as unrelated to climatic events, and the destructive flooding of the countryside. After that event Romans actually built a tunnel-drain which still operates regulating the lake level at 293 m a.s.l., 70 m below the maar rim elevation. Should those chronicles be truthful, we can join the geologic observation of Holocene lahar deposits from lake withdrawal with historical lake withdrawals, reassessing the natural hazard for the city of Roma under a point of view never explored before. This paper carefully explores the historical credibility of the 398 BC lake overspill event and its

  14. Geochemistry and eruptive behaviour of the Finca la Nava maar volcano (Campo de Calatrava, south-central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lierenfeld, Matthias Bernhard; Mattsson, Hannes B.

    2015-10-01

    Here we present a detailed investigation into the geochemistry and the excavational/depositional processes involved in the maar-diatreme forming Finca la Nava (FlN) eruption in south-central Spain. Bulk rock compositions of hand-picked juvenile fragments indicate derivation of the FIN magma from a garnet-bearing mantle source, which has subsequently been overprinted in bulk rock samples by incorporation of a combination of spinel-bearing peridotites and upper-crustal lithics (i.e. quartzites and slates). The dominating phenocryst assemblage with clinopyroxene, olivine, amphibole and phlogopite points to the classification of the juvenile magma as being olivine melilititic in composition. Ascent through the lithosphere was rapid as indicated by the calculations of settling rates of mantle peridotites (~0.8 m s-1). The original magma fragmentation level in the conduit was probably relatively shallow carrying mainly juvenile pyroclasts (~60 %) intermixed with accidental crustal lithics (~35 %) and mantle xenoliths (<5 %) to the surface. The shapes of individual pyroclasts are sub-rounded to rounded and with highly variable vesicularities (5-45 %). This fact, in combination with abundant fine-grained material in the beginning of the eruption, indicates that both magmatic and phreatomagmatic fragmentation processes may have played important roles in forming the FIN maar. A relatively constant increase in quartzitic fragments from ~35 to <60 % with increasing stratigraphic height in the FIN deposits further indicates that the crater area successively widened during the eruption, which resulted in an increased recycling of quartzitic fragments. This eruption scenario, with the formation of a diatreme at depth, is also consistent with the absence of layers dipping inwards into the crater area.

  15. Water chemistry of lakes related to active and inactive Mexican volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, María Aurora; Vilaclara, Gloria; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Ramos, Silvia; Ceniceros, Nora; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor

    2008-12-01

    Water chemistry of crater lakes, maars and water reservoirs linked to some Mexican volcanoes within and outside the Mexican Volcanic Belt has been determined for several years and examined regarding environmental and volcanic factors. All the analyzed lakes are relatively small with a maximum depth of 65 m, and are located in regions with different climates, from semi-arid to very humid, with altitudes ranging from 100 to more than 4000 m a.s.l. Crater lakes in active volcanoes (El Chichón, Popocatépetl) have very low pH, moderate to high temperatures and major ion concentrations varying with the level of volcanic unrest. Lakes in sub-arid and temperate-arid regions (like maars in Puebla and Guanajuato states) show high alkalinity and pH, with bicarbonate/carbonate, chloride, sodium and magnesium as predominant ions. Lakes located in humid climates (Central Michoacán and Veracruz state) have low mineralization and near-neutral pH values. In general, conservative dissolved ions and conductivity appear to be mostly controlled by precipitation/evaporation and by the ionic concentration of groundwater inputs. Calcium, magnesium, sulfate concentrations and pH are strongly influenced by volcanic-rock or volcanic gas interactions with water. The influence of low-level volcanic activity on crater lakes may be obscured by water-rock interactions, and climatic factors. One of the aims of this paper is to define the relative influence of these factors searching for a reference frame to recognize the early volcanic precursors in volcano-related lakes.

  16. Lake Eyre

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ...   View Larger Image Lake Eyre is a large salt lake situated between two deserts in one of Australia's driest regions. ... the effect of sunglint at the nadir camera view angle. Dry, salt encrusted parts of the lake appear bright white or gray. Purple areas have ...

  17. Geoheritage values of one of the largest maar craters in the Arabian Peninsula: the Al Wahbah Crater and other volcanoes (Harrat Kishb, Saudi Arabia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moufti, Mohammed; Németh, Károly; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef

    2013-06-01

    Al Wahbah Crater is one of the largest and deepest Quaternary maar craters in the Arabian Peninsula. It is NW-SE-elongated, ˜2.3 km wide, ˜250 m deep and surrounded by an irregular near-perpendicular crater wall cut deeply into the Proterozoic diorite basement. Very few scientific studies have been conducted on this unique site, especially in respect to understanding the associated volcanic eruption processes. Al Wahbah and adjacent large explosion craters are currently a research subject in an international project, Volcanic Risk in Saudi Arabia (VORiSA). The focus of VORiSA is to characterise the volcanic hazards and eruption mechanisms of the vast volcanic fields in Western Saudi Arabia, while also defining the unique volcanic features of this region for use in future geoconservation, geoeducation and geotourism projects. Al Wahbah is inferred to be a maar crater that formed due to an explosive interaction of magma and water. The crater is surrounded by a tephra ring that consists predominantly of base surge deposits accumulated over a pre-maar scoria cone and underlying multiple lava flow units. The tephra ring acted as an obstacle against younger lava flows that were diverted along the margin of the tephra ring creating unique lava flow surface textures that recorded inflation and deflation processes along the margin of the post-maar lava flow. Al Wahbah is a unique geological feature that is not only a dramatic landform but also a site that can promote our understanding of complex phreatomagmatic monogenetic volcanism. The complex geological features perfectly preserved at Al Wahbah makes this site as an excellent geotope and a potential centre of geoeducation programs that could lead to the establishment of a geopark in the broader area at the Kishb Volcanic Field.

  18. Microbial abundance in lacustrine sediments: a case study from Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, J.; Kitte, J. A.; Grewe, S.; Glombitza, C.

    2015-12-01

    The ICDP "PaleoVan" drilling campaign at Lake Van, Turkey, provided a long (>100 m) record of lacustrine subsurface sedimentary microbial cell abundance. After the ICDP campaign at Potrok Aike, Argentina, this is only the second time that deep lacustrine cell counts have been documented. The lacustrine cell count data are significantly different from published marine records, the most probable cause being differences in sedimentary organic matter composition, with marine sediments containing a higher fraction of labile organic matter. Previous studies showed that microbial activity and abundance increase within centimetres to meters around geologic interfaces. The finely laminated Lake Van sediment allowed studying this phenomenon on the microscale. We sampled at the scale of individual laminae (0.5 to 1 mm thick) and in some depth intervals we found differences in microbial abundance of up to two orders of magnitude between the different laminae. This small-scale heterogeneity is normally overlooked due to much larger sampling intervals that integrate over several centimetres. However, not all laminated intervals exhibit such large differences in microbial abundance, and some non-laminated horizons show large variability on the millimetre-scale as well. The reasons for such contrasting observations remain elusive, but indicate that heterogeneity of microbial abundance in subsurface sediments has not been taken into account sufficiently. These findings have implications not just for microbiological studies but for geochemistry as well, as the large differences in microbial abundance clearly show that there are distinct microhabitats that deviate considerably from the surrounding layers.

  19. Lake Constance

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Lake Constance, Europe     View ... This Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of Lake Constance covers an area measuring 355 kilometers x 287 kilometers, and ... wastewater and fertilizers. This leads to overproduction of algae and aquatic plants, exhaustion of available oxygen, loss of some fish ...

  20. Petrochemistry of ultrapotassic tephrites and associated cognate plutonic xenoliths with carbonatite affinities from the late Quaternary Qa’le Hasan Ali maars, central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, S.; Stern, C. R.; Moradian, A.

    2014-08-01

    The Quaternary Qa’le Hasan Ali (QHA) maars in central Iran occur at the intersection of the north-south Nayband fault, which defines the western boundary of the Lut micro-continental block, and a system of northwest-southeast faults, subparallel to the Zagros suture zone, that formed during the Arabian-Eurasian collision. These post-collisional maars intrude Eocene volcanic rocks of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic belt, which was generated by the subduction of Neotethys oceanic lithosphere below Iran. The highly potassic, Ti-phlogopite + Mg-rich (Fo89-92) olivine + diopside-augite + aegirine-augite basanite tephrites forming the tuff rims of the QHA maars contain tephrite-coated plutonic xenoliths, some of which are interpreted as co-genetic with the tephrites based on their similar mineralogy and Sr isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70590). Cognate plutonic xenoliths have up to ∼20 vol% calcite, considered to be magmatic calcite because of (1) its grain size, which is similar to feldspars and aegirine-augite pyroxenes in these rocks, (2) the occurrence of fine-grained inclusions of pyroxene and apatite within these calcite grains, and (3) the similarity of the Sr-isotopic composition of this calcite with the other minerals in these rocks. The fact that the magmatic calcite has remained intact and did not volatilize during the transport of these xenoliths to the surface in the hot tephrite magma implies a short transit time, indicating that they are samples of a shallow plutonic complex, as does the presence of anorthoclase in these plutonic xenoliths. Their high modal proportion of magmatic calcite suggests that this shallow plutonic complex has affinities with carbonatites. The magmatic calcite-bearing plutonic xenoliths have high LREE/HREE ratios and contain REE-rich allanite (with up to ∼20 wt% LREE) and britholite (∼60 wt% LREE) that make up ∼3 modal percent of the most calcite-rich samples. Similar to many post-collisional highly potassic rocks

  1. Combined U/Pb and (U-Th)/He geochronometry of basalt maars in Western Carpathians: implications for age of intraplate volcanism and origin of zircon metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurai, Vratislav; Danišík, Martin; Huraiová, Monika; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Ádám, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The age of intraplate volcanism in northern Pannonian Basin of Carpathians is revisited using a combination of zircon U/Pb, zircon (U-Th)/He and apatite (U-Th)/He dating techniques, complemented by electron microprobe (EMP) characterisation of dated minerals. A total of six maar structures and diatremes in the South-Slovakian Volcanic Field (SSVF) were dated and the obtained new ages yielded the following key findings: Two isolated maars in SE part indirectly dated by geomorphologic constraints to Late Pleistocene are actually of Pliocene (2.8 ± 0.2 Ma) and Late Miocene (5.5 ± 0.6 Ma) ages. In contrast, two maars in NW part of the study area are of Late Pliocene age (4.1 ± 0.4 and 5.2-5.4 Ma), younger than the Late Miocene age (~6.5 Ma) inferred previously from K/Ar data on the proximal basaltic lava flows. These maars therefore belong to the second volcanic phase that was previously identified only in SE part of the SSVF. In the light of the new geochronologic data, it seems likely that the Pliocene phreatomagmatic eruptions may have occurred along extension-related, NW- and NE-trending orthogonal faults. EMP analyses and imaging revealed an extensive syn- and post-growth metasomatic replacement by dissolution-reprecipitation in the majority of zircons. Abundant silicate melt inclusions in porous metasomatised parts of the zircons are diagnostic of magmatic rather than hydrothermal metasomatism. Consistent ages of the metasomatised and non-metasomatised zones do not indicate disturbance of the U-Pb system during the metasomatism. Enrichment in U and Th loss in the metasomatised zircons are diagnostic of an increasing oxygen fugacity triggered by degassing of the volatile residual melt during the final stages of alkali basalt fractionation. Rare zircon-to-baddeleyite transformation was probably connected with lowered silica activity in carbonated basaltic magmas in south-eastern part of the study area.

  2. Transport and mixing dynamics from explosions in debris-filled volcanic conduits: Numerical results and implications for maar-diatreme volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Matthew R.; Valentine, Greg A.

    2015-09-01

    Most volcanoes experience some degree of phreatomagmatism during their lifetime. However, the current understanding of such processes remains limited relative to their magmatic counterparts. Maar-diatremes are a common volcano type that form primarily from phreatomagmatic explosions and are an ideal candidate to further our knowledge of deposits and processes resulting from explosive magma-water interaction due to their abundance as well as their variable levels of field exposure, which allows for detailed mapping and componentry. Two conceptual models of maar-diatreme volcanoes explain the growth and evolution of the crater (maar) and subsurface vent (diatreme) through repeated explosions caused by the interaction of magma and groundwater. One model predicts progressively deepening explosions as water is used up by phreatomagmatic explosions while the other allows for explosions at any level in the diatreme, provided adequate hydrologic conditions are present. In the former, deep-seated lithics in the diatreme are directly ejected and their presence in tephra rings is often taken as a proxy for the depth at which that particular explosion occurred. In the latter, deep-seated lithics are incrementally transported toward the surface via upward directed debris jets. Here we present a novel application of multiphase numerical modeling to assess the controls on length scales of debris jets and their role in upward transport of intra-diatreme material to determine the validity of the two models. The volume of gas generated during a phreatomagmatic explosion is a first order control on the vertical distance a debris jet travels. Unless extremely large amounts of magma and water are involved, it is unlikely that most explosions deeper than ∼ 250 m breach the surface. Other factors such as pressure and temperature have lesser effects on the length scales assuming they are within realistic ranges. Redistribution of material within a diatreme is primarily driven by

  3. Deglacial and postglacial evolution of the Pingualuit Crater Lake basin, northern Québec (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiage, Pierre-Arnaud; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume; Normandeau, Alexandre; Ledoux, Grégoire; Guyard, Hervé; Pienitz, Reinhard

    2015-11-01

    The Pingualuit Crater, located in the Ungava Peninsula (northern Québec, Canada) is a 1.4-Ma-old impact crater hosting a ~ 245-m-deep lake. The lake has a great potential to preserve unique paleoclimatic and paleoecological sedimentary records of the last glacial/interglacial cycles in the terrestrial Canadian Arctic. In order to investigate the stratigraphy in the lake and the late Quaternary glacial history of the Pingualuit Crater, this study compiles data from three expeditions carried out in May 2007 (~ 9-m-long sediment core), in August 2010 (~ 50 km of seismic lines), and in September 2012 (high-resolution terrestrial LiDAR topography of the inner slopes). Despite the weak penetration (~ 10 m) of the 3.5-kHz subbottom profiling caused by the presence of boulders in the sedimentary column, seismic data coupled with the stratigraphy established from the sediment core enabled the identification of two glaciolacustrine units deposited during the final stages of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) retreat in the crater. Two episodes of postglacial mass wasting events were also identified on the slopes and in the deep basin of the crater. The high-resolution topography of the internal slopes of the crater generated from the LiDAR data permitted the confirmation of a paleolake level at 545 m and determination of the elevation of drainage outlets. Together with the mapping of glacial and deglacial landforms from air photographs, the LiDAR data allowed the development of a new deglaciation and drainage scenario for the Pingualuit Crater Lake and surrounding area. The model proposes three main phases of lake drainage, based on the activation of seven outlets following the retreat of the LIS front toward the southwest. Finally, as opposed to other high-latitude crater lake basins such as Lake El'gygytgyn or Laguna Potrok Aike where high-resolution paleoclimatic records were obtained owing to high sediment accumulation rates, the seismic data from the Pingualuit Crater Lake

  4. Quaternary high-Mg ultrapotassic rocks from the Qal'eh Hasan Ali maars, southeastern Iran: petrogenesis and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Kwan-Nang; Chung, Sun-Lin; Zarrinkoub, Mohammad Hossein; Wang, Fei; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Lee, Hao-Yang

    2015-09-01

    A set of rare, high-Mg ultrapotassic rocks from the Qal'eh Hasan Ali maars, southeastern Iran, was investigated using phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, olivine chemistry, and bulk-rock elemental and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic geochemistry to decipher their petrogenesis and regional tectonic implications. Phlogopite separates yield inverse isochron 40Ar/39Ar ages from ca. 112 to 119 ka, indicating that magma genesis postdated the onset of the Arabia-Eurasia collision at the Late Eocene-Early Oligocene. The studied rocks are characterized by kamafugitic affinity with relatively low SiO2 and Al2O3 and high CaO and Sr. They contain relatively primitive olivine (Fo85-92) that, on the basis of olivine-liquid Fe/Mg exchange equilibrium, suggests the primary melt to be ultrapotassic with ~13 wt% MgO. Other key geochemical features include extreme enrichment in most incompatible trace elements, depletions in Nb, Ta, P and Ti and enrichment in Pb relative to elements of similar incompatibilities. The Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic ratios of the rocks do not deviate significantly from the bulk silicate Earth (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7055-0.7059, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.5125-0.5126 and 176Hf/177Hf = 0.2827-0.2829). Relatively high Zn/Fe, Gd/Yb, Rb, Rb/Sr and P2O5 and low Yb and P/P* for the rocks are consistent with derivation from a mantle source containing clinopyroxene, phlogopite, apatite and garnet that formed in response to modal metasomatism in the lithospheric mantle. Relatively low Hf/Nd and high Sr/Hf of the rocks indicate that the metasomatized lithologies from which the studied rocks formed were derived dominantly from subducted marly sediments. The Qal'eh Hasan Ali magmatism is best explained by small-scale destruction of the continental mantle in a post-collisional setting, presumably driven by localized convective instability as a result of the Arabia-Eurasia collision.

  5. Principles of lake sedimentology

    SciTech Connect

    Janasson, L.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive outline on the basic sedimentological principles for lakes, and focuses on environmental aspects and matters related to lake management and control-on lake ecology rather than lake geology. This is a guide for those who plan, perform and evaluate lake sedimentological investigations. Contents abridged: Lake types and sediment types. Sedimentation in lakes and water dynamics. Lake bottom dynamics. Sediment dynamics and sediment age. Sediments in aquatic pollution control programmes. Subject index.

  6. Tracking the hydro-climatic signal from lake to sediment: A field study from central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Jonathan R.; Eastwood, Warren J.; Roberts, Neil; Jones, Matthew D.; Yiğitbaşıoğlu, Hakan; Allcock, Samantha L.; Woodbridge, Jessie; Metcalfe, Sarah E.; Leng, Melanie J.

    2015-10-01

    Palaeo-hydrological interpretations of lake sediment proxies can benefit from a robust understanding of the modern lake environment. In this study, we use Nar Gölü, a non-outlet, monomictic maar lake in central Turkey, as a field site for a natural experiment using observations and measurements over a 17-year monitoring period (1997-2014). We compare lake water and sediment trap data to isotopic, chemical and biotic proxies preserved in its varved sediments. Nar Gölü underwent a 3 m lake-level fall between 2000 and 2010. δ18Olakewater is correlated with this lake-level fall, responding to the change in water balance. Endogenic carbonate is shown to precipitate in isotopic equilibrium with lake water and there is a strong relationship between δ18Olakewater and δ18Ocarbonate, which suggests the water balance signal is accurately recorded in the sediment isotope record. Over the same period, sedimentary diatom assemblages also responded, and conductivity inferred from diatoms showed a rise. Shifts in carbonate mineralogy and elemental chemistry in the sediment record through this decade were also recorded. Intra-annual changes in δ18Olakewater and lake water chemistry are used to demonstrate the seasonal variability of the system and the influence this may have on the interpretation of δ18Ocarbonate. We use these relationships to help interpret the sedimentary record of changing lake hydrology over the last 1725 years. Nar Gölü has provided an opportunity to test critically the chain of connection from present to past, and its sedimentary record offers an archive of decadal- to centennial-scale hydro-climatic change.

  7. Lake Powell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The white ring around Lake Powell tells the story. The surface is down 98 feet. This is critical, because Powell, Lake Mead, and other lakes along the Colorado River provide water for millions of people in five states. We are in the eighth year of a drought on the Colorado River. This year was the driest year ever reported in Southern California, and there is a severe drought in Northern California, down to less than 30-percent of snow pack. This ASTER image of part of Lake Powell was acquired in 2001. The gray area depicts the shrunken, reduced 2007 lake extent compared to the extended, larger black area in 2001.

    The image covers an area of 24 x 30 km, and is centered near 37.1 degrees north latitude, 111.3 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. Geosphere-biosphere interactions in bio-activity volcanic lakes: evidences from Hule and Rìo Cuarto (Costa Rica).

    PubMed

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Calabrese, Sergio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Chiodini, Giovanni; Marasco, Ramona; Chouaia, Bessem; Avino, Rosario; Vaselli, Orlando; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Bicocchi, Gabriele; Caliro, Stefano; Ramirez, Carlos; Mora-Amador, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2)-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France) from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun (Cameroon). PMID

  9. Geosphere-biosphere interactions in bio-activity volcanic lakes: evidences from Hule and Rìo Cuarto (Costa Rica).

    PubMed

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Calabrese, Sergio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Chiodini, Giovanni; Marasco, Ramona; Chouaia, Bessem; Avino, Rosario; Vaselli, Orlando; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Bicocchi, Gabriele; Caliro, Stefano; Ramirez, Carlos; Mora-Amador, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2)-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France) from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun (Cameroon).

  10. Geosphere-Biosphere Interactions in Bio-Activity Volcanic Lakes: Evidences from Hule and Rìo Cuarto (Costa Rica)

    PubMed Central

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Calabrese, Sergio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Chiodini, Giovanni; Marasco, Ramona; Chouaia, Bessem; Avino, Rosario; Vaselli, Orlando; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Bicocchi, Gabriele; Caliro, Stefano; Ramirez, Carlos; Mora-Amador, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2)-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France) from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun (Cameroon). PMID

  11. The architecture, eruptive history, and evolution of the Table Rock Complex, Oregon: From a Surtseyan to an energetic maar eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2009-03-01

    The Table Rock Complex (TRC; Pliocene-Pleistocene), first documented and described by Heiken [Heiken, G.H., 1971. Tuff rings; examples from the Fort Rock-Christmas Lake valley basin, south-central Oregon. J. Geophy. Res. 76, 5615-5626.], is a large and well-exposed mafic phreatomagmatic complex in the Fort Rock-Christmas Lake Valley Basin, south-central Oregon. It spans an area of approximately 40 km 2, and consists of a large tuff cone in the south (TRC1), and a large tuff ring in the northeast (TRC2). At least seven additional, smaller explosion craters were formed along the flanks of the complex in the time between the two main eruptions. The first period of activity, TRC1, initiated with a Surtseyan-style eruption through a 60-70 m deep lake. The TRC1 deposits are dominated by multiple, 1-2 m thick, fining upward sequences of massive to diffusely-stratified lapilli tuff with intermittent zones of reverse grading, followed by a finely-laminated cap of fine-grained sediment. The massive deposits are interpreted as the result of eruption-fed, subaqueous turbidity current deposits; whereas, the finely laminated cap likely resulted from fallout of suspended fine-grained material through a water column. Other common features are erosive channel scour-and-fill deposits, massive tuff breccias, and abundant soft sediment deformation due to rapid sediment loading. Subaerial TRC1 deposits are exposed only proximal to the edifice, and consist of cross-stratified base-surge deposits. The eruption built a large tuff cone above the lake surface ending with an effusive stage, which produced a lava lake in the crater (365 m above the lake floor). A significant repose period occurred between the TRC1 and TRC2 eruptions, evidenced by up to 50 cm of diatomitic lake sediments at the contact between the two tuff sequences. The TRC2 eruption was the last and most energetic in the complex. General edifice morphology and a high percentage of accidental material suggest eruption through

  12. The geology of split butte — A maar of the south-central snake river plain, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womer, M. B.; Greely, R.; King, J. S.

    1980-09-01

    Split Butte is a volcanic crater of Quaternary age consisting of a tephra ring which at one time retained a lava lake. The tephra is thinly bedded and is composed of partially palagonitized sideromelane clasts and subordinate lithic fragments. The beds typically dip radially away from the center of the crater, but locally dip toward the crater center. The tephra ring resulted from phreatomagmatic eruptions as a result of interaction of groundwater with rising basaltic magma, evidenced by glassy and granulated pyroclastic debris, the presence of abundant palagonite and other secondary minerals, numerous armored lapilli, and plastically deformed ash layers below ejecta blocks. Statistical analysis of the grain size distribution of the ash also indicates a phreatomagmatic origin of Split Butte tephra. In addition, the analysis reveals that the stratigraphically lowest tephra was deposited primarily by pyroclastic flow mechanisms while the upper tephra layers, comprising the bulk of the deposits, were deposited dominantly by airfall and pyroclastic surge. The lava lake and four en echelon basalt dikes were emplaced when phreatomagmatic activity at the vent ceased. Subsequent collapse caused a broad, shallow pit crater to form in the laval lake, and minor spattering occurred at one point along the pit crater scarp. Partial erosion of the tephra, deposition of aeolian sediments and encroachment of the Butte by later lava flows completed the development of Split Butte.

  13. Holocene climatic and hydrological changes in Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, M. R.; Reidy, L. M.; Starratt, S.; Byrne, R.

    2014-12-01

    It is important to separate the role of hydrology from climate change when assessing the Holocene history of lake sediments. Big Soda Lake is a Holocene maar lake in the Great Basin of Nevada with a 9 m sediment record that covers the Holocene. The mm-scale laminations, diatoms, and δ18O and δ13C from bulk calcite in the core are consistent with a saline, closed-basin lake down to approximately 4.3 m below the sediment water interface. The top 7 cm of the core show the influence of human hydrologic modifications to the area. Below that, stable isotope data shows variable groundwater input that is mostly consistent with climate variation from other records in the western USA. Below 4.3 m depth, the laminations abruptly end and are replaced by unlaminated massive mud, sand, and gravel to the bottom. The isotopic composition of the calcite abruptly changes from covarying, to inversely varying compositions below this break. This break occurred at about 5,600 cal yr BP. In addition, the diatom assemblage below 4.3 m is similar to that found in modern Walker Lake; whereas the diatom assemblage above 4.3 m is similar to modern Mono Lake. The δ18O isotopic composition of the calcite is on average 6 ‰ more negative below 4.3 m than above the change, indicating that the lake contained fresher water before 5,600 cal yr BP ago. The cause for the abrupt change cannot be explained through climate shifts because climate in the Great Basin has been shown to be more arid between 8,000 and 5,000 cal yr BP. It has been hypothesized that the Walker River flowed to the Carson River Basin between about 14,000 and 5,000 cal yr BP, and this added water may have raised the groundwater table sufficiently in the Carson Basin to freshen Big Soda Lake. Once the Walker River diverted back to the Walker Basin, more saline conditions prevailed reflecting changes in climate and human influence at the top of the core.

  14. Drill Core Mineral Analysis by Means of the Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer HySpex, XRD and Asd in Proximity of the MÝTINA Maar, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerting, F.; Rogass, C.; Kaempf, H.; Lubitz, C.; Harms, U.; Schudack, M.; Kokaly, R.; Mielke, C.; Boesche, N.; Altenberger, U.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is increasingly used for surface mapping. Therefore different expert systems are being utilized to identify surface cover materials. Those expert systems mainly rely on the spectral comparison between unknown and library spectra, but their performances were only limited qualified. This study aims on the comparative analysis of drill core samples from the recently discovered maar system in the Czech Republic. Drill core samples from the surrounding area of the Mýtina maar were analyzed by X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and the hyperspectral spectrometer HySpex. Additionally, soil samples were measured in-situ by the ASD FieldSpec4 and in the laboratory by the HySpex VNIR/SWIR spectrometer system. The data was then analyzed by the MICA-algorithm and the results were compared to the results of the XRD -analysis. The XRD-analysis served here as validation basis. The results of the hyperspectral and the XRD analyses were used to densify a volcanic map that also integrates in-situ soil measurements in the surrounding area of Mýtina. The comparison of the XRD- and solaroptical remote sensing results showed a good correlation of qualified minerals if the soil organic carbon content was significantly low. Contrary to XRD, smectites and muscovites were also straightforward identified that underlines the overall performance of the approach to identify minerals. Basically, in this work an operable approach is proposed that enables the fast, repeatable and detailed analysis of drill cores, drill core samples and soil samples and, hence, provides a higher performance than state-of-the-art XRD-analyses.

  15. Trace Element Geochemistry of Basaltic Tephra in Maar Cores; Implications for Centre Correlation, Field Evolution, and Mantle Source Characteristics of the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, J. L.; Leonard, G.; Timm, C.; Wilson, C. J. N.; Neil, H.; Millet, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Establishing volcanic hazard and risk management strategies hinges on a detailed understanding of the type, timing and tephra dispersal of past eruptions. In order to unravel the pyroclastic eruption history of a volcanic field, genetic links between the deposits and eruption source centre need to be established. The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF; New Zealand) has been active for ca. 200 kyr and comprises ca. 53 individual centres covering an area of ca. 360km2. These centres show a range of sizes and eruptive styles from maar craters and tuff rings, to scoria cones and lava flows consistent with both phreatomagmatic and magmatic eruptions. Superimposition of the metropolitan area of Auckland (ca. 1.4 million inhabitants) on the volcanic field makes it critically important to assess the characteristics of the volcanic activity, on which to base assessment and management of the consequent hazards. Here we present a geochemical approach for correlating tephra deposits to their source centres. To acquire the most complete stratigraphic record of pyroclastic events, maar crater cores from different locations, covering various depths and thus ages across the field were selected. Magnetic susceptibility and x-ray density scanning of the cores was used to identify the basaltic tephra horizons, which were sampled and in-situ analysis of individual shards undertaken for major and trace elements using EPMA and LA-ICP-MS techniques, respectively. Our results show that tephra shard trace element ratios are comparable and complementary to the AVF whole rock database. The use of specific trace element ratios (e.g. Gd/Yb vs. Zr/Yb) allows us to fingerprint and cross correlate tephra horizons between cores and, when coupled with newly acquired 40Ar-39Ar age dating and eruption size estimates, correlate horizons to their source centres. This integrated style of study can provide valuable information to help volcanic hazard management and forecasting, and mitigation of related risks.

  16. Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Mac, Michael J.; Opler, Paul A.; Puckett Haecker, Catherine E.; Doran, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    The wild plants and animals and the natural systems that support them in the Great Lakes region are valuable resources of considerable local, regional, and national interest. They are also, in part, transboundary resources that the U.S. shares with its Canadian neighbors to the north. The way these resources are changing over time is inadequately known and is a concern for resource users and for those charged with managing and protecting these unique and valuable resources. This chapter describes the wild plants and animals and the systems that support them in the Great Lakes region; addresses their condition; and points out the gaps in our knowledge about them that, if filled, would aid in their conservation and appropriate use.

  17. The Last Glacial Maximum in the Northern European loess belt: Correlations between loess-paleosol sequences and the Dehner Maar core (Eifel Mountains)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zens, Joerg; Krauß, Lydia; Römer, Wolfgang; Klasen, Nicole; Pirson, Stéphane; Schulte, Philipp; Zeeden, Christian; Sirocko, Frank; Lehmkuhl, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The D1 project of the CRC 806 "Our way to Europe" focusses on Central Europe as a destination of modern human dispersal out of Africa. The paleo-environmental conditions along the migration areas are reconstructed by loess-paleosol sequences and lacustrine sediments. Stratigraphy and luminescence dating provide the chronological framework for the correlation of grain size and geochemical data to large-scale climate proxies like isotope ratios and dust content of Greenland ice cores. The reliability of correlations is improved by the development of precise age models of specific marker beds. In this study, we focus on the (terrestrial) Last Glacial Maximum of the Weichselian Upper Pleniglacial which is supposed to be dominated by high wind speeds and an increasing aridity. Especially in the Lower Rhine Embayment (LRE), this period is linked to an extensive erosion event. The disconformity is followed by an intensive cryosol formation. In order to support the stratigraphical observations from the field, luminescence dating and grain size analysis were applied on three loess-paleosol sequences along the northern European loess belt to develop a more reliable chronology and to reconstruct paleo-environmental dynamics. The loess sections were compared to newest results from heavy mineral and grain size analysis from the Dehner Maar core (Eifel Mountains) and correlated to NGRIP records. Volcanic minerals can be found in the Dehner Maar core from a visible tephra layer at 27.8 ka up to ~25 ka. They can be correlated to the Eltville Tephra found in loess section. New quartz luminescence ages from Romont (Belgium) surrounding the tephra dated the deposition between 25.0 + 2.3 ka and 25.8 + 2.4 ka. In the following, heavy minerals show an increasing importance of strong easterly winds during the second Greenland dust peak (~24 ka b2k) correlating with an extensive erosion event in the LRE. Luminescence dating on quartz bracketing the following soil formation yielded ages of

  18. Longevity of Lake Superior lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schram, Stephen T.; Fabrizio, Mary C.

    1998-01-01

    The age structure of mature lake trout Salvelinus namaycush from the Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior increased following a population recovery that has taken place since the 1960s. As the population aged, it became apparent that scales were unreliable aging structures. Beginning in 1986, we examined both scale and sagittal otolith ages from tagged fish with a known period at liberty. We found large discrepancies in scale and sagittal otolith ages of mature fish, such that scale ages were biased low. We estimated lake trout living up to 42 years, which is greater than previously reported from Lake Superior. Investigators studying lake trout population dynamics in the Great Lakes should be aware that lake trout can live longer than previously thought.

  19. Lake Volta, Ghana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Lake Volta in Ghana was acquired March 31, 2002 by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Lake Volta is one of the world's largest artificially created lakes. Lake Volta is actually a reservoir formed from the damming of the Volta River, and extends 250 miles north of the Akosombo Dam. The lake covers an area of 8,482 square km. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  20. Lake Nasser and Toshka Lakes, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Nasser (center) and the Toshka Lakes (center left) glow emerald green and black in this MODIS true-color image acquired March 8, 2002. Located on and near the border of Egypt and Norther Sudan, these lakes are an oasis of water in between the Nubian (lower right) and Libyan Deserts (upper left). Also visible are the Red Sea (in the upper right) and the Nile River (running north from Lake Nasser). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  1. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Eckert, Thomas H.; Schaner, Ted; Bowlby, James N.; Schleen, Larry P.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to maintain the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) population in Lake Ontario by stocking fry failed and the species was extirpated by the 1950s. Hatchery fish stocked in the 1960s did not live to maturity because of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) predation and incidental commercial harvest. Suppression of sea lampreys began with larvicide treatments of Lake Ontario tributaries in 1971 and was enhanced when the tributaries of Oneida Lake and Lake Erie were treated in the 1980s. Annual stocking of hatchery fish was resumed with the 1972 year class and peaked at about 1.8 million yearlings and 0.3 million fingerlings from the 1985–1990 year classes. Survival of stocked yearlings declined over 50% in the 1980 s and was negatively correlated with the abundance of lake trout > 550 mm long (r = −0.91, P < 0.01, n = 12). A slot length limit imposed by the State of New York for the 1988 fishing season reduced angler harvest. Angler harvest in Canadian waters was 3 times higher in eastern Lake Ontario than in western Lake Ontario. For the 1977–1984 year classes, mean annual survival rate of lake trout age 6 and older was 0.45 (range: 0.35–0.56). In U.S. waters during 1985–1992, the total number of lake trout harvested by anglers was about 2.4 times greater than that killed by sea lampreys. The number of unmarked lake trout < 250 mm long in trawl catches in 1978–1992 was not different from that expected due to loss of marks and failure to apply marks at the hatchery, and suggested that recruitment of naturally-produced fish was nil. However, many of the obstacles which may have impeded lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Ontario during the 1980s are slowly being removed, and there are signs of a general ecosystem recovery. Significant recruitment of naturally produced lake trout by the year 2000, one interim objective of the rehabilitation plan for the Lake, may be achieved.

  2. Lakes Ecosystem Services Online

    EPA Science Inventory

    Northeastern lakes provide valuable ecosystem services that benefit residents and visitors and are increasingly important for provisioning of recreational opportunities and amenities. Concurrently, however, population growth threatens lakes by, for instance, increasing nutrient ...

  3. Utah: Salt Lake Region

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter and Summer Views of the Salt Lake Region     View Larger Image Magnificent views of the region surrounding Salt Lake City, Utah are captured in these winter and summer images from the ...

  4. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This book contains lesson plans that provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into elementary subjects. The book is divided into three subject areas: (1) History, which includes the origins of the Great Lakes, Great Lakes people, and shipwrecks; (2) Social Studies, which covers government, acid rain as a…

  5. A Killer Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvath, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In 1986, Lake Nyos, a volcanic lake in Cameroon, released a huge amount of carbon dioxide gas, killing over 1,700 people in the surrounding area. This case study, developed for use in a limnology or aquatic biology course, explores that event, introducing students to concepts relating to lake formation, thermal stratification, and dissolved gases.…

  6. Great Lakes: Chemical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tenth Great Lakes Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society met to assess current Chemical Research activity in the Great Lakes Basin, and addressed to the various aspects of the theme, Chemistry of the Great Lakes. Research areas reviewed included watershed studies, atmospheric and aquatic studies, and sediment studies. (BT)

  7. Lake Layers: Stratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Chris; And Others

    This teacher guide and student workbook set contains two learning activities, designed for fifth through ninth grade students, that concentrate on lake stratification and water quality. In the activities students model the seasonal temperature changes that occur in temperate lakes and observe the resulting stratification of lake waters. Students…

  8. Late Pleistocene aeolian dust provenances and wind direction changes reconstructed by heavy mineral analysis of the sediments of the Dehner dry maar (Eifel Mountains, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmkuhl, Frank; Römer, Wolfgang; Sirocko, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The study presents the results of a heavy mineral analysis from a 38 m long record of aeolian sediments from a core section of the Dehner dry maar (Eifel Mountains, Germany). The record encompasses the period from 30 to about 12.5 ka. Heavy-mineral analysis of the silt fraction has been performed at a sampling interval of 1 m. Statistical analyses enabled the distinction of local and regional source areas of aeolian material and revealed pronounced changes in the amounts of different heavy mineral species and corresponding changes in the grain size index (GSI). The results indicate that during the early stages of MIS 2 (40 to 30m depth) aeolian sediments were supplied mostly from local sources. This period is characterized by a low GSI ratio resulting from a reduced mobility of material due to a vegetation cover. The climax of the LGM is characterized by a higher supply of heavy minerals from regional and more distant sources. Changes in the provenance areas are indicated in inverse relationships between zircon, rutile, tourmaline (ZRT) and carbonate particles. Shifts in the wind direction are documented in pronounced peaks of carbonate particles indicating easterly winds that have crossed the limestone basins in the Eifeler North South Zone. ZRT-group minerals on the other hand suggest a westerly source area and a supply from areas consisting of Paleozoic clastic sedimentary rocks. In the periods following the LGM the analyses indicate an increasing degree of mixing of heavy minerals from various provinces. This suggests the existence of a presumably incomplete, thin cover of deflatable loessic sediments that has been repeatedly reworked on the elevated surfaces of the Eifel.

  9. Food of lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dryer, William R.; Erkkila, Leo F.; Tetzloff, Clifford L.

    1965-01-01

    Stomachs were examined from 1,492 lake trout and 83 siscowets collected from Lake Superior. Data are given on the food of lake trout of legal size (17 inches or longer) by year, season, and depth of water, and on the relation between food and size among smaller lake trout. Fish contributed 96.7 to 99.9 per cent of the total volume of food in the annual samples. Ciscoes (Coregonus spp.) were most common (52.2 to 87.5 per cent of the volume) in 1950 to 1953 and American smelt ranked first (65.6 per cent of the volume) in 1963. Cottids were in 8.9 to 12.3 per cent of the stomachs in 1950 to 1953 but in only 4.3 per cent in 1963. Insects ranked second to fish in occurrence (9.6 per cent for the combined samples) and crustaceans followed at 3.9 per cent. The greatest seasonal changes in the food of lake trout were among fish caught at 35 fathoms and shallower. The occurrence of Coregonus increased from 34.6 per cent in February-March to 71.1 per cent in October-December. Smelt were in 76.9 per cent of the stomachs in February-March but in only 2.2 per cent in October-December. Cottids, Mysis relicta, and insects were most common in the July-September collections. Lake trout taken at depths greater than 35 fathoms had eaten a higher percentage of Cottidae and Coregonus than had those captured in shallower water. Smelt, ninespine sticklebacks, Mysis, and insects were more frequent in stomachs of lake trout from less than 35 fathoms. Crustaceans comprised more than 70 per cent of the total volume of food for 4.0- to 7.9-inch lake trout but their importance decreased as the lake trout grew larger. Pontoporeia affinis was the most common in the stomachs of 4.0- to 6.9-inch lake trout and Mysis held first rank at 7.0 to 12.9 inches. Ostracods were important only to 4.0- to 4.9-inch lake trout. As the lake trout became larger, the importance of fish grew from 4.4-per cent occurrence at 5.0 to 5.9 inches to 93.9 per cent at 16.0 to 16.9 inches. Smelt were most commonly eaten by

  10. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, F.L.; Wells, F.C.; Shelby, W.J.; McPherson, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Lake Austin and Town Lake are impoundments on the Colorado River in Travis County, central Texas, and are a source of water for municipal industrial water supplies, electrical-power generation, and recreation for more than 500,000 people in the Austin metropolitan area. Small vertical temperature variations in both lakes were attributed to shallow depths in the lakes and short retention times of water in the lakes during the summer months. The largest areal variations in dissolved oxygen generally occur in Lake Austin during the summer as a result of releases of water from below the thermocline in Lake Travis. Except for iron, manganese, and mercury, dissolved concentrations of trace elements in water collected from Lake Austin and Town Lake did not exceed the primary or secondary drinking water standards set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Little or no effect of stormwater runoff on temperature, dissolved oxygen, or minor elements could be detected in either Lake Austin or Town Lake. Little seasonal or areal variation was noted in nitrogen concentrations in Lake Austin or Town lake. Total phosphorus concentrations generally were small in both lakes. Increased concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were detected after storm runoff inflow in Town Lake, but not in Lake Austin; densities of fecal-coliform bacteria increased in Lake Austin and Town Lake, but were substantially greater in Town Lake than in Lake Austin. 18 refs., 38 figs., 59 tabs.

  11. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eshenroder, Randy L.; Payne, N. Robert; Johnson, James E.; Bowen, Charles; Ebener, Mark P.

    1995-01-01

    Efforts to restore lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Huron after their collapse in the 1940s were underway in the early 1970s with completion of the first round of lampricide applications in tributary streams and the stocking of several genotypes. We assess results of rehabilitation and establish a historical basis for comparison by quantifying the catch of spawning lake trout from Michigan waters in 1929-1932. Sixty-eight percent of this catch occurred in northern waters (MH-1) and most of the rest (15%) was from remote reefs in the middle of the main basin. Sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) increased in the early 1980s in the main basin and depressed spawning populations of lake trout. This increase was especially severe in northern waters and appeared to be associated with untreated populations in the St. Marys River. Excessive commercial fishing stemming from unresolved treaty rights also contributed to loss of spawning fish in northern Michigan waters. Seneca-strain lake trout did not appear to be attacked by sea lampreys until they reached a size > 532 mm. At sizes > 632 mm, Seneca trout were 40-fold more abundant than the Marquette strain in matched-planting experiments. Natural reproduction past the fry stage has occurred in Thunder Bay and South Bay, but prospects for self-sustaining populations of lake trout in the main basin are poor because sea lampreys are too abundant, only one side of the basin is stocked, and stocking is deferred to allow commercial gillnetting in areas where most of the spawning occurred historically. Backcross lake trout, a lake trout x splake (s. Fontinalis x s. Namaycush) hybrid, did not reproduce in Georgian Bay, but this genotype is being replaced with pure-strain lake trout, whose early performance appears promising.

  12. Stage fluctuations of Wisconsin lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, Leo B.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes lake-stage fluctuations of 83 gaged lakes in Wisconsin and presents techniques for estimating stage fluctuation at ungaged lakes. Included are stage information at 83 lakes and stage-frequency data for 32 of these lakes that had sufficient record for analysis. Lakes are classified by a hydrologic-topographic lake classification scheme as ground-water flowthrough (GWF) lakes, surface-water drainage (SWD) lakes, and surface-water flow-through (SWF) lakes. Lakes within the same class were found to have similar water-level fluctuations. The lake-stage records indicate that most annual maximums occur during the months of May and June for all three classes. Annual minimum lake levels generally occur in September for surface-water drainage lakes, in March for surface-water flowthrough lakes, and in November for ground-water flow-through lakes. Data for each lake include location, period of water-level record, hydrologic classification, drainage area, surface area, lake volume, maximum depth, long-term mean stage and its standard deviation, maximum and minimum observed lake stage, and the average annual lake-stage fluctuation.

  13. The enigmatic Zerelia twin-lakes (Thessaly, Central Greece): two potential meteorite impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, V. J.; Lagios, E.; Reusser, E.; Sakkas, V.; Gartzos, E.; Kyriakopoulos, K.

    2013-09-01

    Two circular permanent lakes of 150 and 250 m diameter and 6-8 m depth to an unconsolidated muddy bottom occur 250 m apart from each other in the agricultural fields SW of the town of Almiros (Thessaly, central Greece). The age of the lakes is assumed to be Late Pliocene to Early Holocene with a minimum age of approx. 7000 yr BP. The abundant polymict, quartz-rich carbonate breccia and clasts with a clay rich matrix in the shallow embankments of the lakes show weak stratification but no volcanic structures. The carbonate clasts and particles often display spheroidal shapes and consist of calcite aggregates with feathery, arborescent, variolitic to micro-sparitic textures and spheroidal fabrics, recrystallized and deformed glass-shaped fragments, calcite globules in quartz; thus indications of possible carbonate melting, quenching and devitrification. The carbonatic matrix includes small xenomorphic phases, such as chromspinel, zircon with blurred granular and skeletal textures, skeletal rutile and ilmenite, which are interpreted as relicts of partial melting and quenching under high temperatures of 1240-1800 °C. Only a few quartz fragments exhibit indistinct planar fractures. In several cases they include exotic Al-Si- and sulfur bearing Fe-phases, < 1-10 μm as globules. The modeled "Residual Gravity" profiles through the lakes indicate negative gravity anomalies of bowl-type structures down to 150 m for the eastern lake and down to 250 m for the larger western lake. Several hypotheses can be drawn upon to explain the origin of these enigmatic twin-lakes: (a) Maar-type volcanic craters; (b) hydrothermal or CO2/hydrocarbon gas explosion craters; (c) and (d) doline holes due to karstification; or (e) small meteorite impact craters, the latter being a plausible explanation due to geologic, petrologic, and geophysical evidence. The morphology and dimensions of the lakes as well as the density contrast tomography of the bedrock favor a meteorite impact hypothesis of a

  14. Hydrology of Indiana lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perrey, Joseph Irving; Corbett, Don Melvin

    1956-01-01

    The stabilization of lake levels often requires the construction of outlet control structures. A detailed study of past lake-level elevations and other hydologic date is necessary to establish a level that can be maintained and to determine the means necessary for maintaining the established level. Detailed lake-level records for 28 lakes are included in the report, and records for over 100 other lakes data are available in the U.S. Geological Survey Office, Indianapolis, Ind. Evaporation data from the four Class A evaporation station of the U. S. Weather Bureau have been compiled in this report. A table showing the established legal lake level and related data is included.

  15. Origins of rainbow smelt in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.

    1983-01-01

    The first rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) to enter Lake Ontario were probably migrants from an anadromous strain introduced into New York's Finger Lakes. Since the upper Great Lakes were originally stocked with a landlocked strain from Green Lake, Maine, subsequent migration to Lake Ontario from Lake Erie makes Lake Ontario unique among the Great Lakes in probably having received introductions from two distinct populations.

  16. David Morrison on Lake Vostok

    NASA Video Gallery

    Dr. David Morrison discusses the implications of research possibilities at Lake Vostok, one of the largest subglacial lakes located over two miles beneath the ice in Antarctica. The lake has been c...

  17. Great Lakes Literacy Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Manzo, Lyndsey

    2011-03-01

    Lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Ontario, and Erie together form North America's Great Lakes, a region that contains 20% of the world's fresh surface water and is home to roughly one quarter of the U.S. population (Figure 1). Supporting a $4 billion sport fishing industry, plus $16 billion annually in boating, 1.5 million U.S. jobs, and $62 billion in annual wages directly, the Great Lakes form the backbone of a regional economy that is vital to the United States as a whole (see http://www.miseagrant.umich.edu/downloads/economy/11-708-Great-Lakes-Jobs.pdf). Yet the grandeur and importance of this freshwater resource are little understood, not only by people in the rest of the country but also by many in the region itself. To help address this lack of knowledge, the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) Great Lakes, supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, developed literacy principles for the Great Lakes to serve as a guide for education of students and the public. These “Great Lakes Literacy Principles” represent an understanding of the Great Lakes' influences on society and society's influences on the Great Lakes.

  18. Lakes, Lagerstaetten, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, E. G.; Park, L. E.

    2001-12-01

    The diversity of terrestrial systems is estimated to be greater than in the marine realm. However no hard data yet exists to substantiate this claim. Ancient lacustrine deposits may preserve an exceptionally diverse fossil fauna and aid in determining continental faunal diversities. Fossils preserved in lake deposits, especially those with exceptional preservation (i.e. Konservat Lagerstaetten), may represent a dependable method for determining species diversity changes in the terrestrial environment because of their faunal completeness. Important Konservat Lagerstaetten, such as the Green River Formation (US) and Messel (Germany), both Eocene in age, are found in lake sediments and show a remarkable faunal diversity for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To date information from nearly 25 lake lagerstaetten derived from different types of lake basins from the Carboniferous to the Miocene have been collected and described. Carboniferous sites derive from the cyclothems of Midcontinent of the US while many Cenozoic sites have been described from North and South America as well as Europe and Australia. Asian sites contain fossils from the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. With this data, insight into the evolutionary processes associated with lake systems can be examined. Do lakes act as unique evolutionary crucibles in contrast to marine systems? The speciation of cichlid fishes in present-day African lakes appears to be very high and is attributed to the diversity of environments found in large rift lakes. Is this true of all ancient lakes or just large rift lakes? The longevity of a lake system may be an important factor in allowing speciation and evolutionary processes to occur; marine systems are limited only in the existence of environments as controlled by tectonics and sea level changes, on the order of tens of millions of years. Rift lakes are normally the longest lived in the millions of years. Perhaps there are only certain types of lakes in which speciation of

  19. Lessons from a Lake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goethals, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study that included classroom lessons on hydroelectric power, the history and construction of a nearby lake, data recording, the use of field guides, and methods of counting natural populations. The study culminated in a field trip to the lake. (JRH)

  20. The Great Lakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seasons, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reserviors of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. These lakes and their relationship with people of Canada and the United States can be useful as a subject for teaching the impact of human…

  1. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  2. Utah: Salt Lake City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... backdrops for the 2002 Winter Olympics, to be held in Salt Lake City, Utah. The mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are renowned for ... western edge of the Rocky Mountains and eastern rim of the Great Basin. This early-winter image pair was acquired by the Multi-angle ...

  3. The lakes of Titan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stofan, E.R.; Elachi, C.; Lunine, J.I.; Lorenz, R.D.; Stiles, B.; Mitchell, K.L.; Ostro, S.; Soderblom, L.; Wood, C.; Zebker, H.; Wall, S.; Janssen, M.; Kirk, R.; Lopes, R.; Paganelli, F.; Radebaugh, J.; Wye, L.; Anderson, Y.; Allison, M.; Boehmer, R.; Callahan, P.; Encrenaz, P.; Flamini, E.; Francescetti, G.; Gim, Y.; Hamilton, G.; Hensley, S.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Kelleher, K.; Muhleman, D.; Paillou, P.; Picardi, G.; Posa, F.; Roth, L.; Seu, R.; Shaffer, S.; Vetrella, S.; West, R.

    2007-01-01

    The surface of Saturn's haze-shrouded moon Titan has long been proposed to have oceans or lakes, on the basis of the stability of liquid methane at the surface. Initial visible and radar imaging failed to find any evidence of an ocean, although abundant evidence was found that flowing liquids have existed on the surface. Here we provide definitive evidence for the presence of lakes on the surface of Titan, obtained during the Cassini Radar flyby of Titan on 22 July 2006 (T16). The radar imaging polewards of 70?? north shows more than 75 circular to irregular radar-dark patches, in a region where liquid methane and ethane are expected to be abundant and stable on the surface. The radar-dark patches are interpreted as lakes on the basis of their very low radar reflectivity and morphological similarities to lakes, including associated channels and location in topographic depressions. Some of the lakes do not completely fill the depressions in which they lie, and apparently dry depressions are present. We interpret this to indicate that lakes are present in a number of states, including partly dry and liquid-filled. These northern-hemisphere lakes constitute the strongest evidence yet that a condensable-liquid hydrological cycle is active in Titan's surface and atmosphere, in which the lakes are filled through rainfall and/or intersection with the subsurface 'liquid methane' table. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Great Lakes: Great Gardening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York Sea Grant Inst., Albany, NY.

    This folder contains 12 fact sheets designed to improve the quality of gardens near the Great Lakes. The titles are: (1) "Your Garden and the Great Lakes"; (2) "Organic Gardening"; (3) "Fruit and Vegetable Gardening"; (4) "Composting Yard Wastes"; (5) "Herbicides and Water Quality"; (6) "Watering"; (7) "Soil Erosion by Water"; (8) "Soil…

  5. Lake Wobegon Dice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraleda, Jorge; Stork, David G.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce Lake Wobegon dice, where each die is "better than the set average." Specifically, these dice have the paradoxical property that on every roll, each die is more likely to roll greater than the set average on the roll, than less than this set average. We also show how to construct minimal optimal Lake Wobegon sets for all "n" [greater…

  6. Great Lakes Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ron

    The Great Lakes are one of the world's greatest reservoirs of fresh water, the foundation of Ontario's economic development, a primary force in ecological systems, and a base for pleasure and recreation. They are also a magnificent resource for the teachers of Ontario. Study of the Great Lakes can bring to life the factors that shape the ecology…

  7. Lake Superior revisited 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacCallum, Wayne R.; Selgeby, James H.

    1987-01-01

    The Lake Superior fish community has changed substantially since the early 1960s, when control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) became effective. Self-reproducing stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) have been reestablished in many inshore areas, although they have not yet reached pre-sea lamprey abundance; offshore lake trout are probably at or near pre-sea lamprey abundance. Stocks of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) appear to have fully recovered; commercial catches are at or above historical levels. Lake herring (Coregonus artedii) are recovering rapidly in U.S. waters and are abundant in western Canadian waters. The population of rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), which declined in the 1970s, is recovering. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus) are becoming more abundant as a result of increased stocking in U.S. waters and are reproducing in most suitable tributaries; they have become significant in anglers' creels.

  8. Lakes and reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Taub, F.B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume in the Ecosystems of the World series studies lakes and reservoirs. The book opens with a discussion of the ecosystem processes that are common to all lakes and reservoirs and then proceeds to a description of mathematical models of these processes. The chapters concentrate on lakes and reservoirs in different parts of the world, ranging from polar to tropical lakes, and in many of the chapters the effects of human activities such as dam construction, increased nutrient inputs, toxic contaminants and fish introduction, are also considered. The book concludes with a summary of the efforts at lake restoration that are being undertaken in many communities in an attempt to undo the damage that has resulted from some of these activities.

  9. Lake trout in northern Lake Huron spawn on submerged drumlins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, Stephen C.; Binder, Thomas; Wattrus, Nigel J.; Faust, Matthew D.; Janssen, John; Menzies, John; Marsden, J. Ellen; Ebener, Mark P.; Bronte, Charles R.; He, Ji X.; Tucker, Taaja R.; Hansen, Michael J.; Thompson, Henry T.; Muir, Andrew M.; Krueger, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations of spawning lake trout Salvelinus namaycush near Drummond Island in northern Lake Huron indicate that lake trout use drumlins, landforms created in subglacial environments by the action of ice sheets, as a primary spawning habitat. From these observations, we generated a hypothesis that may in part explain locations chosen by lake trout for spawning. Most salmonines spawn in streams where they rely on streamflows to sort and clean sediments to create good spawning habitat. Flows sufficient to sort larger sediment sizes are generally lacking in lakes, but some glacial bedforms contain large pockets of sorted sediments that can provide the interstitial spaces necessary for lake trout egg incubation, particularly if these bedforms are situated such that lake currents can penetrate these sediments. We hypothesize that sediment inclusions from glacial scavenging and sediment sorting that occurred during the creation of bedforms such as drumlins, end moraines, and eskers create suitable conditions for lake trout egg incubation, particularly where these bedforms interact with lake currents to remove fine sediments. Further, these bedforms may provide high-quality lake trout spawning habitat at many locations in the Great Lakes and may be especially important along the southern edge of the range of the species. A better understanding of the role of glacially-derived bedforms in the creation of lake trout spawning habitat may help develop powerful predictors of lake trout spawning locations, provide insight into the evolution of unique spawning behaviors by lake trout, and aid in lake trout restoration in the Great Lakes.

  10. Spatial patterns in PCB concentrations of Lake Michigan lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.; Brown, Edward H.; Eck, Gary W.; Schmidt, Larry J.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Chernyak, Sergei M.; Passino-Reader, Dora R.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the PCB body burden in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) of the Great Lakes is from their food. PCB concentrations were determined in lake trout from three different locations in Lake Michigan during 1994–1995, and lake trout diets were analyzed at all three locations. The PCB concentrations were also determined in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), bloater (Coregonus hoyi), slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus), and deepwater sculpin (Myoxocephalus thompsoni), five species of prey fish eaten by lake trout in Lake Michigan, at three nearshore sites in the lake. Despite the lack of significant differences in the PCB concentrations of alewife, rainbow smelt, bloater, slimy sculpin, and deepwater sculpin from the southeastern nearshore site near Saugatuck (Michigan) compared with the corresponding PCB concentrations from the northwestern nearshore site near Sturgeon Bay (Wisconsin), PCB concentrations in lake trout at Saugatuck were significantly higher than those at Sturgeon Bay. The difference in the lake trout PCB concentrations between Saugatuck and Sturgeon Bay could be explained by diet differences. The diet of lake trout at Saugatuck was more concentrated in PCBs than the diet of Sturgeon Bay lake trout, and therefore lake trout at Saugatuck were more contaminated in PCBs than Sturgeon Bay lake trout. These findings were useful in interpreting the long-term monitoring series for contaminants in lake trout at both Saugatuck and the Wisconsin side of the lake.

  11. Water quality of Lake Austin and Town Lake, Austin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Freeman L.; Wells, Frank C.; Shelby, Wanda J.; McPherson, Emma

    1988-01-01

    Water-quality data collected from Lake Austin and Town Lake, following runoff, generally were not adequate to fully determine the effects of runoff on the lakes. Data collection should not to be limited to fixed-station sampling following runoff, and both lakes need to be sampled simultaneously as soon as possible following significant precipitation.

  12. Evidence of offshore lake trout reproduction in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Bowen, Charles A., II

    2003-01-01

    Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef, an offshore reef complex, was an historically important spawning area believed to represent some of the best habitat for the rehabilitation of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in Lake Huron. Since 1986, lake trout have been stocked on these offshore reefs to reestablish self-sustaining populations. We sampled with beam trawls to determine the abundance of naturally reproduced age-0 lake trout on these offshore reefs during May-July in 1994-1998 and 2000-2002. In total, 123 naturally reproduced lake trout fry were caught at Six Fathom Bank, and 2 naturally reproduced lake trout fry were caught at nearby Yankee Reef. Our findings suggest that this region of Lake Huron contains suitable habitat for lake trout spawning and offers hope that lake trout rehabilitation can be achieved in the main basin of Lake Huron.

  13. Lake whitefish and lake herring population structure and niche in ten south-central Ontario lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carl, Leon M.; McGuiness, Fiona

    2006-01-01

    This study compares simple fish communities of ten oligotrophic lakes in south-central Ontario. Species densities and population size structure vary significantly among these lake communities depending on fish species present beyond the littoral zone. Lake whitefish are fewer and larger in the presence of lake herring than in their absence. Diet analysis indicates that lake whitefish shift from feeding on both plankton and benthic prey when lake herring are absent to a primarily benthic feeding niche in the presence of lake herring. When benthic round whitefish are present, lake whitefish size and density decline and they move lower in the lake compared to round whitefish. Burbot are also fewer and larger in lakes with lake herring than in lakes without herring. Burbot, in turn, appear to influence the population structure of benthic coregonine species. Lower densities of benthic lake whitefish and round whitefish are found in lakes containing large benthic burbot than in lakes with either small burbot or where burbot are absent. Predation on the pelagic larvae of burbot and lake whitefish by planktivorous lake herring alters the size and age structure of these populations. As life history theory predicts, those species with poor larval survival appear to adopt a bet-hedging life history strategy of long-lived individuals as a reproductive reserve.

  14. Lake sturgeon population characteristics in Rainy Lake, Minnesota and Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, W.E.; Kallemeyn, L.W.; Willis, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Rainy Lake contains a native population of lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens that has been largely unstudied. The aims of this study were to document the population characteristics of lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake and to relate environmental factors to year-class strength for this population. Gill-netting efforts throughout the study resulted in the capture of 322 lake sturgeon, including 50 recaptures. Lake sturgeon in Rainy Lake was relatively plump and fast growing compared with a 32-population summary. Population samples were dominated by lake sturgeon between 110 and 150 cm total length. Age–structure analysis of the samples indicated few younger (<10 years) lake sturgeon, but the smallest gill net mesh size used for sampling was 102 mm (bar measure) and would not retain small sturgeon. Few lake sturgeon older than age 50 years were captured, and maximum age of sampled fish was 59 years. Few correlations existed between lake sturgeon year-class indices and both annual and monthly climate variables, except that mean June air temperature was positively correlated with year-class strength. Analysis of Rainy Lake water elevation and resulting lake sturgeon year-class strength indices across years yielded consistent but weak negative correlations between late April and early June, when spawning of lake sturgeon occurs. The baseline data collected in this study should allow Rainy Lake biologists to establish more specific research questions in the future.

  15. Yellowstone Lake Nanoarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E.; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P.; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations. PMID:24062731

  16. Whiting in Lake Michigan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Satellites provide a view from space of changes on the Earth's surface. This series of images from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) aboard the Orbview-2 satellite shows the dramatic change in the color of Lake Michigan during the summer. The bright color that appears in late summer is probably caused by calcium carbonate-chalk-in the water. Lake Michigan always has a lot of calcium carbonate in it because the floor of the lake is limestone. During most of the year the calcium carbonate remains dissolved in the cold water, but at the end of summer the lake warms up, lowering the solubility of calcium carbonate. As a result, the calcium carbonate precipitates out of the water, forming clouds of very small solid particles that appear as bright swirls from above. The phenomenon is appropriately called a whiting event. A similar event occured in 1999, but appears to have started later and subsided earlier. It is also possible that a bloom of the algae Microcystis is responsible for the color change, but unlikely because of Lake Michigan's depth and size. Microcystis blooms have occured in other lakes in the region, however. On the shore of the lake it is possible to see the cities of Chicago, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Both appear as clusters of gray-brown pixels. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  17. Yellowstone lake nanoarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Clingenpeel, Scott; Kan, Jinjun; Macur, Richard E; Woyke, Tanja; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Inskeep, William P; Nealson, Kenneth; McDermott, Timothy R

    2013-01-01

    Considerable Nanoarchaeota novelty and diversity were encountered in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park (YNP), where sampling targeted lake floor hydrothermal vent fluids, streamers and sediments associated with these vents, and in planktonic photic zones in three different regions of the lake. Significant homonucleotide repeats (HR) were observed in pyrosequence reads and in near full-length Sanger sequences, averaging 112 HR per 1349 bp clone and could confound diversity estimates derived from pyrosequencing, resulting in false nucleotide insertions or deletions (indels). However, Sanger sequencing of two different sets of PCR clones (110 bp, 1349 bp) demonstrated that at least some of these indels are real. The majority of the Nanoarchaeota PCR amplicons were vent associated; however, curiously, one relatively small Nanoarchaeota OTU (71 pyrosequencing reads) was only found in photic zone water samples obtained from a region of the lake furthest removed from the hydrothermal regions of the lake. Extensive pyrosequencing failed to demonstrate the presence of an Ignicoccus lineage in this lake, suggesting the Nanoarchaeota in this environment are associated with novel Archaea hosts. Defined phylogroups based on near full-length PCR clones document the significant Nanoarchaeota 16S rRNA gene diversity in this lake and firmly establish a terrestrial clade distinct from the marine Nanoarcheota as well as from other geographical locations.

  18. Ecology of playa lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haukos, David A.; Smith, Loren M.

    1992-01-01

    Between 25,000 and 30,000 playa lakes are in the playa lakes region of the southern high plains (Fig. 1). Most playas are in west Texas (about 20,000), and fewer, in New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Colorado. The playa lakes region is one of the most intensively cultivated areas of North America. Dominant crops range from cotton in southern areas to cereal grains in the north. Therefore, most of the native short-grass prairie is gone, replaced by crops and, recently, grasses of the Conservation Reserve Program. Playas are the predominant wetlands and major wildlife habitat of the region.More than 115 bird species, including 20 species of waterfowl, and 10 mammal species have been documented in playas. Waterfowl nest in the area, producing up to 250,000 ducklings in wetter years. Dominant breeding and nesting species are mallards and blue-winged teals. During the very protracted breeding season, birds hatch from April through August. Several million shorebirds and waterfowl migrate through the area each spring and fall. More than 400,000 sandhill cranes migrate through and winter in the region, concentrating primarily on the larger saline lakes in the southern portion of the playa lakes region.The primary importance of the playa lakes region to waterfowl is as a wintering area. Wintering waterfowl populations in the playa lakes region range from 1 to 3 million birds, depending on fall precipitation patterns that determine the number of flooded playas. The most common wintering ducks are mallards, northern pintails, green-winged teals, and American wigeons. About 500,000 Canada geese and 100,000 lesser snow geese winter in the playa lakes region, and numbers of geese have increased annually since the early 1980’s. This chapter describes the physiography and ecology of playa lakes and their attributes that benefit waterfowl.

  19. The Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hassibe, W.R.; Keck, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    The western part of the conterminous United States is often thought of as being a desert without any large bodies of water. In the desert area of western Utah, however, lies Great Salt Lake, which in 1986 covered approximately 2,300 square miles and contained 30 million acre-feet of water (an acre-foot is the amount of water necessary to cover 1 acre of land with water 1 foot in depth or about 326,000 gallons). To emphasize its size, the Great Salt Lake is the largest lake west of the Mississippi River, larger than the states of Rhode Island and Delaware.

  20. Dating Taal Lake sediment of Philippines by using the bomb radiocarbon curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Xu, X.

    2008-12-01

    Taal Lake is located in Batangas Province of central Philippines (14° 00.1'N, 120° 59.1'E), with a surface area of 267 km2, a maximum depth of 176 m and an elevation of 3 m above sea level. The lake occupies the famous Taal Volcano system which consists of a 15 × 22 km prehistoric caldera. The 5 km wide Taal Volcano Island which has 47 craters and 4 maars, lies in the north central Taal Lake. With 34 recorded eruptions, Taal Volcano is considered one of the most active volcanic centers in the Philippines and is one of the 16 monitored volcanoes by the Global Volcanism Network. In order to investigate specifically geochemical and isotopic proxies which have paleo-eruption and paleoclimate significances in the sediment cores, we had retrieved two gravity cores from the lake in 2007: TLS1 with 90cm length from a water depth of 100m, and TLS2 with 120cm length from a water depth of 15m. Core TLS2 contains plant remains at 16 horizons which were selected for AMS 14C dating at UCI. Only one of the sixteen plant samples has a δ13C value of -16.4 per mil, whereas the rest samples have the δ13C values ranging from -24.2 to -30.1 per mil. The δ13C values indicate that the plant remains are mainly terrestrial C3 plants. The comparisons of Acid-Base-Acid (ABA) treated samples with non-ABA treated samples show the same results within uncertainty. Except for the sample at 16.7cm, the Δ14C of samples from 0 to 95cm are 51.9~401.9 per mil peaked at 79cm depth, matching very well with the bomb 14C curve determined in tree rings. The distribution of the bomb 14C profile allows us to establish the chronology of Core TLS2, which yields a constant sedimentation rate of 2.04cm/year. Based on this chronology, living plants around Taal Lake may have a lower initial Δ14C (-30 per mil) compared to the Modern Standard. Core TLS1 contains much less plant remains. Three samples from depths of 1.2, 38.5 and 72 cm have Δ14C values of -32.9, 9.9 and -141.8 per mil, respectively. This

  1. Can lake sensitivity to desiccation be predicted from lake geometry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi Haghighi, Ali; Menberu, Meseret Walle; Aminnezhad, Mousa; Marttila, Hannu; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-08-01

    Declining lake levels (Aral Sea syndrome) can be caused by changes in climate, increased water use or changed regulation patterns. This paper introduces a novel lake geometry index (LGI) to quantify lake hydrological characteristics. The index was developed using a large representative dataset of lake hypsographic characteristics from 152 lakes and man-made reservoirs. Using the LGI index, lakes can be classified into five groups: groups 1-4 when LGI is 0.5-2.5, 2.5-4.5, 4.5-6.5 and 6.5-8.5, respectively, and group 5 when LGI is >8.5. Naturally shallow and vast lakes and wetlands fall into the first group and deep man-made reservoirs in narrow valleys are in group 5. The response of three different lake systems (LGI 0.75, 2.75 and 6.5) to different water flow scenarios was then simulated using the water balance equation. From this, the index 'potential lake area' (Apot) was developed to show lake responses to changed hydro-climatological conditions. Apot and LGI can be used to classify lakes into open or closed systems. Simulations showed that lakes with low LGI have a shorter response time to flow and climate changes. As a result, the impact of water balance restoration is faster for lakes with low LGI than for lakes with high LGI. The latter are also more vulnerable to climate variation and change.

  2. Challenges to the Lake

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the past decade we have extensively studied coastal ecosystems in the Great Lakes. Some research efforts have linked coastal receiving systems to conditions in their contributing watersheds; others have focused on developing invasive species detection and monitoring strat...

  3. Is Lake Tahoe Terminal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, R. N.; Reuter, J.; Heyvaert, A.; Lewis, J.; Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, G.; Thorne, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Tahoe, an iconic ultra-oligotrophic lake in the central Sierra Nevada, has been studied intensively since 1968, with the goal of understanding and ultimately controlling its eutrophication and loss of clarity. Research on the lake has included a) periodic profiles of primary productivity, nutrients, temperature, and plankton; b) Secchi depth; c) nutrient limitation experiments; d) analysis of sediment cores; e) radiocarbon dating of underwater in-place tree stumps; g) analysis of long-term temperature trends. Work in its watershed has included a) monitoring of stream discharge, sediment and nutrients at up to 20 stream gaging stations; b) monitoring of urban runoff water quality at selected sites; c) development of a GIS data base, including soils, vegetation, and land use. Based on these studies, we know that a) primary productivity in the lake is limited by phosphorus, and continues to increase; b) the loss of clarity continues, but at a declining rate; c) the lake has been warming since 1970, and its resistance to deep mixing is increasing; d) historically the lake level drops below the outlet elevation about one year in seven; e) 6300 to 4300 yrs BP lake level was below the present outlet elevation long enough for large trees to grow; f) the date of the peak snowmelt runoff is shifting toward earlier dates; g) after accounting for annual runoff, loads of nutrients and suspended sediment have declined significantly in some basin streams since 1980. Downscaled outputs from GCM climatic models have recently been used to drive hydrologic models and a lake clarity model, projecting future trends in the lake and watersheds. Results show a) the temperature and thermal stability will likely continue to increase, with deep mixing shutting down in the latter half of this century; b) the lake may drop below the outlet for an extended period beginning about 2085; c) the annual snowpack will continue to decline, with earlier snowmelt and shift from snowfall to rain; d

  4. Lake Superior, Duluth, MN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This view shows the west end of Lake Superior and Duluth, MN (47.0N, 91.0W). Portions of Minnesota, Michigan and Ontario, Canada are in the scene. The Duluth metropolitan area is at the west end of the lake. The discoloration plume in the water at Duluth is the result of tailings from the iron ore smelters that process the iron ore from the nearby open pit mines seen near the upper left corner of the photo.

  5. Lake Chad, Chad, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The fluctuating water levels of Lake Chad, (13.0N, 15.0E) at the intersection of the borders of Chad, Niger and Cameroon in the Sahara Desert, is an index of the drought in Africa. The lake level continues to decrease as indicated by the growing number and extent of emerging islands as previously submerged ancient sand dunes become visible. The water impounded between the dunes is probably because of local rainfall rather than a reversal of desertification.

  6. Overview: Ancient Lake Creede

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bethke, Philip M.; Hay, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    Lake Creede was moderately saline closed-basin lake that developed in the 26.9 Ma Creede caldera in the San Juan Mountains in the southwest Colorado. The volcaniclastic sediments deposited within the late Oligocene lake were first described and named as the Creede Formation by Emmons and Larsen (1923). The lake and its sedimentary fill are of interest first as representatives of a caldera-hosted lake in a silicic volcanic terrane, and second because of the likely involvement of lake fluids or related pore waters in the deposition of the 25 Ma silver and base-metal ores of the Creede mining district north of the Creede caldera (Fig. 1), as proposed Bethke and Rye (1979). Much of the material presented in this volume is based on observation of core samples and on downhole geophysical measurements obtained as part of a U.S. Continental Scientific Drilling Program in the moat of the Creede caldera. These core and downhole studies are supplemented by outcrop studies, some initiated in support of the drilling program (Bethke and Lipman, 1987), and by conceptual studies of the evolution of the Creede caldera and its surrounding landscape. Not surprisingly, not all authors agree on all interpretation. Most disagreements are pointed out in this overview chapter, and may present opportunities for future study.

  7. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Salt Lake City, Utah, will host the 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The city is located on the southeastern shore of the Great Salt Lake and sits to the west of the Wasatch Mountains, which rise more than 3,500 meters (10,000 feet) above sea level. The city was first settled in 1847 by pioneers seeking relief from religious persecution. Today Salt Lake City, the capital of Utah, is home to more than 170,000 residents. This true-color image of Salt Lake City was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), flying aboard Landsat 7, on May 26, 2000. The southeastern tip of the Great Salt Lake is visible in the upper left of the image. The furrowed green and brown landscape running north-south is a portion of the Wasatch Mountains, some of which are snow-capped (white pixels). The greyish pixels in the center of the image show the developed areas of the city. A number of water reservoirs can be seen east of the mountain range. Salt Lake City International Airport is visible on the northwestern edge of the city. About 20 miles south of the airport is the Bingham Canyon Copper Mine (tan pixels), the world's largest open pit excavation. See also this MODIS image of Utah. Image courtesy NASA Landsat7 Science Team and USGS Eros Data Center

  8. Is Lake Chabot Eutrophic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, K.; Logan, J.; Esterlis, P.; Lew, A.; Nguyen, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction/Abstract: Lake Chabot is an integral part of the East Bay watershed that provides habitats for animals and recreation for humans year-round. Lake Chabot has been in danger of eutrophication due to excessive dumping of phosphorous and nitrogen into the water from the fertilizers of nearby golf courses and neighboring houses. If the lake turned out to be eutrophified, it could seriously impact what is currently the standby emergency water supply for many Castro Valley residents. Eutrophication is the excessive richness of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus in a lake, usually as a result of runoff. This buildup of nutrients causes algal blooms. The algae uses up most of the oxygen in the water, and when it dies, it causes the lake to hypoxify. The fish in the lake can't breathe, and consequently suffocate. Other oxygen-dependant aquatic creatures die off as well. Needless to say, the eutrophication of a lake is bad news for the wildlife that lives in or around it. The level of eutrophication in our area in Northern California tends to increase during the late spring/early summer months, so our crew went out and took samples of Lake Chabot on June 2. We focused on the area of the lake where the water enters, known on the map as Honker Bay. We also took readings a ways down in deeper water for comparison's sake. Visually, the lake looked in bad shape. The water was a murky green that glimmered with particulate matter that swirled around the boat as we went by. In the Honker Bay region where we focused our testing, there were reeds bathed in algae that coated the surface of the lake in thick, swirling patterns. Surprisingly enough, however, our test results didn't reveal any extreme levels of phosphorous or nitrogen. They were slightly higher than usual, but not by any significant amount. The levels we found were high enough to stimulate plant and algae growth and promote eutrophication, but not enough to do any severe damage. After a briefing with a

  9. TOXAPHENE STUDY OF GREAT LAKES TRIBUTARY SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Product is the paper "Pulp and Paper Mills as Sources of Toxaphene to Lake Superior and Northern Lake Michigan" published in the Journal of Great Lakes Research, 25(2):383-394 International Association of Great Lakes 1999.

  10. Availability of lake trout reproductive habitat in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Kennedy, Gregory W.

    1995-01-01

    A decades-long program to reestablish self-sustaining stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the four lower Great Lakes produced excellent fisheries supported by stocked fish. These fish spawned widely and small numbers of their offspring were collected intermittently from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario, but no self-sustaining stocks were established. Irt this paper we address habitat sufficiency as a factor in the failure of stocked lake trout to established self-sustaining populations in the four lower Great Lakes. We present the previously unpublished results of lake trout spawning habitat surveys conducted at seven sites in the Great Lakes since 1987 and we compare them with the published results of similar surveys conducted at 24 other sites in the four lower lakes since 1981. Our evaluation indicates all but two of these sites can support the production of viable fry from spawnings by the shallow-water strains of lake trout that are stocked in the Great Lakes. However, some of the best spawning, egg, and fry habitat in the lower Great Lakes seems to be at deeper offshore sites that may be unattractive to these shallow-water strains. Thus, we suggest also stocking the lower four lakes with strains from Lake Superior that might more fully exploit the best spawning habitat at these deeper, offshore sites.

  11. Contaminants in American alligator eggs from Lake Apopka, Lake Griffin, and Lake Okeechobee, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Percival, H.F.; Jennings, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    Residues of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and 16 elements were measured in American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) eggs collected in 1984 from Lakes Apopka, Griffin, and Okeechobee in central and south Florida. Organochlorine pesticides were highest in eggs from Lake Apopka. None of the elements appeared to be present at harmful concentrations in eggs from any of the lakes. A larger sample of eggs was collected in 1985, but only from Lakes Griffin, a lake where eggs were relatively clean, and Apopka, where eggs were most contaminated. In 1985, hatching success of artificially incubated eggs was lower for Lake Apopka, and several organochlorine pesticides were higher than in eggs from Lake Griffin. However, within Lake Apopka, higher levels of pesticides in chemically analyzed eggs were not associated with reduced hatching success of the remaining eggs in the clutch. Therefore, it did not appear that any of the pesticides we measured were responsible for the reduced hatching of Lake Apopka eggs.

  12. Evidence of Lake Trout reproduction at Lake Michigan's mid-lake reef complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janssen, J.; Jude, D.J.; Edsall, T.A.; Paddock, R.W.; Wattrus, N.; Toneys, M.; McKee, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Mid-Lake Reef Complex (MLRC), a large area of deep (> 40 m) reefs, was a major site where indigenous lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan aggregated during spawning. As part of an effort to restore Lake Michigan's lake trout, which were extirpated in the 1950s, yearling lake trout have been released over the MLRC since the mid-1980s and fall gill net censuses began to show large numbers of lake trout in spawning condition beginning about 1999. We report the first evidence of viable egg deposition and successful lake trout fry production at these deep reefs. Because the area's existing bathymetry and habitat were too poorly known for a priori selection of sampling sites, we used hydroacoustics to locate concentrations of large fish in the fall; fish were congregating around slopes and ridges. Subsequent observations via unmanned submersible confirmed the large fish to be lake trout. Our technological objectives were driven by biological objectives of locating where lake trout spawn, where lake trout fry were produced, and what fishes ate lake trout eggs and fry. The unmanned submersibles were equipped with a suction sampler and electroshocker to sample eggs deposited on the reef, draw out and occasionally catch emergent fry, and collect egg predators (slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus). We observed slimy sculpin to eat unusually high numbers of lake trout eggs. Our qualitative approaches are a first step toward quantitative assessments of the importance of lake trout spawning on the MLRC.

  13. Big lake records preserved in a little lake's sediment: An example from Silver Lake, Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, T.G.; Loope, W.L.; Pierce, W.; Jol, H.M.

    2007-01-01

    We reconstruct postglacial lake-level history within the Lake Michigan basin using soil stratigraphy, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), sedimentology and 14C data from the Silver Lake basin, which lies adjacent to Lake Michigan. Stratigraphy in nine vibracores recovered from the floor of Silver Lake appears to reflect fluctuation of water levels in the Lake Michigan basin. Aeolian activity within the study area from 3,000 years (cal yr. B.P.) to the present was inferred from analysis of buried soils, an aerial photograph sequence, and GPR. Sediments in and around Silver Lake appear to contain a paleoenvironmental record that spans the entire post-glacial history of the Lake Michigan basin. We suggest that (1) a pre-Nipissing rather than a Nipissing barrier separated Silver Lake basin from the Lake Michigan basin, (2) that the Nipissing transgression elevated the water table in the Silver Lake basin about 6,500 cal yr. B.P., resulting in reestablishment of a lake within the basin, and (3) that recent dune migration into Silver Lake is associated with levels of Lake Michigan.

  14. Winter Lake Breezes near the Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Case studies of lake breezes during wintertime cold air pools in Utah's Salt Lake Valley are examined. While summer breezes originating from the Great Salt Lake are typically deeper, of longer duration, and have higher wind speeds than winter breezes, the rate of inland penetration and cross-frontal temperature differences can be higher during the winter. The characteristics of winter breezes and the forcing mechanisms controlling them (e.g., snow cover, background flow, vertical stability profile, clouds, lake temperature, lake sheltering, and drainage pooling) are more complex and variable than those evident in summer. During the afternoon in the Salt Lake Valley, these lake breezes can lead to elevated pollution levels due to the transport of fine particle pollutants from over the Great Salt Lake, decreased vertical mixing depth, and increased vertical stability.

  15. Movements of adult lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rahrer, Jerold F.

    1968-01-01

    Returns from mature lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) tagged in western Lake Superior in 1959 and 1962-65 described here suggest that trout disperse widely from the spawning grounds after spawning and return in subsequent years. Although the data were not extensive, returns from lake trout tagged near Keweenaw Point in 1950 and off Marquette, Michigan, in 1952 suggested similar movement. Loftus stated that river-spawning lake trout of eastern Lake Superior returned annually to the same spawning streams. Movements of lake trout must be understood to manage and evaluate the rehabilitation of lake trout stocks in Lake Superior, especially when the trout move across interstate and international boundaries and are subject to different fishing regulations and fishing pressures.

  16. Crater Lake revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, David W.; Dartnell, Peter; Bacon, Charles R.; Robinson, Joel E.; Gardner, James V.

    2003-01-01

    Around 500,000 people each year visit Crater Lake National Park in the Cascade Range of southern Oregon. Volcanic peaks, evergreen forests, and Crater Lake’s incredibly blue water are the park’s main attractions. Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago by the eruption and subsequent collapse of a 12,000-foot volcano called Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama drastically changed the landscape all around the volcano and spread a blanket of volcanic ash at least as far away as southern Canada. Prior to the climactic event, Mount Mazama had a 400,000 year history of cone building activity like that of other Cascade volcanoes such as Mount Shasta. Since the climactic eruption, there have been several less violent, smaller postcaldera eruptions within the caldera itself. However, relatively little was known about the specifics of these eruptions because their products were obscured beneath Crater Lake’s surface. As the Crater Lake region is still potentially volcanically active, understanding past eruptive events is important to understanding future eruptions, which could threaten facilities and people at Crater Lake National Park and the major transportation corridor east of the Cascades. Recently, the lake bottom was mapped with a high-resolution multibeam echo sounder. The new bathymetric survey provides a 2m/pixel view of the lake floor from its deepest basins virtually to the shoreline. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, the bathymetry data can be visualized and analyzed to shed light on the geology, geomorphology, and geologic history of Crater Lake.

  17. The Wandering Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In the area at the very far eastern corner of China's Taklimakan Desert, Lop Nor Lake was located up until some years ago. Lop Nor, also called the 'the heart of the heart' of Asia, was the place where the waters of the largest inner basin (i.e., not flowing into the sea) of the world-including the Tarim and Kum-daria Rivers-were collected. Depending on the balance between rainfall water yield and evaporation, both position and size of the lake were strongly variable, thus giving rise to the legend of the Wandering Lake. 'Lop City' was the place where Marco Polo took his last rest before facing the one-year long crossing of the Gobi Desert. Starting from the end of the 19th century, several explorers tried to find the legendary place. One such explorer was Sven Hedin, who was commissioned by the Governor of Nanjing to lead an expedition to find the lake. In 1937, the Swedish explorer published his book entitled The Wandering Lake. Comparing this very precise map from Sven Hedin's book with the above Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) false-color image (acquired on October 28, 2001), one can find a faint sign on the soil where the Lop Nor was located. This image, derived using a combination of MODIS' near-infrared and red channels (vegetation in red), shows where the Tarim River waters currently end their flow. The Wandering Lake does not exist anymore. The combination of climate change and human exploitation of water resources for agriculture caused the disappearance of the lake. This image was processed by Telespazio, Earth Observation division, new products development facility in Rome, Italy. The MODIS sensor flies aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft, launched in December 1999. Caption and image courtesy Luca Pietranera, Telespazio, Rome, Italy, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  18. Examining indirect effects of lake trout recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the recovery of lake trout populations in Lake Superior, there are indications of decreased forage fish abundance and density-dependence in lake trout. In Lake Superior, lean lake trout historically occupied depths < 60 m, and siscowet lake trout occupied depths > 60 m...

  19. 42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to peaks of Outter Lodge, completed in 1964. Construction of the lake got underway in 1964. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  20. National Lakes Assessment: A Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Lakes Assessment A Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Lakes presents the results of an unprecedented assessment of the nation’s lakes. This report is part of the National Aquatic Resource Surveys, a series of statistically based surveys designed to provide the pub...

  1. Lake Michigan lake trout PCB model forecast post audit

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scenario forecasts for total PCBs in Lake Michigan (LM) lake trout were conducted using the linked LM2-Toxics and LM Food Chain models, supported by a suite of additional LM models. Efforts were conducted under the Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study and the post audit represents th...

  2. Microplastic pollution in lakes and lake shoreline sediments - A case study on Lake Bolsena and Lake Chiusi (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elke Kerstin; Paglialonga, Lisa; Czech, Elisa; Tamminga, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Rivers and effluents have been identified as major pathways for microplastics of terrestrial sources. Moreover, lakes of different dimensions and even in remote locations contain microplastics in striking abundances. This study investigates concentrations of microplastic particles at two lakes in central Italy (Lake Bolsena, Lake Chiusi). A total number of six Manta Trawls have been carried out, two of them one day after heavy winds occurred on Lake Bolsena showing effects on particle distribution of fragments and fibers of varying size categories. Additionally, 36 sediment samples from lakeshores were analyzed for microplastic content. In the surface waters 2.68 to 3.36 particles/m(3) (Lake Chiusi) and 0.82 to 4.42 particles/m(3) (Lake Bolsena) were detected, respectively. Main differences between the lakes are attributed to lake characteristics such as surface and catchment area, depth and the presence of local wind patterns and tide range at Lake Bolsena. An event of heavy winds and moderate rainfall prior to one sampling led to an increase of concentrations at Lake Bolsena which is most probable related to lateral land-based and sewage effluent inputs. The abundances of microplastic particles in sediments vary from mean values of 112 (Lake Bolsena) to 234 particles/kg dry weight (Lake Chiusi). Lake Chiusi results reveal elevated fiber concentrations compared to those of Lake Bolsena what might be a result of higher organic content and a shift in grain size distribution towards the silt and clay fraction at the shallow and highly eutrophic Lake Chiusi. The distribution of particles along different beach levels revealed no significant differences. PMID:27104923

  3. Microplastic pollution in lakes and lake shoreline sediments - A case study on Lake Bolsena and Lake Chiusi (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elke Kerstin; Paglialonga, Lisa; Czech, Elisa; Tamminga, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Rivers and effluents have been identified as major pathways for microplastics of terrestrial sources. Moreover, lakes of different dimensions and even in remote locations contain microplastics in striking abundances. This study investigates concentrations of microplastic particles at two lakes in central Italy (Lake Bolsena, Lake Chiusi). A total number of six Manta Trawls have been carried out, two of them one day after heavy winds occurred on Lake Bolsena showing effects on particle distribution of fragments and fibers of varying size categories. Additionally, 36 sediment samples from lakeshores were analyzed for microplastic content. In the surface waters 2.68 to 3.36 particles/m(3) (Lake Chiusi) and 0.82 to 4.42 particles/m(3) (Lake Bolsena) were detected, respectively. Main differences between the lakes are attributed to lake characteristics such as surface and catchment area, depth and the presence of local wind patterns and tide range at Lake Bolsena. An event of heavy winds and moderate rainfall prior to one sampling led to an increase of concentrations at Lake Bolsena which is most probable related to lateral land-based and sewage effluent inputs. The abundances of microplastic particles in sediments vary from mean values of 112 (Lake Bolsena) to 234 particles/kg dry weight (Lake Chiusi). Lake Chiusi results reveal elevated fiber concentrations compared to those of Lake Bolsena what might be a result of higher organic content and a shift in grain size distribution towards the silt and clay fraction at the shallow and highly eutrophic Lake Chiusi. The distribution of particles along different beach levels revealed no significant differences.

  4. Sanctuaries for lake trout in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Jon G.; Eshenroder, Randy L.; Hartman, Wilbur L.

    1987-01-01

    Populations of lake trout, severely depleted in Lake Superior and virtually extirpated from the other Great Lakes because of sea lamprey predation and intense fishing, are now maintained by annual plantings of hatchery-reared fish in Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario and parts of Lake Superior. The extensive coastal areas of the Great Lakes and proximity to large populations resulted in fishing pressure on planted lake trout heavy enough to push annual mortality associated with sport and commercial fisheries well above the critical level needed to reestablish self-sustaining stocks. The interagency, international program for rehabilitating lake trout includes controlling sea lamprey abundance, stocking hatchery-reared lake trout, managing the catch, and establishing sanctuaries where harvest is prohibited. Three lake trout sanctuaries have been established in Lake Michigan: the Fox Island Sanctuary of 121, 500 ha, in the Chippewa-Ottawa Treaty fishing zone in the northern region of the lake; the Milwaukee Reef Sanctuary of 160, 000 ha in midlake, in boundary waters of Michigan and Wisconsin; and Julian's Reef Sanctuary of 6, 500 ha, in Illinois waters. In northern Lake Huron, Drummond Island Sanctuary of 55, 000 ha is two thirds in Indian treaty-ceded waters in Michigan and one third in Ontario waters of Canada. A second sanctuary, Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef Sanctuary, in central Lake Huron contains 168, 000 ha. Sanctuary status for the Canadian areas remains to be approved by the Provincial government. In Lake Superior, sanctuaries protect the spawning grounds of Gull Island Shoal (70, 000 ha) and Devils Island Shoal (44, 000 ha) in Wisconsin's Apostle Island area. These seven sanctuaries, established by the several States and agreed upon by the States, Indian tribes, the U.S. Department of the Interior, and the Province of Ontario, contribute toward solving an interjurisdictional fishery problem.

  5. Lake v. Arnold.

    PubMed

    2000-01-01

    Court Decision: 232 Federal Reporter, 3d Series 360, 2000 Nov 7 (date of decision). The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit agreed with the lower court that the husband of a mentally disabled woman who was involuntarily sterilized by her parents at age 16 was not entitled to a loss of consortium claim because the injury occurred before the couple was married, both he and his wife were aware of the injury before they married and there was not subsequent harm from the initial injury (sterilization) after the Lakes' marriage. At age 16, Lake, a mentally disabled woman, was taken to a hospital by her father and stepmother and was permanently sterilized. The claim by Lake and her husband against her parents, hospital, and physicians that her civil rights were violated because the sterilization was nonconsensual was dismissed by the court on statute of limitation grounds.

  6. Viruses in Antarctic lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepner, R. L. Jr; Wharton, R. A. Jr; Suttle, C. A.; Wharton RA, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Water samples collected from four perennially ice-covered Antarctic lakes during the austral summer of 1996-1997 contained high densities of extracellular viruses. Many of these viruses were found to be morphologically similar to double-stranded DNA viruses that are known to infect algae and protozoa. These constitute the first observations of viruses in perennially ice-covered polar lakes. The abundance of planktonic viruses and data suggesting substantial production potential (relative to bacteria] secondary and photosynthetic primary production) indicate that viral lysis may be a major factor in the regulation of microbial populations in these extreme environments. Furthermore, we suggest that Antarctic lakes may be a reservoir of previously undescribed viruses that possess novel biological and biochemical characteristics.

  7. Michigan: The Great Lakes State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Sandra Lee; La Luzerne-Oi, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Although Michigan is often called the "Wolverine State," its more common nickname is the "Great Lakes State." This name comes from the fact that Michigan is the only state in the United States that borders four of the five Great Lakes. Also referred to as the "Water Wonderland," Michigan has 11,000 additional lakes, 36,000 miles of streams, and…

  8. The Great Lakes whitefish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John; Elliot, Charles

    1942-01-01

    In every one of the Great Lakes- Ontario, Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Superior- the most valuable fishes are declining, and there is no evidence that this trend will be reversed. Under existing conditions of a diversity of regulations that vary between states and between the two countries, and with the present methods of fishing, the Great Lakes fisheries are doomed. This chapter deals with the common whitefish, a valuable species which many believe to be the next that will go unless positive action is forthcoming soon.

  9. Transient Tsunamis in Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couston, L.; Mei, C.; Alam, M.

    2013-12-01

    A large number of lakes are surrounded by steep and unstable mountains with slopes prone to failure. As a result, landslides are likely to occur and impact water sitting in closed reservoirs. These rare geological phenomena pose serious threats to dam reservoirs and nearshore facilities because they can generate unexpectedly large tsunami waves. In fact, the tallest wave experienced by contemporary humans occurred because of a landslide in the narrow bay of Lituya in 1958, and five years later, a deadly landslide tsunami overtopped Lake Vajont's dam, flooding and damaging villages along the lakefront and in the Piave valley. If unstable slopes and potential slides are detected ahead of time, inundation maps can be drawn to help people know the risks, and mitigate the destructive power of the ensuing waves. These maps give the maximum wave runup height along the lake's vertical and sloping boundaries, and can be obtained by numerical simulations. Keeping track of the moving shorelines along beaches is challenging in classical Eulerian formulations because the horizontal extent of the fluid domain can change over time. As a result, assuming a solid slide and nonbreaking waves, here we develop a nonlinear shallow-water model equation in the Lagrangian framework to address the problem of transient landslide-tsunamis. In this manner, the shorelines' three-dimensional motion is part of the solution. The model equation is hyperbolic and can be solved numerically by finite differences. Here, a 4th order Runge-Kutta method and a compact finite-difference scheme are implemented to integrate in time and spatially discretize the forced shallow-water equation in Lagrangian coordinates. The formulation is applied to different lake and slide geometries to better understand the effects of the lake's finite lengths and slide's forcing mechanism on the generated wavefield. Specifically, for a slide moving down a plane beach, we show that edge-waves trapped by the shoreline and free

  10. Reevaluation of lake trout and lake whitefish bioenergetics models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Pothoven, Steve A.; Kao, Yu-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Using a corrected algorithm for balancing the energy budget, we reevaluated the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the laboratory and for lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in the laboratory and in the field. For lake trout, results showed that the bioenergetics model slightly overestimated food consumption by the lake trout when they were fed low and intermediate rations, whereas the model predicted food consumption by lake trout fed ad libitum without any detectable bias. The slight bias in model predictions for lake trout on restricted rations may have been an artifact of the feeding schedule for these fish, and we would therefore recommend application of the Wisconsin lake trout bioenergetics model to lake trout populations in the field without any revisions to the model. Use of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for coregonids resulted in overestimation of food consumption by lake whitefish both in the laboratory and in the field by between 20 and 30%, on average. This overestimation of food consumption was most likely due to overestimation of respiration rate. We therefore adjusted the respiration component of the bioenergetics model to obtain a good fit to the observed consumption in our laboratory tanks. The adjusted model predicted the consumption in the laboratory and the field without any detectable bias. Until a detailed lake whitefish respiration study can be conducted, we recommend application of our adjusted version of the Wisconsin generalized coregonid bioenergetics model to lake whitefish populations in the field.

  11. Gas exchange on Mono Lake and Crowley Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Ledwell, James R.; Broecker, Wallace S.

    1987-01-01

    Gas exchange coefficients (k) have been determined for freshwater Crowley Lake and saline Mono Lake through the use of a man-made purposefully injected gas, SF6. The concentration decreased from an initial value of 40 to 4 pmol/L for Mono Lake and from 20 to 1 pmol/L for Crowley lake over a period of 6 wks. Wind-speed (u) records from anemometers on the shore of each lake made it possible to determine the relationship between k and u. The average u and k values for the experiment were identical for the two lakes, despite the large chemical differences. It is estimated that, for the u values observed over Mono Lake from July to December 1984, the exchange of CO2 occurred 2.5 times faster than without chemical enhancement. This is a factor of 4 lower than needed to explain the high invasion rate of C-14 produced by nuclear bomb tests.

  12. Gold deposition by sulfidation of ferrous Fe in the lacustrine sediments of the Pueblo Viejo district (Dominican Republic): The effect of Fe-C-S diagenesis on later hydrothermal mineralization in a Maar-Diatreme complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kettler, R.M.; Rye, R.O.; Kesler, S.E.; Meyers, P.A.; Polanco, J.; Russell, N.

    1992-01-01

    The Pueblo Viejo district, located in the Cordillera Central of the Dominican Republic, contains large Au-Ag deposits associated with acid-sulfate alteration within spilites, conglomerates and carbonaceous sedimentary rocks that were deposited in a maar-diatreme complex. Much of the Au mineralization occurs in pyritic, carbonaceous siltstones of the Pueblo Viejo Maar-Diatreme Member of the Cretaceous Los Ranchos Formation. Pyrite is the only Fe-bearing phase in mineralized rock, whereas siderite is the dominant Fe-bearing phase in siltstones distal to mineralization. Disseminated pyrite occurs as framboids, cubes, pyritohedra, concretions and cement. Early framboids occur throughout the district. Au occurs as inclusions in later non-framboid disseminated pyrite (NFDP); an occurrence that is interpreted to be indicative of contemporaneous deposition. Pyrite framboids exhibit a wide range of ??34Scdt-values (-17.5 to +4.8???) and are interpreted to have formed during biogenic reduction of pore-water sulfate. The NFDP yield restricted ??34Scdt-values ( x ?? = -5.2???, s = ??2.4???, n = 43) similar to those obtained from later vein pyrite ( x ?? = -6.4???, s = ??1.5???, n = 12). Alunite and barite have ??34S-values ranging from +18.8 to +21.6???. The interpretation that the NFDP, vein pyrite, alunite and barite, and possibly even the framboidal pyrite share a common source of igneous sulfur is supported by the ??34S data. Siderite occurs as concretions and cement, contains abundant Mg (Fe0.75Mg0.19Mn0.03Ca0.02CO3) and has ??13Cpdb- and ??18Osmow-values ranging from -2.5 to +1.1%. and +14.6 to +19.5???, respectively. These data are consistent with the interpretation that the siderite formed in lacustrine sediments and that the carbonate in the siderite is probably methanogenic, although contributions from oxidation of organic matter during biogenic sulfate reduction, thermal decarboxylation of organic matter, or magmatic vapor cannot be ruled out. Disseminated Au

  13. Lake whitefish diet, condition, and energy density in Lake Champlain and the lower four Great Lakes following dreissenid invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herbst, Seth J.; Marsden, J. Ellen; Lantry, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis support some of the most valuable commercial freshwater fisheries in North America. Recent growth and condition decreases in Lake Whitefish populations in the Great Lakes have been attributed to the invasion of the dreissenid mussels, zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha and quagga mussels D. bugensis, and the subsequent collapse of the amphipod, Diporeia, a once-abundant high energy prey source. Since 1993, Lake Champlain has also experienced the invasion and proliferation of zebra mussels, but in contrast to the Great Lakes, Diporeia were not historically abundant. We compared the diet, condition, and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain after the dreissenid mussel invasion to values for those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, Erie, and Ontario. Lake Whitefish were collected using gill nets and bottom trawls, and their diets were quantified seasonally. Condition was estimated using Fulton's condition factor (K) and by determining energy density. In contrast to Lake Whitefish from some of the Great Lakes, those from Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish did not show a dietary shift towards dreissenid mussels, but instead fed primarily on fish eggs in spring, Mysis diluviana in summer, and gastropods and sphaeriids in fall and winter. Along with these dietary differences, the condition and energy density of Lake Whitefish from Lake Champlain were high compared with those of Lake Whitefish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario after the dreissenid invasion, and were similar to Lake Whitefish from Lake Erie; fish from Lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario consumed dreissenids, whereas fish from Lake Erie did not. Our comparisons of Lake Whitefish populations in Lake Champlain to those in the Great Lakes indicate that diet and condition of Lake Champlain Lake Whitefish were not negatively affected by the dreissenid mussel invasion.

  14. Temperature Trends in Montane Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melack, J. M.; Sadro, S.; Jellison, R.

    2014-12-01

    Long-term temperature trends in lakes integrate hydrological and meteorological factors. We examine temperature trends in a small montane lake with prolonged ice-cover and large seasonal snowfall and in a large saline lake. Emerald Lake, located in the Sierra Nevada (California), is representative of high-elevation lakes throughout the region. No significant trend in outflow temperature was apparent from 1991to 2012. Snowfall in the watershed accounted for 93% of the variability in average summer lake temperatures. Mono Lake (California) lies in a closed, montane basin and is hypersaline and monomictic or meromictic. Temperature profiles have been collected from 1982 to 2010. In the upper water column, the July-August-September water temperatures increased 0.8-1.0°C over the 29 years. This rate of warming is less than published estimates based on satellite-derived skin temperatures and will discussed in the context of general limnological interpretation of temperature trends.

  15. Lake Michigan: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey in the nearshore of Lake Michigan at a 20 meter contour using towed electronic instrumentation. The nearly 1200 km survey was conducted Sep 8-15, 2010. We also conducted six cross-contour tows. Along the survey tracks we sampled fixed stat...

  16. Lake Ontario: Nearshore Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a high-resolution survey with towed electronic instrumentation along the Lake Ontario nearshore (720 km) at a 20 meter contour. The survey was conducted September 6-10, 2008 with a shorter 300 km survey conducted August 14-15 for comparing of temporal variability. ...

  17. The People's Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Karen Townsend

    1975-01-01

    Citizen action to stop the disposal of taconite tailings into Lake Superior was unsuccessful when the courts settled in the favor of industry. Although citizen research revealed a form of asbestos, as well as other toxic chemicals in the discharged wastes, company representatives stated that there were no health hazards. (MA)

  18. Great Minds? Great Lakes!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Chicago, IL. Great Lakes National Program Office.

    This booklet introduces an environmental curriculum for use in a variety of elementary subjects. The lesson plans provide an integrated approach to incorporating Great Lakes environmental issues into the subjects of history, social studies, and environmental sciences. Each of these sections contains background information, discussion points, and a…

  19. Lead and Lags of Lake System Responses to Late Allerød and Early Younger Dryas Climatic Fluctuation - an Example from Varved Lake Sediments from Northern Poland (Central Europe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slowinski, M. M.; Zawiska, I.; Ott, F.; Noryśkiewicz, A. M.; Plessen, B.; Apolinarska, K.; Lutyńska, M.; Michczynska, D. J.; Wulf, S.; Skubała, P.; Błaszkiewicz, M.; Brauer, A.

    2014-12-01

    The transition from the warmer Allerød to the cooler Younger Dryas period is well understood to represent sudden and extreme climate changes during the end of the last glaciation. Thus, lake sediment studies within paleoclimatic and paleoecological research on this transition are ideal to enhance the knowledge about "lead and lags" of lake system responses to abrupt climate changes through applying multi-proxy sediment analyses. In this study, we present the results of high-resolution studies on varved late glacial sediments from the Trzechowskie paleolake, located in the northern Poland (center Europe). High-resolution bio-proxies (pollen, macrofossils, Cladocera and diatoms), geochemical analyses (µ-XRF data, TOC, C/N ratios, δ18Ocarb and δ13Corg stable isotopes) and a robust chronology based on varve counting, AMS 14C dating and tephrochronology were used to reconstruct the lake system responses to rapid climatic and environmental changes of Trzechowskie paleolake during the late Allerød - Younger Dryas transition. Paleoecological and geochemical analyses, which were carried out in a 4 to 16 years temporal sample resolution, allowed to defining short-termed shifts of the ecosystem that were triggered by abrupt climate changes. The rapid and pronounced cooling at the beginning of the Younger Dryas had a major impact on the lake and its catchment as clearly reflected by not synchronous changes of both, biotic and geochemical proxies. The results of high-resolution analysis indicate (a) an increased precipitation during the Allerød-YD transition, which is responsible for an increase of soil erosion in the catchment during this period, (b) a delayed response of the vegetation compared to the lake depositional system at the YD onset of 20 years, and (c) a non-synchronicity of vegetation responses between Western (Lake Meerfelder Maar) and Eastern European sites (Trzechowskie palaeolake) at the YD onset. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute

  20. Temperate Lakes Discovered on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vixie, Graham; Barnes, Jason W.; Jackson, Brian; Wilson, Paul

    2012-04-01

    We have discovered two temperate lakes on Titan using Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). Three key features help to identify these surface features as lakes: morphology, albedo, and specular reflection. The presence of lakes at the mid-latitudes mean liquid can accumulate and remain stable outside of the poles. We first identify a lake surface by looking for possible shorelines with a lacustrine morphology. Then, we apply a simple atmospheric correction that produces an approximate surface albedo. Next, we prepare cylindrical projection maps of the brightness of the sky as seen from any points on the surface to identify specular reflections. Our techniques can then be applied to other areas, such as Arrakis Planitia, to test for liquid. Currently, all the known lakes on Titan are concentrated at the poles. Lakes have been suggested in the tropic zone by Griffith et al. Our discovery of non-transient, temperate lakes has important implications for Titan's hydrologic cycle. Clouds have been recorded accumulating in the mid-latitudes and areas have been darkened by rainfall but later brightened after evaporation (Turtle et al. 2011). Stable temperate lakes would affect total rainfall, liquid accumulation, evaporation rates, and infiltration. Polaznik Macula (Figure 1) is a great candidate for lake filling, evaporation rates, and stability. References: Griffith, C., et al.: "Evidence for Lakes on Titan's Tropical Surface". AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts #42, Vol. 42, pp. 1077, 2010. Turtle, E. P., et al.: "Rapid and Extensive Surface Changes Near Titan's Equator: Evidence of April Showers". Science, Vol. 331, pp. 1414-, 2011. Figure 1: Polaznik Macula is the large, dark area central to the figure. The encircled dark blue areas represent positively identified lake regions in the T66 flyby. The light blue areas represent lake candidates still under analysis. The green circle marks a non-lake surface feature enclosed by a

  1. Lake trout rehabilitation in Lake Erie: a case history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornelius, Floyd C.; Muth, Kenneth M.; Kenyon, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) once thrived in the deep waters of eastern Lake Erie. The impact of nearly 70 years of unregulated exploitation and over 100 years of progressively severe cultural eutrophication resulted in the elimination of lake trout stocks by 1950. Early attempts to restore lake trout by stocking were unsuccessful in establishing a self-sustaining population. In the early 1980s, New York's Department of Environmental Conservation, Pennsylvania's Fish and Boat Commission, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service entered into a cooperative program to rehabilitate lake trout in the eastern basin of Lake Erie. After 11 years of stocking selected strains of lake trout in U.S. waters, followed by effective sea lamprey control, lake trout appear to be successfully recolonizing their native habitat. Adult stocks have built up significantly and are expanding their range in the lake. Preliminary investigations suggest that lake trout reproductive habitat is still adequate for natural reproduction, but natural recruitment has not been documented. Future assessments will be directed toward evaluation of spawning success and tracking age-class cohorts as they move through the fishery.

  2. Movements of hatchery-reared lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pycha, Richard L.; Dryer, William R.; King, George R.

    1965-01-01

    The history of stocking of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the Great Lakes is reviewed. The study of movements is based on capture of 24,275 fin-clipped lake trout taken in experimental gill nets and trawls and commercial gill nets. Yearling lake trout planted from shore dispersed to 15-fath (27-m) depths in 3A? hr. Most fish remained within 2 miles (3.2 km) of the planting site 2 months, but within 4 months some fish had moved as much as 17 miles (27 km). The highest abundance of planted lake trout was in areas 2-4 miles (3.2-6.4 km) from the planting site even 3 years after release. Distance moved and size of fish were not correlated. Dispersal of lake trout begins at planting and probably continues until the fish are mature. Most movement was eastward in southern Lake Superior and followed the counterclockwise surface currents. Movement is most rapid in areas of strong currents and slowest in areas of weak currents or eddies. Movement to areas west of the Keweenaw Peninsula was insignificant from plantings in Keweenaw Bay and nil from other plantings farther east. Lake trout planted in the eastern third of the lake dispersed more randomly than those planted farther west. Few fish moved farther offshore than the 50-fath (91-m) contour. Lake trout planted in Canadian waters made insignificant contributions to populations in US waters.

  3. Microbiology of Lonar Lake and other soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Kumaresan, Deepak; Hunger, Sindy; Drake, Harold L; Murrell, J Colin; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-03-01

    Soda lakes are saline and alkaline ecosystems that are believed to have existed throughout the geological record of Earth. They are widely distributed across the globe, but are highly abundant in terrestrial biomes such as deserts and steppes and in geologically interesting regions such as the East African Rift valley. The unusual geochemistry of these lakes supports the growth of an impressive array of microorganisms that are of ecological and economic importance. Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria and Archaea belonging to all major trophic groups have been described from many soda lakes, including lakes with exceptionally high levels of heavy metals. Lonar Lake is a soda lake that is centered at an unusual meteorite impact structure in the Deccan basalts in India and its key physicochemical and microbiological characteristics are highlighted in this article. The occurrence of diverse functional groups of microbes, such as methanogens, methanotrophs, phototrophs, denitrifiers, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers and syntrophs in soda lakes, suggests that these habitats harbor complex microbial food webs that (a) interconnect various biological cycles via redox coupling and (b) impact on the production and consumption of greenhouse gases. Soda lake microorganisms harbor several biotechnologically relevant enzymes and biomolecules (for example, cellulases, amylases, ectoine) and there is the need to augment bioprospecting efforts in soda lake environments with new integrated approaches. Importantly, some saline and alkaline lake ecosystems around the world need to be protected from anthropogenic pressures that threaten their long-term existence.

  4. Microbiology of Lonar Lake and other soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Antony, Chakkiath Paul; Kumaresan, Deepak; Hunger, Sindy; Drake, Harold L; Murrell, J Colin; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-03-01

    Soda lakes are saline and alkaline ecosystems that are believed to have existed throughout the geological record of Earth. They are widely distributed across the globe, but are highly abundant in terrestrial biomes such as deserts and steppes and in geologically interesting regions such as the East African Rift valley. The unusual geochemistry of these lakes supports the growth of an impressive array of microorganisms that are of ecological and economic importance. Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria and Archaea belonging to all major trophic groups have been described from many soda lakes, including lakes with exceptionally high levels of heavy metals. Lonar Lake is a soda lake that is centered at an unusual meteorite impact structure in the Deccan basalts in India and its key physicochemical and microbiological characteristics are highlighted in this article. The occurrence of diverse functional groups of microbes, such as methanogens, methanotrophs, phototrophs, denitrifiers, sulfur oxidizers, sulfate reducers and syntrophs in soda lakes, suggests that these habitats harbor complex microbial food webs that (a) interconnect various biological cycles via redox coupling and (b) impact on the production and consumption of greenhouse gases. Soda lake microorganisms harbor several biotechnologically relevant enzymes and biomolecules (for example, cellulases, amylases, ectoine) and there is the need to augment bioprospecting efforts in soda lake environments with new integrated approaches. Importantly, some saline and alkaline lake ecosystems around the world need to be protected from anthropogenic pressures that threaten their long-term existence. PMID:23178675

  5. Potential strategies for recovery of lake whitefish and lake herring stocks in eastern Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldenburg, K.; Stapanian, M.A.; Ryan, P.A.; Holm, E.

    2007-01-01

    Lake Erie sustained large populations of ciscoes (Salmonidae: Coregoninae) 120 years ago. By the end of the 19th century, abundance of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) had declined drastically. By 1925, the lake herring (a cisco) population (Coregonus artedii) had collapsed, although a limited lake herring fishery persisted in the eastern basin until the 1950s. In the latter part of the 20th century, the composition of the fish community changed as oligotrophication proceeded. Since 1984, a limited recovery of lake whitefish has occurred, however no recovery was evident for lake herring. Current ecological conditions in Lake Erie probably will not inhibit recovery of the coregonine species. Recovery of walleye (Sander vitreus) and efforts to rehabilitate the native lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Erie will probably assist recovery because these piscivores reduce populations of alewife (Alosa psuedoharengus) and rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), which inhibit reproductive success of coregonines. Although there are considerable spawning substrates available to coregonine species in eastern Lake Erie, eggs and fry would probably be displaced by storm surge from most shoals. Site selection for stocking or seeding of eggs should consider the reproductive life cycle of the stocked fish and suitable protection from storm events. Two potential sites in the eastern basin have been identified. Recommended management procedures, including commercial fisheries, are suggested to assist in recovery. Stocking in the eastern basin of Lake Erie is recommended for both species, as conditions are adequate and the native spawning population in the eastern basin is low. For lake herring, consideration should be given to match ecophenotypes as much as possible. Egg seeding is recommended. Egg seeding of lake whitefish should be considered initially, with fingerling or yearling stocking suggested if unsuccessful. Spawning stocks of whitefish in the western basin of Lake

  6. Lake Mead--clear and vital

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wessells, Stephen M.; Rosen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Lake Mead – Clear and Vital” is a 13 minute documentary relating the crucial role of science in maintaining high water quality in Lake Mead. The program was produced coincident with release of the Lakes Mead and Mohave Circular a USGS publication covering past and on-going research in the lakes and tributaries of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

  7. Predicting Maximum Lake Depth from Surrounding Topography

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake volume aids understanding of the physical and ecological dynamics of lakes, yet is often not readily available. The data needed to calculate lake volume (i.e. bathymetry) are usually only collected on a lake by lake basis and are difficult to obtain across broad regions. ...

  8. Lake Erie...Take a Bow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Maureen; Dunlevy, Margie

    This elementary school teaching unit was developed as a part of a series of teaching units that deal with Lake Erie. This unit was developed to enable children to: (1) identify the Great Lakes and pick out Lake Erie on a map; (2) demonstrate knowledge of Lake Erie's origin and geography; (3) list some uses of Lake Erie; and (4) give examples of…

  9. Fecundity of hatchery lake trout in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzsimons, John D.; O'Gorman, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Fecundity (egg number) was determined from 26 stocked (617-800 mm, total length) lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) collected in western Lake Ontario during September 1992. Previous to this study, fecundity was evaluated only once in Lake Ontario using native stocks in 1927. The following relationships between fecundity and total length (TL) and weight (W) were obtained. Fecundity = -12,492 + 25.87 TL(mm) and Fecundity = -1,010 + 1,307 W(kg). Relative fecundity (number of eggs per kg of body weight) was unrelated to body weight and averaged 1,592 eggs kg-1. Fecundity of contemporary lake trout based on length was significantly lower than that of historic native stocks, but was similar to contemporary stocked lake trout in Lake Superior.

  10. Lake-wide distribution of Dreissena in Lake Michigan, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, Guy W.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Holuszko, Jeffrey D.

    2001-01-01

    The Great Lakes Science Center has conducted lake-wide bottom trawl surveys of the fish community in Lake Michigan each fall since 1973. These systematic surveys are performed at depths of 9 to 110 m at each of seven index sites around Lake Michigan. Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) populations have expanded to all survey locations and at a level to sufficiently contribute to the bottom trawl catches. The quagga (Dreissena bugensis), recently reported in Lake Michigan, was likely in the catches though not recognized. Dreissena spp. biomass ranged from about 0.6 to 15 kg/ha at the various sites in 1999. Dreissenid mussels were found at depths of 9 to 82 m, with their peak biomass at 27 to 46 m. The colonization of these exotic mussels has ecological implications as well as potential ramifications on the ability to sample fish consistently and effectively with bottom trawls in Lake Michigan.

  11. Lake Garda, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This ASTER image was acquired on July 29, 2000 and covers an area of 30 by 57 km in northern Italy. Lake Garda was formed by glaciers during the last Ice Age, and is Italy's largest lake. Lago di Garda lies in the provinces of Verona, Brescia, and Trento, and is 51 kilometers (32 miles) long and from 3 to 18 kilometers (2 to 11 miles) wide. The Sarca is its chief affluent, and the lake is drained southward by the Mincio, which discharges into the Po River. Many villas are situated on its shores. On the peninsula of Sirmione, at the southern end of the lake, are the ruins of a Roman villa and a castle of the Scaligers, an Italian family of the 16th century. The RIGHT image has the land area masked out, and a harsh stretch was applied to the lake values to display variations in sediment load. Also visible are hundreds of boats and their wakes, criss-crossing the lake.

    The image is centered at 45.6 degrees north latitude, 10.6 degrees east longitude.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for

  12. State of Michigan, Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Almost the entire state of Michigan and most of lakes Michigan and Huron (45.5N, 83.5W) can be seen in this single midwinter view of the Great Lakes region. Even under midwinter snow and ice conditions, the distinctive silhouette of the state of Michigan is still easy to recognize as well as Lakes Michigan and Huron. The Canadian province of Ontario is at the top of the scene on the opposite shore from Michigan.

  13. Genetic diversity of Diporeia in the Great Lakes: comparison of Lake Superior to the other Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abundances of Diporeia have dropped drastically in the Great Lakes, except in Lake Superior, where data suggest that population counts actually have risen. Various ecological, environmental, or geographic hypotheses have been proposed to explain the greater abundance of Lake Supe...

  14. Aeolian sand preserved in Silver Lake: a new signal of Holocene high stands of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Loope, Walter L.

    2005-01-01

    Aeolian sand within lake sediment from Silver Lake, Michigan can be used as a proxy for the timing of high lake levels of Lake Michigan.We demonstrate that the sand record from Silver Lake plotted as percent weight is in-phase with the elevation curve of Lake Michigan since the mid-Holocene Nipissing Phase. Because fluctuations in Lake Michigan's lake level are recorded in beach ridges, and are a response to climate change, the aeolian sand record within Silver Lake is also a proxy for climate change. It appears that increases in dune activity and lake sand are controlled by similar climatic shifts that drive fluctuations in lake level of Lake Michigan. High lake levels destabilize coastal bluffs that drive dune sand instability, and along with greater wintertime storminess, increase niveo-aeolian transport of sand across lake ice. The sand is introduced into the lake each spring as the ice cover melts.

  15. Life history of lake herring in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dryer, William R.; Beil, Joseph

    1964-01-01

    The average annual commercial catch of lake herring (Coregonus artedi) in U.S. waters of Lake Superior was nearly 12 million pounds in 1929-61. This production contributed 62.4 percent of the total U.S. take of lake herring for the Great Lakes. About 90 percent of the annual catch is taken from small-mesh gill nets during the November-December spawning season. The life-history studies were based on 12,187 fish collected in 1950-62; past growth was computed for 3,779 specimens collected from commercial landings at: Duluth, Minn.; Bayfield, Wis.; and Portage Entry and Marquette, Mich.

  16. Evidence of spring spawning lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bronte, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    In 1992, the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service began research on the life history, population dynamics, and stock delineation of siscowet lake trout Salvelinus namaycush siscowet in Lake Superior. Siscowet were captured with gill nets in 80-150 m of water on 23-26 April 1992 north of the Apostle Islands in western Lake Superior. Of 91 captured siscowets, one male had fully developed testes in nearly ripe condition and one female had eggs running from the vent. This observation represents the earliest dates that lake trout of any morphotype have been found in spawning or near-spawning condition.

  17. Hydrology of Lake County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knochenmus, Darwin D.; Hughes, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Lake County includes a 1,150 square-mile area consisting of ridges, uplands, and valleys in central-peninsular Florida. About 32 percent of the county is covered by lakes, swamps, and marshes. Water requirements in 1970 averaged about 54 million gallons per day. About 85 percent of the water was obtained from wells; about 15 percent from lakes. The Floridan aquifer supplies almost all the ground water used in Lake County. Annual recharge to the Floridan aquifer averages about 7 inches over the county; runoff average 8.5 inches. The quality of ground and surface water in Lake County is in general good enough for most uses; however, the poor quality of Floridan-aquifer water in the St. John River Valley probably results from the upward movement of saline water along a fault zone. Surface water in Lake County is usually less mineralized than ground water but is more turbid and colored. (Woodard-USGS)

  18. Archaea in Yellowstone Lake.

    PubMed

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Macur, Richard E; Inskeep, William P; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Gorby, Yuri; McDermott, Timothy R; Nealson, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex has yielded foundational discoveries that have significantly enhanced our understanding of the Archaea. This study continues on this theme, examining Yellowstone Lake and its lake floor hydrothermal vents. Significant Archaea novelty and diversity were found associated with two near-surface photic zone environments and two vents that varied in their depth, temperature and geochemical profile. Phylogenetic diversity was assessed using 454-FLX sequencing (~51,000 pyrosequencing reads; V1 and V2 regions) and Sanger sequencing of 200 near-full-length polymerase chain reaction (PCR) clones. Automated classifiers (Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) and Greengenes) were problematic for the 454-FLX reads (wrong domain or phylum), although BLAST analysis of the 454-FLX reads against the phylogenetically placed full-length Sanger sequenced PCR clones proved reliable. Most of the archaeal diversity was associated with vents, and as expected there were differences between the vents and the near-surface photic zone samples. Thaumarchaeota dominated all samples: vent-associated organisms corresponded to the largely uncharacterized Marine Group I, and in surface waters, ~69-84% of the 454-FLX reads matched archaeal clones representing organisms that are Nitrosopumilus maritimus-like (96-97% identity). Importance of the lake nitrogen cycling was also suggested by >5% of the alkaline vent phylotypes being closely related to the nitrifier Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. The Euryarchaeota were primarily related to the uncharacterized environmental clones that make up the Deep Sea Euryarchaeal Group or Deep Sea Hydrothermal Vent Group-6. The phylogenetic parallels of Yellowstone Lake archaea to marine microorganisms provide opportunities to examine interesting evolutionary tracks between freshwater and marine lineages.

  19. Great Lakes Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J. Iwan

    2012-11-18

    The vision of the Great Lakes Energy Institute is to enable the transition to advanced, sustainable energy generation, storage, distribution and utilization through coordinated research, development, and education. The Institute will place emphasis on translating leading edge research into next generation energy technology. The Institute’s research thrusts focus on coordinated research in decentralized power generation devices (e.g. fuel cells, wind turbines, solar photovoltaic devices), management of electrical power transmission and distribution, energy storage, and energy efficiency.

  20. Method for lake restoration

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, Gaynor W.; Mercer, Basil W.

    1979-01-01

    A process for removing pollutants or minerals from lake, river or ocean sediments or from mine tailings is disclosed. Magnetically attractable collection units containing an ion exchange or sorbent media with an affinity for a chosen target substance are distributed in the sediments or tailings. After a period of time has passed sufficient for the particles to bind up the target substances, a magnet drawn through the sediments or across the tailings retrieves the units along with the target substance.

  1. Not so Great Lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    In 1965, Frank Sinatra won the Grammy Award for his album, “September of My Years” “Early Bird,” the first commercial communications satellite, was launched; and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested in Selma, Alabama, during demonstrations against voter-registration rules.The year 1965 was also the last time water levels in the U.S. Great Lakes were as low as they are now.

  2. Not so Great Lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    In 1965, Frank Sinatra won the Grammy Award for his album, "September of My Years;" "Early Bird," the first commercial communications satellite, was launched; and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was arrested in Selma, Alabama, during demonstrations against voter-registration rules.The year 1965 was also the last time water levels in the U.S. Great Lakes were as low as they are now.

  3. Angora Fire, Lake Tahoe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On the weekend of June 23, 2007, a wildfire broke out south of Lake Tahoe, which stretches across the California-Nevada border. By June 28, the Angora Fire had burned more than 200 homes and forced some 2,000 residents to evacuate, according to The Seattle Times and the Central Valley Business Times. On June 27, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the burn scar left by the Angora fire. The burn scar is dark gray, or charcoal. Water bodies, including the southern tip of Lake Tahoe and Fallen Leaf Lake, are pale silvery blue, the silver color a result of sunlight reflecting off the surface of the water. Vegetation ranges in color from dark to bright green. Streets are light gray, and the customary pattern of meandering residential streets and cul-de-sacs appears throughout the image, including the area that burned. The burn scar shows where the fire obliterated some of the residential areas just east of Fallen Leaf Lake. According to news reports, the U.S. Forest Service had expressed optimism about containing the fire within a week of the outbreak, but a few days after the fire started, it jumped a defense, forcing the evacuation of hundreds more residents. Strong winds that had been forecast for June 27, however, did not materialize, allowing firefighters to regain ground in controlling the blaze. On June 27, authorities hoped that the fire would be completely contained by July 3. According to estimates provided in the daily report from the National Interagency Fire Center, the fire had burned 3,100 acres (about 12.5 square kilometers) and was about 55 percent contained as of June 28. Some mandatory evacuations remained in effect. NASA image by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  4. THOUSAND LAKES WILDERNESS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Till, Alison B.; McHugh, Edward L.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Thousand Lakes Wilderness in northern California indicated little promise for the occurrence of mineral resources. Volcanic stone and cinders occur, but similar materials are found in abundance outside the wilderness. The wilderness is in the Cascade Volcanic Province, a setting locally favorable for geothermal resource potential. No geothermal potential was identified in the wilderness; subsurface potential cannot be evaluated without regional studies and drilling.

  5. Landsat analysis of lake quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Fisher, L. T.; Holmquist, K. W.

    1979-01-01

    The trophic status of a number of inland lakes in Wisconsin has been assessed. The feasibility of using both photographic and digital representations of Landsat imagery was investigated during the lake classification project. The result of the investigation has been a semi-automatic data acquisition and handling system which, in conjunction with an analytical categorization scheme, can be used to classify all the significant lakes in the state.

  6. Crater Lake: blue through time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, Gary L.; Buktenica, Mark; Collier, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Blue is the color of constancy, hence the term true blue. The unearthly blueness of Crater Lake reflects its pristine character and gives scientists a focal point for studying human impacts on aquatic environments over long periods of time. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Park Service, and Oregon State University have systematically studied the lake for the last two decades. Long-term monitoring of this lake is a priority of Crater Lake National Park and will continue far into the future.

  7. Great Lakes' regional climate regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Sergey; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Roebber, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We simulate the seasonal cycle of the Great Lakes' water temperature and lake ice using an idealized coupled lake-atmosphere-ice model. Under identical seasonally varying boundary conditions, this model exhibits more than one seasonally varying equilibrium solutions, which we associate with distinct regional climate regimes. Colder/warmer regimes are characterized by abundant/scarce amounts of wintertime ice and cooler/warmer summer temperatures, respectively. These regimes are also evident in the observations of the Great Lakes' climate variability over recent few decades, and are found to be most pronounced for Lake Superior, the deepest of the Great Lakes, consistent with model predictions. Multiple climate regimes of the Great Lakes also play a crucial role in the accelerated warming of the lakes relative to the surrounding land regions in response to larger-scale global warming. We discuss the physical origin and characteristics of multiple climate regimes over the lakes, as well as their implications for a longer-term regional climate variability.

  8. Glacioisostasy and Lake-Level Change at Moosehead Lake, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balco, G.; Belknap, D.F.; Kelley, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Reconstructions of glacioisostatic rebound based on relative sea level in Maine and adjacent Canada do not agree well with existing geophysical models. In order to understand these discrepancies better, we investigated the lake-level history of 40-km-long Moosehead Lake in northwestern Maine. Glacioisostasy has affected the level of Moosehead Lake since deglaciation ca. 12,500 14C yr B.P. Lowstand features at the southeastern end and an abandoned outlet at the northwestern end of the lake indicate that the lake basin was tilted down to the northwest, toward the retreating ice sheet, by 0.7 m/km at 10,000 14C yr B.P. Water level then rose rapidly in the southeastern end of the lake, and the northwestern outlet was abandoned, indicating rapid relaxation of landscape tilt. Lowstand features at the northwestern end of the lake suggest that the lake basin was tilted to the southeast at ca. 8750 14C yr B.P., possibly as the result of a migrating isostatic forebulge. After 8000 14C yr B.P., water level at the southeastern end was again below present lake level and rose gradually thereafter. We found no evidence suggesting that postglacial climate change significantly affected lake level. The rebound history inferred from lake-level data is consistent with previous interpretations of nearby relative sealevel data, which indicate a significantly steeper and faster-moving ice-proximal depression and ice-distal forebulge than geophysical models predict. ?? 1998 University of Washington.

  9. Lake Charles CCS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Leib, Thomas; Cole, Dan

    2015-06-30

    In late September 2014 development of the Lake Charles Clean Energy (LCCE) Plant was abandoned resulting in termination of Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project which was a subset the LCCE Plant. As a result, the project was only funded through Phase 2A (Design) and did not enter Phase 2B (Construction) or Phase 2C (Operations). This report was prepared relying on information prepared and provided by engineering companies which were engaged by Leucadia Energy, LLC to prepare or review Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) for the Lake Charles Clean Energy Project, which includes the Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project in Lake Charles, Louisiana. The Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project was to be a large-scale industrial CCS project intended to demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. The Scope of work was divided into two discrete sections; 1) Capture and Compression prepared by the Recipient Leucadia Energy, LLC, and 2) Transport and Sequestration prepared by sub-Recipient Denbury Onshore, LLC. Capture and Compression-The Lake Charles CCS Project Final Technical Report describes the systems and equipment that would be necessary to capture CO2 generated in a large industrial gasification process and sequester the CO2 into underground formations. The purpose of each system is defined along with a description of its equipment and operation. Criteria for selection of major equipment are provided and ancillary utilities necessary for safe and reliable operation in compliance with environmental regulations are described. Construction considerations are described including a general arrangement of the CCS process units within the overall gasification project. A cost estimate is provided, delineated by system area with cost breakdown showing equipment, piping and materials

  10. Embryotoxicity of an extract from Great Lakes lake trout to rainbow trout and lake trout

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.J.; Tillitt, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Aquatic ecosystems such as the Great Lakes are known to be contaminated with chemicals that are toxic to fish. However, the role of these contaminants in reproductive failures of fishes, such as lake trout recruitment, has remained controvertible. It was the objective to evaluate dioxin-like embryotoxicity of a complex mixture of chemicals and predict their potential to cause the lack of recruitment in Great Lakes lake trout. Graded doses of a complex environmental extract were injected into eggs of both rainbow trout and lake trout. The extract was obtained from whole adult lake trout collected from Lake Michigan in 1988. The extract was embryotoxic in rainbow trout, with LD50 values for Arlee strain and Erwin strain of 33 eggEQ and 14 eggEQ respectively. The LOAEL for hemorrhaging, yolk-sac edema, and craniofacial deformities in rainbow trout were 2, 2, and 4 eggEQ, respectively. Subsequent injections of the extract into lake trout eggs were likewise embryotoxic, with an LD50 value of 7 eggEQ. The LOAEL values for the extract in lake trout for hemorrhaging, yolk-sac edema, and craniofacial deformities were 0.1, 1, and 2 eggEQ, respectively. The current levels of contaminants in lake trout eggs are above the threshold for hemorrhaging and yolk-sac edema. The results also support the use of an additive model of toxicity to quantify PCDDs, PCDFs, Non-o-PCBs, and Mono-o-PCBs in relation to early life stage mortality in Lake Michigan lake trout.

  11. Holocene lake-level fluctuations of Lake Aricota, Southern Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Placzek, C.; Quade, Jay; Betancourt, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Lacustrine deposits exposed around Lake Aricota, Peru (17?? 22???S), a 7.5-km2 lake dammed by debris flows, provide a middle to late Holocene record of lake-level fluctuations. Chronological context for shoreline deposits was obtained from radiocarbon dating of vascular plant remains and other datable material with minimal 14C reservoir effects (<350 yr). Diatomites associated with highstands several meters above the modern lake level indicate wet episodes. Maximum Holocene lake level was attained before 6100 14C yr B.P. and ended ???2700 14C yr B.P. Moderately high lake levels occurred at 1700 and 1300 14C yr B.P. The highstand at Lake Aricota during the middle Holocene is coeval with a major lowstand at Lake Titicaca (16?? S), which is only 130 km to the northeast and shares a similar climatology. Comparisons with other marine and terrestrial records highlight emerging contradictions over the nature of mid-Holocene climate in the central Andes. ?? 2001 University of Washington.

  12. Gillnet selectivity for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Selgeby, James H.; Helser, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    Gillnet selectivity for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) was estimated indirectly from catches in nets of 102-, 114-, 127-, 140-, and 152-mm stretch measure. Mesh selectivity was modeled as a nonlinear response surface that describes changes in the mean, standard deviation, and skewness of fish lengths across mesh sizes. Gillnet selectivity for lake trout was described by five parameters that explained 88% of the variation in wedged and entangled catches, 81% of the variation in wedged catches, and 82% of the variation in entangled catches. Combined catches of wedged and entangled lake trout were therefore described more parsimoniously than separate catches of wedged and entangled lake trout. Peak selectivity of wedged and entangled fish increased from 588 to 663 mm total length as mesh size increased from 102 to 152 mm, and relative selectivity peaked at a total length of 638 mm. The estimated lake trout population size-frequency indicated that gillnet catches were negatively biased toward both small and large lake trout. As a consequence of this bias, survival of Lake Superior lake trout across ages 9-11 was underestimated by about 20% when the catch curve was not adjusted for gillnet selectivity.

  13. Geographical distributions of lake trout strains stocked in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; O'Gorman, Robert; Schneider, Clifford P.; Schaner, Ted

    1996-01-01

    Geographical distributions of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) stocked at seven locations in U.S. waters and at four locations in Canadian waters of Lake Ontario were determined from fish caught with gill nets in September in 17 areas of U.S. waters and at 10 fixed locations in Canadian waters in 1986-95. For fish of a given strain stocked at a given location, geographical distributions were not different for immature males and immature females or for mature males and mature females. The proportion of total catch at the three locations nearest the stocking location was higher for mature fish than for immature fish in all 24 available comparisons (sexes combined) and was greater for fish stocked as yearlings than for those stocked as fingerlings in all eight comparisons. Mature fish were relatively widely dispersed from stocking locations indicating that their tendency to return to stocking locations for spawning was weak, and there was no appreciable difference in this tendency among strains. Mature lake trout were uniformly distributed among sampling locations, and the strain composition at stocking locations generally reflected the stocking history 5 to 6 years earlier. Few lake trout moved across Lake Ontario between the north and south shores or between the eastern outlet basin and the main lake basin. Limited dispersal from stocking sites supports the concept of stocking different genetic strains in various parts of the lake with the attributes of each strain selected to match environmental conditions in the portion of the lake where it is stocked.

  14. HABITAT: LAKE SUPERIOR - STATE OF THE LAKE 2005

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation briefly describes the state of research and management in Lake Superior concerning fisheries and their association to habitat. It discusses a general habitat classification for the lake and an increasing interest in the nearshore, summarizing the status of cont...

  15. Biology of young lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Oosten, John; Eschmeyer, Paul H.

    1956-01-01

    Experimental fishing with gill nets of 5 mesh sizes (2 3/8 to 3 inches) in Lake Michigan in 1930-32 yielded more than 16,000 young lake trout. Data are presented here on age, growth, length-weight relationship, abundance, geographical and bathymetric distribution, and other details of their biology.

  16. The near extinction of lake trout in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eschmeyer, Paul H.

    1957-01-01

    Comparisons in 1949 and 1950 of numbers of legal-sized lake trout caught in large-mesh nets with numbers of small fish taken in chub nets showed that both large and small lake trout declined over the same period, and that by these years the decline may have been greater among small than among legal-sized fish.

  17. Delineation of sympatric morphotypes of lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Seth A.; Bronte, Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    Three morphotypes of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush are recognized in Lake Superior: lean, siscowet, and humper. Absolute morphotype assignment can be difficult. We used a size-free, whole-body morphometric analysis (truss protocol) to determine whether differences in body shape existed among lake trout morphotypes. Our results showed discrimination where traditional morphometric characters and meristic measurements failed to detect differences. Principal components analysis revealed some separation of all three morphotypes based on head and caudal peduncle shape, but it also indicated considerable overlap in score values. Humper lake trout have smaller caudal peduncle widths to head length and depth characters than do lean or siscowet lake trout. Lean lake trout had larger head measures to caudal widths, whereas siscowet had higher caudal peduncle to head measures. Backward stepwise discriminant function analysis retained two head measures, three midbody measures, and four caudal peduncle measures; correct classification rates when using these variables were 83% for leans, 80% for siscowets, and 83% for humpers, which suggests the measures we used for initial classification were consistent. Although clear ecological reasons for these differences are not readily apparent, patterns in misclassification rates may be consistent with evolutionary hypotheses for lake trout within the Laurentian Great Lakes.

  18. ARE LAKES GETTING WARMER? REMOTE SENSING OF LARGE LAKE TEMPERATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies (Levitus et al., 2000) suggest a warning of the world ocean over the past 50 years. Freshwater lakes could also be getting warmer but thermal measurements to determine this are lacking. Large lake temperatures are vertically and horizontally heterogeneous and vary ...

  19. The Lake Ohrid SCOPSCO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Bernd; Wilke, Thomas; Krastel, Sebastian; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Sulpizio, Roberto; Leng, Melanie J.; Francke, Alexander; Baumgarten, Henrike; Cvetkoska, Aleksandra; Giacco, Biagio; Lacey, Jack H.; Leicher, Niklas; Levkov, Zlatko; Lindhorst, Katja; Reed, Jane M.; Zhang, Xiaosen; Sadori, Laura; Vogel, Hendrik; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Wonik, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The ICDP SCOPSCO project at Lake Ohrid in Macedonia and Albania was one of the most successful lake drilling campaigns worldwide. Drilling took place from April to June 2013 and yielded more than 2000 m of sediments from four different sites in the lake. The maximum penetration was 569 m below lake floor and the overall recovery at all drill sites was > 95 %. Almost two years after the drilling operation, core opening and processing as well as biological and geological analyses are still ongoing. However, most of the cores from the main drill site, the so-called DEEP site in the centre of the lake, are meanwhile opened and reveal a unique record of lake history. The extraordinary quality of seismic, borehole logging and core data allows us to achieve the major goals of the SCOPSCO project. Seismic data, diatoms and coarse-grained sediments in the basal cores indicate that Lake Ohrid had no marine origin, as it was speculated in the past. The data show that Lake Ohrid established in a highly dynamic pull-apart basin with varying fluvial and shallow water conditions. On top of these basal sediments, borehole logging data, XRF scanning data, carbonate, and the amount of organic matter indicate a complete and high resolution succession of glacial / interglacial cycles and interspersed stadials and interstadials. This allows us to determine the establishment of Lake Ohrid by means of chronostratigraphic tuning to about 1.3 to 1.5 Ma ago. Additional, independent age control is given by paleomagnetic data and by numerous tephra layers, which can be correlated with well-dated proximal tephra deposits in Italy. The uppermost 350 m of the sediment record contain more than 30 tephras, which makes the Lake Ohrid record to the rosetta stone of distal Italian tephra deposits in the Balkan region. The unique sediment record of Lake Ohrid is fundamental to obtain crucial information on the overall goal of the SCOPSCO project, i.e. to clarify why Lake Ohrid has one of highest

  20. Great Salt Lake sets record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    The level of the Great Salt Lake, Utah, broke its 1873 record on May 12, 1986, rising to 1283.7 m above mean sea level, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Heavy snowpack remains in the lake's drainage basin, and the lake is likely to continue rising into June. “It could well go up another foot [i.e., ˜0.3 m],” this season, according to Ted Arnow, USGS district chief in Utah.The Utah state legislature convened a special session on May 13 to discuss measures to control the flooding. Last year, the legislature began to consider funding a plan to pump water from the Great Salt Lake to form a large, shallow pond in the desert 48 km to the west. Because the lake's level was predicted to drop this year, however, the lawmakers postponed action on the issue (Eos, September 10, 1985, p. 641). The Rose Park area of Salt Lake City, which lies below the lake's current level, has been diked, but groundwater is backing up into Rose Park and has to be pumped out over the dikes, Arnow said. Also, trains that use the Southern Pacific railroad causeway, which crosses the lake, have had to be temporarily rerouted south of the lake during storms. The causeway has been progressively raised since 1983, but engineers now say that they can raise it no further because the added weight will make it sink into the lake, Arnow said. If the lake rises much higher, the interstate highway that runs by it might also have to shut down temporarily during storms, he added.

  1. Feeding competition between larval lake whitefish and lake herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savino, Jacqueline F.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    1995-01-01

    The potential for competition for food between larval lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and lake herring (C. artedi) 1- to 8-wk of age was explored in a series of 1-h laboratory feeding studies. Feeding started at 2-wk post-hatch. Learning and fish size appear to be more important than prey density at the onset of feeding. Species differed in their feeding behavior and consumption noticeably by 5-wk and substantially by 8-wk. Lake whitefish generally were more aggressive foragers than lake herring, attacking and capturing more prey. At high plankton density at 8-wk, lake herring feeding was depressed in mixed-fish treatments. This difference in competitive food consumption between the two coregonids occurs at a critical life stage, and when combined with other biotic and abiotic factors, may have a significant impact on recruitment.

  2. Forecasting Lake-Effect Snow in the Great Lakes Using NASA Satllite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipullo, Michelle; Molthan, Andrew; Shafer, Jackie; Case, Jonathan; Jedlovec, Gary

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the forecast of the lake effect snow in the Great Lakes region using models and infrared estimates of Great Lake Surface Temperatures (GLSTs) from the MModerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on Terra and Aqua satellites, and other satellite data. This study analyzes Lake Erie and Lake Ontario which produce storm total snowfall ranged from 8-18 inches off of Lake Ontario and 10-12 inches off of Lake Erie for the areas downwind.

  3. New insights into the Glacial to Holocene climatic evolution of Southern Patagonia from lacustrine lipid biomarker isotope records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockun, K.; Mollenhauer, G.; Sachse, D.; Schefuß, E.

    2015-12-01

    Southern Patagonia is a key region for paleoclimatic reconstructions in the Southern Hemisphere as it is the only landmass located in the Southern Hemisphere westerly wind (SHW) belt. Within the framework of the ICDP drilling campaign PASADO ("Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project"), a high resolution sediment record was recovered from Laguna Potrok Aike (LPTA, 51°58´S, 70°23´W). In order to identify the sources of organic matter contributions to the sedimentary archive, we investigated long-chain n-alkanes as tracers for terrestrial and aquatic plants. We analysed n-alkane distributions and their compound-specific hydrogen (δD) and stable carbon (δ13C) isotopic composition in various sample types such as soils, dust, aquatic and terrestrial plants and lake surface sediments. Based on two different model approaches, one using the n-alkane distributions and the other the compound-specific isotope values, we traced the origin of mid- (n-C23) and long- (n-C29) chain n-alkanes into modern lake sediments. Both models yield similar results: around 70% of the n-C23 originates from aquatic plants and more than 80% of the n-C29 is delivered from dust and terrestrial plants to the sediment. These results provide the basis for a robust paleo-environmental reconstruction of the lipid biomarker isotope records from LPTA. Compound-specific δD and δ13C records for the last 55,000 years from the PASADO core are interpreted in the framework of these findings. Here, δD of the n-C23 alkane serves as proxy for lake water isotopic changes driven by the precipitation-evaporation balance, moisture sources and water column stratification. In contrast, we interpret changes in δD of the n-C29 alkane to reflect dust source area changes and therefore, the intensity of the SHW. A 50‰ shift in the δD record of the n-C23 alkane between 10.000 to 8.000 years age indicates a major hydrological change affecting the lake level while isotopic changes in the n-C29 alkane

  4. Genetic and tagging evidence for movement of walleyes between Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Thomas N.; Haas, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    Walleyes (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) from Lake Erie differed in allele frequencies from walleyes in Lake St. Clair (N = 1,680; 25 loci); however, only slight differences were found among walleyes from different spawning sites in each lake. Analyses of allele frequency data from samples of nonspawning walleyes taken in Lake St. Clair provided conditional maximum likelihood estimates that 86% of these walleyes were from Lake St. Clair and 14% from Lake Erie (SD = 19.7%) in 1983 and that 63% were from Lake St. Clair and 37% were from Lake Erie (SD = 20.0%) in 1984. About 30% of 1,159 recoveries of walleyes tagged in Lake Erie were taken from the Detroit River northward to southern Lake Huron, thus demonstrating extensive mixing of stocks from Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair. Additionally, tags recovered from the upper half of the St. Clair River provided an estimate of mixed stock composition of 76% Lake St. Clair fish and 24% Lake Erie fish. Analyses of tags returned during successive spawning seasons showed that walleyes strongly tended to return to suspected natal spawning areas. The tagging data thus corroborate the genetic evidence that walleye stocks from Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie are different, and that large numbers of Lake Erie walleyes enter Lake St. Clair during nonspawning seasons and return to their Lake Erie spawning sites each year. Western Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair walleyes should be considered as separate stocks for management purposes.

  5. Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Project

    SciTech Connect

    John Jackson

    2008-03-14

    The Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe is a federally recognized Tribe residing on the Pyramid Lake Reservation in western Nevada. The funding for this project was used to identify blind geothermal systems disconnected from geothermal sacred sites and develop a Tribal energy corporation for evaluating potential economic development for profit.

  6. Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ying; Chang, Chein-Chi; Dong, Zhanfeng; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on stream, lake, and reservoir management covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of the following sections: • Biota • Climate effect • Models • Remediation and restoration • Reservoir operations • Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management • Water quality.

  7. The Great Lakes Food Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Marjane L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a play for students in grades four to nine that incorporates the scientific names, physical characteristics, feeding habits, interactions, and interdependence of the plants and animals that make up the Great Lakes food web to facilitate the learning of this complex system. Includes a Great Lakes food web chart. (AIM)

  8. "Lake Woebegone," Twenty Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannell, John Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Almost 20 years ago, the author wrote--and then privately published--the two "Lake Woebegone" reports, named after Garrison Keillor's mythical Minnesota town where "all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average." The first "Lake Woebegone" report documented that all 50 states were testing above the…

  9. PYRAMID LAKE RENEWEABLE ENERGY PLAN

    SciTech Connect

    HIGH DESERT GEOCULTURE, LLC

    2009-06-06

    The Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Plan covers these areas: energy potential (primarily focusing on geothermal resource potential, but also more generally addressing wind energy potential); renewable energy market potential; transmission system development; geothermal direct use potential; and business structures to accomplish the development objectives of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

  10. NATIONAL LAKE ASSESSMENT MONITORING DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA designed the National Lake Assessment in 2005-6 with field sampling being completed in 2007. The objective of the assessment is to estimate the ecological condition of lakes and reservoirs nationally. The objective of this paper is to describe the national survey desi...

  11. An urban lake remediation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Castelli, S.E.; Gardner, K.H.; Jennings, A.A.

    1998-07-01

    Circumstances provided the opportunity to study a small urban lake as the surrounding municipalities attempted to improve its aesthetic quality by dredging. This manuscript focuses primarily on the sediments in the system: accumulation rates, the expected dynamics of the lake bed drying process, and the influence of the sediments on water quality.

  12. Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ying; Chang, Chein-Chi; Dong, Zhanfeng; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on stream, lake, and reservoir management covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of the following sections: • Biota • Climate effect • Models • Remediation and restoration • Reservoir operations • Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management • Water quality. PMID:27620102

  13. A Compilation of Gas Emission-Rate Data from Volcanoes of Cook Inlet (Spurr, Crater Peak, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) and Alaska Peninsula (Douglas, Fourpeaked, Griggs, Mageik, Martin, Peulik, Ukinrek Maars, and Veniaminof), Alaska, from 1995-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doukas, Michael P.; McGee, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This report presents gas emission rates from data collected during numerous airborne plume-measurement flights at Alaskan volcanoes since 1995. These flights began in about 1990 as means to establish baseline values of volcanic gas emissions during periods of quiescence and to identify anomalous levels of degassing that might signal the beginning of unrest. The primary goal was to make systematic measurements at the major volcanic centers around the Cook Inlet on at least an annual basis, and more frequently during periods of unrest and eruption. A secondary goal was to measure emissions at selected volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula. While the goals were not necessarily met in all cases due to weather, funding, or the availability of suitable aircraft, a rich dataset of quality measurements is the legacy of this continuing effort. An earlier report (Doukas, 1995) presented data for the period from 1990 through 1994 and the current report provides data through 2006. This report contains all of the available measurements for SO2, CO2, and H2S emission rates in Alaska determined by the U. S. Geological Survey from 1995 through 2006; airborne measurements for H2S began in Alaska in 2001. The results presented here are from Cook Inlet volcanoes at Spurr, Crater Peak, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine and cover periods of unrest at Iliamna (1996) and Spurr (2004-2006) as well as the 2006 eruption of Augustine. Additional sporadic measurements at volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula (Douglas, Martin, Mageik, Griggs, Veniaminof, Ukinrek Maars, Peulik, and Fourpeaked during its 2006 unrest) are also reported here.

  14. Europa's Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Patterson, G. W.; Schenk, P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Unique to the surface of Europa, chaos terrain is diagnostic of the properties and dynamics of its icy shell. While models have suggested that partial melt within a thick shell or melt-through of a thin shell may form chaos, neither model has been able to definitively explain all observations of chaos terrain. However, we present a new model that suggests large melt lenses form within the shell and that water-ice interactions above and within these lenses drive the production of chaos. Our analysis of the geomorphology of Conamara Chaos and Thera Macula, was used to infer and test a four-stage lens-collapse chaos formation model: 1) Thermal plumes of warm, pure ice ascend through the shell melting the impure brittle ice above, producing a lake of briny water and surface down draw due to volume reduction. 2) Surface deflection and driving force from the plume below hydraulically seals the water in place. 3) Extension of the brittle ice lid generates fractures from below, allowing brines to enter and fluidize the ice matrix. 4) As the lens and now brash matrix refreeze, thermal expansion creates domes and raises the chaos feature above the background terrain. This new "lense-collapse" model indicates that chaos features form in the presence of a great deal of liquid water, and that large liquid water bodies exist within 3km of Europa's surface comparable in volume to the North American Great Lakes. The detection of shallow subsurface "lakes" implies that the ice shell is recycling rapidly and that Europa may be currently active. In this presentation, we will explore environments on Europa and their analogs on Earth, from collapsing Antarctic ice shelves to to subglacial volcanos in Iceland. I will present these new analyses, and describe how this new perspective informs the debate about Europa's habitability and future exploration.

  15. Lake-floor sediment texture and composition of a hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake, Lake Rotomahana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittari, A.; Muir, S. L.; Hendy, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Young volcanic lakes undergo a transition from rapid, post-eruptive accumulation of volcaniclastic sediment to slower pelagic settling under stable lake conditions, and may also be influenced by sublacustrine hydrothermal systems. Lake Rotomahana is a young (129 year-old), hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake formed after the 1886 Tarawera eruption, and provides a unique insight into the early evolution of volcanic lake systems. Lake-bottom sediment cores, 20-46 cm in length, were taken along a transect across the lake and characterised with respect to stratigraphy, facies characteristics (i.e., grain size, componentry) and pore water silica concentrations. The sediments generally comprise two widespread facies: (i) a lower facies of light grey to grey, very fine lacustrine silt derived from the unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits that mantled the catchment area immediately after the eruption, which were rapidly reworked and redeposited into the lake basin; and (ii) an upper facies of dark, fine-sandy diatomaceous silt, that settled from the pelagic zone of the physically stable lake. Adjacent to sublacustrine hydrothermal vents, the upper dark facies is absent, and the upper part of the light grey to grey silt is replaced by a third localised facies comprised of hydrothermally altered pale yellow to yellowish brown, laminated silt with surface iron-rich encrustations. Microspheres, which are thought to be composed of amorphous silica, although some may be halloysite, have precipitated from pore water onto sediment grains, and are associated with a decrease in pore water silicon concentration. Lake Rotomahana is an example of a recently-stabilised volcanic lake, with respect to sedimentation, that shows signs of early sediment silicification in the presence of hydrothermal activity.

  16. Choking Lake Winnipeg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, J. M.; Little, L. J.; Dodgson, K. A.; MacDonald, R. J.; Graham, J.

    2009-12-01

    The problems of waterway eutrophication and coastal zone hypoxia are reaching epidemic proportions. Fresh water and coastal marine environments around the world are suffering unprecedented pollution loadings. We are developing an education program to address the dramatic need for public, community and K-12 education about the harsh impacts of elevated nutrient loads on fresh and marine water environments. The Lake Winnipeg watershed is adopted as the poster child of fresh water eutrophication in western North America. The watershed, one of the largest on the continent, is in rapid decline due to pollution, population pressures and water diversion. A concerted education program is needed to change personal and society actions that negatively impact the Winnipeg watershed; and the confluence of the watershed - Lake Winnipeg. But the education program goes beyond Lake Winnipeg. Negative impacts of nutrient loads are adversely affecting environments right to the oceans. Major dead zones that are expanding on our continental shelves due to nutrient overloading threaten to coalesce into extensive regions of marine life die-off. This presentation outlines the documentary education production process under development. We are building a series of Public Service Announcements (PSAs) for national television networks. The PSAs will direct educators, stakeholders and citizens to an associated website with educational video clips detailing the issues of eutrophication and hypoxia. The video clips or webisodes, present interviews with leading scientists. The discussions address the causes of the problems, and presents workable solutions to nutrient overloads from a variety of sources. The webisodes are accompanied by notes and advice to teachers on ways and means to use the webisodes in classrooms. The project is fully funed by a group of Canadian Community Foundations, with the understanding the work wil be available free to educators anywhere in the world. Our education

  17. Seasonal bathythermal distribution of juvenile lake trout in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elrod, Joseph H.; Schneider, Clifford P.

    1987-01-01

    Bathythermal distributions of hatchery-reared lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) of three genetic strains (Lake Superior; Clearwater Lake, Manitoba; and Seneca Lake, New York) were described from catches with bottom trawls in Lake Ontario during April-May, June, July-August, and October, 1978–1984. This work was part of a program to evaluate post-stocking performance of hatchery-reared fish and identify strains for continued use in rehabilitation of lake trout in Lake Ontario. All age groups of Lake Superior fish were in deeper water in April-May than in June each year; mean depth of capture was greatest at age II and became progressively shallower at ages III and IV. Mean depth of capture in April-May was positively correlated with severity of the preceding winter as judged by heating degree days and average wind speed. During July-August, the fish were concentrated between the epilimnion and 50 m, with no consistent trend in depth by age; however, 92% were captured at water temperatures of 12°C or lower. Mean temperatures of capture for Lake Superior fish during the four respective sampling periods were 3.9, 7.5, 6.9, and 9.5° C for fish of age II and 3.9, 8.4, 6.9, and 8.7° C for fish of age III. The age-II Clearwater Lake fish were consistently at shallower depths than age-II Lake Superior fish. Mean temperatures of capture were 4.2, 9.7, 9.6, and 10.7° C during the four respective sampling periods; during July-August, 91% were taken in water of 12° C or lower. The distribution of Seneca Lake fish was similar to that of the Lake Superior strain. Mean temperatures at which the three strains were captured were well below published preferred temperatures of yearlings in the laboratory. Annual variations in depth distributions during a given season were probably due to differing thermal regimes resulting from annual variations in the weather.

  18. L-Lake macroinvertebrate community

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, W.L.

    1996-06-01

    To characterize the present benthic macroinvertebrate community of L-Lake, Regions 5 and 7 of the reservoir were sampled in September 1995 at the same locations sampled in 1988 and 1989 during the L-Lake monitoring program. The macroinvertebrate community of 1995 is compared to that of 1988 and 1989. The species composition of L-Lake`s macroinvertebrate community has changed considerably since 1988-1989, due primarily to maturation of the reservoir ecosystem. L-Lake contains a reasonably diverse macroinvertebrate community that is capable of supporting higher trophic levels, including a diverse assemblage of fish species. The L-Lake macroinvertebrate community is similar to those of many other southeastern reservoirs, and there is no indication that the macroinvertebrate community is perturbed by chemical or physical stressors.

  19. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and... Anchorage, Alaska, Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. Each person operating an aircraft to or from Lake Campbell or Sixmile Lake Airport shall conform to the...

  20. 75 FR 20920 - Safety Zone; Lake Havasu Grand Prix, Lake Havasu, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Havasu Grand Prix, Lake Havasu, AZ... temporary safety zone upon the navigable waters of Lake Havasu on the Colorado River in Lake Havasu City, Arizona for the Lake Havasu Grand Prix. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide for the...

  1. 75 FR 13232 - Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead, Boulder City, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Lake Mead in support of the construction project for Lake... Pipe from Lake Mead throughout 2010. This safety zone is necessary to ensure non-authorized...

  2. 77 FR 33309 - Safety Zone; Race on the Lake, Onondaga Lake, Syracuse, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Race on the Lake, Onondaga Lake, Syracuse... temporary safety zone on Onondaga Lake, Syracuse, NY. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Onondaga Lake during the Race on the Lake powerboat races. This temporary safety...

  3. 78 FR 17097 - Safety Zone; Lake Havasu Triathlon; Lake Havasu City, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Havasu Triathlon; Lake Havasu City, AZ... temporary safety zone within the navigable waters of Lake Havasu and the London Bridge Channel for the Lake... Triathlon will consist of 600 participants. The waterside swim course consists of 1500 meters in Lake...

  4. 77 FR 9652 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake Linden... administrative settlement for recovery of past response costs concerning the Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake..., Chicago, Illinois, C-14J, 60604, (312) 886-6609. Comments should reference the Lake Linden Superfund...

  5. 76 FR 2579 - Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead, Boulder City, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Lake Mead Intake Construction, Lake Mead... establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of Lake Mead in support of the construction project for Lake... blasting operations for the placement of a water intake pipe in Lake Mead during the first 6 months of...

  6. PLAT X41601 EAST (SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PLAT X-4-160-1 EAST (SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH AT CEMETERY BETWEEN OLIVE STREET (1020 EAST) AND 1000 EAST STREET, REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 12049, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  7. EPA Research Strengthens Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the largest group of freshwater lakes on Earth, the Great Lakes (Lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan, Ontario and Superior) are a source of economic prosperity, recreation and raw materials. Human activity, however, has resulted in pollution and other stressors. The Great Lakes curren...

  8. 27 CFR 9.127 - Cayuga Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cayuga Lake. 9.127 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Cayuga Lake.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Cayuga Lake viticultural area...

  9. 27 CFR 9.127 - Cayuga Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cayuga Lake. 9.127 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Cayuga Lake.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Cayuga Lake viticultural area...

  10. 27 CFR 9.127 - Cayuga Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cayuga Lake. 9.127 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Cayuga Lake.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Cayuga Lake viticultural area...

  11. 27 CFR 9.127 - Cayuga Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cayuga Lake. 9.127 Section... Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Cayuga Lake.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Cayuga Lake viticultural area...

  12. 33 CFR 125.08 - Great Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Great Lakes. 125.08 Section 125... VESSELS § 125.08 Great Lakes. The term Great Lakes as used in the regulations in this subchapter shall include the Great Lakes and their connecting and tributary waters....

  13. Increased piscivory by lake whitefish in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pothoven, Steven A.; Madenjian, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the diet of Lake Whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis in Lake Huron during 2002–2011 to determine the importance of Round Goby Neogobius melanostomus and other fish as prey items. Lake Whitefish that had reached approximately 400 mm in length incorporated fish into their diets. The overall percentage of adult Lake Whitefish in Lake Huron that had eaten fish increased from 10% in 2002–2006 to 20% in 2007–2011, with a corresponding decrease in the frequency of Lake Whitefish that ate Dreissena spp. from 52% to 33%. During 2002–2006, Round Goby (wet mass, 38%), sculpins (Cottidae) (34%), and Ninespine Stickleback Pungitius pungitius (18%) were the primary fish eaten, whereas Round Goby accounted for 92% of the fish eaten in 2007–2011. Overall, Round Goby were found in the fewest Lake Whitefish stomachs in the north region of Lake Huron (6%) and in the most in the central (23%) and south (19%) regions of the lake. In the central region, Round Goby were eaten during all seasons that were sampled (spring through fall). In the south region, Round Goby were eaten only in the winter and spring but not in the summer when Dreissena spp. and spiny water flea Bythotrephes longimanus dominated the diet. Based on the 2007–2011 diet composition, an individual Lake Whitefish would need to have increased their consumption relative to that in 1983–1994 by 6% in the north region, 12% in the central region, and 41% in the southern region in order to achieve the same growth that was observed before dreissenid mussels arrived. However, Lake Whitefish weight adjusted for length only increased by 2% between 2002–2006 and 2007–2011 in the central region, decreased by 4% in the northern region, and remained constant in the southern region. This suggests that a shift toward more frequent piscivory does not necessarily improve the condition of a generalist feeder like Lake Whitefish.

  14. Rehabilitation of Delavan Lake, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Goddard, Gerald L.; Helsel, D.R.; MacKinnon, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive rehabilitation plan was developed and implemented to shift Delavan Lake, Wisconsin, from a hypereutrophic to a mesotrophic condition. The plan was threefold: (1) reduce external phosphorus (P) loading by applying Best Management Practices in the watershed, enhance an existing wetland, and short-circuit the inflows through the lake, (2) reduce internal P loading by treating the sediments with alum and removing carp, and (3) rehabilitate the fishery by removing carp and bigmouth buffalo and adding piscivores (biomanipulation). The first and second parts of the plan met with only limited success. With only minor reductions in internal and external P loading, P concentrations in the lake returned to near pre-treatment concentrations. The intensive biomanipulation and resulting trophic cascade (increased piscivores, decreased planktivores, increased large zooplankton populations, and reduced phytoplankton populations) eliminated most of the original problems in the lake (blue-green algal blooms and limited water clarity). However, now there is extensive macrophyte growth and abundant filamentous algae. Without significantly reducing the sources of the problems (high P loading) in Delavan Lake, the increased water clarity may not last. With an improved understanding of the individual components of this rehabilitation program, better future management plans can be developed for Delavan Lake and other lakes and reservoirs with similar eutrophication problems.

  15. Forest blowdown and lake acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, J.E.; Rush, R.M. ); Peplies, R.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors examine the role of forest blowdown in lake acidification. The approach combines geographic information systems (GIS) and digital remote sensing with traditional field methods. The methods of analysis consist of direct observation, interpretation of satellite imagery and aerial photographs, and statistical comparison of two geographical distributions-one representing forest blow-down and another representing lake chemistry. Spatial and temporal associations between surface water pH and landscape disturbance are strong and consistent in the Adirondack Mountains of New York. In 43 Adirondack Mountain watersheds, lake pH is associated with the percentage of the watershed area blown down and with hydrogen ion deposition (Spearman rank correlation coefficients of {minus}0.67 and {minus}0.73, respectively). Evidence of a temporal association is found at Big Moose Lake and Jerseyfield Lake in New York and the Lygners Vider Plateau of Sweden. They conclude that forest blowdown facilities the acidification of some lakes by altering hydrologic pathways so that waters (previously acidified by acid deposition and/or other sources) do not experience the neutralization normally available through contact with subsurface soils and bedrock. Increased pipeflow is suggested as a mechanism that may link the biogeochemical impacts of forest blowdown to lake chemistry.

  16. Tracking the impact of mid- to late Holocene climate change and anthropogenic activities on Lake Holzmaar using an updated Holocene chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Sushma; Baier, Janina

    2014-11-01

    The mid- to late Holocene interval is characterised by a highly variable climate in response to a gradual change in orbital insolation. The seasonal impact of these changes on the Eifel Maar region is not yet well documented largely due to uncertainties about the completeness of this archive ("missing varves" in the well known Lake Holzmaar) and a limited understanding of the factors (e.g. temperature, precipitation) influencing the seasonality archived within the lamination/varves. In this study we approach these challenges from a different perspective. Using detailed microfacies investigations we: (1) demonstrate that the ambiguity about the "missing varves" is related to the climate induced complex biotic and abiotic laminations that led to mis-identification of varves; (2) use a combination of detailed microfacies investigations (varve structure, seasonality of biotic and abiotic signals), lamination quality, varve counts on multiple cores, published and new radiocarbon dates to develop a continuous master chronology based on the Bayesian modelling approach. The dates of major climate, volcanic, and archaeological event(s) determined using our model are in good agreement with the independently determined ages of the same events from other archives, confirming the accuracy of our age model; (3) test the sensitivity of the seasonal proxies to the available data on mid-Holocene changes in temperature and precipitation; (4) demonstrate that the changes in lake eutrophicity are correlative with temperature changes in NW Europe and probably triggered by solar variability; and (5) show that the early Iron Age onset of eutrophication in Lake Holzmaar was climate induced and began several decades before the impact of anthropogenic activity was seen in the form of intensified detrital erosion in the catchment area. Our work has implications for understanding the impact of climate change and anthropogenic activities on limnological systems.

  17. Mid-Wisconsin to Holocene permafrost and landscape dynamics based on a drained lake basin core from the northern Seward Peninsula, northwest Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lenz, Josefine; Grosse, Guido; Jones, Benjamin M.; Anthony, Katey M. Walter; Bobrov, Anatoly; Wulf, Sabine; Wetterich, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Permafrost-related processes drive regional landscape dynamics in the Arctic terrestrial system. A better understanding of past periods indicative of permafrost degradation and aggradation is important for predicting the future response of Arctic landscapes to climate change. Here, we used a multi-proxy approach to analyse a ~ 4 m long sediment core from a drained thermokarst lake basin on the northern Seward Peninsula in western Arctic Alaska (USA). Sedimentological, biogeochemical, geochronological, micropalaeontological (ostracoda, testate amoebae) and tephra analyses were used to determine the long-term environmental Early-Wisconsin to Holocene history preserved in our core for central Beringia. Yedoma accumulation dominated throughout the Early to Late-Wisconsin but was interrupted by wetland formation from 44.5 to 41.5 ka BP. The latter was terminated by the deposition of 1 m of volcanic tephra, most likely originating from the South Killeak Maar eruption at about 42 ka BP. Yedoma deposition continued until 22.5 ka BP and was followed by a depositional hiatus in the sediment core between 22.5 and 0.23 ka BP. We interpret this hiatus as due to intense thermokarst activity in the areas surrounding the site, which served as a sediment source during the Late-Wisconsin to Holocene climate transition. The lake forming the modern basin on the upland initiated around 0.23 ka BP and drained catastrophically in spring 2005. The present study emphasises that Arctic lake systems and periglacial landscapes are highly dynamic and that permafrost formation as well as degradation in central Beringia was controlled by regional to global climate patterns as well as by local disturbances.

  18. Microplastics in Taihu Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Xue, Yingang; Li, Lingyun; Yang, Dongqi; Kolandhasamy, Prabhu; Li, Daoji; Shi, Huahong

    2016-09-01

    In comparison with marine environments, the occurrence of microplastics in freshwater environments is less understood. In the present study, we investigated microplastic pollution levels during 2015 in Taihu Lake, the third largest Chinese lake located in one of the most developed areas of China. The abundance of microplastics reached 0.01 × 10(6)-6.8 × 10(6) items/km(2) in plankton net samples, 3.4-25.8 items/L in surface water, 11.0-234.6 items/kg dw in sediments and 0.2-12.5 items/g ww in Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea). The average abundance of microplastics was the highest in plankton net samples from the southeast area of the lake and in the sediments from the northwest area of the lake. The northwest area of the lake was the most heavily contaminated area of the lake, as indicated by chlorophyll-α and total phosphorus. The microplastics were dominated by fiber, 100-1000 μm in size and cellophane in composition. To our best knowledge, the microplastic levels measured in plankton net samples collected from Taihu Lake were the highest found in freshwater lakes worldwide. The ratio of the microplastics in clams to each sediment sample ranged from 38 to 3810 and was negatively correlated to the microplastic level in sediments. In brief, our results strongly suggest that high levels of microplastics occurred not only in water but also in organisms in Taihu Lake. PMID:27381875

  19. Microplastics in Taihu Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Xue, Yingang; Li, Lingyun; Yang, Dongqi; Kolandhasamy, Prabhu; Li, Daoji; Shi, Huahong

    2016-09-01

    In comparison with marine environments, the occurrence of microplastics in freshwater environments is less understood. In the present study, we investigated microplastic pollution levels during 2015 in Taihu Lake, the third largest Chinese lake located in one of the most developed areas of China. The abundance of microplastics reached 0.01 × 10(6)-6.8 × 10(6) items/km(2) in plankton net samples, 3.4-25.8 items/L in surface water, 11.0-234.6 items/kg dw in sediments and 0.2-12.5 items/g ww in Asian clams (Corbicula fluminea). The average abundance of microplastics was the highest in plankton net samples from the southeast area of the lake and in the sediments from the northwest area of the lake. The northwest area of the lake was the most heavily contaminated area of the lake, as indicated by chlorophyll-α and total phosphorus. The microplastics were dominated by fiber, 100-1000 μm in size and cellophane in composition. To our best knowledge, the microplastic levels measured in plankton net samples collected from Taihu Lake were the highest found in freshwater lakes worldwide. The ratio of the microplastics in clams to each sediment sample ranged from 38 to 3810 and was negatively correlated to the microplastic level in sediments. In brief, our results strongly suggest that high levels of microplastics occurred not only in water but also in organisms in Taihu Lake.

  20. 33 CFR 162.220 - Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake... REGULATIONS § 162.220 Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev. (a) Lake Mead and Lake Mohave; restricted areas—(1) The areas. That portion of Lake Mead extending 700 feet upstream...

  1. 33 CFR 162.220 - Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake... REGULATIONS § 162.220 Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev. (a) Lake Mead and Lake Mohave; restricted areas—(1) The areas. That portion of Lake Mead extending 700 feet upstream...

  2. 33 CFR 162.220 - Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake... REGULATIONS § 162.220 Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev. (a) Lake Mead and Lake Mohave; restricted areas—(1) The areas. That portion of Lake Mead extending 700 feet upstream...

  3. Monitoring Change in Great Salt Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naftz, David; Angeroth, Cory; Freeman, Michael; Rowland, Ryan; Carling, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Great Salt Lake is the largest hypersaline lake in the Western Hemisphere and the fourth largest terminal lake in the world (Figure 1). The open water and adjacent wetlands of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem support millions of migratory waterfowl and shorebirds from throughout the Western Hemisphere [Aldrich and Paul, 2002]. In addition, the area is of important economic value: Brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) residing in Great Salt Lake support an aquaculture shrimp cyst industry with annual revenues as high as $60 million.

  4. Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    As seen from space, the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA (41.5N, 112.5W) appears as two separate bodies of water with a narrow divider in the middle. At the turn of the century, a railroad bridge without culverts, was built across the lake and ever since, the water and salinity levels have been uneqal on either side. Fed by snowmelt from the nearby Wasatch Mountains, the lake in recent years has had record high water levels, threatening to flood the local areas.

  5. RAINBOW LAKE WILDERNESS AND FLYNN LAKE WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WISCONSIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, W.F.; Dunn, Maynard L.

    1984-01-01

    The Rainbow Lake Wilderness and Flynn Lake Wilderness study area in Wisconsin are contiguous and were studied as a unit. The rainbow Lake Wilderness contains a demonstrated resource of about 210,000 tons of commercial-quality peat in an area of substantiated peat resource potential. The Flynn Lake Wilderness study area contains a demonstrated resource of about 300,000 tons of commercial-quality peat in an area of substantiated peat resource potential. These deposits, however, are of limited importance because larger deposits of similar material are abundant outside the areas, closer to present markets. Rocks in the subsurface contain a low-grade copper resource identified by mining company exploration drilling. Although this is an area of substantiated copper resource potential, it is a low-grade resource, thin and generally at great depth.

  6. Lake trout in the Great Lakes: Basin-wide stock collapse and binational restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.; Taylor, William W.; Ferreri, C. Paola

    1999-01-01

    The lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) was important to the human settlement of each of the Great Lakes, and underwent catastrophic collapses in each lake in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The timing of lake trout stock collapses were different in each lake, as were the causes of the collapses, and have been the subject of much scientific inquiry and debate. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize and review pertinent information relating historical changes in Great Lakes lake trout stocks, binational efforts to restore those stocks, and progress toward stock restoration. This presentation attempts to generalize patterns across the Great Lakes, rather than to focus within each lake. Lake specific analyses have been used to understand lake specific causes and effects, but there is continuing debate about some of these causes and effects. A basinwide review may suggest mechanisms for observed changes that are not evident by lake specific analysis.

  7. Climate, Hydrology, and Lake Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, E.; Forester, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    Components of lake sediment such as endogenic minerals, organic compounds, and fossils as well as chemistry and isotopes of those components are sources of information about past continental climate. No matter the size of the lake, the components of their sedimentary records reflect some integration of catchment processes operating on the landscape, within the ground water, and in the lake. Climate change influences and often drives change among these processes, yet the integration of the processes commonly yields unique records in lakes residing under the same climate. An estimate of the actual climate history from lake records as opposed to the apparent climate history from a given lake depends on how well we understand the modern system, or in the absence of a modern system, making use of known modern systems. We single out the effect of hydrology on lake records to illustrate the importance of understanding the modern system. The Waubay Lakes Chain in NE South Dakota is a series of lakes at different elevations and spill points that may be hydrologically connected, even coalescing, or may be isolated, though some remain hydrologically open (Niehus et al. 1999). Pickerel is an "upland" open freshwater lake whose level remains nearly constant, while Waubay is a shallow lake at intermediate elevation having more changes in level and salinity. Bitter, at the lowest elevation, receives spillover from Waubay during high water periods, exhibits wide ranges of salinity and elevation including going dry. Pickerel has a short residence time with lower δ18O and TDS than Waubay and Bitter (08/1991: -4.1 permil, -1.5 permil, and -1.8 permil; 204 mg/L, 6,420 mg/L, and 13,128mg/L respectively). The three lakes see the same climate, but their hydrologies lead to these different characteristics that interpreted in climate terms would suggest Pickerel resides under a wet climate while Bitter resides under a dry climate. The sediment records from these lakes though incompletely

  8. Linking hydro-climate to the sediment archive: a combined monitoring and calibration study from a varved lake in central Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, C. Neil; Dean, Jonathan R.; Eastwood, Warren J.; Jones, Matthew D.; Allcock, Samantha L.; Leng, Melanie J.; Metcalfe, Sarah E.; Woodbridge, Jessie; Yiǧitbaşıoǧlu, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    Hydro-climatic reconstructions from lake sediment proxies require an understanding of modern formation processes and calibration over multiple years. Here we use Nar Gölü, a non-outlet, monomictic maar lake in central Turkey, as a field site for such a natural experiment. Fieldwork since 1997 has included observations and measurements of lake water and sediment trap samples, and automated data logging (Jones et al., 2005; Woodbridge and Roberts, 2010; Dean et al., 2015). We compare these data to isotopic, chemical and biotic proxies preserved in the lake's annually-varved sediments. Nar Gölü underwent a 3 m lake-level fall between 2000 and 2010, and δ18O in both water and carbonates is correlated with this lake-level fall, responding to the change in water balance. Over the same period, sedimentary diatom assemblages responded via changes in habitat availability and mixing regime, while conductivity inferred from diatoms showed a rise in inferred salinity, although with a non-linear response to hydro-climatic forcing. There were also non-linear shifts in carbonate mineralogy and elemental chemistry. Building on the relationship between lake water balance and the sediment isotope record, we calibrated sedimentary δ18O against local meteorological records to derive a P/E drought index for central Anatolia. Application to of this to the longer sediment core isotope record from Nar Gölü (Jones et al. 2006) highlights major drought events over the last 600 years (Yiǧitbaşıoǧlu et al., 2015). Although this lacustrine record offers an archive of annually-dated, decadally-averaged hydro-climatic change, there were also times of non-linear lake response to climate. Robust reconstruction therefore requires understanding of physical processes as well as application of statistical correlations. Dean, J.R., Eastwood, W.J., Roberts, N., Jones, M.D., Yiǧitbaşıoǧlu, H., Allcock, S.L., Woodbridge, J., Metcalfe, S.E. and Leng, M.J. (2015) Tracking the hydro

  9. Characterization of Lake Michigan coastal lakes using zooplankton assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Goodrich, Maria L.; Murphy, Paul C.; Davis, Bruce M.

    2004-01-01

    Zooplankton assemblages and water quality were examined bi-weekly from 17 April to 19 October 1998 in 11 northeastern Lake Michigan coastal lakes of similar origin but varied in trophic status and limnological condition. All lakes were within or adjacent to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan. Zooplankton (principally microcrustaceans and rotifers) from triplicate Wisconsin net (80 I?m) vertical tows taken at each lake's deepest location were analyzed. Oxygen-temperature-pH-specific conductivity profiles and surface water quality were concurrently measured. Bray-Curtis similarity analysis showed small variations among sample replicates but large temporal differences. The potential use of zooplankton communities for environmental lake comparisons was evaluated by means of BIOENV (Primer 5.1) and principal component analyses. Zooplankton analyzed at the lowest identified taxonomic level yielded greatest sensitivity to limnological variation. Taxonomic and ecological aggregations of zooplankton data performed comparably, but less well than the finest taxonomic analysis. Secchi depth, chlorophyll a, and sulfate concentrations combined to give the best correlation with patterns of variation in the zooplankton data set. Principal component analysis of these variables revealed trophic status as the most influential major limnological gradient among the study lakes. Overall, zooplankton abundance was an excellent indicator of variation in trophic status.

  10. Morphological variation of siscowet lake trout in Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bronte, C.R.; Moore, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Historically, Lake Superior has contained many morphologically distinct forms of the lake trout Salvelinus namaycush that have occupied specific depths and locations and spawned at specific times of the year. Today, as was probably the case historically, the siscowet morphotype is the most abundant. Recent interest in harvesting siscowets to extract oil containing omega-3 fatty acids will require additional knowledge of the biology and stock structure of these lightly exploited populations. The objective of this study was to determine whether shape differences exist among siscowet populations across Lake Superior and whether these shape differences can be used to infer stock structure. Morphometric analysis (truss protocol) was used to differentiate among siscowets sampled from 23 locations in Lake Superior. We analyzed 31 distance measurements among 14 anatomical landmarks taken from digital images of fish recorded in the field. Cluster analysis of size-corrected data separated fish into three geographic groups: The Isle Royale, eastern (Michigan), and western regions (Michigan). Finer scales of stock structure were also suggested. Discriminant function analysis demonstrated that head measurements contributed to most of the observed variation. Cross-validation classification rates indicated that 67–71% of individual fish were correctly classified to their region of capture. This is the first study to present shape differences associated with location within a lake trout morphotype in Lake Superior.

  11. Evaluation of Lake Modification Alternatives for Lake Sihwa, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Il; Kim, Byeong-Chan; Oh, Hae-Jin

    2002-01-01

    After the construction of an embankment at the Bay of Sihwa in Korea, a lake of 56.5 km2 surface area and 330 million m3 volume was created. Because of rapid socioenvironmental changes and the lowering of water quality in Lake Sihwa, various external measures have been proposed and some of them are being implemented. In this paper, we examine two alternatives for in-lake modification: one alternative is zoning of the lake by constructing two submerged dams and the other is channeling of the lake through reclamation. Water quality modeling was conducted for both alternatives to assess their effects. Results of the modeling revealed that the reduction of the lake size through two different approaches, when accompanied with other external measures, would improve the water quality, but to different degrees. The zonation is expected to improve the freshwater quality up to the level supplying 45 million m3 of water per year for agricultural use. The quality of channeled water would be inappropriate for agricultural use, but suitable for outdoor activities such as recreation or fishing regardless of reclamation plans considered.

  12. Functional microbiology of soda lakes.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Banciu, Horia L; Muyzer, Gerard

    2015-06-01

    Soda lakes represent unique permanently haloalkaline system. Despite the harsh conditions, they are inhabited by abundant, mostly prokaryotic, microbial communities. This review summarizes results of studies of main functional groups of the soda lake prokaryotes responsible for carbon, nitrogen and sulfur cycling, including oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, aerobic chemolithotrophs, fermenting and respiring anaerobes. The main conclusion from this work is that the soda lakes are very different from other high-salt systems in respect to microbial richness and activity. The reason for this difference is determined by the major physico-chemical features of two dominant salts - NaCl in neutral saline systems and sodium carbonates in soda lakes, that are influencing the amount of energy required for osmotic adaptation.

  13. Lake restoration technology transfer assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Daschbach, M.H.; Roe, E.M.; Sharpe, W.E.

    1982-06-01

    Based upon a review of the eutrophication problem and its impact on lake restoration (LR) programs, treatment of the relatively new problem of acid deposition and its impact on LR activities, consideration of the LR programs of the Environmental Protection Agency and several states, and a review of individual LR technology transfer publications, it is recommended that new LR technology transfer programs be given a low priority until more new information is available on the restoration of acidified lakes. Both primary and secondary users of LR research, technology transfer documents, and public awareness documents were considered in this assessment. Primary users included the general public and recreationists, lakeshore property owners, lake/homeowner associations, lake/sanitary districts, and research and environmental organizations; secondary users included state/county/local officials who administer/manage water-related regulations/activities. 4 tables.

  14. Water Level Fluctuations of Lake Enriquillo and Lake Saumatre in Response to Environmental Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteau, D.; Romero Luna, E. J.; Walter, M. T.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2011-12-01

    The water levels of Lake Saumatre in Haiti and Lake Enriquillo in the Dominican Republic have been increasing continuously for the past 5-10 years. As result roads and lake shore agriculture are flooded and there is an interest in determining the causes of the continuous lake growth and finding solutions to reverse the trend Various theories haven proposed for growth of the lakes such as climate change and deforestation. Deforestation would affect the hydrological balance by means of changing infiltration rates. To examine the temporal variations in the lake, the lake surface areas during the past 30 years were obtained from available satellite data and converted into volumes. These lake surface areas showed a steady increase starting in 2003 for Lake Saumatre and in 2008 for Lake Enriquillo. Land cover change obtained by means of remote sensing for the years of 1986 and 2010 showed no significant change and could therefore be ruled out as a cause for the lake levels increases. A simple water balance model that had been validated for monsoon climates matched the lake level volumes fluctuations well for the last 30 years including the recent rise in lake levels. Thus the lake level increases could be directly related to the greater precipitation starting some 10 years ago. The difference in starting time of lake level rise between the two lakes could be explained by a larger storage capacity in the a Lake Enriquillo watershed compared to the Lake Saumatre watershed

  15. Spatial variation among lakes within landscapes: Ecological organization along lake chains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soranno, Patricia A.; Webster, Katherine E.; Riera, Joan L.; Kratz, Timothy K.; Baron, Jill S.; Bukaveckas, Paul A.; Kling, George; White, David S.; Caine, Nel; Lathrop, Richard C; Leavitt, Peter R.

    1999-01-01

    Although limnologists have long been interested in regional patterns in lake attributes, only recently have they considered lakes connected and organized across the landscape, rather than as spatially independent entities. Here we explore the spatial organization of lake districts through the concept of landscape position, a concept that considers lakes longitudinally along gradients of geomorphology and hydrology. We analyzed long-term chemical and biological data from nine lake chains (lakes in a series connected through surface or groundwater flow) from seven lake districts of diverse hydrologic and geomorphic settings across North America. Spatial patterns in lake variables driven by landscape position were surprisingly common across lake districts and across a wide range of variables. On the other hand, temporal patterns of lake variables, quantified using synchrony, the degree to which pairs of lakes exhibit similar dynamics through time, related to landscape position only for lake chains with lake water residence times that spanned a wide range and were generally long (close to or greater than 1 year). Highest synchrony of lakes within a lake chain occurred when lakes had short water residence times. Our results from both the spatial and temporal analyses suggest that certain features of the landscape position concept are robust enough to span a wide range of seemingly disparate lake types. The strong spatial patterns observed in this analysis, and some unexplained patterns, suggest the need to further study these scales and to continue to view lake ecosystems spatially, longitudinally, and broadly across the landscape.

  16. Monitoring lake and reservoir restoration: Technical supplement to the lake and reservoir restoration guidance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Wedepohl, R.E.; Knauer, D.R.; Wolbert, G.B.; Olem, H.; Garrison, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    In the manual the lake manager will find practical information on how to design and implement a lake monitoring program during and following a lake restoration project. In addition to describing monitoring methods for both the waterbody and the watershed, the manual deals with monitoring specific in-lake restoration techniques. Although the manual specifically guides the lake manager who must meet the Clean Lakes Program Phase II monitoring requirements, readers will find it helpful as a starting point for more comprehensive studies of lake ecosystems and useful in designing any lake study. Researchers will welcome its recommendations for consistent methods and quality assurance procedures.

  17. Burrowing saves Lake Erie clams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    Freshwater unionid clams in North America have been virtually eliminated from waters that are colonized by zebra mussels. Near total mortality has been reported in western Lake Erie, but we have discovered a large population of native clams in a Lake Erie wetland that shows little sign of infestation. Field observations and laboratory experiments show that warm summer water temperatures and soft, silt-clay sediments trigger burowing by clams. This discourages infestation and physically removes any attached zebra mussels.

  18. Patagonian Lakes, Argentina, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Patagonian Lakes of Argentinas Los Glacieres National Park (50.0S, 73.0W) occupying the foothills of the southern Andes Mountains along the border with Chile, are some of the most scenic in South America. The range is covered by a permanent ice cap and glaciers. Glacier activity frequently reaches into the lake region causing blockage and impounding of the waters until water pressure causes the glacier to crack with a roar that can be heard for miles.

  19. Mitigation alternatives for L Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.B.

    1988-11-03

    The current condition of L Lake/Steel Creek was summarized in a report to SCDHEC in June 1988 which reported that the L Lake and Steel Creek ecosystems were adequately developing towards balanced biological communities. If mitigation for L Lake inputs, specifically temperature and nutrients, are required, several viable alternatives are available. A report prepared by Spencer in 1986 discusses the various options available for cooling L-Reactor discharges. In effect, a small cooling tower is the only realistic solution to reducing effluent temperatures. Nutrient mitigation can take several approaches including upstream sewage treatment, hypolimnetic withdrawal, dilution of input water by Par Pond water, precipitation of nutrients, and sediment oxidation. None of these systems would influence the thermal regime, but would significantly reduce nutrient input into the system. One beneficial use of L-Lake thermal effluents is algaculture, the production of useful algae. A document prepared in 1988 concludes that algaculture is a technically and economically feasible mitigation alternative for L Lake and could allow L Lake to be handled under Section 318 of the Clean Water Act.

  20. The Global Climatology of Large Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Christopher J.; MacCallum, Stuart N.

    2010-12-01

    There are ~250 large lakes in the world, large here meaning lakes with surface areas exceeding 500 km2 . Lakes are potentially sensitive indicators of regional climatic changes and large lakes also significantly modulate climate locally, via their effects on surface atmosphere fluxes and atmospheric stability. The interactions of lakes and atmosphere are therefore significant for climatology and weather forecasting. Relatively few lakes are permanently instrumented (mostly in N America and Europe), and in assimilation systems for numerical weather prediction, highly simplistic approximations for lake surface temperature are giving way to lake temperature models within the land-atmosphere exchange schemes. It is therefore important to exploit satellite observations to inform and constrain lake and weather models, and to provide observations of lake temperature changes for a wider range of lakes. Here we present results from the first phase of an ESA-funded project, ARCLake, to demonstrate accurate lake surface temperatures and detection of ice cover, using ATSR-2 and AATSR, for large lakes globally. It is sometimes assumed that sea surface temperature (SST) techniques are applicable, but in fact, lake-specific approaches are required for cloud detection and for temperature retrieval. In this paper, we present preliminary results from application of the techniques described in a companion paper [1].

  1. Proglacial lakes: character, behaviour and geological importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrivick, Jonathan L.; Tweed, Fiona S.

    2013-10-01

    Proglacial lakes are ubiquitous within the Quaternary record and can provide exceptional breadth and depth of palaeoenvironmental information. Present deglaciation is increasing the number and size of proglacial lakes around the world. This study provides a synthesis of knowledge on proglacial lake character and behaviour and critically evaluates the importance of proglacial lakes from a geological perspective. We show how ‘ice-marginal' or ‘ice-contact' lakes and other distal proglacial lakes can be distinguished from each other by geomorphological, sedimentological, chemical and biological characteristics. The key controls on proglacial lake geomorphology and sedimentology are outlined and discussed. Proglacial lakes can exacerbate mountain glacier and ice sheet margin ablation via mechanical and thermal stresses, but very large lakes can moderate summer air temperatures and relatively retard summer ice ablation. Proglacial lakes interrupt meltwater flux and are very efficient sediment traps. Hydrological routing and consequent geomorphological activity can be radically modified by sudden drainage of proglacial lakes and resultant glacial lake outburst floods; exceptionally large proglacial lake drainages affected global ocean circulation and global climate during the Quaternary. Overall, analyses of proglacial lakes can provide a valuable insight into (i) patterns, character and behaviour of mountain glaciers, ice sheets and glaciations, and (ii) the impacts of past, present and future deglaciation.

  2. The size-distribution of Earth's lakes.

    PubMed

    Cael, B B; Seekell, D A

    2016-01-01

    Globally, there are millions of small lakes, but a small number of large lakes. Most key ecosystem patterns and processes scale with lake size, thus this asymmetry between area and abundance is a fundamental constraint on broad-scale patterns in lake ecology. Nonetheless, descriptions of lake size-distributions are scarce and empirical distributions are rarely evaluated relative to theoretical predictions. Here we develop expectations for Earth's lake area-distribution based on percolation theory and evaluate these expectations with data from a global lake census. Lake surface areas ≥8.5 km(2) are power-law distributed with a tail exponent (τ = 1.97) and fractal dimension (d = 1.38), similar to theoretical expectations (τ = 2.05; d = 4/3). Lakes <8.5 km(2) are not power-law distributed. An independently developed regional lake census exhibits a similar transition and consistency with theoretical predictions. Small lakes deviate from the power-law distribution because smaller lakes are more susceptible to dynamical change and topographic behavior at sub-kilometer scales is not self-similar. Our results provide a robust characterization and theoretical explanation for the lake size-abundance relationship, and form a fundamental basis for understanding and predicting patterns in lake ecology at broad scales. PMID:27388607

  3. INTERSECTION OF 445 NORTH & 1040 EAST, SALT LAKE CITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERSECTION OF 445 NORTH & 1040 EAST, SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18272, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  4. 200 MAIN STREET, SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    200 MAIN STREET, SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING EAST OF "MAIN' STREET. REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18273, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  5. Survival of lake trout eggs and fry reared in water from the upper Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mac, Michael J.; Edsall, Carol Cotant; Seelye, James G.

    1985-01-01

    As part of continuing studies of the reproductive failure of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Lake Michigan, we measured the survival of lake trout eggs and fry of different origins and reared in different environments. Eggs and milt were stripped from spawning lake trout collected in the fall of 1980 from southeastern Lake Michigan, northwestern Lake Huron, south central Lake Superior, and from hatchery brood stock. Eggs from all sources were incubated, and the newly hatched fry were reared for 139 days in lake water from each of the three upper Great Lakes and in well water. Survival of eggs to hatching at all sites was lowest for those from Lake Michigan (70% of fertilized eggs) and highest for eggs from Lake Superior (96%). Comparisons of incubation water from the different lakes indicated that hatching success of eggs from all sources was highest in Lake Huron water, and lowest in Lake Michigan water. The most notable finding was the nearly total mortality of fry from eggs of southeastern Lake Michigan lake trout. At all sites, the mean survival of Lake Michigan fry through 139 days after hatching was only 4% compared to near 50% for fry from the other three sources. In a comparison of the rearing sites, little influence of water quality on fry survival was found. Thus, the poor survival was associated with the source of eggs and sperm, not the water in which the fry were reared.

  6. Lake Level Coherence Supports Common Driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stow, Craig A.; Lamon, E. C.; Kratz, T. K.; Sellinger, C. E.

    2008-10-01

    Lake Superior, the world's largest lake by surface area (82,400 square kilometers), experienced record low water levels in 2007 [Holden, 2007]. In addition, lakes Michigan and Huron (58,000 and 59,596 square kilometers, respectively), which behave hydraulically as one lake and which began declining in 1997, were at near-record low levels in 2007 [Sellinger et al., 2008]. The low levels that these three lakes are experiencing have raised concern that the Laurentian Great Lakes are beginning to realize predicted climate change effects [Magnuson et al., 1997].

  7. Lake water quality mapping from LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherz, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    The lakes in three LANDSAT scenes were mapped by the Bendix MDAS multispectral analysis system. Field checking the maps by three separate individuals revealed approximately 90-95% correct classification for the lake categories selected. Variations between observers was about 5%. From the MDAS color coded maps the lake with the worst algae problem was easily located. This lake was closely checked and a pollution source of 100 cows was found in the springs which fed this lake. The theory, lab work and field work which made it possible for this demonstration project to be a practical lake classification procedure are presented.

  8. Lake water quality mapping from Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherz, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    In the project described remote sensing was used to check the quality of lake waters. The lakes of three Landsat scenes were mapped with the Bendix MDAS multispectral analysis system. From the MDAS color coded maps, the lake with the worst algae problem was easily located. The lake was closely checked, and the presence of 100 cows in the springs which fed the lake could be identified as the pollution source. The laboratory and field work involved in the lake classification project is described.

  9. Hydrogeology of the Lake Miona area, northeast Sumter County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradner, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Lake Miona area, in northeast Sumter County, is characterized by karstic depressions that contain lakes, ponds, and marshes that drain vertically to the upper Floridan aquifer. Lake Miona, Black Lake, and Cherry Lake are the prominent water features of the area. When the lake levels are lowest, the lakes are not connected, but at higher levels, they become connected and water flows eastward from Lake Miona through Black Lake to Cherry Lake. The chemical and biological conditions in the lakes are such that, although they support a large population of submerged aquatic plants, no problem with algae blooms was observed. (USGS)

  10. Salt Lake City, Utah

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This simulated natural color image presents a late spring view of north central Utah that includes all of the Olympic sites. The image extends from Ogden in the north, to Provo in the south; and includes the snow-capped Wasatch Mountains and the eastern part of the Great Salt Lake.

    This image was acquired on May 28, 2000 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution

  11. Dongting Lake, China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images show dramatic change in the water at Dongting Lake in Hunan province, China. A flood crest surged down the Yangtze River in late August of this year, but the embankments made by residents there held. The left image was acquired on September 2, 2002 and shows the extent of the lake. The right image was obtained March 19, 2002 before the flooding began.

    These images were acquired on September 2, 2002 and March 19,2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as

  12. Hydrology of Central Florida Lakes - A Primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schiffer, Donna M.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Lakes are among the most valued natural resources of central Florida. The landscape of central Florida is riddled with lakeswhen viewed from the air, it almost seems there is more water than land. Florida has more naturally formed lakes than other southeastern States, where many lakes are created by building dams across streams. The abundance of lakes on the Florida peninsula is a result of the geology and geologic history of the State. An estimated 7,800 lakes in Florida are greater than 1 acre in surface area. Of these, 35 percent are located in just four counties (fig. 1): Lake, Orange, Osceola, and Polk (Hughes, 1974b). Lakes add to the aesthetic and commercial value of the area and are used by many residents and visitors for fishing, boating, swimming, and other types of outdoor recreation. Lakes also are used for other purposes such as irrigation, flood control, water supply, and navigation. Residents and visitors commonly ask questions such as Whyare there so many lakes here?, Why is my lake drying up (or flooding)?, or Is my lake spring-fed? These questions indicate that the basic hydrology of lakes and the interaction of lakes with ground water and surface water are not well understood by the general population. Because of the importance of lakes to residents of central Florida and the many questions and misconceptions about lakes, this primer was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District and the South Florida Water Management District. The USGS has been collecting hydrologic data in central Florida since the 1920s, obtaining valuable information that has been used to better understand the hydrology of the water resources of central Florida, including lakes. In addition to data collection, as of 1994, the USGS had published 66 reports and maps on central Florida lakes (Garcia and Hoy, 1995). The main purpose of this primer is to describe the hydrology of lakes in central

  13. Lake isotope variability in the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.; Sheng, Y.; Yao, T.; Li, J.

    2010-12-01

    The use of isotopic ratios of meteoric waters has increased rapidly in recent studies of moisture sources, trajectories and other climatic processes over the Tibetan Plateau. However, measurements of δ18O and δD of lake water are scarce. Little is known of isotopic processes in Tibetan lakes. Here we present results from 27 lakes across the plateau. The isotopic results show that the Tibetan lake water line deviates considerably from the regional and global meteoric water lines (Fig. 1). Although many lakes in the plateau have expanded over the last several decades as shown by archived satellite images and reduction in lake salinity, most of the lakes including some freshwater lakes contain water with negative values of d-excess (d). Moreover, there is a negative correlation between d and total dissolved solids (Fig. 2). This study suggests that evaporation has played an important role in regulating water chemical and isotopic compositions of high-altitude lakes in the plateau. Figure 1. Relationship of δ18O and δD in surface waters from open lakes (i.e., lakes with outlets) (open circles) and closed-basin lakes (filled circles) in the Tibetan Plateau. Figure 2. Correlation of deuterium excess (d) and TDS in surface waters from Tibetan lakes.

  14. Eutrophication of the St. Lawrence Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeton, Alfred M.

    1965-01-01

    Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior are classified as oligotrophic lakes on the basis of their biological, chemical, and physical characteristics. Lake Ontario, although rich in nutrients, is morphometrically oligotrophic or mesotrophic because of its large area of deep water. Lake Erie, the most productive of the lakes and the shallowest, is eutrophic. Several changes commonly associated with eutrophication in small lakes have been observed in the Great Lakes. These changes apparently reflect accelerated eutrophication in the Great Lakes due to man's activity. Chemical data compiled from a number of sources, dating as early as 1854, indicate a progressive increase in the concentrations of various major ions and total dissolved solids in all of the lakes except Lake Superior. The plankton has changed somewhat in Lake Michigan and the plankton, benthos, and fish populations of Lake Erie are greatly different today from those of the past. An extensive area of hypolimnetic water of Lake Erie has developed low dissolved oxygen concentrations in late summer within recent years.

  15. Lake Naivasha, Kenya

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    If you live in Europe and buy roses, there is a good chance that they were grown in Kenya specifically, in one of the colossal greenhouses that blot out the once wild shores of Lake Naivasha, 90km north-west of Nairobi. Some 25% of Europe's cut flowers come from Kenya. After a tentative start in the 1980s the industry is now the country's third-largest foreign-currency earner, bringing in $120m a year. But the recent violence in Kenya is having a major impact on the flower growers. A local trade union says 3,000 of the 30,000 workers employed in Naivasha's flower farms have abandoned their jobs. Kenya emerged as a flower power when Israel scaled down its own industry. It has since lost business to neighboring Ethiopia, which offers tax breaks and better security, but Naivasha's perfect intensity of sunlight and days of near-constant length should keep it on top.

    The ASTER image was acquired February 2, 2008, covers an area of 25 x 26.6 km, and is located near 0.8 degrees south latitude, 36.4 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  16. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF THE LOWER END OF TWIN LAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF THE LOWER END OF TWIN LAKES SHOWING THE HISTORIC OUTLET WORKS AT THE EDGE OF THE WATER NEAR CENTER OF THE PHOTO WITH THE NEW TWIN LAKES DAM JUST BEHIND. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  17. Lake and reservoir restoration guidance manual: first edition

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, L.; Thornton, K.

    1988-02-01

    This manual provides guidance to lake managers, homeowners, lake associations, and laypersons on lake and reservoir restoration, management and protection. It also provides information on how to identify lake problems, evaluate practices for restoring and protection lakes, watershed management, and creating a lake-management plan.

  18. Estimate of net trophic transfer efficiency of PCBs to Lake Michigan lake trout from their prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Schmidt, Larry J.; Stedman, Ralph M.; Quintal, Richard T.; Begnoche, Linda J.; Passino-Reader, Dora R.

    1998-01-01

    Most of the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) body burden accumulated by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the Laurentian Great Lakes is from their food. We used diet information, PCB determinations in both lake trout and their prey, and bioenergetics modeling to estimate the efficiency with which Lake Michigan lake trout retain PCBs from their food. Our estimates were the most reliable estimates to date because (a) the lake trout and prey fish sampled during our study were all from the same vicinity of the lake, (b) detailed measurements were made on the PCB concentrations of both lake trout and prey fish over wide ranges in fish size, and (c) lake trout diet was analyzed in detail over a wide range of lake trout size. Our estimates of net trophic transfer efficiency of PCBs to lake trout from their prey averaged from 0.73 to 0.89 for lake trout between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. There was no evidence of an upward or downward trend in our estimates of net trophic transfer efficiency for lake trout between the ages of 5 and 10 years old, and therefore this efficiency appeared to be constant over the duration of the lake trout's adult life in the lake. On the basis of our estimtes, lake trout retained 80% of the PCBs that are contained within their food.

  19. Exploring trends, causes, and consequences of declining lipids in Lake Superior lake trout

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of lake trout to forage in deepwater habitats is facilitated by high lipid content, which affords buoyancy. In Lake Superior, lean lake trout historically occupied depths < 80 m, and siscowet lake trout occupied depths > 80 m. Siscowets have been known f...

  20. 78 FR 24228 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... review and comment following the announcement in the Federal Register on October 29, 2012 ] (77 FR 65574... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final... Complex (Complex), which includes Lake Andes NWR, Karl E. Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes Wetland...

  1. 77 FR 65574 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Complex. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (72 FR 27328; May, 15, 2007... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Draft... assessment (EA) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Complex), which includes Lake Andes...

  2. Energy density of lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis in Lakes Huron and Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pothoven, S.A.; Nalepa, T.F.; Madenjian, C.P.; Rediske, R.R.; Schneeberger, P.J.; He, J.X.

    2006-01-01

    We collected lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis off Alpena and Tawas City, Michigan, USA in Lake Huron and off Muskegon, Michigan USA in Lake Michigan during 2002–2004. We determined energy density and percent dry weight for lake whitefish from both lakes and lipid content for Lake Michigan fish. Energy density increased with increasing fish weight up to 800 g, and then remained relatively constant with further increases in fish weight. Energy density, adjusted for weight, was lower in Lake Huron than in Lake Michigan for both small (≤800 g) and large fish (>800 g). Energy density did not differ seasonally for small or large lake whitefish or between adult male and female fish. Energy density was strongly correlated with percent dry weight and percent lipid content. Based on data from commercially caught lake whitefish, body condition was lower in Lake Huron than Lake Michigan during 1981–2003, indicating that the dissimilarity in body condition between the lakes could be long standing. Energy density and lipid content in 2002–2004 in Lake Michigan were lower than data for comparable sized fish collected in 1969–1971. Differences in energy density between lakes were attributed to variation in diet and prey energy content as well as factors that affect feeding rates such as lake whitefish density and prey abundance.

  3. What can the National Lake Assessment Tell Us about Ecosystem Service Benefits in Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The condition of lakes, ponds, and reservoirs is often viewed as existing along a continuum from pristine to impacted. The 2007 National Lake Survey was conducted to assess the condition of the nation’s lakes. Over 1,000 lakes were surveyed and detailed physical and chemical da...

  4. Competition between larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) for zooplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Bruce M.; Todd, Thomas N.

    1998-01-01

    Diet and growth of larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) were compared in mesocosm experiments in a small mesotrophic lake in southeastern Michigan. Fish were sampled from single-species and mixed assemblages in 2-m3 cages for 8 weeks during April and May. Both species initially ate mostly cyclopoid copepodites and small cladocerans (Bosmia spp.). Schoener's index of diet overlap showed considerable overlap (70-90%). Lake whitefish ate Daphnia spp. and adult copepods about 2 weeks earlier than did lake herring, perhaps related to their larger mean mouth gape. Lake whitefish were consistently larger than lake herring until the eighth week, especially in the sympatric treatments. Lake whitefish appeared to have a negative effect on the growth of lake herring, as lake herring in mixed-species treatments were smaller and weighed less than lake herring reared in single-species treatments. The diet similarities of lake whitefish and lake herring larvae could make them competitors for food in the Great Lakes. The greater initial size of lake whitefish could allow them to eat larger prey earlier and thereby limit availability of these prey to lake herring at a crucial period of development.

  5. 33 CFR 110.127 - Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada... Mead, Nevada and Arizona. (a) Willow Beach, Ariz. That portion of Lake Mohave enclosed by the shore and... the launching ramp, as established by the Superintendent, Lake Mead Recreation Area:...

  6. 33 CFR 110.127 - Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada... Mead, Nevada and Arizona. (a) Willow Beach, Ariz. That portion of Lake Mohave enclosed by the shore and... the launching ramp, as established by the Superintendent, Lake Mead Recreation Area:...

  7. 33 CFR 110.127 - Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada... Mead, Nevada and Arizona. (a) Willow Beach, Ariz. That portion of Lake Mohave enclosed by the shore and... the launching ramp, as established by the Superintendent, Lake Mead Recreation Area:...

  8. 33 CFR 110.127 - Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada... Mead, Nevada and Arizona. (a) Willow Beach, Ariz. That portion of Lake Mohave enclosed by the shore and... the launching ramp, as established by the Superintendent, Lake Mead Recreation Area:...

  9. 33 CFR 110.127 - Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lake Mohave and Lake Mead, Nevada... Mead, Nevada and Arizona. (a) Willow Beach, Ariz. That portion of Lake Mohave enclosed by the shore and... the launching ramp, as established by the Superintendent, Lake Mead Recreation Area:...

  10. Recent warming of lake Kivu.

    PubMed

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A; Crowe, Sean A; Hecky, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient.

  11. Recent Warming of Lake Kivu

    PubMed Central

    Katsev, Sergei; Aaberg, Arthur A.; Crowe, Sean A.; Hecky, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Lake Kivu in East Africa has gained notoriety for its prodigious amounts of dissolved methane and dangers of limnic eruption. Being meromictic, it is also expected to accumulate heat due to rising regional air temperatures. To investigate the warming trend and distinguish between atmospheric and geothermal heating sources, we compiled historical temperature data, performed measurements with logging instruments, and simulated heat propagation. We also performed isotopic analyses of water from the lake's main basin and isolated Kabuno Bay. The results reveal that the lake surface is warming at the rate of 0.12°C per decade, which matches the warming rates in other East African lakes. Temperatures increase throughout the entire water column. Though warming is strongest near the surface, warming rates in the deep waters cannot be accounted for solely by propagation of atmospheric heat at presently assumed rates of vertical mixing. Unless the transport rates are significantly higher than presently believed, this indicates significant contributions from subterranean heat sources. Temperature time series in the deep monimolimnion suggest evidence of convection. The progressive deepening of the depth of temperature minimum in the water column is expected to accelerate the warming in deeper waters. The warming trend, however, is unlikely to strongly affect the physical stability of the lake, which depends primarily on salinity gradient. PMID:25295730

  12. Lake evaporation estimates in tropical Africa (Lake Ziway, Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Legesse, Dagnachew; Gasse, Françoise; Travi, Yves; Chernet, Tesfaye

    2001-05-01

    Estimates of evaporation from an open shallow lake in tropical Africa (Lake Ziway, Main Ethiopian Rift) are made by using monthly hydrometeorological data available for the past three decades. On the one hand, annual average estimates are inferred from three climatic approaches, which can be applied in areas with limited meteorological data. The lake energy balance yields an evaporation rate of 1780 mm yr -1, assuming a Bowen ratio of 0.15 (that of Lake Victoria). The Penman method gives an annual evaporation rate of 1870 mm. The complementary relationship lake evaporation model (CRLE) applied on monthly averaged values of air temperature, air humidity and sunshine duration gives 1730 mm yr -1. The sensitivity of each method to changes in input variables is analyzed in order to test the stability of the resulting estimates. This helps discuss uncertainties and possible inter-annual variations of the evaporation rate. On the other hand, the monthly lake level records together with precipitation and river discharge data between 1969 and 1990, allow us to estimate the water balance, providing an annual rate of 1937 mm for the combined evaporation and groundwater losses. The chloride budget is used to discriminate the groundwater from the evaporation loss. It gives us an annual evaporation rate of 1740 mm and a corresponding groundwater loss of 200 mm yr -1. The groundwater loss estimate is of the same order of magnitude as the surface outflow, but the associated error in the former is significant because the result is sensitive to the poorly known chloride content of river inflows. Our results can be used to forecast the impact of increased water consumption in the basin.

  13. Neoichnology at lake margins: Implications for paleo-lake systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, Jessica M. M.; Sheldon, Nathan D.

    2010-07-01

    Neoichnological studies provide significant information that can aid in the interpretation of ancient ichnological assemblages. Here we examine, for the first time, the pattern in both vertebrate and invertebrate trace distribution and abundance that can be seen in two geographically separate, but broadly analogous, contemporary semi-arid climate lake margin settings in an effort to describe taphonomic processes relevant to paleo-lake systems. Lake margin to supralittoral zone transects were made at Ruby Reservoir, Montana (USA) and La Sotonera, Spain and vegetation cover, trace cover %, trace diversity, and substrate characteristics were recorded. Similar patterns in trace distribution were seen through the eulittoral to supralittoral zones, with the majority of traces identified within a single transect present at both sites. However, a few traces attributed to larger organisms were found to be unique to each and in some instances, could to be assigned to a specific trace maker. The eulittoral zone was considered to have characteristics attributable to the Scoyenia ichnofacies, however, analysis of the supralittoral zone shows some characteristics of both the Coprinisphaera and the Mermia ichnofacies. In addition, a transitional zone between a Scoyenia-like ichnofacies and a fully terrestrial assemblage was found, which may enable continental ichnofacies to be further refined for application to paleo-lake systems. Study of the distribution of traces with distance along the transects also suggests taphonomic biases against the preservation of certain types of traces (e.g., avian) due to seasonal fluctuations of the lake level and the subsequent reduced preservation potential for lake-proximal traces.

  14. Thermokarst lakes, drainage, and drained basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grosse, G.; Jones, B.; Arp, C.; Shroder, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Thermokarst lakes and drained lake basins are widespread in Arctic and sub-Arctic permafrost lowlands with ice-rich sediments. Thermokarst lake formation is a dominant mode of permafrost degradation and is linked to surface disturbance, subsequent melting of ground ice, surface subsidence, water impoundment, and positive feedbacks between lake growth and permafrost thaw, whereas lake drainage generally results in local permafrost aggradation. Thermokarst lakes characteristically have unique limnological, morphological, and biogeochemical characteristics that are closely tied to cold-climate conditions and permafrost properties. Thermokarst lakes also have a tendency toward complete or partial drainage through permafrost degradation and erosion. Thermokarst lake dynamics strongly affect the development of landscape geomorphology, hydrology, and the habitat characteristic of permafrost lowlands.

  15. 33 CFR 162.220 - Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake... REGULATIONS § 162.220 Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev. (a) Lake Mead and... the axis of Hoover Dam and that portion of Lake Mohave (Colorado River) extending 4,500...

  16. 33 CFR 162.220 - Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake... REGULATIONS § 162.220 Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and Lake Mohave (Colorado River), Ariz.-Nev. (a) Lake Mead and... the axis of Hoover Dam and that portion of Lake Mohave (Colorado River) extending 4,500...

  17. SKY LAKES ROADLESS AREA AND MOUNTAIN LAKES WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, James G.; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    Based on a mineral survey of the Sky Lakes Roadless Area and the Mountain Lakes Wilderness, Oregon, the areas have little or no promise for the occurrence of metallic-mineral resources or geothermal energy resources. Nonmetallic resources exist in the areas, but other areas outside the roadless area and wilderness also contain resources of volcanic cinders, scoria, ash, breccia, and sand and gravel which are easier to obtain and closer to markets. The roadless area and wilderness are not geologically favorable for metallic deposits, or for coal, oil, or gas resources.

  18. Bathythermal habitat use by strains of Great Lakes- and Finger Lakes-origin lake trout in Lake Huron after a change in prey fish abundance and composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstedt, Roger A.; Argyle, Ray L.; Krueger, Charles C.; Taylor, William W.

    2012-01-01

    A study conducted in Lake Huron during October 1998–June 2001 found that strains of Great Lakes-origin (GLO) lake trout Salvelinus namaycush occupied significantly higher temperatures than did Finger Lakes-origin (FLO; New York) lake trout based on data from archival (or data storage) telemetry tags that recorded only temperature. During 2002 and 2003, we implanted archival tags that recorded depth as well as temperature in GLO and FLO lake trout in Lake Huron. Data subsequently recorded by those tags spanned 2002–2005. Based on those data, we examined whether temperatures and depths occupied by GLO and FLO lake trout differed during 2002–2005. Temperatures occupied during those years were also compared with occupied temperatures reported for 1998–2001, before a substantial decline in prey fish biomass. Temperatures occupied by GLO lake trout were again significantly higher than those occupied by FLO lake trout. This result supports the conclusion of the previous study. The GLO lake trout also occupied significantly shallower depths than FLO lake trout. In 2002–2005, both GLO and FLO lake trout occupied significantly lower temperatures than they did in 1998–2001. Aside from the sharp decline in prey fish biomass between study periods, the formerly abundant pelagic alewife Alosa pseudoharengus virtually disappeared and the demersal round goby Neogobius melanostomus invaded the lake and became locally abundant. The lower temperatures occupied by lake trout in Lake Huron during 2002–2005 may be attributable to changes in the composition of the prey fish community, food scarcity (i.e., a retreat to cooler water could increase conversion efficiency), or both.

  19. Monitoring change in Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naftz, David L.; Angeroth, Cory E.; Freeman, Michael L.; Rowland, Ryan C.; Carling, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Great Salt Lake, only limited water quality monitoring has occurred historically. To change this, new monitoring stations and networks—gauges of lake level height and rate of inflow, moored buoys, and multiple lake-bottom sensors—will provide important information that can be used to make informed decisions regarding future management of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem.

  20. Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This ASTER image of Teshekpuk Lake on Alaska's North Slope, within the National Petroleum Reserve, was acquired on August 15, 2000. It covers an area of 58.7 x 89.9 km, and is centered near 70.4 degrees north latitude, 153 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 58.7 by 89.9 kilometers (36.4 by 55.7 miles) Location: 70.4 degrees North latitude, 153 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER Bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: ASTER 30 meters (98.4 feet) Dates Acquired: August 15, 2000

  1. Ancient lakes on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldspiel, J. M.; Squyres, S. W.

    1989-01-01

    The valley systems in Mars' ancient cratered terrain provide strong evidence for a warmer and wetter climate very early in planetary history. The valley systems in some instances debouch into closed depressions that could have acted as local ponding basins for the flow. A survey of the Martian equatorial region shows that numerous local depressions at the confluence of valley systems exist. These depressions (approximately 100 km) typically are characterized by many valleys flowing into them and few or none flowing out. If ponding did take place, these basin would have contained lakes for some period during Mars' early warmer epoch. Although the collection basins are numerous, location of ones that have not suffered significant subsequent geologic modification is difficult. Some morphologic features suggest that volcanic lavas may have filled them subsequent to any early fluvial activity. Two detailed maps of valley systems and local ponding basins in USGC 1:2,000,000 subquadrangles were completed and a third is in progress. The completed regions are in Mare Tyrrhenum (MC-22 SW) and Margarifter Sinus (MC-19 SE), and the region in progress is in Iapygia (MC-21 NW). On the maps, the valley systems and interpreted margins of ponding basins are indicated. The depressions are of interest for two reasons. First, the depressions were surely the sites in which the materials eroded from the valleys were deposited. Such sediments could preserve important information about the physical conditions at the time of deposition. Second, the sediments could preserve evidence of water-atmosphere interactions during the early period of the Martian climate. Atmospheric carbon dioxide would dissolve in water, and solid carbonate minerals would tend to precipitate out to form carbonate sedimentary deposits. Formation of carbonates in this manner might account for some of the CO2 lost from the early more dense atmosphere.

  2. A lake as a natural integrator of linear processes: Application to Lake Kinneret (Israel) and Lake Biwa (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmer, Alon; Boger, Michael; Aota, Yasuaki; Kumagai, Michio

    2006-03-01

    The major hydrological variables that may cause long-term salinity changes in fresh water lakes are the volume of the lake, stream and/or groundwater inflows and outflows, direct rainfall, stream, groundwater, and rainfall salinity and evaporation. Measurements of these variables are usually subject to natural fluctuations and unavoidable errors of the measured data. Therefore, evaluation of the contribution of each component to the long-term salinity trends is difficult. In this work, it is shown that since salinization processes are linear, lakes are able to retain a 'solute influx memory', which records information about their lake-watershed-climate relationship in the past. Our objective was to test and verify a system approach method, which evaluates this 'memory', i.e. investigates the causes of long-term salinization processes in fresh water lakes. With this approach, a general expression is developed that represents the lake as a natural integrator of linear processes in space and time. The long-term change of the chloride concentration in the lake (representing salinity) reflects the long-term changes in each of the various past hydrological variables. The general theory of the lake as a natural integrator was tested by examination of the long-term salinity changes in Lake Kinneret, Israel, and Lake Biwa, Japan. The hydrology and salinity of both lakes are well monitored for several decades. In the analysis of Lake Kinneret, the long-term measurements of inflows, outflows and lake salinity were used to verify that the salinization mechanism follows the theory of complete mixing (system identification). In Lake Biwa the same approach was used, however, we assumed that the salinization mechanism was 'complete mixing', and the long-term measurements of the lake hydrology were used to investigate the reasons for increasing salinity (system detection). Since the system analysis is affected by uncertainties of the measured variables, a stochastic component was

  3. Lake Okeechobee seepage monitoring network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenzie, Donald J.

    1973-01-01

    This report summarizes the data collected at the five original monitoring sites along the south shore of Lake Okeechobee from January 29, 1970 to June 28, 1972. In order to use the hydrographs in this report to full advantage, they should be studied in conjunction with Meyer's graphs and text (1971). During steady-state conditions, water seeps from the lake through the filtercake and through the aquifers beneath the dike. At those sites where the filtercake is missing, or has about the same permeability as the aquifers, the seepage from the lake is about equivalent to the flow through the aquifers. Present data are insufficient to determine whether or not filtercake buildup has reduced seepage. No appreciable change in drainage occurred during the observed period.

  4. Lake Effect Snow Covers Buffalo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    An average of one foot of snow per day has fallen on Buffalo, New York, since Christmas Eve, resulting in a total of up to 5 feet from December 24-28. The snow fell very heavily, with accumulations of up to 3 inches per hour. Cold winds blowing along the surface of Lake Erie pick up warmth and moisture, which falls as snow as the warm air rises. This image was acquired by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), operated by NOAA, on December 27, 2001, at 12:32 p.m. EST. The scene shows thick bands of clouds extending from the eastern tip of Lake Erie and over Buffalo. The arrows show the wind direction, which is blowing down the length of the lake. Image and animation by Robert Simmon, based on data from the NASA GOES Project Science Office.

  5. Great Lakes management: Ecological factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonzogni, W. C.; Robertson, A.; Beeton, A. M.

    1983-11-01

    Although attempts to improve the quality of the Great Lakes generally focus on chemical pollution, other factors are important and should be considered Ecological factors, such as invasion of the lakes by foreign species, habitat changes, overfishing, and random variations in organism populations, are especially influential. Lack of appreciation of the significance of ecological factors stems partly from the inappropriate application of the concept of eutrophication to the Great Lakes. Emphasis on ecological factors is not intended to diminish the seriousness of pollution, but rather to point out that more cost-effective management, as well as more realistic expectations of management efforts by the public, should result from an ecosystem management approach in which ecological factors are carefully considered.

  6. First evidence of successful natural reproduction by planted lake trout in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nester, Robert T.; Poe, Thomas P.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-two lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) swim-up fry, 24-27 mm long, were captured with emergent fry traps and a tow net in northwestern Lake Huron on a small nearshore reef off Alpena, Michigan, between May 10 and June 1, 1982. These catches represent the first evidence of successful production of swim-up fry by planted, hatchery-reared lake trout in Lake Huron since the lake trout rehabilitation program began in 1973.

  7. STATUS OF MYSIS RELICTA IN LAKE SUPERIOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The status of different components of the lower food web is reported for Lake Superior. Results are preliminary summaries from the Binational collaboration in 2005, which measured the lower food web at the request of the Lake Superior Fisheries Technical Committee and Lake Superi...

  8. Great Lakes Education Booklet, 1990-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Natural Resources, Lansing.

    This booklet integrates science, history, and environmental education to help students acquire a basic understanding of the importance of the Great Lakes located in the United States. The packet also contains a Great Lakes Basin resource map and a sand dune poster. These materials introduce students to a brief history of the lakes, the diversity…

  9. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34 Finger Lakes. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Finger Lakes.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Finger Lakes viticultural...

  10. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34 Finger Lakes. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Finger Lakes.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Finger Lakes viticultural...

  11. 27 CFR 9.99 - Clear Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.99 Clear Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Clear Lake.” (b) Approved Maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Clear Lake viticultural area are four...

  12. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34 Finger Lakes. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Finger Lakes.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Finger Lakes viticultural...

  13. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34 Finger Lakes. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Finger Lakes.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Finger Lakes viticultural...

  14. 27 CFR 9.34 - Finger Lakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.34 Finger Lakes. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Finger Lakes.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Finger Lakes viticultural...

  15. 27 CFR 9.83 - Lake Erie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.83 Lake Erie. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lake Erie.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Lake Erie viticultural area are four...

  16. 27 CFR 9.83 - Lake Erie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.83 Lake Erie. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lake Erie.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Lake Erie viticultural area are four...

  17. 27 CFR 9.83 - Lake Erie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.83 Lake Erie. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lake Erie.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Lake Erie viticultural area are four...

  18. 27 CFR 9.83 - Lake Erie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.83 Lake Erie. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lake Erie.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Lake Erie viticultural area are four...

  19. 27 CFR 9.83 - Lake Erie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.83 Lake Erie. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Lake Erie.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Lake Erie viticultural area are four...

  20. 27 CFR 9.99 - Clear Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.99 Clear Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Clear Lake.” (b) Approved Maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Clear Lake viticultural area are four...

  1. 27 CFR 9.99 - Clear Lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.99 Clear Lake. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Clear Lake.” (b) Approved Maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Clear Lake viticultural area are four...

  2. 27 CFR 9.146 - Lake Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Columbia County, where Spring Creek enters Lake Wisconsin; (2) From the point of beginning, follow the... Bay, Sauk County, where the Wisconsin River becomes Lake Wisconsin again on the map; (4) Then... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Lake Wisconsin....

  3. 27 CFR 9.146 - Lake Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Columbia County, where Spring Creek enters Lake Wisconsin; (2) From the point of beginning, follow the... Bay, Sauk County, where the Wisconsin River becomes Lake Wisconsin again on the map; (4) Then... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Lake Wisconsin....

  4. 27 CFR 9.146 - Lake Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Columbia County, where Spring Creek enters Lake Wisconsin; (2) From the point of beginning, follow the... Bay, Sauk County, where the Wisconsin River becomes Lake Wisconsin again on the map; (4) Then... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lake Wisconsin....

  5. 27 CFR 9.146 - Lake Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Columbia County, where Spring Creek enters Lake Wisconsin; (2) From the point of beginning, follow the... Bay, Sauk County, where the Wisconsin River becomes Lake Wisconsin again on the map; (4) Then... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Lake Wisconsin....

  6. 27 CFR 9.146 - Lake Wisconsin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Columbia County, where Spring Creek enters Lake Wisconsin; (2) From the point of beginning, follow the... Bay, Sauk County, where the Wisconsin River becomes Lake Wisconsin again on the map; (4) Then... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lake Wisconsin....

  7. Hydrology of Lake Butler, Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, James L.; Schiffer, Donna M.

    1984-01-01

    Lake Butler is one of the lakes that collectively make up the Butler chain of lakes in the headwaters of the Kissimmee River, Florida. The bottom configuration of the lake is typical of relict karst features formed during lower stages in sea level. The top of the Floridan aquifer is 50 to 100 feet below the land surface. The drainage area of Lake Butler is approximately 14.5 sq mi and is comprised of sub-basins of other lakes in the vicinity. Surface outflow from Lake Butler is generally southward to Cypress Creek, a tributary of the Kissimmee River. The extremes in lake stage for the period 1933-81 are 94.67 ft on June 23, 1981 and 101.78 ft on September 13, 1960. The median lake stage for this period was 99.28 ft above sea level. The quality of water in Lake Butler is excellent, based on studies of physical, chemical, and biological conditions by the Orange County Pollution Control Department. The lake water is slightly acidic and soft (48 mg/L hardness as calcium carbonate). Pesticides in water were below detection levels at two sites sampled in the lake, but were detected in the bottom sediments. (USGS)

  8. A reactive nitrogen budget for Lake Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reactive nitrogen budget for Lake Michigan was reviewed and updated, making use of recent estimates of watershed and atmospheric nitrogen loads. The updated total N load to Lake Michigan was approximately double the previous estimate from the Lake Michigan Mass Balance study ...

  9. 36 CFR 13.1208 - Lake Camp.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lake Camp. 13.1208 Section 13... § 13.1208 Lake Camp. Leaving a boat, trailer, or vehicle unattended for more than 72 hours at the facilities associated with the Lake Camp launching ramp is prohibited without authorization from...

  10. CALL FOR ABSTRACTS - PIT LAKES 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    This call for abstracts is for the 11/16-18/2004 Pit Lakes 2004 meeting held in Reno, NV. This conference will provide a forum for the exchange of scientific information on current domestic and international pit lake approaches, including pit lakes from arid and wet regions throu...

  11. Exploration of Subglacial Lake Ellsworth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, N.

    2012-12-01

    Antarctic subglacial lakes are thought to be extreme habitats for microbial life and may contain important records of ice sheet history within their lake-floor sediments. To find if this is true, and to answer the science questions that would follow, direct measurement and sampling of these environments is required. Ever since the water depth of Vostok Subglacial Lake in East Antarctica was shown to be >500 m, attention has been given to how these unique, ancient and pristine subglacial environments may be entered without contamination and adverse disturbance. Several organizations have offered guidelines on the desirable cleanliness and sterility requirements for direct sampling experiments, including the US National Academy of Sciences and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. The aims, design and implementation of subglacial lake access experiments have direct relevance for the exploration of extra-terrestrial ice-covered bodies (e.g. Europa) and the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System. This presentation summarizes the scientific protocols and methods being developed for the exploration of Ellsworth Subglacial Lake in West Antarctica, and provides an up-to-date summary of the status of the project. The proposed exploration, planned for December 2012, involves accessing the lake using a hot-water drill and deploying a sampling probe and sediment corer to allow in situ measurement and sample collection. Details are presented on how this can be undertaken with minimal environmental impact that maximizes scientific return without compromising the environment for future experiments. The implications of this experiment for the search for extra-terrestrial life will be discussed.

  12. Lake Volume Monitoring from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crétaux, J.-F.; Abarca-del-Río, R.; Bergé-Nguyen, M.; Arsen, A.; Drolon, V.; Clos, G.; Maisongrande, P.

    2016-03-01

    Lakes are integrators of environmental change occurring at both the regional and global scale. They present a wide range of behavior on a variety of timescales (cyclic and secular) depending on their morphology and climate conditions. Lakes play a crucial role in retaining and stocking water, and because of the significant global environmental changes occurring at several anthropocentric levels, the necessity to monitor all morphodynamic characteristics [e.g., water level, surface (water contour) and volume] has increased substantially. Satellite altimetry and imagery are now widely used together to calculate lake and reservoir water storage changes worldwide. However, strategies and algorithms to calculate these characteristics are not straightforward, and specific approaches need to be developed. We present a review of some of these methodologies by using lakes over the Tibetan Plateau to illustrate some critical aspects and issues (technical and scientific) linked to the observation of climate change impact on surface waters from remote sensing data. Many authors have measured water variation using the limited remote sensing measurements available over short time periods, even though the time series are probably too short to directly link these results with climate change. Indeed, there are many processes and factors, like the influence of lake morphology, that are beyond observation and are still uncertain. The time response for lakes to reach a new state of equilibrium is a key aspect that is often neglected in current literature. Observations over a long period of time, including maintaining a constellation of comprehensive and complementary satellite missions with service continuity over decades, are therefore necessary especially when the ground gauge network is too limited. In addition, the design of future satellite missions with new instrumental concepts (e.g., SAR, SARin, Ka band altimetry, Ka interferometry) will also be suitable for complete

  13. Hydrology of Hunters Lake, Hernando County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henderson, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The size and shape of Hunters Lake, Florida has been significantly altered by development of the surrounding Spring Hill residential community. The lake is the largest in Hernando County, enlarged by lakeshore excavation and connection to nearby ponds to an area of 360 acres at an average stage of 17.2 ft above sea level. Hunters Lake is naturally a closed lake, but development of Spring Hill has resulted in a surface water outflow from the lake in its southwest corner. Inflow to the lake could occur on the east side during extreme high-water periods. The karst terrain of the Hunters Lake area is internally drained through permeable soils, depressions, and sinkholes, and natural surface drainage is absent. The underlying Floridan aquifer system is unconfined except locally near coastal springs. Flow in the groundwater system is to the west regionally and to the southwest in the immediate area of Hunters Lake. Water level gradients in the groundwater system increase from 1.4 ft/mi east of the lake to about 8 ft/mi southwest of the lake. Hunters Lake is hydraulically connected to the groundwater system, receiving groundwater on the northeast side and losing water to the groundwater system on the southwest side. This close relationship with the groundwater system is demonstrated by graphical and numerical comparison of Hunters Lake stage with water levels in nearby groundwater sites. During 1965-84, the stage of Hunters Lake fluctuated between 12.48 and 20.7 ft above sea level. Because area lakes are all directly affected by groundwater levels, they also show a close relationship with water levels in Hunters Lake. Analysis of water quality data for Hunters Lake indicates that the water of the lake is a soft calcium bicarbonate type with ionic concentrations higher than in water from nearby shallow wells and lower than in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Samples collected in 1981-1983 indicate slightly higher levels of ionic concentration than in 1965

  14. Fertilization of eggs of Lake Michigan lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in lake water: Effect of PCBs (Aroclor 1254)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, N.R.; Berlin, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Various studies indicate that PCBs appear to have an adverse effect on the viability of fertilized eggs and subsequent early life stages of lake trout and related species. Our tests detected no impairment of fertilization of lake trout eggs in PCB-dosed lake water. The concentration of PCBs in the fertilization medium that we used was more than 20 times as high as estimated ambient levels in southeastern Lake Michigan and it appears unlikley that ambient levels of PCBs in the water at fertilization would contribute significantly to the apparent widespread reproductive failure of lake trout there.

  15. Remote sensing and lake eutrophication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Horne, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    An infrared photograph of part of Clear Lake, Cal., shows complex patterns of blue-green algal blooms which were not observed by conventional limnological techniques. Repeated observations of patterns such as these can be used to chart the surface movement of these buoyant algae and can also be used to help control algal scums in eutrophic lakes. Although it is believed that most of the observed patterns resulted from Aphanizomenon (a few were also observed which resulted from suspended sediment), spectral signatures of the algal patterns varied.

  16. Post Audit of Lake Michigan Lake Trout PCB Model Forecasts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lake Michigan (LM) Mass Balance Study was conducted to measure and model polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other anthropogenic substances to gain a better understanding of the transport, fate, and effects of these substances within the system and to aid managers in the env...

  17. Feeding ecology of lake whitefish larvae in eastern Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; McKenna, James E.; Chalupnicki, Marc A.; Wallbridge, Tim; Chiavelli, Rich

    2009-01-01

    We examined the feeding ecology of larval lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in Chaumont Bay, Lake Ontario, during April and May 2004-2006. Larvae were collected with towed ichthyoplankton nets offshore and with larval seines along the shoreline. Larval feeding periodicity was examined from collections made at 4-h intervals over one 24-h period in 2005. Inter-annual variation in diet composition (% dry weight) was low, as was spatial variation among collection sites within the bay. Copepods (81.4%), primarily cyclopoids (59.1%), were the primary prey of larvae over the 3-year period. Cladocerans (8.1%; mainly daphnids, 6.7%) and chironomids (7.3%) were the other major prey consumed. Larvae did not exhibit a preference for any specific prey taxa. Food consumption of lake whitefish larvae was significantly lower at night (i.e., 2400 and 0400 h). Substantial variation in diet composition occurred over the 24-h diel study. For the 24-h period, copepods were the major prey consumed (50.4%) and their contribution in the diet ranged from 29.3% (0400 h) to 85.9% (1200 h). Chironomids made up 33.4% of the diel diet, ranging from 8.0% (0800 h) to 69.9% (0400 h). Diel variation in the diet composition of lake whitefish larvae may require samples taken at several intervals over a 24-h period to gain adequate representation of their feeding ecology.

  18. Crustal structure between Lake Mead, Nevada, and Mono Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Lane R.

    1964-01-01

    Interpretation of a reversed seismic-refraction profile between Lake Mead, Nevada, and Mono Lake, California, indicates velocities of 6.15 km/sec for the upper layer of the crust, 7.10 km/sec for an intermediate layer, and 7.80 km/sec for the uppermost mantle. Phases interpreted to be reflections from the top of the intermediate layer and the Mohorovicic discontinuity were used with the refraction data to calculate depths. The depth to the Moho increases from about 30 km near Lake Mead to about 40 km near Mono Lake. Variations in arrival times provide evidence for fairly sharp flexures in the Moho. Offsets in the Moho of 4 km at one point and 2 1/2 km at another correspond to large faults at the surface, and it is suggested that fracture zones in the upper crust may displace the Moho and extend into the upper mantle. The phase P appears to be an extension of the reflection from the top of the intermediate layer beyond the critical angle. Bouguer gravity, computed for the seismic model of the crust, is in good agreement with the measured Bouguer gravity. Thus a model of the crustal structure is presented which is consistent with three semi-independent sources of geophysical data: seismic-refraction, seismic-reflection, and gravity.

  19. Distribution of haloacetic acids in the water columns of the Laurentian Great Lakes and Lake Malawi.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brian F; Spencer, Christine; Marvin, Christopher H; MacTavish, David C; Muir, Derek C G

    2002-05-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are persistent and mildly phytotoxic compounds that have been detected in many aquatic environments, including the waters of the Great Lakes. Sources of HAAs, especially of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), are not well understood. In this study we assessed the influence of urbanization on the concentrations and profiles of HAAs in the Laurentian Great Lakes and in Lake Malawi, an African Great Lake. Vertical depth profiles for these compounds were taken for each of the Great Lakes with additional profiles taken 2 years later for Lakes Erie and Ontario. The results showed that while TFA was relatively constant throughout the water column, the chloroacetic acids (CAAs) varied with depth. There was a trend of increasing TFA proceeding from Lake Superior to Lake Ontario (18-150 ng/L). Total CAA concentrations were relatively constant throughout the lakes (approximately 500 ng/L) with dichloroacetic acid being the most abundant. No bromoacetic acids were detected. In the Detroit River, a connecting channel between Lakes Huron and Erie, the TFA values were similar to those in Lake Huron, but the CAAs levels were higher than in the upstream lakes and dependent on location, indicating inputs from urban areas along the river. These results were compared to those from Lake Malawi, which has a high population density within the watershed but no heavy industry. CAAs were nondetectable, and TFA concentrations were just at the detection limit (1 ng/L). Total HAA in the water column of Lakes Superior and Huron was compared to annual precipitation inputs at a site situated near both lakes. For Lake Huron, precipitation was a minor contributor to the total HAA inventory of the lake, but for Lake Superior precipitation could be the major contributor to the mass of HAA in this lake. Generally, high HAA levels paralleled the degree of industrial activity in the adjacent waters.

  20. Patterns of organochlorine contamination in lake trout from Wisconsin waters of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Michael A.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Masnado, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate spatial and temporal patterns of organochlorine contamination in lake trout from Wisconsin waters of the Great Lakes, we examined laboratory contaminant analysis data of muscle tissue samples from Lake Michigan (n=317) and Lake Superior (n=53) fish. Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlordane, and dieldrin, reported as mg/kg wet weight in 620 mm to 640 mm mean length Lake Michigan lake trout, decreased over time. Mean total PCB concentration declined exponentially from 9.7 in 1975 to 1.9 in 1990. Total chlordane concentration declined 63 percent from 0.48 in 1983 to 0.18 in 1990, and dieldrin declined 52 percent during this same period, from 0.21 to 0.10. The bioaccumulation rate of PCBs is significantly lower for lake trout inhabiting Lake Michigan's midlake reef complex, compared to lake trout from the nearshore waters of western Lake Michigan. Organochlorine compound concentrations were greater in Lake Michigan lake trout than Lake Superior fish. Lake Superior lean lake trout and siscowet exhibited similar rates of PCB bioaccumulation despite major differneces in muscle tissue lipid content between the two subspecies. The lack of a significant difference in the PCB bioaccumulation rates of lean trout and siscowet suggests that lipid content may not be an important factor influencing PCB bioaccumulation in lake trout, within the range of lipid concentrations observed. Relative concentrations of the various organochlorine contaminants found in lake trout were highly correlated, suggesting similar mass balance processes for these compounds. Evidence presented revealing spatial and temporal patterns of organochlorine contamination may be of value in reestablishing self-sustaining populations of lake trout in Lake Michigan.

  1. The state of Lake Superior in 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    The Lake Superior fish community in 1992 is substantially different than it was a half century ago and is far from a state desired by management agencies. Fish-community objectives were established for Lake Superior in response to A Joint Strategic Plan for Management of Great Lakes Fisheries (Great Lakes Fishery Commission 1980) and are the template for this report on the state of the lake. Reporting on progress toward meeting stated goals and objectives will focus attention on critical fishery issues and enhance understanding among fishery- and environmental-management agencies, political bodies, and the public.

  2. Common plankton of Twin Lakes, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, D.M.

    1983-02-01

    A series of studies is being performed to evaluate the effects of the Mt. Elbert Pumped-Storage Powerplant on the ecology of Twin Lakes. Twin Lakes are a pair of connected dimictic lakes, formed as the result of glacial action on alluvial deposits. This report presents a taxonomic species study of the common plankton collected since 1974 from Twin Lakes. A total of 11 zooplankters and 14 phytoplankters were identified from the limnetic zone of Twin Lakes and the associated Mt. Elbert Forebay. The four divisions of zooplankton included four species of Rotifera (rotifer), three species of Copepoda (copepod), three species of Cladocera (cladoceran), and one species of Mysidacea (opossum shrimp).

  3. Evaluation of offshore stocking of Lake Trout in Lake Ontario

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; O'Gorman, R.; Strang, T.G.; Lantry, J.R.; Connerton, M.J.; Schanger, T.

    2011-01-01

    Restoration stocking of hatchery-reared lake trout Salvelinus namaycush has occurred in Lake Ontario since 1973. In U.S. waters, fish stocked through 1990 survived well and built a large adult population. Survival of yearlings stocked from shore declined during 1990–1995, and adult numbers fell during 1998–2005. Offshore stocking of lake trout was initiated in the late 1990s in response to its successful mitigation of predation losses to double-crested cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus and the results of earlier studies that suggested it would enhance survival in some cases. The current study was designed to test the relative effectiveness of three stocking methods at a time when poststocking survival for lake trout was quite low and losses due to fish predators was a suspected factor. The stocking methods tested during 2000–2002 included May offshore, May onshore, and June onshore. Visual observations during nearshore stockings and hydroacoustic observations of offshore stockings indicated that release methods were not a direct cause of fish mortality. Experimental stockings were replicated for 3 years at one site in the southwest and for 2 years at one site in the southeast. Offshore releases used a landing craft to transport hatchery trucks from 3 to 6 km offshore out to 55–60-m-deep water. For the southwest site, offshore stocking significantly enhanced poststocking survival. Among the three methods, survival ratios were 1.74 : 1.00 : 1.02 (May offshore : May onshore : June onshore). Although not statistically significant owing to the small samples, the trends were similar for the southeast site, with survival ratios of 1.67 : 1.00 : 0.72. Consistent trends across years and sites indicated that offshore stocking of yearling lake trout during 2000–2002 provided nearly a twofold enhancement in survival; however, this increase does not appear to be great enough to achieve the 12-fold enhancement necessary to return population abundance to restoration

  4. Walleye in Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nepszy, S.J.; Davies, D.H.; Einhouse, D.; Hatch, R.W.; Isbell, G.; MacLennan, D.; Muth, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    The history and current status of walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) stocks in Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair are reviewed in relation to their exploitation by commercial and recreational fishermen, environmental factors, rehabilitation efforts, and community dynamics. Management initiatives and stock recovery under these processes are outlined. After the collapse of the fishery in 1957, the highly productive walleye stock of western Lake Erie remained depressed through the 1960s, while the eastern basin stock remained stable. Closure of the fishery for walleye from 1970-73 because of mercury contamination provided an opportunity for the development of an international interagency management plan. With quota management, the walleye stock in western Lake Erie responded well to limited exploitation, steadily increased, and expanded its range. As population expanded, growth began to decline and was more apparent in the young-of-the-year (YOY) in the 1970s, and in older walleye in the late 1970s and 1980s. At the turn of the century, commercial harvest of walleye in Lake St. Clair ranged from 12-127 tonnes annually. A relatively stable period from 1910-59 was followed by significantly increased harvests (100-150 t) in 1959-65. This increase was a result of increased commercial exploitation as well as an increased abundance of walleye. After the mercury contamination problem of 1970, angling effort and harvest was reduced but then gradually increased in Ontario waters from 37 t in 1973 to 62 t in 1988. The increased mean age of the stock during the early 1970s was due to a few strong year-classes (1970, 1972, and 1974) as well as a period of stable or reduced catch per unit effort. With the current mean age not reduced significantly, the stocks of walleye should continue to provide good yields.

  5. Hydrology, water quality, and nutrient loads to Lake Catherine and Channel Lake, near Antioch, Lake County, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, Robert T.; Johnson, Gary P.; Schrader, David L.

    2000-01-01

    From April 21, 1998, through April 30, 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Fox Waterway Agency, conducted an investigation designed to characterize the hydrology, water quality, hydrologic budget, sediment budget, and nutrient budget of Lake Catherine and Channel Lake, Lake County, Illinois. These lakes are the northernmost lakes of the Fox Chain of Lakes. Lake Catherine and Channel Lake are divided into two basins by a submerged ridge but are continuous at the surface. The lakes are marginally to moderately eutrophic. Lake Catherine and Channel Lake have a combined volume of 7,098 acre-feet at a stage of about 736.5 feet above sea level. Lake Catherine and Channel Lake are subject to thermal stratification. Although most of the water in the lakes is well oxidized, nearly anoxic conditions were present at the bottom of Lake Catherine and Channel Lake during part of the summer in 1998. Water enters Lake Catherine and Channel Lake as inflow from surface water in the watershed (61.9 percent), inflow through the State Highway 173 bridge openings (20.7 percent), direct precipitation (8.2 percent), inflow from storm drains (7.2 percent), and inflow of ground water (2.0 percent). Water exits Lake Catherine and Channel Lake as outflow through the State Highway 173 bridge openings (87.8 percent), evaporation (7.2 percent), and as outflow to ground water (5.0 percent). About 5,200 pounds of phosphorus and 107,200 pounds of nitrogen compounds were added to the lakes during the period of investigation. Phosphorus compounds were derived from primarily internal regeneration (40.2 percent), inflow from surface water in the watershed (30.9 percent), inflow from storm drains (12.5 percent), and inflow through the State Highway 173 bridge openings (9.8 percent). Inflowing ground water, waterfowl excrement, precipitation, and atmospheric deposition of particulate matter account for 6.6 percent of the phosphorus load. Nitrogen was derived from inflow of surface

  6. 12. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works construction drawing dated January 15, 1951. Drawn by W.A. Doe for the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co. (copy in possession of Bureau of Reclamation, location of original unknown) 'AS CONSTRUCTED' PLANS OF 1949-50, REHABILITATION OF TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR OUTLET WORKS, DETAILS OF DISCHARGE BASIN. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  7. 11. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photographic copy of copy of Twin Lakes Outlet Works construction drawing dated January 15, 1951. Drawn by W.A. Doe for the Twin Lakes Reservoir and Canal Co. (copy in possession of Bureau of Reclamation, location of original unknown) 'AS CONSTRUCTED' PLANS OF 1949-1950, REHABILITATION OF TWIN LAKES RESERVOIR OUTLET WORKS, DETAILS OF UPSTREAM WING WALLS. - Twin Lakes Dam & Outlet Works, Beneath Twin Lakes Reservoir, T11S, R80W, S22, Twin Lakes, Lake County, CO

  8. Hydrology of Lake Tohopekaliga, Osceola County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.

    1982-01-01

    Lake Tohopekaliga, one of the major lakes in central Florida, provides flood control in the upper Kissimmee River basin, recreation for fishermen and boaters, water for live-stock, esthetic surroundings for homesites, and serves as a receiving body for treated effluent from municipal sewage treatment plants. The purpose of this map report is to provide a general reconnaissance of the lake, based primarily on existing geologic , hydrologic and water-quality data. The lake has a surface area of about 30 square miles and a mean depth of about 5 feet. Maximum depth measured was about 13 feet. Inflow to the lake comes from Shingle Creek and St. Cloud canal and outflow is through the South-port canal. Regulation of lake levels for flood control began in the early 1960 's and has resulted in a decrease in the range of lake stage of about 3 feet. Concentrations of pesticide residues in lake bottom sediments do not appear to have increased from 1972 to 1980. The lake has abundant aquatic vegetation, the amount and extent of which varies with fluctuating water levels. Water-quality data collected between 1954-77 are summarized in the report and additional data collected in 1980 are also shown. The range of plant nutrient concentrations measured in May 1980 are: Total organic nitrogen 0.71-2.2 milligrams per liter. Most water-quality parameters vary from one area of the lake to another because of restricted areal circulation due to the shape of the lake. (USGS)

  9. The Lava sequence of the East African Rift escarpment in the Oldoinyo Lengai - Lake Natron sector, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirchen, Florian; Finkenbein, Thomas; Keller, Jörg

    2010-12-01

    A 500 m sequence of horizontal lava flows forms the Gregory rift escarpment of the western rift shoulder between Lake Natron and Oldoinyo Lengai. A detailed volcanic stratigraphy of this >1.2 Ma evolution of the EAR in Northern Tanzania is presented. The sequence is formed by several distinct rock suites, with increasing alkalinity from base to top. Alkali olivine basalts of the Waterfall Sequence at the base are followed by a basanite series, and by a range of evolved nephelinites forming the upper part of the escarpment. Numerous dykes and Strombolian scoria deposits indicate local fissure eruptions as opposed to or in addition to more distant sources. Primitive compositions within each of the series indicate variable candidates for primary magmas. The composition of the basanite suite ranges from primitive mantle melts (high Mg#, Cr, Ni) to more evolved rocks, in particular hawaiites, generated by fractionation of olivine, pyroxene and magnetite. Inter-bedded within the basanite suite, one single olivine melilitite flow with high Mg# and abundant olivine and pyroxene megacrysts is the only primitive candidate for the nephelinite suite. However, in view of the large compositional gap and marked differences in incompatible element ratios, a relation between this flow and the nephelinites remains hypothetical. The variation within the evolved nephelinite series can be partly explained by fractionation of pyroxene, apatite, perovskite (and some nepheline), while magma mixing is indicated by zonation patterns of pyroxene. The most evolved nephelinite, however, differs significantly from all other nephelinites in major and trace elements. Thus the entire sequence is petrologically not a coherent evolution, rather the result of different mantle melts fractionating under variable conditions. Carved into the rift scarp of the study area west of Engare Sero is a young explosion crater, the Sekenge Crater. Sekenge Tuffs are olivine melilitites, similar to other craters and

  10. Lake fisheries need lamprey control and research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffett, James W.

    1953-01-01

    Since 1921, when the first sea lamprey was recorded from Lake Erie, concern about this parasite in the Great Lakes above Niagara Falls, where previously it had never occurred, grew successively. At first, the concern was shared only in scientific circles, but as the parasite continued its persistent and rapid spread throughout the upper Great Lakes this concern was voiced by state conservation departments, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and interested fishermen. Catches of lake trout especially, and other species secondarily, began to fall below anything representing normal fluctuations in abundance. The fishing industry on Lake Huron and Lake Michigan became extremely concerned due to the fact that income was diminishing greatly. Producers on Lake Superior were fearful that the same decline in production would soon characterize their fishery.

  11. Dissolved Oxygen Levels in Lake Chabot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, D.; Pica, R.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen levels are crucial in every aquatic ecosystem; it allows for the fish to breathe and it is the best indicator of water quality. Lake Chabot is the main backup water source for Castro Valley, making it crucial that the lake stays in good health. Last year, research determined that the water in Lake Chabot was of good quality and not eutrophic. This year, an experiment was conducted using Lake Chabot's dissolved oxygen levels to ensure the quality of the water and to support the findings of the previous team. After testing three specifically chosen sites at the lake using a dissolved oxygen meter, results showed that the oxygen levels in the lake were within the healthy range. It was then determined that Lake Chabot is a suitable backup water source and it continues to remain a healthy habitat.

  12. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information about the physical and chemical characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected includes measurements of lake stage and in-lake water quality. Graphs of Secchi depths, surface totalphosphorus and chlorophyll-a concentrations versus time are included for lakes with two or more years of data. Graphs of vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance are included for sites where these parameters were measured. Descriptive information for each lake includes: location of the lake, drainage area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in another volume: "Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 1996."

  13. Water-quality and lake-stage data for Wisconsin lakes, water year 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, S.J.; Elder, J.F.; Garn, H.S.; Goddard, G.L.; Kammerer, P.A.; Olson, D.L.; Robertson, D.M.; Rose, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide information about the physical, che-nical, and biological characteristics of Wisconsin lakes. Data that have been collected at specific lakes, and information to aid in the interpretation of those data, are included in this report. Data collected includes measurements of lake stage and in-lake water quality. Graphs of Secchi depths, and total-phosphorus and chlorophyll-a concentrations versus time are included for lakes with two or more years of data. Descriptive information for each lake includes location of the lake, drainage area of the lake's watershed, period for which data are available, revisions to previously published records, and pertinent remarks. Additional data, such as streamflow and water quality in tributary and outlet streams of some of the lakes, are published in two other volunres: "Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 1994, St. Lawrence River Basin" (Volume 1) and "Water Resources Data-Wisconsin, 1994, Upper Mississippi River Basin" (Volume 2). 

  14. Geology of central Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Wold, R.J.; Paull, R.A.; Wolosin, C.A.; Friedel, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    The geology beneath Lake Michigan between 43/sup 0/00' and 44/sup 0/00'N and between 86/sup 0/30' and 87/sup 0/40' W is interpreted from a synthesis of 1,700 km of continuous seismic reflection profile data, bathymetry, grab samples, and onshore surface and subsurface information. The continuous seismic reflection profiles and bathymetry provided information for maps of unconsolidated sediment thickness and Paleozoic bedrock topography. Two structural-stratigraphic cross sections of the study area were constructed by utilizing a composite subsurface-surface section for eastern Wisconsin and two control wells in western Michigan. The cross sections, grab samples previously described in the literature, the bedrock topographic map, and published maps were used to construct a Paleozoic geologic map for central Lake Michigan. Rocks from Middle Silurian through Early Mississippian age form subcrops beneath the study area, whereas rocks of Early Silurian, Ordovician, and Late Cambrian age are present at greater depth. The Upper Cambrian rocks unconformably overlie Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks. The structural-stratigraphic cross sections also allow speculation about the petroleum potential beneath Lake Michigan. The possibility of oil occurrences within the Silurian is enhanced by major east-west facies changes, and other horizons with promise are present in Devonian and Ordovician rocks. Although Michigan and Wisconsin laws currently prohibit petroleum exploration in Lake Michigan, it is an area with future potential.

  15. INTERACTIVE PIT LAKES 2004 CONFERENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This CD and the workshop provide a pit lakes forum for the exchange of scientific information on current domestic and international approaches, including arid and wet regions throughout the world. These approaches include characterization, modeling/monitoring, and treatment and r...

  16. Dinkey Lakes Roadless Area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, F.C.W.; Federspiel, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey conducted in 1980, show that parts of the Dinkey Lakes Roadless Area have substantiated resource potential for tungsten and marble and probable resource potential for quartz crystal gemstones. A probable resource potential for geothermal energy exists in one small area. No potential for other metallic mineral or energy resources was identified in this study.

  17. The Source of Lake Wobegon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Richard P.

    2005-01-01

    John J. Cannell's late 1980s "Lake Wobegon" reports suggested widespread deliberate educator manipulation of norm-referenced standardized test (NRT) administrations and results, resulting in artificial test score gains. The Cannell studies have been referenced in education research since, but as evidence that high stakes (and not cheating or lax…

  18. Surgical lessons from the lake.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Shanu N

    2014-12-01

    After circumnavigating Lake Michigan during a sabbatical in the summer of 2011, the lessons learned from this experience and the surgical parallels between boating and life as a surgeon will be discussed. Topics will include the use of surgical checklists, teamwork and communication, leadership, and surgical mentorship. PMID:25440476

  19. The Taos Blue Lake Ceremony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodine, John J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the Blue Lake Ceremony of the Taos Pueblo Indians of New Mexico. Reproduces the 1906 account of the ceremony by anthropologist Matilda Coxe Stevenson and notes modern verification and change. Discusses the importance of this annual August pilgrimage and initiation rite to the preservation of Taos culture. (SV)

  20. Eutrophication of lakes and rivers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eutrophication is an ecological process, akin to aging, in which a water body is increasingly enriched with organic matter. While the most obvious signs of eutrophication in lakes and rivers involve algal blooms and fish kills, the systemic of eutrophication, although profound, are often not as noti...

  1. Genetic diversity of lake whitefish in lakes Michigan and Huron: sampling, standardization, and research priorities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stott, Wendylee; VanDeHey, Justin A.; Sloss, Brian L.

    2010-01-01

    We combined data from two laboratories to increase the spatial extent of a genetic data set for lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis from lakes Huron and Michigan and saw that genetic diversity was greatest between lakes, but that there was also structuring within lakes. Low diversity among stocks may be a reflection of relatively recent colonization of the Great Lakes, but other factors such as recent population fluctuation and localized stresses such as lamprey predation or heavy exploitation may also have a homogenizing effect. Our data suggested that there is asymmetrical movement of lake whitefish between Lake Huron and Lake Michigan; more genotypes associated with Lake Michigan were observed in Lake Huron. Adding additional collections to the calibrated set will allow further examination of diversity in other Great Lakes, answer questions regarding movement among lakes, and estimate contributions of stocks to commercial yields. As the picture of genetic diversity and population structure of lake whitefish in the Great Lakes region emerges, we need to develop methods to combine data types to help identify important areas for biodiversity and thus conservation. Adding genetic data to existing models will increase the precision of predictions of the impacts of new stresses and changes in existing pressures on an ecologically and commercially important species.

  2. Contaminant Monitoring Strategy for Henrys Lake, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    John S. Irving; R. P. Breckenridge

    1992-12-01

    Henrys Lake, located in southeastern Idaho, is a large, shallow lake (6,600 acres, {approx} 17.1 feet maximum depth) located at 6,472 feet elevation in Fremont Co., Idaho at the headwaters of the Henrys Fork of the Snake River. The upper watershed is comprised of high mountains of the Targhee National Forest and the lakeshore is surrounded by extensive flats and wetlands, which are mostly privately owned. The lake has been dammed since 1922, and the upper 12 feet of the lake waters are allocated for downriver use. Henrys Lake is a naturally productive lake supporting a nationally recognized ''Blue Ribbon'' trout fishery. There is concern that increasing housing development and cattle grazing may accelerate eutrophication and result in winter and early spring fish kills. There has not been a recent thorough assessment of lake water quality. However, the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) is currently conducting a study of water quality on Henrys Lake and tributary streams. Septic systems and lawn runoff from housing developments on the north, west, and southwest shores could potentially contribute to the nutrient enrichment of the lake. Many houses are on steep hillsides where runoff from lawns, driveways, etc. drain into wetland flats along the lake or directly into the lake. In addition, seepage from septic systems (drainfields) drain directly into the wetlands enter groundwater areas that seep into the lake. Cattle grazing along the lake margin, riparian areas, and uplands is likely accelerating erosion and nutrient enrichment. Also, cattle grazing along riparian areas likely adds to nutrient enrichment of the lake through subsurface flow and direct runoff. Stream bank and lakeshore erosion may also accelerate eutrophication by increasing the sedimentation of the lake. Approximately nine streams feed the lake (see map), but flows are often severely reduced or completely eliminated due to irrigation diversion. In addition, subsurface flows can occur as a

  3. Acoustic estimates of abundance and distribution of spawning lake trout on Sheboygan Reef in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, D.M.; Claramunt, R.M.; Janssen, J.; Jude, D.J.; Wattrus, N.

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to restore self-sustaining lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) populations in the Laurentian Great Lakes have had widespread success in Lake Superior; but in other Great Lakes, populations of lake trout are maintained by stocking. Recruitment bottlenecks may be present at a number of stages of the reproduction process. To study eggs and fry, it is necessary to identify spawning locations, which is difficult in deep water. Acoustic sampling can be used to rapidly locate aggregations of fish (like spawning lake trout), describe their distribution, and estimate their abundance. To assess these capabilities for application to lake trout, we conducted an acoustic survey covering 22 km2 at Sheboygan Reef, a deep reef (<40 m summit) in southern Lake Michigan during fall 2005. Data collected with remotely operated vehicles (ROV) confirmed that fish were large lake trout, that lake trout were 1–2 m above bottom, and that spawning took place over specific habitat. Lake trout density exhibited a high degree of spatial structure (autocorrelation) up to a range of ~190 m, and highest lake trout and egg densities occurred over rough substrates (rubble and cobble) at the shallowest depths sampled (36–42 m). Mean lake trout density in the area surveyed (~2190 ha) was 5.8 fish/ha and the area surveyed contained an estimated 9500–16,000 large lake trout. Spatial aggregation in lake trout densities, similarity of depths and substrates at which high lake trout and egg densities occurred, and relatively low uncertainty in the lake trout density estimate indicate that acoustic sampling can be a useful complement to other sampling tools used in lake trout restoration research.

  4. Lake volume monitoring from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crétaux, Jean-Francois; Abarca Del Rio, Rodrigo; Berge-Nguyen, Muriel; Arsen, Adalbert; Drolon, Vanessa; Maisongrande, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Lakes are integrator of environmental changes occurring at regional to global scale and present a high variety of behaviors on a variety of time scales (cyclic and secular) depending on the climate conditions and their morphology. In addition their crucial importance as water stocks and retaining, given the significant environment changes occurring worldwide at many anthropocentric levels, has increased the necessity of monitoring all its morphodynamics characteristics, say water level, surface (water contour) and volume. The satellite altimetry and satellite imagery together are now widely used for the calculation of lakes and reservoirs water storage changes worldwide. However strategies and algorithms to calculate these characteristics are not straightforward and need development of specific approaches. We intend to present a review of some of these methodologies by using the lakes over the Tibetan Plateau to illustrate some critical aspects and issues (technical and scientific) linked with the survey of climate changes impacts on surface waters from remote sensing data. Many authors have measured water variations using the short period of remote sensing measurements available, although time series are probably too short to lead to definitive conclusions to link these results directly with the framework of climate changes. Indeed, many processes beyond the observations are still uncertain, for example the influence of morphology of the lakes. The time response for a lake to reach new state of equilibrium is one of the key aspects often neglected in the current literature. Observations over long period of time, therein maintaining a constellation of comprehensive and complementary satellite missions with a continuity of services over decades, especially when ground gauges network is too limited is therefore a necessity. In addition, the design of future satellite missions with new instrumental concepts (e.g. SAR, SARin, Ka band altimetry, Ka interferometry) is

  5. Spatial and temporal genetic diversity of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis (Mitchill)) from Lake Huron and Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stott, Wendylee; Ebener, Mark P.; Mohr, Lloyd; Hartman, Travis; Johnson, Jim; Roseman, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis (Mitchill)) are important commercially, culturally, and ecologically in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Stocks of lake whitefish in the Great Lakes have recovered from low levels of abundance in the 1960s. Reductions in abundance, loss of habitat and environmental degradation can be accompanied by losses of genetic diversity and overall fitness that may persist even as populations recover demographically. Therefore, it is important to be able to identify stocks that have reduced levels of genetic diversity. In this study, we investigated patterns of genetic diversity at microsatellite DNA loci in lake whitefish collected between 1927 and 1929 (historical period) and between 1997 and 2005 (contemporary period) from Lake Huron and Lake Erie. Genetic analysis of lake whitefish from Lakes Huron and Erie shows that the amount of population structuring varies from lake to lake. Greater genetic divergences among collections from Lake Huron may be the result of sampling scale, migration patterns and demographic processes. Fluctuations in abundance of lake whitefish populations may have resulted in periods of increased genetic drift that have resulted in changes in allele frequencies over time, but periodic genetic drift was not severe enough to result in a significant loss of genetic diversity. Migration among stocks may have decreased levels of genetic differentiation while not completely obscuring stock boundaries. Recent changes in spatial boundaries to stocks, the number of stocks and life history characteristics of stocks further demonstrate the potential of coregonids for a swift and varied response to environmental change and emphasise the importance of incorporating both spatial and temporal considerations into management plans to ensure that diversity is preserved.

  6. Life history of lake herring of Green Bay, Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Stanford H.

    1956-01-01

    Although the lake herring has been an important contributor to the commercial fish production of Green Bay, little has been known about it. This study is based on field observations and data from about 6,500 lake herring collected over the period 1948 to 1952. Relatively nonselective commercial pound nets were a primary source of material for the study of age and growth. Commercial and experimental gill nets were used to obtain data on gear selectivity and vertical distribution. Scales were employed to investigate age and growth. Age group IV normally dominated commercial catches during the first half of the calendar year and age group III the last half. At these ages the fish averaged about 10.5 inches in length. The season's growth started in May, was most rapid in July, and terminated near the end of October. The sexes grew at the same rate. Selectivity of fishing gear was found to influence the estimation of growth. Geographical and annual differences in growth are shown. Factors that might contribute to discrepancies in calculated growth are evaluated. Possible real and apparent causes of growth compensation are given. The relation between length and weight is shown to vary with sex, season, year, and method of capture. Females were relatively more plentiful in commercial catches in February than in May through December. The percentage of females decreased with increase in age in pound-net catches but increased with age in gill-net samples. Within a year class the percentage of females decreased with increase in age. Most Green Bay lake herring mature during their second or third year of life. They are pelagic spawners with most intensive spawning over shallow areas. Spawning takes place between mid-November and mid-December, and eggs hatch in April and May. Lake herring ovaries contained from 3,500 to 11,200 eggs (averaged 6,375). Progress of spawning by age, sex, and length is given. Lake herring were distributed at all depths in Green Bay in early May, were

  7. Changes in bathymetry for Lake Katherine and Wood Lake, Richland County, South Carolina, 1989-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, Glenn G.

    1995-01-01

    Bathymetric surveys of Lake Katherine and Wood Lake, small residential lakes in Columbia, South Carolina, were made in 1989 and 1993. During this period the combined volume of the lakes decreased by 519,000 cubic feet (11.9 acre-feet). Most of the decrease in volume occurred in the northern part of Lake Katherine where deltaic sediment deposits at the mouth of Gills Creek increased in thickness during the 4-year period. The sediment was derived from a combination of sources in the Gills Creek Basin upstream from the lakes. Construction of a highway and a housing development in the Basin were significant factors in the sedimentation.

  8. Remote sensing of algal blooms by aircraft and satellite in Lake Erie and Utah Lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    During late summer, when the surface waters of Lake Erie reach their maximum temperature, an algal bloom is likely to develop. Such phenomena, which characterize eutrophic conditions, have been noticed on other shallow lakes using the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1). The concentration of the algae into long streamers provides additional information on surface circulations. To augment the ERTS Multispectral Scanner Subsystem data of Lake Erie, an aircraft was used to obtain correlative thermal-IR and additional multiband photographs. A large bloom of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae observed in Utah Lake together with recent bloom history in Lake Erie is used to verify the Great Lakes bloom.

  9. 77 FR 41686 - Safety Zone; Sheffield Lake Fireworks, Lake Erie, Sheffield Lake, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Buffalo; telephone 716- 843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarineSafety@uscg... DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... Lake, OH. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined that fireworks launched proximate to...

  10. Patterns in benthic biodiversity link lake trophic status to structure and potential function of three large, deep lakes.

    PubMed

    Hayford, Barbara L; Caires, Andrea M; Chandra, Sudeep; Girdner, Scott F

    2015-01-01

    Relative to their scarcity, large, deep lakes support a large proportion of the world's freshwater species. This biodiversity is threatened by human development and is in need of conservation. Direct comparison of biodiversity is the basis of biological monitoring for conservation but is difficult to conduct between large, insular ecosystems. The objective of our study was to conduct such a comparison of benthic biodiversity between three of the world's largest lakes: Lake Tahoe, USA; Lake Hövsgöl, Mongolia; and Crater Lake, USA. We examined biodiversity of common benthic organism, the non-biting midges (Chironomidae) and determined lake trophic status using chironomid-based lake typology, tested whether community structure was similar between the three lakes despite geographic distance; and tested whether chironomid diversity would show significant variation within and between lakes. Typology analysis indicated that Lake Hövsgöl was ultra-oligotrophic, Crater Lake was oligotrophic, and Lake Tahoe was borderline oligotrophic/mesotrophic. These results were similar to traditional pelagic measures of lake trophic status for Lake Hövsgöl and Crater Lake but differed for Lake Tahoe, which has been designated as ultra-oligotrophic by traditional pelagic measures such as transparency found in the literature. Analysis of similarity showed that Lake Tahoe and Lake Hövsgöl chironomid communities were more similar to each other than either was to Crater Lake communities. Diversity varied between the three lakes and spatially within each lake. This research shows that chironomid communities from these large lakes were sensitive to trophic conditions. Chironomid communities were similar between the deep environments of Lake Hövsgöl and Lake Tahoe, indicating that chironomid communities from these lakes may be useful in comparing trophic state changes in large lakes. Spatial variation in Lake Tahoe's diversity is indicative of differential response of chironomid

  11. Monitoring Land Cover Change in the Lake Superior Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake Superior is the largest freshwater lake in the world by area and the third largest by volume. It is also the most pristine of the Great Lakes (Lake Superior Lakewide Management Plan 2006). Even still, Lake Superior is not without its threats ranging from chemical contamina...

  12. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  13. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  14. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  15. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  16. 40 CFR 35.1605-3 - Publicly owned freshwater lake.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Publicly owned freshwater lake. 35.1605... Owned Freshwater Lakes § 35.1605-3 Publicly owned freshwater lake. A freshwater lake that offers public... maintaining the public access and recreational facilities of this lake or other publicly owned...

  17. 250 NORTH & MAIN STREET (PARK 83, SALT LAKE CITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    250 NORTH & MAIN STREET (PARK 8-3, SALT LAKE CITY CEMETERY LOCATER), SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING NORTH - REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18271, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  18. Lake ice cover and its influence on lake ecology in a Finnish lake district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppäranta, Matti; Arvola, Lauri

    2014-05-01

    A wintertime research program on the physics and biology of lakes in Häme lake district in Finland has been performed in the last five years. The set of study lakes contains a wide spectrum in size, depth and trophic status. In this region the lakes freeze over annually for 4-6 months and the mean ice thickness is around 0.5 m. The ice sheet consists of congelation ice and snow-ice. The snow-ice fraction ranges from 0 to 90 per cent depending on the snow fall history and its magnitude makes a major contribution to the ice properties and conditions in the water body beneath the ice, in particular the mechanical strength and optical thickness are much less than for congelation ice. The e-folding depth of light intensity was 50-100 cm for congelation ice and 5-10 cm for snow. A numerical model has been developed to simulate the annual cycle of ice stratigraphy, temperature and thickness. The water bodies had a 1-4 m thick upper mixed layer thick thermocline, and in deeper lakes a lower homogeneous layer. Fall cooling process was crucial to determine the temperature of the lower layer at freeze-up, anything within 0-4°C. Oxygen concentration decreased in winter, especially close to the bottom sediments, and carbon dioxide concentration increased due to respiration activity. Phytoplankton production and biomass level were low or very low and, therefore, heterotrophic and mixotrophic species were abundant. Oxygen depletion in the hypolimnium had several chemical and ecological consequences, such as release of phosphorus from the bottom sediments. In spring, just before the ice-out, photosynthesis was at a high level beneath the ice due to improved light conditions and started to elevate the oxygen concentration in the topmost water layer. Primary production under the ice is limited or prohibited by low level of available light.

  19. Limnology of selected lakes in Ohio, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tobin, R.L.; Youger, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Seventeen Ohio lakes were evaluated in 1975 for water quality status. Spring and late summer data included physical and profile measurements for a broad spectrum of chemical and biological constituents. Secchi disk transparency ranged from 0.1 to 2.9 meters. Thermal stratification or stability is shown for 10 lakes deeper than 4.6 meters. Anaerobic conditions, and high concentrations of ammonia, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, developed in all thermally stabilized lakes. Maximum dissolved oxygen was measured at 20.8 milligrams per liter (229 percent saturation) in Paint Creek Lake. Calcium was the dominant and (or) co-dominant cation and bicarbonate and (or) sulfate the dominant anions in all lakes sampled. Two lakes, Hope and Vesuvius, had soft water. Specific conductance ranged from 128 to 510 micromhos. Pesticides were not detected except in Action Lake, and concentrations of one or more trace metals were above State limits in 10 lakes. Fecal coliform counts were generally low and exceeded 400 colonies per 100 milliliters in four lakes during runoff events. Blue-green algae dominated the summer phytoplankton communities in 16 lakes, with maximum densities greater than two million cells per milliliter. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Urmia Lake (Northwest Iran): a brief review

    PubMed Central

    Eimanifar, Amin; Mohebbi, Feridon

    2007-01-01

    Lake Urmia (or Ormiyeh) is one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world and the habitat of a unique bisexual Artemia species (A. urmiana). Despite this, and several other values of the lake, little literature on it has been published. The present paper is an attempt to provide a brief review on various aspects of the lake. Urmia Lake, located in northwestern Iran, is an oligotrophic lake of thalassohaline origin with a total surface area between 4750 and 6100 km2 and a maximum depth of 16 m at an altitude of 1250 m. The lake is divided into north and south parts separated by a causeway in which a 1500-m gap provides little exchange of water between the two parts. Due to drought and increased demands for agricultural water in the lake's basin, the salinity of the lake has risen to more than 300 g/L during recent years, and large areas of the lake bed have been desiccated. Therefore, management and conservation of this incomparable ecosystem should be considered to improve the current condition by fisheries research institutes. PMID:17506897

  1. Preferred temperatures of juvenile lake whitefish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) supported valuable commercial fisheries in all of the Great Lakes until the 1950s to 1960s when their populations collapsed due to overfishing, pollution, and predation by the exotic sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). Reduction of these population stresses has permitted significant recovery of the lake whitefish in the upper three Great Lakes since the 1980s, and limited but encouraging recovery is now apparent in Lakes Erie and Ontario. In the present study the thermal preferences of age-0 and age-1 lake whitefish were measured in the laboratory to provide a basis for determining thermal habitat use by juvenile lake whitefish and thermal niche overlap with exotic fishes that might prey on them. Final thermal preferenda of young lake whitefish varied inversely with fish size ranging from 16.8°C for fish averaging 1.9 g to 15.6°C for age-1 fish averaging 3.9 g. Final thermal preferenda were in agreement with the limited published information on temperature selection of juvenile lake whitefish in the laboratory and on thermal habitat use by wild, free-ranging populations in the Great Lakes.

  2. Potential flood volume of Himalayan glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sakai, A.; Takenaka, S.; Nuimura, T.; Surazakov, A. B.; Sawagaki, T.; Yamanokuchi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Glacial lakes are potentially dangerous sources of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs), and represent a serious natural hazard in Himalayan countries. Despite the development of various indices aimed at determining the risk of such flooding, an objective evaluation of the thousands of Himalayan glacial lakes has yet to be completed. In this study we propose a single index, based on the depression angle from the lakeshore, which allows the lakes to be assessed using remotely sensed digital elevation models (DEMs). We test our approach on five lakes in Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet using images taken by the declassified Hexagon KH-9 satellite before these lakes flooded. All five lakes had a steep lakefront area (SLA), on which a depression angle was steeper than our proposed threshold of 10° before the GLOF event, but the SLA was no longer evident after the events. We further calculated the potential flood volume (PFV); i.e. the maximum volume of floodwater that could be released if the lake surface was lowered sufficiently to eradicate the SLA. This approach guarantees repeatability because it requires no particular expertise to carry out. We calculated PFVs for more than 2000 Himalayan glacial lakes using the ASTER data. The distribution follows a power-law function, and we identified 49 lakes with PFVs of over 10 million m3 that require further detailed field investigations.

  3. Seasonal thermal ecology of adult walleye (Sander vitreus) in Lake Huron and Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peat, Tyler B; Hayden, Todd A.; Gutowsky, Lee F G; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Fielder, David G.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Murchie, Karen J; Dettmers, John M.; Krueger, Charles C.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize thermal patterns and generate occupancy models for adult walleye from lakes Erie and Huron with internally implanted biologgers coupled with a telemetry study to assess the effects of sex, fish size, diel periods, and lake. Sex, size, and diel periods had no effect on thermal occupancy of adult walleye in either lake. Thermal occupancy differed between lakes and seasons. Walleye from Lake Erie generally experienced higher temperatures throughout the spring and summer months than did walleye in Lake Huron, due to limnological differences between the lakes. Tagged walleye that remained in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron (i.e., adjacent to the release location), as opposed to those migrating to the main basin of Lake Huron, experienced higher temperatures, and thus accumulated more thermal units (the amount of temperature units amassed over time) throughout the year. Walleye that migrated toward the southern end of Lake Huron occupied higher temperatures than those that moved toward the north. Consequently, walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay experienced thermal environments that were more favorable for growth as they spent more time within their thermal optimas than those that remained in Saginaw Bay. Results presented in this paper provide information on the thermal experience of wild fish in a large lake, and could be used to refine sex- and lake-specific bioenergetics models of walleye in the Great Lakes to enable the testing of ecological hypotheses.

  4. Whole-lake burdens and spatial distribution of cadmium in sediments of Wisconsin seepage lakes, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, D.E.; Rada, R.G.; Wiener, J.G.; Atchison, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Cadmium was quantified in the surface sediments of six seepage lakes ranging from 8 to 70 ha in surface area, 6 to 20 m in maximum depth, 5.2 to 7.0 in mean epilimnetic pH, and 1.7 to 6.8 mg.L-1 in dissolved organic carbon. Within each lake, dry-weight concentrations of cadmium (range, 0.02-7.17 mu g.g(-1)) were positively correlated with volatile matter content of the sediments, which increased with water depth. Volumetric concentrations (i.e., mass per volume of met sediment) were correlated with water depth in only one lake, and they more accurately represented the spatial distribution of sedimentary cadmium within the lakes. Analysis of sediment cores from two of the lakes indicated that surface sediments were enriched with cadmium. The source of cadmium and the within-lake processes controlling deposition to the sediments were presumably similar among the lakes, as demonstrated by the strong correlation between lake area and whole-lake burdens of cadmium in the surface sediments (range, 625-5785 g/lake). Hence, cadmium in these lakes appears to be derived largely from atmospheric deposition. When normalized for lake area, cadmium burdens in the surface sediments ranged from 62 to 92 g.ha(-1) and were strongly correlated with dissolved organic carbon, but not with lake pH, which suggests a link between the transport of cadmium and organic matter to the sediments.

  5. Seasonal thermal ecology of adult walleye (Sander vitreus) in Lake Huron and Lake Erie.

    PubMed

    Peat, Tyler B; Hayden, Todd A; Gutowsky, Lee F G; Vandergoot, Christopher S; Fielder, David G; Madenjian, Charles P; Murchie, Karen J; Dettmers, John M; Krueger, Charles C; Cooke, Steven J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize thermal patterns and generate occupancy models for adult walleye from lakes Erie and Huron with internally implanted biologgers coupled with a telemetry study to assess the effects of sex, fish size, diel periods, and lake. Sex, size, and diel periods had no effect on thermal occupancy of adult walleye in either lake. Thermal occupancy differed between lakes and seasons. Walleye from Lake Erie generally experienced higher temperatures throughout the spring and summer months than did walleye in Lake Huron, due to limnological differences between the lakes. Tagged walleye that remained in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron (i.e., adjacent to the release location), as opposed to those migrating to the main basin of Lake Huron, experienced higher temperatures, and thus accumulated more thermal units (the amount of temperature units amassed over time) throughout the year. Walleye that migrated toward the southern end of Lake Huron occupied higher temperatures than those that moved toward the north. Consequently, walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay experienced thermal environments that were more favorable for growth as they spent more time within their thermal optimas than those that remained in Saginaw Bay. Results presented in this paper provide information on the thermal experience of wild fish in a large lake, and could be used to refine sex- and lake-specific bioenergetics models of walleye in the Great Lakes to enable the testing of ecological hypotheses. PMID:26590461

  6. Late Holocene lake-level fluctuations in Walker Lake, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuan, F.; Linsley, B.K.; Howe, S.S.; Lund, S.P.; McGeehin, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Walker Lake, a hydrologically closed, saline, and alkaline lake, is situated along the western margin of the Great Basin in Nevada of the western United States. Analyses of the magnetic susceptibility (??), total inorganic carbon (TIC), and oxygen isotopic composition (??18O) of carbonate sediments including ostracode shells (Limnocythere ceriotuberosa) from Walker Lake allow us to extend the sediment record of lake-level fluctuations back to 2700??years B.P. There are approximately five major stages over the course of the late Holocene hydrologic evolution in Walker Lake: an early lowstand (> 2400??years B.P.), a lake-filling period (??? 2400 to ??? 1000??years B.P.), a lake-level lowering period during the Medieval Warm Period (MWP) (??? 1000 to ??? 600??years B.P.), a relatively wet period (??? 600 to ??? 100??years B.P.), and the anthropogenically induced lake-level lowering period (< 100??years B.P.). The most pronounced lowstand of Walker Lake occurred at ??? 2400??years B.P., as indicated by the relatively high values of ??18O. This is generally in agreement with the previous lower resolution paleoclimate results from Walker Lake, but contrasts with the sediment records from adjacent Pyramid Lake and Siesta Lake. The pronounced lowstand suggests that the Walker River that fills Walker Lake may have partially diverted into the Carson Sink through the Adrian paleochannel between 2700 to 1400??years B.P. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Seasonal thermal ecology of adult walleye (Sander vitreus) in Lake Huron and Lake Erie.

    PubMed

    Peat, Tyler B; Hayden, Todd A; Gutowsky, Lee F G; Vandergoot, Christopher S; Fielder, David G; Madenjian, Charles P; Murchie, Karen J; Dettmers, John M; Krueger, Charles C; Cooke, Steven J

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize thermal patterns and generate occupancy models for adult walleye from lakes Erie and Huron with internally implanted biologgers coupled with a telemetry study to assess the effects of sex, fish size, diel periods, and lake. Sex, size, and diel periods had no effect on thermal occupancy of adult walleye in either lake. Thermal occupancy differed between lakes and seasons. Walleye from Lake Erie generally experienced higher temperatures throughout the spring and summer months than did walleye in Lake Huron, due to limnological differences between the lakes. Tagged walleye that remained in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron (i.e., adjacent to the release location), as opposed to those migrating to the main basin of Lake Huron, experienced higher temperatures, and thus accumulated more thermal units (the amount of temperature units amassed over time) throughout the year. Walleye that migrated toward the southern end of Lake Huron occupied higher temperatures than those that moved toward the north. Consequently, walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay experienced thermal environments that were more favorable for growth as they spent more time within their thermal optimas than those that remained in Saginaw Bay. Results presented in this paper provide information on the thermal experience of wild fish in a large lake, and could be used to refine sex- and lake-specific bioenergetics models of walleye in the Great Lakes to enable the testing of ecological hypotheses.

  8. Fat content of the flesh of siscowets and lake trout from Lake Superior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eschmeyer, Paul H.; Phillips, Arthur M.

    1965-01-01

    Samples of flesh were excised from the middorsal region of 67 siscowets (Salvelinus namaycush siscowet) and 46 lake trout (Salvelinus n. namaycush) collected from Lake Superior. Chemical analysis of the samples revealed a range in fat content (dry weight) of 32.5 to 88.8 per cent in siscowets and 6.6 to 52.3 per cent in lake trout. Percentage fat increased progressively with increase in length of fish in both forms, but the average rate of increase was far greater for siscowets than for lake trout at lengths between 12 and 20 inches. Despite substantial individual variation, the percentage fat in the two forms was widely different and without overlap at all comparable lengths. The range in iodine number of the fat was 100 to 160 for siscowets and 103 to 161 for lake trout; average values were generally lower for siscowets than for lake trout among fish of comparable length. Percentage fat and relative weight were not correlated significantly in either subspecies. The fat content of flesh samples from a distinctive subpopulation of Lake Superior lake trout known as 'humpers' was more closely similar to that of typical lean lake trout than to siscowets, but the rate of increase in fat with increasing length was greater than for lean lake trout. Flesh samples from hatchery-reared stocks of lake trout, hybrid lake trout X siscowets, and siscowets tended to support the view that the wide difference in fat content between siscowets and lake trout is genetically determined.

  9. Genetic structure of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanDeHey, J.A.; Sloss, Brian L.; Peeters, Paul J.; Sutton, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic relationships among lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) spawning aggregates in Lake Michigan were assessed and used to predict a stock or management unit (MU) model for the resource. We hypothesized that distinct spawning aggregates represented potential MUs and that differences at molecular markers underlie population differentiation. Genetic stock identification using 11 microsatellite loci indicated the presence of six genetic MUs. Resolved MUs corresponded to geographically proximate spawning aggregates clustering into genetic groups. Within MUs, analyses suggested that all but one delineated MU was a stable grouping (i.e., no between-population differences), with the exception being the Hog Island - Traverse Bay grouping. Elk Rapids was the most genetically divergent population within Lake Michigan. However, low F st values suggested that moderate to high levels of gene flow occur or have occurred in the past between MUs. Significant tests of isolation by distance and low pairwise Fst values potentially led to conflicting results between traditional analyses and a Bayesian approach. This data set could provide baseline data from which a comprehensive mixed-stock analysis could be performed, allowing for more efficient and effective management of this economically and socially important resource.

  10. 78 FR 60686 - Establishment of the Big Valley District-Lake County and Kelsey Bench-Lake County Viticultural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... on April 5, 2013 (78 FR 20544), proposing to establish the Big Valley District-Lake County and Kelsey... District-Lake County and Kelsey Bench-Lake County Viticultural Areas and Modification of the Red Hills Lake... approximately 11,000-acre ``Big Valley District-Lake County'' viticultural area and the approximately...

  11. Geological nature of subglacial Lake Vostok

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitchenkov, G. L.; Masolov, V. N.; Lukin, V. V.; Bulat, S. A.; Kurinin, R. G.; Lipenkov, V. Ya.

    2003-04-01

    Lake Vostok is located at the edge of vast upland of East Antarctic (Precambrian) Crystalline Shield and represents a typical extensionally-induced intracontinental rift zone. Type indicators of rift nature are: width (60-80 km) and length (about 300 km) of the lake depression; several (3-5) kilometers of sediments (modeled from gravity data) infilling the lake graben, considerable amplitudes of faults bounding the lake (up to 2 km in bedrock relief and in excess of 5 km in basement topography), half-graben-like structures (rotated crustal blocks) at flanks of the lake traceable to crustal extension; along-strike segmentation of the depression (the presence of two isolated basins, recognized from seismic and gravity data); knee-shaped spatial configuration of the lake and existence of diagonal fractures (displayed in bedrock topography) normally nascent in conditions of tensional stress. The rift graben of Lake Vostok is considered to be a part (branch) of more spacious rift system, main arm of which stretched from the Prydz Bay trough the Lambert Glacier and the eastern foot of Gamburtsev Mts. to, at least, 110E. This rift system is a result of large-scale extensional event, which occurred in East Antarctica in Late Jurassic - Early Cretaceous prior to East Gondwana break-up. Sedimentary infill of this age is proposed to dominate in Vostok Lake, although postrift, preglacial (Cretaceous - Paleogene) strata can also forms significant part of depositional section. Helium isotopes data give evidence that the Lake Vostok rift is not active. On the other hand, thermophilic bacteria found in accretion ice suggest the possibility of hydrothermal activity in lake bottom. The conduits for warm underwater can be provided by deep crustal faults bordering rift graben. Microseismicity recorded in the area of Lake Vostok suggests the possibility of crustal deformations (likely during more dramatic earthquakes) providing a necessary fault permeability for water seepage from

  12. Helminths in an intensively stocked population of lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush, from Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muzzall, Patrick M.; Bowen, Charles A., II

    2000-01-01

    Eighty stocked lake trout Salvelinus namaycush (Salmonidae), collected from 2 locations in Lake Huron in May 1995, were examined for parasites. The parasite fauna of this top predator in Lake Huron was characterized by only 6 helminth species. Echinorhynchus salmonis infected all lake trout with a mean intensity of 163.9. The intensity of this acanthocephalan species significantly increased with host length and weight. Eubothrium salvelini infected 78 lake trout with a maximum number of 81 scoleces counted. Diplostomum sp., Cyathocephalus truncatus, Capillaria salvelini, and Neoechinorhynchus sp. infrequently infected lake trout. The low parasite species richness in these lake trout is believed to be due to their large size at stocking and to the loss of historical enzootic host-parasite relationships that followed the absence of this fish species in Lake Huron for 26 yr.

  13. Expanding models of lake trophic state to predict cyanobacteria in lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods: Cyanobacteria are a primary taxonomic group associated with harmful algal blooms in lakes. Understanding the drivers of cyanobacteria presence has important implications for lake management and for the protection of human and ecosystem health. Chlor...

  14. Expanding Models of Lake Trophic State to Predict Cyanobacteria in Lakes: A Data Mining Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods: Cyanobacteria are a primary taxonomic group associated with harmful algal blooms in lakes. Understanding the drivers of cyanobacteria presence has important implications for lake management and for the protection of human and ecosystem health. Chloro...

  15. Why study lakes? An overview of USGS lake studies in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garn, Herbert S.; Elder, J.F.; Robertson, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Wisconsin’s 15,000 lakes are prominent features in its landscape and an important public resource. In the northern part of the State, the recent glaciation (ending about 10,000 years ago) created one of the densest clusters of lakes found anywhere in the world, containing lakes that occupy depressions in the glacial moraines and outwash deposits (fig. 1). This Northern Lakes and Forests Ecoregion contains more than 80 percent of the State’s lakes (Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, 2001). South of this ecoregion, there are fewer lakes, but they still are common. Usually situated in agricultural or urban land- scapes, lakes in southern Wisconsin generally have higher levels of nutrients and alkalinity, and higher biological productivity than their northern counterparts. For most lakes in Wisconsin, phosphorus is the nutrient that limits algal growth (Lillie and Mason, 1983).

  16. Record of glacial Lake Missoula floods in glacial Lake Columbia, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Michelle A.; Clague, John J.

    2016-02-01

    During the last glaciation (marine oxygen isotope stage 2), outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula deposited diagnostic sediments within glacial Lake Columbia. Two dominant outburst flood lithofacies are present within glacial Lake Columbia deposits: a flood expansion bar facies and a finer-grained hyperpycnite facies. We conclude that the flood sediments have a glacial Lake Missoula source because: (1) current indicators indicate westward flow through the lake, and upvalley flow followed by downvalley flow in tributary valleys; (2) no flood sediments are found north of a certain point; (3) there is a dominance of Belt-Purcell Supergroup clasts in a flood expansion bar; and (4) some of the finer-grained beds have a pink colour, reflective of glacial Lake Missoula lake-bottom sediments. A new radiocarbon age of 13,400 ± 100 14C BP on plant detritus found below 37 flood beds helps constrain the timing of outburst flooding from glacial Lake Missoula.

  17. Patterns of egg deposition by lake trout and lake whitefish at Tawas artificial Reef, Lake Huron, 1990-1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, N.R.; Kennedy, G.W.; Munawar, M.; Edsall, T.; Leach, J.

    1995-01-01

    In August 1987, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), with the help and co-sponsorship of Walleyes for Iosco County, constructed Tawas artificial reef to improve recreational fishing in Tawas Bay. Post-construction assessment in October, 1987, by the MDNR found twice as many adult lake trout in a gill net set on the reef as in a similar net set off the reef, indicating that lake trout already had begun to investigate this new habitat. Similar netting efforts in October 1989 caught three times as many adults on the reef as off it, even though the on-reef net was set for less than one third as long a period. Using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), we detected prespawning aggregations of lake trout on the reef in fall 1989, and MDNR biologists set emergent fly traps on the reef in April-May 1990-1991. These fry traps captured several newly emerged lake trout and lake whitefish fry, demonstrating that eggs of both species has hatched successfully. Gill netting in 1992-1993 by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists netted large numbers of ripe lake trout in late October and ripe lake whitefish in early to mid-November. The purpose of this paper is to describe the relative quantities of eggs deposited and the spatial patterns of egg deposition by lake trout and lake whitefish at Tawas artificial reef during 1990-1993.

  18. Lake trout spawning habitat in the Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef lake trout sanctuary, Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Brown, Charles L.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Poe, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    Attempts to reestablish self-sustaining stocks of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the lower four Great Lakes, where the species was extinguished in the 1950s and 1960s, have been largely unsuccessful. To avoid many of the problems believed to be contributing to this failure, the fishery management community recently established several sanctuaries in the offshore waters of the Great Lakes where the development and protection of self-sustaining stocks of lake trout would be a primary management objective. One of these, the Six Fathom Bank-Yankee Reef sanctuary, was created in the south-central portion of Lake Huron. This sanctuary covers 168,000 ha and includes the shallower portions of the Six Fathom and Ipperwash scarps, which are major bathymetric features in the southern half of the lake. Historical accounts describe Six Fathom Bank as the most important lake trout spawning ground in the lake. Here we present the results of lake bed surveys conducted in the sanctuary with side-scan sonar, underwater videocamera systems, and a small research submarine. Our observations of the lake bed are consistent with what is known of the bedrock stratigraphy, glacial history, and karst geomorphology of the Lake Huron basin. Most of the loose rock we found seemed to be derived from local carbonate bedrock formations, although non-carbonate rock probably from Precambrian sources to the north was also present in some areas. Much of the bedrock and loose rock displayed karst solution features described for the Bruce Peninsula on the Ontario shoreline. Our surveys revealed substantial areas of lake bed at water depths of 20–36 m that resembled suitable spawning and fry production habitat for the shallow-water strains of lake trout that are the focus of the rehabilitation effort. Low mid-lake nutrient levels documented recently by others and the extremely high abundance of Mysis relicta (an important item in the diet of young lake trout) that we documented on Yankee Reef

  19. Sedimentary constraints on late Quaternary lake-level fluctuations at Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, J.P.; Rosenbaum, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of sedimentological evidence was used to construct the lake-level history for Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho, for the past ???25,000 years. Shorelines provide evidence of precise lake levels, but they are infrequently preserved and are poorly dated. For cored sediment similar to that in the modern lake, grain-size distributions provide estimates of past lake depths. Sedimentary textures provide a highly sensitive, continuous record of lake-level changes, but the modern distribution of fabrics is poorly constrained, and many ancient features have no modern analog. Combining the three types of data yields a more robust lake-level history than can be obtained from any one type alone. When smooth age-depth models are used, lake-level curves from multiple cores contain inconsistent intervals (i.e., one record indicates a rising lake level while another record indicates a falling lake level). These discrepancies were removed and the multiple records were combined into a single lake-level curve by developing age-depth relations that contain changes in deposition rate (i.e., gaps) where indicated by sedimentological evidence. The resultant curve shows that, prior to 18 ka, lake level was stable near the modern level, probably because the lake was overflowing. Between ca. 17.5 and 15.5 ka, lake level was ???40 m below the modern level, then fluctuated rapidly throughout the post-glacial interval. Following a brief rise centered ca. 15 ka ( = Raspberry Square phase), lake level lowered again to 15-20 m below modern from ca. 14.8-11.8 ka. This regression culminated in a lowstand to 40 m below modern ca. 12.5 ka, before a rapid rise to levels above modern ca. 11.5 ka. Lake level was typically lower than present throughout the Holocene, with pronounced lowstands 15-20 m below the modern level ca. 10-9, 7.0, 6.5-4.5, 3.5, 3.0-2.5, 2.0, and 1.5 ka. High lake levels near or above the modern lake occurred ca. 8.5-8.0, 7.0-6.5, 4.5-3.5, 2.5, and 0.7 ka. This lake-level history

  20. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect

    Eichinger, F.T.; Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  1. Water quality in Lake Lanier

    SciTech Connect

    Callaham, M.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Thirteen water quality tests measuring five categories of pollution were conducted twice monthly from May, 1987 to April, 1990 at eight locations on Lake Sidney Lanier to establish baseline data and detect trends. Additionally, sediment and water samples were analyzed for ten toxic metals. Sampling stations were located at or near the point of entry of streams into the Lake. Oxygen demanding pollutants were highest in urban streams and phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations were highest in streams having poultry processing operations within their watersheds. Indicators of siltation increased coincidentally with highway construction in one watershed. Fecal coliform bacteria counts decreased at Flat Creek and increased in the Chattahoochee River. Zinc and copper occurred in water samples at levels of detectability. Sediment samples from several locations contained metal concentrations which warrant further study.

  2. Thermal springs in Lake Baikal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanks, Wayne C.; Callender, E.

    1992-01-01

    The ??18O values of pore wqters range from -15.2??? to -16.7???, and ??D values range from -119??? to -126??? (both isotopes determined relative to standard mean ocean water [SMOW]). Bottom water in Lake Baikal has a ??18O value of -5.6??? and a ??D value of -120???. Pore waters in the vent area are significantly enriched in Mg, K, Ca, and especially Na and have the lowest ??D and ??18O values; these pore waters are isotopically and chemically distinct from pore waters in other, more typical parts of the lake. The pore-water isotopic data fall on a local meteoric water line, and covariations in water isotopes and chemistry are not consistent with evaporation or hydrothermal water-rock interaction. The thermal springs represent discharging meteoric waters that have been gently heated during subsurface circulation and are largely unaltered isotopically. Chemical variations are most likely due to dissolution of subsurface evaporites. -from Authors

  3. Floodplain Lakes: Evolution and Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Sonja; Hall, Roland; Gell, Peter

    2011-05-01

    PAGES International Floodplain Lakes Workshop; Fayetteville, Arkansas, 16-19 September 2010 ; Human alteration of the major rivers and floodplains of the world is a global concern because they sustain aquatic ecosystems and supply food and energy to society. When in flood stage, the influence of a river extends across the floodplain and can revitalize productive wetlands. The condition of many rivers has declined worldwide, but the degree of degradation is hard to assess due to natural variability of flow and uncertainty of baseline status. Evidence of changes over decades to millennia in river and wetland conditions, however, can be quantified from physical, chemical, and biological information archived in the accumulated sediments of floodplain lakes.

  4. Influence of lake morphology on water quality.

    PubMed

    Moses, Sheela A; Janaki, Letha; Joseph, Sabu; Justus, J; Vimala, Sheeja Ramakrishnan

    2011-11-01

    Lakes are seriously affected due to urban pollution. The study of the morphological features of a lake system helps to identify its environmental status. The objective of the present study is to analyse the influence of morphometry on water quality in a lake (Akkulam-Veli Lake, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala). The morphological features namely mean depth, surface area, volume, shoreline length, shoreline development and index of basin permanence have been evaluated. Correlation analysis has been conducted to determine the relationship between morphological features and water quality. Regression analysis has been conducted to find out the extent of influence of morphometric features on water quality. The study revealed that the lake is less affected by wind-induced wave action due to various reasons. The depth and volume have significant role in the water quality. The nitrogen fixation of blue green algae can be observed from the morphological features. The morphology has greater role in the water quality of a lake system. PMID:21387171

  5. Influence of lake morphology on water quality.

    PubMed

    Moses, Sheela A; Janaki, Letha; Joseph, Sabu; Justus, J; Vimala, Sheeja Ramakrishnan

    2011-11-01

    Lakes are seriously affected due to urban pollution. The study of the morphological features of a lake system helps to identify its environmental status. The objective of the present study is to analyse the influence of morphometry on water quality in a lake (Akkulam-Veli Lake, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala). The morphological features namely mean depth, surface area, volume, shoreline length, shoreline development and index of basin permanence have been evaluated. Correlation analysis has been conducted to determine the relationship between morphological features and water quality. Regression analysis has been conducted to find out the extent of influence of morphometric features on water quality. The study revealed that the lake is less affected by wind-induced wave action due to various reasons. The depth and volume have significant role in the water quality. The nitrogen fixation of blue green algae can be observed from the morphological features. The morphology has greater role in the water quality of a lake system.

  6. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Shawn P.; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  7. Dry Climate Disconnected the Laurentian Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, C. F. Michael; King, John W.; Blasco, Stefan M.; Brooks, Gregory R.; Coakley, John P.; Croley, Thomas E.; Dettman, David L.; Edwards, Thomas W. D.; Heil, Clifford W.; Hubeny, J. Bradford; Laird, Kathleen R.; McAndrews, John H.; McCarthy, Francine M. G.; Medioli, Barbara E.; Moore, Theodore C.; Rea, David K.; Smith, Alison J.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have produced a new understanding of the hydrological history of North America's Great Lakes, showing that water levels fell several meters below lake basin outlets during an early postglacial dry climate in the Holocene (younger than 10,000 radiocarbon years, or about 11,500 calibrated or calendar years before present (B.P.)). Water levels in the Huron basin, for example, fell more than 20 meters below the basin overflow outlet between about 7900 and 7500 radiocarbon (about 8770-8290 calibrated) years B.P. Outlet rivers, including the Niagara River, presently falling 99 meters from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario (and hence Niagara Falls), ran dry. This newly recognized phase of low lake levels in a dry climate provides a case study for evaluating the sensitivity of the Great Lakes to current and future climate change.

  8. Hydrologic description of Lake Jackson, Sebring, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammett, K.M.

    1981-01-01

    Available data were evaluated to document hydrologic conditions in the Lake Jackson basin, Florida. Bathymetric data indicate numerous dredged holes around the perimeter of the lake. Away from the dredged holes, a firm sand bottom slopes gradually from the shore to a maximum depth of 22 feet. Lake Jackson 's stage declined 3 feet from 1970 to 1973 and has remained below normal since that time. Rainfall was below average from 1970 to 1973, but the lake-level decline did not result solely from deficient precipitation. A water-budget analysis of the lake indicates that channelization downstream and groundwater withdrawals contributed significantly to the decline. Lake Jackson is used extensively for recreation. Available water-quality data indicate suitable conditions for recreation and the propagation and management of fish and wildlife. (USGS)

  9. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Shawn P; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  10. A blood chemistry profile for lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Carol Cotant

    1999-01-01

    A blood chemistry profile for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush was developed by establishing baseline ranges for several clinical chemistry tests (glucose, total protein, amylase, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, calcium, and magnesium). Measurements were made accurately and rapidly with a Kodak Ektachem DT60 Analyzer and the Ektachem DTSC Module. Blood serum was collected from both laboratory-reared lake trout (1978 and 1986 year-classes) and feral spawning trout from Lake Michigan and then analyzed in the laboratory. No clinically significant differences were found between samples analyzed fresh and those frozen for 1 or 6 weeks. The ranges in chemistry variables for feral lake trout were generally wider than those for laboratory-reared lake trout, and significant differences existed between male and female feral lake trout for several tests. Blood chemistry profiles also varied seasonally on fish sampled repeatedly.

  11. Comparative hatching success of lake trout eggs in Lake Michigan water and well water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Carol C.; Mac, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    A study was undertaken to examine the influence of water from southern Lake Michigan on the survival of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) eggs by comparing the hatching success of eggs from the same source incubated in water from Lake Michigan, or from the laboratory well. It is concluded that the observed differences in hatching are probably attributable to chemical constituents of water from the lake (eg, chlorinated hydrocarbons, metals and other industrial and agricultural chemicals).

  12. Ontogenic and spatial patterns in diet and growth of lake trout in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; DeSorcie, Timothy J.; Stedman, Ralph M.

    1998-01-01

    Lake trout Salvelinus namaycush in nearshore waters of Lake Michigan grow faster than lake trout residing offshore on Sheboygan Reef, which is in midlake. We examined the stomachs of lake trout, spanning ages 1 through 16, caught in both nearshore and offshore environments of Lake Michigan during 1994 and 1995 to determine whether diet differences may be responsible for the difference in growth rate. A comparison of the diets, coupled with bioenergetics modeling, indicated that juvenile lake trout on Sheboygan Reef experienced slow growth due to low food availability rather than to cold water temperatures. The availability of appropriate-size prey appeared to regulate lake trout growth. Small prey fish were probably not readily available to small (200- to 399-mm total length) lake trout on Sheboygan Reef, a substantial portion of whose diet consisted of invertebrates; in contrast, nearshore juveniles had a nearly 100% fish diet. Growth rate on the reef remained slow through intermediate lake trout sizes (400-599 mm total length), presumably due to low availability of rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax on the reef. Once lake trout achieved total lengths of approximately 600 mm, they grew slightly faster on Sheboygan Reef than near shore, indicating that large (>170-mm total length) prey fish were readily available to lake trout in the reef area. On a wet-weight basis, alewife Alosa pseudoharengus dominated the diet of large (a?Y 600 mm total length) lake trout from both the nearshore and offshore regions of the lake, although bloater Coregonus hoyi composed over 30% of the diet on Sheboygan Reef and in southeastern nearshore Lake Michigan. Size of alewife prey increased with lake trout size. The bloater population currently represents the bulk of the biomass of the adult prey fish community, so our diet analysis suggests that large lake trout are continuing to select alewives.

  13. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  14. Sublgacial Antarctic Lake Environments (SALE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, M. C.; Bell, R. E.; Priscu, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    Subglacial Antarctic lake environments are emerging as one of the new frontiers targeted for exploration during the IPY 2007-2009. Several campaigns by various nations are in the early stages of planning and implementation with timelines that will coincide with the IPY. The ambitious interdisciplinary objectives will best be realized by multiple exploration programs investigating diverse subglacial environments continent-wide over the next decade or more. A concerted, multi-target approach wil be taken to advance our understanding of the range of possible lake evolutionary histories; the character of the physical, chemical, and biological niches; the interconnectivity of subglacial lake environments; the coupling of the ice sheet, climate and the evolution of life under the ice; the tectonic settings; and the interplay of biogeochemical cycles. Research and exploration programs spanning the continent will investigate subglacial lake environments of differing ages, evolutionary histories, and biogeochemical settings. The combined efforts will provide a holistic view of these environments over millions of years and under changing climatic conditions. The IPY will provide an opportunity for an intense period of initial exploration that will advance scientific discoveries in glaciology, biogeochemistry, paleoclimate, biology, geology and tectonics, and ecology. While early discoveries and exciting findings are expected during the IPY 2007-2009, a long term sustained program of research and exploration will continue far beyond the IPY. Within the five year period that spans the IPY, specific accomplishments will be targeted, accelerating the research agenda and setting a framework for follow-on studies. Four phases of exploration and discovery are envisioned.

  15. DINKEY LAKES ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, F.C.W.; Federspiel, F.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Dinkey Lakes Roadless Area occupies an area of about 184 sq mi on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada, California. The results of a mineral survey show that parts of the area have substantiated resource potential for tungsten and marble and probable resource potential for quartz crystal gemstones. A probable resource potential for geothermal energy exists in one small area. No potential for other metallic mineral or energy resources was identified in this study.

  16. Bubbles in a freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, S A; Stubbs, A R

    1979-05-31

    WHEN the wind is strong enough to produce whitecaps on Loch Ness, patchy 'clouds' of acoustic reflectors are detected well below the surface, the depth to which they penetrate increasing with wind speed (Fig. 1). No seasonal variation in the occurrence of the reflectors has been detected. A biological explanation is therefore discounted and we suggest here that they are bubbles caused by waves breaking and forming whitecaps in deep water. Similar bubble clouds may occur in other lakes and in the sea.

  17. Insecticides and the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinert, Robert E.

    1969-01-01

    Cracks in the perfect image of DDT appeared when traces of the insecticide began to show up in a wide variety of organisms throughout the world. As more and more people investigated this problem, it became increasingly evident that terrestrial and aquatic animals were accumulating comparatively high concentrations of DDT from extremely low levels in their environment. It also became apparent that DDT and all of the other chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides were not species-specific, but were toxic to all forms of animal life including man. In 1965, when the Great Lakes Fishery Laboratory of the U.S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries began to monitor pesticide residues in fish from the Great Lakes, it was discovered that the fish contained not only DDT, but also dieldrin, another chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide. Fish from Lake Michigan in particular contained relatively high levels of both of these insecticides; concentrations of DDT were in the parts per million (ppm) range, a factor at least several million times greater than the few parts per trillion found in the water. Two questions presented themselves: first, How did these insecticides get into the water? and second, How did the fish build up such high concentrations in their bodies from such low concentrations in the water?

  18. Seismicity of southern Lake Tanganyika

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavayssiere, A.; Gallacher, R. J.; Keir, D.; Ebinger, C. J.; Drooff, C.; Khalfan, M.; Bull, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global seismic networks document frequent and unusually deep earthquakes in East African rift sectors lacking central volcanoes. The deep seismicity means that we can use earthquakes to probe the geometry and kinematics of fault systems throughout the crust, and to understand the distribution of strain between large offset border fault systems and intrabasinal faults. The southern Tanganyika rift zone has the highest seismicity rate within East Africa during the period 1973-present, yet earlier temporary seismometer networks have been too sparse in space and time to relocate earthquakes with location and depth errors of < 5-10 km. We address this issue by recording seismicity of southern Lake Tanganyika since June 2014 using a network at 12 broadband seismic stations. The distribution of earthquakes shows that deformation primarily occurs on large offset border faults beneath the lake. Subsidiary earthquake activity occurs along the subparrallel Rukwa graben, and beneath the NE-SW striking Mweru rift. The distribution of earthquakes suggests the southern end of lake Tanganyika is characterized by a network of intersecting NNW and NE striking faults. The depths of earthquakes are distributed throughout the crust, consistent with the relatively strong lithosphere.

  19. Monitoring inundation on ephemeral lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, R. G.

    2003-04-01

    Ephemeral lakes have been recognized as being among the most sensitive of closed hydrological systems to regional changes in rainfall patterns, and in some cases, due to their inhospitable nature and isolation, they can also be unaffected by the level of contemporary human interference or management that characterizes perennial catchments. By monitoring and modelling inundation patterns for large ephemeral lakes we can begin to understand and quantify the effects of forecast changes in precipitation (P) and evaporation (E) on the hydrology of a number of dryland systems. Examples are taken from North Africa and the Zone of Chotts (Tunisia and Algeria). Gross changes in the hydrology of ephemeral lakes (or the balance of P-E) can lead to extreme changes in regional dust emissions. Monitoring and modelling changes in the frequency and extent of inundation may lead to a greater understanding of fluctuations in regional dust loadings. Examples of the effects of inundation on dust emissions from large northern and southern-hemisphere dust sources are discussed.

  20. Microbial Communities of Pavilion Lake Microbialites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. A.; Biddle, J.; Pointing, S.; Cardman, Z.; Brady, A. L.; Slater, G. F.; Lim, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    Fossilized remnants of microbial mat growth, called stromatolites, are found in the rock record and are thought to be some of the earliest evidence for life on Earth. On the modern Earth, living versions of these stromatolites, called microbialites, are found in few environments across the globe. Pavilion Lake in British Columbia was found to host these microbialites, even though conditions are not extreme in the lake and grazers exist amongst the microbial growths. The Pavilion Lake Research Project, funded by NASA, the CSA and others, has developed the lake into an analog research site for the exploration of extraplanetary bodies since 2004. Pavilion Lake began to be explored for microbial ecology in 2007 to attempt to determine how the microbial communities change over time, location and depth to build these microbialite structures. DNA extracted from microbialites at two different locations and 3 depths at each location were analyzed by T-RFLP patterns. Significant differences were seen in the total communities from each location. Additional samples were taken in the summer and budding seasons, and significant differences were seen by season. A survey performed on just the cyanobacterial populations show less differences between taxa between sites, but significant differences with depth above and below the chemocline and between mineralized and non-mineralized mats. Differences were also examined between purple and green nodules, which are thought to be the growth forms of the microbialites. Detailed sequence analysis shows that Pavilion Lake microorganisms are similar, yet different, from microbial communities seen in other microbialite systems. In 2011, the research project moved to Kelly Lake, a lake nearby Pavilion Lake, that also contain microbialite structures. Similar morphologies were seen in Kelly Lake with an approximate 20 ft. offset in the typical depths where morphologies were seen. Continued analysis of Kelly Lake microbialites will be performed

  1. Potential flood volume of Himalayan glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sakai, A.; Takenaka, S.; Nuimura, T.; Surazakov, A. B.; Sawagaki, T.; Yamanokuchi, T.

    2013-07-01

    Glacial lakes are potentially dangerous sources of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs), and represent a serious natural hazard in Himalayan countries. Despite the development of various indices aimed at determining the outburst probability, an objective evaluation of the thousands of Himalayan glacial lakes has yet to be completed. In this study we propose a single index, based on the depression angle from the lakeshore, which allows the lakes to be assessed using remotely sensed digital elevation models (DEMs). We test our approach on five lakes in Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet using images taken by the declassified Hexagon KH-9 satellite before these lakes experienced an outburst flood. All five lakes had a steep lakefront area (SLA), on which a depression angle was steeper than our proposed threshold of 10° before the GLOF event, but the SLA was no longer evident after the events. We further calculated the potential flood volume (PFV); i.e., the maximum volume of floodwater that could be released if the lake surface was lowered sufficiently to eradicate the SLA. This approach guarantees repeatability to assess the possibility of GLOF hazards because it requires no particular expertise to carry out, though the PFV does not quantify the GLOF risk. We calculated PFVs for more than 2000 Himalayan glacial lakes using visible band images and DEMs of ASTER data. The PFV distribution follows a power-law function. We found that 794 lakes did not have an SLA, and consequently had a PFV of zero, while we also identified 49 lakes with PFVs of over 10 million m3, which is a comparable volume to that of recorded major GLOFs. This PFV approach allows us to preliminarily identify and prioritize those Himalayan glacial lakes that require further detailed investigation on GLOF hazards and risk.

  2. Estimated Optical Constants of Tagish Lake Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The visible, near-infrared, and mid-infrared (0.3-25 micron) real and imaginary indices of refraction are derived from reflectance measurements of the Tagish Lake meteorite. These are compared to some real and imaginary indices of refraction of the individual minerals composing the Tagish Lake meteorite. From this comparison it is clear that the imaginary indices of several individual minerals contribute to the estimated imaginary index of the Tagish Lake.

  3. Earthquake-dammed lakes in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.

    1981-05-01

    Eleven small lakes were formed by landslides caused by the 1929 Buller earthquake; four others were formed by other historic earthquakes in New Zealand. At least nine other New Zealand lakes are also dammed by landslides and were probably formed by prehistoric earthquakes. When recognized by morphology, synchronous age, and areal distribution, earthquake-dammed lakes could provide an estimate of paleoseismicity for the past few hundred or thousand years.

  4. Pacific salmonines in the Great Lakes Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claramunt, Randall M.; Madenjian, Charles P.; Clapp, David; Taylor, William W.; Lynch, Abigail J.; Leonard, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    Pacific salmon (genus Oncorhynchus) are a valuable resource, both within their native range in the North Pacific rim and in the Great Lakes basin. Understanding their value from a biological and economic perspective in the Great Lakes, however, requires an understanding of changes in the ecosystem and of management actions that have been taken to promote system stability, integrity, and sustainable fisheries. Pacific salmonine introductions to the Great Lakes are comprised mainly of Chinook salmon, coho salmon, and steelhead and have accounted for 421, 177, and 247 million fish, respectively, stocked during 1966-2007. Stocking of Pacific salmonines has been effective in substantially reducing exotic prey fish abundances in several of the Great Lakes (e.g., lakes Michigan, Huron, and Ontario). The goal of our evaluation was to highlight differences in management strategies and perspectives across the basin, and to evaluate policies for Pacific salmonine management in the Great Lakes. Currently, a potential conflict exists between Pacific salmonine management and native fish rehabilitation goals because of the desire to sustain recreational fisheries and to develop self-sustaining populations of stocked Pacific salmonines in the Great Lakes. We provide evidence that suggests Pacific salmonines have not only become naturalized to the food webs of the Great Lakes, but that their populations (specifically Chinook salmon) may be fluctuating in concert with specific prey (i.e., alewives) whose populations are changing relative to environmental conditions and ecosystem disturbances. Remaining questions, however, are whether or not “natural” fluctuations in predator and prey provide enough “stability” in the Great Lakes food webs, and even more importantly, would a choice by managers to attempt to reduce the severity of predator-prey oscillations be antagonistic to native fish restoration efforts. We argue that, on each of the Great Lakes, managers are pursuing

  5. Reconstruction of the geology and structure of Lake Rotomahana and its hydrothermal systems from high-resolution multibeam mapping and seismic surveys: Effects of the 1886 Tarawera Rift eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ronde, C. E. J.; Walker, S. L.; LeBlanc, C.; Davy, B. W.; Fornari, D. J.; Tontini, F. Caratori; Scott, B. J.; Seebeck, H.; Stewart, T. J.; Mazot, A.; Nicol, A.; Tivey, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Present-day Lake Rotomahana is one of the two focal points of the most destructive eruption in New Zealand's historical record, i.e., that of Mt. Tarawera on 10 June 1886, with devastating loss of life and presumed destruction of the iconic Pink and White Terraces that adorned the margins of the lake. Basaltic dikes are considered to have ascended near surface in the area, intruding into hydrothermally altered and water-saturated ground beneath the existing lake. The consequential hydrothermal and phreatomagmatic eruptions ejected 0.5325 km3 of material from the lakefloor and below, plastering the nearby landscape for several kilometers with mud and other debris. The eruption buried the natural outlet of the lake, with the bottom of the craters becoming filled by water within months and completely concealed from view within years; today Lake Rotomahana has depths up to 118 m. High-resolution (0.5 m) bathymetric mapping, when combined with a 2-D seismic reflection survey, enables us to 'see' details of the maar craters on the lakefloor, including those parts subsequently buried by sediment. The large Rotomahana Crater described by workers immediately after the eruption measures ~ 2.5 km in diameter near its southwestern end, and excavated ground to 155 m below present-day lake level. The vent system, as revealed by the present study, forms an array of right-stepping (dextral) craters, with the main crater being host to two sub-craters Rotomahana West Crater and Rotomahana East Crater today buried beneath the lakefloor, and which are in-filled by 36 and 37 m of sediment, respectively. Subordinate craters along the same 057° Tarawera Rift trace include Hochstetter Crater (11 m of infill), Waingongongongo Crater (14 m) and Rotomakariri Crater (26 m). These craters host a total 0.0268 km3 of sediment. Other features highlighted by the bathymetric data include; craters not filled by sediment, sediment fan deltas, volcanic ridges and dikes, submerged wave-cut terraces

  6. BIOLOGICAL INDICATOR DEVELOPMENT AND CLASSIFICATION FOR GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Great Lakes coastal wetlands are a valued aquatic resource that provide important ecological functions for the Great Lakes including serving as fish habitat, aquatic food web support, and nutrient and sediment retention from watersheds. Great Lakes resource managers need assessme...

  7. 5. View north, south and east facade of Lake Forest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View north, south and east facade of Lake Forest (original Forest Cottage structure incorporated into renamed structure) - Lake Placid Club, Forest Wing, East side of Mirror Lake Drive, North of State Route 86 & Main, North Elba, Essex County, NY

  8. 3. View northeast, west facade of Lake Forest (original Forest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View northeast, west facade of Lake Forest (original Forest Cottage structure incorporated into renamed structure) - Lake Placid Club, Forest Wing, East side of Mirror Lake Drive, North of State Route 86 & Main, North Elba, Essex County, NY

  9. 4. View southeast, west facade of Lake Forest (original Forest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View southeast, west facade of Lake Forest (original Forest Cottage structure incorporated into renamed structure) - Lake Placid Club, Forest Wing, East side of Mirror Lake Drive, North of State Route 86 & Main, North Elba, Essex County, NY

  10. 51. Third Floor, Lake Forest, west center room, looking west, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Third Floor, Lake Forest, west center room, looking west, part of original Forest Cottage as of 1901. - Lake Placid Club, Forest Wing, East side of Mirror Lake Drive, North of State Route 86 & Main, North Elba, Essex County, NY

  11. 7. View southwest, east facade of Lake Forest (original Forest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View southwest, east facade of Lake Forest (original Forest Cottage structure incorporated into renamed structure) - Lake Placid Club, Forest Wing, East side of Mirror Lake Drive, North of State Route 86 & Main, North Elba, Essex County, NY

  12. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST OF CITY OF GREENBELT SPRINGHILL LAKE RECREATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST OF CITY OF GREENBELT SPRINGHILL LAKE RECREATION CENTER, 6101 CHERRYWOOD LANE. NOTE CLUBHOUSE FROM FORMER SPRINGHILL LAKE GOLF COURSE IN FOREGROUND. - Springhill Lake Apartments, 9230 Edmonston Road, Greenbelt, Prince George's County, MD

  13. 1. View of Lake Hodges Dam showing the origin of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of Lake Hodges Dam showing the origin of the flume at left. View is looking east. - Lake Hodges Flume, Along San Dieguito River between Lake Hodges & San Dieguito Reservoir, Rancho Santa Fe, San Diego County, CA

  14. 40 CFR 35.1630 - State lake classification surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Freshwater Lakes § 35.1630 State lake classification surveys. States that wish to participate in the clean... trophic condition, of their publicly owned freshwater lakes that are in need of restoration or...

  15. 6. VIEW OF THREE BEARS LAKE, SHOWING WASHED UP 12' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF THREE BEARS LAKE, SHOWING WASHED UP 12' x 12' DAM SUPPORT TIMBERS, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTH SIDE OF LAKE - Three Bears Lake & Dams, North of Marias Pass, East Glacier Park, Glacier County, MT

  16. Thiamine concentrations in lake whitefish eggs from the upper Great Lakes are related to maternal diet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riley, S.C.; Rinchard, J.; Ebener, M.P.; Tillitt, D.E.; Munkittrick, K.R.; Parrott, J.L.; Allen, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency is responsible for reproductive impairment in several species of salmonines in the Great lakes, and is thought to be caused by the consumption of prey containing thiaminase, a thiamine-degrading enzyme. Because thiaminase levels are extremely high in dreissenid mussels, fish that prey on them may be susceptible to thiamine deficiency. We determined thiamine concentrations in lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis eggs from the upper Laurentian Great Lakes to assess the potential for thiamine deficiency and to determine if thiamine concentrations in lake whitefish eggs were related to maternal diet. Mean thiamine concentrations in lake whitefish eggs were highest in Lake Huron, intermediate in Lake Superior, and lowest in Lake Michigan. Some fish had thiamine concentrations below putative thresholds for lethal and sublethal effects in salmonines, suggesting that some larval lake whitefish may currently be at risk of at least sublethal effects of low thiamine concentrations, although thiamine thresholds are unknown for lake whitefish. Egg thiamine concentrations in lake whitefish eggs were statistically significantly related to isotopic carbon signatures, suggesting that egg thiamine levels were related to maternal diet, but low egg thiamine concentrations did not appear to be associated with a diet of dreissenids. Egg thiamine concentrations were not statistically significantly related to multifunction oxidase induction, suggesting that lower egg thiamine concentrations in lake whitefish were not related to contaminant exposure.

  17. 33 CFR 162.138 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to Lake Erie; speed rules. 162.138 Section 162.138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.138 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules. (a) Maximum speed limit for... speed not greater than— (i) 12 statute miles per hour (10.4 knots) between Fort Gratiot Light and...

  18. 33 CFR 162.138 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to Lake Erie; speed rules. 162.138 Section 162.138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.138 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules. (a) Maximum speed limit for... speed not greater than— (i) 12 statute miles per hour (10.4 knots) between Fort Gratiot Light and...

  19. 33 CFR 162.138 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to Lake Erie; speed rules. 162.138 Section 162.138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.138 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules. (a) Maximum speed limit for... speed not greater than— (i) 12 statute miles per hour (10.4 knots) between Fort Gratiot Light and...

  20. 33 CFR 162.138 - Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to Lake Erie; speed rules. 162.138 Section 162.138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... REGULATIONS § 162.138 Connecting waters from Lake Huron to Lake Erie; speed rules. (a) Maximum speed limit for... speed not greater than— (i) 12 statute miles per hour (10.4 knots) between Fort Gratiot Light and...