Science.gov

Sample records for aike volcanic field

  1. Sensitivity to volcanic field boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Melody; Bebbington, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Lindsay, Jan; Rashad Moufti, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazard analyses are desirable where there is potential for future volcanic activity to affect a proximal population. This is frequently the case for volcanic fields (regions of distributed volcanism) where low eruption rates, fertile soil, and attractive landscapes draw populations to live close by. Forecasting future activity in volcanic fields almost invariably uses spatial or spatio-temporal point processes with model selection and development based on exploratory analyses of previous eruption data. For identifiability reasons, spatio-temporal processes, and practically also spatial processes, the definition of a spatial region is required to which volcanism is confined. However, due to the complex and predominantly unknown sub-surface processes driving volcanic eruptions, definition of a region based solely on geological information is currently impossible. Thus, the current approach is to fit a shape to the known previous eruption sites. The class of boundary shape is an unavoidable subjective decision taken by the forecaster that is often overlooked during subsequent analysis of results. This study shows the substantial effect that this choice may have on even the simplest exploratory methods for hazard forecasting, illustrated using four commonly used exploratory statistical methods and two very different regions: the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand, and Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. For Harrat Rahat, sensitivity of results to boundary definition is substantial. For the Auckland Volcanic Field, the range of options resulted in similar shapes, nevertheless, some of the statistical tests still showed substantial variation in results. This work highlights the fact that when carrying out any hazard analysis on volcanic fields, it is vital to specify how the volcanic field boundary has been defined, assess the sensitivity of boundary choice, and to carry these assumptions and related uncertainties through to estimates of future activity and

  2. Origin and evolution of the Laguna Potrok Aike maar (Southern Patagonia, Argentina) as revealed by seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, C.; de Batist, M. A.; Niessen, F.; Anselmetti, F.; Ariztegui, D.; Haberzettl, T.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data provide insights into the sedimentary infill and the underlying volcanic structure of Laguna Potrok Aike, a maar lake situated in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field, Southern Patagonia. The lake has a diameter of ~3.5 km, a maximum water depth of ~100 m and a presumed age of ~770 ka. Its sedimentary regime is influenced by climatic and hydrologic conditions related to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and sporadic outbreaks of Antarctic polar air masses. Multiproxy environmental reconstructions of the last 16 ka document that this terminal lake is highly sensitive to climate change. Laguna Potrok Aike has recently become a major focus of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program and was drilled down to 100 m below lake floor in late 2008 within the PASADO project. The sediments are likely to contain a continental record spanning the last ca. 80 kyrs unique in the South American realm. Seismic reflection data show relatively undisturbed, stratified lacustrine sediments at least in the upper ~100 m of the sedimentary infill but are obscured possibly by gas and/or coarser material in larger areas. A model calculated from seismic refraction data reveals a funnel-shaped structure embedded in the sandstone rocks of the surrounding Santa Cruz Formation. This funnel structure is filled by lacustrine sediments of up to 370 m in thickness. These can be separated into two distinct subunits with low acoustic velocities of 1500-1800 m s-1 in the upper subunit pointing at unconsolidated lacustrine muds, and enhanced velocities of 2000-2350 m s-1 in the lower subunit. Below these lacustrine sediments, a unit of probably volcanoclastic origin is observed (>2400 m s-1). This sedimentary succession is well comparable to other well-studied sequences (e.g. Messel and Baruth maars, Germany), confirming phreatomagmatic maar explosions as the origin of Laguna Potrok Aike.

  3. Recurrence rates of volcanism in basaltic volcanic fields: An example from the Springerville volcanic field, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Condit, C.D.; Connor, C.B.

    1996-10-01

    A spatio-temporal near-neighbor model is used to identify and map variations in the recurrence rate of volcanism in the Springerville volcanic field, Arizona, a large field on the Colorado Plateau boundary. Detailed mapping of individual lava flows and their associated vents, together with radiometric and paleomagnetic dating, demonstrates that 366 volcanic events have formed the Springerville volcanic field. A near-neighbor spatio-temporal recurrence-rate model using seven near-neighbor volcanoes and a 0.5 m.y. time window reveals that (1) areas of waxing and waning magmatism in the Springerville volcanic field are much more localized and (2) volcanic activity within these areas is much more intense than implied by field-wide temporal trends. Because volcanic activity is spatially and temporally clustered, forecasting subsequent activity is more successful if the spatio-temporal recurrence-rate model is used, rather than the average recurrence rates. This success indicates that spatio-temporal recurrence-rate models are useful tools for the quantification of long-term volcanic hazards in basaltic volcanic fields. 61 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Origin and evolution of the Laguna Potrok Aike maar (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, A. C.; de Batist, M.; Niessen, F.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Ariztegui, D.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2009-04-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike, a maar lake in southern-most Patagonia, is located at about 110 m a.s.l. in the Pliocene to late Quaternary Pali Aike Volcanic Field (Santa Cruz, southern Patagonia, Argentina) at about 52°S and 70°W, some 20 km north of the Strait of Magellan and approximately 90 km west of the city of Rio Gallegos. The lake is almost circular and bowl-shaped with a 100 m deep, flat plain in its central part and an approximate diameter of 3.5 km. Steep slopes separate the central plain from the lake shoulder at about 35 m water depth. At present, strong winds permanently mix the entire water column. The closed lake basin contains a sub saline water body and has only episodic inflows with the most important episodic tributary situated on the western shore. Discharge is restricted to major snowmelt events. Laguna Potrok Aike is presently located at the boundary between the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and the Antarctic Polar Front. The sedimentary regime is thus influenced by climatic and hydrologic conditions related to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and sporadic outbreaks of Antarctic polar air masses. Previous studies demonstrated that closed lakes in southern South America are sensitive to variations in the evaporation/precipitation ratio and have experienced drastic lake level changes in the past causing for example the desiccation of the 75 m deep Lago Cardiel during the Late Glacial. Multiproxy environmental reconstruction of the last 16 ka documents that Laguna Potrok Aike is highly sensitive to climate change. Based on an Ar/Ar age determination, the phreatomagmatic tephra that is assumed to relate to the Potrok Aike maar eruption was formed around 770 ka. Thus Laguna Potrok Aike sediments contain almost 0.8 million years of climate history spanning several past glacial-interglacial cycles making it a unique archive for non-tropical and non-polar regions of the Southern Hemisphere. In particular, variations of

  5. Origin and evolution of the Laguna Potrok Aike maar (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, A. C.; de Batist, M.; Niessen, F.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Ariztegui, D.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2009-04-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike, a maar lake in southern-most Patagonia, is located at about 110 m a.s.l. in the Pliocene to late Quaternary Pali Aike Volcanic Field (Santa Cruz, southern Patagonia, Argentina) at about 52°S and 70°W, some 20 km north of the Strait of Magellan and approximately 90 km west of the city of Rio Gallegos. The lake is almost circular and bowl-shaped with a 100 m deep, flat plain in its central part and an approximate diameter of 3.5 km. Steep slopes separate the central plain from the lake shoulder at about 35 m water depth. At present, strong winds permanently mix the entire water column. The closed lake basin contains a sub saline water body and has only episodic inflows with the most important episodic tributary situated on the western shore. Discharge is restricted to major snowmelt events. Laguna Potrok Aike is presently located at the boundary between the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and the Antarctic Polar Front. The sedimentary regime is thus influenced by climatic and hydrologic conditions related to the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Southern Hemispheric Westerlies and sporadic outbreaks of Antarctic polar air masses. Previous studies demonstrated that closed lakes in southern South America are sensitive to variations in the evaporation/precipitation ratio and have experienced drastic lake level changes in the past causing for example the desiccation of the 75 m deep Lago Cardiel during the Late Glacial. Multiproxy environmental reconstruction of the last 16 ka documents that Laguna Potrok Aike is highly sensitive to climate change. Based on an Ar/Ar age determination, the phreatomagmatic tephra that is assumed to relate to the Potrok Aike maar eruption was formed around 770 ka. Thus Laguna Potrok Aike sediments contain almost 0.8 million years of climate history spanning several past glacial-interglacial cycles making it a unique archive for non-tropical and non-polar regions of the Southern Hemisphere. In particular, variations of

  6. Reappraisal of the significance of volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2016-01-01

    "Volcanic field" is a term commonly used to loosely describe a group of volcanoes. Often, it is implicitly assumed that the volcanoes on a volcanic field are small, monogenetic and dominantly basaltic, but none of those attributes is indispensable on some definitions of the term. Actually, the term "volcanic field" can be used to describe a group of purely monogenetic edifices, a group of mixed monogenetic and polygenetic edifices, or even a group formed only by purely polygenetic edifices. Differences between each of those alternatives might be important, but the extent to which those differences are truly relevant remains still to be explored. Furthermore, there are several limitations on the current knowledge of this type of volcanic activity that explain the lack of a comprehensive effort to study volcanic fields in global contexts. In this work, issues concerning current definitions of a volcanic field are examined, and some criteria that can be used to distinguish volcanic fields from non-field volcanoes are suggested. Special attention is given to the role played by spatial scale on such a distinction. Also, the tectonic implications of their spatial distribution are explored. In particular, it is shown that volcanic fields are an important component of volcanic activity at a global scale that is closely associated to diffuse plate boundaries, and might well be considered the archetypical volcanic form of such tectonic scenarios.

  7. PASADO - ICDP Deep Drilling at Laguna Potrok Aike (Argentina): A 50 ka Record of Increasing Environmental Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolitschka, Bernd; Anselmetti, Flavio; Ariztegui, Daniel; Francus, Pierre; Gebhardt, Catalina; Kliem, Annette Hahn Pierre; Lücke, Andreas; Ohlendorf, Christian; Schäbitz, Frank; Wastegard, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike, located in the South-Patagonian province of Santa Cruz (52°58'S, 70°23'W), was formed by a volcanic (maar) eruption in the late Quaternary Pali Aike Volcanic Field several hundred thousand years ago. This archive holds a unique record of paleoclimatic and paleoecological variability from a region sensitive to variations in southern hemispheric wind and pressure systems, which provide a significant cornerstone for the understanding of the entire global climate system. Moreover, Laguna Potrok Aike is close to many active volcanoes allowing a better understanding of the history of volcanism in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field as well as in the Andean mountain chain, the latter located in a distance of less than 150 km to the west. Finally, Patagonia is the source region of eolian dust blown from the South American continent into the South Atlantic and onto the Antarctic ice sheet. The currently ongoing global climate change, the thread of volcanic hazards as well as of regional dust storms are of increasing socio-economic relevance and thus challenging scientific themes that are tackled for southernmost South America with an interdisciplinary research approach in the framework of the ICDP-funded "Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project" (PASADO). Using the GLAD800 drilling platform seven holes were drilled in the southern spring of 2008. A total of 510 m of lacustrine sediments were recovered by an international scientific team from the central 100 m deep basin with an excellent core recovery rate of 94.4%. The reference profile with a composite depth of 106 m consists of undisturbed laminated and sand-layered lacustrine silts with an increasing number of coarse gravel layers, turbidites and homogenites with depth. Below 80 m composite depth two mass-movement deposits (10 m and 5 m in thickness) are recorded. These deposits show tilted and distorted layers as well as nodules of fine-grained sediments and randomly distributed gravel

  8. Deep Drilling at Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina: Recovery of a Paleoclimate Record for the Last Glacial from the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolitschka, B.; Anselmetti, F.; Ariztegui, D.; Corbella, H.; Francus, P.; Gebhardt, C.; Hahn, A.; Kliem, P.; Lücke, A.; Ohlendorf, C.; Schäbitz, F.

    2009-12-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike, located in the South-Patagonian province of Santa Cruz (52°58’S, 70°23’W), was formed 770 ka ago by a volcanic (maar) eruption. Within the framework of the ICDP-funded project PASADO two sites were drilled from September to November 2008 using the GLAD800 drilling platform. A total of 513 m of lacustrine sediments were recovered from the central deep basin by an international team. The sediments hold a unique record of paleoclimatic and paleoecological variability from a region sensitive to variations in southern hemispheric wind and pressure systems and thus significant for the understanding of the global climate system. Moreover, Laguna Potrok Aike is close to many active volcanoes allowing a better understanding of the history of volcanism in the Pali Aike Volcanic Field and in the nearby Andean mountain chain. These challenging scientific themes need to be tackled in a global context as both are of increasing socio-economic relevance. On-site core logging based on magnetic susceptibility data documents an excellent correlation between the quadruplicate holes drilled at Site 1 and between the triplicate holes recovered from Site 2. Also, correlation between both sites located 700 m apart from each other is feasible. After splitting the cores in the lab, a reference profile was established down to a composite depth of 107 m for the replicate cores from Site 2. Sediments consist of laminated and sand-layered lacustrine silts with an increasing number of turbidites and homogenites with depth. Below 80 m composite depth two mass movement deposits (10 m and 5 m in thickness) are recorded. These deposits show tilted and distorted layers as well as nodules of fine grained sediments and randomly distributed gravel. Such features indicate an increased slump activity probably related to lake level fluctuations or seismicity. Also with depth coarse gravel layers are present and point to changes in hydrological conditions in the catchment area

  9. Migration of volcanism in the San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.; Shoemaker, E.M.; Ulrich, G.E.; Wolfe, E.W.

    1986-01-01

    The remanent magnetization of volcanic rocks has been determined at 650 sites in this volcanic field in the S part of the Colorado plateau. The polarity of remanent magnetization, combined with K/Ar age determinations, spatial and petrographic association, stratigraphic relations and state of preservation of the cinder cones, provides a basis of assignment to a known magnetic polarity epoch of 610 mafic vents and >100 intermediate to silicic flows, flow sequences and vents. Basaltic volcanism migrated NE before Matoyama time (2.48-5.0 m.y.) at a rate of approx 1.2 cm/yr and eastward over the past 2.5 m.y. at a rate of 2.9 cm/yr. Total magma production and frequency of basaltic eruption accelerated between 5 and 0.25 m.y. and have decreased thereafter; this evolutionary sequence, coupled with the Sr-isotopic composition of the rocks, can be explained by magmatism caused by shear heating at the base of the lithosphere. The eastward drift of volcanism represents the absolute westward motion of the North America plate.-L.C.H.

  10. Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina: the first non-tropical environmental record in South America extending far beyond the Late-Glacial - a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolitschka, B.; Anselmetti, F.; Ariztegui, D.; Corbella, H.; Francus, P.; Gebhardt, C.; Lücke, A.; Ohlendorf, C.; Schäbitz, F.; Pasado Science Team

    2009-04-01

    Within the framework of the ICDP-funded "Potrok Aike maar lake sediment archive drilling project" (PASADO) an international team of scientists carried out interdisciplinary research at the unique mid-Pleistocene (770 ka) maar lake of Laguna Potrok Aike in southern Patagonia (Province of Santa Cruz, Argentina). This lake is very sensitive to variations in southern hemispheric wind and pressure systems and thus holds a unique and continuous lacustrine record of climatic and ecological variability of global significance. Moreover, Southern Patagonia with its many active volcanoes is an ideal location to better understand the regional history of volcanism. These are two challenging geo-scientific themes that need to be tackled, especially as both of them have an increasing socio-economic relevance. Three months of drilling activities that finished last November 2008 were carried out by DOSECC from the drilling platform R/V "Kerry Kelts". More than 500 m of lacustrine sediments were recovered. This sedimentary archive will provide (1) new insights into the processes of regional back arc volcanism within the Pali Aike Volcanic Field itself as well as the more distant explosive volcanism of the Andean mountain chains; and, (2) high-resolution (decadal) quantitative climate and environmental reconstructions supported by multiple dating and stratigraphic correlations. Marine - ice core - terrestrial linkages will be emphasized as well as the incorporation of results from global climate modelling simulations for the last ca. 100 ka. The two drilled sites in the central deep basin of Laguna Potrok Aike have been selected based on four seismic surveys carried out between 2003 and 2005. Sediments were recovered at both drilled sites down to a subbottom depth of slightly more than 100 m using the GLAD800 drill rig with the hydraulic piston corer tool (HPC) at water depths varying between 95 and 100 m. The total core recovery is 94%. On-site core logging with the multi sensor

  11. The San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Priest, S.S.; Duffield, W.A.; Malis-Clark, Karen; Hendley, J. W.; Stauffer, P.H.

    2001-01-01

    Northern Arizona's San Francisco Volcanic Field, much of which lies within Coconino and Kaibab National Forests, is an area of young volcanoes along the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. During its 6-million-year history, this field has produced more than 600 volcanoes. Their activity has created a topographically varied landscape with forests that extend from the Pi?on-Juniper up to the Bristlecone Pine life zones. The most prominent landmark is San Francisco Mountain, a stratovolcano that rises to 12,633 feet and serves as a scenic backdrop to the city of Flagstaff.

  12. Using Spatial Density to Characterize Volcanic Fields on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. A.; Bleacher, J. E.; Connor, C. B.; Connor, L. J.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new tool to planetary geology for quantifying the spatial arrangement of vent fields and volcanic provinces using non parametric kernel density estimation. Unlike parametricmethods where spatial density, and thus the spatial arrangement of volcanic vents, is simplified to fit a standard statistical distribution, non parametric methods offer more objective and data driven techniques to characterize volcanic vent fields. This method is applied to Syria Planum volcanic vent catalog data as well as catalog data for a vent field south of Pavonis Mons. The spatial densities are compared to terrestrial volcanic fields.

  13. Spatial distribution and alignments of volcanic centers: Clues to the formation of monogenetic volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, Nicolas; Spörli, K. Bernhard; Rowland, Julie; Lindsay, Jan

    2013-09-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanic fields occur worldwide in tectonic environments ranging from extensional to convergent. Understanding similarities and differences between these fields may help to characterize key controls on their generation. Such volcanic fields consist of numerous volcanic centers, each of which represents a pathway of magma from its source to the surface. We analyzed the spatial distribution of volcanic centers in 37 monogenetic volcanic fields, and assuming that the distribution of volcanic centers relative to each other is matched by a similar source pattern within the mantle, applied the following methods for each: (1) the Poisson Nearest Neighbor (PNN) analysis, representing the degree to which the distribution of the volcanic centers departs from a predicted Poisson distribution, and (2) a volcanic alignment analysis to ascertain the preferential pathways, if any, used by the magma to reach the surface. This is the first comprehensive global comparison of such analyses. Magma pathways within the brittle upper crust are influenced to various degrees by two end-member situations: (1) formation of new extension fractures perpendicular to the least compressive stress (σ3) and (2) re-activation of pre-existing fractures that are near-parallel to the maximum principal stress (σ1). The results of the PNN analysis show that, independently of the tectonic environment, most volcanic fields display a clustered distribution of their volcanic centers. Alignment analysis shows that either the ambient tectonic environment exerts a strong influence on the preferential orientations of the volcanic alignments, or that it is in competition with other factors (e.g., pre-existing structures, local stress changes due to older intrusions). Overall, these results indicate that the propagation of the magma (and therefore the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers within volcanic fields) is the product of an interplay between deep level influences (i

  14. South Arch volcanic field9d\

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Clague, D.A.; Moore, J.G.; Holcomb, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    Several young lava fields were imaged by GLORIA sidescan sonar along the Hawaiian Arch south of Hawaii. The largest, 35 by 50 km across, includes a central area characterized by high sonar backscatter and composed of several flow lobes radiating from a vent area. Reflection profiling and sea-floor photography indicate that the central lobes are flat sheet flows bounded by pillowed margins; thin surface sediment and thin palagonite rinds on lava surfaces suggest ages of 1-10 ka. Vents are localized along the arch crest near bases of Cretaceous seamounts. Two dredged flows are basanite and alkalic basalt, broadly similar to rejuvenated-stage and some pre-shield alkalic lavas on the Hawaiian Ridge. Arch volcanism represents peripheral leakage of melt from the Hawaiian hot spot over much larger areas than previously recognized. -Authors

  15. Temporal and Spatial Analysis of Monogenetic Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosugi, Koji

    Achieving an understanding of the nature of monogenetic volcanic fields depends on identification of the spatial and temporal patterns of volcanism in these fields, and their relationships to structures mapped in the shallow crust and inferred in the deep crust and mantle through interpretation of geochemical, radiometric and geophysical data. We investigate the spatial and temporal distributions of volcanism in the Abu Monogenetic Volcano Group, Southwest Japan. E-W elongated volcano distribution, which is identified by a nonparametric kernel method, is found to be consistent with the spatial extent of P-wave velocity anomalies in the lower crust and upper mantle, supporting the idea that the spatial density map of volcanic vents reflects the geometry of a mantle diapir. Estimated basalt supply to the lower crust is constant. This observation and the spatial distribution of volcanic vents suggest stability of magma productivity and essentially constant two-dimensional size of the source mantle diapir. We mapped conduits, dike segments, and sills in the San Rafael sub-volcanic field, Utah, where the shallowest part of a Pliocene magmatic system is exceptionally well exposed. The distribution of conduits matches the major features of dike distribution, including development of clusters and distribution of outliers. The comparison of San Rafael conduit distribution and the distributions of volcanoes in several recently active volcanic fields supports the use of statistical models, such as nonparametric kernel methods, in probabilistic hazard assessment for distributed volcanism. We developed a new recurrence rate calculation method that uses a Monte Carlo procedure to better reflect and understand the impact of uncertainties of radiometric age determinations on uncertainty of recurrence rate estimates for volcanic activity in the Abu, Yucca Mountain Region, and Izu-Tobu volcanic fields. Results suggest that the recurrence rates of volcanic fields can change by more

  16. Volcanology, geochemistry and age of the Lausitz Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büchner, J.; Tietz, O.; Viereck, L.; Suhr, P.; Abratis, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Lausitz (Lusatia) Volcanic Field is part of the Central European Volcanic Province, and its magmas represent an alkaline trend from olivine nephelinites and basanites to trachytes and phonolites, typical for intraplate settings. Neighbouring volcanic fields are the České Středohoří Mountains to the south-west and the Fore-Sudetic Basin in Lower Silesia to the east. More than 1000 volcanic structures associated with approximately 500 vents have been located within this volcanic field. Residuals of scoria cones, lava lakes, lava flows and maar-diatreme in filling occur in situ near the level of the original syn-volcanic terrain. In more deeply eroded structures, volcanic relicts outcrop as plugs or feeders. Evolved rocks occur as monogenetic domes or intrusions in diatremes, while their volcaniclastic equivalents are rare. Twenty-three localities were dated using the 40Ar/39Ar method. The ages range from 35 to 27 Ma, with a focus around 32-29 Ma, indicating Late Eocene and mainly Oligocene volcanism for the LVF. Differentiated rocks appear to be slightly younger than less differentiated. No geographical age clusters are apparent.

  17. Constraining the onset of flood volcanism in Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angkasa, Syahreza; Jerram, Dougal. A.; Svensen, Henrik; Millet, John M.; Taylor, Ross; Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    In order to constrain eruption styles at the onset of flood volcanism, field observations were undertaken on basal sections of the Isle of Skye Lava Field, British Paleogene Volcanic Province. This study investigates three specific sections; Camus Ban, Neist Point and Soay Sound which sample a large area about 1500 km2 and can be used to help explain the variability in palaeo-environments at the onset of flood volcanism. Petrological analysis is coupled with petrophysical lab data and photogrammetry data to create detailed facies models for the different styles of initiating flood basalt volcanism. Photogrammetry is used to create Ortho-rectified 3D models which, along with photomontage images, allow detailed geological observations to be mapped spatially. Petrographic analyses are combined with petrophysical lab data to identify key textural variation, mineral compositions and physical properties of the volcanic rocks emplaced during the initial eruptions. Volcanism initiated with effusive eruptions in either subaerial or subaqueous environments resulting in tuff/hyaloclastite materials or lava flow facies lying directly on the older Mesozoic strata. Volcanic facies indicative of lava-water interactions vary significantly in thickness between different sections suggesting a strong accommodation space control on the style of volcanism. Camus Ban shows hyaloclastite deposits with a thickness of 25m, whereas the Soay Sound area has tuffaceous sediments of under 0.1m in thickness. Subaerial lavas overly these variable deposits in all studied areas. The flood basalt eruptions took place in mixed wet and dry environments with some significant locally developed water bodies (e.g. Camus Ban). More explosive eruptions were promoted in some cases by interaction of lavas with these water bodies and possibly by local interaction with water - saturated sediments. We record key examples of how palaeotopography imparts a primary control on the style of volcanism during the

  18. Evolution of volcanic rocks and associated ore deposits in the Marysvale volcanic field, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Charles G.; Steven, Thomas A.; Rowley, Peter D.; Naeser, Charles W.; Mehnert, Harald H.; Hedge, Carl E.; Ludwig, Kenneth R.

    1994-01-01

    A geological account on the igneous activity and associated mineral deposition in the volcanic field of Marysvale in Utah is presented. Three episodes (34-22 Ma, 22-14 Ma and 9-5 Ma) involved in the volcanic rock eruption and associated mineralization are described. The first episode is believed to have occurred during the time of tectonic convergence when two contrasting suites of rocks, Mount Dutton Formation and Bullion Canyon Volcanics, erupted concurrently. Mineralization during this period was sparse. In the second episode, change from intermediate to bimodal volcanism occurred. During the third episode, basaltic compositions did not change. Although major element constituent had rhyolites similar to that of the second episode, rhyolites had a marked radiogenic isotope characteristic difference.

  19. Geophysical expression of caldera related volcanism, structures and mineralization in the McDermitt volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rytuba, J. J.; Blakely, R. J.; Moring, B.; Miller, R.

    2013-12-01

    The High Rock, Lake Owyhee, and McDermitt volcanic fields, consisting of regionally extensive ash flow tuffs and associated calderas, developed in NW Nevada and SE Oregon following eruption of the ca. 16.7 Ma Steens flood basalt. The first ash flow, the Tuff of Oregon Canyon, erupted from the McDermitt volcanic field at 16.5Ma. It is chemically zoned from peralkaline rhyolite to dacite with trace element ratios that distinguish it from other ash flow tuffs. The source caldera, based on tuff distribution, thickness, and size of lithic fragments, is in the area in which the McDermitt caldera (16.3 Ma) subsequently formed. Gravity and magnetic anomalies are associated with some but not all of the calderas. The White Horse caldera (15.6 Ma), the youngest caldera in the McDermitt volcanic field has the best geophysical expression, with both aeromagnetic and gravity lows coinciding with the caldera. Detailed aeromagnetic and gravity surveys of the McDermitt caldera, combined with geology and radiometric surveys, provides insight into the complexities of caldera collapse, resurgence, post collapse volcanism, and hydrothermal mineralization. The McDermitt caldera is among the most mineralized calderas in the world, whereas other calderas in these three Mid Miocene volcanic fields do not contain important hydrothermal ore deposits, despite having similar age and chemistry. The McDermitt caldera is host to Hg, U, and Li deposits and potentially significant resources of Ga, Sb, and REE. The geophysical data indicate that post-caldera collapse intrusions were important in formation of the hydrothermal systems. An aeromagnetic low along the E caldera margin reflects an intrusion at a depth of 2 km associated with the near-surface McDermitt-hot-spring-type Hg-Sb deposit, and the deeper level, high-sulfidation Ga-REE occurrence. The Li deposits on the W side of the caldera are associated with a series of low amplitude, small diameter aeromagnetic anomalies that form a continuous

  20. Age, distance, and geochemical evolution within a monogenetic volcanic field: Analyzing patterns in the Auckland Volcanic Field eruption sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvec, Nicolas Le; Bebbington, Mark S.; Lindsay, Jan M.; McGee, Lucy E.

    2013-09-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) is a young active monogenetic basaltic field, which contains ˜50 volcanoes scattered across the Auckland metropolitan area. Understanding the temporal, spatial, and chemical evolution of the AVF during the last c.a. 250 ka is crucial in order to forecast a future eruption. Recent studies have provided new age constraints and potential temporal sequences of the past eruptions within the AVF. We use this information to study how the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers evolves with time, and how the chemical composition of the erupted magmas evolves with time and space. We seek to develop a methodology which compares successive eruptions to describe the link between geochemical and spatiotemporal evolution of volcanic centers within a monogenetic volcanic field. This methodology is tested with the present day data of the AVF. The Poisson nearest neighbor analysis shows that the spatial behavior of the field has been constant overtime, with the spatial distribution of the volcanic centers fitting the Poisson model within the significance levels. The results of the meta-analysis show the existence of correlations between the chemical composition of the erupted magmas and distance, volume, and time. The apparent randomness of the spatiotemporal evolution of the volcanic centers observed at the surface is probably influenced by the activity of the source. The methodology developed in this study can be used to identify possible relationships between composition trends and volume, time and/or distance to the behavior of the source, for successive eruptions of the AVF.

  1. Neogene rhyolites of the northern Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, B.M.; Vaniman, D.T.; Baldridge, W.S.; Shafiqullah, M.

    1988-06-10

    Volcanic centers previously mapped as the 20 Ma El Rechuelos Rhyolite in the northern Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico, include three distinct episodes of rhyolitic volcanism. An early (7.5 Ma) extrusive dome of flow-banded biotite rhyolite and an intermediate (5.8 Ma) rhyolite, possibly a volcanic neck, correspond in age to rhyolites of the Keres Group in the southern Jemez volcanic field. Three other extrusive domes of aphyric, pumiceous rhyolite and obsidian comprise a late volcanic episode, dated at 2.0 Ma. We retain the name El Rechuelos Rhyolite only for these late centers. Another center, farther north than the others but previously mapped with the El Rechuelos Rhyolite, is a dacite pumice ring whose age (5.2 Ma), petrography, major- and trace-element chemistry, and Sr initial ratio all suggest it should be included with rocks of the Tschicoma Formation. Nd and Sr isotopic ratios of the Neogene rhyolites of the northern Jemez volcanic field suggest that these rhyolites were not produced by partial melting of either upper or lower crust. Rather, they may have been generated from a mantle-derived mafic magma, such as the nearby Lobato Basalt, by fractional crystallization with concomitant assimilation of small amounts (<6%) of lower crust. If the El Rechuelos is derived from a lower crust magma chamber, as seems likely, then it is not related to the bandelier magma system, even though it is part of a continuum of rhyolite volcanism ranging from 3.6 Ma to 130,000 years ago that includes the Bandelier and precursor rhyolitic units. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  2. Patagonian and Antarctic dust as recorded in the sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberzettl, Torsten; Stopp, Annemarie; Lisé-Pronovost, Agathe; Gebhardt, Catalina; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Kleinhanns, Ilka; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    as additional time control for the recently recovered sediment record within the ICDP deep drilling project PASADO. To support this idea, we performed Sr/Nd-isotopic analyses on the assumed aeolian, well sorted fraction (63-200 µm) deposited in Laguna Potrok Aike during the last glaciation as well as on the <5 µm fraction which is commonly found as dust in Antarctica - both on the same samples. These results are compared to the Sr/Nd-isotopic signatures measured directly on dust from Antarctic ice cores [2]: the isotopic data field of sediments from Laguna Potrok Aike superposes a large part of isotopic data from Antarctic dust, although the 87Sr/86Sr-data seems to show a slight offset to lower values. In conclusion our analyses confirm previous studies that suggested southern South America to be the main source area of east Antarctic dust during glacial periods. However, this is the first evidence for a contemporaneous dust deposition pattern in Patagonia and Antarctica. References [1] R. Röthlisberger, R. Mulvaney, E.W. Wolff, M.A. Hutterli, M. Bigler, S. Sommer, J. Jouzel, Dust and sea salt variability in central East Antarctica (Dome C) over the last 45 kyrs and its implications for southern high-latitude climate, Geophysical Research Letters 29 (2002) doi:10.1029/2002GL015186. [2] B. Delmonte, I. Basile-Doelsch, J.R. Petit, V. Maggi, M. Revel-Rolland, A. Michard, E. Jagoutz, F. Grousset, Comparing the Epica and Vostok dust records during the last 220,000 years: stratigraphical correlation and provenance in glacial periods, Earth-Science Reviews 66 (2004) 63-87.

  3. Unravelling the collapse mechanisms at a Jurassic caldera of the Chon Aike silicic LIP in Southern Patagonia (47° 15 'S, 71° 40'W), Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sruoga, P.; Japas, S.; Salani, F.; Kleiman, L.; Graffigna, M.

    2008-10-01

    La Peligrosa Caldera is located at Sierra Colorada (47° 15'S, 71° 40' W) in the Chon-Aike silicic LIP. It represents an unique window to understand the eruptive mechanisms that prevailed throughout the ignimbritic flare-up in Southern Patagonia during middle to late Jurassic times. Key pieces of lithologic and structural evidences are taken into account to reconstruct the volcanic structure.

  4. Spatio-volumetric hazard estimation in the Auckland volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark S.

    2015-05-01

    The idea of a volcanic field `boundary' is prevalent in the literature, but ill-defined at best. We use the elliptically constrained vents in the Auckland Volcanic Field to examine how spatial intensity models can be tested to assess whether they are consistent with such features. A means of modifying the anisotropic Gaussian kernel density estimate to reflect the existence of a `hard' boundary is then suggested, and the result shown to reproduce the observed elliptical distribution. A new idea, that of a spatio-volumetric model, is introduced as being more relevant to hazard in a monogenetic volcanic field than the spatiotemporal hazard model due to the low temporal rates in volcanic fields. Significant dependencies between the locations and erupted volumes of the observed centres are deduced, and expressed in the form of a spatially-varying probability density. In the future, larger volumes are to be expected in the `gaps' between existing centres, with the location of the greatest forecast volume lying in the shipping channel between Rangitoto and Castor Bay. The results argue for tectonic control over location and magmatic control over erupted volume. The spatio-volumetric model is consistent with the hypothesis of a flat elliptical area in the mantle where tensional stresses, related to the local tectonics and geology, allow decompressional melting.

  5. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions on the deep sea floor have traditionally been assumed to be non-explosive as the high-pressure environment should greatly inhibit steam-driven explosions. Nevertheless, occasional evidence both from (generally slow-) spreading axes and intraplate seamounts has hinted at explosive activity at large water depths. Here we present evidence from a submarine field of volcanic cones and pit craters called Charles Darwin Volcanic Field located at about 3600 m depth on the lower southwestern slope of the Cape Verdean Island of Santo Antão. We examined two of these submarine volcanic edifices (Tambor and Kolá), each featuring a pit crater of 1 km diameter, using photogrammetric reconstructions derived from ROV-based imaging followed by 3D quantification using a novel remote sensing workflow, aided by sampling. The measured and calculated parameters of physical volcanology derived from the 3D model allow us, for the first time, to make quantitative statements about volcanic processes on the deep seafloor similar to those generated from land-based field observations. Tambor cone, which is 2500 m wide and 250 m high, consists of dense, probably monogenetic medium to coarse-grained volcaniclastic and pyroclastic rocks that are highly fragmented, probably as a result of thermal and viscous granulation upon contact with seawater during several consecutive cycles of activity. Tangential joints in the outcrops indicate subsidence of the crater floor after primary emplacement. Kolá crater, which is 1000 m wide and 160 m deep, appears to have been excavated in the surrounding seafloor and shows stepwise sagging features interpreted as ring fractures on the inner flanks. Lithologically, it is made up of a complicated succession of highly fragmented deposits, including spheroidal juvenile lapilli, likely formed by spray granulation. It resembles a maar-type deposit found on land. The eruption apparently entrained blocks of MORB-type gabbroic country rocks with

  6. Geologic Map of the Central Marysvale Volcanic Field, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowley, Peter D.; Cunningham, Charles G.; Steven, Thomas A.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Anderson, John J.; Theissen, Kevin M.

    2002-01-01

    The geologic map of the central Marysvale volcanic field, southwestern Utah, shows the geology at 1:100,000 scale of the heart of one of the largest Cenozoic volcanic fields in the Western United States. The map shows the area of 38 degrees 15' to 38 degrees 42'30' N., and 112 degrees to 112 degrees 37'30' W. The Marysvale field occurs mostly in the High Plateaus, a subprovince of the Colorado Plateau and structurally a transition zone between the complexly deformed Great Basin to the west and the stable, little-deformed main part of the Colorado Plateau to the east. The western part of the field is in the Great Basin proper. The volcanic rocks and their source intrusions in the volcanic field range in age from about 31 Ma (Oligocene) to about 0.5 Ma (Pleistocene). These rocks overlie sedimentary rocks exposed in the mapped area that range in age from Ordovician to early Cenozoic. The area has been deformed by thrust faults and folds formed during the late Mesozoic to early Cenozoic Sevier deformational event, and later by mostly normal faults and folds of the Miocene to Quaternary basin-range episode. The map revises and updates knowledge gained during a long-term U.S. Geological Survey investigation of the volcanic field, done in part because of its extensive history of mining. The investigation also was done to provide framework geologic knowledge suitable for defining geologic and hydrologic hazards, for locating hydrologic and mineral resources, and for an understanding of geologic processes in the area. A previous geologic map (Cunningham and others, 1983, U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series I-1430-A) covered the same area as this map but was published at 1:50,000 scale and is obsolete due to new data. This new geologic map of the central Marysvale field, here published as U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Investigations Series I-2645-A, is accompanied by gravity and aeromagnetic maps of the same area and the same scale (Campbell and

  7. Optimal likelihood-based matching of volcanic sources and deposits in the Auckland Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Emily; Bebbington, Mark S.; Cronin, Shane J.; Wang, Ting

    2016-09-01

    In monogenetic volcanic fields, where each eruption forms a new volcano, focusing and migration of activity over time is a very real possibility. In order for hazard estimates to reflect future, rather than past, behavior, it is vital to assemble as much reliable age data as possible on past eruptions. Multiple swamp/lake records have been extracted from the Auckland Volcanic Field, underlying the 1.4 million-population city of Auckland. We examine here the problem of matching these dated deposits to the volcanoes that produced them. The simplest issue is separation in time, which is handled by simulating prior volcano age sequences from direct dates where known, thinned via ordering constraints between the volcanoes. The subproblem of varying deposition thicknesses (which may be zero) at five locations of known distance and azimuth is quantified using a statistical attenuation model for the volcanic ash thickness. These elements are combined with other constraints, from widespread fingerprinted ash layers that separate eruptions and time-censoring of the records, into a likelihood that was optimized via linear programming. A second linear program was used to optimize over the Monte-Carlo simulated set of prior age profiles to determine the best overall match and consequent volcano age assignments. Considering all 20 matches, and the multiple factors of age, direction, and size/distance simultaneously, results in some non-intuitive assignments which would not be produced by single factor analyses. Compared with earlier work, the results provide better age control on a number of smaller centers such as Little Rangitoto, Otuataua, Taylors Hill, Wiri Mountain, Green Hill, Otara Hill, Hampton Park and Mt Cambria. Spatio-temporal hazard estimates are updated on the basis of the new ordering, which suggest that the scale of the 'flare-up' around 30 ka, while still highly significant, was less than previously thought.

  8. Tectonic implications of space-time patterns of Cenozoic volcanism in the Palo Verde Mountain volcanic field, southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, K.S.

    1981-01-01

    Variations in Cenozoic volcanism in the western United States are believed to correlate closely with changes in tectonic setting. A transition in volcanic association from calc-alkaline to fundamentally basaltic volcanism and subsequent crustal extension, appears to have coincided temporally with the initial collision of the East Pacific Rise with the continental margin trench off western North America, between 28 and 25 Ma. The volcanic stratigraphy of the Palo Verde Mountain volcanic field is broadly similar to other volcanic centers in southeastern California and can be divided into tripartite regional stratigraphy. A basal sequence of andesitic to rhyolitic lava flows, plugs, domes, and extensive pyroclastic deposits rests unconformably on pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. The basal sequence is intruded by cogenetic Cenozoic plutonic rocks and overlain by basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows, dikes, and a second widespread assemblage of pyroclastic deposits, cumulatively referred to as the silicic sequence. The youngest volcanic rocks of the field include olivine basalt flows and breccia which occur at scattered localities in the Palo Verde Mountains. The age, stratigraphy, and chemistry of the intermediate and basaltic composition volcanic rocks broadly supports previously cited volcanic-tectonic models, if modified to incorporate modern plate reconstruction theory. This modification results in a southeast migration of the transition to basaltic volcanism to southeastern California occurring significantly later in time than the previously cited ages of transition. Moreover, this southeast migration of the volcanic transition is coincident with the inception of Basin and Range faulting and the initiation of movement on the San Andreas fault south of the Transverse Ranges, corresponding to the southward migration of the Pacific-Cocos Ridge.

  9. Shield fields: Concentrations of small volcanic edifices on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubele, J. C.; Crumpler, L. S.

    1992-01-01

    Pre-Magellan analysis of the Venera 15/16 data indicated the existence of abundant small volcanic edifices, each less than or equal to 20 km diameter, interpreted to be predominantly shield volcanoes and occurring throughout the plains terrain, most common in equidimensional clusters. With the analysis of Magellan data, these clusters of greater than average concentration of small volcanic edifices have been called 'shield fields'. Although individual small shields can and do occur almost everywhere on the plains terrain of Venus, they most commonly occur in fields that are well-defined, predominantly equant, clusters of edifices. Major questions include why the edifices are concentrated in this way, how they relate to the source of the eruptive material, and what the possible relationship of shield fields to plains terrain is. There are three possible models for the origin of fields and small shields: (1) a field represents an 'island' of higher topography subsequently surrounded by later plains material; and (2) a field represents the area of magma reservoir.

  10. Seismic Activity at tres Virgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antayhua, Y. T.; Lermo, J.; Quintanar, L.; Campos-Enriquez, J. O.

    2013-05-01

    The volcanic and geothermal field Tres Virgenes is in the NE portion of Baja California Sur State, Mexico, between -112°20'and -112°40' longitudes, and 27°25' to 27°36' latitudes. Since 2003 Power Federal Commission and the Engineering Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) initiated a seismic monitoring program. The seismograph network installed inside and around the geothermal field consisted, at the beginning, of Kinemetrics K2 accelerometers; since 2009 the network is composed by Guralp CMG-6TD broadband seismometers. The seismic data used in this study covered the period from September 2003 - November 2011. We relocated 118 earthquakes with epicenter in the zone of study recorded in most of the seismic stations. The events analysed have shallow depths (≤10 km), coda Magnitude Mc≤2.4, with epicentral and hypocentral location errors <2 km. These events concentrated mainly below Tres Virgenes volcanoes, and the geothermal explotation zone where there is a system NW-SE, N-S and W-E of extensional faults. Also we obtained focal mechanisms for 38 events using the Focmec, Hash, and FPFIT methods. The results show normal mechanisms which correlate with La Virgen, El Azufre, El Cimarron and Bonfil fault systems, whereas inverse and strike-slip solutions correlate with Las Viboras fault. Additionally, the Qc value was obtained for 118 events. This value was calculated using the Single Back Scattering model, taking the coda-waves train with window lengths of 5 sec. Seismograms were filtered at 4 frequency bands centered at 2, 4, 8 and 16 Hz respectively. The estimates of Qc vary from 62 at 2 Hz, up to 220 at 16 Hz. The frequency-Qc relationship obtained is Qc=40±2f(0.62±0.02), representing the average attenuation characteristics of seismic waves at Tres Virgenes volcanic and geothermal field. This value correlated with those observed at other geothermal and volcanic fields.

  11. Audiomagnetotelluric data, Taos Plateau Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ailes, Chad E.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin as part of the Geologic framework of the Rio Grande Basins project. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, audiomagnetotelluric surveys, and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers. This report describes a regional east-west audiomagnetotelluric sounding profile acquired in late July 2009 across the Taos Plateau Volcanic Field. No interpretation of the data is included.

  12. Geology and geochemistry of volcanic centers within the eastern half of the Sonoma volcanic field, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Rytuba, James J.; Langenheim, V.E.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The volcanic fields in the California Coast Ranges north of San Francisco Bay are temporally and spatially associated with the northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction and the transition from subduction and associated arc volcanism to a slab window tectonic environment. Our geochemical analyses from the Sonoma volcanic field highlight the geochemical diversity of these volcanic rocks, allowing us to clearly distinguish these volcanic rocks from those of the roughly coeval ancestral Cascades magmatic arc to the west, and also to compare rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field to rocks from other slab window settings.

  13. 1992-93 Results of geomorphological and field studies Volcanic Studies Program, Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.

    1993-10-01

    Field mapping and stratigraphic studies were completed of the Black Tank volcanic center, which represents the southwestern most eruptive center in the Cima volcanic field of California. The results of this mapping are presented. Contacts between volcanic units and geomorphic features were field checked, incorporating data from eight field trenches as well as several exposures along Black Tank Wash. Within each of the eight trenches, logs were measured and stratigraphic sections were described. These data indicate that three, temporally separate volcanic eruptions occurred at the Black Tank center. The field evidence for significant time breaks between each stratigraphic unit is the presence of soil and pavement-bounded unconformities.

  14. Volcanism-sedimentation interaction in the Campo de Calatrava Volcanic Field (Spain): a magnetostratigraphic and geochronological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Hernández, Antonio; López-Moro, Francisco Javier; Gallardo-Millán, José Luis; Martín-Serrano, Ángel; Gómez-Fernández, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on the influence of Cenozoic volcanism of the Campo de Calatrava volcanic field on the sedimentation of two small continental basins in Spain (Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins). The volcanism in this area was mainly monogenetic, according to the small-volume volcanic edifices of scoria cones that were generated and the occurrence of tuff rings and maars. A sedimentological analysis of the volcaniclastic deposits led to the identification of facies close to the vents, low-density (dilute) pyroclastic surges, secondary volcanic deposits and typical maar deposits. Whole-rock K/Ar dating, together with palaeomagnetic constraints, yielded an age of 3.11-3.22 Ma for the onset of maar formation, the deposition finished in the Late Gauss-Early Matuyana. Using both techniques and previous paleontological data allowed it to be inferred that the maar formation and the re-sedimentation stage that occurred in Argamasilla and Calzada-Moral basins were roughly coeval. The occurrence of syn-eruption volcaniclastic deposits with small thicknesses that were separated by longer inter-eruption periods, where fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation was prevalent, together with the presence of small-volume volcanic edifices indicated that there were short periods of volcanic activity in this area. The volcanic activity was strongly controlled by previous basement faults that favoured magma feeding, and the faults also controlled the location of volcanoes themselves. The occurrence of the volcanoes in the continental basins led to the creation of shallow lakes that were related to the maar formation and the modification of sedimentological intra-basinal features, specifically, valley slope and sediment load.

  15. The Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain volcanic fields: Pleistocene hot spot volcanism in the Anahim Volcanic Belt, west-central British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Christian; Guest, Bernard; Russell, James K.; Benowitz, Jeff A.

    2015-03-01

    The Satah Mountain and Baldface Mountain volcanic fields (SMVF, BMVF) comprise more than three dozen small volcanic centers and erosional remnants thereof. These fields are located in the Chilcotin Highland of west-central British Columbia, Canada, and are spatially associated with the Anahim Volcanic Belt (AVB), a linear feature of alkaline to peralkaline plutonic and volcanic centers of Miocene to Holocene ages. The AVB has been postulated to be the track of a hot spot passing beneath the westward moving Cordilleran lithosphere. We test the AVB hot spot model by applying whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar geochronology ( n = 24) and geochemistry. Whole-rock chemical compositions of volcanic rock samples ( n = 59) from these two fields suggest a strong geochemical affinity with the nearby Itcha Range shield volcano; however, SMVF and BMVF centers are mostly small in volume (<1 km3) and differ in composition from one another, even where they are in close spatial proximity. Trace element and REE patterns of mafic AVB lavas are similar to ocean island basalts (OIB), suggesting a mantle source for these lavas. The age ranges for the SMVF ( n = 11; ~2.21 to ~1.43 Ma) and BMVF ( n = 7; ~3.91 to ~0.91 Ma) are largely coeval with the Itcha Range. The distribution of volcanoes in these two volcanic fields is potentially consistent with the postulated AVB hot spot track. Eruption rates in the SMVF were high enough to build an elongated ridge that deviates from the E-W trend of the AVB by almost 90°. This deviation might reflect the mechanisms and processes facilitating magma generation and ascent through the lithosphere in this tectonically complex region and may also indicate interaction of the potential hot spot with (pre)existing fracture systems in vicinity of the Itcha Range.

  16. Magma mixing in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Anne L.; Arculus, Richard J.

    1989-08-01

    A wide variety of rock types are present in the O'Leary Peak and Strawberry Crater volcanics of the Pliocene to Recent San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), AZ. The O'Leary Peak flows range from andesite to rhyolite (56 72 wt % SiO2) and the Strawberry Crater flows range from basalt to dacite (49 64 wt % SiO2). Our interpretation of the chemical data is that both magma mixing and crustal melting are important in the genesis of the intermediate composition lavas of both suites. Observed chemical variations in major and trace elements can be modeled as binary mixtures between a crustal melt similar to the O'Leary dome rhyolite and two different mafic end-members. The mafic end-member of the Strawberry suite may be a primary mantle-derived melt. Similar basalts have also been erupted from many other vents in the SFVF. In the O'Leary Peak suite, the mafic end-member is an evolved (low Mg/(Mg+ Fe)) basalt that is chemically distinct from the Strawberry Crater and other vent basalts as it is richer in total Fe, TiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Na2O, K2O, and Zr and poorer in MgO, CaO, P2O5, Ni, Sc, Cr, and V. The derivative basalt probably results from fractional crystallization of the more primitive, vent basalt type of magma. This evolved basalt occurs as xenolithic (but originally magmatic) inclusions in the O'Leary domes and andesite porphyry flow. The most mafic xenolith may represent melt that mixed with the O'Leary dome rhyolite resulting in andesite preserved as other xenoliths, a pyroclastic unit (Qoap), porphyry flow (Qoaf) and dacite (Darton Dome) magmas. Thermal constraints on the capacity of a melt to assimilate (and melt) a volume of solid material require that melt mixing and not assimilation has produced the observed intermediate lavas at both Strawberry Crater and O'Leary Peak. Textures, petrography, and mineral chemistry support the magma mixing model. Some of the inclusions have quenched rims where in contact with the host. The intermediate rocks, including the

  17. Geothermal Fields on the Volcanic Axis of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado, S.; Gonzalez, A.

    1980-12-16

    At present in Mexico, geothermal energy is receiving a great impulse due to the excellent results obtained in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, in which a geothermoelectric plant is operated. This plant has four units of 37.5 MW each, with a total capacity of 150 MW, and under program 470 MW more by 1984. The Government Institution, Comisi6n Federal de Electricidad, is in charge of the exploration and exploitation of geothermal fields as well as construction and operation of power plants in Mexico. By this time CFE has an extensive program of exploration in the central part of Mexico, in the Eje Neovolcdnico. In this area, several fields with hydrothermal alteration are under exploration, like the Michoac6n geothermal area, where Los Azufres geothermal field is being developed. Seventeen wells have been drilled and twelve of them presented excellent results, including two dry steam wells. In other areas, such as Arar6, Cuitzeo, San Agustln del Maiz,Ixtldn de Los Hervores and Los Negritos, geological, geophysical and geochemical explorations have been accomplished, including shallow well drilling with good results. Another main geothermal area is in the State of Jalisco with an extension of 5,000 m2, where La Primavera geothermal field shows a lot of volcanic domes and has an intensive hydrothermal activity. Deep wells have been drilled, one of them with a bottom temperature of 29OOC. Other fields in this area, like San Narcos, Hervores de La Vega, La Soledad, Villa Corona, etc., have a good geothermal potential. A new geothermal area has been explored recently in the eastern part of the country named Los Humeros, Puebla. In this area studies are being made and there are plans for well drilling exploration by the beginning of 1981. Like this one, there are many other areas in the country in which 300 hydrothermal alteration zones are been classified and 100 of them are considered economically exploitable.

  18. Wave field decomposition of volcanic tremor at Pacaya Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, F.; Waite, G. P.; Kenyon, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    A dense, small-aperture array of 12 short-period seismometers was deployed on the west flank of Pacaya volcano (Guatemala) and operated for 14 days in January 2011. The data were used to investigate the properties of the volcanic tremor wave field at the volcano. Volcanic tremor has been proven to be a powerful tool for eruption forecasting, therefore, identifying its source locations may shed new light on the dynamics of the volcano system. A preliminary spectral analysis highlights that most of the seismic energy is associated with six narrow spectral peaks between 1 and 6 Hz. After taking topography into account, we performed frequency-slowness analyses using the MUSIC algorithm and the semblance technique with the aim to define and locate the different components contributing to the wave field. Results show a complex wave field, with possibly multiple sources. We identify peaks at frequencies < 2 Hz as being related to anthropogenic sources coming from the N- NW direction where the geothermal plant and San Vincente Pacaya village are located. Azimuth measurements indicate that the 3 Hz signal propagates from the SE direction and it has been attributed to the new vent on the southeast flank of Pacaya Volcano. However, the presence of secondary peaks with azimuths of ˜ 200°, 150° and 70° seems to suggest either nonvolcanic sources or perhaps the presence of structural heterogeneities that produce strong scattered waves. At higher frequencies, results show effects of array aliasing, and therefore have not been considered in this study. The dispersive properties of the wave field have been investigated using the Spatial Auto-Correlation Method (SPAC). The dispersion characteristics of Rayleigh waves have been then inverted to find a shallow velocity model beneath the array, which shows a range of velocities from about 0.3 km/s to 2 km/s, in agreement with slowness values of the frequency bands considered. In detail, apparent velocities of 1-2 km/s dominate at

  19. Multiple Brunhes Chron Excursions Recorded in the Eifel Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.; Guillou, H.; Zhang, X.; Schnepp, E.; Hoffman, K. A.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic records of excursional geomagnetic field behavior, in particular paleointensity estimates, are fragmentary for the Pleistocene. The West Eifel volcanic field is unique in that 12 of 66 measured lava flow sites record Virtual Geomagnetic Poles (VGPs) clustered between 34 to 45° N and 30 to 50° E (over Iraq). Paleointensities of 37 lavas reveal that 9 transitionally magnetized and four normally magnetized lavas are <30 μT and have VADMs < 3.8 x 10^{22} Am2 [Schnepp and Hradetzky, 1994; JGR]. Until now, the ages of these lava flows have been known only from imprecise 40Ar/39Ar data that implied acquisition of magnetic remanence between about 460 and 660 ka. Thus, they have been interpreted to record a single, but poorly defined, excursion. To incorporate these paleofield data into the global high-resolution Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale (GITS), we have determined precise ages of groundmass from 11 transitionally magnetized lava flows using the 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating method. New unspiked K-Ar age determinations from two samples are indistinguishable from their 40Ar/39Ar ages. The age determinations fall into five groups at 722 ± 38, 626 ± 24, 578 ± 8, 555 ± 4, and 528 ±16 ka (2σ analytical uncertainties, relative to 1.194 Ma Alder Creek sanidine). The group of 4 flows with an age of 578 ±8 ka correspond in age with lava flow sequences on Tahiti and La Palma that record the Big Lost excursion at 579 ±6 ka. The six other lavas erupted from 626 ka onward correlate with a group of second-order paleointensity lows in SINT-800 centered on the broad low during which the Big Lost excursion occurred. These lava flows thus record snapshots of the behavior of the total vector field experienced at this site during one of the most complex periods of geodynamo instability of the Brunhes Chron. Our findings suggest that four temporally distinctive excursions are recorded between 626 and 528 ka and that each weakening of the geodynamo during this period

  20. Geochemistry of high-potassium rocks from the mid-Tertiary Guffey volcanic center, Thirtynine Mile volcanic field, central Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Wobus, R.A.; Mochel, D.W. ); Mertzman, S.A.; Eide, E.A.; Rothwarf, M.T. ); Loeffler, B.M.; Johnson, D.A. ); Keating, G.N.; Sultz, K. ); Benjamin, A.E. ); Venzke, E.A. ); Filson, T. )

    1990-07-01

    The Guffey volcanic center is the largest within the 2000 km{sup 2} mid-Tertiary Thirtynine Mile volcanic field of central Colorado. This study is the first to provide extensive chemical data for these alkalic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks, which present the eroded remnants of a large stratovolcano of Oligocene age. Formation of early domes and flows of latite and trachyte within the Guffey center was followed by extrusion of a thick series of basalt, trachybasalt, and shoshonite flows and lahars. Plugs, dikes, and vents ranging from basalt to rhyolite cut the thick mafic deposits, and felsic tuffs breccias chemically identical to the small rhyolitic plutons are locally preserved. Whole-rack major and trace element analyses of 80 samples, ranging almost continuously from 47% to 78% SiO{sub 2}, indicate that the rocks of the Guffey center are among the most highly enriched in K{sub 2}O (up to 6%) and rare earth elements (typically 200-300 ppm) of any volcanic rocks in Colorado. These observations, along with the relatively high concentrations of Ba and Rb and the depletion of Cr and Ni, suggest an appreciable contribution of lower crustal material to the magmas that produced the Thirtynine Mile volcanic rocks.

  1. Fissural volcanism, polygenetic volcanic fields, and crustal thickness in the Payen Volcanic Complex on the central Andes foreland (Mendoza, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, F.; Fornaciai, A.; Bistacchi, A.; Pasquarè, F. A.

    2008-09-01

    Shield volcanoes, caldera-bearing stratovolcanoes, and monogenetic cones compose the large fissural Payen Volcanic Complex, located in the Andes foreland between latitude 35°S and 38°S. The late Pliocene-Pleistocene and recent volcanic activity along E-W trending eruptive fissures produced basaltic lavas showing a within-plate geochemical signature. The spatial distribution of fractures and monogenetic vents is characterized by self-similar clustering with well defined power law distributions. Vents have average spacing of 1.27 km and fractal exponent D = 1.33 defined in the range 0.7-49.3 km. The fractal exponent of fractures is 1.62 in the range 1.5-48.1 km. The upper cutoffs of fractures and vent fractal distributions (about 48-49 km) scale to the crustal thickness in the area, as derived from geophysical data. This analysis determines fractured media (crust) thickness associated with basaltic retroarc eruptions. We propose that the Payen Volcanic Complex was and is still active under an E-W crustal shortening regime.

  2. Stress fields of the overriding plate at convergent margins and beneath active volcanic arcs.

    PubMed

    Apperson, K D

    1991-11-01

    Tectonic stress fields in the overriding plate at convergent plate margins are complex and vary on local to regional scales. Volcanic arcs are a common element of overriding plates. Stress fields in the volcanic arc region are related to deformation generated by subduction and to magma generation and ascent processes. Analysis of moment tensors of shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes in volcanic arcs indicates that the seismic strain field in the arc region of many convergent margins is subhorizontal extension oriented nearly perpendicular to the arc. A process capable of generating such a globally consistent strain field is induced asthenospheric corner flow below the arc region. PMID:17774792

  3. Magnetotelluric data, Taos Plateau Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ailes, Chad E.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    The population of the San Luis Basin region of northern New Mexico is growing. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's groundwater resources. An important issue in managing the groundwater resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal groundwater aquifers. The shallow unconfined aquifer and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin are the main sources of municipal water for the region. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey called magnetotellurics (MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers. This report describes a regional east-west MT sounding profile acquired in late July 2009 across the Taos Plateau Volcanic Field where drillhole data are sparse. Resistivity modeling of the MT data can be used to help map changes in electrical resistivity with depths that are related to differences in rock types. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data collected along the east-west profile. No interpretation of the data is included.

  4. Ancient Mudflows in the Tuxtla Volcanic Field, Veracruz, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Godinez, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is a basaltic volcanic enclave in eastern Mexico at the margin of the Gulf of Mexico. Due to the high rates of precipitation floods and mudflows are common. Resulting from a systematic study of geologic hazard in the TVF we found several mudflow deposits that impacted pre-Columbian settlements. Sections of the deposits were observed in detail and sampled for granulometric studies. The deposits contained materials suitable for dating: ceramic shards and some of them charcoal fragments. Shards from the interior of the deposit were collected and placed in black bags to prevent the action of light and to be analyzed by thermoluminiscense (TL), the charcoal samples were dated using standard radiocarbon methods (C-14). The sites were dubbed La Mojarra (18°37.711', 95°18.860'), Revolución (18° 35.848', 95°11.412'), Pisatal (18°36.618', 95°10.634'), and Toro Prieto (18°38.229, 95°12.037'). These places were named after the nearby villages the first two, lake Pisatal the third and Toro Prieto creek the fourth. All the deposits occur close to the margins of riverbeds or lakes. Samples of these sites yielded ages of 1176±100 (TL), 1385±70 (C-14), 1157±105 (TL), 2050+245-235 (C-14), respectively. These locations have undergone recurrent floods in the last decades, showing that these phenomena impact the same areas over centuries. The dates mentioned are important because, no vestiges of human settlements had been reported in the area, which in the past was covered by a dense forest. The settlements must have been very small and depended of such cities as nearby Matacapan an important city with strong ties to Teotihuacán in central Mexico. The ages agree with the findings of archeologic studies in Matacapan, which indicate that the population became increasingly ruralized since the late classic period (≈ 600-800 AD).

  5. Oxygen Isotope Character of the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T.; Strickland, A.; Valley, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen isotope analyses of zircons from lavas and tuffs from the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of east central Oregon unequivocally demonstrate the presence of mid-Miocene low-δ18O magmas (δ18Ozrc<4.7 ‰). Despite the growing data set of low-δ18O melts within, and proximal to, the Snake River Plain (SRP) Large Igneous Province, debate persists regarding both the mechanisms for low-δ18O magma petrogenesis, and their relative influence in the SRP. The LOVF is associated with widespread silicic volcanism roughly concurrent with the eruption of the Steens-Columbia River Basalt Group between ~17-15Ma. Silicic activity in the LOVF is limited to 16-15Ma, when an estimated 1100km3 of weakly peralkaline to metaluminous rhyolitic lavas and ignimbrites erupted from a series of fissures and calderas. Geographically, the LOVF overlaps the Oregon-Idaho Graben (OIG), and straddles the 87Sr/86Sr= 0.704 line which, together with the 0.706 line to the east, delineate the regional transition from the North American Precambrian continental crust to the east to younger Phanerozoic accreted terranes to the west. Here we report high accuracy ion microprobe analyses of δ18O in zircons using a 10-15μm spot, with average spot-to-spot precision ±0.28‰ (2SD), to investigate intra-grain and intra-unit δ18Ozrc trends for LOVF rhyolites. Due to its high closure temperature, chemical and physical resistance, and slow oxygen diffusion rates, zircon offers a robust record of magmatic oxygen isotope ratios during crystallization and provides constraints on the petrogenesis of Snake River Plain (SRP) low-δ18O melts. Individual zircons from LOVF rhyolites show no evidence of core-rim δ18O zoning, and populations exhibit ≤0.42‰ (2SD) intra-unit variability. Unit averages range from 2.2 to 4.3‰, with the lowest values in caldera-forming ignimbrites, but all units show evidence of crystallization from low-δ18O melts. Quartz and feldspar analyses by laser fluorination (precision

  6. Timing and development of the Heise volcanic field, Snake River Plain, Idaho, western USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; McIntosh, W.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Snake River Plain (SRP) developed over the last 16 Ma as a bimodal volcanic province in response to the southwest movement of the North American plate over a fixed melting anomaly. Volcanism along the SRP is dominated by eruptions of explosive high-silica rhyolites and represents some of the largest eruptions known. Basaltic eruptions represent the final stages of volcanism, forming a thin cap above voluminous rhyolitic deposits. Volcanism progressed, generally from west to east, along the plain episodically in successive volcanic fields comprised of nested caldera complexes with major caldera-forming eruptions within a particular field separated by ca. 0.5-1 Ma, similar to, and in continuation with, the present-day Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field. Passage of the North American plate over the melting anomaly at a particular point in time and space was accompanied by uplift, regional tectonism, massive explosive eruptions, and caldera subsidence, and followed by basaltic volcanism and general subsidence. The Heise volcan ic field in the eastern SRP, Idaho, represents an adjacent and slightly older field immediately to the southwest of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field. Five large-volume (>0.5 km3) rhyolitic ignimbrites constitute a time-stratigraphic framework of late Miocene to early Pliocene volcanism for the study region. Field relations and high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age determinations establish that four of these regional ignimbrites were erupted from the Heise volcanic field and form the framework of the Heise Group. These are the Blacktail Creek Tuff (6.62 ?? 0.03 Ma), Walcott Tuff (6.27 ?? 0.04 Ma), Conant Creek Tuff (5.51 ?? 0.13 Ma), and Kilgore Tuff (4.45 ?? 0.05 Ma; all errors reported at ?? 2??). The fifth widespread ignimbrite in the regions is the Arbon Valley Tuff Member of the Starlight Formation (10.21 ?? 0.03 Ma), which erupted from a caldera source outside of the Heise volcanic field. These results establish the Conant Creek Tuff as a

  7. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Woolford, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ˜1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ˜17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ˜17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ˜35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  8. Late Pleistocene ages for the most recent volcanism and glacial-pluvial deposits at Big Pine volcanic field, California, USA, from cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vazquez, Jorge A.; Woolford, Jeff M

    2015-01-01

    The Big Pine volcanic field is one of several Quaternary volcanic fields that poses a potential volcanic hazard along the tectonically active Owens Valley of east-central California, and whose lavas are interbedded with deposits from Pleistocene glaciations in the Sierra Nevada Range. Previous geochronology indicates an ∼1.2 Ma history of volcanism, but the eruption ages and distribution of volcanic products associated with the most-recent eruptions have been poorly resolved. To delimit the timing and products of the youngest volcanism, we combine field mapping and cosmogenic 36Cl dating of basaltic lava flows in the area where lavas with youthful morphology and well-preserved flow structures are concentrated. Field mapping and petrology reveal approximately 15 vents and 6 principal flow units with variable geochemical composition and mineralogy. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages for lava flow units from the top, middle, and bottom of the volcanic stratigraphy indicate eruptions at ∼17, 27, and 40 ka, revealing several different and previously unrecognized episodes of late Pleistocene volcanism. Olivine to plagioclase-pyroxene phyric basalt erupted from several vents during the most recent episode of volcanism at ∼17 ka, and produced a lava flow field covering ∼35 km2. The late Pleistocene 36Cl exposure ages indicate that moraine and pluvial shoreline deposits that overlie or modify the youngest Big Pine lavas reflect Tioga stage glaciation in the Sierra Nevada and the shore of paleo-Owens Lake during the last glacial cycle.

  9. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-01-01

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  10. New Mexico Geochronology Research Laboratory: Zuni-Bandera volcanic field road log

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.; Reid, K.; White, C.

    1993-04-01

    This field conference was designed to assemble a group of Quaternary researchers to examine the possibility of using the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field in western New Mexico as a test area for evaluating and calibrating various Quaternary dating techniques. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic-field is comprised of a large number of basaltic lava flows ranging in age from about 700 to 3 ka. Older basalts are present in the Mount Taylor volcanic field to the north. Geologic mapping has been completed for a large portion of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field and a number of geochronological investigations have been initiated in the area. While amending this conference, please consider how you might bring your expertise and capabilities to bear on solving the many problem in Quaternary geochronology.

  11. Geologic field-trip guide to Lassen Volcanic National Park and vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muffler, L. J. Patrick; Clynne, Michael A.

    2015-07-22

    This geologic field-trip guide provides an overview of Quaternary volcanism in and around Lassen Volcanic National Park in northern California. The guide begins with a comprehensive overview of the geologic framework and the stratigraphic terminology of the Lassen region, based primarily on the “Geologic map of Lassen Volcanic National Park and vicinity” (Clynne and Muffler, 2010). The geologic overview is then followed by detailed road logs describing the volcanic features that can readily be seen in the park and its periphery. Twenty-one designated stops provide detailed explanations of important volcanic features. The guide also includes mileage logs along the highways leading into the park from the major nearby communities. The field-trip guide is intended to be a flexible document that can be adapted to the needs of a visitor approaching the park from any direction.

  12. Quantifying the morphometric variability of monogenetic cones in volcanic fields: the Virunga Volcanic Province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Sam; Grosse, Pablo; Barette, Florian; Smets, Benoît; Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, François; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic cone fields are generally made up of tens to hundreds of monogenetic cones, sometimes related to larger polygenetic edifices, which can exhibit a wide range of morphologies and degrees of preservation. The Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP) developed itself in a transfer zone which separates two rift segments (i.e. Edward and Kivu rift) within the western branch of the East-African Rift. As the result of volcanic activity related to this tectonic regime of continental extension, the VVP hosts eight large polygenetic volcanoes, surrounded by over 500 monogenetic cones and eruptive fissures, scattered over the vast VVP lava flow fields. Some cones lack any obvious geo-structural link to a specific Virunga volcano. Using recent high-resolution satellite images (SPOT, Pléiades) and a newly created 5-m-resolution digital elevation model (TanDEM-X), we have mapped and classified all monogenetic cones and eruptive fissures of the VVP. We analysed the orientation of all mapped eruptive fissures and, using the MORVOLC program, we calculated a set of morphometric parameters to highlight systematic spatial variations in size or morphometric ratios of the cones. Based upon morphological indicators, we classified the satellite cones into 4 categories: 1. Simple cones with one closed-rim crater; 2. Breached cones with one open-rim crater; 3. Complex cones with two or more interconnected craters and overlapping cones; 4. Other edifices without a distinguishable crater or cone shape (e.g. spatter mounds and levees along eruptive fissures). The results show that cones are distributed in clusters and along alignments, in some cases parallel with the regional tectonic orientations. Contrasts in the volumes of cones positioned on the rift shoulders compared to those located on the rift valley floor can possibly be attributed to contrasts in continental crust thickness. Furthermore, higher average cone slopes in the East-VVP (Bufumbira zone) and central-VVP cone clusters suggest

  13. Rapid uplift during 2007-2012 at Laguna del Maule volcanic field, Andean Southern Volcanic Zone, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mevel, H.; Feigl, K.; Ali, T.; Cordova V., M. L.; DeMets, C.; Singer, B. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field includes an unusual concentration of post-glacial rhyolitic lava coulees and domes, dated between 24 to 2 thousand years old that cover more than 100 square kilometers and erupted from 24 vents that encircle a 20-km-diameter lake basin on the range crest. The recent concentration of rhyolite is unparalleled in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. Moreover, the western portion of the LdM volcanic field has experienced rapid uplift since 2007, leading to questions about the current configuration of the magmatic system and processes that drive the ongoing inflation. We aim to quantify the active deformation of the LdM volcanic field and its evolution with time. To do so, we use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data acquired by three satellite missions: Envisat in 2003 and 2004, ALOS between 2007 and 2010, and TerraSAR-X in 2012. An interferogram spanning March 2003 to February 2004 "shows no deformation" (Fournier et al., 2010). From 2007 through 2012, however, the shortening of the satellite-to-ground distance revealed a range change rate of greater than 200 mm/yr along the radar line of sight. The deformation includes a circular area 20 km in diameter centered on the western portion of the circle of young rhyolite domes. To analyze the InSAR results, we employ the General Inversion for Phase Technique (GIPhT; Feigl and Thurber, 2009; Ali and Feigl, 2012). We have considered several hypotheses to interpret this deformation. Artefacts such as orbital errors, atmospheric perturbations or topographic contribution cannot account for the observed signal. We also reject the hypothesis of uplift due to gravitational unloading of the crust based on our modeling of independently measured lake level variations over the observed time interval. We thus attribute the deformation to the intrusion of magma into the upper crust below the southwest region of the LdM volcanic field. The best fit to the InSAR data is

  14. The Boring Volcanic Field of the Portland-Vancouver area, Oregon and Washington: tectonically anomalous forearc volcanism in an urban setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; O'Connor, Jim; Dorsey, Rebecca; Madin, Ian P.

    2009-01-01

    More than 80 small volcanoes are scattered throughout the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan area of northwestern Oregon and southwestern Washington. These volcanoes constitute the Boring Volcanic Field, which is centered in the Neogene Portland Basin and merges to the east with coeval volcanic centers of the High Cascade volcanic arc. Although the character of volcanic activity is typical of many monogenetic volcanic fields, its tectonic setting is not, being located in the forearc of the Cascadia subduction system well trenchward of the volcanic-arc axis. The history and petrology of this anomalous volcanic field have been elucidated by a comprehensive program of geologic mapping, geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and paleomag-netic studies. Volcanism began at 2.6 Ma with eruption of low-K tholeiite and related lavas in the southern part of the Portland Basin. At 1.6 Ma, following a hiatus of ~0.8 m.y., similar lavas erupted a few kilometers to the north, after which volcanism became widely dispersed, compositionally variable, and more or less continuous, with an average recurrence interval of 15,000 yr. The youngest centers, 50–130 ka, are found in the northern part of the field. Boring centers are generally monogenetic and mafic but a few larger edifices, ranging from basalt to low-SiO2 andesite, were also constructed. Low-K to high-K calc-alkaline compositions similar to those of the nearby volcanic arc dominate the field, but many centers erupted magmas that exhibit little influence of fluids derived from the subducting slab. The timing and compositional characteristics of Boring volcanism suggest a genetic relationship with late Neogene intra-arc rifting.

  15. A newly discovered Pliocene volcanic field on the western Sardinia continental margin (western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, Alessandro; Budillon, Francesca; Tonielli, Renato; De Falco, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    A previously unknown submerged volcanic field offshore western Sardinia (western Mediterranean Sea), has been identified based on swath bathymetric data collected in 2009, 2010 and 2013, and high-resolution seismic profiles collected in 2011 and 2013. About 40 conical-shaped volcanic edifices (maximum width of about 1600 m and maximum height of about 180 m) and several lava outcrops (up to 1,200 m wide) were recognized at 20 to 150 m water depth over an area of 800 km2. The volcanic edifices are mainly eruptive monogenic vents, mostly isolated with a rather distinct shape, or grouped to form a coalescent volcanic body in which single elements are often still recognizable. High-resolution seismics enabled identifying relationships between the volcanic bodies and continental margin successions. The edifices overlie a major erosional surface related to the margin exposure following the Messinian salinity crisis, and are overlain by or interbedded with an early Pliocene marine unit. This seismo-stratigraphic pattern dates the volcanic activity to the early Pliocene, in agreement with the radiometric age of the Catalano island lavas (4.7 Ma) reported in earlier studies. The morphometry of the volcanic bodies suggests that cone erosion was higher at shallow water depths. Indeed, most of the shallow edifices are strongly eroded and flattened at 125 to 130 m water depth, plausibly explained by recurrent sub-aerial exposure during Pleistocene sea-level lowstands, whereas cones in deeper water are much better preserved. Volcanic vents and lava deposits, hereafter named the Catalano volcanic field (CVF), are emplaced along lineaments corresponding to the main directions of the normal fault system, which lowered the Sinis Basin and the western Sardinia continental margin. The CVF represents a volumetrically relevant phase of the late Miocene - Quaternary anorogenic volcanic cycle of Sardinia, which is related to the first stage of the extensional tectonics affecting the island

  16. The structural architecture of the Los Humeros volcanic complex and geothermal field, Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Sulpizio, Roberto; Carrasco Núñez, Gerardo; Davila Harris, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    The development of geothermal energy in Mexico is a very important goal, given the presence of a large heat anomaly, associated with the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, the renewability of the resource and the low environmental impact. The Quaternary Los Humeros volcanic complex is an important geothermal target, whose evolution involved at least two caldera events, that alternated with other explosive and effusive activity. The first caldera forming event was the 460 ka eruption that produced the Xaltipan ignimbrite and formed a 15-20 km wide caldera. The second collapse event occurred 100 ka with the formation of the Zaragoza ignimbrite and a nested 8-10 km wide caldera. The whole volcano structure, the style of the collapses and the exact location of the calderas scarps and ring faults are still a matter of debate. The Los Humeros volcano hosts the productive Los Humeros Geothermal Field, with an installed capacity of 40 MW and additional 75 MW power plants under construction. Recent models of the geothermal reservoir predict the existence of at least two reservoirs in the geothermal system, separated by impermeable rock units. Hydraulic connectivity and hydrothermal fluids circulation occurs through faults and fractures, allowing deep steam to ascend while condensate flows descend. As a consequence, the plans for the exploration and exploitation of the geothermal reservoir have been based on the identification of the main channels for the circulation of hydrothermal fluids, constituted by faults, so that the full comprehension of the structural architecture of the caldera is crucial to improve the efficiency and minimize the costs of the geothermal field operation. In this study, we present an analysis of the Los Humeros volcanic complex focused on the Quaternary tectonic and volcanotectonics features, like fault scarps and aligned/elongated monogenetic volcanic centres. Morphostructural analysis and field mapping reveal the geometry, kinematics and dynamics of

  17. [Expression, purification of recombinant cationic peptide AIK in Escherichia coli and its antitumor activity].

    PubMed

    Fan, Fangfang; Sun, Huiying; Xu, Hui; Liu, Jiawei; Zhang, Haiyuan; Li, Yilan; Ning, Xuelian; Sun, Yue; Bai, Jing; Fu, Songbin; Zhou, Chunshui

    2015-12-01

    AIK is a novel cationic peptide with potential antitumor activity. In order to construct the AIK expression vector by Gateway technology, and establish an optimal expression and purification method for recombinant AIK, a set of primers containing AttB sites were designed and used to create the AttB-TEV-FLAG-AIR fusion gene by overlapping PCR. The resulting fusion gene was cloned into the donor vector pDONR223 by attB and attP mediated recombination (BP reaction), then, transferred into the destination vector pDESTl 5 by attL and attR mediated recombination (LR reaction). All the cloning was verified by both colony PCR and DNA sequencing. The BL21 F. coli transformed by the GST-AIR expression plasmid was used to express the GST-AIK fusion protein with IPTG induction and the induction conditions were optimized. GST-AIR fusion protein was purified by glutathione magnetic beads, followed by rTEV cleavage to remove GST tag and MTS assay to test the growth inhibition activity of the recombinant AIR on human leukemia HL-60 cells. We found that a high level of soluble expression of GST-AIK protein (more than 30% out of the total bacterial proteins) was achieved upon 0.1 mmol/L ITPG induction for 4 h at 37 °C in the transformed BL21 F. coli with starting OD₆₀₀ at 1.0. Through GST affinity purification and rTEV cleavage, the purity of the resulting recombinant AIK was greater than 95%. And the MTS assays on HL-60 cells confirmed that the recombinant AIK retains an antitumor activity at a level similar to the chemically synthesized AIK. Taken together, we have established a method for expression and purification of recombinant AIK with a potent activity against tumor cells, which will be beneficial for the large-scale production and application of recombinant AIK in the future. PMID:27093838

  18. A 3D model of crustal magnetization at the Pinacate Volcanic Field, NW Sonora, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Abdeslem, Juan; Calmus, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The Pinacate Volcanic Field (PVF) is located near the western border of the southern Basin and Range province, in the State of Sonora NW Mexico, and within the Gulf of California Extensional Province. This volcanic field contains the shield volcano Santa Clara, which mainly consists of basaltic to trachytic volcanic rocks, and reaches an altitude of ~ 1200 m. The PVF disrupts a series of discontinuous ranges of low topographic relief aligned in a NW direction, which consist mainly of Proterozoic metamorphic rocks and Proterozoic through Paleogene granitoids. The PVF covers an area of approximately 60 by 55 km, and includes more than 400 well-preserved cinder cones and vents and eight maar craters. It was active from about 1.7 Ma until about 13 ka. We have used the ages and magnetic polarities of the volcanic rocks, along with mapped magnetic anomalies and their inverse modeling to determine that the Pinacate Volcanic Field was formed during two volcanic episodes. The oldest one built the Santa Clara shield volcano of basaltic and trachytic composition, and occurred during the geomagnetic Matuyama Chron of reverse polarity, which also includes the normal polarity Jaramillo and Olduvai Subchrons, thus imprinting both normal and reverse magnetization in the volcanic products. The younger Pinacate series of basaltic composition represents monogenetic volcanic activity that extends all around the PVF and occurred during the subsequent geomagnetic Brunhes Chron of normal polarity. Magnetic anomalies toward the north of the Santa Clara volcano are the most intense in the PVF, and their inverse modeling indicates the presence of a large subsurface body magnetized in the present direction of the geomagnetic field. This suggests that the magma chambers at depth cooled below the Curie temperature during the Brunhes Chron.

  19. Contemporaneous trachyandesitic and calc-alkaline volcanism of the Huerto Andesite, San Juan Volcanic Field, Colorado, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parat, F.; Dungan, M.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    2005-01-01

    Locally, voluminous andesitic volcanism both preceded and followed large eruptions of silicic ash-flow tuff from many calderas in the San Juan volcanic field. The most voluminous post-collapse lava suite of the central San Juan caldera cluster is the 28 Ma Huerto Andesite, a diverse assemblage erupted from at least 5-6 volcanic centres that were active around the southern margins of the La Garita caldera shortly after eruption of the Fish Canyon Tuff. These andesitic centres are inferred, in part, to represent eruptions of magma that ponded and differentiated within the crust below the La Garita caldera, thereby providing the thermal energy necessary for rejuvenation and remobilization of the Fish Canyon magma body. The multiple Huerto eruptive centres produced two magmatic series that differ in phenocryst mineralogy (hydrous vs anhydrous assemblages), whole-rock major and trace element chemistry and isotopic compositions. Hornblende-bearing lavas from three volcanic centres located close to the southeastern margin of the La Garita caldera (Eagle Mountain - Fourmile Creek, West Fork of the San Juan River, Table Mountain) define a high-K calc-alkaline series (57-65 wt % SiO2) that is oxidized, hydrous and sulphur rich. Trachyandesitic lavas from widely separated centres at Baldy Mountain-Red Lake (western margin), Sugarloaf Mountain (southern margin) and Ribbon Mesa (20 km east of the La Garita caldera) are mutually indistinguishable (55-61 wt % SiO2); they are characterized by higher and more variable concentrations of alkalis and many incompatible trace elements (e.g. Zr, Nb, heavy rare earth elements), and they contain anhydrous phenocryst assemblages (including olivine). These mildly alkaline magmas were less water rich and oxidized than the hornblende-bearing calc-alkaline suite. The same distinctions characterize the voluminous precaldera andesitic lavas of the Conejos Formation, indicating that these contrasting suites are long-term manifestations of San Juan

  20. Paleomagnetism of the Pleistocene Tequila Volcanic Field (Western Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ceja, M.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; Calvo-Rathert, M.; Morales-Contreras, J.; Alva-Valdivia, L.; Rosas Elguera, J.; Urrutia Fucugauchi, J.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents new paleomagnetic results from 24 independent cooling units in Tequila area (western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt). These units were recently dated by means of state-of-the-art 40Ar-39Ar method (Lewis-Kenedy et al., 2005) and span from 1130 to 150 ka. The characteristic paleodirections are successfully isolated for 20 cooling units. The mean paleodirection, discarding intermediate polarity sites, is I = 29.6°, D = 359.2°, k = 26, α95 = 7.1°, n = 17, which corresponds to the mean paleomagnetic pole position Plat = 85.8°, Plong = 84.3°, K = 27.5, A95 = 6.9°. These directions are practically undistinguishable from the expected Plestocene paleodirections, as derived from reference poles for the North American polar wander curve and in agreement with previously reported directions from western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This suggests that no major tectonic deformation occurred in studied area since early-middle Plestocene to present. The paleosecular variation is estimated trough the study of the scatter of virtual geomagnetic poles giving SF = 15.4 with SU = 19.9 and SL = 12.5 (upper and lower limits respectively). These values are consistent with those predicted by the latitude-dependent variation model of McFadden et al. (1991) for the last 5 Myr. The interesting feature of the paleomagnetic record obtained here is the occurrence of an intermediate polarity at 671± 13 ka which may correspond the worldwide observed Delta excursion at about 680-690 ka. This gives the volcanic evidence of this event. Two independent lava flows dated as 362± 13 and 354± 5 ka respectively, yield transitional paleodirections as well, probably corresponding to the Levantine excursion.

  1. Paleomagnetism of the Pleistocene Tequila Volcanic Field (Western Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceja, Maria Rodríguez; Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Calvo-Rathert, Manuel; Morales-Contreras, Juan; Alva-Valdivia, Luis; Elguera, José Rosas; Fucugauchi, Jaime Urrutia; Granados, Hugo Delgado

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents new paleomagnetic results from 24 independent cooling units in Tequila area (western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt). These units were recently dated by means of state-of-the-art 40Ar-39Ar method (Lewis-Kenedy et al., 2005) and span from 1130 to 150 ka. The characteristic paleodirections are successfully isolated for 20 cooling units. The mean paleodirection, discarding intermediate polarity sites, is I = 29.6°, D = 359.2°, k = 26, α95 = 7.1°, n = 17, which corresponds to the mean paleomagnetic pole position P lat = 85.8°, Plong = 84.3°, K = 27.5, A95 = 6.9°. These directions are practically undistinguishable from the expected Plestocene paleodirections, as derived from reference poles for the North American polar wander curve and in agreement with previously reported directions from western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This suggests that no major tectonic deformation occurred in studied area since early-middle Plestocene to present. The paleosecular variation is estimated trough the study of the scatter of virtual geomagnetic poles giving S F = 15.4 with S U = 19.9 and S L = 12.5 (upper and lower limits respectively). These values are consistent with those predicted by the latitude-dependent variation model of McFadden et al. (1991) for the last 5 Myr. The interesting feature of the paleomagnetic record obtained here is the occurrence of an intermediate polarity at 671 ± 13 ka which may correspond the worldwide observed Delta excursion at about 680-690 ka. This gives the volcanic evidence of this event. Two independent lava flows dated as 362 ±13 and 354 ±5 ka respectively, yield transitional paleodirections as well, probably corresponding to the Levantine excursion.

  2. Numerical recognition of alignments in monogenetic volcanic areas: Examples from the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field in Mexico and Calatrava in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebriá, J. M.; Martín-Escorza, C.; López-Ruiz, J.; Morán-Zenteno, D. J.; Martiny, B. M.

    2011-04-01

    Identification of geological lineaments using numerical methods is a useful tool to reveal structures that may not be evident to the naked eye. In this sense, monogenetic volcanic fields represent an especially suitable case for the application of such techniques, since eruptive vents can be considered as point-like features. Application of a two-point azimuth method to the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico) and the Calatrava Volcanic Province (Spain) demonstrates that the main lineaments controlling the distributions of volcanic vents (~ 322° in Calatrava and ~ 30° in Michoacán) approach the respective main compressional axes that dominate in the area (i.e. the Cocos-North America plates convergence and the main Betics compressional direction, respectively). Considering the stress fields that are present in each volcanic area and their respective geodynamic history, it seems that although volcanism may be a consequence of contemporaneous extensional regimes, the distribution of the volcanic vents in these kinds of monogenetic fields is actually controlled by reactivation of older fractures which then become more favourable for producing space for magma ascent at near-surface levels.

  3. Database compilation for the geologic map of the San Francisco volcanic field, north-central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bard, Joseph A.; Ramsey, David W.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Ulrich, George E.; Newhall, Christopher G.; Moore, Richard B.; Bailey, Norman G.; Holm, Richard F.

    2016-01-08

    The orignial geologic maps were prepared under the Geothermal Research Program of the U.S. Geological Survey as a basis for interpreting the history of magmatic activity in the volcanic field. The San Francisco field, which is largely Pleistocene in age, is in northern Arizona, just north of the broad transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Basin and Range province. It is one of several dominantly basaltic volcanic fields of the late Cenozoic age situated near the margin of the Colorado Plateau. The volcanic field contains rocks ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite—the products of eruption through Precambrian basement rocks and approximately a kilometer of overlying, nearly horizontal, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. About 500 km3 of erupted rocks cover about 5,000 km2 of predominantly Permian and locally preserved Triassic sedimentary rocks that form the erosionally stripped surface of the Colorado Plateau in Northern Arizona.

  4. Database compilation for the geologic map of the San Francisco volcanic field, north-central Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bard, Joseph A.; Ramsey, David W.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Ulrich, George E.; Newhall, Christopher G.; Moore, Richard B.; Bailey, Norman G.; Holm, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    The orignial geologic maps were prepared under the Geothermal Research Program of the U.S. Geological Survey as a basis for interpreting the history of magmatic activity in the volcanic field. The San Francisco field, which is largely Pleistocene in age, is in northern Arizona, just north of the broad transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Basin and Range province. It is one of several dominantly basaltic volcanic fields of the late Cenozoic age situated near the margin of the Colorado Plateau. The volcanic field contains rocks ranging in composition from basalt to rhyolite—the products of eruption through Precambrian basement rocks and approximately a kilometer of overlying, nearly horizontal, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. About 500 km3 of erupted rocks cover about 5,000 km2 of predominantly Permian and locally preserved Triassic sedimentary rocks that form the erosionally stripped surface of the Colorado Plateau in Northern Arizona.

  5. Aeromagnetic and Gravity Maps of the Central Marysvale Volcanic Field, Southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, David L.; Steven, Thomas A.; Cunningham, Charles G.; Rowley, Peter D.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity and aeromagnetic features in the Marysvale volcanic field result from the composite effects of many factors, including rock composition, style of magmatic emplacement, type and intensity of rock alteration, and effects of structural evolution. Densities and magnetic properties measured on a suite of rock samples from the Marysvale volcanic field differ in systematic ways. Generally, the measured densities, magnetic susceptibilities, and natural remanent magnetizations all increase with mafic index, but decrease with degree of alteration, and for tuffs, with degree of welding. Koenigsberger Q indices show no such systematic trends. The study area is divided into three geophysical domains. The northern domain is dominated by aeromagnetic lows that probably reflect reversed-polarity volcanic flows. There are no intermediate-sized magnetic highs in the northern domain that might reflect plutons. The northern domain has a decreasing-to-the-south gravity gradient that reflects the Pavant Range homocline. The central domain has gravity lows that reflect altered rocks in calderas and low-density plutons of the Marysvale volcanic field. Its aeromagnetic signatures consist of rounded highs that reflect plutons and birdseye patterns that reflect volcanic flows. In many places the birdseyes are attenuated, indicating that the flows there have been hydrothermally altered. We interpret the central domain to reflect an east-trending locus of plutons in the Marysvale volcanic field. The southern domain has intermediate gravity fields, indicating somewhat denser rocks there than in the central domain, and high-amplitude aeromagnetic birdseyes that reflect unaltered volcanic units. The southern domain contains no magnetic signatures that we interpret to reflect plutons. Basin-and-range tectonism has overprinted additional gravity features on the three domains. A deep gravity low follows the Sevier and Marysvale Valleys, reflecting grabens there. The gravity gradient in the

  6. Eruptive Productivity of the Ceboruco-San Pedro Volcanic Field, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, H. M.; Lange, R. A.; Hall, C. M.; Delgado-Granados, H.

    2002-12-01

    High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology coupled with GIS spatial analysis provides constraints on magma eruption rates over the past 1 Myr of the Ceboruco-San Pedro volcanic field (1870 km2), located in the Tepic-Zacoalco rift in western Mexico. The volcanic field is part of the Trans Mexican Volcanic arc and is dominated by the andesitic-dacitic stratocone of Volcan Ceboruco and includes peripheral fissure-fed flows, domes, and monogenetic cinder cones. The ages of these volcanic features were determined using 40Ar/39Ar laser step-heating techniques on groundmass or mineral separates, with 78% of the 52 analyses yielding plateau ages with a 2 sigma error < 50 kyrs. The volumes were determined using high resolution (1:50,000) digital elevation models, orthophotos, and GIS software, which allowed for the delineation of individual volcanic features, reconstruction of the pre-eruptive topography, and volume calculations by linear interpolation. The relative proportions of the 80 km3 erupted over the past 1 Myr are 14.5% basaltic andesite, 64.5% andesite, 20% dacite, and 1% rhyolite, demonstrating the dominance of intermediate magma types (in terms of silica content). Overall, there appears to be no systematic progression in the eruption of different magma types (e.g., basalt, andesite, dacite, etc.) with time. However, more than 75% of the total volume of lava within the Ceboruco-San Pedro volcanic field erupted in the last 100 kyrs. This reflects the youthfulness of Volcan Ceboruco, which was constructed during the last 50 kyrs and has a present day volume of 50 +/- 2.5 km3, accounting for 81% of the andesite and 50% of the dacite within the volcanic field. Eleven cinder cones, ranging from the Holocene to 0.37 Ma, display a narrow compositional range, with 52-58 wt% SiO2, 3-5.5 wt% MgO, and relatively high TiO2 concentrations (0.9-1.8 wt%). The total volume of the cinder cones is 0.83 km3. No lavas with < 51 wt% SiO2 have erupted in the past 1 Myr. Peripheral

  7. Volcanic field elongation, vent distribution and tectonic evolution of continental rift: The Main Ethiopian Rift example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzarini, Francesco; Le Corvec, Nicolas; Isola, Ilaria; Favalli, Massimiliano

    2015-04-01

    Magmatism and faulting operate in continental rifts and interact at a variety of scales, however their relationship is complex. The African rift, being the best example for both active continental rifting and magmatism, provides the ideal location to study the interplay between the two mechanisms. The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER), which connects the Afar depression in the north with the Turkana depression and Kenya Rift to the south, consists of two distinct systems of normal faults and its floor is scattered with volcanic fields formed by tens to several hundreds monogenetic, generally basaltic, small volcanoes and composite volcanoes and small calderas. The distribution of vents defines the overall shape of the volcanic field. Previous work has shown that the distribution of volcanic vents and the shape of a field are linked to its tectonic environment and its magmatic system. In order to distinguish the impact of each mechanism, we analyzed four volcanic fields located at the boundary between the central and northern MER, three of them (Debre Zeyit, Wonji and Kone) grew in the rift valley and one (Akaki) on the western rift shoulder. The elongation and shape of the fields were analyzed based on their vent distribution using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the Vent-to-Vent Distance (VVD), and the two dimensional symmetric Gaussian kernel density estimate methods. We extracted from these methods several parameters characterizing the spatial distribution of points (e.g., eccentricity (e), eigenvector index (evi), angular dispersion (Da)). These parameters allow to define at least three types of shape for volcanic fields: strong elongate (line and ellipse), bimodal/medium elongate (ellipse) and dispersed (circle) shapes. Applied to the natural example, these methods well differentiate each volcanic field. For example, the elongation of the field increases from shoulder to rift axis inversely to the angular dispersion. In addition, the results show that none of

  8. The role of phreatomagmatism in a Plio-Pleistocene high-density scoria cone field: Llancanelo Volcanic Field (Mendoza), Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risso, Corina; Németh, Károly; Combina, Ana María; Nullo, Francisco; Drosina, Marina

    2008-01-01

    The Plio-Pleistocene Llancanelo Volcanic Field, together with the nearby Payun Matru Field, comprises at least 800 scoria cones and voluminous lava fields that cover an extensive area behind the Andean volcanic arc. Beside the scoria cones in the Llancanelo Field, at least six volcanoes show evidence for explosive eruptions involving magma-water interaction. These are unusual in the context of the semi-arid climate of the eastern Andean ranges. The volcanic structures consist of phreatomagmatic-derived tuff rings and tuff cones of olivine basalt composition. Malacara and Jarilloso tuff cones were produced by fallout of a range of dry to wet tephra. The Malacara cone shows more evidence for a predominance of wet-emplaced units, with a steep slump-slope characterized by many soft-sediment deformation structures, such as: undulating bedding planes, truncated beds and water escape features. The Piedras Blancas and Carapacho tuff rings resulted from explosive eruptions with deeper explosion loci. These cones are hence dominated by lapilli tuff and tuff units, emplaced mainly by wet and/or dry pyroclastic surges. Carapacho is the only centre that appears to have started with phreatomagmatic eruptions, with lowermost tephra being rich in non-volcanic country rocks. The presence of deformed beds with impact sags, slumping textures, asymmetrical ripples, dunes, cross- and planar lamination, syn-volcanic faulting and accretionary lapilli beds indicate an eruption scenario dominated by excessive water in the transportational and depositional regime. This subordinate phreatomagmatism in the Llancanelo Volcanic Field suggests presence of ground and/or shallow surface water during some of the eruptions. Each of the tuff rings and cones are underlain by thick, fractured multiple older lava units. These broken basalts are inferred to be the horizons where rising magma interacted with groundwater. The strong palagonitization at each of the phreatomagmatic cones formed hard beds

  9. Rapid uplift in Laguna del Maule volcanic field of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (Chile) measured by satellite radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, K.; Ali, T.; Singer, B. S.; Pesicek, J. D.; Thurber, C. H.; Jicha, B. R.; Lara, L. E.; Hildreth, E. W.; Fierstein, J.; Williams-Jones, G.; Unsworth, M. J.; Keranen, K. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field of the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone extends over 500 square kilometers and comprises more than 130 individual vents. As described by Hildreth et al. (2010), the history has been defined from sixty-eight Ar/Ar and K-Ar dates. Silicic eruptions have occurred throughout the past 3.7 Ma, including welded ignimbrite associated with caldera formation at 950 ka, small rhyolitic eruptions between 336 and 38 ka, and a culminating ring of 36 post-glacial rhyodacite and rhyolite coulees and domes that encircle the lake. Dating of five post-glacial flows implies that these silicic eruptions occurred within the last 25 kyr. Field relations indicate that initial eruptions comprised modest volumes of mafic rhyodacite magma that were followed by larger volumes of high silica rhyolite. The post-glacial flare-up of silicic magmatism from vents distributed around the lake, is unprecedented in the history of this volcanic field. Using satellite radar interferometry (InSAR), Fournier et al. (2010) measured uplift at a rate of more than 180 mm/year between 2007 and 2008 in a round pattern centered on the west side of LdM. More recent InSAR observations suggest that rapid uplift has continued from 2008 through early 2011. In contrast, Fournier et al. found no measurable deformation in an interferogram spanning 2003 through 2004. In this study, we model the deformation field using the General Inversion of Phase Technique (GIPhT), as described by Feigl and Thurber (2009). Two different models fit the data. The first model assumes a sill at ~5 km depth has been inflating at a rate of more than 20 million cubic meters per year since 2007. The second model assumes that the water level in the lake dropped at a rate of 20 m/yr from January 2007 through February 2010, thus reducing the load on an elastic simulation of the crust. The rate of intrusion inferred from InSAR is an order of magnitude higher than the average rate derived from well-dated arc

  10. Stratigraphy, geomorphology, geochemistry and hazard implications of the Nejapa Volcanic Field, western Managua, Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avellán, Denis Ramón; Macías, José Luis; Pardo, Natalia; Scolamacchia, Teresa; Rodriguez, Dionisio

    2012-02-01

    The Nejapa Volcanic Field (NVF) is located on the western outskirts of Managua, Nicaragua. It consists of at least 30 volcanic structures emplaced along the N-S Nejapa fault, which represents the western active edge of the Managua Graben. The study area covers the central and southern parts of the volcanic field. We document the basic geomorphology, stratigraphy, chemistry and evolution of 17 monogenetic volcanic structures: Ticomo (A, B, C, D and E); Altos de Ticomo; Nejapa; San Patricio; Nejapa-Norte; Motastepe; El Hormigón; La Embajada; Asososca; Satélite; Refinería; and Cuesta El Plomo (A and B). Stratigraphy aided by radiocarbon dating suggests that 23 eruptions have occurred in the area during the past ~ 34,000 years. Fifteen of these eruptions originated in the volcanic field between ~ 28,500 and 2,130 yr BP with recurrence intervals varying from 400 to 7,000 yr. Most of these eruptions were phreatomagmatic with minor strombolian and fissural lava flow events. A future eruption along the fault might be of a phreatomagmatic type posing a serious threat to the more than 500,000 inhabitants in western Managua.

  11. Geophysical exploration on the subsurface geology of La Garrotxa monogenetic volcanic field (NE Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolós, Xavier; Barde-Cabusson, Stéphanie; Pedrazzi, Dario; Martí, Joan; Casas, Albert; Lovera, Raúl; Nadal-Sala, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    We applied self-potential (SP) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to the exploration of the uppermost part of the substrate geology and shallow structure of La Garrotxa monogenetic volcanic field, part of the European Neogene-Quaternary volcanic province. The aim of the study was to improve knowledge of the shallowest part of the feeding system of these monogenetic volcanoes and of its relationship with the subsurface geology. This study complements previous geophysical studies carried out at a less detailed scale and aimed at identifying deeper structures, and together will constitute the basis to establish volcanic susceptibility in La Garrotxa. SP study complemented previous smaller-scale studies and targeted key areas where ERT could be conducted. The main new results include the generation of resistivity models identifying dykes and faults associated with several monogenetic cones. The combined results confirm that shallow tectonics controlling the distribution of the foci of eruptive activity in this volcanic zone mainly correspond to NNW-SSE and accessorily by NNE-SSW Neogene extensional fissures and faults and concretely show the associated magmatic intrusions. These structures coincide with the deeper ones identified in previous studies, and show that previous Alpine tectonic structures played no apparent role in controlling the loci of this volcanism. Moreover, the results obtained show that the changes in eruption dynamics occurring at different vents located at relatively short distances in this volcanic area are controlled by shallow stratigraphical, structural and hydrogeological differences underneath these monogenetic volcanoes.

  12. Development and relationship of monogenetic and polygenetic volcanic fields in time and space.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, Aurelie; Connor, Chuck; Connor, Laura; Malservisi, Rocco

    2013-04-01

    The classification of volcanic systems, developed by G. P. L. Walker and colleagues, relates volcano morphology to magma transport and eruption processes. In general, distributed monogenetic volcanic fields are characterized by infrequent eruptions, low average output rate, and a low spatial intensity of the eruptive vents. In contrast, central-vent-dominated systems, such as stratovolcanoes, central volcanoes and lava shields are characterized by frequent eruptions, higher average flux rates, and higher spatial intensity of eruptive vents. However, it has been observed that a stratovolcano is often associated to parasitic monogenetic vents on its flanks, related to the central silicic systems, and surrounded by an apron of monogenetic edifices that are part of the volcanic field but independent from the principal central system. It appears from spatial distribution and time-volume relationships that surface area of monogenetic fields reflects the lateral extent of the magma source region and the lack of magma focusing mechanisms. In contrast, magma is focused through a unique conduit system for polygenetic volcanoes, provided by a thermally and mechanically favorable pathway toward the surface that is maintained by frequent and favorable stress conditions. We plan to relate surface observations of spatio-temporal location of eruptive vents and evolution of the field area through time to processes that control magma focusing during ascent and storage in the crust. We choose to study fields that range from dispersed to central-vent dominated, through transitional fields (central felsic system with peripheral field of monogenetic vents independent from the rhyolitic system). We investigate different well-studied volcanic fields in the Western US and Western Europe in order to assess influence of the geodynamic setting and tectonic stress on the spatial distribution of magmatism. In summary, incremental spatial intensity maps should reveal how fast a central conduit

  13. The Quaternary and Pliocene Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field of Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    This region of Yellowstone National Park has been the active focus of one of the Earth's largest magmatic systems for more than 2 million years. The resulting volcanism has been characterized by the eruption of voluminous rhyolites and subordinate basalts but virtually no lavas of intermediate composition. The magmatic system at depth remains active and drives the massive hydrothermal circulation for which the park is widely known. Studies of the volcanic field using geologic mapping and petrology have defined three major cycles of rhyolitic volcanism, each climaxed by the eruption of a rhyolitic ash-flow sheet having a volume of hundreds of thousands of cubic kilometers. The field also has been analyzed in terms of its magmatic and tectonic evolution, including its regional relation to the Snake River plain and to basin-range tectonic extension.

  14. GIS methods applied to the degradation of monogenetic volcanic fields: A case study of the Holocene volcanism of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Fernandez-Turiel, J. L.; Perez-Torrado, F. J.; Aulinas, M.; Carracedo, J. C.; Gimeno, D.; Guillou, H.; Paris, R.

    2011-11-01

    Modeling of volcanic morphometry provides reliable measurements of parameters that assist in the determination of volcanic landform degradation. Variations of the original morphology enable the understanding of patterns affecting erosion and their development, facilitating the assessment of associated hazards. A total of 24 volcanic Holocene eruptions were identified in the island of Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain). 87% of these eruptions occurred in a wet environment while the rest happened in a dry environment. 45% of Holocene eruptions are located along short barrancos (S-type, less than 10 km in length), 20% along large barrancos (L-type, 10-17 km in length) and 35% along extra-large barrancos (XL-type, more than 17 km in length). The erosional history of Holocene volcanic edifices is in the first stage of degradation, with a geomorphic signature characterized by a fresh, young cone with a sharp profile and a pristine lava flow. After intensive field work, a careful palaeo-geomorphological reconstruction of the 24 Holocene eruptions of Gran Canaria was conducted in order to obtain the Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) of the pre- and post-eruption terrains. From the difference between these DTMs, the degradation volume and the incision rate were obtained. The denudation of volcanic cones and lava flows is relatively independent both their geographical location and the climatic environment. However, local factors, such as pre-eruption topography and ravine type, have the greatest influence on the erosion of Holocene volcanic materials in Gran Canaria. Although age is a key factor to help understand the morphological evolution of monogenetic volcanic fields, the Gran Canaria Holocene volcanism presented in this paper demonstrates that local and regional factors may determine the lack of correlation between morphometric parameters and age. Consequently, the degree of transformation of the volcanic edifices evolves, in many cases, independently of their age.

  15. Paleomagnetic evidence bearing on the structural development of the Latir volcanic field near Questa, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Lipman, P.W.; Elston, D.P.

    1982-09-10

    The mid-Tertiary Latir volcanic field in northern New Mexico comprises intermediate-composition volcanics overlain by a regional ash flow sheet and associated lavas of rhyolitic composition that are all cut by silicic-alkalic grantic intrusives. Deeply exposed along the eastern flank of the Rio Grande rift, the silicic extrusive and intrusive rocks all yield radiometric ages of about 23 m.y., within analytical uncertainties. Flow banding and eutaxitic structures within the extrusive units indicate intense structural deformation, which for the most part increases toward the Questa caldera. Paleomagnetic study was undertaken to obtain information on the orientation of the eruptive and intrusive units and to employ the magnetic directions for an evaluation of the tectonic and igneous history of the caldera and enclosing volcanic field. Radiometric ages and the paleomagnetic data indicate that an episode of pronounced extension coincided with a major pulse of igneous activity in the region 23 m.y. ago. Eastward tilting of the volcanic units appears to have been closely followed by caldera collapse and then by resurgent doming of the caldera. Welded tuff units within the caldera were turned on end and together with older volcanic units were incorporated in a collapse megabreccia. The megabreccia and other nearby units were partially or entirely overprinted by a thermochemical aureole associated with the resurgent doming and attendant hydrothermal circulation. The stocks of the resurgent dome appear to have undergone no significant later tilting.

  16. The 40Ar/39Ar ages and tectonic setting of the Middle Eocene northeast Nevada volcanic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, W.E.; Thorman, C.H.; Snee, L.W.

    1995-01-01

    Widespread middle to late Eocene calc-alkalic volcanism, which formed the Northeast Nevada Volcanic Field, marks the earliest Tertiary volcanism in the northern Basin and Range. The central part of this major field in northest Nevada and adjacent Utah is herein defined by 23 40Ar/39Ar ages that arange from 42.6 to 39.0 Ma, rock chemistry from 12 localities, stratigraphic position of the volcanic rocks above a regional middle Eocene unconformity, volcanic setting, and lithology. The type area is at Nanny Creek, in the northern Pequop Mountains, Nevada. In the western and southeastern parts of the field these middle Eocene volcanic rocks rest with depositional angular discordance on lower Eocene lacustrine strata of the Elko and White Sage Formations, respectively. This angular discordance documents a middle Eocene deformational event previously unrecognized in the region. -from Authors

  17. Volcanic ash layers in blue ice fields (Beardmore Glacier Area, Antarctica): Iridium enrichments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeberl, Christian

    1988-01-01

    Dust bands on blue ice fields in Antarctica have been studied and have been identified to originate from two main sources: bedrock debris scraped up from the ground by the glacial movement (these bands are found predominantly at fractures and shear zones in the ice near moraines), and volcanic debris deposited on and incorporated in the ice by large-scale eruptions of Antarctic (or sub-Antractic) volcanoes. Ice core studies have revealed that most of the dust layers in the ice cores are volcanic (tephra) deposits which may be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be related to some specific volcanic eruptions. These eruptions have to be relatively recent (a few thousand years old) since ice cores usually incorporate younger ice. In contrast, dust bands on bare blue ice fields are much older, up to a few hundred thousand years, which may be inferred from the rather high terrestrial age of meteorites found on the ice and from dating the ice using the uranium series method. Also for the volcanic ash layers found on blue ice fields correlations between some specific volcanoes (late Cenozoic) and the volcanic debris have been inferred, mainly using chemical arguments. During a recent field expedition samples of several dust bands found on blue ice fields at the Lewis Cliff Ice Tongue were taken. These dust band samples were divided for age determination using the uranium series method, and chemical investigations to determine the source and origin of the dust bands. The investigations have shown that most of the dust bands found at the Ice Tongue are of volcanic origin and, for chemical and petrological reasons, may be correlated with Cenozoic volcanoes in the Melbourne volcanic province, Northern Victoria Land, which is at least 1500 km away. Major and trace element data have been obtained and have been used for identification and correlation purposes. Recently, some additional trace elements were determined in some of the dust band

  18. Geologic features of Wudalianchi volcanic field, northeastern China: Implications for Martian volcanology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Long; Wang, Chunzeng

    2009-05-01

    Wudalianchi volcanic field, located in northeast China, consists of 14 Quaternary volcanoes with each volcano as a steep-sided scoria cone surrounded by gently sloping lava flows. Each cone is topped with a bowl-shaped or funnel-shaped crater. The volcanic cones are constructed by the accumulation of tephra and other ejecta. In this paper, their geologic features have been investigated and compared with some Martian volcanic features at Ascraeus Mons volcanoes observed on images obtained from High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiments (HiRISE), Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), Context Imager (CTX) and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS). The results show that both Wudalianchi and Ascraeus Mons volcanoes are basaltic, share similar eruptive and geomorphologic features and eruptive styles, and have experienced multiple eruptive phases, in spite of the significant differences in their dimension and size. Both also show a variety of eruptive styles, such as fissure and central venting, tube-fed and channel-fed lava flows, and probably pyroclastic deposits. Three volcanic events are recognized at Ascraeus Mons, including an early phase of shield construction, a middle eruptive phase forming a low lava shield, and the last stage with aprons mantling both NE and SW flanks. We suggest that magma generation at both Wudalianchi and Ascraeus Mons might have been facilitated by an upwelling mantle plume or upwelling of asthenospheric mantle, and a deep-seated fault zone might have controlled magma emplacement and subsequent eruptions in Ascraeus Mons as observed in the Wudalianchi field, where the volcanoes are constructed along the northeast-striking faults. Fumarolic cones produced by water/magma interaction at the Wudalianchi volcanic field may also serve as an analogue for the pseudocraters identified at Isidis and Cerberus Planitia on Mars, suggesting existence of frozen water in the ground on Mars during Martian volcanic eruptions.

  19. Rapid uplift in Laguna del Maule volcanic field of the Andean Southern Volcanic zone (Chile) 2007-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigl, Kurt L.; Le Mével, Hélène; Tabrez Ali, S.; Córdova, Loreto; Andersen, Nathan L.; DeMets, Charles; Singer, Bradley S.

    2014-02-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in Chile is an exceptional example of postglacial rhyolitic volcanism in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. By interferometric analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired between 2007 and 2012, we measure exceptionally rapid deformation. The maximum vertical velocity exceeds 280 mm yr-1. Although the rate of deformation was negligible from 2003 January to 2004 February, it accelerated some time before 2007 January. Statistical testing rejects, with 95 per cent confidence, four hypotheses of artefacts caused by tropospheric gradients, ionospheric effects, orbital errors or topographic relief, respectively. The high rate of deformation is confirmed by daily estimates of position during several months in 2012, as measured by analysis of signals transmitted by the Global Positioning System (GPS) and received on the ground at three stations around the reservoir forming the LdM. The fastest-moving GPS station (MAU2) has a velocity vector of [-180 ± 4, 46 ± 2, 280 ± 4] mm yr-1 for the northward, eastward and upward components, respectively, with respect to the stable interior of the South America Plate. The observed deformation cannot be explained by changes in the gravitational load caused by variations in the water level in the reservoir. For the most recent observation time interval, spanning 44 d in early 2012, the model that best fits the InSAR observations involves an inflating sill at a depth of 5.2 ± 0.3 km, with length 9.0 ± 0.3 km, width 5.3 ± 0.4 km, dip 20 ± 3° from horizontal and strike 14 ± 5° clockwise from north, assuming a rectangular dislocation in a half-space with uniform elastic properties. During this time interval, the estimated rate of tensile opening is 1.1 ± 0.04 m yr-1, such that the rate of volume increase in the modelled sill is 51 ± 5 million m3 yr-1 or 1.6 ± 0.2 m3 s-1. From 2004 January to 2012 April the total increase in volume was at least 0.15 km3 over the 5.2-yr

  20. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey Map of Part of the Southwest Nevada Volcanic Field

    SciTech Connect

    G. Keating; R. Prueitt; A. Cogbill

    2004-06-21

    A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was recently flown to collect data for geologic investigations in the Southwest Nevada Volcanic Field. This survey represents a marked improvement over previous (1999) surveys. The survey includes over 860 km{sup 2} covered by nearly 16,000 km of flightline with 60-m spacing and an instrument altitude of 30 m above the ground surface. Features of interest visible in the dataset include magnetic banding in the volcanic tuffs that form the faulted terrain and sharp delineation of Quaternary basalt cinder cones and lava flows. This 1:100,000-scale map includes a shaded-relief map base and a semi-transparent overlay of the aeromagnetic data, with inset maps illustrating (1) comparisons of detail between the 1999 and 2004 datasets, (2) polarity reversal banding in the volcanic tuff ridges, (3) details of the morphology of Quaternary basalt centers enhanced by aeromagnetic data, and (4) use of GIS in planning the survey.

  1. Measurements and Slope Analyses of Quaternary Cinder Cones, Camargo Volcanic Field, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos, M. I.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Camargo volcanic field (CVF) covers ~3000 km2 and is located in the southeast part of the state of Chihuahua, within the Basin and Range province. The CVF represents the largest mafic alkali volcanic field in northern Mexico. Over a 300 cinder cones have been recognized in the Camargo volcanic field. Volcanic activity ranges from 4.7 to 0.09 Ma revealed by 40Ar/39Ar dating methods. Previous studies say that there is a close relationship between the cinder cone slope angle, due to mechanical weathering, and age. This technique is considered a reliable age indicator, especially in arid climates, such as occur in the CVF. Data were acquired with digital topographic maps (DRG) and digital elevation models (DEM) overlapped in the Global Mapper software. For each cone, the average radius (r) was calculated from six measurements, the height (h) is the difference between peak elevation and the altitude of the contour used to close the radius, and the slope angle was calculated using the equation Θ = tan-1(h/r). The slope angles of 30 cinder cones were calculated showing angles ranging from 4 to 15 degrees. A diffusion model, displayed by an exponential relationship between slope angle and age, places the ages of these 30 cones from 215 to 82 ka, within the range marked by radiometric methods. Future work include the analysis of more cinder cones to cover the whole CVF, and contribute to the validation of this technique.

  2. Uranium geochemistry of selected rock units from the Marysvale Volcanic Field, Piute County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffer, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The Marysvale Volcanic Field is an area rich in uranium. This study was undertaken to determine if the uranium deposits might be of volcanogenic origin. This geochemical study consisted of determining the major, minor and trace element concentrations of the major volcanic units, and the relationships of the rock chemistry to uranium mineralization. The units in the Marysvale Volcanic Field, consist of ash-flow tuffs, intermediate lava flows, and associated intrusives of the Bullion Canyon volcanics and ash-flow tuffs, volcaniclastic deposits, domes and stocks of the Mount Belknap volcanics. When compared to overlaying welded tuff or rhyolitic units, the vitrophyric samples from the Mount Belknap volcanic units, are all enriched in F, Cs, and U, and that 50% of the vitrophyres are enriched in Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Zr, Pb, Sr, V, and Zn. Overlying untis have been devitrified and have released U as well as other trace elements into the volcanogenic system. This study has reevaluated the Marysvale Central Mining District and has proposed another theory as to the origin of the uranium deposits in that area. This hypothesis places a previously unidentified caldera around the area, and this author has named it the Marysvale caldera. Evidence for this caldera includes: arcurate faults which surround the region; alteration patterns which appear to form a circular pattern along the boundary of the proposed caldera; the presence of small monzonite intrusive bodies appear to ring the caldera; the presence of ash-flow tuffs which thicken appreciably along the northeast boundary of the caldera; and the central intrusive which may represent a resurgent phase of the proposed caldera. This seems to be a viable alternative to the magmatic hydrothermal origin for the uranium deposits presently proposed for the Central Mining District.

  3. Analysis of well logging methods in volcanic and volcano sedimentary rocks from Pina petroleum field

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriquez, N.

    1996-09-01

    Petrophysical, petrological and geophysical methods have been applied to prospecting and well logging for several petroleum fields in Cuba. The most common reservoir in these fields are carbonate rocks. However, the Pina field, in the Central region of the island, distinguishes itself by the good quality of the oil and the volcano sedimentary and volcanic character of the reservoirs. These rocks have peculiar geophysical responses, which is why the study of these methods and the development of the interpretation methods is very important. Integrated geological and geophysical information was necessary during the drilling of wells in the Pina field in order to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential. GEONUC code permits us to use different ways to solve questions about interpretation of well logging in the volcanic sedimentary rocks. This code gives us the opportunity to analyze complex methods.

  4. Anomalous Geologic Setting of the Spencer-High Point Volcanic Field, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahashi, G. S.; Hughes, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    The Spencer-High Point (SHP) volcanic field comprises an ~1700 sq km mafic volcanic rift zone located near Yellowstone in the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). SHP lava flows are both similar to and distinct from typical olivine tholeiite lavas of the ESRP. SHP has unique physical volcanic features characterized by numerous cinder cones and short lava flows; whereas, spatter ramparts, fissures and longer flows dominate in other ESRP regions. Topography and aerial photos indicate that vents are generally aligned northwest- southeast, which is sub-parallel to adjacent Basin and Range faults in much of the ESRP. Yet individual vents and other structural elements in SHP where Basin and Range, ESRP and thrust-faulted mountain belts all intersect, are elongated in a more east-west direction. Distinct structural control is manifested in an overall southward slope over the entire volcanic field. Short lava flows tend to flow north or south off of a central topographically higher zone of overlapping lava flows and smaller vents. Several smaller vents appear to be parasitic cones adjacent to larger eruptive centers. Contrary to these relations, preliminary geochemical data by Leeman (1982) and Kuntz et al. (1992) suggest SHP lavas are typical ESRP olivine tholeiite basalts, which notably have coarsely diktytaxitic texture. The central and eastern sections of the SHP field contain lavas with large (3-8cm), clear, euhedral plagioclase phenocrysts but without diktytaxitic texture. Lava flows in the central and eastern sections of SHP volcanic field are pahoehoe. These also contain crustal xenoliths implying a prolonged crustal history. Geochemical whole rock and microprobe analyses are currently being processed for petrogenetic history.

  5. Linking microbial assemblages to paleoenvironmental conditions from the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum times in Laguna Potrok Aike sediments, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuillemin, Aurele; Ariztegui, Daniel; Leavitt, Peter R.; Bunting, Lynda

    2014-05-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a closed basin located in the southern hemisphere's mid-latitudes (52°S) where paleoenvironmental conditions were recorded as temporal sedimentary sequences resulting from variations in the regional hydrological regime and geology of the catchment. The interpretation of the limnogeological multiproxy record developed during the ICDP-PASADO project allowed the identification of contrasting time windows associated with the fluctuations of Southern Westerly Winds. In the framework of this project, a 100-m-long core was also dedicated to a detailed geomicrobiological study which aimed at a thorough investigation of the lacustrine subsurface biosphere. Indeed, aquatic sediments do not only record past climatic conditions, but also provide a wide range of ecological niches for microbes. In this context, the influence of environmental features upon microbial development and survival remained still unexplored for the deep lacustrine realm. Therefore, we investigated living microbes throughout the sedimentary sequence using in situ ATP assays and DAPI cell count. These results, compiled with pore water analysis, SEM microscopy of authigenic concretions and methane and fatty acid biogeochemistry, provided evidence for a sustained microbial activity in deep sediments and pinpointed the substantial role of microbial processes in modifying initial organic and mineral fractions. Finally, because the genetic material associated with microorganisms can be preserved in sediments over millennia, we extracted environmental DNA from Laguna Potrok Aike sediments and established 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal clone libraries to better define the use of DNA-based techniques in reconstructing past environments. We focused on two sedimentary horizons both displaying in situ microbial activity, respectively corresponding to the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum periods. Sequences recovered from the productive Holocene record revealed a microbial community adapted to

  6. Internal architecture of the Tuxtla volcanic field, Veracruz, Mexico, inferred from gravity and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, Juan Manuel; Lopez-Loera, Hector; Mena, Manuel; Zamora-Camacho, Araceli

    2016-09-01

    The Tuxtla Volcanic Field (TVF) is a basaltic volcanic field emerging from the plains of the western margin of the Gulf of Mexico in the Mexican State of Veracruz. Separated by hundreds of kilometers from the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the NW and the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc to the SE, it stands detached not only in location but also in the composition of its rocks, which are predominantly alkaline. These characteristics make its origin somewhat puzzling. Furthermore, one of the large volcanoes of the field, San Martin Tuxtla, underwent an eruptive period in historical times (CE 1793). Such volcanic activity conveys particular importance to the study of the TVF from the perspective of volcanology and hazard assessment. Despite the above circumstances, few investigations about its internal structure have been reported. In this work, we present analyses of gravity and aeromagnetic data obtained from different sources. We present the complete Bouguer anomaly of the area and its separation into regional and residual components. The aeromagnetic data were processed to yield the reduction to the pole, the analytic signal, and the upward continuation to complete the interpretation of the gravity analyses. Three-dimensional density models of the regional and residual anomalies were obtained by inversion of the gravity signal adding the response of rectangular prisms at the nodes of a regular grid. We obtained a body with a somewhat flattened top at 16 km below sea level from the inversion of the regional. Three separate slender bodies with tops 6 km deep were obtained from the inversion of the residual. The gravity and magnetic anomalies, as well as the inferred source bodies that produce those geophysical anomalies, lie between the Sontecomapan and Catemaco faults, which are proposed as flower structures associated with an inferred deep-seated fault termed the Veracruz Fault. These fault systems along with magma intrusion at the lower crust are necessary features to

  7. Spurious behavior in volcanic records of geomagnetic field reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlut, Julie; Vella, Jerome; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Soler, Vicente; Legoff, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Very large directional variations of magnetization have been reported in several lava flows recording a geomagnetic reversal. Such behavior could reflect real geomagnetic changes or be caused by artifacts due to post-emplacement alteration and/or non-ideal magnetic behavior. More recently, a high resolution paleomagnetic record from sediments pleads also for an extremely rapid reversal process during the last reversal. Assuming that the geomagnetic field would have moved by tens of degrees during cooling of moderate thickness lava flows implies brief episodes of rapid changes by a few degrees per day that are difficult to reconcile with the rate of liquid motions at the core surface. Systematical mineralogical bias is a most likely explanation to promote such behavior as recently reconsidered by Coe et al., 2014 for the rapid field changes recorded at Steens Mountain. We resampled three lava flows at La Palma island (Canarias) that are sandwiched between reverse polarity and normal polarity flows associated with the last reversal. The results show an evolution of the magnetization direction from top to bottom. Thermal demagnetization experiments were conducted using different heating and cooling rates. Similarly, continuous demagnetization and measurements. In both cases, we did not notice any remagnetization associated with mineralogical transformations during the experiments. Magnetic grain sizes do not show any correlation with the amplitude of the deviations. Microscopic observations indicate poor exsolution, which could suggests post-cooling thermochemical remagnetization processes.

  8. Origin of metaluminous and alkaline volcanic rocks of the Latir volcanic field, northern Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Lipman, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Volcanic rocks of the Latir volcanic field evolved in an open system by crystal fractionation, magma mixing, and crustal assimilation. Early high-SiO2 rhyolites (28.5 Ma) fractionated from intermediate compositionmagmas that did not reach the surface. Most precaldera lavas have intermediate-compositions, from olivine basaltic-andesite (53% SiO2) to quartz latite (67% SiO2). The precaldera intermediate-composition lavas have anomalously high Ni and MgO contents and reversely zoned hornblende and augite phenocrysts, indicating mixing between primitive basalts and fractionated magmas. Isotopic data indicate that all of the intermediate-composition rocks studied contain large crustal components, although xenocrysts are found only in one unit. Inception of alkaline magmatism (alkalic dacite to high-SiO2 peralkaline rhyolite) correlates with, initiation of regional extension approximately 26 Ma ago. The Questa caldera formed 26.5 Ma ago upon eruption of the >500 km3 high-SiO2 peralkaline Amalia Tuff. Phenocryst compositions preserved in the cogenetic peralkaline granite suggest that the Amalia Tuff magma initially formed from a trace element-enriched, high-alkali metaluminous magma; isotopic data suggest that the parental magmas contain a large crustal component. Degassing of water- and halogen-rich alkali basalts may have provided sufficient volatile transport of alkalis and other elements into the overlying silicic magma chamber to drive the Amalia Tuff magma to peralkaline compositions. Trace element variations within the Amalia Tuff itself may be explained solely by 75% crystal fractionation of the observed phenocrysts. Crystal settling, however, is inconsistent with mineralogical variations in the tuff, and crystallization is thought to have occurred at a level below that tapped by the eruption. Spatially associated Miocene (15-11 Ma) lavas did not assimilate large amounts of crust or mix with primitive basaltic magmas. Both mixing and crustal assimilation processes

  9. Catastrophic volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipman, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    Since primitive times, catastrophes due to volcanic activity have been vivid in the mind of man, who knew that his activities in many parts of the world were threatened by lava flows, mudflows, and ash falls. Within the present century, increasingly complex interactions between volcanism and the environment, on scales not previously experienced historically, have been detected or suspected from geologic observations. These include enormous hot pyroclastic flows associated with collapse at source calderas and fed by eruption columns that reached the stratosphere, relations between huge flood basalt eruptions at hotspots and the rifting of continents, devastating laterally-directed volcanic blasts and pyroclastic surges, great volcanic-generated tsunamis, climate modification from volcanic release of ash and sulfur aerosols into the upper atmosphere, modification of ocean circulation by volcanic constructs and attendent climatic implications, global pulsations in intensity of volcanic activity, and perhaps triggering of some intense terrestrial volcanism by planetary impacts. Complex feedback between volcanic activity and additional seemingly unrelated terrestrial processes likely remains unrecognized. Only recently has it become possible to begin to evaluate the degree to which such large-scale volcanic processes may have been important in triggering or modulating the tempo of faunal extinctions and other evolutionary events. In this overview, such processes are examined from the viewpoint of a field volcanologist, rather than as a previous participant in controversies concerning the interrelations between extinctions, impacts, and volcanism.

  10. Isotopic and chemical constraints on the petrogenesis of Blackburn Hills volcanic field, western Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Moll-Stalcup, E.J.; Arth, J.G. )

    1991-12-01

    The Blackburn Hills volcanic field is one of several Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary (75-50 Ma) volcanic fields in western Alaska that comprise a vast magmatic province extending from the Arctic Circle to Bristol Bay. It consists of andesite flows, rhyolite domes, a central granodiorite to quartz monzonite pluton, and small intrusive rhyolite porphyries, overlain by basalt and alkali-rhyolites. Most of the field consists of andesite flows which can be divided into two groups on the basis of elemental and isotopic composition: a group having lower ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr){sub i}, higher ({sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd){sub i}, and moderate LREE and HREE contents (group 1), and a group having higher ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr){sub i}, lower ({sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd){sub i}, and lower HREE contents. Basalts are restricted to the top of the stratigraphic section, comprise the most primitive part of group 1 (({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr){sub i} = 0.7033; ({sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd){sub i} = 0.5129), and have trace-element ratios that are similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIBs). Although some workers have suggested that the volcanic field is underlain by old continental crust, none of the data require the presence of Paleozoic or Precambrian continental middle or upper crust under this part of the volcanic field. However, the ultimate source of some of the rocks in the Yukon-Koyukuk province that have high {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr and low {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd ratios may be old sub-continental mantle and/or lower crust, which was previously subducted beneath the Yukon-Koyukuk province during Early Cretaceous arc-continent collision.

  11. Stratigraphic relations and lithologic variations in the Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.N.; Goff, F.; Garcia, S.; Hagan, R.C.

    1986-02-10

    Over 100 radiometric dates and recent detailed geologic mapping allow some refinements of the stratigraphic relations of major units and generalization of temporal lithologic variations in the Jemez volcanic field. Volcanism had begun in the area by about 16.5 Ma with episodic eruptions of alkaline basalts. By 13 Ma, alkaline volcanism had been replaced with eruptions of more voluminous olivine tholeiite. High-silica rhyolite, derived from melts of lower crust, also was erupting by about 13 Ma. Basalt and high-silica rhyolite continued to be erupted until about 7 and 6 Ma, respectively, but effusions of dominantly andesitic differentiates of basalt that began as early as about 12 Ma volumetrically overshadowed all other eruptive products between 10 and 7 Ma. From 7 to 13 the dominant erupted lithology was dacite, which appears to have been generated by mixing of magmas whose compositions are approximated by earlier andesites and high-silica rhyolites. Less than 4--3 Ma volcanism was dominated by eruption of rhyolitic tuffs.

  12. Contributions to Astrogeology: Geology of the lunar crater volcanic field, Nye County, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. H.; Trask, N. J.

    1971-01-01

    The Lunar Crater volcanic field in east-central Nevada includes cinder cones, maars, and basalt flows of probably Quaternary age that individually and as a group resemble some features on the moon. Three episodes of volcanism are separated by intervals of relative dormancy and erosion. Changes in morphology of cinder cones, degree of weathering, and superposition of associated basalt flows provide a basis for determining the relative ages of the cones. A method has been devised whereby cone heights, base radii, and angles of slope are used to determine semiquantitatively the age relationships of some cinder cones. Structural studies show that cone and crater chains and their associated lava flows developed along fissures and normal faults produced by tensional stress. The petrography of the basalts and pyroclastics suggests magmatic differentiation at depth which produced interbedded subalkaline basalts, alkali-olivine basalts, and basanitoids. The youngest flows in the field are basanitoids.

  13. Rocky 7 prototype Mars rover field geology experiments 1. Lavic Lake and sunshine volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arvidson, R. E.; Acton, C.; Blaney, D.; Bowman, J.; Kim, S.; Klingelhofer, G.; Marshall, J.; Niebur, C.; Plescia, J.; Saunders, R.S.; Ulmer, C.T.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments with the Rocky 7 rover were performed in the Mojave Desert to better understand how to conduct rover-based, long-distance (kilometers) geological traverses on Mars. The rover was equipped with stereo imaging systems for remote sensing science and hazard avoidance and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers for in situ determination of mineralogy of unprepared rock and soil surfaces. Laboratory data were also obtained using the spectrometers and an X ray diffraction (XRD)/XRF instrument for unprepared samples collected from the rover sites. Simulated orbital and descent image data assembled for the test sites were found to be critical for assessing the geologic setting, formulating hypotheses to be tested with rover observations, planning traverses, locating the rover, and providing a regional context for interpretation of rover-based observations. Analyses of remote sensing and in situ observations acquired by the rover confirmed inferences made from orbital and simulated descent images that the Sunshine Volcanic Field is composed of basalt flows. Rover data confirmed the idea that Lavic Lake is a recharge playa and that an alluvial fan composed of sediments with felsic compositions has prograded onto the playa. Rover-based discoveries include the inference that the basalt flows are mantled with aeolian sediment and covered with a dense pavement of varnished basalt cobbles. Results demonstrate that the combination of rover remote sensing and in situ analytical observations will significantly increase our understanding of Mars and provide key connecting links between orbital and descent data and analyses of returned samples. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Magma evolution and ascent at the Craters of the Moon and neighboring volcanic fields, southern Idaho, USA: implications for the evolution of polygenetic and monogenetic volcanic fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Putirka, Keith D.; Kuntz, Mel A.; Unruh, Daniel M.; Vaid, Nitin

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of polygenetic and monogenetic volcanic fields must reflect differences in magma processing during ascent. To assess their evolution we use thermobarometry and geochemistry to evaluate ascent paths for neighboring, nearly coeval volcanic fields in the Snake River Plain, in south-central Idaho, derived from (1) dominantly Holocene polygenetic evolved lavas from the Craters of the Moon lava field (COME) and (2) Quaternary non-evolved, olivine tholeiites (NEOT) from nearby monogenetic volcanic fields. These data show that NEOT have high magmatic temperatures (1205 + or - 27 degrees C) and a narrow temperature range (50 degrees C). Prolonged storage of COME magmas allows them to evolve to higher 87Sr/86Sr and SiO2, and lower MgO and 143Nd/144Nd. Most importantly, ascent paths control evolution: NEOT often erupt near the axis of the plain where high-flux (Yellowstone-related), pre-Holocene magmatic activity replaces granitic middle crust with basaltic sills, resulting in a net increase in NEOT magma buoyancy. COME flows erupt off-axis, where felsic crustal lithologies sometimes remain intact, providing a barrier to ascent and a source for crustal contamination. A three-stage ascent process explains the entire range of erupted compositions. Stage 1 (40-20 km): picrites are transported to the middle crust, undergoing partial crystallization of olivine + or - clinopyroxene. COME magmas pass through unarmored conduits and assimilate 1% or less of ancient gabbroic crust having high Sr and 87Sr/86Sr and low SiO2. Stage 2 (20-10 km): magmas are stored within the middle crust, and evolve to moderate MgO (10%). NEOT magmas, reaching 10% MgO, are positively buoyant and migrate through the middle crust. COME magmas remain negatively buoyant and so crystallize further and assimilate middle crust. Stage 3 (15-0 km): final ascent and eruption occurs when volatile contents, increased by differentiation, are sufficient (1-2 wt % H2O) to provide magma buoyancy through the

  15. Role of crustal assimilation and basement compositions in the petrogenesis of differentiated intraplate volcanic rocks: a case study from the Siebengebirge Volcanic Field, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, K. P.; Kirchenbaur, M.; Fonseca, R. O. C.; Kasper, H. U.; Münker, C.; Froitzheim, N.

    2016-06-01

    The Siebengebirge Volcanic Field (SVF) in western Germany is part of the Cenozoic Central European Volcanic Province. Amongst these volcanic fields, the relatively small SVF comprises the entire range from silica-undersaturated mafic lavas to both silica-undersaturated and silica-saturated differentiated lavas. Owing to this circumstance, the SVF represents a valuable study area representative of intraplate volcanism in Europe. Compositions of the felsic lavas can shed some new light on differentiation of intraplate magmas and on the extent and composition of potential crustal assimilation processes. In this study, we provide detailed petrographic and geochemical data for various differentiated SVF lavas, including major and trace element concentrations as well as Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope compositions. Samples include tephriphonolites, latites, and trachytes with SiO2 contents ranging between 53 and 66 wt%. If compared to previously published compositions of mafic SVF lavas, relatively unradiogenic 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf coupled with radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr and 207Pb/204Pb lead to the interpretation that the differentiated volcanic rocks have assimilated significant amounts of lower crustal mafic granulites like the ones found as xenoliths in the nearby Eifel volcanic field. These crustal contaminants should possess unradiogenic 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf, radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr, and highly radiogenic 207Pb/204Pb compositions requiring the presence of ancient components in the central European lower crust that are not sampled on the surface. Using energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallisation (EC-AFC) model calculations, differentiation of the SVF lithologies can be modelled by approximately 39-47 % fractional crystallisation and 6-15 % crustal assimilation. Notably, the transition from silica-undersaturated to silica-saturated compositions of many felsic lavas in the SVF that is difficult to account for in closed-system models is also well explained by

  16. Geomagnetic field for the past 5 Myr recorded in lava flows from British Columbia, Patagonia, and Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, Victoria

    2005-11-01

    Paleosecular variation (PSV) and time averaged field (TAF) results recorded in lava flows younger than 5 million years are presented. The targeted areas of studies are several volcanic fields from British Columbia (mainly the Silverthrone, Garibaldi, and Wells Park volcanic fields), Southern Patagonia (the Pali-Aike volcanic field and Meseta Viscachas lavas), and Mexico (the Trans-Mexican volcanic belt and several volcanic areas in San Luis Potosi). The purpose of this investigation was to obtain high quality paleomagetic data suitable to test the presence or absence of permanent non dipolar components of the field that have been interpreted from studies carried out with less rigor. The mean directions in the areas of British Columbia and Patagonia (roughly at 50° N and 50° S latitude) coincide with the expected geocentric axial dipole (GAD) at these areas. The presence of a quadrupolar component of the field is difficult to discard because it is expected to produce only about 1° shallower inclinations. The mean direction in the area of Mexico coincides with a GAD plus a 5% quadrupole. The VGP scatter in the three areas of study coincides with Model G. The asymmetry between the northern and southern hemisphere of the present magnetic field and particularly the 20° inclination anomaly relative to GAD in Patagonia, are not observed in the paleomagnetic data obtained, implying that the present field configuration is relatively recent. The results confirm that axial components prevail in the time-averaged field.

  17. Records of magmatic change as preserved in zircon: examples from the Yellowstone Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Zircon crystals have been used as proxies for their host magmatic composition and as records of the evolution and differentiation of silicic magma systems through the use of integrated techniques such as cathodoluminescence imaging, LA-ICPMS trace element analysis, thermometry, and high-precision CA-IDTIMS U/Pb dating. This petrochronologic approach can aid in identifying crystal populations arising from discrete pulses of magmatism, reconstructing the growth histories of those populations, quantifying the chemical evolution of the host magma, and determining the timing and tempo of that chemical evolution. The Yellowstone Volcanic Field hosts both large and small volume silicic eruptions whose zircon records can provide insights to magmatic processes using a petrochronologic approach. Morphological and thermochemical trends preserved in zircon grains extracted from the three Yellowstone super-eruptions and a small volume precursory eruption indicate that magmatism in the volcanic field is punctuated, characterized by numerous pulses of melting, differentiation, and solidification occurring prior to eruption. U/Pb zircon dating constrains magma assembly to geologically short timescales, with populations of earlier solidified zircon incorporated into the nascent magma just prior to eruption. This requires punctuated intervals of high magmatic flux be superimposed on longer durations of a much lower background flux. Thus super-eruptions within the Yellowstone Volcanic Field result from rapid production and evolution of magma, and preceded by periods of smaller volume magma production that undergo similar differentiation processes over comparable timescales.

  18. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part describes the status of continuing field studies for the volcanic center for this area south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The second part presents an overview of the preliminary results of ongoing chronology studies and their constraints on the age and stratigraphy of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Along with the chronology data, the assumptions, strengths, and limitations of each methods are discussed.

  19. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  20. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

  1. Spatial and Alignment Analyses for a field of Small Volcanic Vents South of Pavonis Mons Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Glaze, L. S.; Greeley, R.; Hauber, E.; Baloga, S. M.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Williams, D. A.; Glotch, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    The Tharsis province of Mars displays a variety of small volcanic vent (10s krn in diameter) morphologies. These features were identified in Mariner and Viking images [1-4], and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data show them to be more abundant than originally observed [5,6]. Recent studies are classifying their diverse morphologies [7-9]. Building on this work, we are mapping the location of small volcanic vents (small-vents) in the Tharsis province using MOLA, Thermal Emission Imaging System, and High Resolution Stereo Camera data [10]. Here we report on a preliminary study of the spatial and alignment relationships between small-vents south of Pavonis Mons, as determined by nearest neighbor and two-point azimuth statistical analyses. Terrestrial monogenetic volcanic fields display four fundamental characteristics: 1) recurrence rates of eruptions,2 ) vent abundance, 3) vent distribution, and 4) tectonic relationships [11]. While understanding recurrence rates typically requires field measurements, insight into vent abundance, distribution, and tectonic relationships can be established by mapping of remotely sensed data, and subsequent application of spatial statistical studies [11,12], the goal of which is to link the distribution of vents to causal processes.

  2. Temporal Gravity Observations in Volcanic Areas : Contribution and Limitation of Field Relative Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvain, B.; Sylvain, B.; Michel, D.; Jerome, A.; Valerie, B.; Christine, D.; Germinal, G.; Dominique, R.

    2001-12-01

    Relative gravimetry has been successfully used in the last decades to evidence temporal gravity changes related with ground deformation or mass flux in volcanic areas. Recent instrumental developments in relative gravity data acquisition combined with performances of GPS surveying have significantly improved the sensitivity and the efficiency of the measurement of the gravity field on land. Classical analogical land gravity meters are now advantageously replaced by new generations of microprocessor based instruments allowing automatic measurements digitally recorded along with other useful information. Such improvements offer new potentialities for the study of internal processes through precise surveying or differential continuous recordings. In the meantime, due to intrinsic properties of relative instruments, rigorous and constraining protocols for data acquisition and processing are required to minimize the effects of instrumental drift and possible calibration changes that should be carefully controlled. The combination of relative and absolute gravity measurements then appears as a promising way to study the mass flux associated with the volcanic activity especially in strong topography or island areas. Current potentialities and limitations of relative instruments are discussed here from results of laboratory experiments and field surveys in volcanic areas performed by IRD and IPGP.

  3. Shallow magma chamber under the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field unveiled by seismic imaging with dense array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiwei; Ni, Sidao; Zhang, Baolong; Bao, Feng; Zhang, Senqi; Deng, Yang; Yuen, David A.

    2016-05-01

    The Wudalianchi Volcano Field (WDF) is a typical intraplate volcano in northeast China with generation mechanism not yet well understood. As its last eruption was around 300 years ago, the present risk for volcano eruption is of particular public interest. We have carried out a high-resolution ambient noise tomography to investigate the location of magma chambers beneath the volcanic cones with a dense seismic array of 43 seismometers and ~ 6 km spatial interval. Significant low-velocity anomalies up to 10% are found at 7-13 km depth under the Weishan volcano, consistent with the pronounced high electrical-conductivity anomalies from previous magnetotelluric survey. We propose these extremely low velocity anomalies can be interpreted as partial melting in a shallow magma chamber with volume at least 200 km3 which may be responsible for most of the recent volcanic eruptions in WDF. Therefore, this magma chamber may pose a serious hazard for northeast China.

  4. Improved Constraints on the Eruptive History of Northern Harrat Rahat Volcanic Field, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelten, M. E.; Downs, D. T.; Calvert, A. T.; Sherrod, D. R.; Hassan, K. H.; Muquyyim, F. A.; Ashur, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Harrat Rahat is a large (~20,000 km2) alkalic volcanic field located in central western Saudi Arabia. A variety of eruptive products ranging from alkali basalt to trachyte have erupted at Harrat Rahat over the past ~10 m.y., with the most recent eruptions occurring at 641 CE (uncertain) and 1256 CE in the northern part of the volcanic field. Despite the field's young age and its close proximity to two major city centers, the eruptive history of Harrat Rahat remains poorly constrained. Previous researchers grouped the volcanic strata of northern Harrat Rahat into seven subunits based on limited K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating, and on the degree of erosion displayed by the eruptive products. The youngest eruptive products (subunits Qm7 - Qm4) are thought to be ≤600 ka, whereas the older lavas (Qm3 - Qm1) are thought to be >600 ka. However, due to the sparse geochronologic control on the ages of the eruptive units, it remains unclear if the currently defined subunits accurately reflect the age distribution of lavas in northern Harrat Rahat. Additionally, the temporal relation between basaltic magmatism and the more evolved eruptive products has yet to be examined. To better constrain the eruptive history of Harrat Rahat we measured >50 new 40Ar/39Ar eruption ages for Qm1 through Qm5 lavas in northern Harrat Rahat. These new 40Ar/39Ar ages suggest that the majority of volcanism in the region occurred ≤400 ka and is significantly younger than previously thought, indicating that the magmatic system at Harrat Rahat has been more active over the past 400 kyr then previously recognized. Additionally, these new age data suggest that nearly all trachytic magmatism occurred <125 ka and was preceded by a pulse of more mafic magmatism. It is likely the magmatic system at Harrat Rahat reached an evolved state late in the history of the volcanic field due to increased and/or prolonged input of basaltic magmas into the crust.

  5. A distinct source and differentiation history for Kolumbo submarine volcano, Santorini volcanic field, Aegean arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, Martijn; Carey, Steven; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Smet, Ingrid; Godelitsas, Athanasios; Vroon, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the first detailed geochemical characterization of Kolumbo submarine volcano in order to investigate the role of source heterogeneity in controlling geochemical variability within the Santorini volcanic field in the central Aegean arc. Kolumbo, situated 15 km to the northeast of Santorini, last erupted in 1650 AD and is thus closely associated with the Santorini volcanic system in space and time. Samples taken by remotely-operated vehicle that were analyzed for major element, trace element and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope composition include the 1650 AD and underlying K2 rhyolitic, enclave-bearing pumices that are nearly identical in composition (73 wt.% SiO2, 4.2 wt.% K2O). Lava bodies exposed in the crater and enclaves are basalts to andesites (52-60 wt.% SiO2). Biotite and amphibole are common phenocryst phases, in contrast with the typically anhydrous mineral assemblages of Santorini. The strong geochemical signature of amphibole fractionation and the assimilation of lower crustal basement in the petrogenesis of the Kolumbo magmas indicates that Kolumbo and Santorini underwent different crustal differentiation histories and that their crustal magmatic systems are unrelated. Moreover, the Kolumbo samples are derived from a distinct, more enriched mantle source that is characterized by high Nb/Yb (>3) and low 206Pb/204Pb (<18.82) that has not been recognized in the Santorini volcanic products. The strong dissimilarity in both petrogenesis and inferred mantle sources between Kolumbo and Santorini suggests that pronounced source variations can be manifested in arc magmas that are closely associated in space and time within a single volcanic field.

  6. Geomorphometric analysis of the scoria cones of the San Francisco Volcanic Field using polar coordinate transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vörös, Fanni; Koma, Zsófia; Karátson, Dávid; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    Scoria cones are often studied using geomorphometric and traditional GIS methods, e.g. aspect, slope histograms, area, cone height/width ratio. In order to enhance the non-symmetric shape components in contrast to the conical forms, we used a new approach in our research: the polar coordinate transformation (PCT) introduced by Székely & Karátson (2004). The study area is the classic cluster of scoria cones at the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) encompassing roughly 600 scoria cones as well as the San Francisco stratovolcano. Our goal is to analyse the even slight asymmetric shape of the scoria cones, and to generalize our findings. The area is a well-studied volcanic field, with a great number of available geological and geomorphological information, so comparing our PCT results with the data in literature is feasible. Polar coordinate transformation, being a one-to-one transformation, maps the original Cartesian coordinates (X, Y in meters) to radial distance (m) and azimuth (°) values. Our inputs were digitized polygons. We created images in the transformed coordinate system that clearly show the asymmetrical shape of the scoria cones. This asymmetry is found to be related to some extent to denudation, and to the age of the volcanic edifice that correlates with differential erosion. However, original asymmetries related to formation (e.g. rifting, emplacement on slope, eruption variations etc.) are also reasonable. The applied technique allows to define new derivatives of volcano-geomorphological parameters. The resultant scoria cone patterns have been manually categorized, however, the results are suitable for automated classification which is our next purpose. BSz contributed as an Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow. Székely, B. & Karátson, D. (2004): DEM-based morphometry as a tool for reconstructing primary volcanic landforms: examples from the Börzsöny Mountains, Hungary, Geomorphology 63:25-37.

  7. A Tale of Two Olivines: Magma Ascent in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smid, E. R.; McGee, L. E.; Smith, I. E.; Lindsay, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) is a nephelinitic to subalkali basaltic monogenetic field centered on the city of Auckland, New Zealand. Lavas are olivine-phyric, and the deposits of several volcanoes in the field contain olivine crystals with chrome spinel (Cr-spinel) inclusions. Microprobe analyses show at least two populations of olivine, categorised by their Mg# and their spinel inclusion compositions: the first has olivines that are euhedral, have compositions slightly less forsteritic than expected for whole rock Mg#, and have Cr-spinel inclusions with relatively low Cr2O3 contents of ~20%. These are interpreted as antecrysts inherited from the mantle source that yielded their host magma. The second population is characterised by olivines that are sub- to euhedral, are significantly more forsteritic than expected from their host whole rock Mg#, and have Cr-spinel inclusons with relatively high Cr2O3 contents of ~50%. These are interpreted as xenocrysts. The composition of these high Cr2O3 spinels very closely resembles the composition of spinels within olivines in dunite sampled from the Dun Mountain Ophiolite on the South Island of New Zealand. The northward extension of the Dun Mountain complex beneath the North Island is defined by the Junction Magnetic Anomaly, marking a crustal terrane boundary that underlies the Auckland Volcanic Field. These data indicate that the magmas that have risen to produce the volcanoes of the Auckland Volcanic Field have carried crystals from an underlying ultramafic crust as well as from their asthenospheric source. Euhedral olivine crystals which do not contain Cr-spinel are also present in AVF lavas and these are interpreted as true phenocrysts that crystallised directly from their host magmas. The lack of reaction textures at crystal margins suggests rapid ascent rates. A crustal origin for the xenocrysts not only has large implications for ascent rate modelling of olivines, but also for the crustal structure of the

  8. Evolution of a magmatic system during continental extension: The Mount Taylor volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, F.V. ); Baldridge, W.S. ); DePaolo, D.J. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA ); Shafiqullah, M. )

    1990-11-10

    In this paper the authors present geologic mapping, K-Ar chronology, major and trace element data, mineral chemistry, and Nd, Sr, and O isotopic data for volcanic rocks of the Mount Taylor volcanic field (MTVF). The MTVF lies on the tectonic boundary between the Basin and Range province and the southeastern Colorado Plateau and is dominated by Mount Taylor, a composite volcano active from {approx}3 to 1.5 m.y. ago. Growth of the volcano began with eruption of rhyolite, followed by quartz latite and finally latite. Basalts erupted throughout the lifetime of the volcano. Rare mixing of evolved hy-hawaiite and rhyolite produced a few intermediate magmas, primarily in the early history of the field. Mixing may have occurred when rhyolite magmas in the lower crust ascended to upper crustal levels and were injected into the bases of mafic magma chambers. Small amounts of crustal assimilation accompanied fractional crystallization and affected all the evolved MTVF rocks. Assimilation/fractional crystallization occurred primarily in the lower crust as hy-hawaiite differentiated to mugearite or latite. Early in the history of the field, evolved lower crustal magmas ascended into the upper crust, where density filtering and a reduced tensional stress field inhibited further ascent until magmas evolved to rhyolite or quartz latite. Later in the history of the field, latite magmas ascended directly from the lower crust and erupted without further significant differentiation because of increased crustal extension.

  9. Assessing spatio-temporal eruption forecasts in a monogenetic volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark S.

    2013-02-01

    Many spatio-temporal models have been proposed for forecasting the location and timing of the next eruption in a monogenetic volcanic field. These have almost invariably been fitted retrospectively. That is, the model has been tuned to all of the data, and hence an assessment of the goodness of fit has not been carried out on independent data. The low rate of eruptions in monogenetic fields means that there is not the opportunity to carry out a purely prospective test, as thousands of years would be required to accumulate the necessary data. This leaves open the possibility of a retrospective sequential test, where the parameters are calculated only on the basis of prior events and the resulting forecast compared statistically with the location and time of the next eruption. In general, events in volcanic fields are not dated with sufficient accuracy and precision to pursue this line of investigation; An exception is the Auckland Volcanic Field (New Zealand), consisting of c. 50 centers formed during the last c. 250 kyr, for which an age-order model exists in the form of a Monte Carlo sampling algorithm, facilitating repeated sequential testing. I examine a suite of spatial, temporal and spatio-temporal hazard models, comparing the degree of fit, and attempt to draw lessons from how and where each model is particularly successful or unsuccessful. A relatively simple (independent) combination of a renewal model (temporal term) and a spatially uniform ellipse (spatial term) performs as well as any other model. Both avoid over fitting the data, and hence large errors, when the spatio-temporal occurrence pattern changes.

  10. Geology and the origin of trachytes and pantellerites from the Eburru volcanic field, Kenya Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velador, J. M.; Omenda, P. A.; Anthony, E. Y.

    2002-12-01

    The Eburru volcanic field is located in the Kenya Rift, where it is part of the very young axial volcanic activity. The Eburru field belongs to the complex of volcanoes -- Menegai, Eburru, Olkaria, Longonot, and Suswa -- that are centered on the Kenya Dome. All of these volcanoes are prime targets for geothermal energy, with Kenya's one geothermal plant at Olkaria.. Correlation with dated volcanism implies that the activity at Eburru is at most approximately 500,000 years. The surfaces preserved on the youngest flows suggest that they erupted within the last 1,000 years. Mapping indicates that the volcanic field is divided into an older western section, composed of pantellerites (Er1) and overlying, faulted trachytes (Et1), and a younger eastern section. The eastern section has a mapable ring structure, and is composed of trachytes (Et2) and pantellerites (Er2). Some of these flows may be contemporaneous, but the final phase of eruption is exclusively pantellerite. We have chemical data for all units except the older pantellerites. The data indicate that the trachytes and rhyolites are both pantelleritic in terms of their alumina and iron contents. This is in contradistinction to the rhyolites immediately adjacent at Olkaria, which are comenditic. Concentrations for all elements are highly elevated, except for Ba, Sr, K, P, and Ti that show deep negative anomalies. The relationship between the trachytes (Et2) and pantellerites (Er2) is one in which the pantellerites consistently have the highest concentrations in all elements, including those with negative anomalies. Correlation coefficients for pairs such as Zr and Rb support the field evidence for the western Et1 trachytes being a separate magmatic event from the Et2 and Er2 units of the eastern field. Sanidine is the principal phenocrystic phase in these rocks, and thus the elevated Sr and Ba in the pantellerites preclude simple crystal fractionation to derive pantellerite from trachyte. Bailey and Macdonald

  11. The Maars of the Tuxtla Volcanic Field: the Example of 'laguna Pizatal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola, J.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Hernandez-Cardona, A.; Alvarez del Castillo, E.; Godinez, M.

    2013-12-01

    Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (TVF), also known as Los Tuxtlas massif, is a structure of volcanic rocks rising conspicuously in the south-central part of the coastal plains of eastern Mexico. The TVF seems related to the upper cretaceous magmatism of the NW part of the Gulf's margin (e.g. San Carlos and Sierra de Tamaulipas alkaline complexes) rather than to the nearby Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanism in this field began in late Miocene and has continued in historical times, The TVF is composed of 4 large volcanoes (San Martin Tuxtla, San Martin Pajapan, Santa Marta, Cerro El Vigia), at least 365 volcanic cones and 43 maars. In this poster we present the distribution of the maars, their size and depths. These maars span from a few hundred km to almost 1 km in average diameter, and a few meters to several tens of meters in depth; most of them filled with lakes. As an example on the nature of these structures we present our results of the ongoing study of 'Laguna Pizatal or Pisatal' (18° 33'N, 95° 16.4'W, 428 masl) located some 3 km from the village of Reforma, on the western side of San Martin Tuxtla volcano. Laguna Pisatal is a maar some 500 meters in radius and a depth about 40 meters from the surrounding ground level. It is covered by a lake 200 m2 in extent fed by a spring discharging on its western side. We examined a succession of 15 layers on the margins of the maar, these layers are blast deposits of different sizes interbedded by surge deposits. Most of the contacts between layers are irregular; which suggests scouring during deposition of the upper beds. This in turn suggests that the layers were deposited in a rapid series of explosions, which mixed juvenile material with fragments of the preexisting bedrock. We were unable to find the extent of these deposits since the surrounding areas are nowadays sugar cane plantations and the lake has overspilled in several occassions.

  12. Titanium and oxygen isotope diffusion in quartz-phenocrysts from a Jurassic rhyolite, Chon Aike Province (Fitz Roy, Patagonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, S.; Putlitz, B.; Baumgartner, L. P.; Escrig, S.; Meibom, A.; Leresche, S.; Vennemann, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    The volcanic El Quemado Complex was deposited during the breakup of Gondwana during the Middle and Late Jurassic. It is part of a large silicic igneous province, which includes the Chon Aike Province in Southern Patagonia and related rocks from the Antarctic Peninsula [1]. The Complex consists of rhyolitic and dacitic ignimbrites and air-fall tuffs, intercalated with andesitic to rhyolitic lava flows. New LA-ICPMS U/Pb-dates of zircons from the Fitz Roy area yield ages between 148 and 153Ma. No inherited zircons were found, suggesting that the temperature of 850°C calculated from zircon saturation is a minimum temperature. Lava flows are typically rich in quartz phenocrysts, which preserved magmatic trace element zoning, as revealed by cathodoluminescence (CL): light cores are surrounded by several darker and lighter zones towards the rim. The δ18O-values for quartz of between 11 to 14 ‰ are compatible with a crustal source for the magma and the SIMS analyses of phenocrysts reveal no zoning in O-isotope compositions. High-resolution Ti-profiles were obtained by NanoSIMS with a beam size of ~200 nm and a minimum step size of ~120 nm. Several lines perpendicular to the magmatic zoning of the quartz-phenocrysts were measured. The profiles show sharp changes in the 48Ti/29Si-ratio over a distance of 5 μm, which correlate with CL-intensity changes. The profiles can be used for diffusion chronometry. The distances obtained from NanoSIMS profiles were used to calculate maximum diffusional relaxation times. Assuming a step function as initial condition and extrusion temperatures from zircon saturation of 850°C, we obtain a maximum residence time for the quartz-phenocrysts of 3.5 years. [1] Pankhurst R.J., Riley T.R., Fanning C.M., Kelley S.P., 2000. J. Pet., 41, 605-625.

  13. Relationship between Bajo Pobre and Chon Aike formations (Deseado Massif, Patagonia, Argentina):a melt inclusions study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busà, T.; Bellieni, G.; Fernandez, R.; Hecheveste, H.; Piccirillo, E. M.

    2003-04-01

    The Deseado Massif covers the centre-east of the Santa Cruz Province, in the extra-Andean Patagonia. Although the Deseado Massif is mainly composed of silicic volcanic rocks (Chon Aike Formation, CA; 151.5 ±0.5 - 177.8 ±0.4 Ma), mafic and intermediate volcanites (Bajo Pobre Formation, BP; 152.7 ±0.5 and 164 ±0.3 Ma) outcrop largely in the central part of the Massif. In this paper quarz-trapped melt inclusions (rhyolitic in composition) from selected samples of the BP and the CA are analysed. On the basis of major elements content, for BP the sequence from andesite (BP whole rock) to ryholite (trapped as inclusions in quartz) can be modelled by simple fractional crystallisation of ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase, quartz and apatite. As regards trace elements, a good calculated/measured ratio (around 1 ±0.2) is obtained assuming only a relatively high apatite fractionation. Since the apatite fractionation amount is not acceptable for major elements, the evolution of BP Formation cannot be modelled by a simple process of fractional crystallisation, and a contamination process probably occurred. The sequence from BP to CA cannot be modelled by fractional crystallisation. 30% batch melting of BP andesite (BP whole rock) produces a magma from which the CA ryholites (trapped as inclusions in quartz) can be obtained by Rayleigh fractional crystallisation of ortho- and clinopyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, quartz, apatite and small amounts of zircon and minor allanite. Since the latter one was not observed in the analysed sample, a contamination process during magma evolution cannot be completely excluded. Finally, on the basis of the different trace elements concentration (Nb anomaly, different content in LILE, B/Be and B/Nb), it is possible to suppose that, at the time of the BP and CA emplacement, a changing in the tectonic setting, from subduction to a lithospheric extension, was active.

  14. Possible earthquake precursor and drumbeat signal detected at the Nirano Mud Volcanic Field, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Matteo; Suski Ricci, Barbara; Kenkel, Johannes; Ricci, Tullio; Fuchs, Florian; Miller, Stephen A.; Kemna, Andreas; Conventi, Marzia

    2016-04-01

    We used the Nirano mud volcanic field as a natural laboratory to test pre- and post-seismic effects generated by distant earthquakes. Mud volcanoes are geological systems often characterized by elevated fluid pressures at depth deviating from hydrostatic conditions. This near-critical state makes mud volcanoes particularly sensitive to external forcing induced by natural or man-made perturbations. We first characterized the subsurface structure of the Nirano mud volcanic field with a geoelectrical study. Next, we deployed a broad-band seismic station to understand the typical seismic signal generated at depth. Seismic records show a background noise below 2 s, sometimes interrupted by pulses of drumbeat-like high-frequency signals lasting from several minutes to hours. Drumbeat signal was previously discovered in geysers and at magmatic volcanoes. To date this is the first observation of drumbeat signal observed in mud volcanoes. In 2013 June we recorded a M4.7 earthquake, that occurred approximately 60 km far from our seismic station. According to empirical estimations the Nirano mud volcanic field should not have been affected by the M4.7 earthquake. Yet, before the seismic event we recorded an increasing amplitude of the signal in the 10-20 Hz frequency band. The signal emerged approximately two hours before the earthquake and lasted for about three hours. We performed an analysis of the 95th percentile of the root mean square amplitude of the waveforms for the day of the earthquake. This statistical analysis suggests the presence of a possible precursory signal about 10 minutes before the earthquake indicating the occurrence of enhanced fluid flow in the subsurface that may be related to pressure build up in the preparation zone of the earthquake.

  15. Mafic monogenetic vents at the Descabezado Grande volcanic field (35.5°S-70.8°W): the northernmost evidence of regional primitive volcanism in the Southern Volcanic Zone of Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Pablo A.; Rabbia, Osvaldo M.; Hernández, Laura B.; Ruprecht, Philipp

    2016-06-01

    In the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ), the broad distribution of mafic compositions along the recent volcanic arc occurs mainly south of 37°S, above a comparatively thin continental crust (≤~35 km) and mostly associated with the dextral strike-slip regime of the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault Zone (LOFZ). North of 36°S, mafic compositions are scarce. This would be in part related to the effect resulting from protracted periods of trapping of less evolved ascending magmas beneath a thick Meso-Cenozoic volcano-sedimentary cover that lead to more evolved compositions in volcanic rocks erupted at the surface. Here, we present whole-rock and olivine mineral chemistry data for mafic rocks from four monogenetic vents developed above a SVZ segment of thick crust (~45 km) in the Descabezado Grande volcanic field (~35.5°S). Whole-rock chemistry (MgO > 8 wt%) and compositional variations in olivine (92 ≥ Fo ≥ 88 and Ni up to ~3650 ppm) indicate that some of the basaltic products erupted through these vents (e.g., Los Hornitos monogenetic cones) represent primitive arc magmas reaching high crustal levels. The combined use of satellite images, regional data analysis and field observations allow to recognize at least 38 mafic monogenetic volcanoes dispersed over an area of about 5000 km2 between 35.5° and 36.5°S. A link between ancient structures inherited from pre-Andean tectonics and the emplacement and distribution of this mafic volcanism is suggested as a first-order structural control that may explain the widespread occurrence of mafic volcanism in this Andean arc segment with thick crust.

  16. Earth's Largest Terrestrial Landslide (The Markagunt Gravity Slide of Southwest Utah): Insights from the Catastrophic Collapse of a Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, D. B.; Biek, R. F.; Rowley, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The newly discovered Miocene Markagunt gravity slide (MGS; Utah, USA) represents the largest volcanic landslide structure on Earth. Recent geologic mapping of the MGS indicates that it was a large contiguous volcanic sheet of allochthonous andesitic mudflow breccias and lava flows, volcaniclastic rocks, and intertonguing regional ash-flow tuffs that blanketed an area of at least 5000 km2 with an estimated volume of ~3000 km3. From its breakaway zone in the Tushar and Mineral Mountains to its southern limits, the MGS is over 95 km long and at least 65 km wide. The MGS consists of four distinct structural segments: 1) a high-angle breakaway segment, 2) a bedding-plane segment, ~60 km long and ~65 km wide, typically located within the volcaniclastic Eocene-Oligocene Brian Head Formation, 3) a ramp segment ~1-2 km wide where the slide cuts upsection, and 4) a former land surface segment where the upper-plate moved at least 35 km over the Miocene landscape. The presence of basal and lateral cataclastic breccias, clastic dikes, jigsaw puzzle fracturing, internal shears, pseudotachylytes, and the overall geometry of the MGS show that it represents a single catastrophic emplacement event. The MGS represents gravitationally induced collapse of the southwest sector of the Oligocene to Miocene Marysvale volcanic field. We suggest that continuous growth of the Marysvale volcanic field, loading more volcanic rocks on a structurally weak Brian Head basement, created conditions necessary for gravity sliding. In addition, inflation of the volcanic pile due to multiple magmatic intrusions tilted the strata gently southward, inducing lateral spreading of the sub-volcanic rocks prior to failure. Although similar smaller-scale failures have been recognized from individual volcanoes, the MGS represents a new class of low frequency but high impact hazards associated with catastrophic sector collapse of large volcanic fields containing multiple volcanoes. The relationship of the MGS to

  17. Geologic map of the Simcoe Mountains Volcanic Field, main central segment, Yakama Nation, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Lava compositions other than various types of basalt are uncommon here. Andesite is abundant on and around Mount Adams but is very rare east of the Klickitat River. The only important nonbasaltic composition in the map area is rhyolite, which crops out in several patches around the central highland of the volcanic field, mainly in the upper canyons of Satus and Kusshi Creeks and Wilson Charley canyon. Because the rhyolites were some of the earliest lavas erupted here, they are widely concealed by later basalts and therefore crop out only in local windows eroded by canyons that cut through the overlying basalts.

  18. Lava-flow characterization at Pisgah Volcanic Field, California, with multiparameter imaging radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaddis, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    Multi-incidence-angle (in the 25?? to 55?? range) radar data aquired by the NASA/JPL Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) at three wavelengths simultaneously and displayed at three polarizations are examined for their utility in characterizing lava flows at Pisgah volcanic field, California. Pisgah lava flows were erupted in three phases; flow textures consist of hummocky pahoehoe, smooth pahoehoe, and aa (with and without thin sedimentary cover). Backscatter data shown as a function of relative age of Pisgah flows indicate that dating of lava flows on the basis of average radar backscatter may yield ambiguous results if primary flow textures and modification processes are not well understood. -from Author

  19. Combining probabilistic hazard assessment with cost-benefit analysis to support decision making in a volcanic crisis from the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandri, Laura; Jolly, Gill; Lindsay, Jan; Howe, Tracy; Marzocchi, Warner

    2010-05-01

    One of the main challenges of modern volcanology is to provide the public with robust and useful information for decision-making in land-use planning and in emergency management. From the scientific point of view, this translates into reliable and quantitative long- and short-term volcanic hazard assessment and eruption forecasting. Because of the complexity in characterizing volcanic events, and of the natural variability of volcanic processes, a probabilistic approach is more suitable than deterministic modeling. In recent years, two probabilistic codes have been developed for quantitative short- and long-term eruption forecasting (BET_EF) and volcanic hazard assessment (BET_VH). Both of them are based on a Bayesian Event Tree, in which volcanic events are seen as a chain of logical steps of increasing detail. At each node of the tree, the probability is computed by taking into account different sources of information, such as geological and volcanological models, past occurrences, expert opinion and numerical modeling of volcanic phenomena. Since it is a Bayesian tool, the output probability is not a single number, but a probability distribution accounting for aleatory and epistemic uncertainty. In this study, we apply BET_VH in order to quantify the long-term volcanic hazard due to base surge invasion in the region around Auckland, New Zealand's most populous city. Here, small basaltic eruptions from monogenetic cones pose a considerable risk to the city in case of phreatomagmatic activity: evidence for base surges are not uncommon in deposits from past events. Currently, we are particularly focussing on the scenario simulated during Exercise Ruaumoko, a national disaster exercise based on the build-up to an eruption in the Auckland Volcanic Field. Based on recent papers by Marzocchi and Woo, we suggest a possible quantitative strategy to link probabilistic scientific output and Boolean decision making. It is based on cost-benefit analysis, in which all costs

  20. The Puelche volcanic field: Extensive Pleistocene rhyolite lava flows in the Andes of central Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Fierstein, J.; Godoy, E.; Drake, Robert E.; Singer, B.

    1999-01-01

    A remote volcanic field in the rugged headwaters of the Rio Puelche and Rio Invernada (35.8??S) constitutes the largest cluster of Quaternary rhyolite lava flows yet identified in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone. The Puelche Volcanic Field belongs to an intra-arc belt of silicic magmatic centers that extends, at least, 140 km north-south and lies well east of the volcanic front but nonetheless considerably west of the intraplate extensional fields of basaltic and alkaline centers of pampean Argentina. The authors' mapping has distinguished one shallow intrusive mass of early Pleistocene biotite rhyodacite (70.5% SiO2), 11 eruptive units of mid-Pleistocene high-K biotite-rhyolite lava (71.3-75.6% SiO2), and 4 eruptive units of basaltic andesite (53.95-4.9% SiO2), the conduits of which cut some of the rhyolites. Basal contacts of the rhyolite lava flows (and subjacent pyroclastic precursors) are generally scree covered, but glacial erosion has exposed internal flow structures and lithologic zonation superbly. Thicknesses of individual rhyolite lava flows range from 75 m to 400 m. Feeders for several units are well exposed. Cliff-draping unconformities and intracanyon relationships among the 11 rhyolite units show that the eruptive sequence spanned at least one glacial episode that accentuated the local relief. Lack of ice-contact features suggests, however, that all or most eruptions took place during non-glacial intervals probably between 400 ka and 100 ka. Post-eruptive glacial erosion reduced the rhyolites to several non-contiguous remnants that altogether cover 83 km2 and represent a surviving volume of about 21 km3. Consideration of slopes, lava thicknesses, and paleotopography suggest that the original area and volume were each about three times greater. Phenocryst content of the rhyolites ranges from 1 to 12%, with plagioclase>>biotite>FeTi oxides in all units and amphibole conspicuous in the least silicic. The chemically varied basaltic andesites range from

  1. Effects of remote earthquakes at the Nirano Mud Volcanic Field: insights from geophysical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Matteo; Kenkel, Johannes; Fuchs, Florian; Ricci, Tullio; Suski, Barbara; Conventi, Marzia; Miller, Stephen A.

    2014-05-01

    more intense signals. The excitement of these higher frequencies lasted for less than 20 minutes with possibly few locally induced microseismic events towards the end of this period. The measured response of the Nirano Mud Volcanic Field to the M4.4 earthquake (~60 km far) falls outside the empirical magnitude-vs-distance plot based on historical and qualitative data. We suggest that new quantitative data based on geophysical methods should be used to review the dynamic triggering threshold currently used for dynamic triggering studies of mud volcanic systems.

  2. Shallow Plumbing Geometry of a Monogenetic Volcano, Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, A.; Valentine, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Lunar Crater Volcanic Field is a 90 km long, 20 km wide field of monogenetic volcanoes such as scoria cones, spatter ramparts, and maars. The most recent eruption was 38 ka indicating it is essentially an active volcanic field. Although scoria cones are relatively small, they can generate natural hazards similar to composite volcanoes, such as ballistic bombs, lava flows, and the disruption of air traffic due to tephra dispersal. Physical controls on eruptions must be identified and studied in order to develop better hazard assessments. The geometry of a scoria cone's shallow plumbing system plays a major role in determining the eruption characteristics. Numerical eruption models and hazard assessments assume simple geometric shapes such as straight-sided or flaring cylinders to represent the shape of the near-surface conduit; little field data exist to support these assumed geometries. A specific vent in the southern area of the volcanic field was selected because of its excellent erosional exposure. Field mapping and measurements were made of proximal pyroclastic deposits, intrusions including the feeder dike, and the eruption conduit. Orientated samples of clastogenic lava flows and magmatic intrusions were gathered and thin sectioned to determine magma flow vectors. The eruption began along a ~295 meter, non-linear fissure in areas now preserved as steep knobs. The fissure eruption created a complex spatter rampart that was later buried as activity focused to a single vent. The feeder dike is intermittently exposed along strike for 1 kilometer, and ranges from 1.5-2 meters wide, and in most cases sub-vertical with the exception of two small sub-horizontal sills ~20 meters long. Erosion has exposed a cross section of the eruption conduit up to 23.5 meters below paleosurface, revealing a distinct flare 15 meters below the paleo-surface and a maximum surface width of 18.3 meters. Felsic streaks, sourced from the rhyolitic country rock, along with crystal

  3. Preliminary isostatic gravity map of the Sonoma volcanic field and vicinity, Sonoma and Napa Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Roberts, C.W.; McCabe, C.A.; McPhee, D.K.; Tilden, J.E.; Jachens, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    This isostatic residual gravity map is part of a three-dimensional mapping effort focused on the subsurface distribution of rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field in Napa and Sonoma counties, northern California. This map will serve as a basis for modeling the shapes of basins beneath the Santa Rosa Plain and Napa and Sonoma Valleys, and for determining the location and geometry of faults within the area. Local spatial variations in the Earth's gravity field (after accounting for variations caused by elevation, terrain, and deep crustal structure explained below) reflect the distribution of densities in the mid to upper crust. Densities often can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in density commonly mark lithologic boundaries. High-density basement rocks exposed within the northern San Francisco Bay area include those of the Mesozoic Franciscan Complex and Great Valley Sequence present in the mountainous areas of the quadrangle. Alluvial sediment and Tertiary sedimentary rocks are characterized by low densities. However, with increasing depth of burial and age, the densities of these rocks may become indistinguishable from those of basement rocks. Tertiary volcanic rocks are characterized by a wide range in densities, but, on average, are less dense than the Mesozoic basement rocks. Isostatic residual gravity values within the map area range from about -41 mGal over San Pablo Bay to about 11 mGal near Greeg Mountain 10 km east of St. Helena. Steep linear gravity gradients are coincident with the traces of several Quaternary strike-slip faults, most notably along the West Napa fault bounding the west side of Napa Valley, the projection of the Hayward fault in San Pablo Bay, the Maacama Fault, and the Rodgers Creek fault in the vicinity of Santa Rosa. These gradients result from juxtaposing dense basement rocks against thick Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks.

  4. Short-time electrical effects during volcanic eruption: Experiments and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, Ralf; Zimanowski, Bernd; Röder, Helmut

    2000-02-01

    Laboratory experiments on the fragmentation and expansion of magmatic melt have been performed using remelted volcanic rock at magmatic temperatures as magma simulant. A specially designed dc amplifier in combination with high speed data recording was used to detect short-time electrostatic field effects related to the fragmentation and expansion history of the experimental system, as documented by simultaneous force and pressure recording, as well as by high-speed cinematography. It was found that (1) the voltage-time ratio of electrostatic field gradients (100 to 104 V/s) reflects different physical mechanisms of fragmentation and expansion and (2) the maximum voltage measured in 1 m distance (-0.1 to -180 V) can be correlated with the intensity of the respective processes. Based on these experimental results, a field method was developed and tested at Stromboli volcano in Italy. A 0.8 m rod antenna was used to detect the dc voltage against local ground (i.e., the electrostatic field gradient), at a distance of 60 to 260 m from the respective vent. Upwind position of the detection site was chosen to prevent interference caused by contact of charged ash particles with the antenna. A standard 8 Hz geophone was used to detect the accompanying seismicity. Three types of volcanic activity occurred during the surveillance operation; two of these could be clearly related to specific electrical and seismical signals. A typical delay time was found between the electrical and the seismical signal, corresponding to the seismic velocity within the crater deposits. Using a simple first-order electrostatic model, the field measurements were recalibrated to the laboratory scale. Comparison of field and laboratory data at first approximation revealed striking similarities, thus encouraging the further development of this technique for real-time surveillance operation at active volcanoes.

  5. Changements climatiques et variations du champ magnetique terrestre dans le sud de la Patagonie (Argentine) depuis 51 200 ans reconstitues a partir des proprietes magnetiques des sediments du lac Laguna Potrok Aike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lise-Pronovost, Agathe

    Rock magnetism is influenced by climate and by the Earth's magnetic field. The goal of this thesis is to use the rock magnetic properties of the long sedimentary sequence from the lake Laguna Potrok Aike (106 m, 51200 cal BP) to derive paleomagnetic and paleoclimatic records in a key area of the Southern Hemisphere that is poorly documented. Laguna Potrok Aike (52°S, 70°W) is located in southeastern Patagonia (Argentina) in the path of the strong Southern Hemisphere westerly winds and in the source area of the dust deposited in Antarctica during Glacial periods. The lake geographical location is therefore ideal to reconstruct past changes in aeolian activity and climate changes in Patagonia. It is also a key location to reconstruct past changes of the geomagnetic field because the Southern Hemisphere is significantly under-documented relative to the Northern Hemisphere. In addition, the proximity of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) as well as the Southern Hemisphere high flux lobes could allow identifying differences in the paleomagnetic field evolution in southern South America relative to the much more documented Northern Hemisphere. For his strong potential to provide high-resolution climatic, aeolian and paleomagnetic records beyond the last climatic transition, the maar lake Laguna Potrok Aike was drilled in the framework of the International scientific Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) for the Potrok Aike maar lake Sediment Archive Drilling prOject (PASADO). In this thesis, high-resolution rock-magnetic and physical properties are used in order to reconstruct paleoclimate and paleomagnetic records from the southernmost part of South America. In the first chapter, the full-vector paleomagnetic record (inclination, declination and relative paleointensity) derived from the sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike. A grain size influence on the relative paleointensity record (NRM/ARM) was corrected using the median destructive field of the natural remanent

  6. First-order estimate of the Canary Islands plate-scale stress field: Implications for volcanic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; Martí, J.; Villaseñor, A.

    2016-06-01

    In volcanic areas, the existing stress field is a key parameter controlling magma generation, location and geometry of the magmatic plumbing systems and the distribution of the resulting volcanism at surface. Therefore, knowing the stress configuration in the lithosphere at any scale (i.e. local, regional and plate-scale) is fundamental to understand the distribution of volcanism and, subsequently, to interpret volcanic unrest and potential tectonic controls of future eruptions. The objective of the present work is to provide a first-order estimate of the plate-scale tectonic stresses acting on the Canary Islands, one of the largest active intraplate volcanic regions of the World. In order to obtain the orientation of the minimum and maximum horizontal compressive stresses, we perform a series of 2D finite element models of plate scale kinematics assuming plane stress approximation. Results obtained are used to develop a regional model, which takes into account recognized archipelago-scale structural discontinuities. Maximum horizontal compressive stress directions obtained are compared with available stress, geological and geodynamic data. The methodology used may be easily applied to other active volcanic regions, where a first order approach of their plate/regional stresses can be essential information to be used as input data for volcanic hazard assessment models.

  7. First-order estimate of the Canary Islands plate-scale stress field: Implications for volcanic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Adelina; Martí, Joan; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    In volcanic areas, the existing stress field is a key parameter controlling magma generation, location and geometry of the magmatic plumbing systems and the distribution of the resulting volcanism at surface. Therefore, knowing the stress configuration in the lithosphere at any scale (i.e. local, regional and plate-scale) is important to understand the distribution of volcanism and, subsequently, to interpret volcanic unrest, forecast the occurrence and potential tectonic controls future eruptions. The objective of the present work is to provide a first-order estimate of the plate-scale tectonic stresses acting on the Canary Islands, one of the largest active intraplate volcanic regions of the World. For this, we perform a series of 2D finite element models of plate scale kinematics assuming plane stress approximation in order to obtain the orientation of the minimum and maximum horizontal stresses. Results obtained are used to develop a more regional model, which takes into account recognized archipelago-scale structural discontinuities. Maximum horizontal stress directions obtained are compared with available stress, geological and geodynamic data. The methodology used may be easily applied to other active volcanic regions where a first order approach of their plate/regional stresses is essential information to be used as input data for volcanic hazard assessment models.This research was founded by the Ramón y Cajal contract (RYC-2012-11024).

  8. The `Strawberry Volcanic Field' of Northeastern Oregon: Another Piece of the CRB Puzzle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, A. R.; Streck, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Mid to Late Miocene Strawberry Volcanics field (SVF) located along the southern margin of the John Day valley of NE Oregon, comprise a diverse group of volcanic rocks ranging from basalt to rhyolite. The main outcrop area of the SVF (3,400 km2) is bordered by units from the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), with the main CRB units to the north, the Picture Gorge Basalt to the east and Steens Basalt to the south. The geographic position and age of the Strawberry Volcanics make a genetic relationship to CRB volcanism likely, yet little is known about this diverse volcanic field. This research aims at refining the stratigraphic and age relationships as well as the petrology and geochemistry of magmas associated with the SVF. Previous investigations (e.g. Robyn, 1977) found that the SVF was active between 20 to 10 Ma with the main pulse largely being coeval with the 15 Ma CRBG eruptions. Lavas and tuffs from the SVF are calc-alkaline with low FeO*/MgO (~ 2.56 wt. %), high Al2O3 (~ 16.4 wt. %), low TiO2 (~ 1.12 wt.%), and span the entire compositional range from basalt to rhyolite (47-78 wt. % SiO2) with andesite as the dominant lithology. Basaltic lavas from the SVF have compositional affinities to earlier Steens Basalt, and some trace element concentrations and ratios are indistinguishable from those of CRBG lavas (e.g. Zr, Ba, Sr, and Ce/Y). Andesites are calc-alkaline, but contrary to typical arc (orogenic) andesites, SVF andesites are exceedingly phenocryst poor (<3% phenocrysts with microphenocrysts of plagioclase and lesser pyroxene which occasionally occur in crystal clots instead of single crystals). In addition, some lavas (basaltic-intermediate) are phenocryst-rich (~25%), containing plagioclase, olivine, opx, and cpx. However, phenocrysts in these lavas are strongly zoned and resorbed, and in general, these lavas are volumetrically insignificant compared with the phenocrysts poor andesites. Rhyolitic lavas are also phenocryst poor (< 3%) and appear to

  9. Multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity and epithermal mineralization in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and their relations to magmatic activity, volcanism and regional extension

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.I.; Noble, D.C.; Jackson, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    Volcanic rocks of middle Miocene age and underlying pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks host widely distributed zones of hydrothermal alteration and epithermal precious metal, fluorite and mercury deposits within and peripheral to major volcanic and intrusive centers of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field (SWNVF) in southern Nevada, near the southwestern margin of the Great Basin of the western United States. Radiometric ages indicate that episodes of hydrothermal activity mainly coincided with and closely followed major magmatic pulses during the development of the field and together spanned more than 4.5 m.y. Rocks of the SWNVF consist largely of rhyolitic ash-flow sheets and intercalated silicic lava domes, flows and near-vent pyroclastic deposits erupted between 15.2 and 10 Ma from vent areas in the vicinity of the Timber Mountain calderas, and between about 9.5 and 7 Ma from the outlying Black Mountain and Stonewall Mountain centers. Three magmatic stages can be recognized: the main magmatic stage, Mountain magmatic stage (11.7 to 10.0 Ma), and the late magmatic stage (9.4 to 7.5 Ma).

  10. Post-eruptive sediment transport and surface processes on unvegetated volcanic hillslopes - A case study of Black Tank scoria cone, Cima Volcanic Field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly

    2016-08-01

    Conical volcanic edifices that are made up from lapilli to block/bomb pyroclastic successions, such as scoria cones, are widespread in terrestrial and extraterrestrial settings. Eruptive processes responsible for establishing the final facies architecture of a scoria cone are not well linked to numerical simulations of their post-eruptive sediment transport. Using sedimentological, geomorphic and 2D fragment morphology data from a 15-ky-old scoria cone from the Cima Volcanic Field, California, this study provides field evidence of the various post-eruptive sediment transport and degradation processes of scoria cones located in arid to semi-arid environments. This study has revealed that pyroclast morphologies vary downslope due to syn-eruptive granular flows, along with post-eruptive modification by rolling, bouncing and sliding of individual particles down a slope, and overland flow processes. The variability of sediment transport rates on hillslopes are not directly controlled by local slope angle variability and the flank length but rather by grain size, and morphological characteristics of particles, such as shape irregularity of pyroclast fragments and block/lapilli ratio. Due to the abundance of hillslopes degrading in unvegetated regions, such as those found in the Southwestern USA, granulometric influences should be accounted for in the formulation of sediment transport laws for geomorphic modification of volcanic terrains over long geologic time.

  11. The eruption history of the quaternary Eifel volcanic fields: Implications from the ELSA - Tephra - Stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Förster, Michael; Sirocko, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Numerous tephra layers occur in maar sediments in the quaternary Eifel volcanic fields. The sediments were systematically drilled and cored since 1998 by the Eifel Laminated Sediment Archive project (ELSA) (Sirocko et al. 2013). These maar sediments are laminated and the tephra is easily recognizeable by a coarser grain size. Additionaly, tephra layers appear dark grey to black in color. The ashes were sieved to a fraction of 250 - 100 µm and sorted into grains of: reddish and greyish sandstone, quartz, amphibole, pyroxene, scoria and pumice, sanidine, leucite and biotite. A minimum of 100 grains for each tephra layer were used for a sediment petrographic tephra characterisation (SPTC). The grain counts resemble the vol. -% of each grain species. Three types of tephra could be identified by their distinctive grain pattern: (1) phreatomagmatic tephra, rich in basement rocks like greyish/reddish sandstone and quartz. (2) Strombolian tephra, rich in scoria and mafic minerals like pyroxene. (3) evolved tephra, rich in sanidine and pumice. 16 drill-cores, covering the last 500 000 years have been examined. Younger cores were dated by 14C ages and older cores by optical stimulated luminescence. Independently from this datings, the drill-cores were cross-correlated by pollen and the occurences of specific marker-tephra layers, comprising characteristic grain-types. These marker-tephra layers are especially thick and of evolved composition with a significant abundance of sanidine and pumice. The most prominent tephra layers of this type are the Laacher See tephra, dated to 12 900 b2k by Zolitschka (1998), the 40Ar/39Ar dated tephra layers of Dümpelmaar, Glees and Hüttenberg, dated to 116 000 b2k, 151 000 b2k and 215 000 b2k by van den Bogaard & Schmincke (1990), van den Bogaard et al. (1989). These datings set the time-frame for the eruption-phases of the quaternary Eifel Volcanic Fields. Our study refines these findings and shows that phases of activity are very

  12. Late Quaternary history of the Vakinankaratra volcanic field (central Madagascar): insights from luminescence dating of phreatomagmatic eruption deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufer, Daniel; Preusser, Frank; Schreurs, Guido; Gnos, Edwin; Berger, Alfons

    2014-05-01

    The Quaternary Vakinankaratra volcanic field in the central Madagascar highlands consists of scoria cones, lava flows, tuff rings, and maars. These volcanic landforms are the result of processes triggered by intracontinental rifting and overlie Precambrian basement or Neogene volcanic rocks. Infrared-stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating was applied to 13 samples taken from phreatomagmatic eruption deposits in the Antsirabe-Betafo region with the aim of constraining the chronology of the volcanic activity. Establishing such a chronology is important for evaluating volcanic hazards in this densely populated area. Stratigraphic correlations of eruption deposits and IRSL ages suggest at least five phreatomagmatic eruption events in Late Pleistocene times. In the Lake Andraikiba region, two such eruption layers can be clearly distinguished. The older one yields ages between 109 ± 15 and 90 ± 11 ka and is possibly related to an eruption at the Amboniloha volcanic complex to the north. The younger one gives ages between 58 ± 4 and 47 ± 7 ka and is clearly related to the phreatomagmatic eruption that formed Lake Andraikiba. IRSL ages of a similar eruption deposit directly overlying basement laterite in the vicinity of the Fizinana and Ampasamihaiky volcanic complexes yield coherent ages of 68 ± 7 and 65 ± 8 ka. These ages provide the upper age limit for the subsequently developed Iavoko, Antsifotra, and Fizinana scoria cones and their associated lava flows. Two phreatomagmatic deposits, identified near Lake Tritrivakely, yield the youngest IRSL ages in the region, with respective ages of 32 ± 3 and 19 ± 2 ka. The reported K-feldspar IRSL ages are the first recorded numerical ages of phreatomagmatic eruption deposits in Madagascar, and our results confirm the huge potential of this dating approach for reconstructing the volcanic activity of Late Pleistocene to Holocene volcanic provinces.

  13. Further constraints for the Plio-Pleistocene geomagnetic field strength: New results from the Los Tuxtlas volcanic field (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2001-09-01

    A rock-magnetic, paleomagnetic and paleointensity study was carried out on 13 Plio-Pleistocene volcanic flows from the Los Tuxtlas volcanic field (Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt) in order to obtain some decisive constraints for the geomagnetic field strength during the Plio-Pleistocene time. The age of the volcanic units, which yielded reliable paleointensity estimates, lies between 2.2 and 0.8 Ma according to the available K/Ar radiometric data. Thermomagnetic investigations reveal that remanence is carried in most cases by Ti-poor titanomagnetite, resulting from oxy-exsolution that probably occurred during the initial flow cooling. Unblocking temperature spectra and relatively high coercivity point to 'small' pseudo-single domain magnetic grains for these (titano)magnetites. Single-component, linear demagnetization plots were observed in most cases. Six flows yield reverse polarity magnetization, five flows are normally magnetized, and one flow shows intermediate polarity magnetization. Evidence of a strong lightning-produced magnetization overprint was detected for one site. The mean pole position obtained in this study is Plat = 83.7°, Plong = 178.1°, K = 36, A95 = 8.1°, N =10 and the corresponding mean paleodirection is I = 31.3°, D = 352°, k = 37, a95 = 8.2°, which is not significantly different from the expected direction estimated from the North American apparent polar wander path. Thirty-nine samples were pre-selected for Thellier palaeointensity experiments because of their stable remanent magnetization and relatively weak-within-site dispersion. Only 21 samples, coming from four individual basaltic lava flows, yielded reliable paleointensity estimates with the flow-mean virtual dipole moments (VDM) ranging from 6.4 to 9.1 × 1022 Am2. Combining the coeval Mexican data with the available comparable quality Pliocene paleointensity results yield a mean VDM of 6.4 × 1022 Am2, which is almost 80% of the present geomagnetic axial dipole. Reliable

  14. Evolution of Rhyolite at Laguna del Maule, a Rapidly Inflating Volcanic Field in the Southern Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, N. L.; Singer, B. S.; Jicha, B. R.; Hildreth, E. W.; Fierstein, J.; Rogers, N. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field (LdM) is host to both the foremost example of post-glacial rhyolitic volcanism in the southern Andes and rapid, ongoing crustal deformation. The flare-up of high-silica eruptions was coeval with deglaciation at 24 ka. Rhyolite and rhyodacite domes and coulees totaling 6.5 km3 form a 20 km ring around the central lake basin. This spatial and temporal concentration of rhyolite is unprecedented in the history of the volcanic field. Colinear major and trace element variation suggests these lavas share a common evolutionary history (Hildreth et al., 2010). Moreover, geodetic observations (InSAR & GPS) have identified rapid inflation centered in the western side of the rhyolite dome ring at a rate of 17 cm/year for five years, which has accelerated to 30 cm/yr since April 2012. The best fit to the geodetic data is an expanding magma body located at 5 km depth (Fournier et al., 2010; Le Mevel, 2012). The distribution of high-silica volcanism, most notably geochemically similar high-silica rhyolite lavas erupted 12 km apart of opposite sides of the lake within a few kyr of each other, raises the possibility that the shallow magma intrusion represents only a portion of a larger rhyolitic body, potentially of caldera forming dimensions. We aim to combine petrologic models with a precise geochronology to formulate a model of the evolution of the LdM magma system to its current state. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations show rhyolitic volcanism beginning at 23 ka with the eruption of the Espejos rhyolite, followed by the Cari Launa Rhyolite at 14.5 ka, two flows of the Barrancas complex at 6.4 and 3.9 ka, and the Divisoria rhyolite at 2.2 ka. In contrast, significant andesitic and dacitic volcanism is largely absent from the central basin of LdM since the early post-glacial period suggesting a coincident basin-wide evolution from andesite to dacite to rhyolite and is consistent with a shallow body of low-density rhyolite blocking the eruption

  15. Differentiation of cinder cone magmas from the Michoacan-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, central Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hasenaka, T.

    1985-01-01

    The Michoacan-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (area:40,000 km/sup 2/) contains various small volcanic centers of 3 Ma to Recent age, including 900 cinder and lava cones, and contrast to other portions of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) with large composite volcanoes. Among 224 scoria and lava samples studied for chemistry and mineralogy, 165 samples are calc-alkaline (basalt, andesite, and dacite), 21 are alkaline (mainly basalt), and 38 are transitional between the two (mainly basalt). The majority of rocks are 01 basalt and 01 andesite with pyroxene and hornblende andesites being subordinate. Their MgO content is relatively high compared with lavas from composite volcanoes in the MVB, and indicate an earlier stage of differentiation. Four samples have Mg-number >70 and Ni content >235 ppm, a criteria of magmas equilibrated with mantle olivine. They include all the rock groups but phenocryst assemblage is always 01+Cpx+Pl. Other samples are plotted between this and 1-atmosphere Ol-Cpx-Pl cotectic. Ol-liquid, two pyroxenes, and magnetite-ilmenite temperatures decrease from 1200/sup 0/C to 900/sup 0/C with increasing FeO*/MgO ratio which also corresponds to the changing mineral assemblages. Calculated oxygen fugacities are on or slightly above Ni-NiO buffer line. Calc-alkaline and alkaline basalts are not related; both are parental. Less differentiated character of cinder cone magmas may result from their transportation under local extensional stress and absence of long-lived shallow magma reservoirs is common in composite volcanoes.

  16. The Lathrop Wells Volcanic Center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. It has long been recognized as the youngest basalt center in the region. However, determination of the age and eruptive history of the center has proven problematic. The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results.

  17. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1993-03-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. It has long been recognized as the youngest basalt center in the region. However, determination of the age and eruptive history of the center has proven problematic. The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results.

  18. Magmatic inclusions in rhyolites, contaminated basalts, and compositional zonation beneath the Coso volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Metz, J.

    1984-01-01

    Basaltic lava flows and high-silica rhyolite domes form the Pleistocene part of the Coso volcanic field in southeastern California. The distribution of vents maps the areal zonation inferred for the upper parts of the Coso magmatic system. Subalkalic basalts (<50% SiO2) were erupted well away from the rhyolite field at any given time. Compositional variation among these basalts can be ascribed to crystal fractionation. Erupted volumes of these basalts decrease with increasing differentiation. Mafic lavas containing up to 58% SiO2, erupted adjacent to the rhyolite field, formed by mixing of basaltic and silicic magma. Basaltic magma interacted with crustal rocks to form other SiO2-rich mafic lavas erupted near the Sierra Nevada fault zone. Several rhyolite domes in the Coso volcanic field contain sparse andesitic inclusions (55-61% SiO2). Pillow-like forms, intricate commingling and local diffusive mixing of andesite and rhyolite at contacts, concentric vesicle distribution, and crystal morphologies indicative of undercooling show that inclusions were incorporated in their rhyolitic hosts as blobs of magma. Inclusions were probably dispersed throughout small volumes of rhyolitic magma by convective (mechanical) mixing. Inclusion magma was formed by mixing (hybridization) at the interface between basaltic and rhyolitic magmas that coexisted in vertically zoned igneous systems. Relict phenocrysts and the bulk compositions of inclusions suggest that silicic endmembers were less differentiated than erupted high-silica rhyolite. Changes in inferred endmembers of magma mixtures with time suggest that the steepness of chemical gradients near the silicic/mafic interface in the zoned reservoir may have decreased as the system matured, although a high-silica rhyolitic cap persisted. The Coso example is an extreme case of large thermal and compositional contrast between inclusion and host magmas; lesser differences between intermediate composition magmas and inclusions lead to

  19. Geology of the Mid-Miocene Rooster Comb Caldera and Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field, eastern Oregon: Silicic volcanism associated with Grande Ronde flood basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Thomas R.; Mahood, Gail A.

    2016-01-01

    The Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) of eastern Oregon consists of rhyolitic caldera centers and lava fields contemporaneous with and spatially related to Mid-Miocene Columbia River flood basalt volcanism. Previous studies delineated two calderas in the southeastern part of LOVF near Owyhee Reservoir, the result of eruptions of two ignimbrites, the Tuff of Leslie Gulch and the Tuff of Spring Creek. Our new interpretation is that these two map units are differentially altered parts of a single ignimbrite produced in a major phreatomagmatic eruption at ~ 15.8 Ma. Areas previously mapped as Tuff of Spring Creek are locations where the ignimbrite contains abundant clinoptilolite ± mordenite, which made it susceptible to erosion. The resistant intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch has an alteration assemblage of albite ± quartz, indicative of low-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Our new mapping of caldera lake sediments and pre- and post-caldera rhyolitic lavas and intrusions that are chemically similar to intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch point to a single ~ 20 × 25 km caldera, which we name the Rooster Comb Caldera. Erosion of the resurgently uplifted southern half of the caldera created dramatic exposures of intracaldera Tuff of Leslie Gulch cut by post-caldera rhyolite dikes and intrusions that are the deeper-level equivalents of lava domes and flows that erupted into the caldera lake preserved in exposures to the northeast. The Rooster Comb Caldera has features in common with more southerly Mid-Miocene calderas of the McDermitt Volcanic Field and High Rock Caldera Complex, including formation in a basinal setting shortly after flood basalt eruptions ceased in the region, and forming on eruption of peralkaline ignimbrite. The volcanism at Rooster Comb Caldera postdates the main activity at McDermitt and High Rock, but, like it, begins ~ 300 ky after flood basalt volcanism begins in the area, and while flood basalts don't erupt through the silicic focus, are

  20. Precaldera lavas of the southeast San Juan Volcanic Field: Parent magmas and crustal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, M. T.; Dungan, M. A.; Ferguson, K. M.; Lipman, P. W.; Moorbath, S.

    1991-07-01

    Early intermediate composition volcanic rocks of the Oligocene (circa 34-29 Ma) southeast San Juan volcanic field, southern Colorado, comprise the Conejos Formation. Conejos lavas include both high-K calc-alkaline and alkaline magma series (54-69% SiO2) ranging in composition from basaltic andesite (basaltic trachyandesite) to dacite (trachydacite). The subsequent Platoro caldera complex (29-27 Ma) was superimposed on a cluster of broadly precursory Conejos stratocones. Precaldera volcanism occurred in three pulses corresponding to three time-stratigraphic members: (1) the Horseshoe Mountain member, (2) the Rock Creek member, and (3) the Willow Mountain member. Each member exhibits distinctive phenocryst modes and incompatible trace element contents. Horseshoe Mountain lavas (hornblende-phyric) have relatively low alkali and incompatible element abundances, Rock Creek lavas (anhydrous phenocrysts) and ash-flow tuffs have the highest abundances, and Willow Mountain lavas (diverse mineralogy) are intermediate. All Conejos lavas exhibit low ratios of lead (206Pb/204Pb = 17.5 to 18.2) and neodymium (ɛNd = -8 to -4) isotopes and high 87Sr/86Sr (0.7045 to 0.7056) compared to depleted asthenospheric mantle. These values lie between those of likely mantle compositions and the isotopic composition of Proterozoic crust of the southern Rocky Mountains. Mafic lavas of the Horseshoe Mountain member have the lowest Pb and Nd isotope ratios among Conejos members but trend toward higher isotopic values with increasing degrees of differentiation. Compositions within the Rock Creek series trend toward higher Pb and lower Nd isotope ratios with increasing SiO2. Willow mountain volcanic sequences define diverse chemical-isotopic correlations. We interpret the chemical and isotopic differences observed between mafic lavas of each member to reflect derivation from compositionally distinct mantle derived parent magmas that have experienced extensive deep level crustal contamination

  1. Temporal relations of volcanism and hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Goff, F. )

    1989-11-01

    Two hydrothermal alteration events (8.07 Ma, one sample; 6.51-5.60 Ma, six samples) related to the waning stages of late Miocene volcanism ({ge} 13 to {le} 5.8 Ma) are recognized at the Cochiti district (southeast Jemez Mountains). Most of the K/Ar dates (0.83 {plus minus} 0.11-0.66 {plus minus} 0.21 Ma, four samples) in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A at Sulfur Springs, Valles caldera, indicate post-Valles caldera hydrothermal alteration. A sample from acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole was too young to be dated by the K/Ar method and is possibly associated with current hot-spring activity and the youngest pulses of volcanism. Oxygen-isotope data from illite/smectite clays in the Cochiti district are zonally distributed and range from {minus}2.15{per thousand} to {plus}7.97{per thousand} (SMOW), depending upon temperature, extent of rock-fluid interaction, and composition. The samples from VC-2A get lighter with depth ({minus}0.20{per thousand} to {plus}1.62{per thousand}). The K/Ar and oxygen-isotope data provide strong evidence that the epithermal quartz-vein-hosted gold-silver mineralization at Cochiti and the sub-ore grade molybdenite at VC-2A were deposited in the late Miocene (5.99-5.60 Ma) and mid-Quaternary ({approximately}0.66 Ma), respectively, by hydrothermal fluids composed primarily of meteoric water.

  2. Isotopic and chemical constraints on the petrogenesis of Blackburn Hills volcanic field, western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moll-Stalcup, E. J.; Arth, Joseph G.

    1991-01-01

    The Blackburn Hills volcanic field is one of several Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary (75-50 Ma) volcanic fields in western Alaska that comprise a vast magmatic province extending from the Arctic Circle to Bristol Bay. It consists of andesite flows, rhyolite domes, a central granodiorite to quartz monzonite pluton, and small intrusive rhyolite porphyries, overlain by basalt and alkali-rhyolites. Most of the field consists of andesite flows which can be divided into two groups on the basis of elemental and isotopic composition: a group having lower ( 87Sr 86Sr)i, higher ( 143Nd 144Nd)i, and moderate LREE and HREE contents (group 1), and a group having higher ( 87Sr 86Sr)i, lower ( 143Sr 144Sr)i, and lower HREE contents. Basalts are restricted to the top of the stratigraphic section, comprise the most primitive part of group 1 [( 87Sr 86Sr)i = 0.7033; ( 143Nd 144Nd)i = 0.5129], and have trace-element ratios that are similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIBs). In contrast to the basalts, group 1 andesites have higher ( 87Sr 86Sr)i and lower ( 143Nd 144Nd)i, and represent interaction of mantle-derived magmas with the lower crust of Koyukuk terrane. Group 2 andesites have ( 87Sr 86Sr)i and ( 143Nd 144Nd)i that are near bulk-earth values and probably formed by partial melting of the lower crust of Koyukuk terrane. The central pluton and rhyolite porphyries are isotopically uniform ( 87Sr 86Sr)i ??? 0.704, ( 143Nd 144Nd)i ??? 0.51275, and are interpreted to have formed by melting of young mafic to intermediate crustal rocks or by fractionation of group 1 andesites. The rhyolite domes have an isotopic range similar to that of the basalts and andesites [( 87Sr 86Sr)i = 0.70355-0.70499; ( 143Nd 144Nd)i = 0.51263-0.51292], which suggests they formed by fractionation of the and site and basalt magmas. Although some workers have suggested that the volcanic field is underlain by old continental crust, none of the data require the presence of Paleozoic or Precambrian

  3. The eruptive history of the Tequila volcanic field, western Mexico: ages, volumes, and relative proportions of lava types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis-Kenedi, Catherine B.; Lange, Rebecca A.; Hall, Chris M.; Delgado-Granados, Hugo

    2005-06-01

    The eruptive history of the Tequila volcanic field (1600 km2) in the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt is based on 40Ar/39Ar chronology and volume estimates for eruptive units younger than 1 Ma. Ages are reported for 49 volcanic units, including Volcán Tequila (an andesitic stratovolcano) and peripheral domes, flows, and scoria cones. Volumes of volcanic units ≤1 Ma were obtained with the aid of field mapping, ortho aerial photographs, digital elevation models (DEMs), and ArcGIS software. Between 1120 and 200 kyrs ago, a bimodal distribution of rhyolite (~35 km3) and high-Ti basalt (~39 km3) dominated the volcanic field. Between 685 and 225 kyrs ago, less than 3 km3 of andesite and dacite erupted from more than 15 isolated vents; these lavas are crystal-poor and show little evidence of storage in an upper crustal chamber. Approximately 200 kyr ago, ~31 km3 of andesite erupted to form the stratocone of Volcán Tequila. The phenocryst assemblage of these lavas suggests storage within a chamber at ~2 3 km depth. After a hiatus of ~110 kyrs, ~15 km3 of andesite erupted along the W and SE flanks of Volcán Tequila at ~90 ka, most likely from a second, discrete magma chamber located at ~5 6 km depth. The youngest volcanic feature (~60 ka) is the small andesitic volcano Cerro Tomasillo (~2 km3). Over the last 1 Myr, a total of 128±22 km3 of lava erupted in the Tequila volcanic field, leading to an average eruption rate of ~0.13 km3/kyr. This volume erupted over ~1600 km2, leading to an average lava accumulation rate of ~8 cm/kyr. The relative proportions of lava types are ~22 43% basalt, ~0.4 1% basaltic andesite, ~29 54% andesite, ~2 3% dacite, and ~18 40% rhyolite. On the basis of eruptive sequence, proportions of lava types, phenocryst assemblages, textures, and chemical composition, the lavas do not reflect the differentiation of a single (or only a few) parental liquids in a long-lived magma chamber. The rhyolites are geochemically diverse and were likely

  4. New Contributions to the Geomagnetic Instability Time Scale: Paleomagnetic study of Tequila and Ceboruco-San Pedro-Amado Nervo Volcanic Fields (Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Ceja, M.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Alva-Valdivia, L.; Rosas Elguera, J.; Calvo, M.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2005-05-01

    The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) is one of the largest continental volcanic arcs of the North American plate. It spans about 1000 km from the Pacific to the Gulf of Mexico. Despite the abundance of thick lava sequences with quite high extrusion rates, the TMVB have been relatively little studied from a paleomagnetic point of view. Previous studies were aimed for tectonic evolution of the region rather than documenting fluctuations of Earth's magnetic field in terms of both directions and intensity. We report a detailed paleomagnetic and rock-magnetic study of Tequila and Ceboruco-San Pedro-Amado Nervo volcanic fields. 350 oriented samples belonging to 31 independent cooling units were collected. All these sites were previously dated by means of the state-of-the-art 40Ar-39Ar geochronological method and span from 1.1 Ma to 2 Ky. Rock-magnetic experiments which included continuous susceptibility, isothermal remanence acquisition and hysteresis measurements point to simple magnetic mineralogy. In most of cases, the remanence is carried by Ti-poor titanomagnetite of pseudo-single-domain magnetic structure. The paleodirections of the flow dated as 819±25 ka correspond to a VGP latitude of 18° N. This anomalous field behaviour apparently recorded prior to the Matuyama-Brunhes reversal may coincide with the geomagnetic event, defined as M-B precursor. Two independent lava flows, dated as 623±91 and 614±16 ka respectively, yield reverse paleodirections and one lava flow dated as 690±29 yields transitional paleodirections. It is possible that these lavas erupted during the worldwide observable Big Lost or Delta events.

  5. Experimental study of near-field air entrainment by subsonic volcanic jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The flow structure in the developing region of a turbulent jet has been examined using particle image velocimetry methods, considering the flow at steady state conditions. The velocity fields were integrated to determine the ratio of the entrained air speed to the jet speed, which was approximately 0.03 for a range of Mach numbers up to 0.89 and. Reynolds numbers up to 217,000. This range of experimental Mach and Reynolds numbers is higher than previously considered for high-accuracy entrainment measures, particularly in the near-vent region. The entrainment values are below those commonly used for geophysical analyses of volcanic plumes, suggesting that existing 1-D models are likely to understate the tendency for column collapse. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Lead and strontium isotopes in rocks of the Absaroka volcanic field, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterman, Z.E.; Doe, B.R.; Prostka, H.J.

    1970-01-01

    The Absaroka volcanic field is comprised of predominant andesitic volcaniclastic rocks and less abundant potassium-rich mafic lavas (shoshonites and absarokites). Strontium and lead isotopic variations preclude a simple derivation from an isotopically uniform source: Sr87/Sr86, 0.7042 to 0.7090; Pb206/Pb204, 16.31 to 17.30; Pb208/Pb204, 36.82 to 37.64. We postulate that these rocks were derived from a lower crust or upper mantle which underwent a preferential loss of uranium relative to lead approximately 2800??200 m.y. ago. Variations in lead and strontium isotopic compositions are thought to reflect small inhomogeneities in U/Pb and Rb/Sr ratios in the source. ?? 1970 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Petrology of lower crustal and upper mantle xenoliths from the Cima Volcanic Field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilshire, H.G.; McGuire, A.V.; Noller, J.S.; Turrin, B.D.

    1991-01-01

    Basaltic rocks of the Cima Volcanic Field in the southern Basin and Range province contain abundant gabbro, pyroxenite, and peridotite xenoliths. Composite xenoliths containing two or more rock types show that upper-mantle spinel peridotite was enriched by multiple dike intrusions in at least three episodes; the mantle was further enriched by intergranular and shear-zone melt infiltration in at least two episodes. Because of their high densities, the gabbros and pyroxenites can occupy the zone immediately above the present Moho (modeled on seismic data as 10-13 km thick, with Vp 6.8 km/s) only if their seismic velocities are reduced by the joints, partial melts, and fluid inclusions that occur in them. Alternatively, these xenoliths may have been derived entirely from beneath the Moho, in which case the Moho is not the local crust-mantle boundary. -from Authors

  8. Primitive magmas at five Cascade volcanic fields: Melts from hot, heterogeneous sub-arc mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Bruggman, P.E.; Christiansen, R.L.; Clynne, M.A.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hildreth, W.

    1997-01-01

    Major and trace element concentrations, including REE by isotope dilution, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and O isotope ratios have been determined for 38 mafic lavas from the Mount Adams, Crater Lake, Mount Shasta, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic fields, in the Cascade arc, northwestern part of the United States. Many of the samples have a high Mg# [100Mg/(Mg + FeT) > 60] and Ni content (>140 ppm) such that we consider them to be primitive. We recognize three end-member primitive magma groups in the Cascades, characterized mainly by their trace-element and alkali-metal abundances: (1) High-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT) has trace element abundances similar to N-MORB, except for slightly elevated LILE, and has Eu/Eu* > 1. (2) Arc basalt and basaltic andesite have notably higher LILE contents, generally have higher SiO2 contents, are more oxidized, and have higher Cr for a given Ni abundance than HAOT. These lavas show relative depletion in HFSE, have lower HREE and higher LREE than HAOT, and have smaller Eu/Eu* (0.94-1.06). (3) Alkali basalt from the Simcoe volcanic field east of Mount Adams represents the third end-member, which contributes an intraplate geochemical signature to magma compositions. Notable geochemical features among the volcanic fields are: (1) Mount Adams rocks are richest in Fe and most incompatible elements including HFSE; (2) the most incompatible-element depleted lavas occur at Medicine Lake; (3) all centers have relatively primitive lavas with high LILE/HFSE ratios but only the Mount Adams, Lassen, and Medicine Lake volcanic fields also have relatively primitive rocks with an intraplate geochemical signature; (4) there is a tendency for increasing 87Sr/86Sr, 207Pb/204Pb, and ??18O and decreasing 206Pb/204Pb and 143Nd/144Nd from north to south. The three end-member Cascade magma types reflect contributions from three mantle components: depleted sub-arc mantle modestly enriched in LILE during ancient subduction; a modern, hydrous subduction component

  9. Eruptive history and geochronology of the Mount Baker volcanic field, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Fierstein, J.; Lanphere, M.

    2003-01-01

    Mount Baker, a steaming, ice-mantled, andesitic stratovolcano, is the most conspicuous component of a multivent Quaternary volcanic field active almost continuously since 1.3 Ma. More than 70 packages of lava flows and ???110 dikes have been mapped, ???500 samples chemically analyzed, and ???80 K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages determined. Principal components are (1) the ignimbrite-filled Kulshan caldera (1.15 Ma) and its precaldera and postcaldera rhyodacite lavas and dikes (1.29-0.99 Ma); (2) ???60 intracaldera, hydrothermally altered, andesite-dacite dikes and pods-remnants of a substantial early-postcaldera volcanic center (1.1-0.6 Ma); (3) unaltered intracaldera andesite lavas and dikes, including those capping Ptarmigan and Lasiocarpa Ridges and Table Mountain (0.5-0.2 Ma); (4) the long-lived Chowder Ridge focus (1.29-0.1 Ma)-an andesite to rhyodacite eruptive complex now glacially reduced to ???50 dikes and remnants of ???10 lava flows; (5) Black Buttes stratocone, basaltic to dacitic, and several contemporaneous peripheral volcanoes (0.5-0.2 Ma); and (6) Mount Baker stratocone and contemporaneous peripheral volcanoes (0.1 Ma to Holocene). Glacial ice has influenced eruptions and amplified erosion throughout the lifetime of the volcanic field. Although more than half the material erupted has been eroded, liberal and conservative volume estimates for 77 increments of known age yield cumulative curves of volume erupted vs. time that indicate eruption rates in the range 0.17-0.43 km3/k.y. for major episodes and longterm background rates of 0.02-0.07 km3/k.y. Andesite and rhyodacite each make up nearly half of the 161 ?? 56 km3 of products erupted, whereas basalt and dacite represent only a few cubic kilometers, each representing 1%-3% the total. During the past 4 m.y., the principal magmatic focus has migrated stepwise 25 km southwestward, from the edge of the Chilliwack batholith to present-day Mount Baker.

  10. Group II Xenoliths from Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Central Nevada: Evidence for a Kinked Geotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, M.; Mosely, J.; Norris, J.

    2015-12-01

    Group II xenoliths associated with the 140 Ka Easy Chair Crater, Lunar Crater volcanic field, NV, consist of amphibole rich-inclusions including amphibolites, pyroxenites, and gabbros. Abundant minerals in these inclusions are kaersutite, aluminous (7.3-9.7 wt% Al2O3), calcic clinopyroxene, primarily diopside, and olivine (Mg# 69-73) with accessory spinel, sulfide and apatite. Although most apatites are fluor-hydroxyapatite solid solutions, one xenolith contains Cl- and OH-rich apatite suggesting that Cl may have been an important constituent in the parent magma(s) . The xenoliths show abundant evidence for equilibration at relatively low temperatures including amphibole and orthopyroxene exsolution in clinopyroxene, and granules of magnetite in hercynite hosts. If latter texture is due to exsolution, then this particular Group II xenolith equilibrated at temperatures near or below 500oC or at a depth of about 15 km along a conductive geotherm. It may be that all the Group II xenoliths equilibrated at low temperatures given the abundant exsolution textures although Fe-Mg exchange relations suggest equilibration at temperatures in excess of 800oC. Low equilibration temperatures are in conflict with the unusually high equilibration temperatures, >1200oC (Smith, 2000) displayed by Group I xenoliths from this same volcanic field. Taken at face value, the geothermometric results indicate unusually high temperatures in the upper mantle, normal temperatures in the crust and the possibility of a kinked geotherm in the region. Curiously the LCVF lies in an area of "normal" heat flow, south of the Battle Mountain area of high heat flow but the number of heat flow measurements in the Lunar Crater area is very low (Humphreys et al., 2003; Sass, 2005). References: Humphreys et al., 2003, Int. Geol. Rev. 45: 575; Sass et al., 2005, http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1207/; Smith, 2000, JGR 105: 16769.

  11. Studying monogenetic volcanoes with a terrestrial laser scanner: case study at Croscat volcano (Garrotxa Volcanic Field, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, A.; García-Sellés, D.; Pedrazzi, D.; Barde-Cabusson, S.; Marti, J.; Muñoz, J. A.

    2015-03-01

    Erosional processes (natural or anthropogenic) may partly destroy the relatively small-sized volcanic edifices characteristic of monogenetic volcanic zones, leaving their internal structure well exposed. Nevertheless, the study of these outcrops may be extremely challenging due to restricted accessibility or safety issues. Digital representations of the outcrop surface have been lately used to overcome such difficulties. Data acquired with terrestrial laser scanning instruments using Light Detection and Ranging technology enables the construction of such digital outcrops. The obtained high-precision 3-D terrain models are of greater coverage and accuracy than conventional methods and, when taken at different times, allow description of geological processes in time and space. Despite its intrinsic advantages and the proven satisfactory results, this technique has been little applied in volcanology-related studies. Here, we want to introduce it to the volcanological community together with a new and user-friendly digital outcrop analysis methodology for inexperienced users. This tool may be useful, not only for volcano monitoring purposes, but also to describe the internal structure of exposed volcanic edifices or to estimate outcrop erosion rates that may be helpful in terms of hazard assessment or preservation of volcanic landscapes. We apply it to the Croscat volcano, a monogenetic cone in the La Garrotxa Volcanic Field (Catalan Volcanic Zone, NE Spain), quarrying of which leads to a perfect view of its interior but restricts access to its uppermost parts. Croscat is additionally one of the most emblematic symbols of the La Garrotxa Volcanic Field Natural Park, and its preservation is a main target of the park administration.

  12. Monogenetic volcanic fields and their geoheritage values of western Saudi Arabia and their implication to holistic geoeducation projects locally and globally (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemeth, K.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    Monogeneitc volcanic fields are the most common manifestation of volcanism on Earth and other planets. They composed of small volume and short lived volcanoes each of them with a relatively simple eruption history. In spite of recent researches demonstrated complex, repeated and geochemically distinct eruption histories commonly associated with te formation of small-volume volcanoes, they are still considerred as volcanoes that are in human-scale and therefore ideal to use them as educational tools or part of volcanic geoheritage projects including geopark developments. In the western margin of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia there are at least 9 intracontinental volcanic fields subparalell with the Red Sea Rift ranging from alkaline basaltic to basalt-trachyte bimodal dispersed volcanic systems. Among these volcanic fields the geoheritage value of three fields were recently evaluated and proposed that they are suitable for further development to establish the first volcanic geoparks in the Arabian Peninsula in the area of 1) Al Madinah (AMVF) 2) Kishb (KVF) and 3) Hutaymah Volcanic Fields (HVF). The AMVF offers a natural concept based on specific volcanic precinct ordering of its volcanic geoheritages from the most accessable and most common volcanism that is historically significant (eg. scoria and lava spatter cones with extensive lava fields) toward a more adventure geotourism style approach in remote, less common but more destructive type of volcanism (eg. trachytic explosion craters). In the contrary, the KVF is a perfect site where phreatomagmatic volcanism and their consequences were identified as a major driving force for further geopark developments. The HVF with its rich archaeological and cultural sites and superbly exposed variously eroded tuff rings and maars offer a good location to develop geoeducation programs to highlight short- and long-term climatic and hydrologic changes in an area a volcanic field evolved. The three Saudi projects also demonstrate

  13. Application of a diffusion model to simulate erosion of scoria cones in the San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F. )

    1992-01-01

    A computer model for simulating the erosion of scoria (cinder) cones by diffusive processes is being formulated to investigate their long-term degradation. The model uses a two-dimensional diffusion algorithm expressed in finite-difference form to operate upon a three-dimensional scoria cone input as a matrix of elevation values (essentially a DTM). The computer simulation exhibits degradation from an initial conical form, through crater infilling, and finally into a low-relief, shield-like hill. This preliminary and simplest version of the model successfully mimicked the degradation pattern observed in degraded cones of the San Francisco volcanic field, Arizona. The scoria cones in this volcanic field range in age from Early Pliocene to Holocene and demonstrate a decrease in cone height/width ratio and slope with an increase in age. Morphometric relationships offer an opportunity to establish a relative age scheme and to loosely date cones of unknown age in a given volcanic field. The systematic decrease with time of scoria cone height, height/width ratio, and slope is the basis for a relative dating scheme. Morphometry is derived from 1:24,000-scale, 20-ft.-contour topographic maps and from calibrated field photographs. Morphometric parameters obtained from computer simulations and from actual degraded cones are calibrated by a least-squares technique with cones that have been dated by radiometric or other absolute age-dating methods. Comparative morphology of scoria cones is a potentially useful age-dating tool for mapping volcanic fields.

  14. Gold-silver mining districts, alteration zones, and paleolandforms in the Miocene Bodie Hills Volcanic Field, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vikre, Peter G.; John, David A.; du Bray, Edward A.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2015-09-25

      Based on volcanic stratigraphy, geochronology, remnant paleosurfaces, and paleopotentiometric surfaces in mining districts and alteration zones, present landforms in the Bodie Hills volcanic field reflect incremental construction of stratovolcanoes and large- to small-volume flow-domes, magmatic inflation, and fault displacements. Landform evolution began with construction of the 15–13 Ma Masonic and 13–12 Ma Aurora volcanic centers in the northwestern and northeastern parts of the field, respectively. Smaller volcanoes erupted at ~11–10 Ma in, between, and south of these centers as erosional detritus accumulated north of the field in Fletcher Valley. Distally sourced, 9.7–9.3 Ma Eureka Valley Tuff filled drainages and depressions among older volcanoes and was partly covered by nearly synchronous eruptives during construction of four large 10–8 Ma volcanoes, in the southern part of the field. The lack of significant internal fault displacement, distribution of Eureka Valley Tuff, and elevation estimates derived from floras, suggest that the Bodie Hills volcanic field attained present elevations mostly through volcano construction and magmatic inflation, and that maximum paleoelevations (>8,500 ft) at the end of large volume eruptions at ~8 Ma are similar to present elevations.

  15. Gold-silver mining districts, alteration zones, and paleolandforms in the Miocene Bodie Hills Volcanic Field, California and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vikre, Peter G.; John, David A.; du Bray, Edward A.; Fleck, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

      Based on volcanic stratigraphy, geochronology, remnant paleosurfaces, and paleopotentiometric surfaces in mining districts and alteration zones, present landforms in the Bodie Hills volcanic field reflect incremental construction of stratovolcanoes and large- to small-volume flow-domes, magmatic inflation, and fault displacements. Landform evolution began with construction of the 15–13 Ma Masonic and 13–12 Ma Aurora volcanic centers in the northwestern and northeastern parts of the field, respectively. Smaller volcanoes erupted at ~11–10 Ma in, between, and south of these centers as erosional detritus accumulated north of the field in Fletcher Valley. Distally sourced, 9.7–9.3 Ma Eureka Valley Tuff filled drainages and depressions among older volcanoes and was partly covered by nearly synchronous eruptives during construction of four large 10–8 Ma volcanoes, in the southern part of the field. The lack of significant internal fault displacement, distribution of Eureka Valley Tuff, and elevation estimates derived from floras, suggest that the Bodie Hills volcanic field attained present elevations mostly through volcano construction and magmatic inflation, and that maximum paleoelevations (>8,500 ft) at the end of large volume eruptions at ~8 Ma are similar to present elevations.

  16. Occurrence of an unknown Atlantic eruption in the Chaîne des Puys volcanic field (Massif Central, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouannic, G.; Walter-Simonnet, A. V.; Bossuet, G.; Cubizolle, H.; Boivin, P.; Devidal, J. L.; Oberlin, C.

    2014-08-01

    A volcanic ash layer, called MF1, was recently identified in Holocene sediments from the Gourgon and Molhiac peat bogs (Monts du Forez, French Massif Central). This ash layer consists of colorless shards with a heterogeneous trachytic to rhyolitic composition. The trace elements analyzed by Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) attest to a local origin. Radiocarbon dating of peat samples taken within and below the ash layer indicates the best age at 6339 ± 61 cal yr BP, i.e. an age contemporaneous with the volcanic activity of Montchal, Montcineyre and Pavin volcanoes from the Chaîne des Puys volcanic field. These volcanoes are characterized by basaltic and trachytic products, thus the rhyolitic composition of MF1 tephra suggests that it is likely originated from an unknown eruption. These results again confirm the interest of studying the distal volcanic ash fallouts in order to establish or specify records of past eruptions of volcanic fields. Identification of this new tephra layer also provides an additional tephrochronological marker for Eastern French Massif Central.

  17. Paleomagnetism in the Determination of the Emplacement Temperature of Cerro Colorado Tuff Cone, El Pinacate Volcanic Field, Sonora, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Trejo, A.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Vidal Solano, J. R.; Garcia Amador, B.; Gonzalez-Rangel, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Cerro Colorado Maar is located at the World Heritage Site, biosphere reserve El Pinacate and Gran Desierto del Altar, at the NNW region of Sonora, Mexico (in El Pinacate Volcanic Field). It is a tuff cone, about 1 km diameter, result of several phreatomagmatic episodes during the late Quaternary. We report paleomagnetic and rock magnetic properties from fusiform volcanic bombs obtained from the borders of Cerro Colorado. This study is based in the thermoremanent magnetization TRM normally acquired by volcanic rocks, which can be used to estimate the emplacement temperature range. We performed the experiments on 20 lithic fragments (10 cm to 20 cm approximately), taking 6-8 paleomagnetic cores from each. Rock magnetic experiments (magnetic susceptibility vs. temperature (k-T), hysteresis curves and FORC analysis, shows that the main magnetic mineral carriers of magnetization are titanomagnetite and titanohematite in different levels of intergrowth. The k-T curves suggest in many cases, only one magnetic phase, but also in other cases a second magnetic phase. Thermal demagnetization was used to demagnetize the specimens in detailed short steps and make a well-defined emplacement temperature determination ranges. We found that temperature emplacement determination range for these two magnetic phases is between 350-450 °C, and 550-580 °C, respectively. These results are consistent with those expected in an eruption of Surtsey type, showing a distinct volcanic activity compared to the other craters from El Pinacate volcanic field.

  18. Review of magnetic field monitoring near active faults and volcanic calderas in California: 1974-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, R.J.; Johnston, M.J.S.

    1998-01-01

    Differential magnetic fields have been monitored along the San Andreas fault and the Long Valley caldera since 1974. At each monitoring location, proton precession magnetometers sample total magnetic field intensity at a resolution of 0.1 nT or 0.25 nT. Every 10 min, data samples are transmitted via satellite telemetry to Menlo Park, CA for processing and analysis. The number of active magnetometer sites has varied during the past 21 years from 6 to 25, with 12 sites currently operational. We use this network to identify magnetic field changes generated by earthquake and volcanic processes. During the two decades of monitoring, five moderate earthquakes (M5.9 to M7.3) have occurred within 20 km of magnetometer sites located along the San Andreas fault and only one preseismic signal of 1.5 nT has been observed. During moderate earthquakes, coseismic magnetic signals, with amplitudes from 0.7 nT to 1.3 nT, have been identified for 3 of the 5 events. These observations are generally consistent with those calculated from simple seismomagnetic models of these earthquakes and near-fault coseismic magnetic field disturbances rarely exceed one nanotesla. These data are consistent with the concept of low shear stress and relatively uniform displacement of the San Andreas fault system as expected due to high pore fluid pressure on the fault. A systematic decrease of 0.8-1 nT/year in magnetic field has occurred in the Long Valley caldera since 1989. These magnetic field data are similar in form to observed geodetically measured displacements from inflation of the resurgent dome. A simple volcanomagnetic model involving pressure increase of 50 MPa/a at a depth of 7 km under the resurgent dome can replicate these magnetic field observations. This model is derived from the intrusion model that best fits the surface deformation data. ?? 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Geochemistry of intrusive rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field, New Mexico, and contrasts between evolution of plutonic and volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Czamanske, G.K.; Lipman, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonic rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field comprise three groups: 1) ???25 Ma high-level resurgent plutons composed of monzogranite and silicic metaluminous and peralkaline granite, 2) 23-25 Ma syenogranite, and alkali-feldspar granite intrusions emplaced along the southern caldera margin, and 3) 19-23 Ma granodiorite and granite plutons emplaced south of the caldera. Major-element compositions of both extrusive and intrusive suites in the Latir field are broadly similar; both suites include high-SiO2 rocks with low Ba and Sr, and high Rb, Nb, Th, and U contents. Moreover, both intermediateto siliciccomposition volcanic and plutonic rocks contain abundant accessory sphene and apatite, rich in rare-earth elements (REE), as well as phases in which REE's are essential components. Strong depletion in Y and REE contents, with increasing SiO2 content, in the plutonic rocks indicate a major role for accessory mineral fractionation that is not observed in volcanic rocks of equivalent composition. Considerations of the rheology of granitic magma suggest that accessory-mineral fractionation may occur primarily by filter-pressing evolved magmas from crystal-rich melts. More limited accessory-mineral crystallization and fractionation during evolution of the volcanic magmas may have resulted from markedly lower diffusivities of essential trace elements than major elements. Accessory-mineral fractionation probably becomes most significant at high crystallinities. The contrast in crystallization environments postulated for the extrusive and intrusive rocks may be common to other magmatic systems; the effects are particularly pronounced in highly evolved rocks of the Latir field. High-SiO2 peralkaline porphyry emplaced during resurgence of the Questa caldera represents non-erupted portions of the magma that produced the Amalia Tuff during caldera-forming eruption. The peralkaline porphyry continues compositional and mineralogical trends found in the tuff. Amphibole

  20. River solute fluxes reflecting active hydrothermal chemical weathering of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Evans, William C.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few decades numerous studies have quantified the load of dissolved solids in large rivers to determine chemical weathering rates in orogenic belts and volcanic areas, mainly motivated by the notion that over timescales greater than ~100kyr, silicate hydrolysis may be the dominant sink for atmospheric CO2, thus creating a feedback between climate and weathering. Here, we report the results of a detailed study during water year 2007 (October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007) in the major rivers of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) which hosts Earth's largest "restless" caldera and over 10,000 thermal features. The chemical compositions of rivers that drain thermal areas in the YPVF differ significantly from the compositions of rivers that drain non-thermal areas. There are large seasonal variations in river chemistry and solute flux, which increases with increasing water discharge. The river chemistry and discharge data collected periodically over an entire year allow us to constrain the annual solute fluxes and to distinguish between low-temperature weathering and hydrothermal flux components. The TDS flux from Yellowstone Caldera in water year 2007 was 93t/km2/year. Extensive magma degassing and hydrothermal interaction with rocks accounts for at least 82% of this TDS flux, 83% of the cation flux and 72% of the HCO3- flux. The low-temperature chemical weathering rate (17t/km2/year), calculated on the assumption that all the Cl- is of thermal origin, could include a component from low-temperature hydrolysis reactions induced by CO2 ascending from depth rather than by atmospheric CO2. Although this uncertainty remains, the calculated low-temperature weathering rate of the young rhyolitic rocks in the Yellowstone Caldera is comparable to the world average of large watersheds that drain also more soluble carbonates and evaporates but is slightly lower than calculated rates in other, less-silicic volcanic regions. Long-term average fluxes at

  1. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Gallego Volcanic Field, Solomon Islands, SW Pacific and geotectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petterson, M. G.; Haldane, M. I.; Smith, D. J.; Billy, D.; Jordan, N. J.

    2011-08-01

    The Upper Miocene to present day Gallego Volcanic Field (GVF) is located in northwest Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, SW Pacific, and potentially includes the offshore Savo volcano. The GVF is a multi-centred complex covering an area of ~ 800 km 2 on Guadalcanal and a further ~ 30 km 2 on the island of Savo, north of west Guadalcanal. GVF volcanism is characterised by effusive eruptions of lava, intrusion of sub-volcanic plutons, as well as pyroclastic flow and fall deposits dominated by block and ash flow deposits. Geochemical analysis of a representative suite of samples from the GVF demonstrates that the GVF comprise largely a 'main suite' of basalts to andesites and minor trachyandesites. The predominant mineralogy of the GVF comprises plagioclase, amphibole, clinopyroxene and magnetite-ilmenite. Associated with the 'main suite' are cognate nodules composed of hornblendite, gabbros, and clinopyroxenite. Interpretation of major and trace element geochemistry and petrographic studies suggests that fractionation was dominated by early clinopyroxene, and later amphibole + clinopyroxene + minor plagioclase. Geochemical features such as the incompatibility of Sr suggest that plagioclase largely crystallised en-masse late in the fractionation sequence. The presence of amphibole and late fractionation of plagioclase is suggestive of derivation from initially water-rich magmas. The region is characterised by strong geographically-related geochemical variations as evidenced by the Woodlark (and Manus) basins: basalts become more arc-like within the ocean basins with decreasing distance to the subducting trench. The GVF-Savo volcanoes are spatially and geochemically affected by deep N-S fractures that show some evidence of sympathetic geochemical variations with distance from the trench (e.g. Sr/Y ratios). Comparison with a range of international data for Th/Nb vs Pb/Nb and Dy/Yb vs SiO 2 indicate that: amphibole was indeed a strong controlling phase on magmatic evolution

  2. Eruptive History of the Rhyolitic Guangoche Volcano, Los Azufres Volcanic Field, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel Granados, E.; Arce, J. L.; Macias, J. L.; Layer, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Guangoche is a rhyolitic and polygenetic volcano with a maximum elevation of 2,760 meters above sea level. It is situated to the southwest of the Los Azufres Volcanic Field (LAVF), in the central sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Guangoche volcano is the youngest volcano described within the LAVF. It shows a horseshoe shaped crater open to the south, with a central lava dome. Its eruptive history during late Pleistocene has been intense with six explosive eruptions that consists of: 1) A southwards sector collapse of the volcano that generated a debris avalanche deposit with megablocks of heterogenous composition; 2) A plinian-type eruption that generated a pumice fall deposit and pyroclastic density currents by column collapse at 30.6 ka; 3) A plinian-type eruption "White Pumice Sequence" (29 ka) that developed a 22-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 7.0 x 107 kg/s (vol. = 0.53 km3); 4) A dome-destruction event, "Agua Blanca Pyroclastic Sequence" at 26.7 ka, that deposited a block-and-ash flow deposit; 5) A subplinian-plinian type eruption "Ochre Pyroclastic Sequence" (<26 ka) with an important initial phreatomagmatic phase, that generated pyroclastic density currents and pumice fallouts. The subplinian-plinian event generated a 16-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 1.9 x 107 kg/s, and magma volume of 0.38 km3; 6) The eruptive history ended with a subplinian eruption (<<26 ka), that generated a multilayered fall deposit, that developed a 11-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 2.9 x 106 kg/s and a magma volume of 0.26 km3. Volcanic activity at Guangoche volcano has been intense and future activity should not be discarded. Unfortunately, the last two events have not been dated yet. Guangoche rhyolitic magma is characterized by low-Ba contents suggesting crystal mush extraction for their genesis.

  3. Age and petrology of the Tertiary As Sarat volcanic field, southwestern Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, E.A.; Stoeser, D.B.; McKee, E.H.

    1991-01-01

    Harrat As Sarat forms the second smallest and southernmost of the basalt fields of western Saudi Arabia and is part of a voluminous Red Sea rift-related continental alkali basalt province. The rocks of the As Sarat were emplaced during the first stage of Red Sea rifting and represent the northernmost extension of the Tertiary Trap Series volcanics that occur mainly in the Yemen Arab Republic and Ethiopia. The field consists of up to 580 m of basalt flows, that are intruded by basaltic plugs, necks, minor dikes, and highly evolved peralkaline trachyte intrusions. K-Ar ages indicate that the As Sarat field formed between 31 and 22 Ma and contains an eruption hiatus of one million years that began about 25 Ma ago. Pre-hiatus flows are primarily hypersthene normative intersertal subalkaline basalt, whereas the majority of post-hiatus flows are nepheline normative alkali basalt and hawaiite with trachytic textures. Normative compositions of the basalts are consistent with their genesis by partial melting at varying depths. Trace element abundances in the basalt indicate that varying degrees of partial melting and fractional crystallization (or crystal accumulation) had major and minor roles, respectively, in development of compositional variation in these rocks. Modeling indicates that the pre-hiatus subalkaline basalts represent 8-10 percent mantle melting at depths of about 70 km and the post-hiatus alkali basalts represent 4-9 percent mantle melting at depths greater than 70 km. ?? 1991.

  4. Preliminary Ambient Noise and Seismic Interferometry Analysis of the Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wespestad, C.; Thurber, C. H.; Bennington, N. L.; Zeng, X.; Cardona, C.; Keranen, K. M.; Singer, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field is a large, restless, youthful rhyolitic system in the Southern Andes of Chile. We present a preliminary examination of ambient noise data at this site from 12 University of Wisconsin and 6 OVDAS (Southern Andean Volcano Observatory) broadband seismometers for a 3 month period. Ambient noise tomography seeks to correlate pairs of stations, with one station acting as a virtual source and the other a receiver, generating empirical Green's functions between each pair. The noise correlation functions (NCFs) were computed for day-long and hour-long windows, then the final NCFs were obtained from stacking each time window set. The hour-long NCFs converged more rapidly, so this time window was chosen for use in later stages. This study used phase weighted stacking of the NCFs instead of linear stacking in order to achieve a better signal to noise ratio (SNR), although linearly stacked Green's functions were also created to confirm the improvement. Phase weighted stacking can detect signals with weak amplitudes much more clearly than linear stacking by finding coherence of signals in multiple frequency bins and down-weighting the importance of amplitude for correlation (Schimmel and Gallart, 2007). The Frequency-Time Analysis Technique was utilized to measure group velocity, and initial results show it to be about 2 km/s on average. Fluctuations of the average velocity between different station pairs across this dense array will provide a preliminary indication of the location and size of the magma system. This study also applied seismic interferometry using ambient noise to determine temporal changes in seismic velocity occurring at Laguna del Maule. Initial results show temporal changes in seismic velocity correlated to seasonal changes in the hydrologic cycle (rain, snow pack, snow melt, etc.). Current work focuses on identifying changes in seismic velocity associated with ongoing volcanic processes.

  5. Managing a Monogenetic Volcanic Field As a World Heritage Nomination: Implications for Science, Outreach, and Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive-Garcia, C.; van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2014-12-01

    Monogenetic volcanoes form a large proportion of the world's volcanoes. They are in all tectonic environments and thus provide a significant link to understand fundamental geological processes such as plate tectonics. The Chaîne des Puys - Limagne fault World Heritage nomination is a prime example of this link where monogenetic volcanism, continental rifting, uplift and erosion are highlighted, and are made understandable to the lay person, though the actions on over 80 aligned monogenetic volcanoes. Such geoheritage is essential for monogenetic and other geological risks to be communicated to the wider public. The current scientific interest on monogenetic volcanoes is quite recent, and because of this, and probably their global distribution but small size, they have not received their due importance from a geoheritage standpoint. Some individual sites and some fields are protected and developed as attractions, but there has been no coherent global strategy for defining monogenetic heritage, or for linking sites. This is starting through the monogenetic commission of IAVCEI, and with wider participation of the IUGS and other bodies. The Chaîne des Puys - Limagne Fault UNESCO project is an example of how public awareness, at a global scale, and be increased through geoheritage. This is done integrating local stakeholders: population, industry, science, landscapers, artists, sports, government. This builds on existing protection and sustainable activities, integrating them with education programs. The result is to create a populace that 'thinks geological', and which leads visitors to also become geologically aware. This is helped by a monogenetic landscape that is easily readable and by links made to other geological sites around the world. We will explain how this process is ongoing. The project started over 35 years ago, and is a long-term vision to develop geological understanding and protection of this unique monogenetic and tectono-volcanic site.

  6. Incremental assembly and prolonged consolidation of Cordilleran magma chambers--Evidence from the Southern Rocky Mountain volcanic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Plutons thus provide an integrated record of prolonged magmatic evolution, while volcanism offers snapshots of conditions at early stages. Growth of subvolcanic batholiths involved sustained multistage open-system processes. These commonly involved ignimbrite eruptions at times of peak power input, but assembly and consolidation processes continued at diminishing rates long after peak volcanism. Some evidence cited for early incremental pluton assembly more likely records late events during or after volcanism. Contrasts between relatively primitive arc systems dominated by andesitic compositions and small upper-crustal plutons versus more silicic volcanic fields and associated batholiths probably reflect intertwined contrasts in crustal thickness and magmatic power input. Lower power input would lead to a Cascade- or Aleutian-type arc system, where intermediate-composition magma erupts directly from middle- and lower-crustal storage without development of large shallow plutons. Andean and southern Rocky Mountain–type systems begin similarly with intermediate-composition volcanism, but increasing magma production, perhaps triggered by abrupt changes in plate boundaries, leads to development of larger upper-crustal reservoirs, more silicic compositions, large ignimbrites, and batholiths. Lack of geophysical evidence for voluminous eruptible magma beneath young calderas suggests that near-solidus plutons can be rejuvenated rapidly by high-temperature mafic recharge, potentially causing large explosive eruptions with only brief precursors.

  7. 40Ar/39Ar Ages for the Sentinel-Arlington Volcanic Field, Southwestern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, S. R.; Greeley, R.; Champion, D. E.; Turrin, B. D.

    2007-12-01

    The Sentinel Plains lava field and proximate small (<10 km diameter) shield volcanoes, collectively referred to as the Sentinel-Arlington Volcanic Field (SAVF) are composed of mostly basaltic lava flows with a small percentage of magmatic and phreatomagmatic tephra deposits. SAVF is located ~75 km southwest of Phoenix, Arizona, and covers ~600 km2. SAVF lies on the eastern terminus of the Gila River graben within the Basin and Range physiographic province. A series of northwest-trending normal faults cut across the surrounding terrain, indicating that the loci of the SAVF eruptive centers could be controlled by structural trends. The volcanic centers of SAVF erupted near the Gila River channel, damming and diverting the river at least twice, forming small ephemeral lakes. The relative timing of the SAVF eruptions was determined in order to unravel the SAVF eruptive history as well as the timing of the ancient Gila River interactions that led to the development of the Painted Rock transverse drainage. The absolute timing was determined in order datermine causal relationships with local tectonism. The SAVF basal contact is ~30 m above the Holocene surface where exposed along the current river channel; and the lavas show similar amounts mantling by aeolian dust, development of pedogenic calcium carbonate, and subsequent incision by radial ephemeral drainages. Relative timing of eruptive events was determined by stratigraphic and embayment relationships. Continuity of distal flows exposed in cross-sections to their source vents could be established using field work, and confirmed using geomagnetic secular variation and geochemical analyses. Edifices generally corresponded to discreet geomagnetic inclination, declination, and paleointensity values. Older eruptive events exhibited normal polarity, while stratigraphically younger events exhibited reversed polarity. Most lavas were alkali olivine basalt with a range of unnormalized SiO2 weight percentages ranging from 47

  8. Spatial analysis of the Los Tuxtlas Volcanic Field (LTVF) and hazard implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieron, K.; Alvarez, D.

    2013-05-01

    The Tuxtlas volcanic field (LTVF) is located in the southern part of Veracruz state (Mexico) adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico and consists of 4 large volcanic edifices, 3 of them considered inactive and the active San Martin shield volcano. The monogenetic volcanoes belonging to the younger series are represented by hundreds of scoria cones and tens of maars and tuff cones, all of which show ages less than 50,000 years. In comparison to other monogenetic fields, the scoria cone density is quite elevated with 0.2 cones/km2, although the highest scoria cone density can be observed along narrow zones corresponding to the main NW-SE fault system where it reaches 0.7 cones/km2. Scoria cones occur as single edifices and in clusters and show individual edifice volumes of 0.0009 km3 to 0.2 km3, cone heights varying between 21.39 m and 299.21 m. Lava flows associated to scoria cones originate especially along the main NW-SE trending main fault and present run out distances up to 11 kilometers. Only few radiocarbon and Ar-Ar dates exist for the LTVF, mostly because of the high cone density and dense vegetation of the Los Tuxtlas region. Therefore, morphological parameters were used to estimate relative ages. In consequence, the scoria cones can be subdivided into four age groups; the members of each group do not seem to follow any particular trend and are rather scattered throughout the field. The explosive (or wet) equivalents of the mainly basaltic strombolian scoria cones are explosion craters, such as maars and tuff cones, show the highest concentration along the border of the two main geological units to the S of the area with the highest scoria cone concentration. Although the relatively small scale strombolian eruptions associated to scoria cone emplacement do not represent a considerable hazard for the surrounding population, lava flows can easily extent to the main urban zones accommodating about 262,384 inhabitants. Within the area prone to maar formation, the hazard

  9. San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona, as AN Analog for Lunar and Martian Surface Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K. E.; Hodges, K.; Eppler, D.; Horz, F.; Lofgren, G. E.; Hurtado, J. M.; Desert Rats Science Team

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial analog sites are an important tool that planetary geologists and engineers can use to examine both the geologic processes that shape other planetary surfaces as well as to develop and test technologies that are needed for the exploration of planetary surfaces. During the Apollo era, sites like Meteor Crater, Arizona, were used to train astronauts in the protocols and practices of field geology so that their lunar surface activities would be more geologically productive and efficient. As we enter a new period of planetary surface exploration, analogs will be increasingly important in preparing the next generation of both human and robotic planetary explorers. No single analog will be representative of another planetary surface, but testing technologies in a variety of settings will provide NASA and other space agencies with the operational knowledge needed to launch exploratory missions. The site we present here is one of many that can be used to explore surface operations on other planetary surfaces. The San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), containing both SP Crater and Black Point Lava Flow (BPLF), Arizona, is currently being used as the test site for the Desert Research and Technology Studies (D-RATS) field test, coordinated by Johnson Space Center (JSC) and involving several other NASA centers. During the 2010 test, two habitat rovers (Space Exploration Vehicles, or SEVs) operated simultaneously, each with one astronaut crewmember and one geologist crewmember. The mission lasted 14 days and traversed some 150 km. The geologic setting of SFVF includes a series of ~2 Ma basaltic lava flows overlying Triassic sedimentary rocks, both among the predominant rock types that are found primarily on Mars. SFVF has also been identified as an analog to the Marius Hills on the Moon, a Constellation site of interest. In addition, D-RATS 2010 is simulating operational scenarios based on notional traverses near the Malapert Massif on the lunar surface. While SFVF is

  10. Mantle xenocrysts of Chompolo field of the alkaline volcanics, Aldan shield, South Yakutia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolenko, Evgeny; Tychkov, Nikolay; Afanasiev, Valentin

    2015-04-01

    New mineralogical and chemical constraints for 10 dikes, veins (360-800m) and pipes (60-110 m) of Chompolo field discovered in 1957-1958 are discussed. Feld is located within Central Aldan Archean and Paleoproterozoic granulite-orthogneiss superterrane of Aldan-Stanovoy Shield, with peak of metamorphism - 2.1-1.9 Ga (Smelov, Timofeev, 2007). Originally (Shilina and Zeitlin 1959) and later (Kostrovitsky and Garanin 1992, Ashchepkov, Vladykin et al. 2001) these rocks were classified as kimberlites by mineralogy including pyrope, Cr spinel, and Cr diopside. Panina and Vladykin (1994), Davies et al, (2006) identified them as lamprophyres and lamproites. The age of Chompolo rocks is pre-Jurassic (Vladimirov et. al., 1989) dated by 40Ar/39Ar as 164.7±1 Ma (233.7±2.2 next plato)(unpublished Ashchepkov). The Rb-Sr isochron for lamprophyre "intrusions 104" indicate later age of 131±4 Ma (Zaitsev, Smelov, 2010). Magmatic bodies (Aldanskaya, Sputnik, Gornaya, Ogonek, Perevalnaya, Kilier-E) were studied during 2012-2013 fieldworks. Most of igneous rocks occur as inequigranular volcanic breccias with micro- or crypto-crystalline groundmass of K feldspar (up to 16.3 wt.% K2O, up to 3.2 wt.% FeO), chlorite, opaque minerals, melanocratic xenocrysts and phenocrysts (garnet, pyroxene, amphibole, Cr spinel, apatite, zircon, mica), and abundant xenogenic fragments of wallrock and crystalline basement. Garnet chemistry records the presence of mantle and crustal material. Mantle garnets lack the common megacryst, wehrlite, and high-temperature lherzolite varieties. Mantle mineralization prevails in the Aldan dike and the Sputnik, Gornaya, and Ogonek pipes, while crustal and elcogitic material is in the Perevalnaya and Kilier-E pipes. The Cr spinel consists of (in wt%) 3.5 to 50.9 Al2O3, 18.6-63.5 wt% Cr2O3, 6.1 to 19.1 MgO, and 0 to 1.61 TiO2. Al and Cr in spinels are in inverse proportion. The Chompolo alkaline volcanic rocks are most similar to the Central Aldan lamproites in trace

  11. Bibliography of literature pertaining to Long Valley Caldera and associated volcanic fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ewert, John W.; Harpel, Christopher J.; Brooks, Suzanna K.; Marcaida, Mae

    2011-01-01

    define the beginning of the Brunhes Chron and helps constrain the Brunhes-Matuyama boundary. The Bishop ash, which was dispersed as far east as Nebraska, Kansas, and Texas, provides an important tephrostratigraphic marker throughout the Western United States. The obsidian domes of both the Mono and Inyo Craters, which were produced by rhyolitic eruptions in the past 40,000 years, have been well studied, including extensive scientific drilling through the domes. Exploratory drilling to 3-km depth on the resurgent dome and subsequent instrumentation of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) have led to a number of important new insights. Scientific drilling also has been done within the Casa Diablo geothermal field, which, aside from drilling, has been commercially developed and is currently feeding 40 MW of power into the Southern California Edison grid. Studies in all the above-mentioned volcanic fields have contributed to the extensive scientific literature published on the Long Valley region. Although most of this scientific literature has been published since 1970, a significant amount of historical literature extends backward to the late 1800s. The purpose of this bibliography is to compile references pertaining to the Long Valley region from all time periods and all Earth science fields into a single listing, thus providing an easily accessible guide to the published literature for current and future researchers.

  12. Igneous activity and related ore deposits in the western and southern Tushar Mountains, Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steven, Thomas A.

    1984-01-01

    PART A: Igneous activity in the Marysvale volcanic field of western Utah can be separated into many episodes of extrusion, intrusion, and hydrothermal activity. The rocks of the western Tushar Mountains, near the western part of the volcanic field, include intermediate-composition, calc-alkalic volcanic rocks erupted from scattered volcanoes in Oligocene through earliest Miocene time and related monzonitic intrusions emplaced 24-23 m.y. ago. Beginning 22-21 m.y. ago and extending through much of the later Cenozoic, a bimodal basalt-rhyolite assemblage was erupted widely throughout the volcanic field. Only volcanic and intrusive rocks belonging to the rhyolitic end member of this bimodal assemblage are present in the western Tushar Mountains; most of these rocks either fill the Mount Belknap caldera (19 m.y. old) or are part of the rhyolite of Gillies Hill (9---8 m.y. old). Episodic hydrothermal activity altered and mineralized rocks at many places in the western Tushar Mountains during Miocene time. The earliest activity took place in and adjacent to monzonitic calcalkalic intrusions emplaced in the vicinity of Indian Creek and Cork Ridge. These rocks were widely propylitized, and gold-bearing quartz-pyrite-carbonate veins formed in local fractures. Hydrothermal activity associated with the Mount Belknap caldera mobilized and redeposited uranium contained in the caldera-fill rocks and formed primary concentrations of lithophile elements (including molybdenum and uranium) in the vicinity of intrusive bodies. Hydrothermal activity associated with the rhyolite of Gillies Hill altered and mineralized rocks at several places along the fault zone that marks the western margin of the Tushar Mountains; the zoned alunite and gold deposits at Sheep Rock, the gold deposit at the Sunday Mine, and an alunite deposit near Indian Creek were thus produced. Resetting of isotopic ages suggests that another center of hydrothermally altered rocks associated with a buried pluton about

  13. Spatio-temporal hazard estimation in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand, with a new event-order model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebbington, Mark S.; Cronin, Shane J.

    2011-01-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) with 49 eruptive centres in the last c. 250 ka presents many challenges to our understanding of distributed volcanic field construction and evolution. We re-examine the age constraints within the AVF and perform a correlation exercise matching the well-dated record of tephras from cores distributed throughout the field to the most likely source volcanoes, using thickness and location information and a simple attenuation model. Combining this augmented age information with known stratigraphic constraints, we produce a new age-order algorithm for the field, with errors incorporated using a Monte Carlo procedure. Analysis of the new age model discounts earlier appreciations of spatio-temporal clustering in the AVF. Instead the spatial and temporal aspects appear independent; hence the location of the last eruption provides no information about the next location. The temporal hazard intensity in the field has been highly variable, with over 63% of its centres formed in a high-intensity period between 40 and 20 ka. Another, smaller, high-intensity period may have occurred at the field onset, while the latest event, at 504 ± 5 years B.P., erupted 50% of the entire field's volume. This emphasises the lack of steady-state behaviour that characterises the AVF, which may also be the case in longer-lived fields with a lower dating resolution. Spatial hazard intensity in the AVF under the new age model shows a strong NE-SW structural control of volcanism that may reflect deep-seated crustal or subduction zone processes and matches the orientation of the Taupo Volcanic Zone to the south.

  14. Eruptive history, petrology, and petrogenesis of the Joe Lott Tuff Member of the Mount Belknap Volcanics, Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budding, Karin E.

    1982-01-01

    The Joe Lott Tuff Member of the Mount Belknap Volcanics is the largest rhyolitic ash-flow tuff sheet in the Marysvale volcanic field. It was erupted 19 m.y. ago, shortly after the changeover from intermediate-composition calc-alkalic volcanism to bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism. Eruption of the tuff resulted in the formation of the Mount Belknap Caldera whose pyroclastic intracaldera stratigraphy parallels that in the outflow facies. The Joe Loft Tuff Member is a composite ash-flow sheet that changes laterally from a simple cooling unit near the source to four distinct cooling units toward the distal end. The lowest of these units is the largest and most widespread; it is 64 m thick and contains a basal vitrophyre. Eruption of the lower unit led to the initial collapse of the caldera. The lower unit is followed upward by a 43 m middle unit, a 26 m pink-colored unit which is separated by a prominent air- fall layer, and a 31 m upper unit. The Joe Loft Tuff Member is an alkali rhyolite with 75.85-77.31 wt. % silica and 8.06-9.32 wt. % K2O+Na2O; the agpaitic index (Na2O+ K2O/Al2O3) is .77-.98. The tuff contains about I% phenocrysts of quartz, sanidine, oligoclase, augite, apatite, zircon, sphene, biotite, and oxidized Fe-Ti oxides. The basal vitrophyre contains accessory allanite, chevkinite, and magnesiohastingsite. The main cooling units are chemically and mineralogically zoned indicating that the magma chamber restratified prior to each major eruption. Within each of the two thickest cooling units, the mineralogy changes systematically upwards; the Or content and relative volume of sanidine decreases and An content of plagioclase increases. The basal vitrophyre of the lower unit has a bulk composition that lies in the thermal trough near the minima of Or-Ab-Q at 1 kb PH2O. Microprobe analyses of feldspar and chemical modeling on experimental systems indicate that pre-eruption temperatures were near 750?C and that the temperature increased during the eruption of

  15. Sedimentology, eruptive mechanism and facies architecture of basaltic scoria cones from the Auckland Volcanic Field (New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly

    2016-09-01

    Scoria cones are a common type of basaltic to andesitic small-volume volcanoes (e.g. 10- 1-10- 5 km3) that results from gas-bubble driven explosive eruptive styles. Although they are small in volume, they can produce complex eruptions, involving multiple eruptive styles. Eight scoria cones from the Quaternary Auckland Volcanic Field in New Zealand were selected to define the eruptive style variability from their volcanic facies architecture. The reconstruction of their eruptive and pyroclastic transport mechanisms was established on the basis of study of their volcanic sedimentology, stratigraphy, and measurement of their pyroclast density, porosity, Scanning Electron Microscopy, 2D particle morphology analysis and Visible and Near Visible Infrared Spectroscopy. Collection of these data allowed defining three end-member types of scoria cones inferred to be constructed from lava-fountaining, transitional fountaining and Strombolian type, and explosive Strombolian type. Using the physical and field-based characteristics of scoriaceous samples a simple generalised facies model of basaltic scoria cones for the AVF is developed that can be extended to other scoria cones elsewhere. The typical AVF scoria cone has an initial phreatomagmatic phases that might reduce the volume of magma available for subsequent scoria cone forming eruptions. This inferred to have the main reason to have decreased cone volumes recognised from Auckland in comparison to other volcanic fields evolved dominantly in dry eruptive condition (e.g. no external water influence). It suggests that such subtle eruptive style variations through a scoria cone evolution need to be integrated into the hazard assessment of a potentially active volcanic field such as that in Auckland.

  16. High-silica rhyolite magmatism in the Big Pine volcanic field, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidzbarski, M. I.; Vazquez, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Quaternary Big Pine volcanic field (BPVF) located in the Owens Valley of eastern California is dominated by basaltic cinder cones and associated lava flows, but contains a single rhyolite lava erupted at circa 1 Ma. Despite its uniqueness, the petrogenesis of this rhyolite is poorly known. At nearby Coso volcanic field, an abundance of rhyolite relative to basalt suggests crustal melting by mafic magmas stalled in mid to upper crustal reservoirs, whereas the paucity of rhyolite relative to basalt at BPVF suggests only brief crustal residence of ascending mafic magmas (Mordick and Glazner, 2006). In order to determine the origin of rhyolite magmatism at BPVF (e.g., crustal melting versus extreme fractionation), we have examined the geochemical and petrographic characteristics of the Fish Springs high-silica rhyolite. The Fish Springs rhyolite comprises a single thick coulee with a volume of at least 0.05 km3 (DRE) of highly evolved (~76 wt.% SiO2) magma. The outer portions of the coulee are composed of autobrecciated and felsitic rhyolite, and internal portions, as exposed by quarrying, are pumiceous perlite with local obsidian. Fish Springs rhyolite is crystal poor (~1%), with small (<0.5 mm) phenocrysts of generally euhedral to subhedral plagioclase, sanidine, quartz, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, biotite, hornblende, Fe-Ti oxides, apatite, pyrrhotite, and zircon, as well as apparent xenoliths and xenocrysts of metamorphic and igneous wallrocks. Orthopyroxene phenocrysts show compositional zoning, with rims that contain higher Mg and lower Fe concentrations than cores. Trace element concentrations in Fish Springs rhyolite are characterized by very low concentrations of typically compatible elements such as Ba (~15 ppm), Sr (~8 ppm), La (~10 ppm) and Zr (~80 pm), as well as a pronounced europium anomaly, comparable to other high-silica rhyolites elsewhere in the Owens Valley, and suggesting high degrees of feldspar and accessory mineral fractionation. Samples

  17. Remarkable similarity in genome nucleotide sequences between the Schwarz FF-8 and AIK-C measles virus vaccine strains and apparent nucleotide differences in the phosphoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Ito, Chie; Ohgimoto, Shinji; Kato, Seiichi; Sharma, Luna Bhatta; Ayata, Minoru; Komase, Katsuhiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Ihara, Toshiaki; Ogura, Hisashi

    2011-07-01

    The Schwarz FF-8 (FF-8) and AIK-C measles virus vaccine strains are currently used for vaccination in Japan. Here, the complete genome nucleotide sequence of the FF-8 strain has been determined and its genome sequence found to be remarkably similar to that of the AIK-C strain. These two strains are differentiated only by two nucleotide differences in the phosphoprotein gene. Since the FF-8 strain does not possess the amino acid substitutions in the phospho- and fusion proteins which are responsible for the temperature-sensitivity and small syncytium formation phenotypes of the AIK-C strain, respectively, other unidentified common mechanisms likely attenuate both the FF-8 and AIK-C strains.

  18. Trace Element Geochemistry of Basaltic Tephra in Maar Cores; Implications for Centre Correlation, Field Evolution, and Mantle Source Characteristics of the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, J. L.; Leonard, G.; Timm, C.; Wilson, C. J. N.; Neil, H.; Millet, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Establishing volcanic hazard and risk management strategies hinges on a detailed understanding of the type, timing and tephra dispersal of past eruptions. In order to unravel the pyroclastic eruption history of a volcanic field, genetic links between the deposits and eruption source centre need to be established. The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF; New Zealand) has been active for ca. 200 kyr and comprises ca. 53 individual centres covering an area of ca. 360km2. These centres show a range of sizes and eruptive styles from maar craters and tuff rings, to scoria cones and lava flows consistent with both phreatomagmatic and magmatic eruptions. Superimposition of the metropolitan area of Auckland (ca. 1.4 million inhabitants) on the volcanic field makes it critically important to assess the characteristics of the volcanic activity, on which to base assessment and management of the consequent hazards. Here we present a geochemical approach for correlating tephra deposits to their source centres. To acquire the most complete stratigraphic record of pyroclastic events, maar crater cores from different locations, covering various depths and thus ages across the field were selected. Magnetic susceptibility and x-ray density scanning of the cores was used to identify the basaltic tephra horizons, which were sampled and in-situ analysis of individual shards undertaken for major and trace elements using EPMA and LA-ICP-MS techniques, respectively. Our results show that tephra shard trace element ratios are comparable and complementary to the AVF whole rock database. The use of specific trace element ratios (e.g. Gd/Yb vs. Zr/Yb) allows us to fingerprint and cross correlate tephra horizons between cores and, when coupled with newly acquired 40Ar-39Ar age dating and eruption size estimates, correlate horizons to their source centres. This integrated style of study can provide valuable information to help volcanic hazard management and forecasting, and mitigation of related risks.

  19. Petrology and geochemistry of high cascade volcanics in southern Washington: Mount St. Helens volcano and the Indian Heaven basalt field

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    Mount St. Helens volcano (Washington, USA) has been characterized by four eruptive periods during the last 2200 years. Eruptive products include a wide spectrum of rock types including basaltic to andesitic lavas, andesitic to dacitic pyroclastic flows and tephra, and dacite domes. The major and trace element compositions of some andesites and dacites are broadly consistent with their derivation from a basaltic andesite parental magma by fractional cyrstallization processes involving the observed phenocryst assemblages. However, the strontium and oxygen isotopic compositions of representative samples of the Mount St. Helens suite indicate that closed system processes cannot explain the isotopic variations. The isotopic rations are positively correlated with one another and the bulk composition (SiO/sub 2/, Mg number, etc.). The vents of the nearby Indian Heaven Quaternary volcanic field erupted several basalt types which can be defined on the basis of major and trace element composition - calcalkaline (low and high TiO/sub 2/ varieties), transitional, and tholeiitic. Several of these basalt types occur at Mount St. Helens as well, but Indian Heaven lavas are generally more primitive as indicated by higher Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratios. The distribution of volcanic rock types in relation to local structures in the Cascade Range of southern Washington and northern Oregon suggests that crustal structure may influence the degree of evolution of specific volcanic fields. Cascade arc suggests that volcanic arc magma evolution does not necessarily produce a continuous sequence from tholeiitic to calcalkaline rocks in time or space.

  20. Pyroclastic Density Current Hazards in the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, B. D.; Gravley, D.; Clarke, A. B.; Bloomberg, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    The most dangerous phenomena associated with phreatomagmatic eruptions are dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). These are turbulent, ground-hugging sediment gravity currents that travel radially away from the explosive center at up to 100 m/s. The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand, consists of approximately 50 eruptive centers, at least 39 of which have had explosive phreatomagmatic behaviour. A primary concern for future AVF eruptions is the impact of dilute PDCs in and around the Auckland area. We combine field observations from the Maungataketake tuff ring, which has one of the best exposures of dilute PDC deposits in the AVF, with a quantitative model for flow of and sedimentation from a radially-spreading, steady-state, depth-averaged dilute PDC (modified from Bursik and Woods, 1996 Bull Volcanol 58:175-193). The model allows us to explore the depositional mechanisms, macroscale current dynamics, and potential impact on societal infrastructure of dilute PDCs from a future AVF eruption. The lower portion of the Maungataketake tuff ring pyroclastic deposits contains trunks, limbs and fragments of Podocarp trees (<1 m in diameter) that were blown down by dilute PDCs up to 0.7-0.9 km from the vent. Beyond this trees were encapsulated and buried in growth position up to the total runout distance of 1.6-1.8 km. This observation suggests that the dynamic pressure of the current quickly dropped as it travelled away from source. Using the tree diameter and yield strength of the wood, we calculate that dynamic pressures (Pdyn) of 10-75 kPa are necessary to topple trees of this size and composition. Thus the two main criteria for model success based on the field evidence include (a) Pdyn must be >10 kPa nearer than 0.9 km to the vent, and <10 kPa beyond 0.9 km, and (b) the total run-out distance must be between 1.6 and 1.8 km. Model results suggest the two main forces controlling the runout distance and Pdyn over the extent of the current are

  1. Rhyolite thermobarometry and the shallowing of the magma reservoir, Coso volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manley, C.R.; Bacon, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    The compositionally bimodal Pleistocene Coso volcanic field is located at the western margin of the Basin and Range province ~ 60 km north of the Garlock fault. Thirty-nine nearly aphyric high-silica rhyolite domes were emplaced in the past million years: one at 1 Ma from a transient magma reservoir, one at ~ 0.6 Ma, and the rest since ~ 0.3 Ma. Over the past 0.6 My, the depth from which the rhyolites erupted has decreased and their temperatures have become slightly higher. Pre-eruptive conditions of the rhyolite magmas, calculated from phenocryst compositions using the two-oxide thermometer and the Al-in-hornblende barometer, ranged from 740??C and 270 MPa (2.7 kbar; ~ 10 km depth) for the ~ 0.6 Ma magma, to 770??C and 140 MPa (1.4 kbar; ~ 5.5 km) for the youngest (~ 0.04 Ma) magma. Results are consistent with either a single rhyolitic reservoir moving upward through the crust, or a series of successively shallower reservoirs. As the reservoir has become closer to the surface, eruptions have become both more frequent and more voluminous.

  2. Marine tephrochronology of the Mt. Edgecumbe volcanic field, southeast Alaska, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Addison, Jason A.; Beget, James E.; Ager, Thomas A.; Finney, Bruce P.

    2010-01-01

    The Mt. Edgecumbe Volcanic Field (MEVF), located on Kruzof Island near Sitka Sound in southeast Alaska, experienced a large multiple-stage eruption during the last glacial maximum (LGM)-Holocene transition that generated a regionally extensive series of compositionally similar rhyolite tephra horizons and a single well-dated dacite (MEd) tephra. Marine sediment cores collected from adjacent basins to the MEVF contain both tephra-fall and pyroclastic flow deposits that consist primarily of rhyolitic tephra and a minor dacitic tephra unit. The recovered dacite tephra correlates with the MEd tephra, whereas many of the rhyolitic tephras correlate with published MEVF rhyolites. Correlations were based on age constraints and major oxide compositions of glass shards. In addition to LGM-Holocene macroscopic tephra units, four marine cryptotephras were also identified. Three of these units appear to be derived from mid-Holocene MEVF activity, while the youngest cryptotephra corresponds well with the White River Ash eruption at not, vert, similar 1147 cal yr BP. Furthermore, the sedimentology of the Sitka Sound marine core EW0408-40JC and high-resolution SWATH bathymetry both suggest that extensive pyroclastic flow deposits associated with the activity that generated the MEd tephra underlie Sitka Sound, and that any future MEVF activity may pose significant risk to local population centers.

  3. Discriminating lava flows of different age within Nyamuragira's volcanic field using spectral mixture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Canters, Frank; Solana, Carmen; Ma, Weiwei; Chen, Longqian; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2015-08-01

    In this study, linear spectral mixture analysis (LSMA) is used to characterize the spectral heterogeneity of lava flows from Nyamuragira volcano, Democratic Republic of Congo, where vegetation and lava are the two main land covers. In order to estimate fractions of vegetation and lava through satellite remote sensing, we made use of 30 m resolution Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and Advanced Land Imager (ALI) imagery. 2 m Pleiades data was used for validation. From the results, we conclude that (1) LSMA is capable of characterizing volcanic fields and discriminating between different types of lava surfaces; (2) three lava endmembers can be identified as lava of old, intermediate and young age, corresponding to different stages in lichen growth and chemical weathering; (3) a strong relationship is observed between vegetation fraction and lava age, where vegetation at Nyamuragira starts to significantly colonize lava flows ∼15 years after eruption and occupies over 50% of the lava surfaces ∼40 years after eruption. Our study demonstrates the capability of spectral unmixing to characterize lava surfaces and vegetation colonization over time, which is particularly useful for poorly known volcanoes or those not accessible for physical or political reasons.

  4. Geologic map and geothermal assessment of the Mount Adams volcanic field, Cascade Range of southern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, Wes; Fierstein, Judy

    1990-01-01

    More than 60 Quaternary vents make up the basalt-to-rhyodacite Mount Adams volcanic field and have erupted scoriae and lavas with a total volume of >370 km3. The Mount Adams andesite-dacite stratocone itself is a compound edifice that includes the high cone above 2300 m (20-10 ka), remnants of at least two earlier andesite-dacite cones as old as 0.5 Ma, and 7 Holocene flank vents. Four other Holocene vents and tens of vents contemporaneous with Mount Adams are peripheral to the stratocone. All of these vents, including Mount Adams, lie within a N-S eruptive zone 55 km long and 5 km wide. The age of all known Mount Adams silicic products (>100 ka) and the heterogeneous mafic compositions of the summit cone and Holocene lavas make it unlikely that the stratocone is underlain by an upper-crustal reservoir. Rather, the stratocone at the focus is built up of fractionated hybrid magmas that rise from MASH zones (melting-assimilation-storage-homogenization). The pyroclastic core of breccia and scoria at Mount Adams has undergone acid-sulfate leaching and deposition of alunite, kaolinite, silica, gypsum, sulfur, and Fe-oxides and has been a constant source of avalanches and debris flows. Most heat supplied from depth to the fumarolically altered core is dispersed by the high precipitation rate and high permeability of the rubbly lava flows so that a hydrothermal convection pattern is not maintained. Summit-restricted fumaroles are weak and diffuse.

  5. Impact of reduced near-field entrainment of overpressured volcanic jets on plume development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffaraval, Farhad; Solovitz, Stephen A.; Ogden, Darcy E.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic plumes are often studied using one-dimensional analytical models, which use an empirical entrainment ratio to close the equations. Although this ratio is typically treated as constant, its value near the vent is significantly reduced due to flow development and overpressured conditions. To improve the accuracy of these models, a series of experiments was performed using particle image velocimetry, a high-accuracy, full-field velocity measurement technique. Experiments considered a high-speed jet with Reynolds numbers up to 467,000 and exit pressures up to 2.93 times atmospheric. Exit gas densities were also varied from 0.18 to 1.4 times that of air. The measured velocity was integrated to determine entrainment directly. For jets with exit pressures near atmospheric, entrainment was approximately 30% less than the fully developed level at 20 diameters from the exit. At pressures nearly three times that of the atmosphere, entrainment was 60% less. These results were introduced into Plumeria, a one-dimensional plume model, to examine the impact of reduced entrainment. The maximum column height was only slightly modified, but the critical radius for collapse was significantly reduced, decreasing by nearly a factor of two at moderate eruptive pressures.

  6. Catastrophic isotopic modification of rhyolitic magma at times of caldera subsidence, Yellowstone plateau volcanic field.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Christiansen, R.L.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    This Wyoming volcanic field has undergone repeated eruption of rhyolitic magma strongly depleted in 18O. Large calderas subsided 2.0, 1.3 and 0.6 m.y. ago on eruption of ash-flow sheets. More than 60 other rhyolite lavas and tuffs permit reconstruction of the long-term chemical and isotopic evolution of the silicic system. Narrow delta 18O ranges in the ash-flow sheets contrast with wide delta 18O variation in post-caldera lavas. The earliest post-collapse lavas are 3-6per mille lighter than the preceding ash-flow sheets. The 18O depletions were short-lived events that immediately followed caldera subsidence and sequences of post-caldera lavas record partial recovery toward pre-caldera delta 18O values. Contemporaneous extra-caldera rhyolites show no effects of the repeated depletions. Although some contamination by foundering roof rocks seems to be required, water was probably the predominant contaminant.-W.H.B.

  7. Heteromorphism and crystallization paths of katungites, Navajo volcanic field, Arizona, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.W.; Aldrich, M.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A swarm of thin, isochemical but heteromorphic dikes crops out in the valley of Hasbidito Creek in NE Arizona. The swarm is part of the dominantly potassic, mid-Tertiary Navajo volcanic field of the Colorado Plateau. Whole-rock chemical analyses of five samples from four of the dikes indicate that they are chemically identical to the katungites of Uganda. These dikes show the characteristic seriate-porphyritic texture of lamprophyres. Samples of an olivine-melilitite dike from the same swarm lack this texture and the chemical analysis, while similar to those of the other dikes, shows effects from the incorporation of xenocrystic olivine. Over 20 mineral phases have been identified in the Arizona samples and as many as 18 phases may occur in a single sample. The major phases are phlogopite, olivine, perovskite, opaque oxides, +- melilite and +- clinopyroxene. Based upon the modal mineralogies and textures of ten dike samples, we recognize five general non-equilibrium assemblages. Comparison of these assemblages with recent experimental results shows that they represent various combinations of complete and incomplete reactions. Reaction relations were determined by entering melt and phase compositions into the computer program GENMIX to obtain balanced reactions. By combining petrographic observations with mineral chemical data, balanced reactions from GENMIX, and the recently determined phase diagrams we are able to trace crystallization paths for the katungite magma.

  8. Petrology and geochemistry of lower crustal granulites from the Geronimo Volcanic Field, southeastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Kempton, P.D.; Hawkesworth, C.J. ); Harmon, R.S. ); Moorbath, S. )

    1990-12-01

    Mafic to intermediate composition granulite xenoliths occur in Pliocene to Recent alkali basalts from the Geronimo Volcanic Field (GVF), southeastern Arizona, USA. The range of compositions and mineral assemblages observed suggests that the ultimate derivation of these rocks is from a variety of protoliths and that more than one mechanism has operated during the geologic evolution of the lower crust in this area. Two-pyroxene, two-feldspar granulites (meta-diorites) have major and trace element characteristics similar to estimates of post-Archaen lower crust. Low {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd values and Proterozoic Nd-depleted-mantle model ages (1.2-1.4 Ga) for these rocks require that Precambrian material exists in the lower crust of southeastern Arizona, either as the meta-diorites themselves or as older crust available for melting during production of the meta-diorite protoliths. K-feldspar-free granulites have more mafic compositions and their trace element characteristics are consistent with a cumulate origin. A negative correlation of {sup 208}Pb/{sup 204}Pb vs. {sup 206}Pb/{sup 204}Pb suggests that the meta-cumulate granulites represent mixing between Basin and Range age lavas with older meta-diorite crust and is, thus, evidence for Cenozoic underplating of the lower crust beneath the Basin and Range.

  9. Magnetotelluric Studies of the Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordell, D. R.; Unsworth, M. J.; Diaz, D.; Pavez, M.; Blanco, B.

    2015-12-01

    Geodetic data has shown that the surface of the Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in central Chile has been moving upwards at rates >20 cm/yr since 2007 over a 200 km2 area. It has been hypothesized that this ground deformation is due to the inflation of a magma body at ~5 km depth beneath the lake (2.8 km b.s.l.). This magma body is a likely source for the large number of rhyolitic eruptions at this location over the last 25 ka. A dense broadband magnetotelluric (MT) array was collected from 2009 to 2015 and included data from a geothermal exploration project. MT phase tensor analysis indicates that the resistivity structure of the region is largely three-dimensional for signals with periods longer than 1 s, which corresponds to depths >5 km. The MT data were inverted using the ModEM inversion algorithm to produce a three-dimensional electrical resistivity model which included topography. Four primary features were identified in the model: 1) A north-south striking, 10 km by 5 km, low-resistivity zone (<5 Ωm) northwest of the inflation centre at a depth of ~5 km (2.8 km b.s.l.) is interpreted as a zone of partial melt which may be supplying material via conduits to account for the observed ground deformation; 2) A shallow low-resistivity feature ~400 m beneath the lake surface (1.8 km a.s.l.) and spatially coincident with the inflation centre is interpreted to be a zone of hydrothermal alteration; 3) A thin, low-resistivity feature to the west of LdM at a depth of ~250 m (2.2 km a.s.l.) is interpreted to be the clay cap of a potential geothermal prospect; 4) A large, low-resistivity zone beneath the San Pedro-Tatara Volcanic Complex to the west of LdM at a depth of ~10 km (8 km b.s.l.) is interpreted to be a zone of partial melt. Further MT data collection is planned for 2016 which will expand the current grid of MT stations to better constrain the lateral extent of the observed features and give greater insight into the dynamics of this restless magma system.

  10. Stress Field and Dike Propagation within a Partially Submerged Volcanic Edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, S.; Taisne, B.; Manga, M.; Pasquet, E.; Limare, A.; Bhat, H.

    2013-12-01

    In order to better understand dike propagation within and flank collapse on volcanic islands, we performed a set of analogue laboratory experiments. We created conic edifices of gelatin and measured their deformation under their own weight whilst we varied the level to which they were partially submerged. In most experiments the lower part of the edifice was submerged in water while the upper part was surrounded by air, but in some cases oil was used as the fluid surrounding the upper part of the edifice in order to change density differences. The gelatin was typically made of a sugar (or glycerol) solution so that it was approximately 10-30% denser than water, and its strength was varied by using different gelatin concentrations. The strain field was visualized from the birefringence pattern created by placing the gelatin between sheets of polarising film with the directions crossed. One first order feature of the strain field is an approximately elliptical shaped extensional region, centered below the summit and at approximately sea-level. The second feature is a region of strong sub-horizontal shear in the lower most part of the edifice, close to the lower, rigid no-slip boundary. We also observed the behaviour of dikes injected into the base of the edifice from below: these dikes were filled with water or salt solution so that they had variable amounts of positive buoyancy with respect to the edifice. If all, or a very large fraction, of the edifice was submerged, the dike typically propagated vertically and erupted at the summit. If the edifice was only partially submerged, however, the dikes typically switched from dominantly vertical to horizontal propagation and erupted on the flanks of the edifice, very often at sea level.

  11. Continued Rapid Uplift at Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field (Chile) from 2007 through 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mével, H.; Feigl, K. L.; Cordova, L.; DeMets, C.; Lundgren, P.

    2014-12-01

    The current rate of uplift at Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in Chile is among the highest ever observed geodetically for a volcano that is not actively erupting. Using data from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) recorded at five continuously operating stations, we measure the deformation field with dense sampling in time (1/day) and space (1/hectare). These data track the temporal evolution of the current unrest episode from its inception (sometime between 2004 and 2007) to vertical velocities faster than 200 mm/yr that continue through (at least) July 2014. Building on our previous work, we evaluate the temporal evolution by analyzing data from InSAR (ALOS, TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X) and GPS [http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1093/gji/ggt438]. In addition, we consider InSAR data from (ERS, ENVISAT, COSMO-Skymed, and UAVSAR), as well as constraints from magneto-telluric (MT), seismic, and gravity surveys. The goal is to test the hypothesis that a recent magma intrusion is feeding a large, existing magma reservoir. What will happen next? To address this question, we analyze the temporal evolution of deformation at other large silicic systems such as Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Three Sisters, during well-studied episodes of unrest. We consider several parameterizations, including piecewise linear, parabolic, and Gaussian functions of time. By choosing the best-fitting model, we expect to constrain the time scales of such episodes and elucidate the processes driving them.

  12. Volcanic sanidinites: an example for the mobilization of high field strength elements (HFSE) in magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aßbichler, Donjá; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Müller, Dirk; Kunzmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In earth science the mobility of high field strength elements (HFSE) is generally discussed in context of hydrothermal processes. Recent investigations mainly address processes in (late) magmatic-, metamorphic- and submarine hydrothermal systems. They have all in common that H2O is main solvent. The transport of HFSE is suggested to be favored by volatiles, like boron, fluorine, phosphate and sulfate (Jiang et al., 2005). In this study processes in magmatic system are investigated. Sanidinites are rare rocks of igneous origin and are found as volcanic ejecta of explosive volcanoes. They consist mainly of sanidine and minerals of the sodalite group. The very porous fabric of these rocks is an indication of their aggregation from a gaseous magmatic phase. The large sanidine crystals (up to several centimeters) are mostly interlocking, creating large cavities between some crystals. In these pores Zr crystallizes as oxide (baddeleyite, ZrO2) or silicate (zircon, ZrSiO4). The euhedral shape of these minerals is a further indication of their formation out of the gas phase. Furthermore, bubbles in glass observed in some samples are evidence for gas-rich reaction conditions during the formation of the sanidinites. The formation of sanidinites is suggested to be an example for solvothermal processes in natural systems. Solvothermal processes imply the solvation, transport and recrystallization of elements in a gas phase. Results obtained from whole rock analysis from sanidinites from Laacher See (Germany) show a positive correlation between LOI, sulfate, Cl, and Na with the HFSE like Zr. Na-rich conditions seem to ameliorate the solvothermal transport of Zr. All these features point to the formation of sanidinites in the upper part of a magma chamber, where fluid consisting of SO3 and Cl compounds in addition to H2O, CO2 and HFSE (high field strength elements) like Zr accumulate.

  13. A geologic and anthropogenic journey from the Precambrian to the new energy economy through the San Juan volcanic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Burchell,; Johnson, Raymond H.

    2010-01-01

    The San Juan volcanic field comprises 25,000 km2 of intermediate composition mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks and dacitic to rhyolitic calderas including the San Juan–Uncompahgre and La Garita caldera-forming super-volcanoes. The region is famous for the geological, ecological, hydrological, archeological, and climatological diversity. These characteristics supported ancestral Puebloan populations. The area is also important for its mineral wealth that once fueled local economic vitality. Today, mitigating and/or investigating the impacts of mining and establishing the region as a climate base station are the focuses of ongoing research. Studies include advanced water treatment, the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of propylitic bedrock for use in mine-lands cleanup, and the use of soil amendments including biochar from beetle-kill pines. Biochar aids soil productivity and revegetation by incorporation into soils to improve moisture retention, reduce erosion, and support the natural terrestrial carbon sequestration (NTS) potential of volcanic soils to help offset atmospheric CO2 emissions. This field trip will examine the volcano-tectonic and cultural history of the San Juan volcanic field as well as its geologic structures, economic mineral deposits and impacts, recent mitigation measures, and associated climate research. Field trip stops will include a visit to (1) the Summitville Superfund site to explore quartz alunite-Au mineralization, and associated alteration and new water-quality mitigation strategies; (2) the historic Creede epithermal-polymetallic–vein district with remarkably preserved resurgent calderas, keystone-graben, and moat sediments; (3) the historic mining town of Silverton located in the nested San Juan–Silverton caldera complex that exhibits base-metal Au-Ag mineralization; and (4) the site of ANC and NTS studies. En route back to Denver, we will traverse Grand Mesa, a high NTS area with Neogene basalt-derived soils and will enjoy a soak

  14. Initial results from the Volcanic Risk in Saudi Arabia project: Microearthquakes in the northern Harrat Rahat monogenetic volcanic field, Madinah, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenedi, C. L.; Alvarez, M. G.; Abdelwahed, M. F.; Aboud, E.; Lindsay, J. M.; Mokhtar, T. A.; Moufti, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    An 8-station borehole seismic research array is recording microearthquake data in northern Harrat Rahat. This recently active monogenetic volcanic field lies southeast of the Islamic holy city of Madinah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The VORiSA seismographs are operated in collaboration between King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah and the Institute of Earth Science and Engineering, University of Auckland, in New Zealand. The goal of the VORiSA project is to evaluate the seismic and volcanic hazard around Madinah. To this end, we will evaluate the local earthquake activity including the extent to which local earthquakes are tectonic or volcanic. We also will use seismicity to understand the subsurface structure. The analytical goals of the seismic research array are the following: (1) Calculate a new seismic velocity model, (2) Map subsurface structures using seismic tomography, and (3) Explore for fracture zones using shear wave splitting analysis. As compared to seismographs installed on the surface, borehole seismometers detect smaller and more numerous microearthquake signals. The sensitivity and location of the borehole sensors in the VORiSA array are designed to detect these weak signals. The array has a total aperture of 17 km with station spacing at 5 - 10 km. The seismometers are housed in IESE model S21g-2.0, two Hz, 3-component borehole sondes. Sensor depths range from 107 - 121 m. The data acquisition system at each stand-alone station consists of a Reftek 130-01, 6-channel, 24 bit data logger which records at 250 samples per second. The power source is a deep cycle battery with solar recharge. Local temperatures reach extremes of 0° to 50°C, so the battery and recorder are contained in a specially designed underground vault. The vault also provides security in the remote and sparsely populated volcanic field. Recording began on 31 March 2012. An average of one earthquake every three days suggests that currently this is not a highly seismic area. However

  15. Geologic Map of Part of the Uinkaret Volcanic Field, Mohave County, Northwestern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Billingsley, George H.; Hamblin, W. Kenneth; Wellmeyer, Jessica L.; Dudash, Stephanie L.

    2001-01-01

    The geologic map of part of the Uinkaret Volcanic Field is one product of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Land Management to provide geologic information about this part of the Grand Canyon-Parashant Canyon National Monument of Arizona. The Uinkaret Volcanic Field is a unique part of western Grand Canyon where volcanic rocks have preserved the geomorphic development of the landscape. Most of the Grand Canyon, and parts of adjacent plateaus have already been mapped. This map completes one of the remaining areas where uniform quality geologic mapping was needed. A few dozen volcanoes and lava flows within the Grand Canyon are not included in the map area, but their geologic significance to Grand Canyon development is documented by Hamblin (1994) and mapped by Billingsley and Huntoon (1983) and Wenrich and others (1997). The geologic information in this report may be useful to resource managers of the Bureau of Land Management for range management, biological, archaeological, and flood control programs. The map area lies within the Shivwits, Uinkaret, and Kanab Plateaus, which are subplateaus of the Colorado Plateaus physiographic province (Billingsley and others, 1997), and is part of the Arizona Strip north of the Colorado River. The nearest settlement is Colorado City, Arizona, about 58 km (36 mi) north of the map area (fig. 1). Elevations range from about 2,447 m (8,029 ft) at Mount Trumbull, in the northwest quarter of the map area, to about 732 m (2,400 ft) in Cove Canyon, in the southeast quarter of the map area. Vehicle access is via the Toroweap and Mount Trumbull dirt roads (fig. 1). Unimproved dirt roads traverse other parts of the area except in designated wilderness. Extra fuel, two spare tires, and extra food and water are highly recommended for travelers in this remote area. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Arizona Strip Field Office, St. George, Utah manages most of the area. In

  16. Subsurface fluid distribution and possible seismic precursory signal at the Salse di Nirano mud volcanic field, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Matteo; Ricci, Barbara Suski; Kenkel, Johannes; Ricci, Tullio; Fuchs, Florian; Miller, Stephen A.; Kemna, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Mud volcanoes are geological systems often characterized by elevated fluid pressures at depth deviating from hydrostatic conditions. This near-critical state makes mud volcanoes particularly sensitive to external forcing induced by natural or man-made perturbations. We used the Nirano mud volcanic field as a natural laboratory to test pre- and post-seismic effects generated by distant earthquakes. We first characterized the subsurface structure of the Nirano mud volcanic field with a geoelectrical study. Next, we deployed a broad-band seismic station in the area to understand the typical seismic signal generated by the mud volcano. Seismic records show a background noise below 2 s, sometimes interrupted by pulses of drumbeat-like high-frequency signals lasting from several minutes to hours. To date this is the first observation of drumbeat signal observed in mud volcanoes. In 2013 June we recorded a M4.7 earthquake, that occurred approximately 60 km far from our seismic station. According to empirical estimations the Nirano mud volcanic field should not have been affected by the M4.7 earthquake. Yet, before the seismic event we recorded an increasing amplitude of the signal in the 10-20 Hz frequency band. The signal emerged approximately two hours before the earthquake and lasted for about three hours. Our statistical analysis suggests the presence of a possible precursory signal about 10 min before the earthquake.

  17. Petrochemistry of late miocene peraluminous silicic volcanic rocks from the Morococala field, Bolivia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, VI G.B.; London, D.; Luedke, R.G.

    1998-01-01

    Late Miocene peraluminous volcanic rocks of the Morococala field, Bolivia, define a layered stratigraphy of basal andalusite-, biotite-(?? Muscovite)-bearing rhyolite tuffs (AR), overlain by cordierite-, biotite-bearing rhyolite tuffs (CR), and capped by biotite-beanng quartz latite tuffs, lavas, and late domal flows (QL). Mineral and whole-rock compositions become more evolved from top to bottom, with differentiation reflected by decreasing Ca, Ba, Mg, Fe, and rare earth elements (REE) versus increasing F, Na/K, and aluminosity from QL to AR. Mineral, whole-rock, and glass inclusion compositions are consistent with derivation of all three rock types from a single stratified magma reservoir, but age and spatial relations between the three units make this unlikely. Genesis of the QL involved biotite-dehydration melting of an aluminous source at T > 750??C and P ??? 4-6 kbar. If not co-magmatic with QL, the other units were generated primarily by muscovite-dehydration melting at T = 730-750??C and P ??? 3??5-4??5 kbar for CR, and T ??? 750??C for AR with pre-emptive residence at low pressure (1??5-3??0 kbar). Low hematite contents (XHem ??? 0??06) of ilmenite grains in AR, CR, and early grains (as inclusions in plagioclase and sanidine cores) in QL indicate reduced conditions imposed by a graphite-bearing source. Compositional variability among texturally later oxides (ilmenite with XHem = 0??06-0??50, primary magnetite), however, apparently records progressive increases in pre-eruptive f(O2) in QL. Plagioclase-melt equilibria and electron microprobe analysis difference for quartz-hosted glass inclusions suggest pre-emptive melt H2O contents ??? 5-7 wt % for the AR, ???4-6 wt % for the CR, and ???3-5 wt % for the QL.

  18. Microtopographic evolution of lava flows at Cima volcanic field, Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.

    1992-01-01

    Microtopographic profiles were measured and power spectra calculated for dated lava flow surfaces at Cima volcanic field in the eastern Mojave Desert of California in order to quantify changes in centimeter- to meter-scale roughness as a function of age. For lava flows younger than about 0.8 m.y., roughness over all spatial scales decreases with age, with meter-scale roughness decreasing slightly more than centimeter scales. Flows older than about 0.8 m.y. show a reversal of this trend, becoming as rough as young flows at these scales. Modeling indicates that eolian deposition can explain most of the change observed in the offset, or roughness amplitude, of power spectra of flow surface profiles up to 0.8 m.y. Other processes, such as rubbing and stone pavement development, appear to have a minor effect in this age range. Changes in power spectra of surfaces older than about 0.8 m.y. are consistent with roughening due to fluvial dissection. These results agree qualitatively with a process-response model that attributes systematic changes in flow surface morphology to cyclic changes in the rates of eolian, soil formation, and fluvial processes. Identification of active surficial processes and estimation of the extent of their effects, or stage of surficial evolution, through measurement of surface roughness will help put the correlation of surficial units on a quantitative basis. This may form the basis for the use of radar remote sensing data to help in regional correlations of surficial units.

  19. Hydrothermal alteration in oceanic ridge volcanics: A detailed study at the Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ridley, W.I.; Perfit, M.R.; Josnasson, I.R.; Smith, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field is composed of altered oceanic crust and extinct hydrothermal vents within the eastern Galapagos Rift between 85??49???W and 85??55???W. The discharge zone of the hydrothermal system is revealed along scarps, thus providing an opportunity to examine the uppermost mineralized, and highly altered interior parts of the crust. Altered rocks collected in situ by the submersible ALVIN show complex concentric alteration zones. Microsamples of individual zones have been analysed for major/minor, trace elements, and strontium isotopes in order to describe the complex compositional details of the hydrothermal alteration. Interlayered chlorite-smectite and chlorite with disequilibrium compositions dominate the secondary mineralogy as replacement phases of primary glass and acicular pyroxene. Phenocrysts and matrix grains of plagioclase are unaffected during alteration. Using a modification of the Gresens' equation we demonstrate that the trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively immobile, and calculate degrees of enrichment and depletion in other elements. Strontium isotopic ratios increase as Sr concentrations decrease from least-altered cores to most-altered rims and cross-cutting veins in individual samples, and can be modeled by open system behaviour under low fluid-rock ratio (< 10) conditions following a period of lower-temperature weathering of volcanics within the rift zone. The complex patterns of element enrichment and depletion and strontium isotope variations indicate mixing between pristine seawater and ascending hot fluids to produce a compositional spectrum of fluids. The precipitation of base-metal sulfides beneath the seafloor is probably a result of fluid mixing and cooling. If, as suggested here, the discharge zone alteration occurred under relatively low fluid-rock ratios, then this shallow region must play an important role in determining the exit composition of vent fluids in marine hydrothermal systems

  20. Petrofabric and seismic properties of lithospheric mantle xenoliths from the Calatrava volcanic field (Central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puelles, P.; Ábalos, B.; Gil Ibarguchi, J. I.; Sarrionandia, F.; Carracedo, M.; Fernández-Armas, S.

    2016-06-01

    The microstructural and petrofabric study of peridotite xenoliths from the El Aprisco (Neogene Calatrava Volcanic Field) has provided new information on deformation mechanisms, ambient conditions and seismic properties of the central Iberian subcontinental mantle. Olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, amphibole and spinel constitute the mineral assemblage in equilibrium. Their microstructure indicates that they accommodated crystal-plastic deformation under high water fugacity conditions. Crystallographic preferred orientation patterns of key minerals were determined with the EBSD technique. The xenoliths exhibit B, C and A olivine fabrics. B-type fabrics, involving the (010)[001] slip system, may develop in domains where deformation occurs under comparatively lower temperature, higher water-content and faster strain rates. They are interpreted here as the result of deformation in a suprasubduction mantle setting triggered by changing conditions imposed by a cooler subducting slab that incorporated fluids into the system. Xenoliths with olivine C-type fabrics involve activation of the dominant (100)[001] slip system, denote intracrystalline slip at higher temperatures and water-contents. They are here interpreted to sample lithospheric mantle domains where the impact of those new conditions was not so strong. Finally, the A-type fabrics, characteristic of the (010)[100] slip system, are frequent in the mantle under moderate to high temperature. These fabrics are considered here as characteristic of the mantle prior to subduction. The olivine fabrics constrain heterogeneous seismic properties. Propagation orientation of P waves (8.27-8.51 km/s) coincides with olivine [100] axis concentrations, whereas the fastest S1 waves (5.13-5.22 km/s) propagate parallel to [010] axis minima. The maximum shear wave birefringence (VS1-VS2 = 0.17-0.37 km/s) is close to the direction of the macroscopic lineation. Heterogeneity of calculated seismic properties would concur with

  1. Megacrystic pyroxene basalts sample deep crustal gabbroic cumulates beneath the Mount Taylor volcanic field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Mariek E.; Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Rowe, Michael C.; Wolff, John A.; Boroughs, Scott P.

    2016-04-01

    Distributed over the ~ 2.3 m.y. history of the alkaline and compositionally diverse Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico is a widespread texturally distinct family of differentiated basalts that contain resorbed megacrysts (up to 3 cm) of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine ± Ti-magnetite ± ilmenite ± orthopyroxene. These lavas have gabbroic cumulate inclusions with mineral compositions similar to the megacrysts, suggesting a common origin. Gabbroic and megacrystic clinopyroxenes form positive linear arrays in TiO2 (0.2-2.3 wt.%) with respect to Al2O3 (0.7-9.3 wt.%). Plagioclase (An41-80) from representative thin sections analyzed for 87Sr/86Sr by laser ablation ICP-MS range from 0.7036 to 0.7048. The low 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7036 to 0.7037) are associated with high Ti-Al clinopyroxenes. Likewise, the higher 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7043 to 0.7047) are associated with the low-Al clinopyroxenes. Taken together, the pyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts appear to track the differentiation of a gabbroic pluton (or related plutons) from alkaline to Si-saturated conditions by fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation. Clinopyroxene-liquid geobarometry calculations suggest that crystallization occurred near the crust-mantle transition at an average of ~ 1200 °C and 12-13 kbar. The distribution of the megacrystic pyroxene basalts suggests that a gabbroic intrusive body underlies subregions of the MTVF that have generated silicic magmas. The gabbro is interpreted to be a significant heat and mass input into the lower crust that is capable of driving the petrogenesis of diverse silicic compositions (through fractionation and crustal assimilation), including mugearites, trachytes, trachy-andesites and dacites, high-Si rhyolites, and topaz rhyolites of the MTVF.

  2. Residence, resorption and recycling of zircons in Devils Kitchen rhyolite, Coso Volcanic Field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, J.S.; Wooden, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Zircons from the Devils Kitchen rhyolite in the Pleistocene Coso Volcanic field, California have been analyzed by in situ Pb/U ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG) and by detailed cathodoluminescence imaging. The zircons yield common-Pb-corrected and disequilibrium-corrected 206Pb/238U ages that predate a previously reported K-Ar sanidine age by up to 200 kyr, and the range of ages exhibited by the zircons is also approximately 200 kyr. Cathodoluminescence imaging indicates that zircons formed in contrasting environments. Most zircons are euhedral, and a majority of the zircons are weakly zoned, but many also have anhedral, embayed cores, with euhedral overgrowths and multiple internal surfaces that are truncated by later crystal zones. Concentrations of U and Th vary by two orders of magnitude within the zircon population, and by 10-20 times between zones within some zircon crystals, indicating that zircons were transferred between contrasting chemical environments. A zircon saturation temperature of ???750??C overlaps within error a previously reported phenocryst equilibration temperature of 740 ?? 25??C. Textures in zircons indicative of repeated dissolution and subsequent regrowth are probably caused by punctuated heating by mafic magma input into rhyolite. The overall span of ages and large variation in U and Th concentrations, combined with calculated zircon saturation temperatures and resorption times, are most compatible with crystallization in magma bodies that were emplaced piecemeal in the crust at Coso over 200 kyr prior to eruption, and that were periodically rejuvenated or melted by subsequent basaltic injections. ?? Oxford University Press 2004; all rights reserved.

  3. Hydrothermal alteration in oceanic ridge volcanics: A detailed study at the Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ridley, W.I.; Perfit, M.R.; Smith, M.F.; Jonasson, I.R.

    1994-06-01

    The Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field is composed of altered oceanic crust and extinct hydrothermal vents within the eastern Galapagos Rift between 85{degree}49 feet W and 85{degree} 55 feet W. The discharge zone of the hydrothermal system is revealed along scarps, thus providing an opportunity to examine the uppermost mineralized, and highly altered interior parts of the crust. Altered rocks collected in situ by the submersible ALVIN show complex concentric alteration zones. Microsamples of individual zones have been analysed for major/minor, trace elements, and strontium isotopes in order to describe the complex compositional details of the hydrothermal alteration. Interlayered chlorite-smectite and chlorite with disequilibrium compositions dominate the secondary mineralogy as replacement phases of primary glass and acicular pyroxene. Phenocrysts and matrix grains of plagioclase are unaffected during alteration. Using a modification of the Gresens` equation we demonstrate that the trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively immobile, and calculate degrees of enrichment and depletion in other elements. Strontium isotopic ratios increase as Sr concentrations decrease from least-altered cores to most-altered rims and cross-cutting veins in individual samples, and can be modeled by open system behaviour under low fluid-rock ratio (<10) conditions following a period of lower-temperature weathering of volcanics within the rift zone. The complex patterns of element enrichment and depletion and strontium isotope variations indicate mixing between pristine seawater and ascending hot fluids to produce a compositional spectrum of fluids. If, as suggested here, the discharge zone alteration occurred under relatively low fluid-rock ratios, then this shallow region must play an important role in determining the exit composition of vent fluids in marine hydrothermal systems. 50 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Pleistocene high-silica rhyolites of the Coso volcanic field, Inyo County, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Macdonald, R.; Smith, R.L.; Baedecker, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    The high-silica rhyolite domes and lava flows of the bimodal Pleistocene part of the Coso volcanic field provide an example of the early stages of evolution of a silicic magmatic system of substantial size and longevity. Major and trace element compositions are consistent with derivation from somewhat less silicic parental material by liquid state differentiation processes in compositionally and thermally zoned magmatic systems. Seven chemically homogeneous eruptive groups can be distinguished on the basis of trace element and K/Ar data. The oldest two groups are volumetrically minor and geochemically distinct from the younger groups, all five of which appear to have evolved from the same magmatic system. Erupted volume-time relations suggest that small amounts of magma were bled from the top of a silicic reservoir at a nearly constant long-term rate over the last 0.24Ma. The interval of repose between eruptions appears to be proportional to the volume of the preceding eruptive group. This relationship suggests that eruptions take place when some parameter which increases at a constant rate reaches a critical value; this parameter may be extensional strain accumulated in roof rocks. Extension of the lithosphere favors intrusion of basalt into the crust, attendant partial melting, and maintenance of a long-lived silicic magmatic system. The Coso silicic system may contain a few hundred cubic kilometers of magma. The Coso magmatic system may eventually have the potential for producing voluminous pyroclastic eruptions if the safety valve provided by rapid crustal extension becomes inadequate to 1) defuse the system through episodic removal of volatile-rich magma from its top and 2) prohibit migration of the reservoir to a shallow crustal level.-from Authors

  5. The origin of bajaites from the San Borja Volcanic Field in Baja California Norte, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibbins, M.; Castillo, P.; Negrete-Aranda, R.; Canon-Tapia, E.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Garcia-Amador, B. I.

    2014-12-01

    Baja California is a peninsula in western Mexico that was formed through a dynamic tectonic history of convergence, rifting and strike slip motion. At approximately 13 Ma, subduction along the northwestern coast of Mexico stopped, subsequently the Gulf of California opened and strike slip faults formed parallel to the ancient trench. After subduction ended, arc-related magmatism continued as the Baja peninsula was forming until about 2 Ma. The lavas erupting in the peninsula have variable compositions including calc-alkalic and tholeiitic arc basalts and bajaites. The term bajaite is a collective term for the high magnesian andesites and basaltic andesites in Baja California that have adakitic characteristics. Adakites, on the other hand, are arc lavas characterized by high silica content and Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios; these are generally believed to have formed through melting of subducted basaltic crust. The origin of bajaite is controversial. It has been proposed as product of melting of either subducted basaltic crust primarily because of its adakitic characteristics (Saunders et al, 1987) or metasomatized mantle wedge because of its arc lava-like geochemical features (Castillo, 2008); it has also been proposed as a mixture of differentiated and mafic arc lavas (Streck et al, 2007). The composition of bajaite is similar to that of the bulk continental crust and, thus, its true origin can shed light on the mechanism for continental growth. In this study, we use geochemical techniques to resolve some of the controversies surrounding the origin of bajaite. We analyze the petrographic, major element, trace element, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions of bajaites from the San Borja Volcanic Field in Baja California Norte, Mexico to better constrain their petrogenetic history and origin.

  6. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, paleomagnetism, and evolution of the Boring volcanic field, Oregon and Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar investigations of a large suite of fine-grained basaltic rocks of the Boring volcanic field (BVF), Oregon and Washington (USA), yielded two primary results. (1) Using age control from paleomagnetic polarity, stratigraphy, and available plateau ages, 40Ar/39Ar recoil model ages are defined that provide reliable age results in the absence of an age plateau, even in cases of significant Ar redistribution. (2) Grouping of eruptive ages either by period of activity or by composition defines a broadly northward progression of BVF volcanism during latest Pliocene and Pleistocene time that reflects rates consistent with regional plate movements. Based on the frequency distribution of measured ages, periods of greatest volcanic activity within the BVF occurred 2.7–2.2 Ma, 1.7–0.5 Ma, and 350–50 ka. Grouped by eruptive episode, geographic distributions of samples define a series of northeast-southwest–trending strips whose centers migrate from south-southeast to north-northwest at an average rate of 9.3 ± 1.6 mm/yr. Volcanic activity in the western part of the BVF migrated more rapidly than that to the east, causing trends of eruptive episodes to progress in an irregular, clockwise sense. The K2O and CaO values of dated samples exhibit well-defined temporal trends, decreasing and increasing, respectively, with age of eruption. Divided into two groups by K2O, the centers of these two distributions define a northward migration rate similar to that determined from eruptive age groups. This age and compositional migration rate of Boring volcanism is similar to the clockwise rotation rate of the Oregon Coast Range with respect to North America, and might reflect localized extension on the trailing edge of that rotating crustal block.

  7. Reflection seismic imaging in the volcanic area of the geothermal field Wayang Windu, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polom, Ulrich; Wiyono, Wiyono; Pramono, Bambang; Krawczyk, CharLotte M.

    2014-05-01

    Reflection seismic exploration in volcanic areas is still a scientific challenge and requires major efforts to develop imaging workflows capable of an economic utilization, e.g., for geothermal exploration. The SESaR (Seismic Exploration and Safety Risk study for decentral geothermal plants in Indonesia) project therefore tackles still not well resolved issues concerning wave propagation or energy absorption in areas covered by pyroclastic sediments using both active P-wave and S-wave seismics. Site-specific exploration procedures were tested in different tectonic and lithological regimes to compare imaging conditions. Based on the results of a small-scale, active seismic pre-site survey in the area of the Wayang Windu geothermal field in November 2012, an additional medium-scale active seismic experiment using P-waves was carried out in August 2013. The latter experiment was designed to investigate local changes of seismic subsurface response, to expand the knowledge about capabilities of the vibroseis method for seismic surveying in regions covered by pyroclastic material, and to achieve higher depth penetration. Thus, for the first time in the Wayang Windu geothermal area, a powerful, hydraulically driven seismic mini-vibrator device of 27 kN peak force (LIAG's mini-vibrator MHV2.7) was used as seismic source instead of the weaker hammer blow applied in former field surveys. Aiming at acquiring parameter test and production data southeast of the Wayang Windu geothermal power plant, a 48-channel GEODE recording instrument of the Badan Geologi was used in a high-resolution configuration, with receiver group intervals of 5 m and source intervals of 10 m. Thereby, the LIAG field crew, Star Energy, GFZ Potsdam, and ITB Bandung acquired a nearly 600 m long profile. In general, we observe the successful applicability of the vibroseis method for such a difficult seismic acquisition environment. Taking into account the local conditions at Wayang Windu, the method is

  8. King's Bowl Pit Crater, Lava Field and Eruptive Fissure, Idaho - A Multipurpose Volcanic Planetary Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S. S.; Garry, B.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Sears, D. W. G.; Borg, C.; Elphic, R. C.; Haberle, C. W.; Kobayashi, L.; Lim, D. S. S.; Sears, H.; Skok, J. R.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    King's Bowl (KB) and its associated eruptive fissure and lava field on the eastern Snake River Plain, is being investigated by the NASA SSERVI FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team as a planetary analog to similar pits on the Moon, Mars and Vesta. The 2,220 ± 100 BP basaltic eruption in Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve represents early stages of low shield growth, which was aborted when magma supply was cut off. Compared to mature shields, KB is miniscule, with ~0.02 km3 of lava over ~3 km2, yet the ~6 km long series of fissures, cracks and pits are well-preserved for analog studies of volcanic processes. The termination of eruption was likely related to proximity of the 2,270 ± 50 BP eruption of the much larger Wapi lava field (~5.5 km3 over 325 km2 area) on the same rift. Our investigation extends early work by R. Greeley and colleagues, focusing on imagery, compositional variations, ejecta distribution, dGPS profiles and LiDAR scans of features related to: (1) fissure eruptions - spatter ramparts, cones, feeder dikes, extension cracks; (2) lava lake formation - surface morphology, squeeze-ups, slab pahoehoe lava mounds, lava drain-back, flow lobe overlaps; and (3) phreatic steam blasts - explosion pits, ejecta blankets of ash and blocks. Preliminary results indicate multiple fissure eruptions and growth of a basin-filled lava lake up to ~ 10 m thick with outflow sheet lava flows. Remnant mounds of original lake crust reveal an early high lava lake level, which subsided as much as 5 m as the molten interior drained back into the fissure system. Rapid loss of magma supply led to the collapse of fissure walls allowing groundwater influx that triggered multiple steam blasts along at least 500 m. Early blasts occurred while lake magma pressure was still high enough to produce squeeze-ups when penetrated by ejecta blocks. The King's Bowl pit crater exemplifies processes of a small, but highly energetic

  9. The Mantle and Basalt-Crust Interaction Below the Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian M.; Crumpler, Larry S.; Schmidt, Marick E.

    2010-01-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) lies on the Jemez Lineament on the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau. The field is centered on the Mt. Taylor composite volcano and includes Mesa Chivato to the NE and Grants Ridge to the WSW. MTVF magmatism spans approximately 3.8-1.5 Ma (K-Ar). Magmas are dominantly alkaline with mafic compositions ranging from basanite to hy-basalt and felsic compositions ranging from ne-trachyte to rhyolite. We are investigating the state of the mantle and the spatial and temporal variation in basalt-crustal interaction below the MTVF by examining mantle xenoliths and basalts in the context of new mapping and future Ar-Ar dating. The earliest dated magmatism in the field is a basanite flow south of Mt. Taylor. Mantle xenolith-bearing alkali basalts and basanites occur on Mesa Chivato and in the region of Mt. Taylor, though most basalts are peripheral to the main cone. Xenolith-bearing magmatism persists at least into the early stages of conebuilding. Preliminary examination of the mantle xenolith suite suggests it is dominantly lherzolitic but contains likely examples of both melt-depleted (harzburgitic) and melt-enriched (clinopyroxenitic) mantle. There are aphyric and crystal-poor hawaiites, some of which are hy-normative, on and near Mt. Taylor, but many of the more evolved MTVF basalts show evidence of complex histories. Mt. Taylor basalts higher in the cone-building sequence contain >40% zoned plagioclase pheno- and megacrysts. Other basalts peripheral to Mt. Taylor and at Grants Ridge contain clinopyroxene and plagioclase megacrysts and cumulate-textured xenoliths, suggesting they interacted with lower crustal cumulates. Among the questions we are addressing: What was the chemical and thermal state of the mantle recorded by the basaltic suites and xenoliths and how did it change with time? Are multiple parental basalts (Si-saturated vs. undersaturated) represented and, if so, what changes in the mantle or in the tectonic

  10. The ~ 2000 yr BP Jumento volcano, one of the youngest edifices of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, J. L.; Muñoz-Salinas, E.; Castillo, M.; Salinas, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Chichinautzin Volcanic Field is situated at the southern limit of the Basin of Mexico and the Metropolitan area of Mexico City, the third most populated city around the world. The Chichinautzin Volcanic field holds more than 220 monogenetic volcanoes. Xitle is the youngest of these with an estimated age of 1.6 ky BP. Xitle's eruptive activity took place during the Mesoamerican Mexican Pre-classic period and is related to the destruction of Cuicuilco Archaeological Site, the oldest civilization known in Central Mexico. However, there are still several regional cones that have not been dated. Based on 14C ages, stratigraphic and geomorphologic criteria, we conclude that the Jumento volcano, located to the west of Xitle, is one of the youngest cones of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field. The Jumento volcano has a basaltic andesite composition, and its eruptive activity was initially hydromagmatic, followed by Strombolian and finally effusive events occurred recorded through: (1) a sequence of hydromagmatic pyroclastic surges and ashfall layers emplaced at a radius of > 5 km from the crater with charcoal fragments at its base; this activity built the Jumento's cone with slopes of 32°; and (2) lava flows that breached the southern part of the cone and flowed for up to 2.5 km from the vent. The resulting 14C ages for this volcano yielded a maximum age of ~ 2 ky BP. Morphometric analysis indicates that the state of degradation of Jumento cone is similar to the Xitle, suggesting that the Jumento could be in the state of degradation of a volcanic structure of similar age or younger adding credence to the probable radiocarbon age of ~ 2 ky BP for the Jumento edifice.

  11. Evolution of unrest at Laguna del Maule volcanic field (Chile) from InSAR and GPS measurements, 2003 to 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mével, Hélène; Feigl, Kurt L.; Córdova, Loreto; DeMets, Charles; Lundgren, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in the southern volcanic zone of the Chilean Andes exhibits a large volume of rhyolitic material erupted during postglacial times (20-2 ka). Since 2007, LdM has experienced an unrest episode characterized by high rates of deformation. Analysis of new GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data reveals uplift rates greater than 190 mm/yr between January 2013 and November 2014. The geodetic data are modeled as an inflating sill at depth. The results are used to calculate the temporal evolution of the vertical displacement. The best time function for modeling the InSAR data set is a double exponential model with rates increasing from 2007 through 2010 and decreasing slowly since 2010. We hypothesize that magma intruding into an existing silicic magma reservoir is driving the surface deformation. Modeling historical uplift at Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Three Sisters volcanic fields suggests a common temporal evolution of vertical displacement rates.

  12. Megacrystic Clinopyroxene Basalts Sample A Deep Crustal Underplate To The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Schrader, C. M.; Crumpler, L. S.; Wolff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The alkaline and compositionally diverse (basanite to high-Si rhyolite) Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico comprises 4 regions that cover ~75 x 40 km2: (1) Mount Taylor, a large composite volcano and a surrounding field of basaltic vents; (2) Grants Ridge, constructed of topaz rhyolitic ignimbrite and coulees; (3) Mesa Chivato, a plateau of alkali basalts and mugearitic to trachytic domes; and (4) the Rio Puero basaltic necks. Distributed throughout its history (~3.6 to 1.26 Ma; Crumpler and Goff, 2012) and area (excepting Rio Puerco Necks) is a texturally distinct family of differentiated basalts (Mg# 43.2-53.4). These basalts contain resorbed and moth-eaten megacrysts (up to 2 cm) of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine ±Ti-magnetite ±ilmenite ±rare orthopyroxene. Some megacrystic lava flows have gabbroic cumulate inclusions with mineral compositions similar to the megacrysts, suggesting a common origin. For instance, gabbroic and megacrystic clinopyroxenes form linear positive arrays in TiO2 (0.2-2.3 wt%) with respect to Al2O3 (0.7-9.3 wt%). The lowest Al clinopyroxenes are found in a gabbroic inclusion and are associated with partially melted intercumulus orthopyroxene. Megacrystic and gabbroic plagioclase (An 41-80) in 4 representative thin sections were analyzed for 87Sr/86Sr by Laser Ablation ICP-MS. 87Sr/86Sr values for the suite range from 0.7036 to 0.7047. The low 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7036 to 0.7037) are associated with high Ti-Al clinopyroxenes. Likewise, the higher 87Sr/86Sr plagioclases (0.7043 to 0.7047) are associated with the low-Al clinopyroxenes. Taken together, these megacrysts track the differentiation of an intrusive body (or related bodies) from alkaline to Si-saturated conditions by fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation. The intrusive body likely underplates portions of the MTVF that have generated silicic magmas (Mount Taylor, Grants Ridge, Mesa Chivato). Although disequilibrium is implied by resorbed

  13. Combining long- and short-term probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment with cost-benefit analysis to support decision making in a volcanic crisis from the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandri, Laura; Jolly, Gill; Lindsay, Jan; Howe, Tracy; Marzocchi, Warner

    2012-04-01

    By using BET_VH, we propose a quantitative probabilistic hazard assessment for base surge impact in Auckland, New Zealand. Base surges resulting from phreatomagmatic eruptions are among the most dangerous phenomena likely to be associated with the initial phase of a future eruption in the Auckland Volcanic Field. The assessment is done both in the long-term and in a specific short-term case study, i.e. the simulated pre-eruptive unrest episode during Exercise Ruaumoko, a national civil defence exercise. The most important factors to account for are the uncertainties in the vent location (expected for a volcanic field) and in the run-out distance of base surges. Here, we propose a statistical model of base surge run-out distance based on deposits from past eruptions in Auckland and in analogous volcanoes. We then combine our hazard assessment with an analysis of the costs and benefits of evacuating people (on a 1 × 1-km cell grid). In addition to stressing the practical importance of a cost-benefit analysis in creating a bridge between volcanologists and decision makers, our study highlights some important points. First, in the Exercise Ruaumoko application, the evacuation call seems to be required as soon as the unrest phase is clear; additionally, the evacuation area is much larger than what is recommended in the current contingency plan. Secondly, the evacuation area changes in size with time, due to a reduction in the uncertainty in the vent location and increase in the probability of eruption. It is the tradeoff between these two factors that dictates which cells must be evacuated, and when, thus determining the ultimate size and shape of the area to be evacuated.

  14. Vent distribution in the Quaternary Payún Matrú Volcanic Field, western Argentina: Its relation to tectonics and crustal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, I. R.; Franzese, J. R.; Llambías, E. J.; Petrinovic, I. A.

    2014-05-01

    The Payún Matrú Volcanic Field consists of two polygenetic and mostly trachytic volcanoes (Payún Matrú with a summit caldera and Payún Liso) along with around 220 scoria cones and basaltic lava flows. This volcanic field belongs to the Payenia Basaltic Province (33° 30‧-38° S), a Quaternary Andean back-arc basaltic province of the Southern Volcanic Zone, in western Argentina. The vent density distribution of the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field is different from the other volcanic fields within Payenia. The Payún Matrú volcano and the scoria cones are distributed in an E-W oriented fringe about 15 km wide and 70 km long, with the Payún Matrú caldera in the middle of this fringe. The structural framework in which the volcanic field is located allows to infer that this vent density distribution is strongly conditioned by pre-existing crustal anisotropies. The volcanic field is located in a transfer zone related to Jurassic extensional structures of the Neuquén Basin, which were inverted also as a transfer zone during the Miocene compressive deformation that formed the Malargüe fold and thrust belt, and, in addition, it is located in the southern margin of a Neogene syn-orogenic basin. The analysis of vent center location and vent morphology is helpful to determine basaltic vent alignments within the Payún Matrú Volcanic Field and to infer the syn-eruptive stress field. This analysis shows that vent alignments are compatible with the present-day maximum horizontal stress, as measured by break-out of oil wells.

  15. Increasing Interaction of Alkaline Magmas with Lower Crustal Gabbroic Cumulates over the Evolution of Mt. Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. E.; Crumpler, L. S.; Schrader, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field at the southeastern edge of the Colorado Plateau, New Mexico erupted diverse alkaline magmas from ~3.8 to 1.5 Ma (Crumpler, 1980; Perry et al., 1990). The earliest eruptions include high silica topaz rhyolites of Grants Ridge (plagioclase, quartz, biotite) and Si-under saturated basanites and trachytes at Mt Taylor stratovolcano. Mt. Taylor was later constructed of stacks of thick, trachyandesitic to rhyolitic lava flows that were subsequently eroded into a ~4-km across amphitheatre opening toward the southeast. Early Mt. Taylor rhyolitic lavas exposed within the amphitheatre contain quartz, plagioclase, hornblende, and biotite (± sanidine) phenocrysts. Later cone-building trachydacite to trachyandesite lavas are crystal-rich with plagioclase and augite megacrysts (± hornblende, ± quartz) and record an overall trend of decreasing SiO2 with time. The last eruptions ~1.5 Ma from the stratovolcano (Perry et al. 1990) produced thick (>70 m), viscous lava flows that contain up to 50% zoned plagioclase phenocrysts. While SiO2 decreased among the silicic magmas, the degree of silica saturation increased among peripheral basaltic magmas from basanite to ne-normative hawaiite to hy-normative basalts. Evidence of increasing crustal contamination within the basalts includes zoned plagioclase megacrysts, augite and plagioclase cumulate texture xenoliths with accompanying xenocrysts. These textures within the basalts combined with abundant, complex plagioclase among the cone-building silicic magmas imply interaction and mixing with gabbroic cumulate mush in the lower crust beneath Mt. Taylor Volcano. Contemporaneous basanitic to trachytitc volcanism in the northern part of the volcanic field at Mesa Chivato (Crumpler, 1980) was more widely distributed, smaller volume, and produced mainly aphyric magmas. The lower crustal gabbroic cumulates either do not extend northward beneath Mesa Chivato, or they were not accessed by lower magma flux rate

  16. Transitional Evolution of the Geomagnetic Field Recorded in Long Volcanic Sequences: Insights From Icelandic and Hawaiian Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, J. K.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Valet, J.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the short-term evolution of the geomagnetic field recorded by long volcanic sequences in Iceland and Hawaii. The eastern Icelandic sequences correspond to 45 and 49 individual lava flows sampled and range in age from 12.9 to 10.21 Ma as reported by Watkins and Walker [Watkins and Walker, 1977. Am J. Sci. 277, 513-584] and are labeled as profiles C and D. Also sampled were long volcanic sequences in the Waianae, Koolau (island of O"ahu) and Mauna Loa (Big Island of Hawaii) volcanoes. We have studied in detail the directional characteristics of three successive reversals, the Gilbert-Gauss, the Lower and the Upper Mammoth reversals recorded by the Waianae lavas. These results confirm that large oscillations of directions precede or follow the reversals, which shows waveforms typical of paleosecular variation with their amplitude being considerably amplified by the decrease of the dipole. There is no apparent preferred location for the virtual geomagnetic poles (VGP). In addition to the directional analyses, determinations of absolute paleointensity were attempted on more than 540 samples, which document the field variations surrounding the Lower Mammoth transition. A period of a weak field dominated before the reversal; then the transition was initiated by a transit from normal to reverse polarity followed by a short restoration of field intensity in reverse polarity. A second episode of a very weak field was accompanied by a return to positive inclinations before reaching the reverse polarity. The very strong and apparent rapid recovery of the dipole following completion of the reversal culminated at a value of 16 x 1022 Am2 similar to field intensities reported for the other detailed volcanic records of reversals studied so far. The asymmetry between the pre- and the post-reversal phases appears as a dominant characteristic and indicates the importance of field regeneration to initiate a new stable polarity interval. In addition we have obtained

  17. NASA Desert RATS 2010: Preliminary results for science operations conducted in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruener, J. E.; Lofgren, G. E.; Bluethmann, W. J.; Abercromby, A. F.

    2013-10-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working with international partners to develop the space architectures and mission plans necessary for human spaceflight beyond Earth orbit. The Apollo missions to the Moon demonstrated conclusively that surface mobility is a key asset that improves the efficiency of human explorers on a planetary surface. NASA's Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS), a multi-year series of tests of hardware and operations carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona, has tested a crewed pressurized rover concept referred to as the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). During NASA's Desert RATS 2010, four 2-person crews driving two SEVs collectively conducted 12 days of field exploration in the San Francisco Volcanic Field in northern Arizona. They collected 461 samples, with a total mass of 161.2 kg, on 70 simulated extravehicular activities (EVAs). Each SEV crew traveled over 60 km during their field explorations. This paper illustrates where the actual field sites, or 'science stations', were located, provides a brief description of the types of samples collected at each station, and highlights some of the more interesting sites. Most of the geologic samples collected at Desert RATS 2010 were well documented at the site of collection, and upon delivery to the Johnson Space Center the samples were given a preliminary examination. The samples are available for further study by interested researchers developing scientific instruments for use on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, or for geological investigations of the San Francisco Volcanic Field.

  18. A geostatistical method applied to the geochemical study of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robidoux, P.; Roberge, J.; Urbina Oviedo, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    The origin of magmatism and the role of the subducted Coco's Plate in the Chichinautzin volcanic field (CVF), Mexico is still a subject of debate. It has been established that mafic magmas of alkali type (subduction) and calc-alkali type (OIB) are produced in the CVF and both groups cannot be related by simple fractional crystallization. Therefore, many geochemical studies have been done, and many models have been proposed. The main goal of the work present here is to provide a new tool for the visualization and interpretation of geochemical data using geostatistics and geospatial analysis techniques. It contains a complete geodatabase built from referred samples over the 2500 km2 area of CVF and its neighbour stratovolcanoes (Popocatepetl, Iztaccihuatl and Nevado de Toluca). From this database, map of different geochemical markers were done to visualise geochemical signature in a geographical manner, to test the statistic distribution with a cartographic technique and highlight any spatial correlations. The distribution and regionalization of the geochemical signatures can be viewed in a two-dimensional space using a specific spatial analysis tools from a Geographic Information System (GIS). The model of spatial distribution is tested with Linear Decrease (LD) and Inverse Distance Weight (IDW) interpolation technique because they best represent the geostatistical characteristics of the geodatabase. We found that ratio of Ba/Nb, Nb/Ta, Th/Nb show first order tendency, which means visible spatial variation over a large scale area. Monogenetic volcanoes in the center of the CVF have distinct values compare to those of the Popocatepetl-Iztaccihuatl polygenetic complex which are spatially well defined. Inside the Valley of Mexico, a large quantity of monogenetic cone in the eastern portion of CVF has ratios similar to the Iztaccihuatl and Popocatepetl complex. Other ratios like alkalis vs SiO2, V/Ti, La/Yb, Zr/Y show different spatial tendencies. In that case, second

  19. Phreatomagmatic eruptions through unconsolidated coastal plain sequences, Maungataketake, Auckland Volcanic Field (New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustín-Flores, Javier; Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Kereszturi, Gábor; Brand, Brittany D.; Smith, Ian E. M.

    2014-04-01

    Maungataketake is a monogenetic basaltic volcano formed at ~ 85-89 ka in the southern part of the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand. It comprises a basal 1100-m diameter tuff ring, with a central scoria/spatter cone and lava flows. The tuff ring was formed under hydrogeological and geographic conditions very similar to the present. The tuff records numerous density stratified, wet base surges that radiated outward up to 1 km, decelerating rapidly and becoming less turbulent with distance. The pyroclastic units dominantly comprise fine-grained expelled grains from various sedimentary deposits beneath the volcano mixed with a minor component of juvenile pyroclasts (~ 35 vol.%). Subtle lateral changes relate to deceleration with distance and vertical transformations are minor, pointing to stable explosion depths and conditions, with gradual transitions between units and no evidence for eruptive pauses. This volcano formed within and on ~ 60 m-thick Plio/Pleistocene, poorly consolidated, highly permeable shelly sands and silts (Kaawa Formation) capped by near-impermeable, water-saturated muds (Tauranga Group). These sediments rest on moderately consolidated Miocene-aged permeable turbiditic sandstones and siltstones (Waitemata Group). Magma-water fuelled thermohydraulic explosions remained in the shallow sedimentary layers, excavating fine-grained sediments without brittle fragmentation required. On the whole, the resulting cool, wet pyroclastic density currents were of low energy. The unconsolidated shallow sediments deformed to accommodate rapidly rising magma, leading to development of complex sill-like bodies and a range of magma-water contact conditions at any time. The weak saturated sediments were also readily liquefied to provide an enduring supply of water and fine sediment to the explosion loci. Changes in magma flux and/or subsequent stabilisation of the conduit area by a lava ring-barrier led to ensuing Strombolian and fire-fountaining eruption

  20. Solar Schwabe cycle signals in varved sediments of maar lakes of the Westeifel volcanic field (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruechmann, C.; Mingram, J.; Negendank, J.; Vos, H.; Zolitschka, B.

    Annually laminated lake deposits possess a great potential for the study of climatic change and the recognition of solar-terrestrial connections. The profiles discussed below are Holocene and Eocene maar lake sediments from Lake Holzmaar and Eckfeld maar lake, both situated in the Eifel volcanic field, Germany. Whereas the sediments of Lake Holzmaar are mainly composed of diatoms, the organic component of the Tertiary oilshales of Eckfeld is dominated by green algae. In both sequences the variations in varve thickness are controlled by biological productivity. Supposing a nonlinear transfer of the solar induced climatic signal by the limnic ecosystem which reacts with maximum productivity during optimal conditions and reduced productivity during years with deviations from the optimum, a detailed analysis of the average phase behaviour of the 11 year solar Schwabe cycle yields phase jumps of half a cycle length at times of optimal conditions. Those times depend on the overlying pattern of secular solar activity fluctuations (Gleissberg and longer cyclicities). The phase pattern of the Schwabe cycle in Lake Holzmaar has been compared with that of other archives, e.g. MSA accumulation rates of Greenland ice (GISP2), for time intervals with optimal time control (10 to 9 ka BP) and led to comparable results. For the time interval analysed, longer cyclicities of solar activity of 229, 500 and 750 years can be deduced from the timing of the phase jumps. The debate about decadal cyclicities in varved sequences of the northern hemisphere, the existence of similar cyclicities depending on nonlinear feedback mechanisms of the ocean/atmosphere circulation has to be excluded. Going back in time, we can observe general changes of the circulation pattern due to changes of the sea/land distribution and the loss of importance of the polar ice accumulation. Next to Lake Holzmaar, Eocene varved sediments can be analysed. First analyses show that the varve thickness variability

  1. A Disequilibrium Melting Spectrum: Partially Melted Crustal Xenoliths from the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field, NE China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, C. L.; McGee, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Disequilibrium melting has been established as a common process occurring during crustal anatexis and thus demonstrates that crustal assimilation by ascending mantle-derived magmas is likley not a closed system. Observations of extreme compositional heterogeneity within partial melts derived from crustal xenoliths have been documented in several recent examples, however, the retention or transfer of elements to and from residues and glasses, and their relative contributions to potential crustal contaminants warrants further investigation. Sampled lavas from the Huoshaoshan volcano in the Holocene Wudalianchi volcanic field of Northeast China contain crustal xenoliths which preserve a spectrum of partial melting both petrographically and geochemically, thus providing an excellent, natural example of crustal anatexis. Correlations exist between the volume of silicic glass preserved within the xenoliths and bulk rock SiO2 (70-83 wt%), Al2O3 (16-8 wt%), glass 87Sr/86Sr (0.715-0.908), abundances of elements common in feldspars and micas (Sr, Ba, Rb) and elements common in accessory minerals (Y, Zr, Nb). These correlations are likely associated with the consumption of feldspars and micas and the varying retention of accessory phases during partial melting. The xenoliths which contain the greater volumes of silicic glass and residual quartz (interpreted as being the most melted) were found within pahoehoe lava, whilst the least melted xenoliths were found within scoria of the summit cone of Huoshaoshan; thus it is interpreted that the extent of melting is linked to the immersion time in the lava. Small-scale (mm) mingling and transfer of material from the enclosing lava to the xenolith is observed, however, modelling of potential contaminant compositions is inconsistent with crustal contamination during lava petrogenesis. It is inferred that crustal contamination in sampled lavas is localized within the open magmatic system and most likely occurs at the contact zone

  2. The questa magmatic system: Petrologic, chemical and isotopic variations in cogenetic volcanic and plutonic rocks of the latir volcanic field and associated intrusives, northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Field, chemical and isotopic data demonstrate that nearly all igneous rocks at Questa resulted from interactions between mantle-derived parental magmas and the crust. Strontium, neodymium and lead isotope ratios of early andesites to rhyolites (28 to 26 Ma) indicate that these magmas assimilated > 25% lower crust. Injection of basaltic magmas extensively modified the strontium and neodymium but not the lead isotope compositions of the lower crust. Eruption of comendite magmas and the peralkaline Amalia Tuff 26 Ma is correlated with inception of regional extension. Lead isotope ratios identify different sources for the metaluminous granites and the peralkaline rocks. 26 Ma metaluminous granite to granodiorite intrusions have chemical and isotopic compositions to those of the precaldera intermediate-composition rocks, and are interpreted as representing the solidified equivalents of the precaldera magmatic episode. However, both conventional and ion-microprobe isotopic data prohibit significant assimilation of crustal rocks at the level of exposure, suggesting that the plutons were emplaced a relatively crystal-rich mushes which did not have sufficient heat to assimilate country rocks. This suggest that in some cases plutonic rocks are better than volcanic rocks in representing the isotopic compositions of their source regions, because the assimilation potential of crystal-rich magmas is significantly less than that of largely liquid magmas.

  3. Influence of hydrothermal venting on water column properties in the crater of the Kolumbo submarine volcano, Santorini volcanic field (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopoulou, Maria E.; Mertzimekis, Theo J.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steven; Mandalakis, Manolis

    2016-02-01

    The Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of the island of Santorini, is part of Santorini's volcanic complex in the south Aegean Sea, Greece. Kolumbo's last eruption was in 1650 AD. However, a unique and active hydrothermal vent field has been revealed in the northern part of its crater floor during an oceanographic survey by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in 2006. In the present study, conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data collected by ROV Hercules during three oceanographic surveys onboard E/V Nautilus in 2010 and 2011 have served to investigate the distribution of physicochemical properties in the water column, as well as their behavior directly over the hydrothermal field. Additional CTD measurements were carried out in volcanic cone 3 (VC3) along the same volcanic chain but located 3 km northeast of Kolumbo where no hydrothermal activity has been detected to date. CTD profiles exhibit pronounced anomalies directly above the active vents on Kolumbo's crater floor. In contrast, VC3 data revealed no such anomalies, essentially resembling open-sea (background) conditions. Steep increases of temperature (e.g., from 16 to 19 °C) and conductivity near the maximum depth (504 m) inside Kolumbo's cone show marked spatiotemporal correlation. Vertical distributions of CTD signatures suggest a strong connection to Kolumbo's morphology, with four distinct zones identified (open sea, turbid flow, invariable state, hydrothermal vent field). Additionally, overlaying the near-seafloor temperature measurements on an X-Y coordinate grid generates a detailed 2D distribution of the hydrothermal vent field and clarifies the influence of fluid discharges in its formation.

  4. Origins and exploration significance of replacement and vein-type alunite deposits in the Marysvale volcanic field, west central Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, C.G.; Rye, R.O.; Steven, T.A.; Mehnert, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    Alunite in the Marysvale volcanic field forms two (three are described) different types of deposits which contrast in appearance and conditions of origin: 1) Replacement deposits are generally fine-grained and formed by near-surface replacement of intermediate-composition volcanic rocks. The deposits form a bead necklace around a monzonite stock. Each deposit is zoned horizontally from alunitic cores to kaolinitic and propylitic envelopes and zoned vertically from pyrite/propylite upward through alunite/jarosite/hematite to a silica cap. Alunite does not extend below 100 m. Sulphur isotope ratios agree with derivation from underlying Mesozoic evaporites. 2) Natroalunite of 14-m.y. age crosscuts replacement-type alunite deposits. Its S-isotope ratios are comparable with those of pyrite in the volcanics. The Na may be from underlying Mesozoic halites. 3) Veins of coarse-grained alunite of 14-m.y. age filled extension fractures above a postulated stock. S-isotope ratios indicate a probable magmatic source. The contrasting properties of the Marysvale alunite deposits preclude any simple relation to ore deposits, but serve to refine interpretations based on other geological considerations. The replacement deposits are a logical near-surface result of skarn forming processes at depth around the monzonite stock. The vein- type deposits are a logical near-surface result of porphyry metallization in an underlying stock. -G.J.N.

  5. Melding Research on the Navajo Volcanic Field into Undergraduate Curriculum to Promote Scientific Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation highlights the curricular design and preliminary outcomes of undergraduate research in the Department of Geosciences at Fort Lewis College (FLC), supported by an NSF-RUI project on the Navajo volcanic field (NVF). A prime impact of this project was to support the education and career development of undergraduate students by further developing basic knowledge and skills in the context of authentic inquiry on petrologic-based research topics. Integrating research into the curriculum promoted scientific habits of mind by engaging students as "active agents" in discovery, and the creative development and testing of ideas. It also gave students a sense of ownership in the scientific process and knowledge construction. The initial phase of this project was conducted in Igneous Petrology at FLC in 2010. Eleven students were enrolled in this course which allowed them to work as a team in collaboration with the PI, and engage in all aspects of research to further develop and hone their skills in scientific inquiry. This course involved a small component of traditional lecture in which selected topics were discussed to provide students with a foundation to understand magmatic processes. This was complemented by a comprehensive review of the literature in which students read and discussed a spectrum of articles on Tertiary magmatism in the western United States and the NVF. Invited lectures by leading-scientists in geology provided opportunities for discussions and interaction with professional geologists. All of the students in the class engaged in the active collection of petrologic data in the field and laboratory sessions, and were introduced to the use of state-of-the art analytical tools as part of their experiences. Four students were recruited from the course to design, develop, and conduct long-term research projects on selected petrologic topics in the NVF. This research allowed these students to engage in the "messy" process of testing existing

  6. Contrasting Holocene vs. Late Pleistocene dynamics of sediment deposition in Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, C.; Gebhardt, C.; Hahn, A.; Kliem, P.; Zolitschka, B.; Science Team

    2010-12-01

    In the maar lake Laguna Potrok Aike (52°S, 70°W; 116 m asl.; diameter: 3.5 km, water depth: 100 m) in southern Patagonia, Argentina, in total 510 m of lacustrine sediments were recovered in the framework of the ICDP project PASADO (Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project). Quadruplicate and triplicate cores down to a maximum depth of 101.5 m below lake floor were taken with a total core recovery of 94.4 % from two drillsites located 700 m apart in the central profundal plain of the lake. Seismic refraction data reveal a funnel-shaped structure originating from phreatomagmatic maar explosions embedded in the sandstone rocks of the surrounding Santa Cruz Formation. The funnel is filled by lacustrine sediments of up to 370 m in thickness with seismic velocities (sv) of 1500-2350 m s-1 which are underlain by a unit of probably volcanoclastic origin (sv >2400 m s-1). Seismic reflection data of the uppermost 100 m of the sediments reveal stratified lacustrine sediments and a rather dynamic development of the lake: on top of pelagic sediments, a desiccation horizon is found, with sand dunes in the eastern part of the lake basin. These are overlain by a series of paleo shorelines documenting the history of lake level rise in this early new lake. While this new lake formed in the central and eastern part of the maar depression, the western part was filled by stacked coarse-grained, delta-type sediments probably deriving from the only inlet that at present is sporadically active. After this early filling of the new lake, a stage of rapid lake level rise is observed in the seismic reflection data. Seismic findings are currently verified by the analyses of a 106.08 m long composite profile created by splicing of the three drilled cores of Site 2. According to a first age model, the sedimentary record from Laguna Potrok Aike reaches back to approx. 56,000 cal. BP and exhibits contrasting lithologies downcore especially in the Pleistocene part of the record

  7. Preliminary paragenetic interpretation of the Quaternary topaz rhyolite lava domes of the Blackfoot volcanic field, southeastern Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochridge, W. K., Jr.; McCurry, M. O.; Goldsby, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Quaternary topaz rhyolite lava domes of the bimodal, basalt-dominated Blackfoot volcanic field (BVF), SE Idaho occur in three clusters. We refer to these as the China Hat lava dome field (southernmost; ~ 57 ka), and the 1.4 to 1.5 Ma Sheep Island and White Mountain (northernmost) lava dome fields. The rhyolites and surrounding, more voluminous basalt lavas closely resemble coeval Quaternary rocks erupted to the north along the Eastern Snake River Plain segment of the Yellowstone-Snake River Plain volcanic track. However rhyolites in BVF are distinguished by having more evolved Sr- and Nd-isotopic ratios, as well as having phenocryst assemblages that includes hydrous phases (biotite and hornblende), thorite, and vapor-phase topaz. This study seeks to improve our understanding of the unique conditions of magma evolution that led to these differences. We focus on textural features of major and accessory phenocrysts as a basis for inferring paragenesis for rhyolites from the China Hat lava dome field. Preliminary work indicates that there are three sequentially formed populations of textures among magmatic phases: 1. population of anhedral quartz and plagioclase; 2. population of euhedral grains that includes quartz, sandine, plagioclase, biotite, hornblende, Fe-Ti oxides, zircon and apatite; 3. boxy cellular (skeletal?) sanidine and quartz. We speculate that the first population are resorbed antecrysts, the second formed prior to eruption as autocrysts (at or near equilibrium?), and the third formed soon before or during eruption.

  8. Alkaline Basalts of The Quaternary Buffalo Valley Volcanic Field, NW Fish Creek Mountains, North-central Nevada, Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousens, B.; Henry, C. D.

    2008-12-01

    The Buffalo Valley volcanic field, 5 km southwest of Battle Mountain, consists of approximately 11 cinder cones and associated flows. Youthful volcanoes are rare in the region, and thus this field offers the opportunity to investigate mantle sources currently beneath the central Great Basin. Most of the eruptive centers are distributed along the northwestern margin of the Fish Creek Mountains, a mid-Tertiary caldera complex, along a 13-km-long northeasterly trend that is perpendicular to the regional stress field (or GPS velocity field), suggesting fault control or eruption from a now-buried fissure. The cones are geomorphologically youthful, with well-defined, commonly breached craters. At least one cone, situated slightly east of the main trend, consists of only a thin mantle of scoria and bombs overlying grey Paleozoic limestone. Previous K-Ar and Ar-Ar dating indicate that the cones are between 1.29 and 0.95 Ma in age. Two other nearby Quaternary volcanic centers lie northeast of the Fish Creek Mountains (K-Ar date of 3.3 Ma) and in the center of the Fish Creek caldera (age unknown). Rare Tertiary basalts and more common Tertiary andesites lie around the margin of the caldera. Lavas from the Buffalo Valley cones have vesicular flow tops and more massive interiors. All Quaternary centers are similar petrographically, including 1-2% olivine phenocrysts and megacrysts up to 1 cm in size, and characteristic plagioclase megacrysts that are rarely up to 4 cm long, commonly in a glassy matrix. Two cone samples are alkalic basalt and tephrite with Mg numbers of 0.55, high TiO2 (2.4%), K2O (2.0%), light REE, Nb (60 ppm), but low Cr and Ni (80 ppm), Pb (2 ppm), Ba (450 ppm) and 87Sr/86Sr (0.70375) compared to Late Pliocene/Quaternary volcanic rocks from the western Great Basin near Reno/Carson City/Fallon. The Buffalo Valley cones are similar chemically to lavas from the Pliocene-Quaternary Lunar Craters volcanic field in central Nevada, and are melts of mantle that is

  9. Making room for magma beneath the Jemez Mountains volcanic field: implications for chemical diversity and caldera formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunstad, K. A.; Wolff, J. A.; Watkinson, A.; Gardner, J. N.

    2006-12-01

    The Miocene-Quaternary Jemez Mountains volcanic field (JMVF), the site of the Valles caldera, lies at the intersection of the Jemez lineament, which marks the site of a Proterozoic suture zone, and the Cenozoic Rio Grande rift. The JMVF has a history of volcanism reaching back more than 20 Myr prior to the caldera-forming eruption of the Bandelier Tuff, involving magma compositions ranging from nephelinite to high-silica rhyolite. This longevity of volcanism, despite significant westward movement of the North American continent, indicates that the controls on the location of the JMVF volcanism reside within the lithosphere. The geochemical evolution of continental magmatic systems must be considered in the light of the "space problem" of crustal magma chambers. Significantly, the present geometry of seismic attenuation zones beneath the JMVF may be predicted on the basis of tectonic patterns that existed during the initiation of the volcanic field in the mid-Miocene. We integrate regional structural, tectonic and geophysical data to construct a model for the emplacement and chemical diversification of magmas erupted throughout the history of the JMVF. In addition, we use this approach to develop a new model for the Valles caldera. Reactivation of Laramide thrust faults and transtensional movement on the Jemez lineament during rift-related extension produce low-pressure zones at bends in shear zones were magma could be emplaced. The bends in the shear zones are located at structural triple points representing rheologically stronger and weaker material. The existence of this rheologic variability produces an asymmetry during simple shear deformation in which the stronger material is displaced towards the weaker along one boundary and visa versa along the other. This process creates fragile dilational, low-pressure zones into which magma can be emplaced. Magma chamber shape was controlled by syn-magmatic opening of a tensional-shear fracture or fracture network

  10. Style of Plate Spreading Derived from the 2008-2014 Velocity Field Across the Northern Volcanic Zone of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, V.; Sigmundsson, F.; Hreinsdottir, S.; Ofeigsson, B.; Sturkell, E.; Einarsson, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Northern Volcanic Zone (NVZ) of Iceland is a subaerial part of the divergent boundary between the North-American and Eurasian Plates. At this latitude, the full spreading between the plates is accommodated by the NVZ. We derived the plate boundary velocity field from GPS campaign and continuous measurements between 2008 and 2014, a time period free of any magma intrusion. Average velocities were estimated in the ITRF08 reference frame. The overall extension is consistent with 18 mm/yr in the 104°N direction spreading, in accordance with the MORVEL2010 plate motion model. We find that a 40km-wide band along the plate boundary accommodates about 75% of the full plate velocities. Within this zone, the average strain rate is approximately 0.35 μstrain/yr. The deformation field and the strain rate are, however, much affected by other sources of deformations in the NVZ. These include magmatic sources at the most active volcanic centers, glacial rebound near the ice-caps and geothermal power-plant water extraction. Magmatic sources include a shallow magma chamber deflation under Askja caldera, as well as under Þeistareykir and eventual deep magma inflation north of Krafla volcano. Vatnajökull ice cap melting causes large uplift and outward displacements in the southern part of the NVZ. The two geothermal power-plants near Krafla are inducing local deflations. Our GPS velocities show a 35° change in the direction of the plate boundary axis north of Askja volcano that we infer to be linked to the geometric arrangement of volcanic systems within the NVZ.We use a simple arctangent model to describe the plate spreading to provide constraints on the location and the locking depth of the spreading axis. For that purpose we divided the area in short overlapping segments having the same amount of GPS points along the plate spreading direction and inverted for the location of the center of the spreading axis and locking depth. With this simple model we can account for most

  11. Volcanic Gas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hazards Tephra/Ash Lava Flows Lahars Volcanic Gas Climate Change Pyroclastic Flows Volcanic Landslides Preparedness Volcano Hazard Zones ... Please see our discussion of volcanic gases and climate change for additional information. Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is ...

  12. Ground Penetrating Radar and Magnetic Investigations of Phreatomagmatic Tephra Rings in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Northern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, A. M.; Kruse, S.; Macorps, E.; Charbonnier, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can be a valuable geophysical tool for studying near-surface volcanic stratigraphy in areas where outcrops do not exist. Likewise, high resolution ground-based magnetic surveys have the potential to reveal significant features not exposed at the surface, especially in the case of small-volume basaltic volcanoes. Here we present the results of geophysical studies to investigate the eruptive history of deposits surrounding phreatomagmatic eruption sites, and why some may become magnetized. Magnetic surveys undertaken at basaltic phreatomagmatic sites suggest that some tuff rings carry no discernable magnetic signature, while others reveal slight to significant magnetic anomalies. Material deposited in the tephra ring could become magnetized through Thermal Remanent Magnetization - emplacement of magnetically susceptible material above 560° C. In this case tephra layers would need to be deposited in sufficient thickness to retain high temperatures long enough for the magnetic material to orient itself to the magnetic field. To test this hypothesis we examine GPR data collected at Rattlesnake Maar in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona, and we will collect GPR data at two other tephra rings in the same volcanic field. The first site, Sugarloaf Mountain, is an active quarry with excellent exposures of tephra ring stratigraphy. Although this site is rhyolitic in composition and not suitable for magnetic study, it is an excellent site to determine how well GPR reflectors correlate with actual stratigraphy. The second site, an un-named phreatomagmatic ring nearby, will then be studied by GPR and walking magnetic survey. GPR reflectors will be compared to depositional patterns defined in previous studies and correlated with magnetic survey results to determine if a correlation can be made - little to no magnetization where only thin units are recorded by GPR, and positive magnetization where thick units are recorded.

  13. Seismic data acquisition over San Juan volcanic field, San Juan sag, south-central Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Henkel, R.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The San Juan sag, a foreland basin along the Uncompahgre-Brazos uplift, contains Mesozoic sediments overlain by up to 10,000 ft of Tertiary volcanics. Petroleum exploration beneath thick volcanic cover requires successful acquisition of seismic data; however, experience elsewhere has generally produced only marginal results. Commencing in 1983, Meridian Oil recorded 18 seismic lines comprising 260 mi of conventional and portable data. Noise test were performed at two sites to evaluate seismic response and to determine source and receiver parameters. Vibroseis, shothole, and surface dynamite were examined as sources and gave comparable results. Coherent noise trains with velocities from 4,000 to 8,000 ft/sec and dominant frequencies of 10 to 15 Hz were generated in the Tertiary section. The predominant factor affecting data quality was outcrop lithology. Data recorded over alluvial and other Quaternary deposits tended to be good to fair. Data quality over Tertiary volcanics was variable and highly unit dependent, ranging from fair over andesites and volcaniclastics, poor over ash-flow tuffs, and uniformly very poor over basalts. Seismic source appeared to have only a minor effect on quality. Data processing involved no unusual operations. Velocity filtering was used to suppress near-surface generated coherent noise, Refraction statics were applied to lines with significant elevation or lithologic variations. A successful acquisition program helped to establish the presence of a Mesozoic sedimentary section beneath the volcanics. these data revealed large structural features within the sedimentary section as well as a dramatic angular unconformity at the top of the Cretaceous section.

  14. Modeling of Small Martian Volcanoes: A Changing View of Volcanic Shield and Cone Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimoto, S. E.; Bradley, B. A.; Garvin, J. B.

    2001-05-01

    The small volcanic features on Mars (channels, flows, shields, and cratered cones) are key to understanding eruption styles, rates, and volumes because they are ubiquitous and simple enough to attempt modeling. Several of these small features have been suggested to be geologically recent [1,2,3]. This study measures and models small (3-50 km) volcanic edifices. Recent Mars Global Surveyor data reveal that these small features are more common that we had previously thought from the lower resolution Viking mission data (e.g., [3,4]). Furthermore, there are clear geometric differences in the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data between regions suggesting local and regional eruption styles may vary with latitude. While a few of the pre-MGS construction models predict the martian mid-latitude volcanic shield shapes fairly well, the small explosive volcanic edifice shapes were not well predicted by existing models (see[5]), and there are a host of types-mostly polar-that are not well described by prior modeling. We compare small edifice construction model results for a percolation style model of effusive and mixed effusive and explosive edifices to prior model results for several martian volcanic regions. While mid-latitude edifices match well to predicted cross-section shapes, steeper flank slopes (See [6]; Glaze and Sakimoto, this volume) for the polar edifices suggest that the magma supply rate or the edifice permeability may be higher in the polar regions for some edifices types. However, polar edifice flank slopes do not commonly reach the greater than 10 degree flanks expected from prior explosive edifice models. Additionally, we do not observe shallow flank slope shields in the polar regions. This suggests that simple shield building may be significantly influenced or modified by volatile involvement near the martian poles, while a range of poorly understood explosive activity may be active in both regions. [1] Keszthelyi et al. JGR 105, 15027-15049, 2000. [2

  15. The Cerro Bitiche Andesitic Field: petrological diversity and implications for magmatic evolution of mafic volcanic centers from the northern Puna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maro, Guadalupe; Caffe, Pablo J.

    2016-07-01

    The Cerro Bitiche Andesitic Field (CBAF) is one of the two largest mafic volcanic fields in northern Puna (22-24° S) and is spatially and temporally associated with ignimbrites erupted from some central Andean Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex calderas. The CBAF comprises seven scoria cones and widespread high-K calcalkaline lava flows that cover an area of 200 km2. Although all erupted rocks have a relatively narrow chemical range (56-62 % SiO2, 3-6 % MgO), there is a broad diversity of mineral compositions and textures. The least evolved lavas (˜58-61 % SiO2) are high-Mg andesites with scarce (<10 %) microphenocrysts of either olivine or orthopyroxene. The small compositional range and low phenocryst content indicate evolution controlled by low percentages (<10 %) of fractional crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene of magmas similar to the least evolved rocks from the field, accompanied by assimilation during rapid ascent through the crust. Evolved andesites (˜62 wt% SiO2), on the other hand, are porphyritic rocks with plagioclase + orthopyroxene + biotite and ubiquitous phenocryst disequilibrium textures. These magmas were likely stored in crustal reservoirs, where they experienced convection caused by mafic magma underplating, magma mixing, and/or assimilation. Trace element and mineral compositions of CBAF lavas provide evidence for complex evolution of distinct magma batches.

  16. Ground Penetrating Radar Field Studies of Planetary Analog Geologic Settings: Impact Ejecta, Volcanics, and Fluvial Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. S.; Grant, J. A.; Carter, L. M.; Garry, W.; Williams, K. K.; Morgan, G. A.; Daubar, I.; Bussey, B.

    2012-12-01

    Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) data from terrestrial analog environments can help constrain models for evolution of the lunar and martian surfaces, aid in interpretation of orbital SAR data, and help predict what might be encountered in the subsurface during future landed scientific or engineering operations. Results and interpretations presented here from impact ejecta (Barringer Meteorite Crater), volcanic deposits (Northern Arizona cinders overlying lavas, columnar-jointed Columbia River flood basalts, Hawaii lava flows), and terrains influenced by fluvial-related activity (channeled scablands megaflood bar, Mauna Kea glacio-fluvial deposits) focus on defining the radar "fingerprint" of geologic materials and settings that may be analogous to those found on the Moon and Mars. The challenge in using GPR in geologic investigations is the degree to which different geologic features and processes can be uniquely identified and distinguished in the data. Our approach to constraining this is to qualitatively and quantitatively characterize GPR signatures of different geological environments and to compare them with "ground-truth" observations of subsurface exposures immediately adjacent or subjacent to our GPR transects. Several sites were chosen in each field area based on accessibility, visual access to the subsurface, and presence of particular geologic features of interest. The interpreted distribution of blocks in impact ejecta at Meteor Crater, using a 400 MHz antenna (wavelength of 75 cm) is 1.5-3 blocks per m^3 in the upper 1 m (and 0.5-1 blocks per m^3 in the upper two meters), which is close to the in situ measured block distribution of 2-3 blocks larger than 0.25-0.30 m per m^3. This is roughly the detection limit to be expected from the λ/3 resolution approximation of radar wavelength and indicates that the 400 MHz GPR is characterizing the block population in ejecta. While megaflood bar deposits are also reflector-rich, individual reflectors are in

  17. Fracture development within a stratovolcano: The Karaha-Telaga Bodas geothermal field, Java volcanic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemcok, M.; Moore, J.N.; Allis, R.; McCulloch, J.

    2004-01-01

    Karaha-Telaga Bodas, a vapour-dominated geothermal system located in an active volcano in western Java, is penetrated by more than two dozen deep geothermal wells reaching depths of 3 km. Detailed paragenetic and fluid-inclusion studies from over 1000 natural fractures define the liquid-dominated, transitional and vapour-dominated stages in the evolution of this system. The liquid-dominated stage was initiated by ashallow magma intrusion into the base of the volcanic cone. Lava and pyroclastic flows capped a geothermal system. The uppermost andesite flows were only weakly fractured due to the insulating effect of the intervening altered pyroclastics, which absorbed the deformation. Shear and tensile fractures that developed were filled with carbonates at shallow depths, and by quartz, epidote and actinolite at depths and temperatures over 1 km and 300??C. The system underwent numerous cycles of overpressuring, documented by subhorizontal tensile fractures, anastomosing tensile fracture patterns and implosion breccias. The development of the liquidsystem was interrupted by a catastrophic drop in fluid pressures. As the fluids boiled in response to this pressure drop, chalcedony and quartz were selectively deposited in fractures that had the largest apertures and steep dips. The orientations of these fractures indicate that the escaping overpressured fluids used the shortest possible paths to the surface. Vapour-dominated conditions were initiated at this time within a vertical chimney overlying the still hot intrusion. As pressures declined, these conditions spread outward to form the marginal vapour-dominated region encountered in the drill holes. Downward migration of the chimney, accompanied by growth of the marginal vapour-dominated regime, occurred as the intrusion cooled and the brittle-ductile transition migrated to greater depths. As the liquids boiled off, condensate that formed at the top of the vapour-dominated zone percolated downward and low

  18. Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Stevens, J.L.; Luu, L.; Combs, J.

    1996-11-01

    The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses, and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. The work accomplished during Year 1 of this ongoing program is described in the present report. A brief overview of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is given. The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature, and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures. Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter. Finally, plans for future work are outlined.

  19. Revealing the eruptive dynamics of post-glacial effusive volcanism in the western part of Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field: Insights into a complex magmatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cáceres, F.; Castruccio, A.; Parada, M. Á.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we analyzed six Quaternary lava flows and one lava dome from Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, in the Chilean Andes, in order to create a volcano-petrological eruptive model to get ideas about pre- and syn-eruptive stages, the main factors that control the broad distribution of vents and the architecture of magma reservoir. We estimated eruptive parameters such as effusion rates and erupted volumes, extrinsic and intrinsic lava flows emplacement controlling factors, magma ascent rates and pre-eruptive thermodynamics conditions to determine different stages in magma evolution from magma reservoir to emplacement of lava at surface. The analyzed lavas have andesitic-to-rhyolitic compositions, blocky morphology with volumes about a few cubic kilometers, thicknesses up to 140 m, maximum widths of 5 km and maximum lengths of 10 km. Modeling of the advance of these flows gives effusion rates of 10-1-102 m3s-1 and eruptions of a few months to years. Petrologic studies which include quantitative textural analyses and mineral and glass compositions, reveal similar provenance and crystalizing temperatures of similar minerals, coupled with similar pressures, H2O content and oxygen fugacity by similar lava composition, meanwhile individual chamber size estimations show an overlap sharing volume in near chambers indicating the equivalent provenance. Our main results about dynamics of lava flows suggest a crustal yield strength control in the emplacement over the internal viscosity of the flow for each lava. On the other hand, non-rhyolitic units appear to come from chambers located in similar depths and with coinciding volumes which indicate that the eruptions were triggered by the injection of different magma batches into a crystal-rich magma reservoir that could be divided into many sub-compartments which could explain the broad distribution of the vents. In addition, rhyolitic units also show similar thermodynamics conditions and coming from equivalent chambers.

  20. Monogenetic volcanoes fed by interconnected dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muirhead, James D.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Although monogenetic volcanic fields pose hazards to major cities worldwide, their shallow magma feeders (<500 m depth) are rarely exposed and, therefore, poorly understood. Here, we investigate exposures of dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Arizona, to shed light on the nature of its magma feeder system. Shallow exposures reveal a transition zone between intrusion and eruption within 350 m of the syn-eruptive surface. Using a combination of field- and satellite-based observations, we have identified three types of shallow magma systems: (1) dike-dominated, (2) sill-dominated, and (3) interconnected dike-sill networks. Analysis of vent alignments using the pyroclastic massifs and other eruptive centers (e.g., maar-diatremes) shows a NW-SE trend, parallel to that of dikes in the region. We therefore infer that dikes fed many of the eruptions. Dikes are also observed in places transforming to transgressive (ramping) sills. Estimates of the observable volume of dikes (maximum volume of 1.90 × 106 m3) and sills (minimum volume of 8.47 × 105 m3) in this study reveal that sills at Hopi Buttes make up at least 30 % of the shallow intruded volume (∼2.75 × 106 m3 total) within 350 m of the paeosurface. We have also identified saucer-shaped sills, which are not traditionally associated with monogenetic volcanic fields. Our study demonstrates that shallow feeders in monogenetic fields can form geometrically complex networks, particularly those intruding poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. We conclude that the Hopi Buttes eruptions were primarily fed by NW-SE-striking dikes. However, saucer-shaped sills also played an important role in modulating eruptions by transporting magma toward and away from eruptive conduits. Sill development could have been accompanied by surface uplifts on the order of decimeters. We infer that the characteristic feeder systems described here for the Hopi Buttes may underlie monogenetic fields elsewhere

  1. Monogenetic volcanoes fed by interconnected dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muirhead, James D.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-02-01

    Although monogenetic volcanic fields pose hazards to major cities worldwide, their shallow magma feeders (<500 m depth) are rarely exposed and, therefore, poorly understood. Here, we investigate exposures of dikes and sills in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Arizona, to shed light on the nature of its magma feeder system. Shallow exposures reveal a transition zone between intrusion and eruption within 350 m of the syn-eruptive surface. Using a combination of field- and satellite-based observations, we have identified three types of shallow magma systems: (1) dike-dominated, (2) sill-dominated, and (3) interconnected dike-sill networks. Analysis of vent alignments using the pyroclastic massifs and other eruptive centers (e.g., maar-diatremes) shows a NW-SE trend, parallel to that of dikes in the region. We therefore infer that dikes fed many of the eruptions. Dikes are also observed in places transforming to transgressive (ramping) sills. Estimates of the observable volume of dikes (maximum volume of 1.90 × 106 m3) and sills (minimum volume of 8.47 × 105 m3) in this study reveal that sills at Hopi Buttes make up at least 30 % of the shallow intruded volume (˜2.75 × 106 m3 total) within 350 m of the paeosurface. We have also identified saucer-shaped sills, which are not traditionally associated with monogenetic volcanic fields. Our study demonstrates that shallow feeders in monogenetic fields can form geometrically complex networks, particularly those intruding poorly consolidated sedimentary rocks. We conclude that the Hopi Buttes eruptions were primarily fed by NW-SE-striking dikes. However, saucer-shaped sills also played an important role in modulating eruptions by transporting magma toward and away from eruptive conduits. Sill development could have been accompanied by surface uplifts on the order of decimeters. We infer that the characteristic feeder systems described here for the Hopi Buttes may underlie monogenetic fields elsewhere, particularly where

  2. Petrology and Geochemistry of Hydrothermally Altered Volcanic Rocks in the Iheya North Hydrothermal Field, Middle Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Iheya North hydrothermal field is located in the middle Okinawa Trough, a young and actively spreading back-arc basin extending behind the Ryukyu arc-trench system in the southeastern margin of the East China Sea. In this hydrothermal field, two scientific drilling expeditions (IODP Exp 331 and SIP CK14-04) were conducted using a deep-sea drilling vessel "Chikyu," and samples from a total of 27 holes were taken. Through these expeditions, Kuroko-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits (VMS), hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks, and pumiceous and pelagic sediments were recovered. The recovered core provided important information about the relationship between hydrothermal activity, alteration, and ore mineralization. Whole-rock major element composition and trace element (TE) patterns of pumices were very similar to those of rhyolites in the middle Okinawa Trough (RMO). However, pumices were relatively enriched in chalcophile elements Sr and Nb, which suggest incipient mineralization. Volcanic rock generally demonstrated strong silicification and was greenish pale gray in color. Regardless of severe alteration, some rock displayed major element composition broadly similar to the RMO. Alteration was evidenced by an increase in the content of SiO2 and MgO, and decrease in Al2O3, Na2O, and K2O content. The most striking geochemical feature of altered volcanic rock was the discordance between texture and the degree of modification of TEs. Some samples showed decussate texture occupied by petal-like quartz with severe silicification, but no prominent disturbance of concentration and patterns of TEs were observed. In contrast, samples with well-preserved igneous porphyritic texture showed very low TE content and modification of TE patterns. These results suggest that the modification of texture and composition of TEs, as well as silicification, do not occur by a uniform process, but several processes. This may reflect the differences in temperature and the

  3. High Field Strength Elements Reflect Segmentation of the Central American Volcanic Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolge, L. L.; Carr, M. J.; Feigenson, M. D.; Lindsay, F. N.; Milidakis, K.

    2006-12-01

    The Central American volcanic front is divided into several discrete segments defined by right steps and changes in the strike of the volcanic front. The HFSE ratio, Zr/Nb, provides the first geochemical signature that regularly reflects this segmentation. From El Salvador to Costa Rica there are five volcanic segments: El Salvador, western Nicaragua, eastern Nicaragua, western Costa Rica and central Costa Rica. The two Costa Rican segments are separated by a volcanic gap, whereas all the other segments are separated by right steps in the volcanic front. At each segment boundary defined by a right step, there is a sharp increase in Zr/Nb, such that the volcanoes to the SE, which step closer to the trench, have much higher Zr/Nb. Furthermore, within each segment, Zr/Nb steadily decreases from the northwest to the southeast. A sawtooth pattern is generated by the sharp increases followed by gradual declines. The Zr/Nb sawtooth pattern along the arc (sensu lato) is very similar to the sawtooth pattern of slab depths for each volcanic center calculated by Syracuse and Abers (2006). The depth to the slab steadily increases moving northwest to southeast along each segment of the arc. Furthermore, at each segment boundary that is defined by a right step there is a sharp decrease in slab depth to the SE accompanying the sharp increase in Zr/Nb. As the depth to the slab increases, Zr/Nb decreases. The decrease in this ratio primarily reflects an increase of Nb. In Central America there are several examples of different magma types erupting from the same vent. Therefore the range of Zr/Nb may reflect mixing of a highly Nb depleted magma of shallow origin with magmas of deeper origin that lack Nb depletion. This decrease in Nb retention with increasing depth may also be the result of varying mineral instabilities with increasing depth and pressure. It may also result from a longer route of the rising melt through the mantle wedge allowing different amounts of Nb to be removed

  4. Reverse Faulting as a Crucial Mechanism for Magma Ascent in Compressional Volcanic Arcs: Field Examples from the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, F. A.; Gonzalez, G.; Cembrano, J. M.; Veloso, E. E.

    2010-12-01

    The nature of crustal deformation in active arcs and the feedback mechanisms between tectonics and magma transport constitute fundamental problems in the understanding of volcanic systems. Additionally, for geothermal energy exploration, a better understanding of how crustal architecture and stress field controls fluid ascent and heat transfer from deep levels to the surface is crucial. The Central Andes volcanic belt is an excellent, modern example of such systems but, the scarcity of good outcrops has limited our ability to define the relations between structure and volcanism. In the Salar de Atacama Basin of northern Chile, there are good exposures of folded and faulted Neogene units (continental sediments, volcanic rocks and ignimbrites) and reverse faults spatially and temporally related to volcanic edifices. The subsurface of the study area has been interpreted by previous authors as a thin-skinned, 6-8 km-deep, east-vergent compressional belt. We carried out structural mapping, Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) analyses, strain tensor analyses and fault-related fold kinematic modelling to assess the causal relationship between compressional deformation and magmatism in this region. Field observations indicate that the structures deformed progressively Oligocene-Miocene continental sedimentary units, the upper sedimentary infill of the Salar de Atacama basin (Pliocene-Present), and Pliocene-Pleistocene Ignimbrites. The topographic expression of the compressional belt corresponds to a set of subparallel, asymmetric, fault-related-folds, which can be seen in the field as prominent NS-trending ridges with heights ranging between 50 and 400 m. Furthermore, we found evidence of a ~100 km-long structure along the active magmatic arc, so-called Miscanti Fault. This fault represents the easternmost expression of the above mentioned compressional belt. Pleistocene-Holocene monogenetic cones and strato-volcanoes are located either at the hinge zone of fault

  5. Stratigraphy, geochronology and evolution of the Mt. Melbourne volcanic field (North Victoria Land, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Guido; Lucci, Federico; Phillips, David; Cozzupoli, Domenico; Runci, Valentina

    2012-11-01

    Mt. Melbourne (2,732 m a.s.l.) is a large quiescent stratovolcano located in Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) and is one of a handful of volcanoes on the Antarctic plate with the potential for large-scale explosive eruptions. During the XVIII Italian Expedition in 2002-2003, the Mt. Melbourne volcanic succession was studied in terms of stratigraphy and sampled for 40Ar/39Ar age determinations and geochemistry. The early, Lower Pleistocene, volcanism was largely alkali basaltic to hawaiitic in composition and monogenetic in style, producing tens of small scoria cones and lava flows scattered over a wide area across the Transantarctic Mountains (Random Hills Period). During the Middle Pleistocene, volcanic activity focused to the area of the Mt. Melbourne stratovolcano, where several monogenetic centres show the transition from early sub-glacial/subaqueous conditions to emergent subaerial conditions (Shield Nunatak Period). The oldest exposed deposit associated with the early activity of the Mt. Melbourne stratovolcano (Mt. Melbourne Period) is a trachytic subaerial ignimbrite dated at 123.6 ± 6.0 ka, which reflects the establishment of a crustal magma chamber. Above the ignimbrite a succession of alkali basaltic, hawaiitic, and subordinate benmoreitic lavas and scoria cones is exposed, dated at 90.7 ± 19.0 ka. The Holocene deposits are exposed at the top of Mt. Melbourne, where the crater rim is composed of trachytic to rhyolitic pumice fall deposits, which are also extensively dispersed around the volcano, likely originated from Plinian-scale eruptions. The most recent explosive deposit proved difficult to date accurately because very low quantities of radiogenic 40Ar were released, resulting in imprecise plateau ages of 50 ± 70 and 35 ± 22 ka.

  6. Determining volcanic SO2 plume heights in satellite observations using meteorological wind fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keicher, Viktoria; Hörmann, Christoph; Sihler, Holger; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Satellite observations nowadays provide the global monitoring of volcanic plumes via sulphur dioxide (SO2) that is injected into the Earth's atmosphere. In turn, SO2 may lead to the formation of sulphate aerosols that can influence climate via direct and indirect radiative effects. The retrieval of SO2 requires an accurate plume height estimate in order to constrain total amounts for such events. One of the main difficulties for the retrieval is the typically unknown atmospheric profile resulting from unknown initial conditions (individual explosions over an extended time period leading to different gas layer altitudes and influencing the atmospheric transport pattern). In recent years, satellite observations helped to improve global SO2 estimates, but still large uncertainties exist. Passive satellite remote sensing using measurements in the UV/vis spectral range for example offers the opportunity to observe the location of a plume in two dimensions, but information about the corresponding height is sparse. Furthermore, information about these plume profiles is not only interesting in itself (e.g. to assess the radiative effect of volcanic plumes). It is also important for the quantitative interpretation of satellite observations. Here, we present first results for a newly developed approach using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT) in combination with data for different volcanic SO2 plumes as observed by the second generation Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument (GOME-2). The main plume information that can be retrieved by the satellite (i.e. plume location and observation time) are used as initial input parameters in order to estimate the plume's profile at the time of the measurements. For selected case studies we use these trajectories to further estimate values the eruption time and height. The correspondingly modelled values can also be used to verify the results when they are compared to direct local observations and

  7. Recent eruptive episodes of the Rungwe volcanic field (Tanzania) recorded in lacustrine sediments of the Northern malawi rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T. M.; Henney, P. J.; Owen, R. B.

    1993-07-01

    Discrete ash horizons in Holocene sediments from northern Lake Malawi provide evidence of six eruptive episodes within the nearby Rungwe Volcanic Field between c.9000-360 BP. Rare earth element (REE) analyses show the ash layers to be strongly enriched in La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb, Dy, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu, with low Eu/Eu∗ and high La N/Sm N values, relative to the surrounding muds. Mixing calculations suggest possible affinities between the Rungwe ash emissions and silicic volcanics from other important Quaternary centres (e.g. Naivasha) with respect to HREE geochemistry. The LREE spectra are less comparable and may indicate a less fractionated ash assemblage for Rungwe Field. In the absence of clear in situ evidence regarding the timing and frequency of Holocene eruptions at Rungwe, the Lake Malawi sediments may prove a valuable reconstructive tool. However, the direction and extent of ash dispersal is strongly controlled by wind/climatic factors and the retention of a complete record at any single location is unlikely.

  8. Distribution and Stratigraphy of Basaltic Lavas in the Southwest Portion of the Quaternary Big Pine Volcanic Field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolford, J.; Vazquez, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Pleistocene Big Pine Volcanic Field (BPVF), located in the Owens Valley of eastern California, is dominated by basaltic cinder cones and lavas, and poses a potential volcanic hazard to local infrastructure, in particular Highway 395 and the Los Angeles Aqueduct. However, despite numerous petrologic studies, the volcanic history and distribution of products from individual BPVF eruptions are poorly known. Using detailed field mapping and petrology, we have determined the distribution and stratigraphy of basaltic lavas in the southwest portion of the BPVF, which contains the largest number exposed vents and lava. In the Aberdeen area, individual cinder cones and fissure vents are aligned along N-S trending lineaments, with local clustering of vents and lavas. Approximately 19 cones, and at least 14 lava flows occur in the area. Two cinder cones located near the valley floor are partly buried by younger lavas and alluvium. In most cases, lavas are aa in character and traveled ca. 7 km down alluvial fans (8% gradient) towards the Owens River. On average, individual lavas cover ca. 10-12 km2, with average individual volumes of ca. 0.065 km3. Two general groups of basaltic lavas characterize the Aberdeen area: 1) xenocryst-rich and 2) xenolith-poor basalts. Xenolith-rich basalts contain variable amounts of ultramafic, mafic, granitic, and metamorphic lithologies, whereas xenolith-poor lavas are dominated by olivine phenocrysts. Overlapping flow margins define relative ages between adjacent basalts. In both north and south portions of the Aberdeen area, flows composing the base of the volcanic stratigraphy are the xenolith-rich variety, and are typically overlain by xenolith-poor flows. In general, these younger xenolith-poor lavas are approximately 25% larger in volume than the older xenolith-rich lavas. Several vents record changes in lava type during individual eruptions, suggesting transitions in magma discharge rate. At one vent cluster, pahoehoe is restricted to

  9. Crustal deformation and magmatic processes at Laguna del Maule volcanic field (Chile): Geodetic measurements and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mével, Hélène

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field in Chile is an exceptional example of postglacial rhyolitic volcanism in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes. Since 2007, LdM has experienced an unrest episode characterized by high rates of deformation measured by interferometric analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired between 2007 and 2016, and data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) recorded since 2012 at five stations. The inflating region includes most of the 16--km-by--14--km ring of rhyolitic domes and coulees. The fastest-moving GPS station (MAU2) has a velocity vector of [[special character omited]72 +/- 4, 19 +/- 1, 194 +/- 3] mm/yr between 2012 and 2016 for the eastward, northward, and upward components, respectively. First, we model the InSAR observations assuming a rectangular dislocation in a half space with uniform elastic properties. The best time function for modeling the InSAR data set is a double exponential model with rates increasing from 2007 through 2010 and decreasing slowly since 2011. Modeling of historical uplift at Yellowstone, Long Valley, and Three Sisters volcanic fields suggests a common temporal evolution of vertical displacement rates. We hypothesize that magma intruding into an existing silicic magma reservoir is driving the surface deformation and present a new dynamic model to describe this process. A Newtonian fluid characterized by its viscosity, density, and pressure flows through a vertical conduit, intruding into a reservoir embedded in an elastic domain and leading to time-dependent surface deformation. Using a grid-search optimization, we minimize the misfit to the InSAR displacement data by varying the three parameters governing the analytical solution: the characteristic timescale tauP for magma propagation, the injection pressure, and the inflection time when the acceleration switches from positive to negative. For a spheroid with semi-major axis a = 6200 m, semi-minor axis c = 100 m, located at a

  10. Carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of core catcher samples from the ICDP deep drilling at Laguna Potrok Aike (Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luecke, Andreas; Wissel, Holger; Mayr*, Christoph; Oehlerich, Markus; Ohlendorf, Christian; Zolitschka, Bernd; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    The ICDP project PASADO aims to develop a detailed paleoclimatic record for the southern part of the South American continent from sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike (51°58'S, 70°23'W), situated in the Patagonian steppe east of the Andean cordillera and north of the Street of Magellan. The precursor project SALSA recovered the Holocene and Late Glacial sediment infill of Laguna Potrok Aike and developed the environmental history of the semi-arid Patagonian steppe by a consequent interdisciplinary multi-proxy approach (e.g. Haberzettl et al., 2007). From September to November 2008 the ICDP deep drilling took place and successfully recovered in total 510 m of sediments from two sites resulting in a composite depth of 106 m for the selected main study Site 2. A preliminary age model places the record within the last 50.000 years. During the drilling campaign, the core catcher content of each drilled core run (3 m) was taken as separate sample to be shared and distributed between involved laboratories long before the main sampling party. A total of 70 core catcher samples describe the sediments of Site 2 and will form the base for more detailed investigations on the palaeoclimatic history of Patagonia. We here report on the organic carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of bulk sediment and plant debris of the core catcher samples. Similar investigations were performed for Holocene and Late Glacial sediments of Laguna Potrok Aike revealing insights into the organic matter dynamics of the lake and its catchment as well as into climatically induced hydrological variations with related lake level fluctuations (Mayr et al., 2009). The carbon and nitrogen content of the core catcher fine sediment fraction (<200 µm) is low to very low (around 1 % and 0.1 %, respectively) and requires particular attention in isotope analysis. The carbon isotope composition shows comparably little variation around a value of -26.0 per mil. The positive values of the Holocene and the Late

  11. Geothermal test hints at oil potential in eastern Arizona volcanic field

    SciTech Connect

    Rauzi, S.L. )

    1993-01-03

    A recently drilled geothermal well, funded by the US Department of Energy and the Arizona Department of Commerce, has provided information about the geology of east-central Arizona and west-central New Mexico. Tonto Drilling Services in cooperation with New Mexico State University completed the well, the 1 Alpine-Federal, at a total depth of 4,505 ft. The well is located among volcanic rocks in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest about 6 miles north of the town of Alpine and 6.2 miles west of the Arizona-New Mexico line. The well was drilled to determine the hot dry rock geothermal potential of Precambrian rocks. The operator expected to penetrate Precambrian at about 4,200 ft, but the hole was still in Permian rocks at that depth and was in a mafic dike that intruded the Permian rocks at the total depth of 4,505 ft. The hole did show that Cretaceous and Permian strata contain potentially important source rocks for oil and gas that are apparently unaffected by nearby volcanism. These potential oil source rocks are the focus of this article.

  12. Petrologic evolution of divergent peralkaline magmas from the Silent Canyon caldera complex, southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sawyer, D.A.; Sargent, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Silent Canyon volcanic center consists of a buried Miocene peralkaline caldera complex and outlying peralkaline lava domes. Two widespread ash flow sheets, the Tub Spring and overlying Grouse Canyon members of the Miocene Belted Range Tuff, were erupted from the caldera complex and have volumes of 60-100 km3 and 200 km3, respectively. Eruption of the ash flows was preceded by widespread extrusion of precaldera comendite domes and was followed by extrusion of postcollapse peralkaline lavas and tuffs within and outside the caldera complex. Lava flows and tuffs were also deposited between the two major ash flow sheets. Rocks of the Silent Canyon center vary significantly in silica content and peralkalinity. Weakly peralkaline silicic comendites (PI 1.0-1.1) are the most abundant precaldera lavas. Postcollapse lavas range from trachyte to silicic comendite; some have anomalous light rare earth element (LREE) enrichments. Silent Canyon rocks follow a common petrologic evolution from trachyte to low-silica comendite; above 73% SiO2, compositions of the moderately peralkaline comendites diverge from those of the weakly peralkaline silicic comendites. The development of divergent peralkaline magmas, toward both pantelleritic and weakly peralkaline compositions, is unusual in a single volcanic center. -from Authors

  13. Stratigraphy, geochronology and evolution of the Mt. Melbourne volcanic field (North Victoria Land, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Guido; Lucci, Federico

    2016-04-01

    Mt. Melbourne (2,732 ma.s.l.) is a large quiescent stratovolcano located in Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) and is one of a handful of volcanoes on the Antarctic plate with the potential for large-scale explosive eruptions. The early, Lower Pleistocene, volcanism was largely alkali basaltic to hawaiitic in composition and monogenetic in style, producing tens of small scoria cones and lava flows scattered over a wide area across the Transantarctic Mountains (Random Hills Period). During the Middle Pleistocene, volcanic activity focused to the area of the Mt. Melbourne stratovolcano, where several monogenetic centres show the transition from early subglacial/ subaqueous conditions to emergent subaerial conditions (Shield Nunatak Period). The oldest exposed deposit associated with the early activity of the Mt. Melbourne stratovolcano (Mt. Melbourne Period) is a trachytic subaerial ignimbrite dated at 123.6±6.0 ka, which reflects the establishment of a crustal magma chamber. Above the ignimbrite a succession of alkali basaltic, hawaiitic, and subordinate benmoreitic lavas and scoria cones is exposed, dated at 90.7±19.0 ka. The most recent deposits are exposed at the top of Mt. Melbourne, where the crater rim is composed of trachytic to rhyolitic pumice fall deposits, which are also extensively dispersed around the volcano, originated from Plinian-scale eruptions. The most recent explosive deposit proved difficult to date accurately because very low quantities of radiogenic 40Ar were released, resulting in imprecise plateau ages of 50±70 and 35±22 ka.

  14. Coupling observable data to the spatio-temporal properties of natural hazards, An application to the volcanic field of Harrat Rahat, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, M.; Bebbington, M. S.; Cronin, S. J.; Lindsay, J. M.; Moufti, R.

    2013-12-01

    The volcanic field of Harrat Rahat in Saudi Arabia is a highly complex volcanic system with 950+ volcanic cones or craters distributed over 20,000 km2 and with evidence of volcanic activity spanning from 10 Ma to present with two historical eruptions in 641 AD and 1256 AD. This record, the proximity of Harrat Rahat to the city of Al-Madinah, and a possible stalled eruption in 1999 AD, drives a need to quantify the likelihood and magnitude of future eruptions. For volcanic fields, as is common for the majority of natural hazards, we cannot yet directly observe the underlying geophysical processes, nor do we understand them sufficiently to create reliable, predictive models. However, technological advancements and novel monitoring techniques facilitate the collection of a vast range of data types from satellite based to subsurface measurements for a region of interest. Observable data for Harrat Rahat include: vent locations, volumes and spatial distributions of past eruptive products, aeromagnetic and seismic interpretations of sub-surface structure, and regional tectonic models. We present here a bootstrap method whereby observed data values at the locations and times of an eruption are compared to values sampled at random points in space-time. This allows direct determination of the relationship (if any) between each observable data set and the spatio-temporal recurrence rates of volcanism in Harrat Rahat.

  15. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and geochemical reconnaissance of the Eocene Lowland Creek volcanic field, west-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dudas, F.O.; Ispolatov, V.O.; Harlan, S.S.; Snee, L.W.

    2010-01-01

    We report geochronological and geochemical data for the calc-alkalic Lowland Creek volcanic field (LCVF) in westcentral Montana. 40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations show that the LCVF was active from 52.9 to 48.6 Ma, with tuff-forming eruptions at 52.9 ?? 0.14 and 51.8 ?? 0.14 Ma. These dates span the age range of vigorous Eocene igneous activity in the Kamloops-Absaroka-Challis belt. The LCVF evolved upward from basal rhyolites (SiO 2>71 wt%) to dacites and andesites (SiO 2 > 62 wt%). Compositional change parallels a transition from early explosive volcanism to late effusive activity. Four geochemical components can be detected in the rocks. A component with 206Pb/204Pb < 16.5 and epsilon;Nd near-15 is predominant in anhydrous, two-pyroxene dacites; hydrous rhyolites, rhyodacites, and dacites with epsilon;Nd below-10 are dominated by a second component; hydrous rocks with 206Pb/ 204Pb > 18.3 and epsilon;Nd>-9 contain a third component; and an andesite with low Nd content and epsilon;Nd near-9 probably contains a fourth component. The first three components probably derive from the lower and middle crust, whereas the fourth is probably from the lithospheric mantle. ?? 2010 by The University of Chicago.

  16. Plio-Pleistocene paleomagnetic secular variation and time-averaged field: Ruiz-Tolima volcanic chain, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Duque, A.; Mejia, V.; Opdyke, N. D.; Huang, K.; Rosales-Rivera, A.

    2016-02-01

    Paleomagnetic results obtained from 47 Plio-Pleistocene volcanic flows from the Ruiz-Tolima Volcanic Chain (Colombia) are presented. The mean direction of magnetization among these flows, which comprise normal (n = 43) and reversed (n = 4) polarities, is Dec = 1.8°, Inc = 3.2°, α95 = 5.0°, and κ = 18.4. This direction of magnetization coincides with GAD plus a small persistent axial quadrupolar component (around 5%) at the site-average latitude (4.93°). This agreement is robust after applying several selection criteria (α95 < 10º α95 < 5.5º polarities: normal, reversed, and tentatively transitional). The data are in agreement with Model G proposed by McElhinny and McFadden (1997) and the fit is improved when sites tentatively identified as transitional (two that otherwise have normal polarity) are excluded from the calculations. Compliance observed with the above mentioned time-averaged field and paleosecular variation models, is also observed for many recent similar studies from low latitudes, with the exception of results from Galapagos Islands that coincide with GAD and tend to be near sided.

  17. Prehistoric Agriculture and Soil Fertility on Lava Flows in Northern Arizona, USA: Results from the San Francisco Volcanic Field REU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadman, E.; Anderson, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    The San Francisco Volcanic Field in northern Arizona is home to ~600 cinder cones, the youngest of which is Sunset Crater (erupted ~AD 1100). This study documents trends in available phosphate and nitrate content with time, testing whether lowered soil pH from the addition of Sunset cinders increased soil fertility and became a factor in Anasazi agricultural success. Soil fertility is examined both before and after Sunset's eruption in soils of different ages that have developed from eolian deposition on top of lava flows. An increase in phosphate and nitrate levels following acidification would suggest that the presence of Sunset cinders brought the soils to the optimal pH for mobilization of these nutrients. The combined effects of the cinder layer retaining nutrients and water, wetter climates, and increases in phosphate and nitrate (both limiting nutrients for plant growth), would have contributed to Anasazi agricultural success after Sunset's eruption. Samples for this study were taken from eolian-derived soils of different ages atop lava flows in the San Francisco Volcanic Field. OSL data from these soils on Strawberry and SP Craters' lava flows yielded age estimates of ~12.3 ka (Strawberry) and ~32.7 ka (SP), on which a soil chronosequence was based. Results from the chronosequence supported these OSL ages, indicating that soils on the SP flow are older than those on the Strawberry flow. Field descriptions, Harden Development Indices, particle size analysis, and nutrient content analysis were used for this aspect of the project. An experimental acid wash method will be used to simulate the addition of Sunset's acidic cinders, and will yield data for phosphate and nitrate content after Sunset erupted. Preliminary results indicate that phosphate and nitrate accumulate in upper, eolian-derived horizons (Av, Bw) and in more deeply buried carbonate horizons (Bk). Higher concentrations of phosphate and nitrate were found in older (SP) soils than younger

  18. Hydrothermal uranium deposits containing molybdenum and fluorite in the Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, C.G.; Rasmussen, J.D.; Steven, T.A.; Rye, R.O.; Rowley, P.D.; Romberger, S.B.; Selverstone, J.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium deposits containing molybdenum and fluorite occur in the Central Mining Area, near Marysvale, Utah, and formed in an epithermal vein system that is part of a volcanic/hypabyssal complex. They represent a known, but uncommon, type of deposit; relative to other commonly described volcanic-related uranium deposits, they are young, well-exposed and well-documented. Hydrothermal uranium-bearing quartz and fluorite veins are exposed over a 300 m vertical range in the mines. Molybdenum, as jordisite (amorphous MoS2, together with fluorite and pyrite, increase with depth, and uranium decreases with depth. The veins cut 23-Ma quartz monzonite, 20-Ma granite, and 19-Ma rhyolite ash-flow tuff. The veins formed at 19-18 Ma in a 1 km2 area, above a cupola of a composite, recurrent, magma chamber at least 24 ?? 5 km across that fed a sequence of 21- to 14-Ma hypabyssal granitic stocks, rhyolite lava flows, ash-flow tuffs, and volcanic domes. Formation of the Central Mining Area began when the intrusion of a rhyolite stock, and related molybdenite-bearing, uranium-rich, glassy rhyolite dikes, lifted the fractured roof above the stock. A breccia pipe formed and relieved magmatic pressures, and as blocks of the fractured roof began to settle back in place, flat-lying, concave-downward, 'pull-apart' fractures were formed. Uranium-bearing, quartz and fluorite veins were deposited by a shallow hydrothermal system in the disarticulated carapace. The veins, which filled open spaces along the high-angle fault zones and flat-lying fractures, were deposited within 115 m of the ground surface above the concealed rhyolite stock. Hydrothermal fluids with temperatures near 200??C, ??18OH2O ~ -1.5, ?? -1.5, ??DH2O ~ -130, log fO2 about -47 to -50, and pH about 6 to 7, permeated the fractured rocks; these fluids were rich in fluorine, molybdenum, potassium, and hydrogen sulfide, and contained uranium as fluoride complexes. The hydrothermal fluids reacted with the wallrock resulting in

  19. Oligocene caldera complex and calc-alkaline tuffs and lavas of the Indian Peak volcanic field, Nevada and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Best, M.G.; Christiansen, E.H.; Blank, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Indian Peak volcanic field is representative of the more than 50 000 km3 of ashflow tuff and tens of calderas in the Great Basin that formed during the Oligocene-early Miocene "ignimbrite flareup' in southwestern North America. These dominantly high-K calc-alkaline rocks are a record of the birth, maturation, and death of a large, open, continental magma system that was probably initiated and sustained by influx of mafic magma derived from a southward-migrating locus of magma production in the mantle. Recurrent production of very large batches (some greater than 3000 km3) of quite uniform dacite magmas appears to have required combination of andesite magma and crustal silicic material in vigorously convecting chambers. Compositional data indicate that rhyolites are polygenetic. As the main locus of mantle magma production shifted southward, trachydacite magma could have been produced by fractionation of andesitic magma within the crust. -from Author

  20. Magma Injection Models to Quantify Reservoir Dynamics at Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Chile, between 2007 and 2015.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mével, H.; Gregg, P. M.; Feigl, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Moving beyond the widely used kinematic models for the deformation sources, we present new dynamic models to describe the process of injecting magma into an existing magma reservoir. The 3-dimensional numerical models account for a viscoelastic, gravitationally loaded domain with spatially variable rheological properties. A Newtonian fluid characterized by its viscosity, density, and overpressure (relative to the lithostatic value) intrudes into a viscoelastic solid via a conduit leading to the reservoir. Using the Finite Element Method (FEM), we simultaneously solve the coupled quasi-static elastic and Navier-Stokes governing equations for the solid and the fluid, respectively, using the COMSOL Multiphysics software. The fluid and the solid interact through buoyancy and viscoelastic relaxation, leading to time-dependent deformation. To quantify the "strength" of the source, we define the product of the volume change (in cubic meters) and pressure change (in Pascals) as the "volcanic moment" (in Newton-meters or Joules). This quantity serves as a basis for comparing the calculated displacement fields to analytical solutions. After validating our injection model, we apply it to the ongoing episode of unrest at Laguna del Maule (Chile). Since 2007, the volcanic field there has been deforming at an exceptionally high rate, with vertical velocities up to 200 mm/yr, as measured by GPS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) between 2013 and 2014, as described recently by Le Mével et al. (2015, Geophys. Res. Lett. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/2015GL064665). We are modeling the geodetic data to analyze the temporal and spatial evolution of the displacement. These models constrain the mass flux of material into the reservoir and thus its impact on the stress in the crust. Our results contribute to understanding the current unrest episode at Laguna del Maule and to assessing geodetic signals at other active volcanoes.

  1. Petrology and Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics of five late Cretaceous-early Tertiary volcanic fields in western Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Moll-Stalcup, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical and Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics were studied in an attempt to determine if old continental crust having high /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr (SIR) and low /sup 143/Nd//sup 144/Nd (NIR) underlies the Yukon-Koyukuk province. The Blackburn Hills, Yukon River, and Kanuti fields lie within the Yukon-Koyukuk province and the Sischu and Nowitna fields overlie Paleozoic and Precambrian metamorphic terranes to the southeast. The Nowitna field is chiefly andesite having SIR = 0.7044-0.7051 and NIR = 0.51256-0.51257. The Sischu field is chiefly rhyolite and dacite having high SIR (0.7079-0.7140) and low NIR (0.51246-0.51252), which suggests that old continental crust was involved in their genesis, either by direct partial melting or by large degrees of assimilation. The Blackburn Hills field consists of medium-K basalt, andesite, and rhyolite intruded by a small granodiorite pluton and has SIR = 0.7033-0.7052 and NIR = 0.51253-51290. The Yukon River field is basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite having SIR = 0.70374-0.70511 and NIR = 0.51270-0.51284, and much of its isotopic variation can be modeled by assimilation of seawater-altered oceanic crust during fractionation of basalt. Isotopic compositions of most felsic rocks from the Blackburn Hills field (SIR = 0.7038-0.7041) and dacites from the Kanuti volcanic field (SIR = 0.7043-0.7048) require little or no old continental crust in their genesis, suggesting that ancient crust does not extend beneath this part of the Yukon-Koyukuk province. However, the ultimate source of the shoshonitic lower crust of the Koyukuk terrane (SIR = 0.705, NIR = 0.5125) may be continental mantle, which may have been thrust under this part of the Yukon-Koyukuk province during arc-continent collision in the early Cretaceous.

  2. Seismic activity and stress tensor inversion at Las Tres Vírgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field (México)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antayhua-Vera, Yanet; Lermo-Samaniego, Javier; Quintanar-Robles, Luis; Campos-Enríquez, Oscar

    2015-10-01

    We analyze local earthquakes occurring between 2003 and 2012 at the Las Tres Vírgenes Volcanic and Geothermal Field (TVVGF) to establish their temporal and spatial distribution, and relationships with local and regional fault systems, water injection, acid stimulation and steam production tests. We obtained focal mechanisms and inverted data for the stress tensor to understand the local and regional stress fields. We analyzed 423 local earthquakes with magnitudes between 0.1 and 2.9 Mc and hypocentral depths from 0.2 to 7.4 km b.s.l. The cutoff depth at ~ 7.4 km possibly delineates the brittle-ductile transition zone. We identified seven swarms (from 1 to 7). Swarms 1 (December 2009), 2 (May 2010), 3 (June-July 2010) and 7 (December 2012) are strongly correlated with injection processes; whereas swarms 5 (April 2012) and 6 (September 2012) are correlated with local tectonic faults. Stress inversion showed NW-SE, E-W and NE-SW extensional orientations (Shmin), in agreement with the local tectonic stress field; while NE-SW compressional orientations (SHmax) are correlated with the regional tectonic stress field.

  3. A New Geomagnetic Field Model for the last 2k years based on high quality archaeomagnetic and volcanic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campuzano, Saioa A.; Gómez-Paccard, Miriam; Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Osete, María Luisa

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge of the ancient Earth's magnetic field is crucial to understand its origin and future evolution. In this context, the palaeomagnetic studies provide useful information about the past geomagnetic field registered in rocks, lava flows, sediments or archaeological materials. The continuous upgrade of the palaeomagnetic database during the last decade has allowed the generation of global geomagnetic field models based on different palaeomagnetic data and techniques (such as the SHA.DIF.14K, ARCH3K.1, CALS3K.4b, pfm9k.1a models, among others). Some recent studies have pointed out that the archaeointensity database might not be reliable enough, by observing high scatter in the records. Here, we present a new global geomagnetic model for the last 2000 years, SHAQ2K, based on high quality archaeomagnetic and volcanic intensity data. For this purpose we classify the palaeointensity data in two quality categories following widely accepted palaeomagnetic criteria based on the methodology used during the laboratory treatment of the samples and on the number of specimens finally used to calculate the mean intensities. Respect to the modelling process, we use the spherical harmonic analysis in space and cubic b-splines in time, also applying a spatial and temporal regularization which minimizes the energy of the geomagnetic field at the core-mantle boundary. The implications of the differences between this new model and other previously published global geomagnetic models are discussed.

  4. Extension-related origin of magmas from a garnet-bearing source in the Los Tuxtlas volcanic field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.

    2006-09-01

    The Los Tuxtlas volcanic field (LTVF) of late Miocene to Recent age is a key area to understand the consequences of the current subduction of the Cocos plate beneath the North American plate, as well as the competing effects of the ongoing extension along the Gulf of Mexico coast. Geochemical and radiogenic (Sr, Nd, and Pb) isotope data are used to constrain the origin of these 7 Ma to Recent magmas in this area. The basanitic and alkaline basaltic rocks show highly steep light rare-earth element-enriched patterns implying residual garnet in their mantle source, whereas the evolved alkaline and sub-alkaline rocks have less steep rare-earth element patterns consistent with a contribution from the continental crust. Geochemical and isotope data from the LTVF are compared with those from continental rifts, extension-related areas, continental break-up regions, and island and continental arcs, including the Central American volcanic arc related to the subduction of the same oceanic plate (Cocos plate), as well as with those from the two nearby Mexican provinces [the Eastern Alkaline Province (EAP) and the eastern part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (E-MVB)]. These data for the LTVF primitive rocks are similar to rifts, extension-related areas and continental break-up regions, including the two Mexican provinces, but different from island and continental arcs, including the northern part of the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA). The LTVF rocks show an unusual Th and U enrichment with respect to Ba and Rb, which also renders a distinct negative Nb anomaly (with respect to Th and K) in them. These rocks also show a negative Nb anomaly (with respect to Ba and La) that is similar to numerous rift, extension-related areas, and continental break-up regions, but distinct from all arcs around the world, indicating that the magma genesis processes in the LTVF are similar to those in rifts. The “Sr-shift”, shown to be a typical feature of most, if not all, island and

  5. What is controlling spectral reflectance of lava flows? First results of a field spectrometric survey of volcanic surfaces on Tenerife Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Kervyn, Matthieu; Solana, Carmen; Canters, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Space-based remote sensing techniques have demonstrated their great value in volcanic studies thanks to their synoptic spatial coverage and the repeated acquisitions. On satellite images, volcanic surfaces display a wide range of colors, and therefore contrasted reflectance spectra. Understanding the factors controlling the spectral reflectance of volcanic materials at different wavelength is essential to mapping volcanic areas. Detailed investigation into spectra of volcanic materials are, however, restricted due to the trade-off between spatial and spectral resolution of space-based sensors, such as Hyperion imagery that allows resolving 220 spectral bands ranging from 400 to 2500 nm with a spatial resolution of 30 meters. In order to better understand reflectance of volcanic materials, especially lava, a field campaign was launched in Tenerife Island, Spain in November 2013 with an ASD FieldSpec 3 to document the reflectance spectra of historical mafic lava flow surfaces. 20 specific lava and lapilli surfaces, with contrasted age, surface roughness, weathering condition and vegetation coverage were characterized, using a systematic recording method documenting the spectra's variability within a 15×15 m2 area. Results show that all the volcanic materials have great differences in spectral reflectance. Among them, lava's reflectance is low but still slightly higher than that of lapilli. Comparison of rough and smooth lava surfaces on the same lava flow suggests that roughness tends to increase the reflectance of lava surfaces. Also, vegetation and lichen alter lava's reflectance in some spectral regions, especially through a rise in the near infrared part of the spectrum. It is therefore suggested that reflectance spectra of lava evolve over time due to weathering processes, such as chemical alteration and growth of lichen and moss. In addition, it is possible to compare field measurements with spectra derived from Hyperion imagery, resulting in a strong match

  6. Groundmass Crystallinities of Proximal and Distal Lavas from Cinder Cone, Lassen Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymanski, M. E.; Teasdale, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cinder Cone is located in the northeast corner of Lassen Volcanic Center, approximately 35 km southeast of Old Station, California. The area consists of a cinder cone constructed of loose scoria, lava flows and a 13-16 km diameter ash deposit. According to radiocarbon ages from trees affected by the lava flows and paleomagnetic data, Cinder Cone erupted in about 1650 AD (1). The youngest products of the Cinder Cone eruption are two Fantastic Lava Beds flows which are basaltic andesite and andesite with olivine (1). Samples were collected along the longest flow from Cinder Cone, the Fantastic Lava Beds Flow 2 (4.5 km) at approximately 0.5 km interval. The samples contain olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene phenocrysts in fine grained groundmass with varying vesicularity. Quartz xenocrysts also occur. SEM-Back Scatter Electron images are used to map and quantify groundmass crystallinities along the length of the Fantastic Lava Beds flow 2 and of tephra units. The average area of groundmass plagioclase crystals increases along the length of the lava flow from 94.7 to 292.6 μm2. The number of groundmass plagioclase crystals per area (μm2) decreases from 0.0045 to 0.0018 from proximal to distal samples. Crystals also become blockier in distal samples along the lava flow. The larger number of crystals per area in near vent samples establishes a baseline from which we interpret crystal growth and nucleation to have occurred in the flow channel. Increasing crystal size and a decrease in the number of crystals per area indicates growth dominated nucleation during cooling and crystallization in the flow channel. Relative cooling rates along the length of the flow from proximal to distal samples can be inferred based on groundmass crystallinities, distance travelled and estimates of flow and crystallization rates. (1) Muffler and Clynne, 2015.

  7. Investigating Mantle Sources of Basaltic Melts Using Olivine LA-ICPMS Analysis, Mount Taylor Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, C. M.; Schmidt, M. E.; Thomas, A.; Bryce, J. G.; Fahnestock, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF), New Mexico, is located along the Jemez Lineament, a major crustal feature and a focus of post-Laramide magmatism. The MTVF comprises at least three regions containing contemporaneous (~3.7 to 1.26 Ma) Ne-normative volcanic rocks. The intermediate Mount Taylor (MT) strata-volcano contains early central and flanking mantle xenolith-bearing alkali basalts and hawaiites. The Rio Puerco (RP) volcanic necks contain mantle xenolith-bearing basanites and alkali basalts and no evolved lavas. Mesa Chivato (MC) contains an alkaline mafic to felsic suite with geochemical similarities to RP and MT lavas but no known mantle-xenoliths. The MTVF xenoliths are diverse (e.g., Thomas et al., 2012, AGU Fall Meeting, V43A-2825) and suggest varying degrees of melt enrichment/fertilization. By LA-ICPMS, we are characterizing olivine trace element chemistry from the mantle xenoliths and basaltic (sensu lato) phenocrysts to test how much can be determined about likely source rocks by phenocryst olivine alone. This is part of a continuing project to investigate spatial trends in Laramide mantle melt metasomatism and its relation to post-Laramide magma compositions. We have analyzed samples from a RP neck (lherzolite in alkali basalt); flows from the MT flank (websterite in alkali basalt) and from the MT amphitheater (wehrlite in hawaiite). Additionally, we analyzed olivine phenocrysts from three xenolith-free lavas: a MT basanite and MC alkali basalt and hawaiite. (1) As diverse as the xenoliths are, their olivine clusters together with regards to most trace elements, though the xenoliths can be discriminated from each other by Co abundances alone or in Cr-Al and Cr-Zn space. (2) Phenocrysts from xenolith-bearing alkali basalts cluster with the xenolith olivine, suggesting the melt was in equilibrium with a lithology of a similar trace element budget. (3) Phenocrysts from the xenolith-bearing MT hawaiite and most MC phenocrysts are depleted in

  8. The Geochronology and Geochemistry of Caldera-related Plutons in the Southern Rocky Mountain Volcanic Field: Insight into the Volcanic-plutonic Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerer, M. J.; Mills, R. D.; Tappa, M. J.; McIntosh, W. C.; Coleman, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    Preliminary Ar-Ar and U-Pb results from the Questa (NM) and Mt. Aetna (CO) caldera systems indicate that their caldera-related plutons are not cumulates or residual material from which caldera-collapse ignimbrites differentiated. Rio Grande rift-related faulting and erosion at both locations provide exposures of intracaldera volcanic rocks and subcaldera intrusions, allowing for the comparison of cogenetic volcanic and plutonic rocks. Resurgent plutons at both locations are indistinguishable in age to the associated ignimbrite, however the majority of plutons are either younger or older than the caldera-forming event. The geochemistry of the resurgent plutons and corresponding ignimbrite is similar. These results challenge the common interpretation that melt for ignimbrite eruptions is derived from crystal-mushes, which are then preserved as plutons. The Questa caldera, northern New Mexico, formed during the 25.4 Ma eruption of the peralkaline Amalia Tuff. Peralkaline phases of two resurgent plutons, Virgin Canyon and Canada Pinabete, are geochemically similar to the Amalia Tuff, but these phases have yet to be successfully dated. The metaluminous phase of the Canada Pinabete pluton is indistinguishable in age to the Amalia Tuff, suggesting that the peralkaline phase is also contemporaneous. The remaining seven plutons associated with the Questa caldera were emplaced between 25.2 and 19.4 Ma. Postcaldera plutonism was coeval with volcanism, though these plutons have not been geochemically linked to any postcaldera volcanic rocks. The Mt. Aetna complex consists of the Mt. Princeton batholith and the nested Mt. Aetna caldera. The Mt. Princeton batholith has been inferred to be the less-evolved source of the 37.2 Ma Wall Mountain Tuff. During the eruption of the 34.0 Ma Badger Creek Tuff, the fully crystallized Mt. Princeton batholith was involved in the Mt. Aetna caldera collapse. New Ar-Ar and U-Pb ages indicate the Mt. Princeton batholith is too young to be the

  9. Carbonatite associated with ultramafic diatremes in the Avon Volcanic District, Missouri, USA: Field, petrographic, and geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shavers, Ethan J.; Ghulam, Abduwasit; Encarnacion, John; Bridges, David L.; Luetkemeyer, P. Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Here we report field, petrographic, and geochemical analyses of the southeast Missouri Avon Volcanic District intrusive rocks and present the first combined textural and geochemical evidence for the presence of a primary magmatic carbonatite phase among ultramafic dikes, pipes, and diatremes of olivine melilitite, alnöite, and calciocarbonatite. The δ13CVPDB values measured for primary calciocarbonatite as well as carbonates in olivine melilitite and alnöite rocks range from - 3.8‰ to - 8.2‰, which are within the typical range of mantle values and are distinct from values of the carbonate country rocks, 0.0‰ to - 1.3‰. The carbonate oxygen isotope compositions for the intrusive lithologies are in the range of 21.5‰ to 26.2‰ (VSMOW), consistent with post-emplacement low temperature hydrothermal alteration or kinetic fractionation effects associated with decompression and devolatilization. Metasomatized country rock and breccia-contaminated igneous lithologies have carbonate δ13CVPDB values gradational between primary carbonatite values and country rock values. Unaltered sedimentary dolomite breccia and mafic spheroids entrained by calciocarbonatite and the lack of microstratigraphic crystal growth typical of carbonate replacement, also exclude the possibility of hydrothermal replacement as the cause of the magmatic-textured carbonates. Rare earth element (REE) patterns for the alnöite, olivine melilitite, and carbonatite are similar to each other with strong light REE enrichment and heavy REE depletion relative to MORB. These patterns are distinct from those of country rock rhyolite and sedimentary carbonate. These data suggest that rocks of the Avon Volcanic District represent a single ultramafic-carbonatite intrusive complex possibly derived from a single mantle source.

  10. Depositional environments, diagenesis, and porosity of upper cretaceous volcanic-rich Tokio sandstone reservoirs, Haynesville Field, Clairborne Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.J.

    1995-10-01

    Tokio Formation sandstones produce oil from volcanic-rich to quartzose lithic sandstones in the Haynesville Field. The Tokio interval is approximately 210 feet thick and has been divided into four sandstone zones separated by shales or scoured contacts. In ascending order, the four zones are the RA, S3, S2, and S1. The RA is composed of quartzose sublitharenites inferred to have been deposited in delta front bars and distributary channels. The upper three zones are composed of sublitharenite and feldspathic litharenite to quartzose litharenite. The upper sands are interpreted to have been deposited in littoral environments including storm influenced shelf, tidal flats and channels, and barrier island/strand plain. The diagenesis of these sands is strongly related to composition: greater percentages of cements and secondary porosity occur in lithic-rich sandstones. Diagenetic cements in quartzose sandstones are mainly quartz overgrowths with minor early K-spar overgrowths on plagioclase, early chlorite-rims, and late patchy calcite, pyrite, and rare dolomite and siderite. Diagenesis in lithic-rich sands includes greater amounts of chlorite rim and pore-filling kaolinite cements and less quartz-overgrowth and other cements. The effect of the original mineralogy and diagenetic minerals on wireline logs includes: (1) reduction of SP due to cements, (2) increase in GR response due to K-spar and volcanic detritus, (3) higher resistivity due to carbonate minerals, and (4) increase in irreducible water saturation due to pore-lining and pore-filling clay. Thus, potential reservoir zones with lithic-rich sandstones like the Tokio could be overlooked in many areas around the world.

  11. Surface exposure dating of Holocene basalt flows and cinder cones in the Kula volcanic field (western Turkey) using cosmogenic 3He and 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heineke, Caroline; Niedermann, Samuel; Hetzel, Ralf; Akal, Cüneyt

    2015-04-01

    The Kula volcanic field is the youngest volcanic province in western Anatolia and covers an area of about 600 km2 around the town Kula (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996). Its alkali basalts formed by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle in a region of long-lived continental extension and asthenospheric upwelling (Prelevic et al., 2012). Based on morphological criteria and 40Ar/39Ar dating, four phases of Quaternary activity have been distinguished in the Kula volcanic field (Richardson-Bunbury, 1996; Westaway et al., 2006). The youngest lava flows are thought to be Holocene in age, but so far only one sample from this group was dated by 40Ar/39Ar at 7±2 ka (Westaway et al., 2006). In this study, we analysed cosmogenic 3He in olivine phenocrysts from three basalt flows and one cinder cone to resolve the Holocene history of volcanic eruptions in more detail. In addition, we applied 10Be exposure dating to two quartz-bearing xenoliths found at the surface of one flow and at the top of one cinder cone. The exposure ages fall in the range between ~500 and ~3000 years, demonstrating that the youngest volcanic activity is Late Holocene in age and therefore distinctly younger than previously envisaged. Our results show that the Late Holocene lava flows are not coeval but formed over a period of a few thousand years. We conclude that surface exposure dating of very young volcanic rocks provides a powerful alternative to 40Ar/39Ar dating. References Prelevic, D., Akal, C. Foley, S.F., Romer, R.L., Stracke, A. and van den Bogaard, P. (2012). Ultrapotassic mafic rocks as geochemical proxies for post-collisional dynamics of orogenic lithospheric mantle: the case of southwestern Anatolia, Turkey. Journal of Petrology, 53, 1019-1055. Richardson-Bunbury, J.M. (1996). The Kula Volcanic Field, western Turkey: the development of a Holocene alkali basalt province and the adjacent normal-faulting graben. Geological Magazine, 133, 275-283. Westaway, R., Guillou, H., Yurtmen, S., Beck, A

  12. Mapping the edge of the Cerros del Rio volcanic field, New Mexico: a piece of the puzzle to understanding a potential geothermal resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellerin, L.; Gallegos, M.; Goebel, M.; Murphy, B. S.; Smith, J.; Soto, D.; Swiatlowski, J.; Volk, C.; Welch, M.; Feucht, D. W.; Hollingshaus, B.; Bedrosian, P. A.; McPhee, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    The Cerros del Rio volcanic field located west of Santa Fe, New Mexico spans the southwestern part of the Espanola Basin with the Rio Grande to the west. Underlying the volcanics are the Santa Fe Group sediments, which contain the Ancha Formation, an important aquifer in the region. High temperature gradients in water wells reveal a potential geothermal prospect. In 2012 the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE) program acquired transient electromagnetic (TEM), audiomagnetotelluric (AMT), gravity and ground magnetic data to determine the buried eastern margin of the volcanic field and the connectivity related to the underlying sediments. The roughly EW 5-km long transect was sited from USGS aeromagnetic data to cross the boundary of the Cerros del Rio volcanic field. TEM data collected at ten stations, at 200-400 m spacing, along the transect employed an in-loop configuration with a square 100 m x 100 m transmitter loop and both a Zonge receiver coil and a 5 m square receiver loop. The 5 m loop allowed for the recovery of early-time data that was saturated when using the Zonge coil. AMT data were acquired at eight stations, at 400-500 m spacing, using the Geometric Stratagem system recording from 92 kHz to 10 Hz; a horizontal magnetic dipole transmitter was used to augment low signal strength at around 1 kHz. Gravity data along the profile were acquired using CG-3 and CG-5 Scintrex gravimeters with a station interval >250 m. Magnetic data were acquired with a Geometrics Cesium vapor G-858 magnetometer for about 3500 m along the profile at a 0.5 second sampling rate. Two volcanic flows interbedded with Ancha Formation and overlying Santa Fe Group sediments were identified in both the TEM and AMT modeling. High surface resistivity zones (>300 ohm-m) with depths ranging from ~100 to 300 m define the volcanic flows and correspond to high densities (2.3 to 2.55 g/cm3), while low resistivity zones (<30 ohm-m) correspond to lower densities (~2.1 g/cm3). High

  13. Spectroscopy of olivine basalts using FieldSpec and ASTER data: A case study from Wadi Natash volcanic field, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims at revealing the spectral characteristics of the olivine basalts exposed at Wadi Natash area, Egypt, using FieldSpec spectroradiometer. It also evaluates band ratios and fusion techniques for mapping purposes using ASTER data. Several volcanic episodes occurred during Early- to Late-Cretaceous are recorded in the study area. Early-Cretaceous olivine basalts are highly carbonated. Late-Cretaceous eruptions took place throughout several volcanic cones aligned in NW direction. Based on FieldSpec measurements and petrographic data, two groups of olivine basalt namely `A' and `B' are recognized. Fresh olivine basalt (group A) is characterized by low flat spectral profile with overall low reflectance values (˜20%). Spectral profile of altered olivine basalt (group B) shows moderate reflectance values (˜37%) with four little absorption features around the 1.10, 1.40, 2.00 and 2.35 μm wavelength regions. These absorption features are attributed mainly to the presence of chlorite and carbonate alteration products as indicated by petrographic examination. ASTER false colour composite band ratio image (3/2:R, 8/1:G and 8/5:B) discriminates easily the fresh and altered basalts by deep blue and reddish blue colours respectively. Image fusion between previously mentioned FCC ratios image and high spatial resolution ASTER panchromatic image are carried out using brovey and HSV transformation methods. Visual and statistical assessment methods proved that HSV fusion image yields better image interpretability results compared to brovey image. It improves the spatial resolution of original FCC ratios image with acceptable spectral preservation. The present study proved the usefulness of FieldSpec spectral profiles and the processed ASTER data for discriminating different olivine basalt groups exposed at the study area.

  14. Database for the Quaternary and Pliocene Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field of Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana (Database for Professional Paper 729-G)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koch, Richard D.; Ramsey, David W.; Christiansen, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    The superlative hot springs, geysers, and fumarole fields of Yellowstone National Park are vivid reminders of a recent volcanic past. Volcanism on an immense scale largely shaped the unique landscape of central and western Yellowstone Park, and intimately related tectonism and seismicity continue even now. Furthermore, the volcanism that gave rise to Yellowstone's hydrothermal displays was only part of a long history of late Cenozoic eruptions in southern and eastern Idaho, northwestern Wyoming, and southwestern Montana. The late Cenozoic volcanism of Yellowstone National Park, although long believed to have occurred in late Tertiary time, is now known to have been of latest Pliocene and Pleistocene age. The eruptions formed a complex plateau of voluminous rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs and lavas, but basaltic lavas too have erupted intermittently around the margins of the rhyolite plateau. Volcanism almost certainly will recur in the Yellowstone National Park region. This digital release contains all the information used to produce the geologic maps published as plates in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 729-G (Christiansen, 2001). The main component of this digital release is a geologic map database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains files to view or print the geologic maps and main report text from Professional Paper 729-G.

  15. The role of external environmental factors in changing eruption styles of monogenetic volcanoes in a Mio/Pleistocene continental volcanic field in western Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kereszturi, Gábor; Németh, Károly; Csillag, Gábor; Balogh, Kadosa; Kovács, János

    2011-04-01

    The occurrence, shape, structure and eruption style of monogenetic volcanoes, such as maars, tuff rings, tuff cones and scoria cones, are generally governed by several internal (composition of the magma, magmatic flux, ascent rate, viscosity, volatile contents) and external conditions (regional and local tectonics, topography, and the presence of surfacial, ground and meteoric water). These controlling factors are together responsible for the eruption style, distribution pattern, volcanic facies architecture and morphology of the monogenetic volcanic landforms. The Late Miocene to Pleistocene Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (BBHVF) in western Hungary is a typical small sized (< 50 eruption centres), basaltic, intraplate "monogenetic" volcanic field. Generally, initial eruptions of the BBHVF were phreatomagmatic (n = ~ 28); however, a lesser number (n = ~ 14) of predominantly scoria cone forming eruptions are also inferred. The temporal distribution of the Strombolian style scoria cones was concentrated mostly between 3 and 2.5 Ma. A detailed study of the changes in eruption styles recorded in the pyroclastic sequences suggested a change from a conventional phreatomagmatic to a magmatic fragmentation style during the activity of the volcanic field. A clear correlation has been identified between the long-term environmental changes of the region that resulted in a gradual shift from a more phreatomagmatic eruption style to a more magmatic eruption style. Detailed examination of the temporal distribution of K-Ar and Ar-Ar radiometric data, Digital Elevation Model and Dense Rock Equivalent-based volume calculations of eruptive products and origin of pyroclastic rocks (e.g. phreatomagmatic or magmatic) preserved in variously eroded monogenetic volcanoes were utilized to integrate available volcanological and climatological data to identify potential links between external and internal controlling parameters that responsible for long-term eruption style changes

  16. Time and space variations in magmatic and phreatomagmatic eruptive processes at Easy Chair (Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Nevada, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Greg A.; Cortés, Joaquín A.

    2013-09-01

    The products of monogenetic volcanoes often record complex sequences of eruptive processes. Easy Chair volcano (Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Nevada, USA) was formed by a monogenetic eruption along a ˜2.5-km-long series of en echelon fissure vents. Hawaiian to Strombolian fountains along the fissures dominated initial activity, producing a series of agglomerate ramparts. Focusing of eruptive activity to two central vents and the formation of two overlapping scoria cones followed the early phase. Fountain-fed lavas from those cones merged to form a channel that fed lava onto a flow field at the foot of the cones. Focusing of subsurface magma flow toward the central conduits may have reduced magma flux in the remaining fissures, and the southern segment(s) entered a phase of phreatomagmatic explosions that destroyed the early agglomerate rampart and formed a maar and tephra ring composed of lapilli tuff rich in clasts derived from pre-Easy Chair lavas and early agglomerates. The eruption closed with a minor phase of magmatic activity that deposited scoria lapilli and bombs on top of the phreatomagmatic deposits. The eruptive sequence indicates that relatively low hazard Strombolian to Hawaiian activity can be replaced by more hazardous phreatomagmatic explosions well into a monogenetic eruption.

  17. Volcanic edifice alignment detection software in MATLAB: Test data and preliminary results for shield fields on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Bradley J.; Lang, Nicholas P.

    2016-08-01

    The scarcity of impact craters on Venus make it difficult to infer the relative ages of geologic units. Stratigraphic methods can be used to help infer the relative ordering of surface features, but the relatively coarse resolution of available radar data means ambiguity about the timing of certain features is common. Here we develop a set of statistical tools in MATLAB to help infer the relative timing between clusters of small shield volcanoes and sets of fractures in the surrounding terrain. Specifically, we employed two variants of the two-point azimuth method to detect anisotropy in the distribution of point-like features. The results of these methods are shown to successfully identify anisotropy at two spatial scales: at the whole-field level and at scales smaller than a set fraction of the mean value. Initial results on the test cases presented here are promising, at least for volcanic fields emplaced under uniform conditions. These methods could also be used for detecting anisotropy in other point-like geologic features, such as hydrothermal vents, springs, and earthquake epicenters.

  18. Comprehensive Paleomagnetic Study of the Oligocene-Miocene Rocks from the San Luis Potosí Volcanic Field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Gonzalez-Rangel, J. A.; Torres-Hernandez, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Comprehensive paleomagnetic study of the Oligocene-Miocene sequence of lithological units from the San Luis Potosí volcanic field in central Mexico was accomplished to set up the magnetostratigraphic record. Two hundred and one oriented standard paleomagnetic cores corresponding to twenty-eight paleomagnetic sites were collected from all units. Rock-magnetic properties are characteristic for each unit. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curves and continuous susceptibility vs. temperature experiments point from low to medium-Ti content in titanomagnetite as the main opaque magnetic minerals, presumably result from oxy-exsolution processes during the initial flow cooling. Opaque mineral microscopy supports this assumption. Unblocking temperature and hysteresis parameters suggests predominance of pseudo-single domain magnetic grain size. Thermal and alternating field demagnetizations show mostly well-defined univectorial magnetizations. Most sites present a mean direction with small angular dispersion. The overall mean direction (N=10, Dec=1.1°, Inc=34.1°, k=531 and α95=2.1°) is characterized by small angular dispersion and inclination close to dipolar value for the locality. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility lineation match the geologically inferred flow direction.

  19. The petrogenesis and trace-element geochemistry of intermediate lavas from humphreys peak, san francisco volcanic field, arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wenrich-Verbeek, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    The San Francisco Mountain lavas exposed in the upper portion of the southeast slope of Humphreys Peak are composed of three petrographically distinct types: (1) a lower series of hornblende pyroxene andesites; (2) a group of hypersthene dacites; and (3) an upper series of olivine andesites. These rocks have been shown to be related by crystallization differentiation through comparison of groundmass and bulk rock-chemical data. The major and trace elements from rocks representative of the volcanic field form continuous trends, an indication of differentiation rather than separate and discrete magma sources. Xenoliths found in the volcanic field are composed of the proper major and trace element contents to allow their extraction from a primary melt to form residual melts of more silicic lavas. The alkali olivine basalts, probably formed by partial melting of the mantle at a depth of 35-60 km, may well have differentiated to the alkali-rich highalumina basalts at depths of 15-35 km (the lower crust of the Colorado Plateau) by removal of olivine and clinopyroxene. Some of both lava types erupted periodically onto the surface while others continued to differentiate. Removal of plagioclase, with more minor amounts of olivine and pyroxenes (of less mafic composition than those above), from the high-alumina basalts eventually may have resulted in magmas similar in composition to the intermediate and more silicic rocks. The intermediate and silicic magmas contain hornblende and probably formed between 5 and 8 km. This places a minimum depth of penetration by the normal faults, such as the Mesa Butte fault, along which many silicic centers are aligned, at a depth of 5-8 km. Because of the continuous linear trends of the chemical data and the repetition over the past 6 m.y. of most of the rock types, the mantle beneath this southwestern margin of the Colorado Plateau apparently has not changed significantly during the past 6 m.y., nor is it likely to be very heterogeneous

  20. Examining Volcanic Terrains Using In Situ Geochemical Technologies; Implications for Planetary Field Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, K. E.; Bleacher, J. E.; Evans, C. A.; Rogers, A. D.; Ito, G.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Gendreau, K.

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of the target destination for the next manned planetary mission, the crew will require technology with which to select samples for return to Earth. The six Apollo lunar surface missions crews had only the tools to enable them to physically pick samples up off the surface or from a boulder and store those samples for return to the Lunar Module and eventually to Earth. Sample characterization was dependent upon visual inspection and relied upon their extensive geology training. In the four decades since Apollo however, great advances have been made in traditionally laboratory-based instrument technologies that enable miniaturization to a field-portable configuration. The implications of these advancements extend past traditional terrestrial field geology and into planetary surface exploration. With tools that will allow for real-time geochemical analysis, an astronaut can better develop a series of working hypotheses that are testable during surface science operations. One such technology is x-ray fluorescence (XRF). Traditionally used in a laboratory configuration, these instruments have now been developed and marketed commercially in a field-portable mode. We examine this technology in the context of geologic sample analysis and discuss current and future plans for instrument deployment. We also discuss the development of the Chromatic Mineral Identification and Surface Texture (CMIST) instrument at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). Testing is taking place in conjunction with the RIS4E (Remote, In Situ, and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration) SSERVI (Solar System Exploration and Research Virtual Institute) team activities, including field testing at Kilauea Volcano, HI..

  1. Paleosecular variation and paleointensity records for the last millennium from southern South America (Laguna Potrok Aike, Santa Cruz, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogorza, C. S. G.; Sinito, A. M.; Ohlendorf, C.; Kastner, S.; Zolitschka, B.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution paleo- and rock magnetic studies were performed on a group of four sediment cores from Laguna Potrok Aike (Santa Cruz, Argentina) representing the time period AD 1300-2000. The rock magnetic analyses show that the main magnetic mineral is (titano)magnetite with a concentration between 0.01 and 0.08%, and a grain size of 4-15 μm. This study is helpful in order to complete the paleosecular variation (PSV) and paleointensity type curves for South America which do not have a detailed record for the last millennium. The comparison with the study carried out for Lake El Trébol shows a very good agreement, supporting that PSV records of south-western Argentina can be developed into a stratigraphic correlation tool on a regional scale.

  2. Partial record of a Miocene geomagnetic field excursion: Paleomagnetic data from the Paiute Ridge volcanic center, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, C.D.; Geissman, J.W.; Perry, F.V. ); Crowe, B.M. )

    1993-04-01

    In the Palute Ridge area, northern Halfpint Range, a complex system of late Miocene (about 8.5 Ma) intrusive and extrusive alkaline mafic rocks crops out over an area of about 25km[sup 2]. Post-magmatic faulting and erosion have resulted in excellent exposure of this sub-volcanic center, allowing for a detailed study of mechanisms and timing of magma emplacement. Paleomagnetic data have been obtained from over 50 sites in mafic rocks, and host ash-flow tuffs and carbonate strata, to better understand the duration of magmatic activity. Magnetizations, isolated in progressive alternating field and thermal demagnetization, for most of the sites at Palute Ridge deviate significantly from expected directions for a time-averaged late Miocene field. Demagnetization data show that there are two types of sample behavior. First, samples with close to expected reverse polarity directions (e.g., the chilled margin of a sill, D=209.2, l=[minus]36.4, [alpha]95=13.2, N=5, k=34.8). Second, and far more common, are samples giving magnetizations of southwest to northwest declination, with both shallow to moderate positive and negative inclination. Within this second grouping are several sites, including syenite pods which differentiated in situ from a large lopolith, having mean declinations that are due west and of shallow inclination. Contact tests performed at several sites are positive and show a clear correlation between sample position and isolated remanence direction. The authors preferred interpretation of the anomalously directed magnetization is that these rocks acquired a TRM during either a high amplitude excursion, or the transitional portion of a field reversal. Thermal models based on larger intrusions [+-] 10m thick at Paiute Ridge indicate that the magmas could cool through estimated magnetization blocking temperatures within weeks or months of emplacement.

  3. Geologic Investigations Spurred by Analog Testing at the 7504 Cone-SP Mountain Area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, Dean B.

    2015-01-01

    The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ, has been used as an analog mission development site for NASA since 1998. This area consists of basaltic cinder cones, lava flows and maar craters that have been active since mid-Miocene, with the youngest events occurring within the last 10,000 years. The area has been used because its geologic and topographic resemblance to lunar and Martian terrains provides an ideal venue for testing hardware and science operations practices that might be employed on planetary surfaces, as well as training astronauts in field geology. Analog operations have often led to insights that spurred new scientific investigations. Most recently, an investigation of the 7504 cone was initiated due to perceptions that Apollo-style traverse plans executed during the Desert RATS 2010 mission had characterized the area incorrectly, leading to concerns that the Apollo traverse planning process was scientifically flawed. This investigation revealed a complex history of fissure eruptions of lava and cinders, cinder cone development, a cone-fill-and-spill episode, extensive rheomorphic lava flow initiation and emplacement, and cone sector collapse that led to a final lava flow. This history was not discernible on pre-RATS mission photogeology, although independent analysis of RATS 2010 data and samples develped a "75% complete solution" that validated the pre-RATS mission planning and Apollo traverse planning and execution. The study also pointed out that the development of scientific knowledge with time in a given field area is not linear, but may follow a functional form that rises steeply in the early period of an investigation but flattens out in the later period, asymptotically approaching a theoretical "complete knowledge" point that probably cannot be achieved. This implies that future human missions must be prepared to shift geographic areas of investigation regularly if significant science returns are to be forthcoming.

  4. Geologic Investigations Spurred by Analog Testing at the 7504 Cone-Sp Mountain Area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Needham, D. H.; Evans, C. A.; Skinner, J. A.; Feng, W.

    2015-12-01

    The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ, has been used as an analog mission development site for NASA since 1998. This area consists of basaltic cinder cones, lava flows and maar craters that have been active since mid-Miocene, with the youngest events occurring within the last 10,000 years. The area has been used because its geologic and topographic resemblance to lunar and Martian terrains provides an ideal venue for testing hardware and science operations practices that might be employed on planetary surfaces, as well as training astronauts in field geology. Analog operations have often led to insights that spurred new scientific investigations. Most recently, an investigation of the 7504 cone was initiated due to perceptions that Apollo-style traverse plans executed during the Desert RATS 2010 mission had characterized the area incorrectly, leading to concerns that the Apollo traverse planning process was scientifically flawed. This investigation revealed a complex history of fissure eruptions of lava and cinders, cinder cone development, a cone-fill-and-spill episode, extensive rheomorphic lava flow initiation and emplacement, and cone sector collapse that led to a final lava flow. This history was not discernible on pre-RATS mission photogeology, although independent analysis of RATS 2010 data and samples develped a "75% complete solution" that validated the pre-RATS mission planning and Apollo traverse planning and execution. The study also pointed out that the development of scientific knowledge with time in a given field area is not linear, but may follow a functional form that rises steeply in the early period of an investigation but flattens out in the later period, asymptotically approaching a theoretical "complete knowledge" point that probably cannot be achieved. This implies that future human missions must be prepared to shift geographic areas of investigation regularly if significant science returns are to be forthcoming.

  5. Deciphering lake and maar geometries from seismic refraction and reflection surveys in Laguna Potrok Aike (southern Patagonia, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, A. C.; De Batist, M.; Niessen, F.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Ariztegui, D.; Haberzettl, T.; Kopsch, C.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2011-04-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a bowl-shaped maar lake in southern Patagonia, Argentina, with a present mean diameter of ~ 3.5 km and a maximum water depth of ~ 100 m. Seismic surveys were carried out between 2003 and 2005 in order to get a deeper knowledge on the lake sediments and the deeper basin geometries. A raytracing model of the Laguna Potrok Aike basin was calculated based on refraction data while sparker data were additionally used to identify the crater-wall discordance and thus the upper outer shape of the maar structure. The combined data sets show a rather steep funnel-shaped structure embedded in the surrounding Santa Cruz Formation that resembles other well-known maar structures. The infill consists of up to 370 m lacustrine sediments underlain by probably volcanoclastic sediments of unknown thickness. The lacustrine sediments show a subdivision into two sub-units: (a) the upper with seismic velocities between 1500 and 1800 m s - 1 , interpreted as unconsolidated muds, and (b) the lower with higher seismic velocities of up to 2350 m s - 1 , interpreted as lacustrine sediments intercalated with mass transport deposits of different lithology and/or coarser-grained sediments. The postulated volcanoclastic layer has acoustic velocities of > 2400 m s - 1 . The lake sediments were recently drilled within the PASADO project in the framework of the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). Cores penetrated through lacustrine unconsolidated sediments down to a depth of ~ 100 m below lake floor. This minimal thickness for the unconsolidated and low-velocity lithologies is in good agreement with our raytracing model.

  6. Spatio-temporal variations in water quality of Nullah Aik-tributary of the river Chenab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Abdul; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Husain, Syed Z

    2008-05-01

    This study reports the spatio-temporal changes in water quality of Nullah Aik, tributary of the Chenab River, Pakistan. Stream water samples were collected at seven sampling sites on seasonal basis from September 2004 to April 2006 and were analyzed for 24 water quality parameters. Most significant parameters which contributed in spatio-temporal variations were assessed by statistical techniques such as Hierarchical Agglomerative Cluster Analysis (HACA), Factor Analysis/Principal Components Analysis (FA/PCA), and Discriminant Function Analysis (DFA). HACA identified three different classes of sites: Relatively Unimpaired, Impaired and Less Impaired Regions on the basis of similarity among different physicochemical characteristics and pollutant level between the sampling sites. DFA produced the best results for identification of main variables for temporal and spatial analysis and separated eight parameters (DO, hardness, sulphides, K, Fe, Pb, Cr and Zn) that accounted 89.7% of total variations of spatial analysis. Temporal analysis using DFA separated six parameters (E.C., TDS, salinity, hardness, chlorides and Pb) that showed more than 84.6% of total temporal variation. FA/PCA identified six significant factors (sources) which were responsible for major variations in water quality dataset of Nullah Aik. The results signify that parameters identified by statistical analyses were responsible for water quality change and suggest the possibility of industrial, municipal and agricultural runoff, parent rock material contamination. The results suggest dire need for proper management measures to restore the water quality of this tributary for a healthy and promising aquatic ecosystem and also highlights its importance for objective ecological policy and decision making process.

  7. Volcanic plume and bomb field masses from thermal infrared camera imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. J. L.; Delle Donne, D.; Dehn, J.; Ripepe, M.; Worden, A. K.

    2013-03-01

    Masses erupted during normal explosions at Stromboli volcano (Italy) are notoriously difficult to measure. We present a method that uses thermal infrared video for cooling bomb fields to obtain the total power emitted by all hot particles emitted during an explosion. A given mass of magma (M) will emit a finite amount of thermal power, defined by M cp(Te-T0), cp and Te being magma specific heat capacity and temperature, and T0 being ambient temperature. We use this relation to convert the total power emitted by the bomb field to the mass required to generate that power. To do this we extract power flux curves for the field and integrate this through time to obtain total power (E). This is used to estimate mass (Q) in Q=E/cp(Te-T0). When applied to individual bombs we obtain masses of between 1 and 9 kg per bomb, or a volume of 970 and 6500 cm3. These volumes equate to spheres with diameters 12 and 27 cm. For the entire bomb field we obtain volumes of 7-28 m3. We calculate masses for 32 eruptions and obtain typical bomb masses of between 103 and 104 kg per eruption. In addition, we estimate that between 102 and 103 kg of gas and ash are emitted as part of a mixed plume of bombs, gas and ash. We identify two types of eruption on the basis of the erupted bomb masses and the ratio of the plume's gas-and-ash component to the bomb component. The first type is bomb-dominated, is characterized by bomb masses of 104 kg and has ash-gas/ bomb ratios of ˜0.02. The second type is ash-and-gas dominated, is characterized by erupted bomb masses of 103 kg and has ash-gas/bomb ratios of around one, and as high as two. There is no correlation between the quantity of bombs and quantity of gas-ash erupted. In addition, while source pressure for each explosion correlates with the quantity of gas and ash erupted, the mass of bombs emitted varies independently of pressure.

  8. Isotopic and trace element constraints on the petrogenesis of lavas from the Mount Adams volcanic field, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jicha, B.R.; Hart, G.L.; Johnson, C.M.; Hildreth, W.; Beard, B.L.; Shirey, S.B.; Valley, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Strontium, Nd, Pb, Hf, Os, and O isotope compositions for 30 Quaternary lava flows from the Mount Adams stratovolcano and its basaltic periphery in the Cascade arc, southern Washington, USA indicate a major component from intraplate mantle sources, a relatively small subduction component, and interaction with young mafic crust at depth. Major- and trace-element patterns for Mount Adams lavas are distinct from the rear-arc Simcoe volcanic field and other nearby volcanic centers in the Cascade arc such as Mount St. Helens. Radiogenic isotope (Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf) compositions do not correlate with geochemical indicators of slab-fluids such as (Sr/P)n and Ba/Nb. Mass-balance modeling calculations, coupled with trace-element and isotopic data, indicate that although the mantle source for the calc-alkaline Adams basalts has been modified with a fluid derived from subducted sediment, the extent of modification is significantly less than what is documented in the southern Cascades. The isotopic and trace-element compositions of most Mount Adams lavas require the presence of enriched and depleted mantle sources, and based on volume-weighted chemical and isotopic compositions for Mount Adams lavas through time, an intraplate mantle source contributed the major magmatic mass of the system. Generation of basaltic andesites to dacites at Mount Adams occurred by assimilation and fractional crystallization in the lower crust, but wholesale crustal melting did not occur. Most lavas have Tb/Yb ratios that are significantly higher than those of MORB, which is consistent with partial melting of the mantle in the presence of residual garnet. ??18O values for olivine phenocrysts in Mount Adams lavas are within the range of typical upper mantle peridotites, precluding involvement of upper crustal sedimentary material or accreted terrane during magma ascent. The restricted Nd and Hf isotope compositions of Mount Adams lavas indicate that these isotope systems are insensitive to crustal

  9. Isotopic and trace element constraints on the petrogenesis of lavas from the Mount Adams volcanic field, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jicha, Brian R.; Hart, Garret L.; Johnson, Clark M.; Hildreth, Wes; Beard, Brian L.; Shirey, Steven B.; Valley, John W.

    2009-02-01

    Strontium, Nd, Pb, Hf, Os, and O isotope compositions for 30 Quaternary lava flows from the Mount Adams stratovolcano and its basaltic periphery in the Cascade arc, southern Washington, USA indicate a major component from intraplate mantle sources, a relatively small subduction component, and interaction with young mafic crust at depth. Major- and trace-element patterns for Mount Adams lavas are distinct from the rear-arc Simcoe volcanic field and other nearby volcanic centers in the Cascade arc such as Mount St. Helens. Radiogenic isotope (Sr, Nd, Pb, and Hf) compositions do not correlate with geochemical indicators of slab-fluids such as (Sr/P) n and Ba/Nb. Mass-balance modeling calculations, coupled with trace-element and isotopic data, indicate that although the mantle source for the calc-alkaline Adams basalts has been modified with a fluid derived from subducted sediment, the extent of modification is significantly less than what is documented in the southern Cascades. The isotopic and trace-element compositions of most Mount Adams lavas require the presence of enriched and depleted mantle sources, and based on volume-weighted chemical and isotopic compositions for Mount Adams lavas through time, an intraplate mantle source contributed the major magmatic mass of the system. Generation of basaltic andesites to dacites at Mount Adams occurred by assimilation and fractional crystallization in the lower crust, but wholesale crustal melting did not occur. Most lavas have Tb/Yb ratios that are significantly higher than those of MORB, which is consistent with partial melting of the mantle in the presence of residual garnet. δ 18O values for olivine phenocrysts in Mount Adams lavas are within the range of typical upper mantle peridotites, precluding involvement of upper crustal sedimentary material or accreted terrane during magma ascent. The restricted Nd and Hf isotope compositions of Mount Adams lavas indicate that these isotope systems are insensitive to crustal

  10. 39Ar/40Ar Chronology and Volumes of Eruptive Products Over the Last 1 Myr in the Tequila Volcanic Field, Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis-Kenedi, C. B.; Lange, R. A.; Hall, C. M.; Delgado-Granados, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Tequila volcanic field, located within the western Trans-Mexican arc, covers an area of 1036 km2 and includes a central, andesitic stratocone, Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila, as well as cinder cones, domes, and fissure-fed flows. Sixty-nine high precision 39Ar-40Ar dates reveal that major activity in the Tequila volcanic field began at approximately 1 Ma. From 1 Ma to 200 ka, rhyolite (> 73 wt. % SiO2) and alkali basalt (­š 51 wt. % SiO2) were the only compositions erupted in significant volumes (29 +/- 5.7 km3 and 12 +/- 1.2 km3, respectively). At approximately 200 ka, the andesite comprising Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila erupted within 30-40 kyr, producing a volume of 30 +/- 2.0 km3. Additional andesitic flows (11 +/- 1.4 km3) erupted to the northwest and southeast of the stratocone between 140 and 20 ka. The total volume of dacite that erupted at the Tequila volcanic field is small (1.3 +/- 0.03 km3) and occurred largely (88%) within the last 70 kyrs. Unlike the andesites and dacites, the basalts and rhyolites did not erupt within narrow time intervals, but extruded over the entire last 1 Myr, producing a total volume of 12.6 +/- 1.2 km3 and 32 +/- 6.1 km3, respectively. This detailed eruptive history, combined with the observed phenocryst assemblages (0-10 vol. %) in the small-volume andesite, dacite, and alkali basalt flows, suggest that they were erupted directly from the lower (or middle) crust, without prior storage in an upper crustal chamber. In contrast, the voluminous burst of andesitic volcanism that produced the phenocryst-rich (35-45 vol. %) lavas of Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila was likely fed from a short-lived (­š 40 kyrs) upper crustal chamber. This scenario is supported by the complex, disequilibrium textures seen in the phenocryst assemblage of the Volc\\­_{a}n Tequila lavas, indicative of magma mingling within an upper crustal chamber (Wallace and Carmichael, 1994). The total volume of erupted material at the Tequila volcanic field is 89 +/- 12 km3, of which

  11. Geology of the Mohon Mountain volcanic field, Yavapai and Mohave Counties, Arizona: A preliminary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; King, John S.

    1987-01-01

    Field mapping has produced a preliminary picture of Mohon Mountain as a composite volcano, in which pyroclastic ash and larger tephra erupted alternately with flows of rhyodacite and dacite. An analog study which uses imagery of lunar and Martian features will compare the overall shape of the vent complex, including its breached southern flank and satellite vents, to similar landforms found on Mars and the Moon which are believed to have formed similar processes. Ash flow sheets were hypothesized to comprise the outer slopes of Olympus Mons suggesting that explosive eruptions which are more volatile-rich than those which produce basalt flows are not confined to terrestrial settings but may also be found on bodies such as Mars, which have a thicker crust and deeper magma source in the mantle. The analog study will explore further evidence for explosive eruptions on Mars and the Moon.

  12. Field measurement of penetrator seismic coupling in sediments and volcanic rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Latham, G. V.; Frohlich, C.

    1979-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to determine experimentally how well a seismometer installed using a penetrator would be coupled to the ground. A dry lake bed and a lava bed were chosen as test sites to represent geological environments of two widely different material properties. At each site, two half-scale penetrators were fired into the ground, a three-component geophone assembly was mounted to the aft end of each penetrator, and dummy penetrators were fired at various distances to generate seismic signals. The recorded signals were digitized, and cross-spectral analyses were performed to compare the observed signals in terms of power spectral density ratio, coherence and phase difference. The analyses indicate that seismometers deployed by penetrators will be as well coupled to the ground as are seismometers installed by conventional methods for the frequency range of interest in earthquake seismology, although some minor differences were observed at frequencies near the upper limit of the frequency band.

  13. Characterizing the eolian sediment component in the lacustrine record of Laguna Potrok Aike (southeastern Patagonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, C.; Gebhardt, C.

    2013-12-01

    Southern South America with its extended dry areas was one of the major sources for dust in the higher latitudes of the southern hemisphere during the last Glacial, as was deduced from fingerprinting of dust particles found in Antarctic ice cores. The amount of dust that was mobilized is mostly related to strength and latitudinal position of the Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds (SWW). How exactly SWW shifted between glacial and interglacial times and what consequences such shifts had for ocean and atmospheric circulation changes during the last deglaciation is currently under debate. Laguna Potrok Aike (PTA) as a lake situated in the middle of the source area of dust offers the opportunity to arrive at a better understanding of past SWW changes and their associated consequences for dust transport. For this task, a sediment record of the past ~51 ka is available from a deep drilling campaign (PASADO). From this 106 m long profile, 76 samples representing the different lithologies of the sediment sequence were selected to characterize an eolian sediment component. Prior to sampling of the respective core intervals, magnetic susceptibility was measured and the element composition was determined by XRF-scanning on fresh, undisturbed sediment. After sampling and freeze drying, physical, chemical and mineralogical sediment properties were determined before and after separation of each sample into six grainsize classes for each fraction separately. SEM techniques were used to verify the eolian origin of grains. The aim of this approach is to isolate an exploitable fingerprint of the eolian sediment component in terms of their grain size, physical properties, geochemistry and mineralogy. Thereby, the challenging aspect is that such a fingerprint should be based on high-resolution down-core scanning techniques, so time-consuming techniques such as grain-size measurements by laser detection can be avoided. A first evaluation of the dataset indicates that magnetic

  14. The effects of volcanic ash on the maceral and chemical composition of the C coal bed, Emery Coal Field, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, S.S.; Stanton, R.W.; Ryer, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    Volcanic ash which fell in the peat swamp that formed the Upper Cretaceous C coal bed (Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, Utah) produced semi-impermeable layers that caused the ponding of surface waters. Coal samples from directly above tonsteins (altered volcanic ash partings) are enriched in desmocollinite, telinite, and detrocollinite, as a result of poorly drained swamp conditions; coal samples from directly below tonsteins are enriched in semifusinite, inertodetrinite, and fusinite, as a result of well-drained conditions. Leaching of the volcanic ash or the incorporation of volcanic ash in peat provided a source for many elements (including Zr, Nb, Th, and Ce) that are enriched in coal samples taken from directly above and below tonsteins. ?? 1989.

  15. Magnetotelluric survey for exploration of a volcanic-rock reservoir in the Yurihara oil and gas field, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuhata, Yuji; Matsuo, Koichi; Minegishi, Masato

    1999-03-01

    The Yurihara oil and gas field is located on the southern edge of Akita Prefecture, northeastern Japan. In this area, drilling, surface geological surveys and many seismic surveys have been used to investigate the geological structure. Wells drilled into the Nishikurosawa Basalt Group (NBG) of Miocene age found oil and gas reservoirs at depths of 1.5--2 km. Oil and gas are now being produced commercially and further exploration is required in the surrounding areas. However, since the neighboring areas are covered with young volcanic products from the Chokai volcano, and have a rough topography, the subsurface distribution of the NBG must be investigated using other methods in addition to seismic reflection. According to the well data, the resistivity of the NBG is comparatively higher than that of the overlying sedimentary formations, and therefore the magnetotelluric (MT) method is expected to be useful for the estimation of the distribution of the NBG. An MT survey was conducted along three survey lines in this area. Each line trended east-west, perpendicular to the regional geological strike, and was composed of about 25 measurement sites. Induction vectors evaluated from the magnetic field show that this area has a two-dimensional structure. The evaluated resistivity sections are in agreement with the log data. In conclusion, the authors were able to detect resistive layers (the NBG) below conductive layers. The results indicate that the NBG becomes gradually less resistive from north to south. In the center of the northern line, an uplifted resistive area is interpreted as corresponding to the reservoir. By comparison with a seismic section, the authors prove the effectiveness of the integration of seismic and MT surveys for the investigation of the morphology and internal structure of the NBG. On other survey lines, the resistive uplifted zones are interpreted as possible prospective areas.

  16. Comparison of AIK-C measles vaccine in infants at 6 months with Schwarz vaccine at 9 months: a randomized controlled trial in Ghana.

    PubMed Central

    Nkrumah, F. K.; Osei-Kwasi, M.; Dunyo, S. K.; Koram, K. A.; Afari, E. A.

    1998-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial in a measles endemic area, standard-dose (4.0 log10pfu) AIK-C measles vaccine administered at 6 months of age was compared to standard-dose Schwarz vaccine (3.7log10pfu) given at 9 months. Seroconversion rates at 3 and 6 months after immunization in the two groups were comparable and similar. The geometric mean titres achieved were, however, significantly higher in the Schwarz group (P < 0.05). No immediate serious side-effects were observed with either vaccine. We conclude that standard-dose AIK-C measles vaccine can be recommended for measles immunization in children below 9 months of age, especially in highly endemic and high-risk areas in developing countries. PMID:9803586

  17. Comparing and Reconciling Traditional Field and Photogeologic Mapping Techniques: Lessons from the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, J. A., Jr.; Eppler, D. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Janoiko, B.; Whitson, P.

    2014-01-01

    Cartographic products and - specifically - geologic maps provide critical assistance for establishing physical and temporal frameworks of planetary surfaces. The technical methods that result in the creation of geologic maps vary depending on how observations are made as well as the overall intent of the final products [1-3]. These methods tend to follow a common linear work flow, including the identification and delineation of spatially and temporally discrete materials (units), the documentation of their primary (emplacement) and secondary (erosional) characteristics, analysis of the relative and absolute age relationships between these materials, and the collation of observations and interpretations into an objective map product. The "objectivity" of a map is critical cross comparison with overlapping maps and topical studies as well as its relevance to scientific posterity. However, the "accuracy" and "correctness" of a geologic map is very subject to debate. This can be evidenced by comparison of existing geologic maps at various scales, particularly those compiled through field- and remote-based mapped efforts. Our study focuses on comparing the fidelity of (1) "Apollo-style" geologic investigations, where typically non-geologist crew members follow static traverse routes established through pre-mission planning, and (2) "traditional" field-based investigations, where geologists are given free rein to observe without preplanned routes. This abstract summarizes the regional geology wherein our study was conducted, presents the geologic map created from traditional field mapping techniques, and offers basic insights into how geologic maps created from different tactics can be reconciled in support of exploratory missions. Additional abstracts [4-6] from this study discuss various exploration and science results of these efforts.

  18. Volcano-Tectonic Evolution of the Central Death Valley Volcanic Field - Insights Derived from the Geologic Map of the Death Valley Junction 30' x 60' Quadrangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. A.; Fridrich, C.; Chan, C. F.; Zellman, K. L.; Workman, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    The geologic map of the Death Valley Junction 30' x 60' quadrangle encompasses many geologic features recording the Cenozoic volcano-tectonic evolution of central Death Valley. Most notable is the central Death Valley rhombochasm. The rhombochasm is a 65x80-km rhombic pull-apart basin complex that occupies the releasing step-over between the northern Death Valley—Furnace Creek and southern Death Valley faults. Stewart (1983) documented this feature by palinspastically restoring offset thrust fault segments and isopachs, thereby closing the rhombochasm. The central Death Valley volcanic field records the coincident and related magmatism that occurred during the extension and strike-slip strain that formed the rhombochasm. In the multi-stage evolution of this tectonomagmatic feature, changes in volcanic and structural styles, rates, and loci were synchronized, both spatially and temporally. The volcanic field covers an area of 3600 km2, and consists of >700 km3 of lava flows, domes, and pyroclastic deposits. Cenozoic map units reflect four major eruptive stages: Stage 1 (11-9 Ma: rhyolite and andesite), Stage 2 (9-7.5 Ma: dacite>basalt>andesite), Stage 3 (7-5 Ma: dacite>basalt), and Stage 4 (4.5-0.7 Ma: basalt). The predominant loci of eruptive centers migrated northwestward during this volcanic evolution, coeval with northwestward migration of adjacent depocenters. Stage 1 and 2 volcanism is broadly correlative to the supradetachment stage of rhombochasm development. Related intrusions include exposed upper-plate hypabyssal and lower-plate plutonic bodies. Stage 3 and 4 volcanism occurred during two tectonic stages in which higher-angle faults cut across the detachment fault, forming basins that are nested within the original detachment-floored area of the rhombochasm. Time-transgressive changes from dominantly silicic and intermediate magmas in Stages 1 and 2 to dominantly mafic and lesser intermediate magmas in Stages 3 and 4 coincided with decreases in eruptive

  19. Holocene Flows of the Cima Volcanic Field, Mojave Desert, Part 2: Flow Rheology from Laboratory Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, T.; Whittington, A. G.; Soldati, A.; Sehlke, A.; Beem, J. R.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lava flow morphology is often utilized as an indicator of rheological behavior during flow emplacement. Rheological behavior can be characterized by the viscosity and yield strength of lava, which in turn are dependent on physical and chemical properties including crystallinity, vesicularity, and bulk composition. We are studying the rheology of a basaltic lava flow from a monogenetic Holocene cinder cone in the Cima lava field (Mojave Desert, California). The flow is roughly 2.5 km long and up to 700m wide, with a well-developed central channel along much of its length. Samples were collected along seven different traverses across the flow, along with real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS profiles to allow levee heights and slopes to be measured. Surface textures change from pahoehoe ropes near the vent to predominantly jagged `a`a blocks over the majority of the flow, including all levees and the toe. Chemically the lava shows little variation, plotting on the trachybasalt-basanite boundary on the total alkali-silica diagram. Mineralogically the lava is dominated by plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine phenocrysts, with abundant flow-aligned plagioclase microcrystals. The total crystal fraction is ~50% near the vent, with higher percentages in the distal portion of the flow. Vesicularity varies between ~10 and more than ~60%. Levees are ~10-15m high with slopes typically ~25-35˚, suggesting a yield strength at final emplacement of ~150,000 Pa. The effective emplacement temperature and yield strength of lava samples will be determined using the parallel-plate technique. We will test the hypothesis that these physical and rheological properties of the lava during final emplacement correlate with spatial patterns in flow morphology, such as average slope and levee width, which have been determined using remote sensing observations (Beem et al. 2014).

  20. Mercury isotopic composition of hydrothermal systems in the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and Guaymas Basin sea-floor rift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherman, L.S.; Blum, J.D.; Nordstrom, D.K.; McCleskey, R.B.; Barkay, T.; Vetriani, C.

    2009-01-01

    To characterize mercury (Hg) isotopes and isotopic fractionation in hydrothermal systems we analyzed fluid and precipitate samples from hot springs in the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and vent chimney samples from the Guaymas Basin sea-floor rift. These samples provide an initial indication of the variability in Hg isotopic composition among marine and continental hydrothermal systems that are controlled predominantly by mantle-derived magmas. Fluid samples from Ojo Caliente hot spring in Yellowstone range in δ202Hg from - 1.02‰ to 0.58‰ (± 0.11‰, 2SD) and solid precipitate samples from Guaymas Basin range in δ202Hg from - 0.37‰ to - 0.01‰ (± 0.14‰, 2SD). Fluid samples from Ojo Caliente display mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) of Hg from the vent (δ202Hg = 0.10‰ ± 0.11‰, 2SD) to the end of the outflow channel (&delta202Hg = 0.58‰ ± 0.11‰, 2SD) in conjunction with a decrease in Hg concentration from 46.6pg/g to 20.0pg/g. Although a small amount of Hg is lost from the fluids due to co-precipitation with siliceous sinter, we infer that the majority of the observed MDF and Hg loss from waters in Ojo Caliente is due to volatilization of Hg0(aq) to Hg0(g) and the preferential loss of Hg with a lower δ202Hg value to the atmosphere. A small amount of mass-independent fractionation (MIF) was observed in all samples from Ojo Caliente (Δ199Hg = 0.13‰ ±1 0.06‰, 2SD) but no significant MIF was measured in the sea-floor rift samples from Guaymas Basin. This study demonstrates that several different hydrothermal processes fractionate Hg isotopes and that Hg isotopes may be used to better understand these processes.

  1. Holocene flows of the Cima volcanic field, Mojave Desert (California), Part 1: Remote sensing and multi-scale morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beem, J. R.; Luecke, A.; Polun, S. G.; Robertson, T.; Savage, A.; Soldati, A.; Whittington, A. G.; Gomez, F. G.

    2014-12-01

    Lava flow morphology and texture can provide insight into rheological and other physical properties of the flow. Studies of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial lava flows rely heavily on remotely sensed observations. This research aims to quantify micromorphology and texture of a Holocene lava flow in the Cima volcanic field (eastern California) using digital elevation models and radar backscatter imagery. We are testing the hypothesis that spatial patterns in morphometry and backscatter roughness correspond with varying rheological conditions during emplacement. The site is ideally suited for morphological study owing to the youthfulness of the flow, as well as the lack of vegetation and minimal surface erosion resulting from the high desert climate. The studied lava flow spans approximately 2.5 km and exhibits well defined lobate forms and lava ropes with clear A'a' to Pahoehoe transitions. This study assesses lava flow micromorphology using a very high resolution (5 cm pixel) digital elevation model (DEM). The DEM was constructed from low-altitude aerial photos acquired using a remotely-controlled model aircraft. In addition to the DEM, the resulting orthoimagery provided a basis for distinguishing pristine lava flow surfaces from areas covered by vegetation and/or eolian deposits. Longer-wavelength morphology (spatial scales greater than 1 meter) is analyzed using a 50 cm pixel DEM produced using stereoscopic NAPP aerial photographs. Roughness estimates are compared with radar backscatter images including steeply incident C-band (5.6 cm wavelength) and L-band (24 cm wavelength) satellite data, as well as shallow incidence Ku-band data (1.7 cm wavelength) acquired using a ground-based imaging radar from an adjacent cinder cone. Photogrammetry and radar provide complementary information on lava flow morphology and micromorphological roughness, which are assessed at different spatial scales using general statistics, as well as the local hypsometric integral.

  2. Monitoring Surface Moisture of Crater-fill Sediment in Extreme hydroclimatic conditions (Ubehebe Volcanic Field, Death Valley, California).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Zent, A.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    The long term monitoring of soil surface moisture is key for constraining surface hydrology processes in extreme weather and climatic settings and their impact on biological and geological components of desert environments. We tested and applied the use of miniature data loggers to acquire novel Temperature (T) and water content (weight percent, wt%) of fine-grained sediments deposited during rain events at Ubehebe Crater (UC), the larger and deeper crater within a volcanic field in Death Valley. The Miniaturized in situ systems are compliant with Death Valley National Park's regulations to conduct scientific research in wilderness and sacred sites. About 130,000 hours of recorded soil moisture and temperature were acquired in relation to the hydroclimatic conditions (2009-current). Total annual rainfall in the area range from ~50mm to <250 mm/y in water years (WY) 2004-to date. These values are representative of the climatic context of the Mojave Region as they encompass the wettest (2005, 2011) and driest years (2002, 2007, 2012, 2013, 2014) of the last ~120 years (Western Regional Climate Center, www.wrcc.dri.edu). To date, surface (0.5 cm to 2 cm-depth) moisture of intra-crater deposits can vary from dry-very dry (1-3wt % to - 10 wt%) to wet-saturated (10-60 wt%). Over saturated conditions occur in ephemeral ponds, which appear to form once a year as a result of winter and summer rainstorms, and may last for one-two weeks (2009-2014 study years). Summer storms can yield ca. 40% to 60% of the total annual precipitation (WY 2011 thru 2014). The intensity and temporal distribution of annual storms together with ground temperature extremes (-16 to +67 ºC) influence moisture distribution and retention within the crater's floor.

  3. Terrestrial Analog Field Investigations to Enable Science and Exploration Studies of Impacts and Volcanism on the Moon, NEAs, and Moons of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldmann, Jennifer Lynne; Colaprete, Anthony; Cohen, Barbara; Elphic, Richard; Garry, William; Hodges, Kip; Hughes, Scott; Kim, Kyeon; Lim, Darlene; McKay, Chris; Osinski, Gordon R.; Petro, Noah; Sears, Derek; Squyres, Steve; Tornabene, Livio

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial analog studies are a critical component for furthering our understanding of geologic processes on the Moon, near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), and the moons of Mars. Carefully chosen analog sites provide a unique natural laboratory with high relevance to the associated science on these solar system target bodies. Volcanism and impact cratering are fundamental processes on the Moon, NEAs, and Phobos and Deimos. The terrestrial volcanic and impact records remain invaluable for our understanding of these processes throughout our solar system, since these are our primary source of firsthand knowledge on volcanic landform formation and modification as well as the three-dimensional structural and lithological character of impact craters. Regarding impact cratering, terrestrial fieldwork can help us to understand the origin and emplacement of impactites, the history of impact bombardment in the inner Solar System, the formation of complex impact craters, and the effects of shock on planetary materials. Volcanism is another dominant geologic process that has significantly shaped the surface of planetary bodies and many asteroids. Through terrestrial field investigations we can study the processes, geomorphic features and rock types related to fissure eruptions, volcanic constructs, lava tubes, flows and pyroclastic deposits. Also, terrestrial analog studies have the advantage of enabling simultaneous robotic and/or human exploration testing in a low cost, low risk, high fidelity environment to test technologies and concepts of operations for future missions to the target bodies. Of particular interest is the importance and role of robotic precursor missions prior to human operations for which there is little to no actual mission experience to draw upon. Also critical to understanding new worlds is sample return, and analog studies enable us to develop the appropriate procedures for collecting samples in a manner that will best achieve the science objectives.

  4. Voluminous low δ18O magmas in the late Miocene Heise volcanic field, Idaho: Implications for the fate of Yellowstone hotspot calderas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bindeman, I.N.; Watts, K.E.; Schmitt, A.K.; Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, P.W.C.

    2007-01-01

    We report oxygen isotope compositions of phenocrysts and U-Pb ages of zircons in four large caldera-forming ignimbrites and post-caldera lavas of the Heise volcanic field, a nested caldera complex in the Snake River Plain, that preceded volcanism in Yellowstone. Early eruption of three normal δ18O voluminous ignimbrites with δ18Oquartz = 6.4‰ and δ18Ozircon = 4.8‰ started at Heise at 6.6 Ma, and was followed by a 2‰–3‰ δ18O depletion in the subsequent 4.45 Ma Kilgore caldera cycle that includes the 1800 km3 Kilgore ignimbrite, and post-Kilgore intracaldera lavas with δ18Oquartz = 4.3‰ and δ18Ozircon = 1.5‰. The Kilgore ignimbrite represents the largest known low-δ18O magma in the Snake River Plain and worldwide. The post-Kilgore low δ18O volcanism likely represents the waning stages of silicic magmatism at Heise, prior to the reinitiation of normal δ18O silicic volcanism 100 km to the northeast at Yellowstone. The occurrence of low δ18O magmas at Heise and Yellowstone hallmarks a mature stage of individual volcanic cycles in each caldera complex. Sudden shifts in δ18O of silicic magmas erupted from the same nested caldera complexes argue against any inheritance of the low δ18O signature from mantle or crustal sources. Instead, δ18O age trends indicate progressive remelting of low δ18O hydrothermally altered intracaldera rocks of previous eruptions. This trend may be generally applicable to older caldera complexes in the Snake River Plain that are poorly exposed.

  5. Terrestrial analog field investigations to enable science and exploration studies of impacts and volcanism on the Moon, NEAs, and moons of Mars (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heldmann, J. L.; Colaprete, A.; Cohen, B. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Garry, W. B.; Hodges, K. V.; Hughes, S. S.; Kim, K. J.; Lim, D.; McKay, C. P.; Osinski, G. R.; Petro, N. E.; Sears, D. W.; Squyres, S. W.; Tornabene, L. L.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial analog studies are a critical component for furthering our understanding of geologic processes on the Moon, near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), and the moons of Mars. Carefully chosen analog sites provide a unique natural laboratory with high relevance to the associated science on these solar system target bodies. Volcanism and impact cratering are fundamental processes on the Moon, NEAs, and Phobos and Deimos. The terrestrial volcanic and impact records remain invaluable for our understanding of these processes throughout our solar system, since these are our primary source of firsthand knowledge on volcanic landform formation and modification as well as the three-dimensional structural and lithological character of impact craters. Regarding impact cratering, terrestrial fieldwork can help us to understand the origin and emplacement of impactites, the history of impact bombardment in the inner Solar System, the formation of complex impact craters, and the effects of shock on planetary materials. Volcanism is another dominant geologic process that has significantly shaped the surface of planetary bodies and many asteroids. Through terrestrial field investigations we can study the processes, geomorphic features and rock types related to fissure eruptions, volcanic constructs, lava tubes, flows and pyroclastic deposits. Also, terrestrial analog studies have the advantage of enabling simultaneous robotic and/or human exploration testing in a low cost, low risk, high fidelity environment to test technologies and concepts of operations for future missions to the target bodies. Of particular interest is the importance and role of robotic precursor missions prior to human operations for which there is little to no actual mission experience to draw upon. Also critical to understanding new worlds is sample return, and analog studies enable us to develop the appropriate procedures for collecting samples in a manner that will best achieve the science objectives.

  6. Evolution of silicic magma in the upper crust: the mid-Tertiary Latir volcanic field and its cogenetic granitic batholith, northern New Mexico, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Structural and topographic relief along the eastern margin of the Rio Grande rift, northern New Mexico, provides a remarkable cross-section through the 26-Ma Questa caldera and cogenetic volcanic and plutonic rocks of the Latir field. Exposed levels increase in depth from mid-Tertiary depositional surfaces in northern parts of the igneous complex to plutonic rocks originally at 3-5 km depths in the S. Erosional remnants of an ash-flow sheet of weakly peralkaline rhyolite (Amalia Tuff) and andesitic to dactitic precursor lavas, disrupted by rift-related faults, are preserved as far as 45 km beyond their sources at the Questa caldera. Broadly comagmatic 26 Ma batholithic granitic rocks, exposed over an area of 20 by 35 km, range from mesozonal granodiorite to epizonal porphyritic granite and aplite; shallower and more silicic phases are mostly within the caldera. Compositionally and texturally distinct granites defined resurgent intrusions within the caldera and discontinuous ring dikes along its margins: a batholithic mass of granodiorite extends 20 km S of the caldera and locally grades vertically to granite below its flat-lying roof. A negative Bouguer gravity anomaly (15-20 mgal), which encloses exposed granitic rocks and coincides with boundaries of the Questa caldera, defined boundaries of the shallow batholith, emplaced low in the volcanic sequence and in underlying Precambrian rocks. Paleomagnetic pole positions indicate that successively crystallised granitic plutons cooled through Curie temperatures during the time of caldera formation, initial regional extension, and rotational tilting of the volcanic rocks. Isotopic ages for most intrusions are indistinguishable from the volcanic rocks. These relations indicate that the batholithic complex broadly represents the source magma for the volcanic rocks, into which the Questa caldera collapsed, and that the magma was largely liquid during regional tectonic disruption. -from Author

  7. Volcanic mesocyclones.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Pinaki; Gioia, Gustavo; Kieffer, Susan W

    2009-03-26

    A strong volcanic plume consists of a vertical column of hot gases and dust topped with a horizontal 'umbrella'. The column rises, buoyed by entrained and heated ambient air, reaches the neutral-buoyancy level, then spreads radially to form the umbrella. In classical models of strong volcanic plumes, the plume is assumed to remain always axisymmetric and non-rotating. Here we show that the updraught of the rising column induces a hydrodynamic effect not addressed to date-a 'volcanic mesocyclone'. This volcanic mesocyclone sets the entire plume rotating about its axis, as confirmed by an unprecedented analysis of satellite images from the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo. Destabilized by the rotation, the umbrella loses axial symmetry and becomes lobate in plan view, in accord with satellite records of recent eruptions on Mounts Pinatubo, Manam, Reventador, Okmok, Chaiten and Ruang. The volcanic mesocyclone spawns waterspouts or dust devils, as seen in numerous eruptions, and groups the electric charges about the plume to form the 'lightning sheath' that was so prominent in the recent eruption of Mount Chaiten. The concept of a volcanic mesocyclone provides a unified explanation for a disparate set of poorly understood phenomena in strong volcanic plumes. PMID:19325632

  8. Planetary Volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonenko, I.; Head, J. W.; Pieters, C. W.

    1998-01-01

    The final report consists of 10 journal articles concerning Planetary Volcanism. The articles discuss the following topics: (1) lunar stratigraphy; (2) cryptomare thickness measurements; (3) spherical harmonic spectra; (4) late stage activity of volcanoes on Venus; (5) stresses and calderas on Mars; (6) magma reservoir failure; (7) lunar mare basalt volcanism; (8) impact and volcanic glasses in the 79001/2 Core; (9) geology of the lunar regional dark mantle deposits; and (10) factors controlling the depths and sizes of magma reservoirs in Martian volcanoes.

  9. Semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries: Validation and application to the cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region (Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Traglia, Federico; Morelli, Stefano; Casagli, Nicola; Garduño Monroy, Victor Hugo

    2014-08-01

    The shape and size of monogenetic volcanoes are the result of complex evolutions involving the interaction of eruptive activity, structural setting and degradational processes. Morphological studies of cinder cones aim to evaluate volcanic hazard on the Earth and to decipher the origins of various structures on extraterrestrial planets. Efforts have been dedicated so far to the characterization of the cinder cone morphology in a systematic and comparable manner. However, manual delimitation is time-consuming and influenced by the user subjectivity but, on the other hand, automatic boundary delimitation of volcanic terrains can be affected by irregular topography. In this work, the semi-automatic delimitation of volcanic edifice boundaries proposed by Grosse et al. (2009) for stratovolcanoes was tested for the first time over monogenetic cinder cones. The method, based on the integration of the DEM-derived slope and curvature maps, is applied here to the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region of the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico), where 309 Plio-Quaternary cinder cones are located. The semiautomatic extraction allowed identification of 137 of the 309 cinder cones of the Tancitaro-Nueva Italia region, recognized by means of the manual extraction. This value corresponds to the 44.3% of the total number of cinder cones. Analysis on vent alignments allowed us to identify NE-SW vent alignments and cone elongations, consistent with a NE-SW σmax and a NW-SE σmin. Constructing a vent intensity map, based on computing the number of vents within a radius r centred on each vent of the data set and choosing r = 5 km, four vent intensity maxima were derived: one is positioned in the NW with respect to the Volcano Tancitaro, one in the NE, one to the S and another vent cluster located at the SE boundary of the studied area. The spacing of centroid of each cluster (24 km) can be related to the thickness of the crust (9-10 km) overlying the magma reservoir.

  10. Late Pleistocene to Holocene soil development and environments in the Long Gang Volcanic Field area, Jilin Province, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Daniela; Zhang, Xinrong; Knöbel, Jette; Maerker, Lutz

    2014-05-01

    Late Pleistocene to Holocene shifts of climate and vegetation in the Long Gang Volcanic Field in NE China have been reconstructed, e. g. by Steblich et al. (2009), based on Maar lake sediment cores. In this study, we investigated soil development during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene and linked it to the climate and vegetation reported in the literature. Three pedons were described and analyzed on a crater wall surrounding a maar. The lower part of the slope is covered by basic pyroclastics that are obviously younger than the maar itself. Pedon 1 is located on the upper slope, where the younger pyroclastics are not present; thus it developed over the entire Holocene and part of the Late Pleistocene. Pedon 2 is on the toe slope and developed from the young basic pyroclastics. Vegetation remains, charred by fire that was caused by the volcanic ash fall, were found in the lowermost part of the pyroclastics layer, on top of a paleosol. Charcoal fragments were dated to 18950-18830 cal BP (using INTCAL 09). Thus, pedon 2 developed since around 18.9 ka BP, whereas the development of the paleosol that was buried under the pyroclastics (pedon 3), was stopped at this time. Pedons 1 and 2 are Vitric Andosols, developed mainly from basic pyroclastics, as evidenced by the composition of rock fragments in the soils, comprising 78 / 81 mass % lapilli and 22 / 19 mass % gneiss fragments, respectively. Pedon 3 is a Cutanic Luvisol (Chromic) that developed entirely from gneiss fragments produced by the maar explosion. Lab data suggest increasing intensity of pedogenesis in the direction: Pedon 3 (paleosol) < Pedon 2 < Pedon 1, reflected e. g. in increasing Fed/Fet ratios, decreasing molar ratios of (Ca+K+Na)/Al, and decreasing pH. However, it needs to be considered that lapilli are more readily weatherable than gneiss fragments. The profile morphology of the paleosol, characterized by reddish-brown color (7.5YR), strong angular blocky structure and well-expressed illuvial clay

  11. Volcanism in Eastern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauthen, Clay; Coombs, Cassandra R.

    1996-01-01

    In 1891, the Virunga Mountains of Eastern Zaire were first acknowledged as volcanoes, and since then, the Virunga Mountain chain has demonstrated its potentially violent volcanic nature. The Virunga Mountains lie across the Eastern African Rift in an E-W direction located north of Lake Kivu. Mt. Nyamuragira and Mt. Nyiragongo present the most hazard of the eight mountains making up Virunga volcanic field, with the most recent activity during the 1970-90's. In 1977, after almost eighty years of moderate activity and periods of quiescence, Mt. Nyamuragira became highly active with lava flows that extruded from fissures on flanks circumscribing the volcano. The flows destroyed vast areas of vegetation and Zairian National Park areas, but no casualties were reported. Mt. Nyiragongo exhibited the same type volcanic activity, in association with regional tectonics that effected Mt. Nyamuragira, with variations of lava lake levels, lava fountains, and lava flows that resided in Lake Kivu. Mt. Nyiragongo, recently named a Decade volcano, presents both a direct and an indirect hazard to the inhabitants and properties located near the volcano. The Virunga volcanoes pose four major threats: volcanic eruptions, lava flows, toxic gas emission (CH4 and CO2), and earthquakes. Thus, the volcanoes of the Eastern African volcanic field emanate harm to the surrounding area by the forecast of volcanic eruptions. During the JSC Summer Fellowship program, we will acquire and collate remote sensing, photographic (Space Shuttle images), topographic and field data. In addition, maps of the extent and morphology(ies) of the features will be constructed using digital image information. The database generated will serve to create a Geographic Information System for easy access of information of the Eastem African volcanic field. The analysis of volcanism in Eastern Africa will permit a comparison for those areas from which we have field data. Results from this summer's work will permit

  12. Rheology and Morphology of a Trachybasaltic Lava Flow: a Case Study from the Cima Volcanic Field (CA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, A.; Beem, J. R.; Robertson, T.; Gomez, F. G.; Whittington, A. G.

    2015-12-01

    Subliquidus rheology of a trachybasaltic lava was measured in the laboratory for the first time. Field observations of the parent flow focused on surface morphology characterization, which was later quantified in terms of surface roughness. The studied lava flow was emitted during the Holocene by a monogenetic cinder cone in the Cima Volcanic Field (CA). Surface morphology transitions from smooth pahoehoe ropes near the vent to jagged `a`a blocks over the majority of the flow. A variety of 2 m2 outcrops were photographed using a hand-held DSLR camera, and their surface texture was reconstructed with photogrammetry. The roughness of each outcrop, effectively described by the standard deviation between the real photogrammetric point cloud and the best-fitting surface, was quantified at different spatial scales, ranging from 0.5 cm to 200 m. We found that the roughness of the flow increases linearly as spatial resolution decreases, with a slope break corresponding to the average size of the outcrop lava blocks. The rheology of Cima lavas was determined by concentric cylinder viscometry in the 1220 °C to 1160 °C temperature range. The obtained rheological flow curves indicate a Bingham rheology, with clearly detected yield strength ranging from 25 Pa at the higher temperatures up to 650 Pa at the lower temperatures. Plagioclase crystallization begins at 1170 °C, likely playing a key role in promoting yield strength escalation. Viscosity increases by one order of magnitude (from 94 to 1116 Pa·s) over the 60 °C span of cooling considered, remaining consistently lower than most basaltic melts due to the high alkali content (6 wt%). The rheological and morphological results are being integrated, in order to assess if it is possible to identify the rheological fingerprint of the active flow on the preserved flow morphology. The composition-dependence of the morphological pahoehoe to `a`a transition in a rheological map is being assessed by comparing our results to

  13. Lead and strontium isotopes and related trace elements as genetic tracers in the Upper Cenozoic rhyolite-basalt association of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doe, B.R.; Leeman, W.P.; Christiansen, R.L.; Hedge, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    Pb, U, Th, Rb and Sr contents and Pb- and Sr-isotopic compositions, together with field and petrological data, are consistent with the hypothesis of derivation of the basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of this volcanic field from source regions in the upper mantle and lower crust, respectively. It is suggested that the isotopic signatures of the basalts were inherited from a 2600 m.y.-old mantle 'keel' attached to the continental crust and were essentially unaffected by passage of the magma through the latter.R.J.P.

  14. Inverse steptoes in Las Bombas volcano, as an evidence of explosive volcanism in a solidified lava flow field. Southern Mendoza-Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risso, Corina; Prezzi, Claudia; Orgeira, María Julia; Nullo, Francisco; Margonari, Liliana; Németh, Karoly

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe the unusual genesis of steptoes in Las Bombas volcano- Llancanelo Volcanic Field (LVF) (Pliocene - Quaternary), Mendoza, Argentina. Typically, a steptoe forms when a lava flow envelops a hill, creating a well-defined stratigraphic relationship between the older hill and the younger lava flow. In the Llancanelo Volcanic Field, we find steptoes formed with an apparent normal stratigraphic relationship but an inverse age-relationship. Eroded remnants of scoria cones occur in "circular depressions" in the lava field. To express the inverse age-relationship between flow fields and depression-filled cones here we define this landforms as inverse steptoes. Magnetometric analysis supports this inverse age relationship, indicating reverse dipolar magnetic anomalies in the lava field and normal dipolar magnetization in the scoria cones (e.g. La Bombas). Negative Bouguer anomalies calculated for Las Bombas further support the interpretation that the scoria cones formed by secondary fracturing on already solidified basaltic lava flows. Advanced erosion and mass movements in the inner edge of the depressions created a perfectly excavated circular depression enhancing the "crater-like" architecture of the preserved landforms. Given the unusual genesis of the steptoes in LVF, we prefer the term inverse steptoe for these landforms. The term steptoe is a geomorphological name that has genetic implications, indicating an older hill and a younger lava flow. Here the relationship is reversed.

  15. A combined field and numerical approach to understanding dilute pyroclastic density current dynamics and hazard potential: Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Gravley, Darren M.; Clarke, Amanda B.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Bloomberg, Simon H.; Agustin-Flores, Javier; Németh, Károly

    2014-04-01

    The most dangerous and deadly hazards associated with phreatomagmatic eruptions in the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF; Auckland, New Zealand) are those related to volcanic base surges - dilute, ground-hugging, particle laden currents with dynamic pressures capable of severe to complete structural damage. We use the well-exposed base surge deposits of the Maungataketake tuff ring (Manukau coast, Auckland), to reconstruct flow dynamics and destructive potential of base surges produced during the eruption. The initial base surge(s) snapped trees up to 0.5 m in diameter near their base as far as 0.7-0.9 km from the vent. Beyond this distance the trees were encapsulated and buried by the surge in growth position. Using the tree diameter and yield strength of the wood we calculate that dynamic pressures (Pdyn) in excess of 12-35 kPa are necessary to cause the observed damage. Next we develop a quantitative model for flow of and sedimentation from a radially-spreading, dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) to determine the damage potential of the base surges produced during the early phases of the eruption and explore the implications of this potential on future eruptions in the region. We find that initial conditions with velocities on the order of 65 m s- 1, bulk density of 38 kg m- 3 and initial, near-vent current thicknesses of 60 m reproduce the field-based Pdyn estimates and runout distances. A sensitivity analysis revealed that lower initial bulk densities result in shorter run-out distances, more rapid deceleration of the current and lower dynamic pressures. Initial velocity does not have a strong influence on run-out distance, although higher initial velocity and slope slightly decrease runout distance due to higher rates of atmospheric entrainment. Using this model we determine that for base surges with runout distances of up to 4 km, complete destruction can be expected within 0.5 km from the vent, moderate destruction can be expected up to 2 km, but much

  16. The Blacktail Creek Tuff: an analytical and experimental study of rhyolites from the Heise volcanic field, Yellowstone hotspot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolte, Torsten; Holtz, Francois; Almeev, Renat; Nash, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    The magma storage conditions of the 6.62 Ma Blacktail Creek Tuff eruption, belonging to the Heise volcanic field (6.62-4.45 Ma old) of the Yellowstone hotspot system, have been investigated by combining thermobarometric and experimental approaches. The results from different geothermometers (e.g., Fe-Ti oxides, feldspar pairs, apatite and zircon solubility, and Ti in quartz) indicate a pre-eruptive temperature in the range 825-875 °C. The temperature estimated using two-pyroxene pairs varies in a range of 810-950 °C, but the pyroxenes are probably not in equilibrium with each other, and the analytical results of melt inclusion in pyroxenes indicate a complex history for clinopyroxene, which hosts two compositionally different inclusion types. One natural Blacktail Creek Tuff rock sample has been used to determine experimentally the equilibrium phase assemblages in the pressure range 100-500 MPa and a water activity range 0.1-1.0. The experiments have been performed at fluid-present conditions, with a fluid phase composed of H2O and CO2, as well as at fluid-absent conditions. The stability of the quartzo-feldspathic phases is similar in both types of experiments, but the presence of mafic minerals such as biotite and clinopyroxene is strongly dependent on the experimental approach. Possible explanations are given for this discrepancy which may have strong impacts on the choice of appropriate experimental approaches for the determination of magma storage conditions. The comparison of the composition of natural phases and of experimentally synthesized phases confirms magma storage temperatures of 845-875 °C. Melt water contents of 1.5-2.5 wt% H2O are required to reproduce the natural Blacktail Creek Tuff mineral assemblage at these temperatures. Using the Ti-in-quartz barometer and the Qz-Ab-Or proportions of natural matrix glasses, coexisting with quartz, plagioclase and sanidine, the depth of magma storage is estimated to be in a pressure range between 130 and

  17. Magma Differentiation and Storage Inferred from Crystal Textures at Harrat Rahat Volcanic Field, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witter, M. R.; Mahood, G. A.; Stelten, M. E.; Downs, D. T.; Zahran, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present results of a petrographic study of Harrat Rahat volcanic field in western Saudi Arabia as part of a collaborative project between the U.S.G.S. and the Saudi Geological Survey. Lavas range in composition from alkali basalt to trachyphonolite. Basalts have <2-10 vol.% phenocrysts of euhedral olivine and plagioclase (± minor clinopyroxene). In intermediate lavas, phenocrysts (<5 vol.%) of olivine and plagioclase are resorbed, and plagioclase also exhibits sieve textures and strong zoning, indicative of complex magmatic histories. Trachyphonolite lavas have 0-35 vol.% large phenocrysts of anorthoclase and trace fayalitic olivine but are characterized by a size distribution of crystals that is seriate in hand specimen, so that most exceeded 45% crystals at the time of eruption. Some contain groundmass alkali amphibole. Crystal size distributions (CSD) of crystal-rich trachyphonolites produce simple linear trends (see below), which are interpreted as signifying that all the crystals are related through a common nucleation and growth history, at more or less constant pressure. Linear CSDs indicate no loss of small crystals due to reheating of magmas by recharge, no gain of small crystals due to late-stage nucleation on ascent or degassing, and no addition of large phenocrysts by crystal accumulation or magma mixing. Experimental studies demonstrate that silica-undersaturated evolved magmas like those erupted at Harrat Rahat can form by fractionation of alkali basalts at crustal depths greater than ~25 km. The observed phenocryst assemblage in the trachyphonolites, however, forms at shallow depths, ~2-4 km, according to MELTS modeling. Coupled with CSD data, this suggests that deep extraction events yield crystal-poor trachyphonolite magmas that rise to the upper crust where they undergo crystallization. Extensive shallow crystallization of trachyphonolites may have triggered eruptions by causing vapor saturation, which lowers magma density via vesiculation and

  18. Magma mixing in the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field brought to light by X-ray microtomography and chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgavi, Daniele; Arzilli, Fabio; Pritchard, Chad; Perugini, Diego; Mancini, Lucia; Larson, Peter; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2015-04-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YVF) hosts at least four mixed magma complexes (Wilcox, 1944; Christiansen et al. 2007; Pritchard et al., 2013). We focus on the well-exposed Grizzly Lake complex. The main evidence of mixing in igneous rocks is commonly found as textural heterogeneities, such as i) flow structures, ii) magmatic enclaves and iii) physico-chemical disequilibria in melt and crystals (e.g. Perugini and Poli, 2012). From the geochemical and mineralogical point of view, quantitative and qualitative analyses of chemical and textural heterogeneity in mixed rocks highlights the important role of mixing dynamics in producing geochemical complexities and heterogeneities (Kratzmann et al., 2009). Zoned crystals and complex mineralogical associations are also considered, in many cases, evidence for mixing (e.g., Murphy at al., 1998; Couch et al., 2001). The generation of such textures implies the development of large contact interfaces between interacting melts/solids through which chemical and crystals exchanges are strongly amplified, leading to highly variable degrees of homogenization depending on differing element mobility (e.g. Perugini et al., 2006; 2008; De Campos et al., 2011; Perugini et al., 2012; Perugini and Poli, 2012; Morgavi et al., 2013a, b, c). Despite the abundant literature regarding magma mixing processes, only a few studies are focused on describing and quantifying the inter-relationship between the morphological texture of mixing patterns and the geochemical variability in mixed rhyolitic and basaltic complexes. (Freundt and Schmincke 1992; Morgavi et al., 2013 a, b, c;). Here, we combine two analytical techniques; X-ray computed microtomography and microprobe analysis to study the texture and chemistry of mixed rocks. Since mixed rocks of Grizzly Lake in the YVF had a very complex history and evolution, a significant amount of chemical measurements were needed to characterize the phases. In addition, X-ray microtomography was

  19. Amplified hazard of small-volume monogenetic eruptions due to environmental controls, Orakei Basin, Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Agustin Flores, Javier

    2012-11-01

    Orakei maar and tuff ring in the Auckland Volcanic Field is an example of a basaltic volcano in which the style and impacts of the eruption of a small volume of magma were modulated by a fine balance between magma flux and groundwater availability. These conditions were optimised by the pre-85 ka eruption being hosted in a zone of fractured and variably permeable Plio-Pleistocene mudstones and sandstones. Orakei maar represents an end-member in the spectrum of short-lived basaltic volcanoes, where substrate conditions rather than the magmatic volatile content was the dominant factor controlling explosivity and eruption styles. The eruption excavated a crater ≫80 m deep that was subsequently filled by slumped crater wall material, followed by lacustrine and marine sediments. The explosion crater may have been less than 800 m in diameter, but wall collapse and wave erosion has left a 1,000-m-diameter roughly circular basin. A tuff ring around part of the maar comprises dominantly base surge deposits, along with subordinate fall units. Grain size, texture and shape characteristics indicate a strong influence of magma-water and magma-mud interactions that controlled explosivity throughout the eruption, but also an ongoing secondary role of magmatic gas-driven expansion and fragmentation. The tuff contains >70 % of material recycled from the underlying Plio-Pliestocene sediments, which is strongly predominant in the >2 ϕ fraction. The magmatic clasts are evolved alkali basalt, consistent with the eruption of a very small batch of magma. The environmental impact of this eruption was disproportionally large, when considering the low volume of magma involved (DRE < 0.003 km3). Hence, this eruption exemplifies one of the worst-case scenarios for an eruption within the densely populated Auckland City, destroying an area of ~3 km2 by crater formation and base surge impact. An equivalent scenario for the same magma conditions without groundwater interaction would yield a

  20. Influences of quaternary climatic changes on processes of soil development on desert loess deposits of the Cima volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McFadden, L.D.; Wells, S.G.; Dohrenwend, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Soils formed in loess are evidence of both relict and buried landscapes developed on Pliocene-to-latest Pleistocene basalt flows of the Cima volcanic field in the eastern Mojave Desert, California. The characteristics of these soils change systematically and as functions of the age and surface morphology of the lava flow. Four distinct phases of soil development are recognized: phase 1 - weakly developed soils on flows less than 0.18 M.y. old; phase 2 - strongly developed soils with thick argillic horizons on 0.18 - 0.7 M.y. old flows; phase 3 - strongly developed soils with truncated argillic horizons massively impregnated by carbonate on 0.7 to 1.1 M.y. old flows; and phase 4 - degraded soils with petrocalcic rubble on Pliocene flows. A critical aspect of the development of stage 1 soils is the evolution of a vesicular A horizon which profoundly affects the infiltration characteristics of the loess parent materials. Laboratory studies show that secondary gypsum and possibly other salt accumulation probably occurred during the period of phase 1 soil development. Slight reddening of the interiors of peds from vesicular-A horizons of phase 1 soils and presence of weakly developed B horizons indicates a slight degree of in situ chemical alteration. However, clay and Fe oxide contents of these soils show that these constituents, as well as carbonates and soluble salts, are incorporated as eolian dust. In contrast to phase 1 soils, chemical and mineralogical analysis of argillic horizons of phase 2 soils indicate proportionally greater degrees of in-situ chemical alteration. These data, the abundant clay films, and the strong reddening in the thick argillic horizons suggest that phase 2 and phase 3 soils formed during long periods of time and periodically were subjected to leaching regimes more intense than those that now exist. Flow-age data and soil-stratigraphic evidence also indicate that several major loess-deposition events occurred during the past ??? 1.0 M

  1. Extensive felsic lavas and rheoignimbrites in the Keweenawan Midcontinent Rift plateau volcanics, Minnesota: petrographic and field recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, John C.; Fitz, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    The ≈8-km-thick sequence of plateau lavas (North Shore Volcanic Group) in northeastern Minnesota that was erupted during the formation of the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent Rift System includes an unusually large proportion (10-25%) of felsic flows (rhyolites and icelandites). Individual flows are now recognized with estimated volumes up to 600 km 3 and lateral extents up to 40 km; some were probably originally much broader. Many are anomalously large compared to most silicic lava flows. Primary structures and textures of these essentially unmetamorphosed rocks indicate eruptive style for most of these large flows. In particular, the features of the basal meter or so and uppermost several meters show that some flows were emplaced as fluid lavas, and others as strongly rheomorphic tuffs. It may be essential in interpreting the origin of felsic flows elsewhere to examine petrographically the lowermost few decimeters and the top, where the only evidence (poorly to strongly welded shards) may exist of the pyroclastic origin of a large, otherwise lava-like flow. Interior textures of these crystalline flows provide evidence of high-temperature eruption, especially in the form of abundant paramorphs of magmatic tridymite in the groundmass, commonly arranged in a pilotaxitic flow structure. Based on structures, textures, field relations, and geochemistry, We conclude that (a) all the icelandites and some rhyolites were emplaced as large, moderately to very fluid lava flows that spread widely while crystallizing tridymite; and that (b) some large rhyolites, which are only sparsely phyric, were emplaced as pyroclastic flows subsequently remobilized as rheoignimbrites. The mode of emplacement of one of the largest aphyric flows remains enigmatic. Vent areas or characteristics are unknown. The low apparent viscosity of the erupted magmas is probably attributable to compositional factors (F content, high Fe 2+) as well as to high temperatures and eruption rates. Estimated temperatures

  2. The Volatile Element Evolution of Intra-plate Alkaline Rocks as Recorded by Apatite: An Example from the Hegau Volcanic Field (Southwest Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Der Handt, A.; Rahn, M. K. W.; Wang, L. X.; Marks, M. A. W.

    2014-12-01

    The role of volatiles in the petrogenesis of alkaline intra-plate magmas has been the subject of an increasing number of experimental studies. The study of naturally occurring rocks and their volatile contents is often complicated by syn- and post-eruptive degassing and alteration processes. Minerals that incorporate volatiles into their structure such as apatites are often more faithful recorders of the pre-eruptive volatile budget. The Hegau volcanic field in Southwest Germany is part of the Central European Volcanic Province, lies around 60-70 km to the east of the Upper Rhine graben and of Miocene age. Three main lithological units can be distinguished (1) olivine melilites (2) phonolites and (3) the "Deckentuff" series referring to a series of diatreme-filling pipe breccias and lapilli tuff layers. Carbonatites occur subordinately in the Hegau province. Earlier radiometric age dating suggested distinct phases of volcanic activity of Deckentuffs, melilites and phonolites with little overlap, but new apatite fission-track and (U-Th)/He age data suggest a synchronous activity. Apatite is an abundant accessory phase in the Deckentuff and phonolite series and we investigated its major, trace and volatile element composition by EPMA, SIMS and cathodoluminescence imaging. Pronounced core-rim zoning of apatite in places attests that diffusional equilibration was very limited and they likely retained their primary compositions. This allows us to trace the entire magmatic evolution of the Hegau province from its most primitive to most evolved products as well as resolve it in time by combining age dating with compositional analysis. Apatite compositions fall along the OH-F join with low Cl-contents (<0.5 wt%). Volatile contents (Cl, OH, S) are highest in most primitive compositions and decrease with further evolution while F increases. Multiple magmatic cycles can be discerned with a general trend to the more evolved phonolite compositions toward the end of volcanic

  3. Late Middle Eocence Nanny Creek calc-alkaline volcanic field, NE Nevada and NW Utah: Age, extent, and implications for Eocene tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Thorman, C.H.; Brooks, W.E.; Snee, L.W.; Potter, C.J.; Dubiel, R.J.; Ketner, K.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Eighteen new [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dates indicate that widespread rhyolitic to andesitic calc-alkaline volcanic rocks in NE Nevada and NW Utah are part of a distinct eruptive sequence that is late Middle Eocene in age, considerably older than previously believed. Most of the rocks were erupted at 41--39 Ma. The presently recognized extent of the field spans 11 ranges from near Elko on the west to the Silver Island Mts on the east and from 20 miles north of Wells to the southern Deep Creek Range. The authors informally designate this the Nanny Creek volcanic field, the type area being Nanny Creek, in the northern Pequop Mts, where compositional and stratigraphic features of the field are clearly displayed. Typically, the base of the sequence includes one or more rhyolite ash-flow tuffs and (or) dacite flows; sources for the tuffs probably were outside the study area as they all appear to be outflow-facies rocks. The similarities in age, chemistry, and mode of occurrence of these rocks throughout their extent indicate that they are all part of the same eruptive sequence. The widespread occurrence of ash-flows in the lower part of the eruptive cycle suggests that the region initially was one of moderate to low relief. The central part of the field rests with angular discordance on Devonian to Triassic rocks, whereas the western and eastern parts rest with angular discordance on lower Eocene rocks (Elko and White Sage basinal rocks, respectively). Ostracode-bearing limestones at several localities in the central part of the field are parallel to the overlying volcanics rocks; the authors interpret the limestones to be correlative with the Elko and White Sage and the limestone/volcanic contact to be a disconformity that is correlative with the angular unconformities to the east and west. These relationships identify a widespread pre-late Middle Eocene deformational event during which the Elko and White Sage basins, but not the intervening area, were deformed.

  4. Surface heat flow and CO2 emissions within the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rissmann, C.; Christenson, B.; Werner, C.; Leybourne, M.; Cole, J.; Gravley, D.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions and heat flow have been determined from the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand following 20a of production (116MW e). Soil CO2 degassing was quantified with 2663 CO2 flux measurements using the accumulation chamber method, and 2563 soil temperatures were measured and converted to equivalent heat flow (Wm -2) using published soil temperature heat flow functions. Both CO2 flux and heat flow were analysed statistically and then modelled using 500 sequential Gaussian simulations. Forty subsoil CO 2 gas samples were also analysed for stable C isotopes. Following 20a of production, current CO2 emissions equated to 111??6.7T/d. Observed heat flow was 70??6.4MW, compared with a pre-production value of 122MW. This 52MW reduction in surface heat flow is due to production-induced drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows (61.5MW) and steam-heated pools (8.6MW) within the Ohaaki West thermal area (OHW). The drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows at Ohaaki means that the soil zone is now the major natural pathway of heat release from the high-temperature reservoir. On the other hand, a net gain in thermal ground heat flow of 18MW (from 25MW to 43.3??5MW) at OHW is associated with permeability increases resulting from surface unit fracturing by production-induced ground subsidence. The Ohaaki East (OHE) thermal area showed no change in distribution of shallow and deep soil temperature contours despite 20a of production, with an observed heat flow of 26.7??3MW and a CO 2 emission rate of 39??3T/d. The negligible change in the thermal status of the OHE thermal area is attributed to the low permeability of the reservoir beneath this area, which has limited production (mass extraction) and sheltered the area from the pressure decline within the main reservoir. Chemistry suggests that although alkali-Cl outflows once contributed significantly to the natural surface heat flow (~50%) they contributed little (<1%) to pre-production CO 2

  5. Dikes, sills, and stress-regime evolution during emplacement of the Jagged Rocks Complex, Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field, Navajo Nation, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Giuseppe; White, J. D. L.; Ort, M. H.

    2015-03-01

    The dikes and related intrusions formed below small volcanoes in volcanic fields are remnants of the simplest volcanic plumbing systems. Their geometry is controlled by interaction of magma-driven cracks with country rock, and reveals regional structural and stress patterns at the time of their emplacement. The shallow stress field, however, may change during the time an intrusion complex is emplaced, in response to addition or removal of magma and country rock during associated surface eruptions. The Jagged Rocks Complex, in the Miocene Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field, Navajo Nation, Arizona, is exposed 300-350 m below the pre-eruptive surface. It comprises a group of generally NW-SE striking dikes, punctuated in places by buds, a saucer-like intrusion, larger pyroclastic massifs and a diatreme. We made measurements of 13 dikes, divided into 172 segments, with thicknesses from 8 to 122 cm (mean 43 cm) and lengths of 60 to 780 m. Several sills and inclined sheets in places are thicker than dikes, having mean thicknesses of 48 cm and 73 cm respectively. Dikes typically show straight, parallel, and en echelon patterns, while sills and inclined sheets are curved. The northwestern dikes differ from the rest in containing large mafic crystals, and are inferred to have been emplaced after the others. We find that the strike of the overall complex (dikes and other sheets, elongate massifs and aligned sub-cylindrical bodies) reflects a crystalline-basement control that is evident throughout Hopi Buttes. Over the period of the complex's emplacement, local stress patterns were not stable. We infer that excavation of deep maar craters, and perhaps the construction of a scoria cone at the surface, modified the local stress patterns to favor emplacement of sills and en echelon dikes later in the complex's evolution, in contrast to simple straight dikes as the complex first formed.

  6. Paleomagnetism and 40Ar / 39Ar Geochronology of Yemeni Oligocene volcanics: Implications for timing and duration of Afro-Arabian traps and geometry of the Oligocene paleomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisager, Peter; Knight, Kim B.; Baker, Joel A.; Ukstins Peate, Ingrid; Al-Kadasi, Mohamed; Al-Subbary, Abdulkarim; Renne, Paul R.

    2005-09-01

    A combined paleomagnetic and 40Ar / 39Ar study was carried out along eight stratigraphically overlapping sections in the Oligocene Afro-Arabian flood volcanic province in Yemen (73 sites). The composite section covers the entire volcanic stratigraphy in the sampling region and represents five polarity zones that are correlated to the geomagnetic polarity time scale based on 40Ar / 39Ar ages from this and previous studies. The resulting magnetostratigraphy is similar to that of the conjugate margin in Ethiopia. The earliest basaltic volcanism took place in a reverse polarity chron that appears to correspond to C11r, while the massive rhyolitic ignimbrite eruptions correlated to ash layers in Oligocene Indian Ocean sediment 2700 km away from the Afro-Arabian traps, appear to have taken place during magnetochron C11n. The youngest ignimbrite was emplaced during magnetochron C9n. Both 40Ar / 39Ar and paleomagnetic data suggest rapid < 1 Ma eruption of the basal basalt units and punctuated eruption of the upper silicic units over a duration potentially as long as 3 Ma with interspersed eruptive hiatuses. Eruption of the basal basalts may have preceded the Oi2 cooling event. The paleomagnetic pole λ = 74.2°N, φ = 249.1°E (A95 = 3.6°; N = 48) is supported by a positive reversal test. Paleosecular variation, estimated as the angular standard deviation of the VGP distribution 14.2° + 2.3° / - 1.7°, is close to expected, suggesting that the paleomagnetic pole represents a time-averaged field. The pole is in excellent accord with the paleomagnetic poles obtained from the Ethiopian part of the Afro-Arabian province, after closure of the Red Sea. By analyzing Afro-Arabian paleomagnetic data in conjunction with contemporaneous paleomagnetic poles available from different latitudes we argue that the Oligocene paleomagnetic field was dominated by the axial dipole with insignificant non-dipole field contributions.

  7. Characteristics of zircons from volcanic ash-derived tonsteins in Late Permian coal fields of eastern Yunnan, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, Y.; Ren, Y.; Tang, D.; Bohor, B.

    1994-01-01

    Kaolinitic tonsteins of altered synsedimentary volcanic ash-fall origin are well developed in the Late Permian coal-bearing formations of eastern Yunnan Province. Because of their unique origin, wide lateral extent, relatively constant thickness and sharp contacts with enclosing strata, great importance has been attached to these isochronous petrographic markers. In order to compare tonsteins with co-existing, non-cineritic claystones and characterize the individuality of tonsteins from different horizons for coal bed correlation, a semi-quantitative method was developed that is based on statistical analyses of the concentration and morphology of zircons and their spatial distribution patterns. This zircon-based analytical method also serves as a means for reconstructing volcanic ash-fall dispersal patterns. The results demonstrate that zircons from claystones of two different origins (i.e., tonstein and non-cineritic claystone) differ greatly in their relative abundances, crystal morphologies and spatial distribution patterns. Tonsteins from the same area but from different horizons are characterized by their own unique statistical patterns in terms of zircon concentration values and morphologic parameters (crystal length, width and the ratio of these values), thus facilitating stratigraphic correlation. Zircons from the same tonstein horizon also show continuous variation in these statistical patterns as a function of areal distribution, making it possible to identify the main path and direction in which the volcanic source materials were transported by prevailing winds. ?? 1994.

  8. Assessment of planetary geologic mapping techniques for Mars using terrestrial analogs: The SP Mountain area of the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.; Skinner, J.A.; Crumpler, L.S.; Dohm, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    We photogeologically mapped the SP Mountain region of the San Francisco Volcanic Field in northern Arizona, USA to evaluate and improve the fidelity of approaches used in geologic mapping of Mars. This test site, which was previously mapped in the field, is chiefly composed of Late Cenozoic cinder cones, lava flows, and alluvium perched on Permian limestone of the Kaibab Formation. Faulting and folding has deformed the older rocks and some of the volcanic materials, and fluvial erosion has carved drainage systems and deposited alluvium. These geologic materials and their formational and modificational histories are similar to those for regions of the Martian surface. We independently prepared four geologic maps using topographic and image data at resolutions that mimic those that are commonly used to map the geology of Mars (where consideration was included for the fact that Martian features such as lava flows are commonly much larger than their terrestrial counterparts). We primarily based our map units and stratigraphic relations on geomorphology, color contrasts, and cross-cutting relationships. Afterward, we compared our results with previously published field-based mapping results, including detailed analyses of the stratigraphy and of the spatial overlap and proximity of the field-based vs. remote-based (photogeologic) map units, contacts, and structures. Results of these analyses provide insights into how to optimize the photogeologic mapping of Mars (and, by extension, other remotely observed planetary surfaces). We recommend the following: (1) photogeologic mapping as an excellent approach to recovering the general geology of a region, along with examination of local, high-resolution datasets to gain insights into the complexity of the geology at outcrop scales; (2) delineating volcanic vents and lava-flow sequences conservatively and understanding that flow abutment and flow overlap are difficult to distinguish in remote data sets; (3) taking care to

  9. Spatial and Alignment Analyses for a Field of Small Volcanic Vents South of Pavonis Mons and Implications for the Tharsis Province, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob E.; Glaze, Lori S.; Greeley, Ronald; Hauber, Ernst; Baloga, Stephen; Sakimoto, Susan E. H.; Williams, David A.; Glotch, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    A field of small volcanic vents south of Pavonis Mons was mapped with each vent assigned a two-dimensional data point. Nearest neighbor and two-point azimuth analyses were applied to the resulting location data. Nearest neighbor results show that vents within this field are spatially random in a Poisson sense, suggesting that the vents formed independently of each other without sharing a centralized magma source at shallow depth. Two-point azimuth results show that the vents display north-trending alignment relationships between one another. This trend corresponds to the trends of faults and fractures of the Noachian-aged Claritas Fossae, which might extend into our study area buried beneath more recently emplaced lava flows. However, individual elongate vent summit structures do not consistently display the same trend. The development of the volcanic field appears to display tectonic control from buried Noachian-aged structural patterns on small, ascending magma bodies while the surface orientations of the linear vents might reflect different, younger tectonic patterns. These results suggest a complex interaction between magma ascension through the crust, and multiple, older, buried Tharsis-related tectonic structures.

  10. The nature of the crust in the Yukon-Koyukuk province as inferred from the chemical and isotopic composition of five Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary volcanic fields in western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moll-Stalcup, E.; Arth, Joseph G.

    1989-01-01

    Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary volcanic and plutonic rocks in western Alaska comprise a vast magmatic province extending from the Alaska Range north to the Arctic Circle, south to Bristol Bay, and west to the Bering Sea Shelf. The chemical and isotopic composition of five of these Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary volcanic fields in the north central part of this province were studied to determine if Paleozoic or older continental crust underlies the Yukon-Koyukuk province. -from Authors

  11. Geothermal Prospecting with Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System Technologies in Xilingol Volcanic Field in the Eastern Inner Mongolia, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, F.; Huang, S.; Xiong, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Cheng, Y.

    2013-05-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable and low-carbon energy source independent of climate change. It is most abundant in Cenozoic volcanic areas where high temperature can be obtained within a relatively shallow depth. Like other geological resources, geothermal resource prospecting and exploration require a good understanding of the host media. Remote sensing (RS) has the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution and broad spatial coverage over the conventional geological and geophysical prospecting, while geographical information system (GIS) has intuitive, flexible, and convenient characteristics. In this study, we apply RS and GIS technics in prospecting the geothermal energy potential in Xilingol, a Cenozoic volcanic field in the eastern Inner Mongolia, NE China. Landsat TM/ETM+ multi-temporal images taken under clear-sky conditions, digital elevation model (DEM) data, and other auxiliary data including geological maps of 1:2,500,000 and 1:200,000 scales are used in this study. The land surface temperature (LST) of the study area is retrieved from the Landsat images with the single-channel algorithm on the platform of ENVI developed by ITT Visual Information Solutions. Information of linear and circular geological structure is then extracted from the LST maps and compared to the existing geological data. Several useful technologies such as principal component analysis (PCA), vegetation suppression technique, multi-temporal comparative analysis, and 3D Surface View based on DEM data are used to further enable a better visual geologic interpretation with the Landsat imagery of Xilingol. The Preliminary results show that major faults in the study area are mainly NE and NNE oriented. Several major volcanism controlling faults and Cenozoic volcanic eruption centers have been recognized from the linear and circular structures in the remote images. Seven areas have been identified as potential targets for further prospecting geothermal energy based on the visual

  12. Lower crustal earthquake swarms beneath Mammoth Mountain, California - evidence for the magmatic roots to the Mammoth Mountain mafic volcanic field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. P.; Shelly, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a cluster of dacitic domes erupted ~ 68 ka. It stands on the SW topographic rim of Long Valley caldera in eastern CA. Structurally, it is outboard of the caldera ring-fracture system and its magmatic system is genetically distinct from that of the caldera. It resides within a field of mafic (basaltic) vents that erupted between 190 - 8 ka. A series of phreatic explosions from the north flank of the mountain some 700 ybp attest to the infusion of heat to shallow depths shortly prior to the 600 ybp eruptions of the Inyo Domes 6 to 12 km north of the Mountain. Unrest beneath Mammoth Mountain since 1980 has included 1) swarms of brittle-failure earthquakes in the upper 10 km of the crust that define concentric elliptical ring-like patterns centered beneath the summit, 2) mid-crustal (depths 10 to 20 km) long-period volcanic earthquakes, 3) the onset of diffuse CO2 degassing in 1990 following an 11-month-long swarm of shallow (<10 km), brittle-failure earthquakes in 1989, 4) occasional very-long-period earthquakes at depths of ~ 3 km, and 5) brief swarms of lower-crustal, brittle-failure earthquakes at depths of 20 to 30 km, including sizable episodes June 16-17, 2006 and September 29-30, 2009. Seismic waveform correlation analysis at multiple stations reveals that these lower-crustal, brittle-failure swarms consist of tens to hundreds of repeated similar events and also serves to identify many events not included in the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) catalog. In the case of the 2009 episode, an evolution in waveform is clearly discernible over the sequence, suggesting a corresponding evolution in source location or mechanism. Work is ongoing to take advantage of the waveform similarity to estimate precise hypocentral locations of these events in order to distinguish between these possibilities.We suggest that the brittle-failure earthquakes at depths of 20 to 30 km are occurring within the more mafic mid- to lower-crust, which can remain

  13. Paleomagnetism and 40ar/39ar Geochronology of the Plio-Pleistocene Boring Volcanic Field: Implications for the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, J. T.; Fleck, R. J.; Evarts, R. C.; Calvert, A. T.; Conrey, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Boring volcanic field (BVF) in western Oregon and Washington has been the subject of a recently completed investigation that included detailed geologic mapping, petrographic and geochemical analyses, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic and paleomagnetic studies. At least 80 monogenetic volcanic centers compose the BVF, each of which erupted small volumes of magma ranging from basalt to mafic andesite over short intervals of time. More than 140 40Ar/39Ar determinations for lava flows and intrusions in the BVF range in age from ~3100 ka to ~60 ka. Oriented samples for paleomagnetic analysis were collected at an equivalent number of localities (>160) coincident with, or within the same unit proximal to, the geochronologic sampling sites. Based on the frequency distribution of ages, the most significant episodes of Boring volcanism occurred between 2700 and 2200 ka, 1700 and 500 ka, and 350 and 60 ka. A systematic determination of the BVF's eruptive history was undertaken mainly to assess its anomalous neotectonic setting west of the Cascade arc axis, as well as the magnitude of its concomitant volcanic hazards within the greater Portland and Vancouver metropolitan areas. Our paleomagnetic and geochronologic data, however, also have significant implications for the timing of geomagnetic field reversals and excursions during the Late Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs. The BVF data are more numerous higher in the section, and they capture transitional fields at two polarity boundaries allowing precise age determinations to be made for these reversals: the Brunhes-Matuyama transition is thus dated at 773±5 ka, and the upper Jaramillo-Matuyama transition at 973±6 ka. The lower Jaramillo-Matuyama transition occurred prior to 1068±8 ka, and the normal Cobb subchron must have occurred between reversed-polarity Matuyama flows dated at 1159±14 ka and 1207±6 ka. The lower Olduvai-Matuyama transition occurred prior to 1927±4 ka, and the Matuyama-Gauss transition prior to 2616

  14. Characterization and initial field test of an 8-14 μm thermal infrared hyperspectral imager for measuring SO2 in volcanic plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrieli, Andrea; Wright, Robert; Lucey, Paul G.; Porter, John N.; Garbeil, Harold; Pilger, Eric; Wood, Mark

    2016-10-01

    The ability to image and quantify SO2 path-concentrations in volcanic plumes, either by day or by night, is beneficial to volcanologists. Gas emission rates are affected by the chemical equilibria in rising magmas and a better understanding of this relationship would be useful for short-term eruption prediction. A newly developed remote sensing long-wave thermal InfraRed (IR) imaging hyperspectral sensor - the Thermal Hyperspectral Imager (THI) - was built and tested. The system employs a Sagnac interferometer and an uncooled microbolometer in rapid scanning configuration to collect hyperspectral images of volcanic plumes. Each pixel in the resulting image yields a spectrum with 50 samples between 8 and 14 μm. Images are spectrally and radiometrically calibrated using an IR source with a narrow band filter and two blackbodies. In this paper, the sensitivity of the instrument for the purpose of quantifying SO2 using well constrained laboratory experiments is evaluated, and initial field results from Kīlauea volcano, Hawai'i, are presented. The sensitivity of THI was determined using gas cells filled with known concentrations of SO2 and using NIST-traceable blackbodies to simulate a range of realistic background conditions. Measurements made by THI were then benchmarked against a high spectral resolution off-the-shelf Michelson FTIR instrument. Theoretical thermal IR spectral radiances were computed with MODTRAN5 for the same optical conditions, to evaluate how well the (known) concentration of SO2 in the gas cells could be retrieved from the resulting THI spectra. Finally, THI was recently field-tested at Kīlauea to evaluate its ability to image the concentration of SO2 in a real volcanic plume. A path-concentration of 7150 ppm m was retrieved from measurements made near the Halema'uma'u vent.

  15. Rocks of the Thirtynine Mile volcanic field as possible sources of uranium for epigenetic deposits in central Colorado, USA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    The most likely volcanic source rock for uranium in epigenetic deposits of the Tallahassee Creek uranium district and nearby areas is the Wall Mountain Tuff. The widespread occurrence of the Tuff, its high apparent original uranium content, approx 11 ppm, and its apparent loss of uranium from devitrification and other alteration suggest its role in providing that element. An estimate of the original Th/U ratio is based on the present thorium and uranium contents of the basal vitrophyre of the Tuff from Castle Rock Gulch, Hecla Junction and other areas.-from Author

  16. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distingushing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Lava Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts [1-3]. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  17. Mapping Planetary Volcanic Deposits: Identifying Vents and Distinguishing between Effects of Eruption Conditions and Local Storage and Release on Flow Field Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, J. E.; Eppler, D. B.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Hurwitz, D. M.; Whitson, P.; Janoiko, B.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial geologic mapping techniques are regularly used for "photogeologic" mapping of other planets, but these approaches are complicated by the diverse type, areal coverage, and spatial resolution of available data sets. When available, spatially-limited in-situ human and/or robotic surface observations can sometimes introduce a level of detail that is difficult to integrate with regional or global interpretations. To assess best practices for utilizing observations acquired from orbit and on the surface, our team conducted a comparative study of geologic mapping and interpretation techniques. We compared maps generated for the same area in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona using 1) data collected for reconnaissance before and during the 2010 Desert Research And Technology Studies campaign, and 2) during a traditional, terrestrial field geology study. The operations, related results, and direct mapping comparisons are discussed in companion LPSC abstracts. Here we present new geologic interpretations for a volcanic cone and related lava flows as derived from all approaches involved in this study. Mapping results indicate a need for caution when interpreting past eruption conditions on other planetary surfaces from orbital data alone.

  18. Accessory mineral U-Th-Pb ages and 40Ar/39Ar eruption chronology, and their bearing on rhyolitic magma evolution in the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, J.I.; Vazquez, J.A.; Renne, P.R.; Schmitt, A.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Reid, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    We determined Ar/Ar eruption ages of eight extrusions from the Pleistocene Coso volcanic field, a long-lived series of small volume rhyolitic domes in eastern California. Combined with ion-microprobe dating of crystal ages of zircon and allanite from these lavas and from granophyre geothermal well cuttings, we were able to track the range of magma-production rates over the past 650 ka at Coso. In ??? 230 ka rhyolites we find no evidence of protracted magma residence or recycled zircon (or allanite) from Pleistocene predecessors. A significant subset of zircon in the ???85 ka rhyolites yielded ages between ???100 and 200 Ma, requiring that generation of at least some rhyolites involves material from Mesozoic basement. Similar zircon xenocrysts are found in an ???200 ka granophyre. The new age constraints imply that magma evolution at Coso can occur rapidly as demonstrated by significant changes in rhyolite composition over short time intervals (???10's to 100's ka). In conjunction with radioisotopic age constraints from other young silicic volcanic fields, dating of Coso rhyolites highlights the fact that at least some (and often the more voluminous) rhyolites are produced relatively rapidly, but that many small-volume rhyolites likely represent separation from long-lived mushy magma bodies. ?? The Author(s) 2009.

  19. Channel and tube flow features associated with the Twin Craters Lava Flow, Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field, NM: Insights into similar features on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, R.; deWet, A.; Bleacher, J. E.; von Meerscheidt, H. C.; Hamilton, C.; Garry, W. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field lies near the center of the Jemez lineament that extends from central Arizona to northeastern New Mexico. The Jemez lineament is a result of rifting in the Earth's crust and is associated with volcanic activity that spans the last 16 Ma. The youngest volcanic activity associated with the lineament includes basaltic lava that was erupted 3 ka ago to form the McCartys Flow. The Twin Craters flow is moderately older (18.0 ka), but it also well-preserved and provides an ideal location to investigate volcanic processes and landforms. In this study, we combined detailed field observations and mapping with remote sensing to better understand variations in morphology along the transport system of the flow . The Twin Craters flow is characterized as an aā and tube-fed pāhoehoe flow with braided or branching tubes and channels; and associated aā and pāhoehoe break-outs. It is possible that the variations in morphology along the same transport structure might be related to pre-flow slope, which might have also been variable along flow. Shatter ring features are thought to be related to changes in eruption rate, and therefore, local flux through the system. However, over-pressurization of the tube might also be related to changes in local discharge rate associated with the ponding and release of lava within the transport system that may be due to interactions between the lava and obstacles along the flow's path (see Mallonee et al., this meeting). Many of these features are similar to features present in the Tharsis Montes region of Mars and particularly on the southern apron of Ascraeus Mons. The detailed description of the morphology of the Twin Craters Lava Flow and the understanding of the emplacement mechanisms will be crucial in identifying the processes that formed the Ascraeus flows and channels. This will aid in determining if the lava surface textures are directly related to eruption conditions or if they have been significantly

  20. Reconstructing paleoenvironmental conditions during the past 50 ka from the biogeochemical record of Laguna Potrok Aike, southern Patagonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, A.; Rosén, P.; Kliem, P.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.

    2011-12-01

    Total organic carbon (TOC), total inorganic carbon (TIC) and biogenic silica (BSi) assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) are used to reconstruct the environmental history during the past 50kyrs in high resolution from Laguna Potrok Aike. During the Holocene warmer conditions lead to an increased productivity reflected in higher TOC and BSi contents. Calcite precipitation initiated around 9 ka cal. BP probably due to supersaturation induced by lake level lowering. It is assumed that prior to this time period sediments are carbonate-free because high lake-level conditions prevailed. During the Glacial, increased runoff linked to permafrost, precipitation related to stronger cyclonic activity and reduced evaporation have caused higher lake levels. Moreover, during cold glacial conditions lake productivity was low and organic matter mainly of algal or cyanobacterial origin as indicated by generally low TOC and C/N values. During interstadials, such as the Antarctic A-events and the Younger Dryas, TOC contents appear to rise. The glacial C/N ratios and their correlation with TOC concentrations indicate that aquatic moss blooms probably induce these increases in TOC. Aquatic mosses grow if surface water temperatures rise due to warmer climatic conditions and/or development of a lake water stratification. The latter may occur if wind speeds are low and melt water inflow caused higher density gradients. Prevailing permafrost thawing during warmer periods could lead to considerable rises of lake levels, which would contribute to the preservation of organic material. This may explain why higher C/N and TOC values occur at the end of Antarctic A-events. For the uppermost 25 m, the BSi profile shows a high correlation with the TOC profile. In deeper horizons, however, there are indications that the BSi/TOC ratio increased. This part of the record is dominated by mass movement events, which may have supplied nutrients and thus triggered diatom blooms.

  1. Remote Sensing as a First Step in Geothermal Exploration in the Xilingol Volcanic Field in NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, F.; Huang, S.; Xiong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Geothermal energy is a renewable and low-carbon energy source independent of climate change. It is most abundant in Cenozoic volcanic areas where high temperature can be obtained within a relatively shallow depth. Geological structures play an important role in the transfer and storage of geothermal energy. Like other geological resources, geothermal resource prospecting and exploration require a good understanding of the host media. Remote sensing (RS) has the advantages of high spatial and temporal resolution and broad spatial coverage over the conventional geological and geophysical prospecting techniques, while geographical information system (GIS) has intuitive, flexible, and convenient characteristics. In this study, RS and GIS techniques are utilized to prospect the geothermal energy potential in Xilingol, a Cenozoic volcanic area in the eastern Inner Mongolia, NE China. Landsat TM/ETM+ multi-temporal images taken under clear-sky conditions, digital elevation model (DEM) data, and other auxiliary data including geological maps of 1:2,500,000 and 1:200,000 scales are used in this study. The land surface temperature (LST) of the study area is retrieved from the Landsat images with a single-channel algorithm. Prior to the LST retrieval, the imagery data are preprocessed to eliminate abnormal values by reference to the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the improved normalized water index (MNDWI) on the ENVI platform developed by ITT Visual Information Solutions. Linear and circular geological structures are then inferred through visual interpretation of the LST maps with references to the existing geological maps in conjunction with the computer automatic interpretation features such as lineament frequency, lineament density, and lineament intersection. Several useful techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA), image classification, vegetation suppression, multi-temporal comparative analysis, and 3D Surface View based on DEM data are

  2. Counterclockwise rotations in the Late Eocene-Oligocene volcanic fields of San Luis Potosí and Sierra de Guanajuato (eastern Mesa Central, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, Louis; Gattacceca, Jerôme; Rangin, Claude; Martínez-Reyes, Juventino; Demory, François

    2014-12-01

    We used paleomagnetic and structural data to investigate the late Eocene-Oligocene tectonic evolution of the Mesa Central area in Mexico. The Mesa Central was affected by NW-trending faults (Tepehuanes-San Luis fault system) coeval with a Late Eocene-Oligocene ignimbrite flare-up and by post-27 Ma NNE-trending grabens related to the Basin and Range. We obtained reliable paleomagnetic directions from 61 sites within the Late Eocene-Oligocene volcanic series (~ 30 to ~ 27 Ma) of the San Luis Potosí volcanic field and Sierra de Guanajuato. For each site we also measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). Tilt corrections were made using AMS data for 33 sites where in situ bedding measurements were not available. Paleomagnetic directions indicate counterclockwise rotations of about 10° with respect to stable North America after 30-25 Ma. Structural data suggest that the volcanic succession was mainly affected by normal faults. However, we also found evidences for oblique or horizontal striae showing a left-lateral component along NW-trending faults and a right lateral component along NE-trending faults. Both motions are consistent with a N-S extension oblique to the Tepehuanes-San Luis fault system. Previous paleomagnetic studies in northern and southern Mexico show the prevalence of minor left-lateral shear components along regional-scale transpressional and transtensional lineaments. Our paleomagnetic data may reflect thus small vertical-axis rotations related to a minor shear component coeval with the Oligocene intra-arc extension in central Mexico.

  3. Field-trip guide to volcanic and volcaniclastic deposits of the lower Jurassic Talkeetna formation, Sheep Mountain, south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Blodgett, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    This guide provides information for a one-day field trip in the vicinity of Sheep Mountain, just north of the Glenn Highway in south-central Alaska. The Lower Jurassic Talkeetna Formation, consisting of extrusive volcanic and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks of the Talkeetna arc complex, is exposed on and near Sheep Mountain. Field-trip stops within short walking distance of the Glenn Highway (approximately two hours’ drive from Anchorage) are described, which will be visited during the Geological Society of America Penrose meeting entitled Crustal Genesis and Evolution: Focus on Arc Lower Crust and Shallow Mantle, held in Valdez, Alaska, in July 2006. Several additional exposures of the Talkeetna Formation on other parts of Sheep Mountain that would need to be accessed with longer and more strenuous walking or by helicopter are also mentioned.

  4. Volcanic gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, Kenneth A.; Gerlach, Terrance M.

    1995-01-01

    In Roman mythology, Vulcan, the god of fire, was said to have made tools and weapons for the other gods in his workshop at Olympus. Throughout history, volcanoes have frequently been identified with Vulcan and other mythological figures. Scientists now know that the “smoke" from volcanoes, once attributed by poets to be from Vulcan’s forge, is actually volcanic gas naturally released from both active and many inactive volcanoes. The molten rock, or magma, that lies beneath volcanoes and fuels eruptions, contains abundant gases that are released to the surface before, during, and after eruptions. These gases range from relatively benign low-temperature steam to thick hot clouds of choking sulfurous fume jetting from the earth. Water vapor is typically the most abundant volcanic gas, followed by carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. Other volcanic gases are hydrogen sulfide, hydrochloric acid, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrofluoric acid, and other trace gases and volatile metals. The concentrations of these gas species can vary considerably from one volcano to the next.

  5. Provenance of the Gueydan Formation, south Texas: Implications for the late Oligocene—early Miocene tectonic evolution of the Trans-Pecos volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Don F.; Krystinik, Jon G.; McKee, Bryce J.

    1988-12-01

    Coarse fluvial deposits of the Soledad Member of the Gueydan Formation were derived from the Trans-Pecos volcanic field (TPVF), but the proportions of clast types in the deposits do not match present outcrop abundances in the TPVF. Basalt and mafic trachyte are most abundant in Soledad conglomerate and sandstone, durable trachyte forming the largest clasts. In contrast, the surviving remnant of the TPVF is dominated by silicic lava and tuff. The basaltic and trachytic clasts most closely resemble rocks within some of the younger (˜32-27 Ma) units in the Davis, Chinati, and Bofecillos mountains of the TPVF. Our data suggest that these and similar units were much more widespread at the time of Gueydan deposition and were largely stripped from the TPVF during erosion (1-2 km). Gueydan deposition may have been associated with regional uplift of the TPVF accompanying the onset of Basin and Range extension. This uplift would have provided the steep gradient necessary to transport coarse detritus from the TPVF to the Gulf Coast. Basin and Range extension eventually disrupted the course of the ancestral Rio Grande-Rio Conchos, thereby cutting off the supply of volcanic detritus and ending Gueydan deposition.

  6. Nature of basalt-deep crust interaction in the petrogenesis of a potassium-rich, silicic-dominated eruptive system, Davis Mountain volcanic field, west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, R.L.; Walker, J.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Davis Mountain volcanic field (DMVF) is one of several silicic-dominated eruptive centers that constitute the bulk of the Trans Pecos volcanic province (TPVP). New major-, trace element, and Pb-O isotope data on local granulite-facies xenoliths and the DMVF are used in evaluating the extent of basalt-deep crust interaction to produce voluminous silicic lavas and -ignimbrites. The DMVF (39.3--35.4 Ma) is a high-K, alkali basalt-potassic trachybasalt-shoshonite-latite-trachyte-rhyolite volcanoplutonic series with the evolved members being silica-saturated. DMF silicic rocks are characterized by high concentrations of Rb, Th, U, and K, low-[sup 18]O and have a broad range in Pb isotopes. These characteristics are inconsistent with an origin by partial melting of a Rb-Th-U depleted, unradiogenic Pb granulitic deep crust. However, distinctly different Pb isotope compositions between mafic and silicic rocks preclude an origin by fractional crystallization alone. Multistage-AFC involving a mantle-source, various proportions of OL-CPX-PLAG-KSPAR-MAG-AP-BIO-QTZ-aenigmatite-ZR differentiation, limited (<10%) amounts of deep and upper crustal contamination, and mixing between mafic and silicic magmas can satisfactorily account for the observed chemical and isotopic variation in the DMVF.

  7. Closer look at lunar volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Heiken, G.; Taylor, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    Although the American Apollo and Soviet Luna missions concentrated on mare basalt samples, major questions remain about lunar volcanism. Lunar field work will be indispensable for resolving the scientific questions about ages, compositions, and eruption processes of lunar volcanism. From a utilitarian standpoint, a better knowledge of lunar volcanism will also yield profitable returns in lunar base construction (e.g., exploitation of rille or lava-tube structures) and in access to materials such as volatile elements, pure glass, or ilmenite for lunar industry.

  8. Paleomagnetic and geochemical applications to tectonics and Quaternary geology: Studies at Coso Volcanic Field, California and the Channelled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhar, Christopher J.

    At the Coso Range, CA we used paleomagnetism to reveal the long-term history and kinematics of deformation resulting from distributed transtension of the Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ). Pliocene lavas and sediments deposited in and around the Wild Horse Mesa record and result from the initiation of deformation along the ECSZ in this area. Geochemical analyses, geochronologic, and stratigraphic constraints provide new information about the initiation and evolution of volcanism in this region. Following emplacement of the volcanics, distributed faulting has accommodated dextral shear of the ECSZ by 12°--22° of rotation of fault-bounded blocks in the Wild Horse Mesa and tilting in the Coso geothermal area. This partitioning of block kinematic style probably results from partitioning of slip of the master faults at depth that control block motion of the shallow crust. A calculation based upon some simple assumptions about block geometry indicates that at least 1.5 km of dextral slip is accommodated across the Wild Horse Mesa. Magnetostratigraphic studies of the Cold Creek bar at Hanford, WA constrain the timing of deposition of cataclysmic flood deposits resulting from jokulhlaups like the Missoula floods and similar processes. Abundant evidence for reversed polarity sediments confirm previous studies suggesting onset of cataclysmic floods prior to the last major magnetic polarity reversal (0.78 Ma). A normal polarity zone bracketed by reversed polarity at eastern Cold Creek bar extends the chronology back to before the Jaramillo subchron (0.99--1.07 Ma) suggesting that the climatic and physiographic elements for cataclysmic floods were in place in the Pacific Northwest by about 1.1 Ma.

  9. Geochemistry of the late Holocene rocks from the Tolbachik volcanic field, Kamchatka: Quantitative modelling of subduction-related open magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnyagin, Maxim; Duggen, Svend; Hauff, Folkmar; Mironov, Nikita; Bindeman, Ilya; Thirlwall, Matthew; Hoernle, Kaj

    2015-12-01

    We present new major and trace element, high-precision Sr-Nd-Pb (double spike), and O-isotope data for the whole range of rocks from the Holocene Tolbachik volcanic field in the Central Kamchatka Depression (CKD). The Tolbachik rocks range from high-Mg basalts to low-Mg basaltic trachyandesites. The rocks considered in this paper represent mostly Late Holocene eruptions (using tephrochronological dating), including historic ones in 1941, 1975-1976 and 2012-2013. Major compositional features of the Tolbachik volcanic rocks include the prolonged predominance of one erupted magma type, close association of middle-K primitive and high-K evolved rocks, large variations in incompatible element abundances and ratios but narrow range in isotopic composition. We quantify the conditions of the Tolbachik magma origin and evolution and revise previously proposed models. We conclude that all Tolbachik rocks are genetically related by crystal fractionation of medium-K primary magmas with only a small range in trace element and isotope composition. The primary Tolbachik magmas contain ~ 14 wt.% of MgO and ~ 4% wt.% of H2O and originated by partial melting (~ 6%) of moderately depleted mantle peridotite with Indian-MORB-type isotopic composition at temperature of ~ 1250 °C and pressure of ~ 2 GPa. The melting of the mantle wedge was triggered by slab-derived hydrous melts formed at ~ 2.8 GPa and ~ 725 °C from a mixture of sediments and MORB- and Meiji-type altered oceanic crust. The primary magmas experienced a complex open-system evolution termed Recharge-Evacuation-Fractional Crystallization (REFC). First the original primary magmas underwent open-system crystal fractionation combined with periodic recharge of the magma chamber with more primitive magma, followed by mixing of both magma types, further fractionation and finally eruption. Evolved high-K basalts, which predominate in the Tolbachik field, and basaltic trachyandesites erupted in 2012-2013 approach steady-state REFC

  10. Towards real-time eruption forecasting in the Auckland Volcanic Field: application of BET_EF during the New Zealand National Disaster Exercise `Ruaumoko'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Jan; Marzocchi, Warner; Jolly, Gill; Constantinescu, Robert; Selva, Jacopo; Sandri, Laura

    2010-03-01

    The Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF) is a young basaltic field that lies beneath the urban area of Auckland, New Zealand’s largest city. Over the past 250,000 years the AVF has produced at least 49 basaltic centers; the last eruption was only 600 years ago. In recognition of the high risk associated with a possible future eruption in Auckland, the New Zealand government ran Exercise Ruaumoko in March 2008, a test of New Zealand’s nation-wide preparedness for responding to a major disaster resulting from a volcanic eruption in Auckland City. The exercise scenario was developed in secret, and covered the period of precursory activity up until the eruption. During Exercise Ruaumoko we adapted a recently developed statistical code for eruption forecasting, namely BET_EF (Bayesian Event Tree for Eruption Forecasting), to independently track the unrest evolution and to forecast the most likely onset time, location and style of the initial phase of the simulated eruption. The code was set up before the start of the exercise by entering reliable information on the past history of the AVF as well as the monitoring signals expected in the event of magmatic unrest and an impending eruption. The average probabilities calculated by BET_EF during Exercise Ruaumoko corresponded well to the probabilities subjectively (and independently) estimated by the advising scientists (differences of few percentage units), and provided a sound forecast of the timing (before the event, the eruption probability reached 90%) and location of the eruption. This application of BET_EF to a volcanic field that has experienced no historical activity and for which otherwise limited prior information is available shows its versatility and potential usefulness as a tool to aid decision-making for a wide range of volcano types. Our near real-time application of BET_EF during Exercise Ruaumoko highlighted its potential to clarify and possibly optimize decision-making procedures in a future AVF eruption

  11. Recording of climate and diagenesis through sedimentary DNA and fossil pigments at Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuillemin, Aurèle; Ariztegui, Daniel; Leavitt, Peter R.; Bunting, Lynda; The Pasado Science Team

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic sediments record past climatic conditions while providing a wide range of ecological niches for microorganisms. In theory, benthic microbial community composition should depend on environmental features and geochemical conditions of surrounding sediments, as well as ontogeny of the subsurface environment as sediment degraded. In principle, DNA in sediments should be composed of ancient and extant microbial elements persisting at different degrees of preservation, although to date few studies have quantified the relative influence of each factor in regulating final composition of total sedimentary DNA assemblage. Here geomicrobiological and phylogenetic analyses of a Patagonian maar lake were used to indicate that the different sedimentary microbial assemblages derive from specific lacustrine regimes during defined climatic periods. Two climatic intervals (Mid-Holocene, 5 ka BP; Last Glacial Maximum, 25 ka BP) whose sediments harbored active microbial populations were sampled for a comparative environmental study based on fossil pigments and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The genetic assemblage recovered from the Holocene record revealed a microbial community displaying metabolic complementarities that allowed prolonged degradation of organic matter to methane. The series of Archaea identified throughout the Holocene record indicated an age-related stratification of these populations brought on by environmental selection during early diagenesis. These characteristics were associated with sediments resulting from endorheic lake conditions and stable pelagic regime, high evaporative stress and concomitant high algal productivity. In contrast, sulphate-reducing bacteria and lithotrophic Archaea were predominant in sediments dated from the Last Glacial Maximum, in which pelagic clays alternated with fine volcanic material characteristic of a lake level highstand and freshwater conditions, but reduced water column productivity. Comparison of sedimentary DNA composition

  12. Recording of climate and diagenesis through fossil pigments and sedimentary DNA at Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuillemin, A.; Ariztegui, D.; Leavitt, P. R.; Bunting, L.; Pasado Science Team

    2015-11-01

    Aquatic sediments record past climatic conditions while providing a wide range of ecological niches for microorganisms. Although marine sedimentary microbial assemblages are often defined by their surrounding geochemical conditions, the influence of environmental features upon microbial development and post-depositional survival remains largely unknown in the lacustrine realm. Due to long-term microbial activity, the composition of environmental DNA can be expected to evolve with sediment depth and over time and therefore should reflect both ancient and extant microbial populations, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested using a multiproxy approach. Here geomicrobiological and phylogenetic analyses of a Patagonian maar lake were used to indicate that the different sedimentary microbial assemblages derive from specific lacustrine regimes during defined climatic periods. Two well defined climatic intervals whose sediments harboured active microbial populations and measurable ATP were sampled for a comparative environmental study based on fossil pigments and 16S rRNA gene sequences. Bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences recovered from the Holocene record revealed a microbial community adapted to subsaline conditions actively producing methane during organic matter degradation. These characteristics were associated with sediments resulting from endorheic lake conditions with high evaporative stress and concomitant high algal productivity. Moreover, archaeal clone libraries established throughout the Holocene record indicate an age-related stratification of these populations, consistent with a gradual use of organic substrates after deposition. In contrast, sulphate-reducing bacteria and lithotrophic Archaea were predominant in sediments dated from the Last Glacial Maximum, in which pelagic clays alternated with fine volcanic material characteristic of a lake level highstand and freshwater conditions, but reduced water column productivity. These patterns

  13. Volcanic eruptions observed with infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Aster, Richard C.; Kyle, Philip R.

    2004-07-01

    Infrasonic airwaves produced by active volcanoes provide valuable insight into the eruption dynamics. Because the infrasonic pressure field may be directly associated with the flux rate of gas released at a volcanic vent, infrasound also enhances the efficacy of volcanic hazard monitoring and continuous studies of conduit processes. Here we present new results from Erebus, Fuego, and Villarrica volcanoes highlighting uses of infrasound for constraining quantitative eruption parameters, such as eruption duration, source mechanism, and explosive gas flux.

  14. Models of volcanic eruption hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Wohletz, K.H.

    1992-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

  15. A Conceptual Model to Link Anomalously High Temperature Gradients in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field to Regional Flow in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingham, E. J.; Keller, S. N.; McCullough, K. R.; Watters, J.; Weitering, B.; Wilce, A. M.; Folsom, M.; Kelley, S.; Pellerin, L.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature-depth well data along with electromagnetic (EM) data were collected by students of the Summer of Applied Geophysics Experience (SAGE) 2015 field season in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico. The data from this year, in addition to data acquired since 2013, were used to construct a conceptual east-west cross-section of the Espanola Basin and the adjacent highlands in order to evaluate the regional flow system. Vertical geothermal gradients from several monitoring wells were measured using a thermistor. Anomalously warm geothermal gradients were mapped in the Cerros del Rio volcanic field in the basin just east of the Rio Grande. Temperature gradients are up to 70℃/km, while the background geothermal gradients in the Rio Grande rift zone generally show 28℃-35℃/km. This anomaly extends to the Buckman well field, which supplies water to the city of Santa Fe. Overpumping of this well field has led to subsidence in the past. However, discharge temperature plots indicate that the temperature gradients of the Buckman field may be rebounding as pumping is reduced. Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) data were acquired in the vicinity of three monitoring wells. TEM and AMT methods complement each other with the former having depths of investigation of less than ten to hundreds of meters and AMT having depths of investigation comparable to the wells deeper than 500m. These datasets were used collectively to image the subsurface stratigraphy and, more specifically, the hydrogeology related to shallow aquifers. The EM data collected at these wells showed a trend indicating a shallow aquifer with a shallower resistive layer of approximately 100 ohm-m at 70-100 meters depth. Beneath this resistive layer we resolved a more conductive, clay-rich layer of 10 ohm-m. These resistivity profiles compliment the electrical logs provided by Jet West, which indicate shallower sandstone interbedded with silt on top of more silt-dominant layers. Our

  16. Volcanic Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    The big news from 20th century geophysics may not be plate tectonics but rather the surprise return of catastrophism, following its apparent 19th century defeat to uniformitarianism. Divine miracles and plagues had yielded to the logic of integrating observations of everyday change over time. Yet the brilliant interpretation of the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary iridium anomaly introduced an empirically based catastrophism. Undoubtedly, decades of contemplating our own nuclear self-destruction played a role in this. Concepts of nuclear winter, volcanic winter, and meteor impact winter are closely allied. And once the veil of threat of all-out nuclear exchange began to lift, we could begin to imagine slower routes to destruction as "global change". As a way to end our world, fire is a good one. Three-dimensional magma chambers do not have as severe a magnitude limitation as essentially two-dimensional faults. Thus, while we have experienced earthquakes that are as big as they get, we have not experienced volcanic eruptions nearly as great as those preserved in the geologic record. The range extends to events almost three orders of magnitude greater than any eruptions of the 20th century. Such a calamity now would at the very least bring society to a temporary halt globally, and cause death and destruction on a continental scale. At maximum, there is the possibility of hindering photosynthesis and threatening life more generally. It has even been speculated that the relative genetic homogeneity of humankind derives from an evolutionary "bottleneck" from near-extinction in a volcanic cataclysm. This is somewhat more palatable to contemplate than a return to a form of Original Sin, in which we arrived at homogeneity by a sort of "ethnic cleansing". Lacking a written record of truly great eruptions, our sense of human impact must necessarily be aided by archeological and anthropological investigations. For example, there is much to be learned about the influence of

  17. Revised ages for tuffs of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field: Assignment of the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff to a new geomagnetic polarity event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.; Christiansen, R.L.; Izett, G.A.; Obradovich, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages were determined on the three major ash-flow tuffs of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field in the region of Yellowstone National Park in order to improve the precision of previously determined ages. Total-fusion and incremental-heating ages of sanidine yielded the following mean ages: Huckleberry Ridge Tuff-2.059 ?? 0.004 Ma; Mesa Falls Tuff-1.285 ?? 0.004 Ma; and Lava Creek Tuff-0.639 ?? 0.002 Ma. The Huckleberry Ridge Tuff has a transitional magnetic direction and has previously been related to the Reunion Normal-Polarity Subchron. Dating of the Reunion event has been reviewed and its ages have been normalized to a common value for mineral standards. The age of the Huckleberry Ridge Tuff is significantly younger than lava flows of the Reunion event on Re??union Island, supporting other evidence for a normal-polarity event younger than the Reunion event.

  18. Cape Wanbrow: A stack of Surtseyan-style volcanoes built over millions of years in the Waiareka-Deborah volcanic field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhouse, B. L.; White, J. D. L.; Scott, J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Volcanic fields typically include many small, monogenetic, volcanoes formed by single eruptions fed by short-lived magma plumbing systems that solidify after eruption. The Cape Wanbrow coastline of the northeast Otago region in the South Island of New Zealand exposes an Eocene-Oligocene intraplate basaltic field that erupted in Surtseyan style onto a submerged continental shelf, and the stratigraphy of Cape Wanbrow suggests that eruptions produced multiple volcanoes whose edifices overlapped within a small area, but separated by millions of years. The small Cape Wanbrow highland is shown to include the remains of 6 volcanoes that are distinguished by discordant to locally concordant inter-volcano contacts marked by biogenic accumulations or other slow-formed features. The 6 volcanoes contain several lithofacies associations: (a) the dominantly pyroclastic E1 comprising well-bedded tuff and lapilli-tuff, emplaced by traction-dominated unsteady, turbulent high-density currents; (b) E2, massive to diffusely laminated block-rich tuff deposited by grain-dominant cohesionless debris flows; (c) E3, broadly cross-stratified tuff with local lenses of low- to high-angle cross-stratification which was deposited by either subaerial pyroclastic currents or subaqueously by unstable antidune- and chute-and-pool-forming supercritical flows; (d) E4, very-fine- to medium-grained tuff deposited by turbidity currents; (e) E5, bedded bioclast-rich tuff with increasing glaucony content upward, emplaced by debris flows; (f) E6, pillow lava and inter-pillow bioclastic sediment; and (g) E7, hyaloclastite breccia. These lithofacies associations aid interpretation of the eruptive evolution of each separate volcano, which in turn grew and degraded during build-up of the overall volcanic pile. Sedimentary processes played a prominent role in the evolution of the volcanic pile with both syn- and post-eruptive re-mobilization of debris from the growing pile of primary pyroclastic deposits of

  19. Volcanics oil bearing in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lukman, K.A.; Nyak, B.R.; Anditya, I.M. )

    1996-01-01

    The volcanic rock is seldom considered as good reservoir rocks. However, in Indonesia there is a volcanic layer called the Jatibarang Formation in Jatibarang Field, West Java, that has proven to be a producer of oil and gas of adequate amount. The lateral development of this rock extent along the whole of the basin, about 400 km over a Tertiary block-faulting system of the North West Java Basin. It is estimated that the volume of the spread is about 2360 km[sup 3]. Beside from the primary volcanic rock, the developing reservoir rock could also resulted from rework of massive volcanics or agglomerate, and other volcanic product resedimented as clastic deposits. The hydrocarbon is sourced from the younger Talang Aker Formation that is in direct contact with the reservoir rock. It migrated through the faults. Present cumulative production has reached 1.2 BBC and 2.7 TCFG, while speculative reserve is estimated at 4.0 BBO and 3 TCFG. Regionally, the volcanic rock of the Jatibarang Formation where the hydrocarbon is found is the result of eruptions along the magmatic trend during Late Cretaceous. In North West Java Basin, the trapping system includes both the structural and stratigraphic traps. Reservoir analysis yields pororsity values of around 16-25% and permeability of around 10 Darcies. It is concluded that there are good opportunities still left for hydrocarbon exploration in volcanic rocks. The study is discussed in detail, supported by data from cores and laboratories.

  20. Volcanics oil bearing in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lukman, K.A.; Nyak, B.R.; Anditya, I.M.

    1996-12-31

    The volcanic rock is seldom considered as good reservoir rocks. However, in Indonesia there is a volcanic layer called the Jatibarang Formation in Jatibarang Field, West Java, that has proven to be a producer of oil and gas of adequate amount. The lateral development of this rock extent along the whole of the basin, about 400 km over a Tertiary block-faulting system of the North West Java Basin. It is estimated that the volume of the spread is about 2360 km{sup 3}. Beside from the primary volcanic rock, the developing reservoir rock could also resulted from rework of massive volcanics or agglomerate, and other volcanic product resedimented as clastic deposits. The hydrocarbon is sourced from the younger Talang Aker Formation that is in direct contact with the reservoir rock. It migrated through the faults. Present cumulative production has reached 1.2 BBC and 2.7 TCFG, while speculative reserve is estimated at 4.0 BBO and 3 TCFG. Regionally, the volcanic rock of the Jatibarang Formation where the hydrocarbon is found is the result of eruptions along the magmatic trend during Late Cretaceous. In North West Java Basin, the trapping system includes both the structural and stratigraphic traps. Reservoir analysis yields pororsity values of around 16-25% and permeability of around 10 Darcies. It is concluded that there are good opportunities still left for hydrocarbon exploration in volcanic rocks. The study is discussed in detail, supported by data from cores and laboratories.

  1. Origin and potential geothermal significance of China Hat and other late Pleistocene topaz rhyolite lava domes of the Blackfoot Volcanic Field, SE Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurry, M. O.; Pearson, D. M.; Welhan, J. A.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Fisher, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Snake River Plain and neighboring regions are well known for their high heat flow and robust Neogene-Quaternary tectonic and magmatic activity. Interestingly, however, there are comparatively few surficial manifestations of geothermal activity. This study is part of a renewed examination of this region as a possible hidden or blind geothermal resource. We present a testable, integrated volcanological, petrogenetic, tectonic and hydrothermal conceptual model for 57 ka China Hat and cogenetic topaz rhyolite lava domes of the Blackfoot Volcanic Field. This field is well suited for analysis as a blind resource because of its distinctive combination of (1) young bimodal volcanism, petrogenetic evidence of shallow magma storage and evolution, presence of coeval extension, voluminous travertine deposits, and C- and He-isotopic evidence of active magma degassing; (2) a paucity of hot springs or other obvious indicators of a geothermal resource in the immediate vicinity of the lava domes; and (3) proximity to a region of high crustal heat flow, high-T geothermal fluids at 2.5-5 km depth and micro-seismicity characterized by its swarming nature. Eruptions of both basalt and rhyolite commonly evolve from minor phreatomagmatic to effusive. In our model, transport of both magmatic and possible deep crustal aqueous fluids may be controlled by preexisting crustal structures, including west-dipping thrust faults. Geochemical evolution of rhyolite magma is dominated by mid- to upper-crustal fractional crystallization (with pre-eruption storage and phenocryst formation at ~14 km). Approximately 1.2 km3 of topaz rhyolite have been erupted since 1.4 Ma, yielding an average eruption rate of 0.8 km3/m.y. Given reasonable assumptions of magma cumulate formation and eruption rates, and initial and final volatile concentrations, we infer average H2O and CO2 volatile fluxes from the rhyolite source region of ~2MT/year and 340 T/day, respectively. Lithium flux may be comparable to CO2.

  2. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar sanidine geochronology of ignimbrites in the Mogollon-Datil volcanic field, southwestern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McIntosh, W.C.; Sutter, J.F.; Chapin, C.E.; Kedzie, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra have been obtained from 85 sanidine separates from 36 ignimbrites and one rhyolitic lava in the latest Eocene-Oligocene Mogollon-Datil volcanic field of southwestern New Mexico. Of the 97 measured age spectra, 94 yield weighted-mean plateau ages each giving single-spectrum 1?? precision of??0.25%-0.4% (??0.07-0.14 Ma). Replicate plateau age determinations for eight different samples show within-sample 1?? precisions averaging ??0.25%. Plateau ages from multiple (n=3-8) samples of individual ignimbrites show 1?? within-unit precision of ??0.1%-0.4% (??0.04-0.13 Ma). This within-unit precision represents a several-fold improvement over published K-Ar data for the same ignimbrites, and is similar to the range of precisions reported from single-crystal laser fusion studies. A further indication of the high precision of unit-mean 40Ar/30Ar ages is their close agreement with independently established stratigraphic order. Two samples failed to meet plateau criteria, apparently due to geologic contamination by older feldspars. Effects of minor contamination are shown by six other samples, which yielded slightly anomalous plateau ages. 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages permit resolution of units differing in age by 0.5% (0.15 Ma) or less. This high resolution, combined with paleomagnetic studies, has helped to correlate ignimbrites among isolated ranges and has allowed development of an integrated timestratigraphic framework for the volcanic field. Mogollon-Datil ignimbrites range in age from 36.2 to 24.3 Ma. Ignimbrite activity was strongly episodic, being confined to four brief (<2.6 m.y.) eruptive episodes separated by 1-3 m.y. gaps. Ignimbrite activity generally tended to migrate from the southeast toward the north and west. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Venus volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Head, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Eruption styles and processes on the planets are known to be strongly influenced by such factors as gravity, temperature, and atmospheric characteristics. The ascent and eruption of magma on Venus in the current Venus environment must take into account the influence of the extreme surface temperatures (650-750 K) and pressures (40-100 bars) on these processes. Conditions on Venus will reduce the subsurface exsolution of volatiles and lead to a reduction of the possible range of explosive interactions with the atmosphere. Pyroclastic eruptions will be severely inhibited and continuous magma disruption by gas bubble growth may not occur at all unless the exsolved magma volatile content exceeds several weight percent. Recent US and USSR spacecraft missions and Earth-based radar observations are beginning to provide a view of the range of Venus volcanic features, including domes, cones, calderas, shields, and flows. The nature of many lava flows suggests that numerous eruptions have effusion rates exceeding common terrestrial rates and lying more in the range inferred for lunar basaltic flood eruptions (10/sup 4/-10/sup 5/m/sup 3//s). Shield volcanoes are often wide but are low (<2 km elevation) relative to those on Mars and the Earth. Volcano height depends in part on the depth of origin of the magma and the density contrast between the lava and the rocks between the source and the surface, both of which may be different on Venus. Correlations between volcanic style and tectonic structure are emerging.

  4. Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan. Final report, May 1, 1995--November 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Pritchett, J.W.

    1997-07-01

    The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. This comprehensive report describes the work accomplished during FY 1993-1996. A brief review of the geological and geophysical surveys at the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is presented (Section 2). Chemical data, consisting of analyses of steam and water from Sumikawa wells, are described and interpreted to indicate compositions and temperatures of reservoir fluids (Section 3). The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures (Section 4). Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter (Section 5). New interpretations of pressure transient data from several wells are discussed (Section 6). The available data have been synthesized to formulate a conceptual model for the Sumikawa Geothermal Field (Section 7).

  5. Modeling volcanic deformation in a regional stress field: Implications for the formation of graben structures on Alba Patera, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cailleau, Beatrice; Walter, Thomas R.; Janle, Peter; Hauber, Ernst

    2003-12-01

    Abundant grabens transect the volcano Alba Patera. Their complex geometry and formation mechanisms are still poorly understood. Tectonic processes and magmatic intrusions are responsible for these long surface features. Cross-cutting relationships of the grabens show radial fractures that were formed during early stages and were progressively overprinted by concentric fractures on the mid and upper flanks of the volcano. Two modeling methods are used to understand the formation of the observed structures and to evaluate their implications for hidden subvolcanic processes. Surface deformation and fault arrangements predicted in finite element models are compared to the graben systems observed in Viking images. The orientation and position of the concentric grabens are found to be best reproduced by local crustal subsidence, superimposed on a regional NW-SE oriented extension with decreasing magnitude from south to north. In analogue sandbox models we also simulate surface structures of arrangements that almost perfectly mimic the observed lineaments on Alba Patera. Formation of the grabens spans a period on the order of a billion years, suggesting long-term geodynamic processes to be responsible for the subsidence of the central Alba Patera area. The progressive change toward higher concentricity is likely resultant from an increase in density in the crust by accumulation of intrusive material and cooling, thus causing subsidence of the region above this volcanic root.

  6. Castro ring zone: a 4,500-km2 fossil hydrothermal system in the Challis volcanic field, central Idaho.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, R.E.; Ekren, E.B.; Hardyman, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The largest fossil hydrothermal system occupying a 4500 km2 area in central Idaho is revealed by delta 18O studies. The remains of this meteoric-hydrothermal system are preserved within a sharply bounded, 15 km wide, 70-km-diameter annulus of low delta 18O rock (+2.0 to -8.8per mille) termed the Castro ring zone. The zone is centred on a less depleted (+4.5) core zone consisting of granitic rocks of the Castro pluton. This 700-km2 Eocene subvolcanic batholith has intruded, domed, and hydrothermally metamorphosed a thick sequence of Challis Volcanics, the stratigraphically low rocks in the 2000-km2 Van Horn Peak and the 1000-km2 Thunder Mountain cauldron complexes being most strongly altered. Less extreme 18O depletions occur in the youngest major ash-flow sheets of these complexes, indicating a vertical 18O gradient. Water/rock ratios of geothermal systems are surprisingly insensitive to the circulation scale.-L.-di H.

  7. Magnitude, geomorphologic response and climate links of lake level oscillations at Laguna Potrok Aike, Patagonian steppe (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PASADO science Team Kliem, P.; Buylaert, J. P.; Hahn, A.; Mayr, C.; Murray, A. S.; Ohlendorf, C.; Veres, D.; Wastegård, S.; Zolitschka, B.

    2013-07-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a large maar lake located in the semiarid steppe of southern Patagonia known for its Lateglacial and Holocene lake level fluctuations. Based on sedimentary, seismic and geomorphological evidences, the lake level curve is updated and extended into the Last Glacial period and the geomorphological development of the lake basin and its catchment area is interpreted.Abrasion and lake level oscillations since at least ˜50 ka caused concentric erosion of the surrounding soft rocks of the Miocene Santa Cruz Formation and expanded the basin diameter by approximately 1 km. A high lake level and overflow conditions of the lake were dated by luminescence methods and tephra correlation to the early Lateglacial as well as to ˜45 ka. The lowest lake level of record occurred during the mid-Holocene. A further lake level drop was probably prevented by groundwater supply. This low lake level eroded a distinct terrace into lacustrine sediments. Collapse of these terraces probably caused mass movement deposits in the profundal zone of the lake. After the mid-Holocene lake level low stand a general and successive transgression occurred until the Little Ice Age maximum; i.e. ca 40 m above the local groundwater table. Frequent lake level oscillations caused deflation of emerged terraces only along the eastern shoreline due to prevailing westerly winds. Preservation of eolian deposits might be linked to relatively moist climate conditions during the past 2.5 ka.Precisely dated lake level reconstructions in the rain-shadow of the Andes document high Last Glacial and low Holocene lake levels that could suggest increased precipitation during the Last Glacial period. As permafrost in semiarid Patagonia is documented and dated to the Last Glacial period we argue that the frozen ground might have increased surficial runoff from the catchment and thus influenced the water balance of the lake. This is important for investigating the glacial to Holocene latitudinal shift

  8. Magnitude, geomorphologic response and climate links of lake level oscillations at Laguna Potrok Aike, Patagonian steppe (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliem, P.; Buylaert, J. P.; Hahn, A.; Mayr, C.; Murray, A. S.; Ohlendorf, C.; Veres, D.; Wastegård, S.; Zolitschka, B.; The Pasado Science Team

    2013-07-01

    Laguna Potrok Aike is a large maar lake located in the semiarid steppe of southern Patagonia known for its Lateglacial and Holocene lake level fluctuations. Based on sedimentary, seismic and geomorphological evidences, the lake level curve is updated and extended into the Last Glacial period and the geomorphological development of the lake basin and its catchment area is interpreted. Abrasion and lake level oscillations since at least ˜50 ka caused concentric erosion of the surrounding soft rocks of the Miocene Santa Cruz Formation and expanded the basin diameter by approximately 1 km. A high lake level and overflow conditions of the lake were dated by luminescence methods and tephra correlation to the early Lateglacial as well as to ˜45 ka. The lowest lake level of record occurred during the mid-Holocene. A further lake level drop was probably prevented by groundwater supply. This low lake level eroded a distinct terrace into lacustrine sediments. Collapse of these terraces probably caused mass movement deposits in the profundal zone of the lake. After the mid-Holocene lake level low stand a general and successive transgression occurred until the Little Ice Age maximum; i.e. ca 40 m above the local groundwater table. Frequent lake level oscillations caused deflation of emerged terraces only along the eastern shoreline due to prevailing westerly winds. Preservation of eolian deposits might be linked to relatively moist climate conditions during the past 2.5 ka. Precisely dated lake level reconstructions in the rain-shadow of the Andes document high Last Glacial and low Holocene lake levels that could suggest increased precipitation during the Last Glacial period. As permafrost in semiarid Patagonia is documented and dated to the Last Glacial period we argue that the frozen ground might have increased surficial runoff from the catchment and thus influenced the water balance of the lake. This is important for investigating the glacial to Holocene latitudinal shift

  9. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  10. Hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field: Sulphur Springs and the Cochiti mining district

    SciTech Connect

    WoldeGabriel, G.

    1989-03-01

    K/Ar dates and oxygen isotope data were obtained on 13 clay separates (<2 ..mu..m) of thermally altered mafic and silicic rocks from the Cochiti mining district (SE Jemez Mountains) and Continental Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP) core hole VC-2A (Sulphur Springs, Valles caldera). Illite with K/sub 2/O contents of 6.68%--10.04% is the dominant clay in the silicic rocks, whereas interstratified illite/smectites containing 1.4%--5.74% K/sub 2/O constitute the altered andesites. Two hydrothermal alteration events are recognized at the Cochiti area (8.07 m.y., n = 1, and 6.5--5.6 m.y., n = 6). The older event correlates with the waning stages of Paliza Canyon Formation andesite volcanism (greater than or equal to13 to less than or equal to8.5 m.y.), whereas the younger event correlates with intrusions and gold- and silver-bearing quartz veins associated with the Bearhead Rhyolite (7.54--5.8 m.y.). The majority of K/Ar dates in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A (0.83--0.66 m.y., n = 4) indicate that hydrothermal alteration developed contemporaneously with resurgence and ring fracture Valles Rhyolite domes (0.89--0.54 m.y.). One date of 0 +- 0.10 m.y. in acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole probably correlates with Holocene hydrothermal activity possibly associated with the final phases of the Valles Rhyolite (0.13 m.y.).

  11. Analysis of the Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropy of the Cantera Ignimbrite, San Luis Potosé­ Volcanic field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, C.; Torres-Hernandez, J.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2007-05-01

    Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) results from a group of 17 - 18 sites (286 - 312 specimens) from the Cantera Ignimbrite - of Oligocene age and part of the San Luis Potosí Volcanic Filed (SLPVF), México - are presented and analysed in order to help to determine the source and flow directions. In each site a flow direction is inferred based on AMS results. As the Cantera Ignimbrite is generally dipping, AMS was structural corrected. So two sets of geographical and paleo-geographical (structural corrected) inferred-flow directions were obtained. Both sets are analysed trying to define if the source of the ignimbrite is related to a calderic (concentric structure) or to the NW-SE faulting and jointing. Geographical AMS results mostly give SW flow directions, the southernmost sites give to SSE. Meanwhile structural corrected results give a wider range of flow directions, a group of them to NW and another northerly group mostly to NE. AMS was measured in a KLY2 appliance, Jelinek and other statistics and density distributions were performed, giving all very similar results in each site. Mean susceptibilities range from 147 to 27200 x10-6 SI (average = 5713 x10-6 SI). Anisotropy degree (Pj) range from 1.011 to 1.055 with two sites of 1.134-1.254 (Pj average = 1.046). Shape is mostly oblate ranging the T-factor from 0.843 to 0.409 and only one site mainly prolate: T of -0.277 (T average = 0.550).

  12. Earthquake-induced seismic tremor explained by Krauklis wave resonance in fractured reservoir rocks: A case study of Salse di Nirano mud volcanic field (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marcel; Lupi, Matteo

    2014-05-01

    For seismic studies of fractured fluid-filled reservoir rocks, the so-called Krauklis wave is of particular interest. It is a special guided wave mode that is bound to and propagates along fluid-filled fractures. It can repeatedly propagate back and forth along a fracture and eventually fall into resonance. This resonant behavior has been speculated to be the source of narrow-band seismic tremor and long-period events in volcanic areas. However, it remains unstudied whether Krauklis waves may be initiated by body waves and therefore be relevant for active seismic surveys or earthquake signals in fractured reservoir rocks. The presented study consists of two parts: A combined theoretical-numerical study on the possible initiation of Krauklis wave resonance in fractures by an incident body wave Application of the theoretical resonance frequency of Krauklis waves to narrow-band seismic tremor signals recorded above a mud volcanic system to determine fracture size within the fluid-filled reservoir. In the first part, we study Krauklis wave initiation by an incident plane P- or S-wave using numerical finite-element simulations. Both wave modes initiate two Krauklis waves, one at each fracture tip, with significant amplitudes that strongly depend on the orientation of the facture. S-waves generally lead to larger-amplitude Krauklis waves, with maximum amplitudes at fracture angles of 50º, while P-waves initiate large-amplitude Krauklis waves at moderate (12°-40°) and high (>65°) fracture angles. The fact that large-amplitude Krauklis waves are initiated by body waves has severe implications for earthquake signals propagating through fractured reservoirs, because Krauklis wave-related signals are expected to be present in seismic recordings. The second part is a case study of the Salse di Nirano mud volcanic field in northern Italy. Immediately after a M4.4 earthquake with a dominant frequency of 2 Hz, the recorded seismic tremor increased significantly with a

  13. Fake ballistics and real explosions: field-scale experiments on the ejection and emplacement of volcanic bombs during vent-clearing explosive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Valentine, G.; Gaudin, D.; Graettinger, A. H.; Lube, G.; Kueppers, U.; Sonder, I.; White, J. D.; Ross, P.; Bowman, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ballistics - bomb-sized pyroclasts that travel from volcanic source to final emplacement position along ballistic trajectories - represent a prime source of volcanic hazard, but their emplacement range, size, and density is useful to inverse model key eruption parameters related to their initial ejection velocity. Models and theory, however, have so far focused on the trajectory of ballistics after leaving the vent, neglecting the complex dynamics of their initial acceleration phase in the vent/conduit. Here, we use field-scale buried explosion experiments to study the ground-to-ground ballistic emplacement of particles through their entire acceleration-deceleration cycle. Twelve blasts were performed at the University at Buffalo Large Scale Experimental Facility with a range of scaled depths (burial depth divided by the cubic root of the energy of the explosive charge) and crater configurations. In all runs, ballistic analogs were placed on the ground surface at variable distance from the vertical projection of the buried charge, resulting in variable ejection angle. The chosen analogs are tennis and ping-pong balls filled with different materials, covering a limited range of sizes and densities. The analogs are tracked in multiple high-speed and high-definition videos, while Particle Image Velocimetry is used to detail ground motion in response to the buried blasts. In addition, after each blast the emplacement position of all analog ballistics was mapped with respect to the blast location. Preliminary results show the acceleration history of ballistics to be quite variable, from very short and relatively simple acceleration coupled with ground motion, to more complex, multi-stage accelerations possibly affected not only by the initial ground motion but also by variable coupling with the gas-particle mixture generated by the blasts. Further analysis of the experimental results is expected to provide new interpretative tools for ballistic deposits and better

  14. Preliminary Geochemical and Petrologic Assessment of the Fanney Rhyolite and the Bloodgood Canyon and Apache Springs tuffs, Mogollon-Datil Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salings, E. E.; Rentz, S. P.; Michelfelder, G.; Sikes, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Continental arc volcanoes represent a dramatic expression of a significant and fundamental phenomena in global tectonics: the subduction of an oceanic plate beneath a more buoyant continental plate. The subduction of an oceanic plate results in recycling of crustal material into the convecting mantle, partial melting, and primary basalt production. Moreover, during passage through thick continental crust, subduction zone magmas may substantially differentiate and melt crustal rocks giving rise to the great diversity of igneous lithologies characteristic of earth. These are important processes that must be understood in detail in order to interpret the long-term evolution of the earth and continental crust. Here we present variations in the isotopic and trace element composition of volcanic rocks from Bloodgood Canyon and Apache Springs tuffs, and the Fanney Rhyolite located in the western Mogollon-Datil Volcanic Field (MDVF). The project will address several questions. First, are the Bloodgood and Apache Springs tuffs and Fanney Rhyolite petrogenically related, and are these rhyolites expressions of a continental arc ignimbrite flare-up? Second, what petrogenic processes affected differentiation and where is the magma sourced? Finally, to what extent do these units represent a manifestation of the MDVF and the transition from arc magmatism to rifting? The Bloodgood Canyon is a crystal-rich rhyolite tuff containing quartz>k-feldspar>plagioclase>biotite, and pumice and lithic fragments. Rb ranges from 230-330ppm, Sr from 14-83ppm, and 87Sr/86Srm from 0.71619-0.72477.The Apache Springs Tuff is a rhyolite tuff containing quartz>k-feldspar>plagioclase>biotite, and lithics. Rb (228-233ppm) and 87Sr/86Srm (0.71025-0.71056) are restricted, while Sr (105-399ppm) is more variable in composition. The Fanney Creek is a massive rhyolite lava with flow banding and contains quartz phenocryst clusters and k-feldspars. Currently, no data exists for the Apache Springs Tuff.

  15. Tools and techniques for developing tephra stratigraphies in lake cores: A case study from the basaltic Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Jenni L.; Millet, Marc-Alban; Timm, Christian; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Leonard, Graham S.; Palin, J. Michael; Neil, Helen

    2015-09-01

    Probabilistic hazard forecasting for a volcanic region relies on understanding and reconstructing the eruptive record (derived potentially from proximal as well as distal volcanoes). Tephrostratigraphy is commonly used as a reconstructive tool by cross-correlating tephra deposits to create a stratigraphic framework that can be used to assess magnitude-frequency relationships for eruptive histories. When applied to widespread rhyolitic deposits, tephra identifications and correlations have been successful; however, the identification and correlation of basaltic tephras are more problematic. Here, using tephras in drill cores from six maars in the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF), New Zealand, we show how X-ray density scanning coupled with magnetic susceptibility analysis can be used to accurately and reliably identify basaltic glass shard-bearing horizons in lacustrine sediments and which, when combined with the major and trace element signatures of the tephras, can be used to distinguish primary from reworked layers. After reliably identifying primary vs. reworked basaltic horizons within the cores, we detail an improved method for cross-core correlation based on stratigraphy and geochemical fingerprinting. We present major and trace element data for individual glass shards from 57 separate basaltic horizons identified within the cores. Our results suggest that in cases where major element compositions (SiO2, CaO, Al2O3, FeO, MgO) do not provide unambiguous correlations, trace elements (e.g. La, Gd, Yb, Zr, Nb, Nd) and trace element ratios (e.g. [La/Yb]N, [Gd/Yb]N, [Zr/Yb]N) are successful in improving the compositional distinction between the AVF basaltic tephra horizons, thereby allowing an improved eruptive history of the AVF to be reconstructed.

  16. Tracking and understanding volcanic emissions through cross-disciplinary integration of field, textural, geochemical and geophysical data: A textural working group. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gurioli, L.

    2013-12-01

    Relating magma ascent to eruption style using information preserved in pyroclastic deposits is a major challenge in modern volcanology. Because magma ascent and fragmentation are inaccessible to direct observation, one way to obtain quantitative information for conduit dynamics is through textural quantification of the sampled products (i.e., full definition of the rock vesicle and crystal properties). Many workers have shown that quantification of vesicle and crystal size distributions yields valuable insights into the processes that created the pyroclasts. However, the physical characteristics of individual pyroclasts must not be considered in isolation from information regarding: (i) the deposits from which they are taken; (ii) their chemistry; (iii) geophysical signatures of the related explosive events; and (iv) results from petrological and/or analogue experiments. As a result, attempts to understand eruption dynamics have increasingly involved the coupling of traditional field and sample-return analyses with geophysical measurements made synchronous with sample collection. In spite of this progress, we remain far from developing a definitive methods that allows us to sample, correlate and/or compare the multitude of parameters that can be measured at an actively building field deposits. As a result, no study has yet been able to correlate all derivable textural parameters with the full range of available multidisciplinary data. To discuss these issues, a working group met during 6-7 November 2012 at the Maison International of the Université Blaise Pascal (Clermont-Ferrand, France). The workshop was supported by the European Science Foundation and was held under the title: 'Tracking and understanding volcanic emissions through cross-disciplinary integration: A textural working group'. Our main objective was to gather an advisory group to define measurements, methods, formats and standards to be applied to integration of geophysical and physical

  17. Pre-eruptive storage conditions and eruption dynamics of a small rhyolite dome: Douglas Knob, Yellowstone volcanic field, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kenneth S.; Zinke, Robert W.; Jordan, Jacob S.; Manga, Michael; Gardner, James E.

    2014-03-01

    The properties and processes that control the size, duration, and style of eruption of rhyolite magma are poorly constrained because of a paucity of direct observations. Here, we investigate the small-volume, nonexplosive end-member. In particular, we determine the pre-eruptive storage conditions and eruption dynamics of Douglas Knob, a 0.011-km3 obsidian dome that erupted from a 500-m-long fissure in the Yellowstone volcanic system. To determine pre-eruptive storage conditions, we analyzed compositions of phenocrysts, matrix glass, and quartz-hosted glass inclusions by electron microprobe and Fourier-transform infrared analyses. The pre-eruptive melt is a high-silica rhyolite (˜75 wt.% SiO2) and was stored at 760 ± 30 °C and 50 ± 25 MPa prior to eruption, assuming vapor saturation at depth. To investigate emplacement dynamics and kinematics, we measured number densities and orientations of microlites at various locations across the lava dome. Microlites in samples closest to the inferred fissure vent are the most aligned. Alignment does not increase with distance traveled away from the vent, suggesting microlites record conduit processes. Strains of <5 accumulated in the conduit during ascent after microlite formation, imparted by a combination of pure and simple shear. Average microlite number density in samples varies from 104.9 to 105.7 mm-3. Using the magma ascent model of Toramaru et al. (J Volcanol Geotherm Res 175:156-157, 2008), microlite number densities imply decompression rates ranging from 0.03 to 0.11 MPa h-1 (˜0.4-1.3 mm s-1 ascent rates). Such slow ascent would allow time for passive degassing at depth in the conduit, thus resulting in an effusive eruption. Using calculated melt viscosity, we infer that the dike that fed the eruption was 4-8 m in width. Magma flux through this dike, assuming fissure dimensions at the surface represent its geometry at depth, implies an eruption duration of 17-210 days. That duration is also consistent with the

  18. Subsidence in the geothermal fields of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand from 1996 to 2005 measured by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, J. K.; Bromley, C. J.; Stevens, N. F.; Wadge, G.

    2007-10-01

    A number of the geothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, have been utilised on a large scale to provide heat and to generate electricity, in some cases causing areas of localised subsidence. Subsidence monitoring using field-based surveys is practically constrained by limits to available resources so we have investigated the use of satellite differential radar interferometry (InSAR) for this purpose. Using ERS and Envisat radar data spanning 1996 to 2005, we have mapped the deformation at five of the heavily utilised geothermal fields of the TVZ. Subsidence signals were identified at the Ohaaki geothermal field from 1999-2004, and at Wairakei-Tauhara from 1996-2005, where our measurements compare well with coeval levelling data across the wider deformation field. Subsidence was also measured at Rotorua from 1996-2000. In favourable conditions, the InSAR measurements provide a relatively dense spatial coverage of the deformation field that extends well beyond the boundaries of the geothermal systems and beyond the scope of the networks of levelling benchmarks. In the case of the Wairakei-Tauhara geothermal field, using InSAR it is now possible to improve the spatial resolution near the field margins and to interpret the subsidence signals in the context of the wider, more regional, deformation. Our data also provide new insights into possible fault motion at the Mokai geothermal field occurring around the time of the commissioning of its first power station. We note, however, that the InSAR technique is not without limitations. High gradient subsidence features are poorly represented, although this can be resolved to some extent via a trade-off in data processing. Temporal decorrelation, a well known problem for this technique, is also an issue for TVZ geothermal fields. Therefore, we find that it is possible to provide fortuitous snapshots of the deformation at the TVZ geothermal fields, but operational monitoring using InSAR would be

  19. Unrest within a large rhyolitic magma system at Laguna del Maule volcanic field (Chile) from 2007 through 2013: geodetic measurements and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mevel, H.; Cordova, L.; Ali, S. T.; Feigl, K. L.; DeMets, C.; Williams-Jones, G.; Tikoff, B.; Singer, B. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule (LdM) volcanic field is remarkable for its unusual concentration of post-glacial rhyolitic lava coulées and domes that erupted between 25 and 2 thousand years ago. Covering more than 100 square kilometers, they erupted from 24 vents encircling a lake basin approximately 20 km in diameter on the range crest of the Andes. Geodetic measurements at the LdM volcanic field show rapid uplift since 2007 over an area more than 20 km in diameter that is centered on the western portion of the young rhyolite domes. By quantifying this active deformation and its evolution with time, we aim to investigate the storage conditions and dynamic processes in the underlying rhyolitic reservoir that drive the ongoing inflation. Analyzing interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data, we track the rate of deformation. The rate of vertical uplift is negligible from 2003 to 2004, accelerates from at least 200 mm/yr in 2007 to more than 300 mm/yr in 2012, and then decreases to 200mm/yr in early 2013. To describe the deformation, we use a simple model that approximates the source as a 8 km-by-6 km sill at a depth of 5 km, assuming a rectangular dislocation in a half space with uniform elastic properties. Between 2007 and 2013, the modeled sill increased in volume by at least 190 million cubic meters. Four continuous GPS stations installed in April 2012 around the lake confirm this extraordinarily high rate of vertical uplift and a substantial rate of radial expansion. As of June 2013, the rapid deformation persists in the InSAR and GPS data. To describe the spatial distribution of material properties at depth, we are developing a model using the finite element method. This approach can account for geophysical observations, including magneto-telluric measurements, gravity surveys, and earthquake locations. It can also calculate changes in the local stress field. In particular, a large increase in stress in the magma chamber roof could lead to the initiation and

  20. Core scanning procedures and first characterisation of the 106 m long lacustrine sediment record of Laguna Potrok Aike, Argentina (ICDP-project PASADO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, Christian; Enters, Dirk; Gebhardt, Catalina; Hahn, Annette; Kliem, Pierre; Zolitschka, Bernd; Pasado Science Team

    2010-05-01

    Drilling operations for the southernmost ICDP project dedicated to terrestrial paleoclimatic reconstruction, the "Potrok Aike Maar Lake Sediment Archive Drilling Project" (PASADO), were completed in late November 2008. In the maar lake Laguna Potrok Aike (52°S, 70°W; 116 m asl.; diameter: 3.5 km, water depth: 100 m) in southern Patagonia, Argentina in total 510 m of lacustrine sediments have been recoverd using the GLAD800 platform equipped with a CS-1500 drill rig. Quadruplicate and triplicate cores down to a maximum depth of 101.5 m below lake floor have been taken using mainly the hydraulic piston coring tool. Total core recovery was 94,4 % from two drillsites located 700 m apart from each other in the central profundal plane of the lake. In 2009 all cores from Site 2 (southern basin plane) and most cores from Site 1 (central basin plane) were opened, described, documented by digital high resolution photography and scanned with different non-destructive techniques. A 106.08 m long composite profile was constructed for Site 2 based on visual core correlation and was then subsampled completely in consecutive 2 cm thick intervalls. Core scanning was performed in 5 mm steps for all parameters and involved the following techniques: 1) color scanning with a handheld X-rite spectrometer, 2) magnetic susceptibility scanning with a Bartington MS2F-sensor, 3) XRF scanning and X-radiography with an ITRAX core scanner (COX analytical systems) and 4) p-wave velocity/transmission seismograms and gamma ray absorption with a modified Geotek MSCL tool. According to the preliminary age model, the sedimentary record from Laguna Potrok Aike reaches back to OIS 3 and exhibits contrasting lithologies downcore especially in the Pleistocene part of the record. Moreover, first estimates indicate that up to 50% of the record consist of redeposited sediments. To account for these pronounced downcore lithological changes it was necessary to adjust the XRF-scanning parameters (i.e. X

  1. Mapping fumarolic fields in volcanic areas: A methodological approach based on the case study of La Fossa cone, Vulcano island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madonia, Paolo; Cangemi, Marianna; Costa, Michela; Madonia, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Changes in the activity state of a volcano can be inferred by monitoring the steam flux from fumarolic fields, in terms of 4D (x, y, z, time) variations in temperature and extension of the zone. During the last decades, several studies in this field have been conducted worldwide, and at Vulcano island (Italy) in particular. Both direct and remotely sensed measurements have been used for identifying thermally anomalous areas, but the possible role of the hydrothermal alteration of volcanic products, producing a sealing effect that obscures the surface thermal evidence of fumarolic activity, have never been explored. The novelty of the present study, carried out at La Fossa cone (Vulcano Island), was the integration of direct and remotely sensed temperature measurements with the evaluation of soil permeability, for the precise mapping of areas where shallow hydrothermal circulation could occur even in the absence of surface evidence. The main results of this study concern the role of a coating found on rock surfaces and regolith in introducing mapping errors, especially during diachronic temperature surveys based on remotely sensed measurements.

  2. Trace element geochemistry of Archean volcanic rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, B.-M.; Shih, C.-Y.; Murthy, V. R.

    1974-01-01

    The K, Rb, Sr, Ba and rare-earth-element contents of some Archean volcanic rocks from the Vermilion greenstone belt, northeast Minnesota, were determined by the isotopic dilution method. The characteristics of trace element abundances, supported by the field occurrences and major element chemistry, suggest that these volcanic rocks were formed in an ancient island arc system.

  3. Volcanic hazard management in dispersed volcanism areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, Jose Manuel; Garcia, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2014-05-01

    Traditional volcanic hazard methodologies were developed mainly to deal with the big stratovolcanoes. In such type of volcanoes, the hazard map is an important tool for decision-makers not only during a volcanic crisis but also for territorial planning. According to the past and recent eruptions of a volcano, all possible volcanic hazards are modelled and included in the hazard map. Combining the hazard map with the Event Tree the impact area can be zoned and defining the likely eruptive scenarios that will be used during a real volcanic crisis. But in areas of disperse volcanism is very complex to apply the same volcanic hazard methodologies. The event tree do not take into account unknown vents, because the spatial concepts included in it are only related with the distance reached by volcanic hazards. The volcanic hazard simulation is also difficult because the vent scatter modifies the results. The volcanic susceptibility try to solve this problem, calculating the most likely areas to have an eruption, but the differences between low and large values obtained are often very small. In these conditions the traditional hazard map effectiveness could be questioned, making necessary a change in the concept of hazard map. Instead to delimit the potential impact areas, the hazard map should show the expected behaviour of the volcanic activity and how the differences in the landscape and internal geo-structures could condition such behaviour. This approach has been carried out in La Palma (Canary Islands), combining the concept of long-term hazard map with the short-term volcanic scenario to show the expected volcanic activity behaviour. The objective is the decision-makers understand how a volcanic crisis could be and what kind of mitigation measurement and strategy could be used.

  4. Detailed geologic field mapping and radiometric dating of the Abanico Formation in the Principal Cordillera, central Chile: Evidence of protracted volcanism and implications for Cenozoic tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosolf, J.; Gans, P. B.; Wyss, A. R.; Cottle, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Many aspects of the long-term evolution of intra-arc processes remain poorly understood, including temporal trends in magmatism, temporal and spatial patterns of volcanism, and styles of arc deformation. The Abanico Formation in the Principal Cordillera of central Chile is a thick, well-exposed section of volcanogenic strata providing a superb locale for the investigation of continental arc dynamics over a 60+ myr timescale. In this study, eight new litho-stratigraphic members of the Abanico Formation are described and mapped in the Río Tinguiririca river area. Mapping and field observations show the Abanico Formation measures up to ~2.5 km in composite stratigraphic thickness. The lower ~1.1 km of the section (> 46 Ma) is dominated by andesitic breccias interbedded with andesite, basaltic andesite, and olivine basalt lavas. The upper 1.4 km of the section (< 46 Ma) consists of volcaniclastic sandstone interbedded with abundant dacitic tuffs and minor andesite, basaltic andesite, and basalt flows. Nineteen new LA-MC-ICPMS U-Pb zircon ages and ten new 40Ar/39Ar whole rock and plagioclase ages obtained for the Abanico Formation clarify ambiguous field relationships and provide a robust chrono-stratigraphic framework spanning ~72 to 11 Ma; these new ages significantly revise the maximum mid-Tertiary age for the Abanico Formation previously established by the mammal fossil record. The map units are cut by numerous dacitic to gabbroic dikes and sills with ages spanning the Eocene to Pliocene. The Abanico Formation is overlain in angular unconformity by Pliocene and Quaternary volcanics composed mainly of andesite, basaltic andesite, and basalt lavas. A strong deformational overprint has tilted, folded, and faulted the Abanico map units. Fold axes and reverse faults, both east and west directed, are generally N-S trending. Reverse faults achieve up to ~50 Ma of stratigraphic separation, placing Campanian strata on Miocene rocks with up to ~2 km of vertical throw. The

  5. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes

    PubMed Central

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis. PMID:20368458

  6. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    PubMed

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  7. Lead and strontium isotopic evidence for crustal interaction and compositional zonation in the source regions of Pleistocene basaltic and rhyolitic magmas of the Coso volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Kurasawa, H.; Delevaux, M.H.; Kistler, R.W.; Doe, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The isotopic compositions of Pb and Sr in Pleistocene basalt, high-silica rhyolite, and andesitic inclusions in rhyolite of the Coso volcanic field indicate that these rocks were derived from different levels of compositionally zoned magmatic systems. The 2 earliest rhyolites probably were tapped from short-lived silicic reservoirs, in contrast to the other 36 rhyolite domes and lava flows which the isotopic data suggest may have been leaked from the top of a single, long-lived magmatic system. Most Coso basalts show isotopic, geochemical, and mineralogic evidence of interaction with crustal rocks, but one analyzed flow has isotopic ratios that may represent mantle values (87Sr/86Sr=0.7036,206Pb/204Pb=19.05,207Pb/204Pb=15.62,208Pb/204Pb= 38.63). The (initial) isotopic composition of typical rhyolite (87Sr/86Sr=0.7053,206Pb/204Pb=19.29,207Pb/204Pb= 15.68,208Pb/204Pb=39.00) is representative of the middle or upper crust. Andesitic inclusions in the rhyolites are evidently samples of hybrid magmas from the silicic/mafic interface in vertically zoned magma reservoirs. Silicic end-member compositions inferred for these mixed magmas, however, are not those of erupted rhyolite but reflect the zonation within the silicic part of the magma reservoir. The compositional contrast at the interface between mafic and silicic parts of these systems apparently was greater for the earlier, smaller reservoirs. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Comparative zircon tephrochronology: correlating the Pliocene Bouse tephra, lower Colorado River trough, California, with the Lawlor Tuff of the Sonoma volcanic field, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Identification, correlation, and absolute dating of glassy volcanic ash and cryptically reworked pyroclastic deposits can be problematic. This is especially the case in strongly weathered samples where primary glass chemistry may not be preserved, or in lacustrine and fluvial environments where detrital materials can heavily bias bulk analysis or produce complex age distributions in single crystal dating approaches. These problems have frustrated numerous attempts to date a singular key ash horizon from the Mio-Pliocene Bouse Formation in southern California (fine-grained carbonate beds and clastic sediments derived from the Colorado River, deposited in the lower Colorado River Trough). Constraining the depositional age of the Bouse Formation is important for understanding the evolution of the Colorado River system, the uplift history of the Colorado Plateau, and the climate conditions involved in Colorado River evolution. Prior attempts to directly date the ash have been inconclusive. A K-Ar in glass date of 5.47 × 0.20 Ma (Shafiqullah et al., 1980) was questioned because of the potential disturbance of both the parent and daughter products of potassium decay in glass, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology on bulk glass and bulk plagioclase separates (Spencer et al., 2000) produced discordant results. Recent glass chemistry correlation of the ash horizon to the 4.83 × 0.011 Ma Lawlor Tuff, Sonoma volcanic field, California (Sarna-Wojcicki et al., 2011), has also been contentious, because that age appears to conflict with the proposed onset of the delivery of Colorado River sediment through to the Gulf of California (Dorsey et al., 2007). To resolve the persistent age arguments, comparative zircon tephrochronology has been undertaken utilizing the single-crystal analysis capabilities of secondary ion mass spectrometry. Here, U-Pb zircon crystallization age spectra, U and Th abundances, and oxygen isotopic composition are presented which confirm the correlation of the Bouse

  9. NASA Desert RATS 2010: Preliminary Results for Science Operations Conducted in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, J. E.; Lofgren, G. E.; Bluethmann, W. J.; Bell, E. R.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is working with international partners to develop the space architectures and mission plans necessary for human spaceflight beyond earth orbit. These mission plans include the exploration of planetary surfaces with significant gravity fields. The Apollo missions to the Moon demonstrated conclusively that surface mobility is a key asset that improves the efficiency of human explorers on a planetary surface. NASA's Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series tests of hardware and operations carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona. Conducted since 1998, these activities are designed to exercise planetary surface hardware and operations in relatively harsh climatic conditions where long-distance, multi-day roving is achievable

  10. Palaeomagnetism and 40Ar/ 39Ar age from a Cretaceous volcanic sequence, Inner Mongolia, China: Implications for the field variation during the Cretaceous normal superchron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Rixiang; Pan, Yongxin; He, Huaiyu; Qin, Huafeng; Ren, Shoumai

    2008-08-01

    An integrated palaeomagnetic and 40Ar/ 39Ar dating study was carried out on an Early Cretaceous volcanic lava sequence from the Suhongtu section, Inner Mongolia, to determine the field behavior within the Cretaceous normal superchron (CNS). 40Ar/ 39Ar ages were obtained from 12 lava flows, indicating that the studied lava was formed around 114.1 ± 0.3 Ma for the lower interval and 110.6 ± 0.1 Ma for the upper interval. Rock-magnetic experiments and electron microprobe analyses indicate that the primary Fe-Ti oxides are the main magnetic carriers. All lava flows carry normal palaeomagnetic directions, which can be grouped into 31 units by an F-test, with a Fisher mean characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) of D/ I = 12.8/58.6° ( α95 = 2.3°). The corresponding palaeomagnetic pole is located at 80.3°N and 200.3°E ( A95 = 3.2°, K = 64.4), which is indistinguishable at the 95% confidence level from the Eurasia pole derived from the apparent polar wander path for the early Cretaceous. Using a modified Thellier palaeointensity method with stringent acceptance criteria, we obtained two time-series of palaeointensity records from 15 independent palaeomagnetic units (total 136 samples). The virtual dipole moment (VDM) values varied from 2.53 × 10 22 Am 2 to 9.92 × 10 22 Am 2. The mean VDMs for the upper and lower intervals are (5.38 ± 2.06) × 10 22 Am 2 and (4.61 ± 2.67) × 10 22 Am 2, respectively. The observed time-series of palaeointensity, together with the previously available data for the CNS, suggest that magnetic field strength during the CNS fluctuated significantly with time.

  11. Volcan Reventador's Unusual Umbrella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, P.; Gioia, G.; Kieffer, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    In the past two decades, field observations of the deposits of volcanoes have been supplemented by systemmatic, and sometimes, opportunistic photographic documentation. Two photographs of the umbrella of the December 3, 2002 eruption of Volcan Reventador, Ecuador, reveal a prominently scalloped umbrella that is unlike any umbrella previously documented on a volcanic column. The material in the umbrella was being swept off a descending pyroclastic flow, and was, therefore, a co-ignimbrite cloud. We propose that the scallops are the result of a turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability with no precedents in volcanology. We ascribe the rare loss of buoyancy that drives this instability to the fact that the Reventador column fed on a cool co-ignimbrite cloud. On the basis of the observed wavelength of the scallops, we estimate a value for the eddy viscosity of the umbrella of 4000 ~m2/s. This value is consistent with a previously obtained lower bound (200 ~m2/s, K. Wohletz, priv. comm., 2005). We do not know the fate of the material in the umbrella subsequent to the photos. The analysis suggests that the umbrella was negatively buoyant. Field work on the co-ignimbrite deposits might reveal whether or not the material reimpacted, and if so, where and whether or not this material was involved in the hazardous flows that affected the main oil pipeline across Ecuador.

  12. A conflict of water and fire: Remote sensing imagery of the Uinkaret Volcanic Field, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Michael S.

    1995-01-01

    The sedimentary geology of the western Grand Canyon consists of gently northeast dipping sandstones, shales, and carbonates. However, due to facies changes within the units, the geomorphology varies from that seen by visitors at the National Park Headquarters. There, the cliff and slope expression of the rocks is replaced in the west by a series of mesas, ridges, and horizontal platforms. The largest of these occurs on the Esplanade Sandstone within the Supai Formation. The Esplanade is formed by slope retreat of the overlying units and resistance to erosion by the underlying limestones. It is onto this platform that the lavas of the Uinkaret Plateau were emplaced. The Uinkaret lava field lies 120 km south of St. George, Utah and is tectonically defined by two major normal faults -- the Hurricane to the west and the Toroweap to the east. The purpose of this investigation was to collect visible, near and thermal infrared data at different periods of the day and year. It is expected that these data will provide the ability to retrieve water temperatures; monitor sediment loads; map and examine any changes in the near shore vegetation communities and understand some of the intricacies of the geology. This paper will serve, to some degree, as a progress report on the Grand Canyon study, since only a fraction of the data has been received and processed thus far. Data from the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) and the Landsat Thematic Mapper simulator (NS001) were acquired simultaneously on April 4, 1994. A second data acquisition occurred on August 27, 1994. Initial analysis of the TIMS data indicates a remarkably noise-free data set with minimal atmospheric attenuation. environments is evident.

  13. Recurrent eruption and subsidence at the Platoro caldera complex, southeastern San Juan volcanic field, Colorado: New tales from old tuffs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Dungan, M.A.; Brown, L.L.; Deino, A.

    1996-01-01

    Reinterpretation of a voluminous regional ash-flow sheet (Masonic Park Tuff) as two separate tuff sheets of similar phenocryst-rich dacite erupted from separate source calderas has important implications for evolution of the multicyclic Platoro caldera complex and for caldera-forming processes generally. Masonic Park Tuff in central parts of the San Juan field, including the type area, was erupted from a concealed source at 28.6 Ma, but widespread tuff previously mapped as Masonic Park Tuff in the southeastern San Juan Mountains is the product of the youngest large-volume eruption of the Platoro caldera complex at 28.4 Ma. This large unit, newly named the "Chiquito Peak Tuff," is the last-erupted tuff of the Treasure Mountain Group, which consists of at least 20 separate ash-flow sheets of dacite to low-silica rhyolite erupted from the Platoro complex during a 1 m.y. interval (29.5-28.4 Ma). Two Treasure Mountain tuff sheets have volumes in excess of 1000 km3 each, and five more have volumes of 50-150 km3. The total volume of ash-flow tuff exceeds 2500 km3, and caldera-related lavas of dominantly andesitic composition make up 250-500 km3 more. A much greater volume of intermediate-composition magma must have solidified in subcaldera magma chambers. Most preserved features of the Platoro complex - including postcollapse asymmetrical trap-door resurgent uplift of the ponded intracaldera tuff and concurrent infilling by andesitic lava flows - postdate eruption of the Chiquito Peak Tuff. The numerous large-volume pre-Chiquito Peak ash-flow tuffs document multiple eruptions accompanied by recurrent subsidence; early-formed caldera walls nearly coincide with margins of the later Chiquito Peak collapse. Repeated syneruptive collapse at the Platoro complex requires cumulative subsidence of at least 10 km. The rapid regeneration of silicic magmas requires the sustained presence of an andesitic subcaldera magma reservoir, or its rapid replenishment, during the 1 m.y. life

  14. Spectroscopic mapping of the white horse alunite deposit, Marysvale volcanic field, Utah: Evidence of a magmatic component

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rockwell, B.W.; Cunningham, C.G.; Breit, G.N.; Rye, R.O.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the replacement alunite deposits just north of the town of Marysvale, Utah, USA, were formed primarily by low-temperature (100??-170?? C), steam-heated processes near the early Miocene paleoground surface, immediately above convecting hydrothermal plumes. Pyrite-bearing propylitically altered rocks occur mainly beneath the steam-heated alunite and represent the sulfidized feeder zone of the H2S-dominated hydrothermal fluids, the oxidation of which at higher levels led to the formation of the alunite. Maps of surface mineralogy at the White Horse deposit generated from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were used in conjunction with X-ray diffraction studies of field samples to test the accuracy and precision of AVIRIS-based mineral mapping of altered rocks and demonstrate the utility of spectroscopic mapping for ore deposit characterization. The mineral maps identified multiple core zones of alunite that grade laterally outward to kaolinite. Surrounding the core zones are dominantly propylitically altered rocks containing illite, montmorillonite, and chlorite, with minor pyrite, kaolinite, gypsum, and remnant potassium feldspar from the parent rhyodacitic ash-flow tuff. The AVIRIS mapping also identified fracture zones expressed by ridge-forming selvages of quartz + dickite + kaolinite that form a crude ring around the advanced argillic core zones. Laboratory analyses identified the aluminum phosphate-sulfate (APS) minerals woodhouseite and svanbergite in one sample from these dickite-bearing argillic selvages. Reflectance spectroscopy determined that the outer edges of the selvages contain more dickite than do the medial regions. The quartz + dickite ?? kaolinite ?? APS-mineral selvages demonstrate that fracture control of replacement processes is more prevalent away from the advanced argillic core zones. Although not exposed at the White Horse deposit, pyrophyllite ?? ordered illite was identified

  15. Vent 7504 of the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF), Arizona: Sample Geochemistry and Implications for Cone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needham, D. H.; Eppler, D. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Skinner, J. A.; Evans, C. A.; Feng, W.; Gruener, J. E.; Whitson, P. A.; Janoiko, B. A.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Vent 7504 is a complex structure in the SFVF that has 3 unit classes: a central cone with exposed dikes and cinder-covered rheomorphic facies; a SE/NW-trending ridge north of the cone with cinder-covered rheomorphic facies; and three discrete lava flows that emanate to the N from the ridge and to the SW and NW from the cone. Field observations suggest the ridge was the northern crest of an initial, larger cone. The NW portion of this cone was most likely disrupted during a catastrophic breach of lava that had accumulated within the cone; this third of three lava flows carried rafted packages of the rheomorphic cone facies to the NW, forming the linear N ridge. The final phase of pyroclastic activity was concentrated in the SW portion of the original cone, covering the top of the cone with cinders and forming the more traditional conic-shaped construct observed today. This study describes the geochemistry of 9 samples collected from the mapped units (2 from the cone, 1 from the N ridge, 1 from the N lava flow, 2 from the SW lava flow, and 3 from the NW lava flow) to further constrain the formation of Vent 7504. Geochemical analyses including back-scatter electron scanning electron microscopy and laboratory X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy were conducted on the 9 collected samples to measure bulk rock and olivine phenocryst compositions. Major element concentrations in the bulk rock and olivine compositions are strongly clustered in all samples, indicating they likely originated from a single magmatic source. Bulk rock SiO2 (~47.5 wt%) and alkali (Na2O + K2O, ~2.7 wt% + 0.71 wt%) concentrations are consistent with a basaltic classification for these samples. Trends in major elements relative to MgO are observed for the olivine phenocrysts: SiO2, Al2O3, Na2O, and TiO2 remain constant relative to MgO, but strong linear trends are observed in MnO, FeO, and NiO relative to MgO. These linear trends are expected given the potential for bivalent cation exchanges in the

  16. Volcanic and non-volcanic debris avalanche deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzella, Irene; Phillips, Jeremy; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2010-05-01

    Dry debris avalanches are characterized by extremely rapid, flow-like motion of large masses and they travel extremely long distances showing much greater mobility than could be predicted using frictional models. Rock avalanches (i.e. flows of fragmented rock derived from a bed-rock failure) and volcanic debris avalanches (i.e. block and ash flows caused by volcanic sector collapses) are both examples of this phenomenon. However, field observations show that volcanic-derived avalanches travel typically greater distance than non-volcanic rock avalanches. At present time the mechanisms involved in these phenomena are still mostly unknown. Several theories have been developed to explain their long runouts but there is no general agreement on a comprehensive rheological law and many questions remain unsolved. The main goal of this research is to constrain experimentally the effect of the characteristics of flow material on runout, deposit morphology and granular flow mechanisms. This will help identify the main differences between volcanic and non-volcanic debris avalanches. Preliminary experiments of unconstrained granular flows have been carried out at the École Polytechinique Féderale de Lausanne. Three kinds of material with different grain size distribution were used: a fine sand with D90 of 0.55mm and two types of gravel with similar density and friction coefficient but with D90 values of respectively 2 and 4 mm. Experiments showed relevant differences between sand and gravel deposit morphologies. The shape of the sand deposit is rather regular and compact whereas the gravel deposit showed well defined angular discontinuities: a central zone with a small slope and several ridges and a front, rear and sides with strong inclination. The presence of ridges and a steep front in gravel deposit evidence a rapid stop of the mass. These morphological features are also often observed in the field. For this reason this kind of gravel results to be more suitable for

  17. Volcanism in southern Guinevere Planitia, Venus: Regional volcanic history and morphology of volcanic domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crown, David A.; Stofan, Ellen R.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    1993-01-01

    Guinevere Planitia is a low-lying region located between the highlands of Beta Regio and Eistla Regio. Analyses of Pioneer Venus, Goldstone, and Arecibo radar data suggested that the surface of Guinevere Planitia is dominated by volcanism, primarily in the form of bright, dark, and mottled plains units. Also identified in this region was the Beta-Eistla Deformation Zone, composed of ovoids and discontinuous segments of lineament belts that have been embayed by the surrounding plains. The resolution of Magellan SAR images allows detailed investigations of the volcanic deposits found in the area in order to determine the types of eruptive activity which have occurred and to constrain the regional volcanic history. Analyses of an area of southern Guinevere Planitia between 0-25 deg N and 300-330 deg indicate the presence of a wide variety of volcanic land forms, including large shield volcanoes, widespread plains, lava flow fields, and small domes, cones, and shields as well as coronae and other circular structures that have associated volcanic deposits.

  18. Magma injection into a long-lived reservoir to explain geodetically measured uplift: Application to the 2007-2014 unrest episode at Laguna del Maule volcanic field, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mével, Hélène; Gregg, Patricia M.; Feigl, Kurt L.

    2016-08-01

    Moving beyond the widely used kinematic models for the deformation sources, we present a new dynamic model to describe the process of injecting magma into an existing magma reservoir. To validate this model, we derive an analytical solution and compare its results to those calculated using the Finite Element Method. A Newtonian fluid characterized by its viscosity, density, and overpressure (relative to the lithostatic value) flows through a vertical conduit, intruding into a reservoir embedded in an elastic domain, leading to an increase in reservoir pressure and time-dependent surface deformation. We apply our injection model to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data from the ongoing unrest episode at Laguna del Maule (Chile) volcanic field that started in 2007. Using a grid search optimization, we minimize the misfit to the InSAR displacement data and vary the three parameters governing the analytical solution: the characteristic timescale τP for magma propagation, the maximum injection pressure, and the inflection time when the acceleration switches from positive to negative. For a spheroid with semimajor axis a = 6200 m, semiminor axis c = 100 m, located at a depth of 4.5 km in a purely elastic half-space, the best fit to the InSAR displacement data occurs for τP=9.5 years and an injection pressure rising up to 11.5 MPa for 2 years. The volume flow rate increased to 1.2 m3/s for 2 years and then decreased to 0.7 m3/s in 2014. In 7.3 years, at least 187 × 106 m3 of magma was injected.

  19. Wehrlitisation in the upper mantle beneath the Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field (Northern Pannonian Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patkó, Levente; Előd Aradi, László; Liptai, Nóra; Szabó, Csaba

    2013-04-01

    The Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field is situated in the northern part of the Pannonian Basin, where Plio-Pleistocene alkaline basalts brought upper mantle xenoliths to the surface. We collected great number of ultramafic xenoliths from the central part of the region, Medves-plateau (Eresztvény, Magyarbánya) and Baby hill (Ratka, Filakovske Kovace, Terbelovce), and detailed petrographic studies were carried out. As a result, beside the dominating lherzolite xenoliths, large number of wehrlite xenoliths also appeared, in which the modal proportion of clinopyroxene was increased in contrast to the descending amount of ortopyroxene. These wehrlite xenoliths show very unique texture, which is characterized by irregularly shaped olivine grains hosted in clinopyroxene and vermicular spinel inclusions in clinopyroxenes. According to petrographic features, ten wehrlite xenoliths have been selected for a detailed study. Based on the major elements of rock forming minerals, Fe and Mn enrichment in olivines, Ti, Al and Fe enrichment in clinopyroxenes, and Fe and Ti enrichment in spinels can be observed compared to those of lherzolite xenoliths. In the studied wehrlite xenoliths silicate, fluid and sulfide inclusions are also abundant. We focused on the latter ones in this thesis. The mineralogy of these multi-phase sulfides is in agreement with those usually found in the upper mantle with domination of pyrrhotite, pentlandite and chalcopyrite. However, bulk composition of the sulfides slightly differs from the lherzolite xenoliths. Sulfides in wehrlite xenoliths show higher Fe and lower Cu concentrations. Based on our detailed petrography and geochemistry of rock forming constituents and sulfide minerals, wehrlite xenoliths are products of a process called stealth mantle metasomatism where new minerals, in our case clinopyroxene is introduced to the system that is mineralogically indistinguishable from common upper mantle peridotites. This metasomatism is supposed to be

  20. Subterranean fragmentation of magma during conduit initiation and evolution in the shallow plumbing system of the small-volume Jagged Rocks volcanoes (Hopi Buttes Volcanic Field, Arizona, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Giuseppe; White, James D. L.; Muirhead, James D.; Ort, Michael H.

    2016-08-01

    Monogenetic volcanoes have limited magma supply and lack long-lived sustained magma plumbing systems. They erupt once, often from multiple vents and sometimes over several years, and are rarely or never re-activated. Eruptive behavior is very sensitive to physical processes (e.g., volatile exsolution, magma-water interaction) occurring in the later stages of magma ascent at shallow crustal depths (<1 km), which yield a spectrum of eruptive styles including weak to moderate explosive activity, violent phreatomagmatism, and lava effusion. Jagged Rocks Complex in the late Miocene Hopi Buttes Volcanic field (Arizona, USA) exposes the frozen remnants of the feeding systems for one or a few monogenetic volcanoes. It provides information on how a shallow magmatic plumbing system evolved within a stable non-marine sedimentary basin, and the processes by which magma flowing through dikes fragmented and conduits were formed. We have identified three main types of fragmental deposits, (1) buds (which emerge from dikes), (2) pyroclastic massifs, and (3) diatremes; these represent three different styles and intensities of shallow-depth magma fragmentation. They may develop successively and at different sites during the evolution of a monogenetic volcano. The deposits consist of a mixture of pyroclasts with varying degrees of welding and country-rock debris in various proportions. Pyroclasts are commonly welded together, but also reveal in places features consistent with phreatomagmatism, such as blocky shapes, dense groundmasses, and composite clasts (loaded and cored). The extent of fragmentation and the formation of subterranean open space controlled the nature of the particles and the architecture and geometry of these conduit structures and their deposits.

  1. Cerro Toledo Rhyolite, Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico: {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar geochronology of eruptions between two caldera-forming events

    SciTech Connect

    Spell, T.L. |; McDougall, I.; Doulgeris, A.P.

    1996-12-01

    The Cerro Toledo Rhyolite comprises a group of domes and tephra which were erupted during the interval between two caldera-forming ignimbrites, the Tshirege Member and Otowi Member of the Bandelier Tuff, in the Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico. To provide a chronologic framework for geochemical and isotopic studies on these rhyolites, which record the evolution of the Bandelier magma system during this interval, a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar geochronology study was undertaken. Pumice from major pyroclastic fall deposits within the rhyolite tephra and samples from the rhyolite domes were dated as well as the stratigraphically bracketing Bandelier Tuff. The {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages for the two members of the Bandelier Tuff Yield and interval of 380{+-}20 k.y. between these caldera forming eruptions. During this interval nine major pyroclastic pumice units were deposited in the sections studies, for which six yield isochron ages, one a weighted mean age, one a maximum age, and one no reliable age due to lack of sanidine. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dates on pumice fall units within the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite tephra indicate that eruptive activity occurred at > 1.59, 1.54, 1.48, 1.37 and 1.22 Ma. {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating of Cerro Toledo Rhyolite domes indicates these were erupted within the caldera at 1.54, 1.45, 1.38-1.34, and 1.27 Ma. The dates obtained indicate that eruptive activity occurred throughout the 380 k.y. interval between the two members of the Bandelier Tuff, but suggest that eruptions producing both tephra and domes occurred during discrete intervals at ca. 1.54, 1.48 and 1.38-1.34 Ma. 43 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Magnetic Fabric Investigations of the Sapinero Mesa and Fish Canyon Tuffs, Northern Part of the Southern Rocky Mountain Volcanic Field, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, C.; Martin, M.; Geissman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Exposures of two laterally extensive ignimbrites in the northern part of the Southern Rocky Mountain Volcanic Field (SRMVF) allow examination of the emplacement mechanisms of these pyroclastic deposits as a function of deposition on irregular preexisting topography using magnetic fabric techniques. The Sapinero Mesa Tuff (28.19 × 0.03 Ma) was erupted from the San Juan/Uncompahgre Caldera Complex and the Fish Canyon tuff (ca. 28.02 × 0.16 Ma) was erupted from the La Garita caldera. These ignimbrites are major components of the SRMVF and were emplaced on highly irregular paleotopography. The Sapinero Mesa Tuff was emplaced directly on the late Eocene West Elk Breccia near and west of the Blue Mesa reservoir and directly on Precambrian crystalline rocks south of the Blue Mesa reservoir. The Fish Canyon Tuff was emplaced directly on Precambrian crystalline rocks south and southwest of Gunnison. Our study of these two ignimbrites is concentrated in the northern part of the SRMVF and examines how these deposits were emplaced on different topographic features. To date, a total of 16 sites in the Fish Canyon and Sapinero Mesa tuffs have been collected and analyzed for determination of magnetic fabrics through measurements of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). These samples are currently being analyzed for measurements of anisotropy of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (AARM). Initial analyses indicate transport directions that generally coincide with the inferred regional north-northwest transport direction. Additional sampling includes a greater spatial extent and a more focused method of collection with an emphasis on localities chosen with careful consideration of relationships to paleotopographic features present during emplacement of the ignimbrites. Specifically, we have selected linear features of varying scales with strikes that vary significantly from the regional, inferred transport directions. Our work provides a means to compare regional inferred

  3. Climate induced changes as registered in inorganic and organic sediment components from Laguna Potrok Aike (Argentina) during the past 51 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, A.; Kliem, P.; Ohlendorf, C.; Zolitschka, B.; Rosén, P.; Pasado Science Team

    2013-07-01

    Total organic carbon, total inorganic carbon, biogenic silica content and total organic carbon/total nitrogen ratios of the Laguna Potrok Aike lacustrine sediment record are used to reconstruct the environmental history of south-east Patagonia during the past 51 ka in high resolution. High lake level conditions are assumed to have prevailed during the Last Glacial, as sediments are carbonate-free. Increased runoff linked to permafrost and reduced evaporation due to colder temperatures and reduced influence of Southern Hemispheric Westerlies (SHW) may have caused these high lake levels with lake productivity being low and organic matter mainly of algal or cyanobacterial origin. Aquatic moss growth and diatom blooms occurred synchronously with southern hemispheric glacial warming events such as the Antarctic A-events, the postglacial warming following the LGM and the Younger Dryas chronozone. During these times, a combination of warmer climatic conditions with related thawing permafrost could have increased the allochthonous input of nutrients and in combination with warmer surface waters increased aquatic moss growth and diatom production. The SHW were not observed to affect southern Patagonia during the Last Glacial. The Holocene presents a completely different lacustrine system because (a) permafrost no longer inhibits infiltration nor emits meltwater pulses and (b) the positioning of the SHW over the investigated area gives rise to strong and dry winds. Under these conditions total organic carbon, total organic carbon/total nitrogen ratios and biogenic silica cease to be first order productivity indicators. On the one hand, the biogenic silica is influenced by dissolution of diatoms due to higher salinity and pH of the lake water under evaporative stress characterizing low lake levels. On the other hand, total organic carbon and total organic carbon/total nitrogen profiles are influenced by reworked macrophytes from freshly exposed lake level terraces during

  4. California's potential volcanic hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions have occurred infrequently in California during the last few thousand years, the potential danger to life and property from volcanoes in the state is great enough to be of concern, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publication. The 17-page bulletin, Potential Hazards from Future Volcanic Eruptions in California, gives a brief history of volcanic activity in California during the past 100,000 years, descriptions of the types of volcanoes in the state, the types of potentially hazardous volcanic events that could occur, and hazard-zonation maps and tables depicting six areas of the state where volcanic eruptions might occur. The six areas and brief descriptions of their past volcanic history and potential for future volcanic hazards are briefly summarized here.

  5. Comparison of ASTER- and AVIRIS-Derived Mineraland Vegetation Maps of the White Horse Replacement Alunite Deposit and Surrounding Area, Marysvale Volcanic Field, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents and compares mineral and vegetation maps of parts of the Marysvale volcanic field in west-central Utah that were published in a recent paper describing the White Horse replacement alunite deposit. Detailed, field-verified maps of the deposit were produced from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data acquired from a low-altitude Twin Otter turboprop airborne platform. Reconnaissance-level maps of surrounding areas including the central and northern Tushar Mountains, Pahvant Range, and portions of the Sevier Plateau to the east were produced from visible, near-infrared, and shortwave-infrared data acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor carried aboard the Terra satellite platform. These maps are also compared to a previously published mineral map of the same area generated from AVIRIS data acquired from the high-altitude NASA ER-2 jet platform. All of the maps were generated by similar analysis methods, enabling the direct comparison of the spatial scale and mineral composition of surface geologic features that can be identified using the three types of remote sensing data. The high spatial (2-17 meter) and spectral (224 bands) resolution AVIRIS data can be used to generate detailed mineral and vegetation maps suitable for geologic and geoenvironmental studies of individual deposits, mines, and smelters. The lower spatial (15-30 meter) and spectral (9 bands) resolution ASTER data are better suited to less detailed mineralogical studies of lithology and alteration across entire hydrothermal systems and mining districts, including regional mineral resource and geoenvironmental assessments. The results presented here demonstrate that minerals and mineral mixtures can be directly identified using AVIRIS and ASTER data to elucidate spatial patterns of mineralogic zonation; AVIRIS data can enable the generation of maps with significantly greater detail and accuracy. The

  6. Archaeological applications of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: an example from the Coso Volcanic Field, California, using advanced statistical signal processing analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Remus, Jeremiah J.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Harmon, Russell S.; Draucker, Anne; Baron, Dirk; Yohe, Robert

    2010-05-01

    Over the past quarter century, multielement chemical analysis has become a common means for attributing the provenance of archaeological materials. The Coso Volcanic Field (CVF) in California, USA, contains at least 38 high-silica rhyolite domes, many of which contain obsidian glass that has been quarried for tools by the indigenous population for more than 12,000 years. Artifacts made from CVF obsidian are found throughout the southwestern United States and geochemical sourcing of CVF obsidian has been an important tool in understanding prehistoric Native American trading patterns. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a simple atomic emission spectroscopic technique that has the potential for real-time man-portable chemical analysis in the field. Because LIBS is simultaneously sensitive to all elements, a single laser shot can be used to record the broadband emission spectra, which provides a ''chemical fingerprint'' of a material. Single-shot broadband LIBS spectra were collected using a commercial benchtop LIBS system for 27 obsidian samples from major sites across the CVF and four additional sites in California and western Nevada outside of CVF. Classification of the samples was performed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), a common chemometric technique suitable for performing regression on high-dimensional data. Provenance identification for the obsidian samples was evaluated for three separate labeling frameworks. The first framework consisted of a binary classification problem to distinguish CVF samples from non-CVF samples. The second approach focused on the CVF samples with labels that corresponded to the eight separate Coso sites encompassed by the 27 samples. In the third analysis, non-CVF samples were excluded, and the remaining 27 CVF samples were labeled based on groupings defined from previous major and trace element chemical studies, which reduces the number of possible classes from eight to four. Different aspects

  7. Morphology and development of pahoehoe flow-lobe tumuli and associated features from a monogenetic basaltic volcanic field, Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, Ezz El Din Abdel Hakim; Hammed, Mohamed Saleh

    2016-01-01

    The dimensions, landforms, and structural characteristics of pahoehoe flow-lobe tumuli from Bahariya Depression are collectively reported here for the first time. The flow-lobe tumuli documented here characterize hummocky flow surfaces. These tumuli are characterized by low, dome-like mounds, lava-inflation clefts, and squeeze ups. Flow-lobe tumuli are of various shapes and sizes, which are affected by the mechanism of inflation because they formed in response to the increase of pressure within the flow when the flow's crust becomes thicker. The tumuli often appear isolated or in small groups in the middle sectors of the lava flows, whereas in the distal sectors they form large concentration, suggesting the presence of complex lava tubes inside of the flow. Tumuli exhibited by El Bahariya lava flows are between 3.0 and 50 m in length and up to 5.0 m in height with lenticular geometry in aerial view. The flow emplacement of flow-lobe tumuli is controlled by variations in local characteristics such as nature of the substrate, flow orientation, slope, interferrence with other lobes, and rate of lava supply. Their presence generally towards the terminal ends of flow fields suggests that they seldom form over the clogged portions of distributary tubes or pathways. Thus, localized inflations that formed over blockages in major lava tubes result in formation of flow-lobe tumuli. The three-tiered (crust-core-basal zone) internal structure of the flow-lobe tumuli, resembling the typical distribution of vesicles in P-type lobes, confirms emplacement by the mechanism of inflation. All the available data show that the morphology and emplacement mechanism of the studied flow-lobe tumuli may be analogous to similar features preserved within topographically confined areas of the Hawaiian and Deccan hummocky lava flows. Considering the age of the studied volcanic fields (˜22 Ma) it is most probable that the structures described here may be amongst the oldest recognized examples

  8. Microsedimentological characterization using image analysis and μ-XRF as indicators of sedimentary processes and climate changes during Lateglacial at Laguna Potrok Aike, Santa Cruz, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PASADO Science Team Jouve, Guillaume; Francus, Pierre; Lamoureux, Scott; Provencher-Nolet, Laurence; Hahn, Annette; Haberzettl, Torsten; Fortin, David; Nuttin, Laurence

    2013-07-01

    Palaeoclimatic and paleoenvironmental high latitude records in the Southern Hemisphere are scarce compared to the northern counterpart. However, understanding global evolution of environmental systems during sudden climate changes is inseparable from an equivalent knowledge of both Hemispheres. In this context, a high-resolution study of lacustrine sediments from Laguna Potrok Aike, Santa Cruz province, Patagonia, Argentina, was conducted for the Lateglacial period using concurrent X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Scanning electron microscope analyses. Peaks of Ca/Si and Mn, and occurrences of the green alga Phacotus lenticularis have been interpreted as variations in ventilation of the water column from 13.6 to 11.1 ka cal. BP. During this interval, mild climate conditions during the Younger Dryas are characterized by relatively weak westerlies favouring the formation of a stratified water body as indicated by preserved manganese and Ca/Si peaks and high Total Organic Carbon (TOC) values. In this environment, water in the epilimnion can reach sufficiently high temperature to allow P. lenticularis to grow. Colder conditions are marked by peaks in Ca without P. lenticularis and occur during the Antarctic Cold Reversal (ACR). In this Lateglacial interval, micropumices were also detected in large amount. Image analysis of thin sections allowed the counting and size measurement of detrital particles and micropumices separately. Micropumices significantly influence the iron and titanium content, hence preventing to use them as proxies of detrital input in this interval.

  9. Magma-derived CO2 emissions in the Tengchong volcanic field, SE Tibet: Implications for deep carbon cycle at intra-continent subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Maoliang; Guo, Zhengfu; Sano, Yuji; Zhang, Lihong; Sun, Yutao; Cheng, Zhihui; Yang, Tsanyao Frank

    2016-09-01

    Active volcanoes at oceanic subduction zone have long been regard as important pathways for deep carbon degassed from Earth's interior, whereas those at continental subduction zone remain poorly constrained. Large-scale active volcanoes, together with significant modern hydrothermal activities, are widely distributed in the Tengchong volcanic field (TVF) on convergent boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates. They provide an important opportunity for studying deep carbon cycle at the ongoing intra-continent subduction zone. Soil microseepage survey based on accumulation chamber method reveals an average soil CO2 flux of ca. 280 g m-2 d-1 in wet season for the Rehai geothermal park (RGP). Combined with average soil CO2 flux in dry season (ca. 875 g m-2 d-1), total soil CO2 output of the RGP and adjacent region (ca. 3 km2) would be about 6.30 × 105 t a-1. Additionally, we conclude that total flux of outgassing CO2 from the TVF would range in (4.48-7.05) × 106 t a-1, if CO2 fluxes from hot springs and soil in literature are taken into account. Both hot spring and soil gases from the TVF exhibit enrichment in CO2 (>85%) and remarkable contribution from mantle components, as indicated by their elevated 3He/4He ratios (1.85-5.30 RA) and δ13C-CO2 values (-9.00‰ to -2.07‰). He-C isotope coupling model suggests involvement of recycled organic metasediments and limestones from subducted Indian continental lithosphere in formation of the enriched mantle wedge (EMW), which has been recognized as source region of the TVF parental magmas. Contamination by crustal limestone is the first-order control on variations in He-CO2 systematics of volatiles released by the EMW-derived melts. Depleted mantle and recycled crustal materials from subducted Indian continental lithosphere contribute about 45-85% of the total carbon inventory, while the rest carbon (about 15-55%) is accounted by limestones in continental crust. As indicated by origin and evolution of the TVF

  10. Constraints on the seismic properties of the mantle beneath the Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field (Northern Pannonian Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebesz, Rita; Liptai, Nora; Kovacs, Istvan; Patko, Levente; Pinter, Zsanett; Falus, Gyorgy; Graczer, Zoltan; Szanyi, Gyongyver; Wesztergom, Viktor; Szabo, Csaba

    2014-05-01

    In the Carpathian Pannonian Region (CPR) Plio-Pleistocene alkali basalts have sampled the upper mantle at five known occurrences, bringing upper mantle xenoliths to the surface. One of these is the Nógrád-Gömör Volcanic Field (NGVF), which is located in the northern part of the Pannonian Basin. For this study, 25 representative lherzolite and wehrlite xenoliths were selected from the central and southern parts of the NGVF. These xenoliths sample a small volume (~4000 km3) of the upper mantle from a depth of about 35-50 km. Xenoliths collected from the southern part of NGVF originate from shallower depth (35-40 km) than those from the central part (40-50 km) [1]. Crystal preferred orientations (CPO) of the minerals were measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Two distinct orientation types (A-Type, D-Type) based on the distribution and alignment of crystallographic axes were recognized, which show some correlation not only with the macroscopic texture, but also with olivine J-factors that indicate the strength of the xenolith fabric [2]. The seismic properties, i.e. seismic anisotropy and velocities, of these 25 mantle xenoliths were calculated based on the CPO and volume fractions of olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene. It was found that P wave and fast split shear wave polarization direction is always close to the density maximum of the a-axis of olivine. Seismic anisotropy is higher for stronger CPO. Maximum P wave azimuthal anisotropy ranges are 4.5%-6.9% and 5.3%-11.9%, for the southern and the central area respectively. Maximum S wave polarization anisotropy ranges are 2.92%-5.31% and 3.97%-7.46%for the southern area and the central area respectively. The anisotropy that would be measured by SKS, Rayleigh and Love waves for end-member orientations of the lineation and foliation could be predicted based on the already calculated seismic properties of the xenoliths [3]. The calculated anisotropy is compared to the results of S receiver function

  11. Expanding Geophysical and Geochemical Investigation of Causes of Extraordinary Unrest at the Laguna del Maule (Rhyolitic) Volcanic Field, Southern Andes, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Laguna del Maule Volcanic Field, Chile, includes an unusually large and recent concentration of silicic eruptions. Since 2007 the crust here has been inflating at an astonishing rate of 25 cm/yr. Findings thus far lead to the hypothesis that the silicic vents have tapped an extensive layer of crystal-poor, rhyolitic melt that began to form atop a magmatic mush zone that was established by ~20 ka with a renewed phase of rhyolite eruptions during the Holocene. Modeling of surface deformation, magnetotelluric data, and gravity changes suggest that magma is currently intruding at a depth of ~5 km. Swarms of volcano-tectonic and long period earthquakes, mostly of M < 2, have occurred beneath the most recent rhyolite coulees on the southwestern and southern margins of the 20 km diameter ring of silicic vents. With support from the US NSF and the Chilean government (SERNAGEOMIN and OVDAS) we are seizing the unique opportunity to investigate, over the next 5 years, the dynamics of this large rhyolitic system while magma migration, reservoir growth, and crustal deformation are actively underway. This collaboration involves scientists and students at: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Georgia Tech, Cornell, University of Alberta, Simon Fraser University, University of Chile-Santiago, CONICET/University of San Juan-Argentina, Nanyang Technological University-Singapore, SERNAGEOMIN, OVDAS, USGS, and SEGEMAR-Argentina. Team members will be introduced in this presentation. Our approach includes augmenting the OVDAS array of 6 permanent seisic stations with 40 additional instruments to conduct tomographic, receiver function and ambient noise studies. We continue to collect 4-D gravity data from 37 stations. Surface deformation is monitored via cGPS at 5 permanent receivers and InSAR data. A magnetotelluric survey across the Andes at 36o S is planned. Geochemical studies include mineral zoning and U-Th disequilibrium of zircons to constrain the timing of magma intrusion and

  12. Isotopic and trace element compositions of upper mantle and lower crustal xenoliths, Cima volcanic field, California: Implications for evolution of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mukasa, S.B.; Wilshire, H.G.

    1997-01-01

    Ultramafic and mafic xenoliths from the Cima volcanic field, southern California, provide evidence of episodic modification of the upper mantle and underplating of the crust beneath a portion of the southern Basin and Range province. The upper mantle xenoliths include spinel peridotite and anhydrous and hydrous pyr