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Sample records for ailao shan-red river

  1. Potassic magma genesis and the Ailao Shan-Red River fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, Martin F. J.; Hoàng, Nguyễn; Lo, Chinh-hua; Chí, Cung Thu'ọ'ng; Cu'ò'ng, Nguyễn Quốc; Liu, Fu-tian; Deng, Jin-fu; Mo, Xuan-xue

    2013-09-01

    Two types of K-rich magma of Eocene to Early Oligocene (ca. 40-30) and Plio-Pleistocene (ca. 5-0.1 Ma) age were emplaced prior to and following left-lateral slip on the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) fault, a regional shear zone extending between southwest China and the Tonkin Gulf (South China Sea) that accommodated 'escape' of the Indochina block. The first type is exposed in the Dali-Lijiang and adjacent regions of western Yunnan and Sichuan and comprises ultramafic potassic to ultrapotassic 'absarokites' and their shoshonite, banakite, and SiO2-rich derivatives which were emplaced immediately prior to activation of the ASRR fault. They are characterized by high Mg.-nos, and low contents of fusible oxides (FeO*, CaO, Al2O3), for equivalent MgO content, and pronounced primitive mantle-normalized high-field strength element (HFSE) depletions. In contrast, 'post-escape' K-rich magmas were erupted in the Puer, Maguan-Pingbian regions of south and southeast Yunnan. Apart from their relative enrichments in potassium they show typical HFSE-rich intra-plate compositional affinity. Geological and geomorphic evidence, and thermochronologic age dating of metamorphisc events, suggest that left-lateral shearing occurred between ca. 30 and 17 Ma; thereby accommodating the southeastward 'escape' of Indochina and (possibly) two episodes of spreading in the South China Sea. The southwestern part of Dali-Lijiang magmatic products was detached and offset by ca. 600 km and are now located in Phan Xi Pang in northern Viet Nam. The same is true for the Permo-Triassic Emeishan flood basalts, whose western exposures were likewise displaced by the same amount and are now represented by the Song Da complex, also in northern Viet Nam. Here, we report geochemical, isotopic, and 40Ar/39Ar age data for samples from both the 'pre-escape' Dali-Lijiang magmas and the 'post-escape' K-rich Puer, Maguan-Pingbian basalts and basanites, with a view to comparing and contrasting their interpolated source

  2. Midcrustal shearing and doming in a Cenozoic compressive setting along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Yin, C. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Wang, J. M.; Zhong, D. L.; Wang, Y.; Lai, Q. Z.; Yue, Y. H.; Zhou, Q. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The Cenozoic Xuelong Shan antiformal dome is located along the northern segment of the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone in Yunnan, China. Subhorizontal foliation in the gneiss core is recognized, representing a broad top-to-NE shear initiated under amphibolite facies conditions and propagating into greenschist facies in the mantling schist and strike-slip shear zone. Microfabrics of crystallographic-preferred orientations (CPOs) in quartz suggest that the deformation temperatures increased with increasing structural depth from the upper crust (300-500°C) in the mantling schist to the midcrust (15 km or more, ≥650°C) in the gneissic core. This trend is mirrored by variations in the metamorphic grade of the syn-kinematic mineral assemblages and microstructures, which range from garnet + amphibole + biotite + sillimanite + rutile + feldspar in the core to garnet + staurolite + biotite + epidote + muscovite within the limb units. The dome experienced the following deformation history: (1) a broad top-to-NE shear in the subhorizontal foliation of the gneiss core during the first stage of deformation (D1); (2) opposing reverse-sense shear along the two schist limbs of the dome during contraction-related doming (D2-D3); (3) sinistral strike-slip shearing within the eastern limb (D4); and (4) extensional deformation (D5). The structural-thermal patterns suggest the antiformal dome formation was roughly coeval with top-to-NE ductile shearing in the midcrust of Tibet at 32 Ma or earlier. A major implication is that there was a phase of contractional ductile deformation in the region prior to the initiation of strike-slip deformation.

  3. Late Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Ailao Shan-Red River fault (SE Tibet): Implications for kinematic change during plateau growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Bo; Schoenbohm, Lindsay M.; Zhang, Jinjiang; Zhou, Renjie; Hou, Jianjun; Ai, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Surface uplift, river incision, shear zone exhumation, and displacement along active faults have all interacted to shape the modern landscape in the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. The Ailao Shan-Red River fault, a major structure in the tectonic evolution of southeastern Asia, is an excellent recorder of these processes. We present new stratigraphic, structural, and low-temperature thermochronologic data to explore its late Cenozoic tectonic and geomorphic evolution. The stratigraphic and structural observations indicate that the major bend in the fault was a releasing bend with significant Miocene sedimentation in the early-middle Miocene but became a restraining bend with abundant shortening structures developed after the late Miocene reversal of displacement. We also document exhumation of the shear zone from two low-temperature thermochronologic transects. New apatite (U-Th)/He(AHe) data and published thermochronologic results reveal two accelerated cooling episodes, backed by stratigraphic and geomorphic observations. The first rapid cooling phase occurred from ca. 27 to 17 Ma with removal of cover rocks and exhumation of the shear zone. The second accelerated cooling episode revealed by our AHe data commenced at 14-13 Ma, lasting 2-3 Myr. The Ailao Shan range may have risen to its modern elevation with high-relief topography developing due to river incision. We interpret the onset of this rapid exhumation to reflect renewed plateau growth associated with lower crustal flow.

  4. Timing of initiation of left-lateral shearing along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone: microstructural and geochronological constraints from high temperature mylonites in Diancang Shan, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Liu, J.; Leiss, B.; Neubauer, F.; Genser, J.

    2009-04-01

    The high grade metamorphic massifs (e.g. Xuelong Shan, Diancang Shan, Ailao Shan in China and Day Nui Con Voi metamorphic massif in Vietnam) along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone in Southwestern China bear much information on the large-scale left-lateral strike-slip shearing in eastern Tibet during Indian-Eurasian plate collision and post-collisional accommodation process in late Oligocene-early Miocene. The metamorphic massifs are narrow zones bounded by brittle faults. Low-grade metamorphic rocks are lying on the west and sedimentary rocks to the east. Rocks in these massifs are partly sheared with widespread occurrence of high temperature mylonites that have subhorizontal stretching lineations. Left-lateral shearing is indicated by mesoscale and microscale shear indicators in the mylonites. Debates exist on the timing of initiation and duration of left-lateral shearing, and mechanism of exhumation of the high grade metamorphic rocks along Ailao Shan Red River shear zone. The Diancang Shan complex, a typical metamorphic massif, is constituted by three units, i.e. a central high strain shear zone, a western low-grade metamorphic volcanic-sedimentary sequence in the Lanping basin, and an eastern superimposed retrograde metamorphic belt. The central high grade metamorphic complex consists of metamorphic rocks of amphibolite facies conditions. High-grade metamorphic mineral assemblages and structural elements indicate a deep level crustal metamorphism and deformation of the rocks. L-tectonites are typical indicators of high-temperature deformation in the highly sheared granitic mylonites. Widespread occurrence of different shear criteria (e.g. sheared veins, sigmoid and delta -porphyroclasts) suggests that these gneisses experienced very intensive high-temperature progressive left-lateral strike-slip shearing. A large synkinematic augen monzogranitic intrusion is recognized in the central belt by the present work. The intrusion has an obvious porphyritic texture

  5. Ductile and Brittle Neogene Deformation of Late Permian Orthogneiss in the Northern Ailao Shan-Red River Shear Zone: View from the Xuelong Shan Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintsch, R. P.; Yi, D.; Yi, K.; Wang, Q. F.; Wang, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    The orthogneisses in the core of the Xuelong Shan block are surrounded by ductile and then brittle fault rocks. This lens-shape block is in fault contact with Triassic marbles on the eastern margin and Jurassic-Cretaceous mudstones on the western margin. The rocks in the core of the Xuelong Shan block contain multiply foliated feldspathic orthogneisses with local amphibolites, largely overprinted by protomylonitic deformation. Foliation strengthens to the east to become mylonites and ultramylonites, with a 30 m wide zone of loosely cemented fault breccia adjacent to brittlely faulted Triassic marbles. In contrast, the rocks to the west are dominated by brittle deformation, with mylonites becoming cataclasites and then breccias facing the mudstones to the east. Well-foliated phyllonites are locally present within the cataclasites. Early S1 gneissosity striking ENE are recognized only in the interior protomylonite. In the east, the dominate mylonitic S2 foliation strikes 340° with a moderate dip to the east, and an L2 mineral stretching lineation plunges gently north. However, in the west S2 cleavage is transposed into a NNW trending schistosity that dips steeply to the ENE, with down-dip mineral stretching lineations. Whole rock chemistry indicates a granitic to granodioritic protolith for all the rocks including the ultramylonites, but also suggests the progressive loss of alkalis with increasing deformation. Trace element compositions show these rocks lie in the volcanic arc/syn-collisional granite field. U-Pb SHRIMP ages show an Early Triassic age for these granite, with possible Middle Permian inheritance in some cores. These ages are consistent with the period of the closure of the northern Paleo-Tethys ocean. Metamorphic rim ages of ~ 30 Ma record a small amount of zircon dissolution/precipitation probably associated with the Oligocene ductile deformation that produced the upper greenschist facies mylonites. These results support the geologic history of the ASRRSZ based on data obtained in the southern Diancang Shan block. Permian granitoids were intruded and ductily deformed in the Early Triassic. The left lateral shearing that brought these blocks to the surface was delayed until the Neogene extrusion of the Indochina block.

  6. Petrology, geochemistry, and metamorphic evolution of meta-sedimentary rocks in the Diancang Shan-Ailao Shan metamorphic complex, Southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Liu, Fulai; Liu, Pinghua; Shi, Jianrong; Cai, Jia

    2016-07-01

    -grained biotite-muscovite-bearing symplectites were formed, which occur at the grain boundaries of garnet and felsic minerals; such assemblage as Bt + Ms + Pl ± Kfs ± Grt + Qz were formed at 553-613 °C and 4.0-5.0 kb. The metamorphic history of the Diancang Shan-Ailao Shan metamorphic complex is thus defined by a clockwise P-T trajectory which includes a nearly isothermal decompression recording the subduction, collision and exhumation events between the Yangtze and Indochina blocks at Oligocene to Early Miocene, prior to the regional strong left-lateral shearing along the Ailao Shan-Red River Fault.

  7. [Population and distribution of western black crested gibbon (Nomascus concolor) at Ailao Mountain, Xinping, Yunnan].

    PubMed

    Li, Guo-Song; Yang, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Li, Wei

    2011-12-01

    The western black crested gibbon (Nomascus concolor) is mainly distributed in Yunnan, China. Ailao Mountain is located in central Yunnan and divided into three prefectures and six counties. This mountain forms the principle distribution range for western black crested gibbon; however, there are no published data on the gibbon population inhabiting the Xinping administrative. Take the interview results conducted in 2007 and 2009 with local people as the reference, this study conducted an extensive field survey covering all possible habitats from November 2009 to January 2010 using call surveys. Among the one hundred and twenty-four gibbon groups which were confirmed across the Ailao Mountain, the largest known population of western black crested gibbons yet, 85 groups inhabit the national nature reserve and adjacent national forest, 30 groups inhabit the provincial nature reserve and nine groups inhabit the collective forest located outside the reserve and national forest. We found that the western black crested gibbons here have a patchy distribution pattern and occur at higher densities in certain areas. Moreover, the population distribution density and elevation gradient distribution decline from north to south. The results also demonstrated the importance of Ailao Mountain in the western black crested gibbon protection.

  8. The coexistence of seven sympatric fulvettas in Ailao Mountains, Ejia Town, Yunnan Province

    PubMed Central

    XIA, Ji; WU, Fei; HU, Wan-Zhao; FANG, Jian-Ling; YANG, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of ecologically similar species sharing sympatric areas is a central issue of community ecology. Niche differentiation is required at least in one dimension to avoid competitive exclusion. From 2012-2014, by adopting the methods of mist-nets and point counts to evaluate spatial niche partitioning and morphological differentiations, we explored the coexistence mechanisms of seven sympatric fulvettas in Ailao Mountains, Ejia town, Yunnan Province, China. The microhabitats of these seven fulvettas were significantly different in elevation, roost site height and vegetation coverage, indicating a spatial niche segregation in different levels. Approximately, 90.30% of the samples were correctly classified by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) with correct rates at 91.20%-100%, except the White-browed fulvetta (Alcippe vinipectus) (65.4%) and the Streak-throated fulvetta (A. cinereiceps) (74.6%). The seven fulvettas were classified into four guilds based on their specific morphological characters, suggesting that the species in each guild use their unique feeding ways to realize resource partitioning in the overlapped areas. These finding indicate that through multi-dimensional spatial niche segregation and divergence in resource utilizing, the inter-specific competition among these seven fulvettas is minimized, whereas, coexistence is promoted. PMID:25730457

  9. The relationship between the age and depth of the oceanic crust in the central South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yi-Jui; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Chiao, Ling-Yun

    2016-04-01

    South China Sea (SCS) is the largest marginal basin in the western Pacific. The onset of seafloor spreading in the central part of the SCS was suggested at 32 Ma. After a ridge jump around 25 Ma, the southwestern sub-basin started to open. The spreading of the entire basin ended at ~16 Ma, then a phase of post-magmatic seamount formation occurred (eg., Taylor and Hayes, 1983; Briais et al.,1993; Barckhausen et al., 2014). In this study, we want to find the relationship between the age and depth of the oceanic crust in the central SCS. We will also study a fracture zone trending NW-SE near to Manila trench and to understand how did the fracture zone affect the development of the SCS. We have analyzed five reflection seismic profiles collected by R/V Ocean Researcher 1 during the cruise ORI-1115. We have correlated the age of seismic strata in the central SCS by comparing to the seismic phase of profile MCS1115-7 that has crossed the IODP drilling site U1431. To understand the characteristics of the fracture zone, we have also applied the analytic signal and Euler deconvolution methods to the gravity and magnetic anomalies related to the fracture zone. We suggest that the fraction zone was formed in order to accommodate the spreading in the east sub-basin. However, this fracture zone is somewhat curved concave southwestward. According to the collision-extrusion model of Tapponnier et al. (1982), the formation of Indochina is followed with the constitution of Ailao Shan-Red River Shear Zone. We suppose that the formation of the fracture zone in this study is similar to the Ailao Shan-Red River Shear Zone. The fan-shaped crustal fabric is distinct in the younger portions of the oceanic basin. Both Ailao Shan-Red River Shear Zone and the fracture zone in northeastern SCS may share the same rotation pole. Furthermore, we have tried to find a relationship between oceanic crust depth and age in this area. The preliminary result shows that the relationship between depth and

  10. [Microbial community and its activities in canopy- and understory humus of two montane forest types in Ailao Mountains, Northwest China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-jie; Liu, Wen-yao; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Han-bo; Wang, Gao-sheng

    2010-09-01

    Mid-montane moist evergreen broadleaved forest (MMF) and top-montane dwarf mossy forest (DMF) are the two major natural forest types in subtropical mountainous area of Ailao Mountains, Northwest China. In this paper, a comparative study was made on the microbial composition, quantity, biochemical activity, metabolic activity, and their seasonal dynamics in the canopy- and understory humus of the two forest types. The composition, quantity, and metabolic activity of the microbes in the canopy humus of dominant tree species in MMF and DMF were also analyzed. In the canopy humus of the two forest types, the amounts of fungi and actinomycetes, microbial biomass C and N, and intensities of nitrogen fixation and cellulose decomposition were significantly higher than those in understory humus. Meanwhile, the amount of cellulose-decomposing microbes (ACDM), cellulose decomposition intensity, microbial biomass C and N, and metabolic activity in the canopy humus of MMF were significantly higher than those of DMF. The amounts of bacteria, fungi, and aerobic nitrogen-fixing bacteria (ANFB) and the metabolic activity in the canopy humus of MMF and DMF were significantly higher in wet season than in dry season, while a contradictory trend was observed on the amount of actinomycetes. No significant difference was observed on the amount of ACDM between wet season and dry season. For the two forest types, the amounts of microbes and their biochemical activities in canopy humus had a larger seasonal variation range than those in understory humus. There was a significant difference in the amounts of the microbes in canopy humus among the dominant tree species in MMF and DMF, especially in wet season. The microbes in canopy humus played important roles in maintaining the biodiversity of epiphytes in the canopy, and in supplying the needed nutrients for the vigorous growth of the epiphytes.

  11. [Characteristics of floor litter and soil arthropod community in different types ot subtropical forest in Ailao Mountain of Yunnan, Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao; Yang, Xiao-Dong

    2011-11-01

    By using line transect method, an investigation was conducted on the floor litter and soil arthropod community in a mid mountain wet evergreen broad-leaved forest, a mossy dwarf forest, and a Populus bonatii forest in Ailao Mountain of Yunnan in April (dry and hot season), June (rainy season), and December (dry and cold season), 2005. In both dry and rainy seasons, the existing floor litter mass, C storage, and C/N ratio in the three forests all increased in the order of mossy dwarf forest > P. bonatii forest > evergreen broad-leaved forest, but the N storage had less difference. In the floor litter layer of the forests, Acari and Collembola were the dominant groups of soil arthropod community, while Diptera larvae, Coleoptera, ants, and Homoptera were the common groups. The Sorenson coefficients of soil arthropod community in the three forests were extremely great. No significant differences were observed in the soil arthropod density (ind x m(-2)) in the floor litter layer among the three forests, but the relative density (ind x g(-1)) of soil arthropods was higher in the evergreen broad-leaved forest and P. bonatii forest than in the mossy dwarf forest. In the three forests, the density of soil arthropods was significantly higher in dry season than in rainy season, but the Shannon diversity index had less difference. There were significant positive correlations between the existing floor litter mass and the individual density (ind x m(-2)) and dominant groups of soil arthropod communities in dry and hot season (April), but negative correlations between the existing floor litter mass and the relative density (ind x g(-1)) of soil arthropod communities and Acari in dry and cold season (December). The individual densities of Collembola and Coleoptera also had positive correlations with the N storage of the existing floor litter mass in the three forests. It was considered that the floor litter and the development of soil arthropod community in the litter layer of

  12. [Composition and carbon storage of woody debris in moist evergreen broad-leaved forest and its secondary forests in Ailao Mountains of Yunnan Provinve].

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Pan; Liu, Wen-Yao; Yang, Guo-Ping; Ma, Wen-Zhang; Li, Da-Wen

    2007-10-01

    This paper studied the composition and carbon storage of woody debris in the primary moist evergreen broad-leaved forest and its main secondary forests (regenerated Lithocarpus forest, Populus bonatii forest, and Alnus nepalensis forest) in Ailao Moutains of Yunnan Province. The results showed that in the primary forest, the carbon storage of woody debris amounted to 36.56 t x hm(-2). Castanopsis wattii, Lithocarpus xylocarpus and L. chintungensis were the main contributors, and most of them were the logs with larger diameter and at intermediate stage of decay. The unique environment of richer precipitation, higher humidity and lower temperature in the study area, and the decay-resistance of hardwood were favorable to the accumulation of woody debris. The three secondary forests had a carbon storage of 1.2-5.0 t x hm(-2), which decreased in the order of regenerated Lithocaropus forest > P. bonatii forest > A. nepalensis forest, showing a tendency of increasing carbon storage with succession course.

  13. Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1962-01-01

    Rivers are both the means and the routes by which the products of continental weathering are carried to the oceans of the world. Except in the most arid areas more water falls as precipitation than is lost by evaporation and transpiration from the land surface to the atmosphere. Thus there is an excess of water, which must flow to the ocean. Rivers, then, are the routes by which this excess water flows to the ultimate base level. The excess of precipitation over evaporation and transpiration provides the flow of rivers and springs, recharges ground-water storage, and is the supply from which man draws water for his needs.

  14. How Orogen-scale Exhumed Strike-slip Faults Initiate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, S.; Neubauer, F.

    2015-12-01

    Orogen-scale strike-slip faults present one the most important geodynamic processes affecting the lithosphere-asthenosphere system. In specific subtypes, faulting is virtually initiated along hot-to-cool boundaries, e.g. at such of hot granite intrusions or metamorphic core complexes to cool country rocks. Such fault zones are often subparallel to mountain ranges and expose a wide variety of mylonitic, cataclastic and non-cohesive fault rocks, which were formed at different structural levels of the crust and are stacked within each other ("telescoping"). Exhumation of rocks is, therefore, a common feature of such strike-slip faults implying major transtensive and/or transpressive processes accompanying pure strike-slip motion. The hot-to-cool thermal structure across the fault zone significantly influences the physical fault rock properties. One major question is how and where a major strike-slip initiates and further development. Here, we propose a model in which major continental exhumed strike-slip faults potentially evolve along rheologically weak zones such as plutons or margins of metamorphic complexes. As an example, we propose a model for the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) fault, SE Asia, which initiated along the edge of a plutonic belt and evolved in response to India-Asia collision with four tectonic phases.

  15. Petrogenesis of late Eocene high Ba-Sr potassic rocks from western Yangtze Block, SE Tibet: A magmatic response to the Indo-Asian collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Liao, Shi-Yong; Wang, Jin-Rong; Ma, Zhen; Liu, Yi-Xin; Wang, Dong-Bing; Tang, Yuan; Yang, Jing

    2017-03-01

    The Indo-Asian collision resulted in extrusion of the Indochina Block along the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) shear zone in the Cenozoic, with the emplacement of widespread potassic magmatic rocks. In this contribution, we investigated five potassic felsic intrusions exposed in the western Yangtze Block adjacent to the ASRR shear zone, including the Xiaoqiaotou, Jianchuan, Yuzhaokuai, Laojunshan and South Taohuacun intrusions. New LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb results in combination with previous data indicate that these felsic rocks have identical crystallization ages of ∼36-35 Ma. They are characterized by high Ba (mostly >1500 ppm) and Sr (mostly >1000 ppm) abundances, with high K2O contents and K2O/Na2O ratios. They exhibit similar Sr-Nd isotopic components as the coeval shoshonitic mafic rocks exposed in the studied area. Elemental and isotopic data suggest that the five intrusions were likely derived from fractional crystallization of shoshonitic mafic magmas originating from an enriched lithospheric mantle. On the basis of previously published data and results in this paper, we considered that the lithospheric mantle underneath the western Yangtze might have undergone enrichment events twice at least, including the Neoproterozoic oceanic subduction and the Neo-Tethyan oceanic subduction.

  16. Thermochronology of the PoSen complex, northern Vietnam: Implications for tectonic evolution in SE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei-Ling; Lo, Ching-Hua; Lan, Ching-Ying; Chung, Sun-Lin; Lee, Tung-Yi; Nam, Tran Ngoc; Sano, Yuji

    2011-03-01

    The PoSen complex, located closely adjacent to the southwestern margin of the Red River shear zone represents the uplifted basement of north Vietnam and may record the motion of the shear zone. However, its thermochronological history has not been fully examined yet. Here we applied U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar dating methods to reveal its thermochronological history. U-Pb analysis of composite zircon grains by TIMS yielded an average age of 760 ± 25 Ma, clustering on the concordia line. Twelve SHRIMP U-Pb analyses also yielded a consistent result of 751 ± 7 Ma. Along with the geochemical features, the U-Pb dating results suggest the PoSen complex was a late Proterozoic magmatic complex, which could correspond to the Chengjiang orogeny, a widespread thermal event in southwest China. Results of 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of micas and K-feldspars were in the range of 36-30 Ma, revealing a rapid cooling and exhumation history of the PoSen complex during the late Paleogene. The time span of cooling and exhumation of the PoSen complex is slightly older than the main cooling phases of the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) metamorphic massifs (28-17 Ma), but is synchronous with the early igneous activity stage in the eastern Indo-Asian collision zone of southeast China and north Vietnam. Owing to the ongoing debate about the initiation and offset of the ASRR shear zone, the tectonic force for the late Paleogene cooling of the PoSen complex is still inconclusive. The rapid exhumation of the PoSen complex could be in response to either the detachment of the Neo-Tethyan slab or a transpressional phase of continental subduction along the ASRR shear system in the eastern Indo-Asian collision zone.

  17. Reappraisal of the Jianchuan Cenozoic basin stratigraphy and its implications on the SE Tibetan plateau evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourbet, Loraine; Leloup, Philippe Hervé; Paquette, Jean-Louis; Sorrel, Philippe; Maheo, Gweltaz; Wang, GuoCan; Yadong, Xu; Cao, Kai; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Eymard, Inès; Liu, Wei; Lu, Haijian; Replumaz, Anne; Chevalier, Marie-Luce; Kexin, Zhang; Jing, Wu; Shen, Tianyi

    2017-03-01

    We present a new stratigraphy of the Jianchuan basin, one of the largest Cenozoic sedimentary basins in southeastern Tibet. This basin was regarded as recording sedimentation from the Eocene up to the Pliocene, and as such has been the focus of several studies aiming at constraining the environmental, tectonic and topographic evolution of the area. Within the Shuanghe and Jianchuan formations thirteen new zircon U/Pb ages and one biotite 40Ar/39Ar age of interbedded and cross-cutting ultrapotassic magmatic rocks show that a brief magmatic event occurred from 35.7 to 34.5 Ma (35.2 ± 0.4 Ma on average). The uppermost formation (Jianchuan Fm), supposedly Pliocene in age, is related to this magmatic event and is 35.4 ± 0.8 Ma old. All sedimentary formations are thus Eocene in age, with neither Oligocene nor Miocene sediments. The coal-bearing Shuanghe Formation yields a fossil of a large amynodontid typical of the Upper Eocene Ergilian interval (37.2 to 33.9 Ma). Sedimentation of the Shuanghe Formation took place in a short time interval at 35.9 ± 0.9 Ma, after a large-scale drainage reorganization that induced the abandonment of a large braided-river system. This reorganization was possibly linked with the initiation of the left-lateral Ailao-Shan Red River fault and/or to widespread magmatism in the Jianchuan basin. Previous high paleoaltitude estimates for the Jianchuan basin are thoroughly re-evaluated and yield a value of 1200 ± 1200 m.a.s.l. for the Upper Eocene.

  18. New thermochronological constraints on the timing of shear from the Khlong Marui and Ranong faults, Peninsular Thailand: implications for Himalayan lateral extrusion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkinson, I.; Elders, C.; Hall, R.

    2009-04-01

    New Ar-Ar data from the strike-slip faults of Peninsular Thailand indicate rapid uplift of mid-crustal ductile shear zones during the Eocene. The cooling ages are consistent with a northwards younging pattern of Ar-Ar cooling ages from the NW-trending Three Pagodas and Mae Ping faults in Northern Thailand, to the Ailao Shan-Red River fault in Vietnam and Yunnan, taken to reflect the northwards movement of India during the Cenozoic. The peninsular structures: the Khlong Marui fault (KMF) and Ranong fault (RF), are major NNE trending strike-slip faults of respectively 220 km and 420 km length. Exposed mylonitic rocks bear consistently dextral kinematic indicators, unlike the sinistral mylonites of the NW-trending structures to the north. Brittle strike-slip and dip-slip faults overprint all the shear zones. Rocks ranging from low grade mylonites to syn-kinematic amphibolite facies migmatites from the RF and KMF yield similar biotite Ar-Ar cooling ages, suggesting that uplift from all depths in the shear zone was rapid. Retrograde shear fabrics in places show that dextral shear may have continued during uplift. While the new thermochronological data show that the peninsular mylonites cooled during the Eocene, constraint from pre- and post-kinematic granitoids strongly suggests that ductile shear occurred during the Late-Cretaceous to Paleocene. Since this is well before the onset of India-Eurasia collision, much of the ductile shear must pre-date that orogeny, and therefore cannot be related to Himalayan lateral extrusion, as has been speculated. The regional cooling pattern, however, shows that Indian indentation may have triggered progressive northward exhumation of mylonitic rocks. If the model of the peninsular faults is applied to the NW-trending faults in northern Thailand, then a pre-Himalayan history may also be recorded by those mylonites, rather than a simple, lateral extrusion-related history.

  19. Orientation-related deformation mechanisms of naturally deformed amphibole in amphibolite mylonites from the Diancang Shan, SW Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuyun; Liu, Junlai; Leiss, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Sheared amphibolite rocks from Diancang Shan high-grade metamorphic complex along the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone, southwestern Yunnan, China, show typical mylonitic microstructures. The mylonites are characterized by porphyroclastic microstructures and the ultramylonites are highly lineated with alternating amphibole- and quartzofeldspathic domains. Microstructural analysis and P/T estimation suggest that the amphibole grains in the mylonitic rocks are deformed and dynamically recrystallized at amphibolite facies. In the mylonitic amphibolites, there are two types of amphibole porphyroclasts, i.e. type I "hard" and type II "soft" porphyroclasts. They have their [001] crystallographic orientations subnormal and sub-parallel to the stretching lineation of the rocks, respectively. The two types of porphyroclasts show distinct deformation microstructures and sub-microstructures formed by various deformation mechanisms, which contribute in different ways to the generation of the fine-grained matrix. Shape preferred orientation analysis, misorientation analysis of the two types of porphyroclasts and new fine grains around them further prove the generation of the fine grains in matrix from the type II porphyroclasts. The type I "hard" porphyroclasts are deformed mainly by mechanical rotation, work hardening and intragranular microfracturing. In contrast, the deformation of the type II "soft" porphyroclasts is mainly attributed to crystalline plasticity, i.e. twinning, dislocation creep and dynamic recrystallization. During the deformation of the type II porphyroclasts, the (100) [001] slip system plays a dominant role during deformation and grain size reduction of amphibole. Twinning along the active (100) slip system, in combination with dislocation creep (gliding and climbing) governs the nucleation of subgrains and formation of dynamically recrystallized fine grains, a process here named Twinning Nucleation Recrystallization.

  20. Zircon Hf isotopic constraints on the mantle source of felsic magmatic rocks in the Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu Le basin, northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuki, T.; Lan, C.; Tran, T.; Pham, T.; Wang, K.

    2013-12-01

    Permian plume-related rocks, such as picrites, flood basalts and silicic volcanic rocks occur in northern Vietnam. This area was displaced 600 km southeastward along the Ailao Shan-Red River fault during mid-Tertiary in response to the India-Eurasia collision. The original location of the area was situated at the central Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP) in SW China before Tertiary. The picrites and flood basalts in northern Vietnam have been investigated by many authors and are comparable with the ELIP. While, felsic magmatisms in northern Vietnam has been poorly studied. Zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotopic data are useful to compare the felsic magmatism in northern Vietnam with that in the ELIP, because the magmatisms of the ELIP had a characteristic time period (260-250 Ma) and the Hf isotopes show a remarkable mantle signature. Therefore, this study carried out in-situ U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions for 300 zircon grains in eighteen granitoids and rhyolites in Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu Le basin in northern Vietnam. Zircons from the granitoids and rhyolites occasionally show development of {101} pyramid and {100} prism crystal facies, suggesting typical zircons crystallized from high temperature alkaline granite. 206Pb/238U ages of granitoid and rhyolite yield consistently in a narrow range of 260 to 250 Ma, which coincides with those from peralkaline to metaluminous granites in the ELIP. ɛHf(t) values of zircons in rhyolites and granites of this study dominate in the range of +5 to +10, which is consistent with those from the ELIP. U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic compositions of zircons indicate that felsic magmatic rocks in the Phan Si Pan uplift and Tu La basin have been derived from the same mantle source with the ELIP.

  1. Microstructural, textural and thermal evolution of an exhumed strike-slip fault and insights into localization and rheological transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuyun; Neubauer, Franz; Liu, Junlai; Bernroider, Manfred; Genser, Johann

    2016-04-01

    The presence of deep exhumed crustal rocks with a dominant but contrasting mineralogy results in shear concentration in the rheological weakest layer, which exhibits contrasting patterns of fabrics and thermal conditions during their formation. We tested a combination of methodologies including microstructural and textural investigations, geochronology and geothermometry on deformed rocks from exhumed strike-slip fault, Ailao Shan-Red River, SE, Asian. Results indicate that the exhumed deep crustal rocks since late Oligocene (ca. 28 Ma) to Pliocene (ca. 4 Ma) typically involve dynamic microstructural, textural and thermal evolution processes, which typically record a progressive deformation and syn-kinematic reactions from ductile to semi-ductile and brittle behavior during exhumation. This transformation also resulted in dramatic strength reduction that promoted strain localization along the strike-slip and transtensional faults. Detailed analysis has revealed the co-existence of microfabrics ranging from high-temperatures (granulite facies conditions) to overprinting low-temperatures (lower greenschist facies conditions). The high-temperature microstructures and textures are in part or entirely altered by subsequent, overprinting low-temperature shearing. In quartz-rich rocks, quartz was deformed in the dislocation creep regime and records transition of microfabrics and slip systems during decreasing temperature, which lasted until retrogression related to final exhumation. As a result, grain-size reduction associated by fluids circulating within the strike-slip fault zone at brittle-ductile transition leads to rock softening, which resulted in strain localization, weak rock rheology and the overall hot thermal structure of the crust. Decompression occurred during shearing and as a result of tectonic exhumation. All these results demonstrate that the ductile to ductile-brittle transition involves a combination of different deformation mechanisms, rheological

  2. River meanders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Langbein, Walter Basil

    1966-01-01

    The striking geometric regularity of a winding river is no accident. Meanders appear to be the form in which a river does the least work in turning; hence they are the most probable form a river can take

  3. Exhumation history of the Red River shear zone in northern Vietnam: New insights from zircon and apatite fission-track analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, G.; Anczkiewicz, R.

    2008-06-01

    A new set of zircon and apatite fission-track ages from the Ailao Shan and Day Nui Con Voi (DNCV) metamorphic massifs of the Red River shear zone (RRSZ) and neighboring rocks in northern Vietnam is presented. A complex, along-strike diachronous, denudation history is revealed. The southern sector of the DNCV cooled to about 100 °C by the Late Oligocene, whereas its central compartment was affected by the later thermotectonic evolution of the Song Chay dome to the E of the RRSZ, whose final exhumation occurred during the Early Miocene. The northern sector of the RRSZ is characterized by the 35 Ma Phan Si Pang pre- to synkinematic intrusion. Fission-track ages from a vertical section within the Phan Si Pang granite indicate rapid exhumation and cooling. The Paleozoic tectonic block to the west of the RRSZ (fission-track ages between 40 and 30 Ma) was exhumed and cooled earlier than the fault mylonite belt (fission track ages of 30 Ma and younger) and also than the eastern block. Its structural level is consistent with field observations that suggest the RRSZ in northern Vietnam to be a transtensional system, with a regional NE-SW oriented extension component.

  4. Charles River

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the efforts of the US EPA, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the municipalities within the Charles River Watershed and nongovernmental organizations to improve the water quality of the Charles River.

  5. Amazon River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Mouth of the Amazon River     View ... of the world's mightiest rivers. This image of the Amazon's mouth was captured by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ... available at JPL September 8, 2000 - Mouth of the mighty Amazon River. project:  MISR ...

  6. Early Cenozoic uplift of the SE margin of Tibet: implications for the lower crustal flow hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoke, G. D.; Liu-Zeng, J.; Hren, M. T.; Garzione, C. N.; Wissink, G. K.

    2012-12-01

    . If lower crustal flow occurred in this region, then it would have preceded, or coincided with, major Paleogene right-lateral strike slip faulting along the Ailao Shan - Red River shear zone and related faults.

  7. River restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen; Angermeier, Paul L.; Bledsoe, Brian; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Macdonnell, Larry; Merritt, David M.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Poff, N. Leroy; Tarboton, David

    2005-10-01

    River restoration is at the forefront of applied hydrologic science. However, many river restoration projects are conducted with minimal scientific context. We propose two themes around which a research agenda to advance the scientific basis for river restoration can be built. First, because natural variability is an inherent feature of all river systems, we hypothesize that restoration of process is more likely to succeed than restoration aimed at a fixed end point. Second, because physical, chemical, and biological processes are interconnected in complex ways across watersheds and across timescales, we hypothesize that restoration projects are more likely to be successful in achieving goals if undertaken in the context of entire watersheds. To achieve restoration objectives, the science of river restoration must include (1) an explicit recognition of the known complexities and uncertainties, (2) continued development of a theoretical framework that enables us to identify generalities among river systems and to ask relevant questions, (3) enhancing the science and use of restoration monitoring by measuring the most effective set of variables at the correct scales of measurement, (4) linking science and implementation, and (5) developing methods of restoration that are effective within existing constraints. Key limitations to river restoration include a lack of scientific knowledge of watershed-scale process dynamics, institutional structures that are poorly suited to large-scale adaptive management, and a lack of political support to reestablish delivery of the ecosystem amenities lost through river degradation. This paper outlines an approach for addressing these shortcomings.

  8. Mississippi River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Mississippi River Flooding during Spring 2001   ... 794 x 390 South TIFF: 1024 x 724 The Mississippi River, from its source at Lake Itasca Minnesota to the Gulf of ... lower valley occurred in 1927 and the largest in the upper Mississippi in 1993. In April 2001 another flooding event in the upper ...

  9. Paleomagnetic data from Upper Cretaceous Red Beds, Northwest Vietnam (Song Da Terrane), and Their Bearing on the Extrusion History of Indochina and Deformation Along its Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissman, J. W.; Pho, N.; Burchfiel, B.; Muggleton, S. R.

    2008-12-01

    Northwest Vietnam mainly consists of the Song Da terrane, which is bounded to the east by the NW-oriented Ailao Shan/Red River (ASRR) fault system, interpreted to be the southwest margin of the South China Block, and the NW-oriented Song Ma fault. The northern termination of the Song Da terrane is considered to be where the NE-oriented, right lateral Dien Bien Phu fault intersects the ASRR. Whether the Song Da terrane is part of the extruded Indochina Block, paleomagnetic data from which suggest some 10°+ southward latitudinal displacement, can be evaluated with paleomagnetic data from rocks of the appropriate age. Our paleomagnetic sampling concentrated on the Upper Cretaceous Yen Chau Formation, which unconformably overlies Paleozoic and Triassic sedimentary rocks. The Yen Chau Formation is locally up to about 1300 m thick, and is characterized by medium to thick bedded, coarse to fine-grained sandstones and siltstones, all of which are partially cemented by hematite. Samples were collected from 10 localities using a portable drill, with 6 to 19 sites collected per locality, and 7 to 15 samples collected from each site. This approach allows evaluation of the integrity of the remanence at the locality level, where, presumably, considerable time is recorded in each section. Each locality is a homoclinal road cut exposure, with bedding dips varying from sub-horizontal to moderately overturned. NRM intensities range from about 0.7 mA/m to about 25 mA/m; values which are relatively low in comparison to many red beds. A varied response to alternating field (AF) demagnetization indicates that magnetite carries a considerable (over 50 percent) of the remanence; the finest grained samples of relatively high NRM intensity reveal little response to AF treatment, indicating a dominance by hematite, as also supported by three-component IRM thermal demagnetization. Samples with the highest NRM intensities and the least contribution by magnetite respond favorably to thermal

  10. Jurassic to Miocene magmatism and metamorphism in the Mogok metamorphic belt and the India-Eurasia collision in Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barley, M. E.; Pickard, A. L.; Zaw, Khin; Rak, P.; Doyle, M. G.

    2003-06-01

    Situated south of the eastern Himalayan syntaxis at the western margin of the Shan-Thai terrane the high-grade Mogok metamorphic belt (MMB) in Myanmar occupies a key position in the tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia. The first sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe U-Pb in zircon geochronology for the MMB shows that strongly deformed granitic orthogneisses near Mandalay contain Jurassic (˜170 Ma) zircons that have partly recrystallized during ˜43 Ma high-grade metamorphism. A hornblende syenite from Mandalay Hill also contains Jurassic zircons with evidence of Eocene metamorphic recrystallization rimmed by thin zones of 30.9 ± 0.7 Ma magmatic zircon. The relative abundance of Jurassic zircons in these rocks is consistent with suggestions that southern Eurasia had an Andean-type margin at that time. Mid-Cretaceous to earliest Eocene (120 to 50 Ma) I-type granitoids in the MMB, Myeik Archipelago, and Western Myanmar confirm that prior to the collision of India, an up to 200 km wide magmatic belt extended along the Eurasian margin from Pakistan to Sumatra. Metamorphic overgrowths to zircons in the orthogneiss near Mandalay date a period of Eocene (˜43 Ma) high-grade metamorphism possibly during crustal thickening related to the initial collision between India and Eurasia (at 65 to 55 Ma). This was followed by emplacement of syntectonic hornblende syenites and leucogranites between 35 and 23 Ma. Similar syntectonic syenites and leucogranites intruded the Ailao Shan-Red River shear belt in southern China and Vietnam during the Eocene-Oligocene to Miocene, and the Wang Chao and Three Pagodas faults in northern Thailand (that most likely link with the MMB) were also active at this time. The complex history of Eocene to early Miocene metamorphism, deformation, and magmatism in the MMB provides evidence that it may have played a key role in the network of deformation zones that accommodated strain during the northwards movement of India and resulting extrusion or

  11. Implications of IODP Expedition 349 Age Results for the Spreading History of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briais, Anne

    2016-04-01

    The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 349 in the South China Sea drilled three sites (U1431, U1433, and U1434) into the basaltic crustal basement near the fossil spreading center in the East and Southwest Subbasins. These results provided age constraints on the termination of seafloor spreading in the South China Sea (SCS) basin. Shipboard biostratigraphic analysis of microfossils from the sediment immediately above or between flows in the basaltic basement indicates early Miocene ages: 16.7-17.6 Ma for Site U1431 in the East Subbasin, ~18-21 Ma for Site U1433 in the Southwest Subbasin. Since Expedition 349, Ar/Ar dating of basalt samples from these two sites have confirmed these ages in the east, and have provided an age of 17 Ma in the Southwest. The similarity in crustal age between sites suggests that the last stages of spreading have been coeaval in both the East and Southwest Subbasins, forming a single mid-ocean ridge system with a series of transform faults and discontinuities between the two subbasins. Expedition 349 also drilled Site U1435 on a bathymetric high along the northwestern continent-ocean boundary. Onboard core description, biostratigraphy and magnetostratigraphy revealed that sediment at this site shows a sharp discontinuity at about 33 Ma, interpreted to represent the breakup unconformity and date the beginning of seafloor spreading in the East Subbasin. The results of IODP Exp. 349, as well as results from deep-towed magnetic surveys, thus imply that oceanic seafloor spreading in the SCS, from 33 to ~16-18 Ma, is coeval with a large part of the left-lateral motion along the Ailao Shan-Red River Fault Zone (dated 34 to 17 Ma). This episode of the extension of the South China Sea basin is therefore more likely driven by the extrusion of the Indochina tectonic block resulting from the collision of India with Eurasia than by the subduction of a proto-South China Sea to the south.

  12. Paleogene post-collisional lamprophyres in western Yunnan, western Yangtze Craton: Mantle source and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yong-Jun; Campbell McCuaig, T.; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Jourdan, Fred; Hart, Craig J. R.; Hou, Zeng-Qian; Tang, Suo-Han

    2015-09-01

    A suite of lamprophyres, spatially associated with mafic lavas and potassic felsic intrusive rocks, was emplaced between 36.5 ± 0.2 and 33.7 ± 0.5 Ma (based on phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar dating) on the eastern side of the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone in the western Yangtze Craton. These shoshonitic and ultrapotassic intrusive rocks post-date the 60-55 Ma collisional event between the Indian and the Asian continents. They are characterized by: (1) enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements and light rare-earth elements with (La/Sm)n = 3.15-7.15; (2) strong positive Pb spikes; (3) depletion in high-field-strength elements (e.g. Nb/La = 0.08-0.98); (4) high initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.706-0.709) with negative εNd(t) values of - 10.5 to - 0.9; (5) old Nd model ages of 1542-945 Ma; and (6) radiogenic (207Pb/204Pb)i of 15.57-15.70 and (208Pb/204Pb)i (38.70-39.06). These features suggest that the mantle source was metasomatized by Proterozoic subduction beneath the Yangtze Craton. The lamprophyres have similar trace element patterns, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions, as coeval mafic lava, indicating a common source of metasomatized veined continental lithospheric mantle (CLM). Lower degree partial melting of metasomatic veins likely generated the lamprophyres, whereas the coeval mafic lava was likely derived from melting of phlogopite harzburgite. The lamprophyres and mafic lava have similar Sr-Nd isotope systematics as CLM-derived Neoproterozoic mafic rocks and Late Permian Emeishan low-Ti basalt in the region, indicating that they share the same Proterozoic source. We envisage that mantle plumes thermally eroded the Proterozoic metasomatized CLM beneath the western part of the Yangtze Craton during 825-750 Ma and 260-250 Ma, although residual metasomatized domains remained before being tapped by delamination after the India-Asia continental collision during the Paleogene period.

  13. River Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auldridge, Teresa; And Others

    The James River is one of the most precious resources of Virginia. It was the site of the first permanent English settlement in the New World; the power of the water at the Fall Zone was a major factor in the development of Richmond; and the river served as a primary transportation route to the West via the Kanawha Canal. Both the water itself and…

  14. Niger River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    ... third largest river in Africa, the Niger, forms an inland delta in central Mali. This Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image ... the region as it appears after the rainy season, when the delta is flooded. The image covers an area measuring about 400 kilometers x 450 ...

  15. Mississippi River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... to melt and the Wapsipinicon River was 52 centimeters above flood stage at De Witt, Iowa (between Clinton and Davenport). By mid-April ... slightly below the level reached in the record-setting flood of 1993. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion ...

  16. 33 CFR 162.90 - White River, Arkansas Post Canal, Arkansas River, and Verdigris River between Mississippi River...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Arkansas River, and Verdigris River between Mississippi River, Ark., and Catoosa, Okla.; use... White River, Arkansas Post Canal, Arkansas River, and Verdigris River between Mississippi River, Ark... apply to: (1) Waterways. White River between Mississippi River and Arkansas Post Canal, Ark.;...

  17. Mystic River Watershed

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on the efforts of the US EPA, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the municipalities within the Mystic River Watershed and nongovernmental organizations to improve the water quality of the Mystic River.

  18. 33 CFR 165.510 - Delaware Bay and River, Salem River, Christina River and Schuylkill River-Regulated Navigation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Delaware Bay and River, Salem... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.510 Delaware Bay and River, Salem River, Christina... Regulated Navigation Area: The navigable waters of Delaware Bay and River, Salem River, Christina River,...

  19. Flowing with Rivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Heather

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a lesson in which students compare how artists have depicted rivers in paintings, using different styles, compositions, subject matter, colors, and techniques. They create a watercolor landscape that includes a river. Students can learn about rivers by studying them on site, through environmental study, and through works of…

  20. Rethinking the River.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenbaum, David

    1994-01-01

    Examines the ecological impacts of the Mississippi River flood of 1993 and the rethinking of river management practices that has resulted. Provides a map of the flood area which shows the occurrence of rare wildlife found in or near the region's rivers. (LZ)

  1. Mathematics. Rivers Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brueggeman, Gail; Clendenin, Donna

    The Rivers Project at Southern Illinois University began in February, 1990 as a pilot program involving eight high schools along the Mississippi and lower Illinois River. The Rivers Project network has grown through the training of teachers from across the United States and Canada. With scientific literacy as the ultimate goal, students collect…

  2. Measuring River Pollution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayyavoo, Gabriel

    2004-01-01

    The Don River watershed is located within Canada's most highly urbanized area--metropolitan Toronto. Many residential and commercial uses, including alterations to the river's course with bridges, have had a significant impact on the Don's fauna and flora. Pollutants have degraded the river's water quality, a situation exacerbated by the…

  3. Study on river regulation measures of dried-up rivers of Haihe River basin, China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Li, Shaoming; Qi, Lan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the ecological environment of plain rivers within Haihe River basin is questionable because of severe water shortages. Most of the rivers dry up regularly and it is therefore necessary to take measures to improve the river ecological environment. Meanwhile, flood control is the principal function for most of the dried-up rivers, so river regulation works for flood control also should be undertaken. In this paper, some measures of river regulation were selected applied to the Haihe River basin, taking these measures not only ensure the river security but also realize its ecological benefit. Examples of the application of selected measures for the representative rivers, Yongding River and Hutuo River, both located within the Haihe River basin, are also assessed. These measures provide practical solutions to ecological and flood control problems of dried-up rivers, are generic in nature, and could therefore be applied to other same type rivers.

  4. Ice Atlas 1985 - 1986. Monongahela River, Allegheny River, Ohio River, Illinois River and Kankakee River.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    V 0 1m =1 uvydae aury1,18 Belevlle oo Sufc MAPUNTS( MArea concentration MAP NITS(in 2 x 106) (%/) Oppen water 24.97 NA Solid ice cover 0.00 NA Solid...January 28, 1986 ideo Ta-pe 14 Lock and Dam #3 Pool.- Allegheny River: 1/1 / New Kensington Bridge 19- Lock and Dam #2 Pool Surface MArea

  5. Rivers: Nature's Wondrous Waterways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, David L.

    Rivers play a vital role in the life of the planet. They provide water for wildlife, plant life, and people, and they help to fertilize fields where corn and other crops grow. But how were these rivers made? This children's book takes readers/students on a journey down a river from its source at the top of a mountain to its mouth where it meets…

  6. Mountain Rivers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-12-01

    Published in 2000, the original Mountain Rivers was written to provide a concise summary of the scientific understanding of the distinct subset of rivers that gave the book its name. Spurred by developments in the field in the past decade, the book's author, Ellen Wohl, produced Mountain Rivers Revisited, an updated edition aimed at graduate students and professional researchers. In this interview, Eos talks to Wohl about steep channels, climate change, and opportunities for future research.

  7. Student-Designed River Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkall, Sheila Florian

    1996-01-01

    Describes an integrated student-designed investigation in which students explore different aspects of the Chagrin River including the river ecosystem, velocity and average depth, river flooding, water quality, and economic and political factors. (JRH)

  8. One river, many stories

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactive exhibition elements include opportunity to add stories, drawings, and place names to maps of the river; record & share your vision for the river with public television. The Duluth Art Institute will present the kick-off event for the month-long media focus around ...

  9. Umpqua River Entrance, Oregon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a letter from the Portland District dated 28 March 1975, subject: ’Tidal Hydraulics Committee Services - Umpqua River Entrance, Oregon,’ the...Committee on Tidal Hydraulics was requested to assist in the evaluation of navigation problems at the entrance to the Umpqua River. As a result, the 80th

  10. Alaska Glaciers and Rivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image on October 7, 2007, showing the Alaska Mountains of south-central Alaska already coated with snow. Purple shadows hang in the lee of the peaks, giving the snow-clad land a crumpled appearance. White gives way to brown on the right side of the image where the mountains yield to the lower-elevation Susitna River Valley. The river itself cuts a silver, winding path through deep green forests and brown wetlands and tundra. Extending from the river valley, are smaller rivers that originated in the Alaska Mountains. The source of these rivers is evident in the image. Smooth white tongues of ice extend into the river valleys, the remnants of the glaciers that carved the valleys into the land. Most of the water flowing into the Gulf of Alaska from the Susitna River comes from these mountain glaciers. Glacier melt also feeds glacier lakes, only one of which is large enough to be visible in this image. Immediately left of the Kahiltna River, the aquamarine waters of Chelatna Lake stand out starkly against the brown and white landscape.

  11. Mississippi River. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchberg, Wendy

    Based on novels and books about the Mississippi River, this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that the Mississippi River has made its mark on America's geography, commerce, and literature; and that booktalks provide a summary, explains what kind of reader the book will appeal to, and may also contain a oral…

  12. 76 FR 51887 - Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD AGENCY... safety zone during the ``NAS Patuxent River Air Expo '11,'' which consists of aerial practices, performance demonstrations and air shows, to be held over certain waters of the Patuxent River adjacent...

  13. 36 CFR 7.89 - New River Gorge National River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false New River Gorge National River. 7.89 Section 7.89 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.89 New River Gorge National River....

  14. Uranium in river water

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.R. ); Edmond, J.M. )

    1993-10-01

    The concentration of dissolved uranium has been determined in over 250 river waters from the Orinoco, Amazon, and Ganges basins. Uranium concentrations are largely determined by dissolution of limestones, although weathering of black shales represents an important additional source in some basins. In shield terrains the level of dissolved U is transport limited. Data from the Amazon indicate that floodplains do not represent a significant source of U in river waters. In addition, the authors have determined dissolved U levels in forty rivers from around the world and coupled these data with previous measurements to obtain an estimate for the global flux of dissolved U to the oceans. The average concentration of U in river waters is 1.3 nmol/kg, but this value is biased by very high levels observed in the Ganges-Brahmaputra and Yellow rivers. When these river systems are excluded from the budget, the global average falls to 0.78 nmol/kg. The global riverine U flux lies in the range of 3-6 [times] 10[sup 7] mol/yr. The major uncertainty that restricts the accuracy of this estimate (and that of all other dissolved riverine fluxes) is the difficulty in obtaining representative samples from rivers which show large seasonal and annual variations in runoff and dissolved load.

  15. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  16. Collision-induced basalt eruptions at Pleiku and Buôn Mê Thuột, south-central Viet Nam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoàng, Nguyễn; Flower, Martin F. J.; Chí, Cung Thu'ọ'ng; Xuân, Phạm Tích; Quý, Hoàng Văn; Sơn, Trần Thanh

    2013-09-01

    Neogene-Quaternary basalts occur as dispersed volcanic clusters in the vicinity of the Tethyan tectonic belt, possibly representing 'far-field' effects of the Early Tertiary collisions of Gondwana fragments with the southern margin of Eurasia. In Indochina, such a 'Diffuse Igneous Province' post-dates the 45-42 Ma 'hard' India-Asia collision and southeastward, collision induced (c. 30-17 Ma.), extrusion of Indochina. Extrusion was accommodated by left-lateral strike-slip shearing on the Ailao Shan-Red River Fault, coeval with seafloor spreading in the East Viet Nam (South China) Sea. The Indochina basalts mostly comprise shield-building tholeiites capped by small-volume undersaturated types, the latter often bearing mantle xenoliths and 'exotic' xenocrysts such as sapphire, zircon. They appeared at c. 17 Ma, more-or-less coinciding with the cessation of both continental extrusion and seafloor spreading. At this point extensional stress appears to have shifted westwards to continental Indochina, with magmatic activity appearing, characteristically, at 'pull-apart' basins. However, the relationship of mantle melting beneath this region to its geodynamic setting is controversial, being variously attributed to mantle plumes, extreme lithospheric stretching, and lateral asthenospheric displacement. There is little or no definitive evidence for regional mantle upwelling while lithosphere stretching alone appears to be insufficient to allow for melting, Here, we present geochemical and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic (and paleomagnetic data), for cored sections from the Pleiku and Buon Mê Thuột plateaus in south-central Viet Nam, representative in most respects of the Indochina province as a whole. In the Pleiku shield olivine tholeiite flows are intercalated with quartz tholeiites while, in contrast, alkali basalts predominate over olivine tholeiite in the Buon Mê Thuột (BMT) shield. The first of these features (in Pleiku) probably reflects crustal wall-rock reaction while

  17. Measuring Local Strain Rates In Ductile Shear Zones: A New Approach From Deformed Syntectonic Dykes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassier, C.; Leloup, P.; Rubatto, D.; Galland, O.; Yue, Y.; Ding, L.

    2006-12-01

    At the Earth surface, deformation is mostly localized in fault zones in between tectonic plates. In the upper crust, the deformation is brittle and the faults are narrow and produce earthquakes. In contrast, deformation in the lower ductile crust results in larger shear zones. While it is relatively easy to measure in situ deformation rates at the surface using for example GPS data, it is more difficult to determinate in situ values of strain rate in the ductile crust. Such strain rates can only be estimated in paleo-shear zones. Various methods have been used to assess paleo-strain rates in paleo-shear zones. For instance, cooling and/or decompression rates associated with assumptions on geothermic gradients and shear zone geometry can lead to such estimates. Another way to estimate strain rates is the integration of paleo-stress measurements in a power flow law. But these methods are indirect and imply strong assumptions. Dating of helicitic garnets or syntectonic fibres are more direct estimates. However these last techniques have been only applied in zones of low deformation and not in major shear zones. We propose a new direct method to measure local strain rates in major ductile shear zones from syntectonic dykes by coupling quantification of deformation and geochronology. We test our method in a major shear zone in a well constrained tectonic setting: the Ailao-Shan - Red River Shear Zone (ASRRsz) located in SE Asia. For this 10 km wide shear zone, large-scale fault rates, determined in three independent ways, imply strain rates between 1.17×10^{-13 s-1 and 1.52×10^{-13 s-1 between 35 and 16 Ma. Our study focused on one outcrop where different generations of syntectonic dykes are observed. First, we quantified the minimum shear strain γ for each dyke using several methods: (1) by measuring the stretching of dykes with a surface restoration method (2) by measuring the final angle of the dykes with respect to the shear direction and (3) by combining the two

  18. Hood River Production Master Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Patty

    1991-07-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program authorizes the development of artificial production facilities to raise chinook salmon and steelhead for enhancement in the Hood, Umatilla, Walla Walla, Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers and elsewhere. On February 26, 1991 the Council agreed to disaggregate Hood River from the Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, and instead, link the Hood River Master Plan (now the Hood River Production Plan) to the Pelton Ladder Project (Pelton Ladder Master Plan 1991).

  19. Mackenzie River Delta, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories, Canada, with its headstreams the Peace and Finley, is the longest river in North America at 4241 km, and drains an area of 1,805,000 square km. The large marshy delta provides habitat for migrating Snow Geese, Tundra Swans, Brant, and other waterfowl. The estuary is a calving area for Beluga whales. The Mackenzie (previously the Disappointment River) was named after Alexander Mackenzie who travelled the river while trying to reach the Pacific in 1789.

    The image was acquired on August 4, 2005, covers an area of 55.8 x 55.8 km, and is located at 68.6 degrees north latitude, 134.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  20. Santa Cruz River Options

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes qualitative research insights gained during development of a nonmarket valuation survey for changes to the Santa Cruz River in Southern Arizona. Qualitative research provides an important avenue for understanding how the public interprets valuation s...

  1. Merrimack River Watershed Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Listing of all communities included in each of the hydrologic unit code (HUC) 8, 10, and 12 boundaries for the Merrimack River Watershed and city locations for the EPA water quality monitoring stations.

  2. River basin management

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.H.; Edwards, A.M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The quality of water is of paramount importance in the management of water resources - including marine waters. A quantitative knowledge of water quality and the factors governing it is required to formulate and implement strategies requiring an inter-disciplinary approach. The overall purpose of this conference was to bring together the latest work on water quality aspects of river basin management. These proceedings are structured on the basis of five themes: problems in international river basins; the contribution of river systems to estuarial and marine pollution; the setting of standards; monitoring; and practical water quality management including use of mathematical models. They are followed by papers from the workshop on advances in the application of mathematical modelling to water quality management, which represent some of the current thinking on the problems and concepts of river basin management.

  3. Detroit River habitat inventory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.

    2003-01-01

    This inventory complements a previous survey of habitat in Ontario waters of the Detroit River (OMNR,1993). It is a starting point for balanced and sustained use of the river for natural resource conservation and economic development. The objectives of the inventory were to: (1) locate candidate sites for protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat in Michigan waters of the Detroit River; (2) describe the ownership and size of each site, as well as its potential for habitat protection and restoration; and (3) subjectively assess the extent to which existing habitat along the river is productive of fish and wildlife and protected from land uses that have degraded or destroyed such habitat.

  4. Colorado River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Colorado River ends its 2330 km journey in the Gulf of Mexico in Baja California. The heavy use of the river as an irrigation source for the Imperial Valley has dessicated the lower course of the river in Mexico such that it no longer consistently reaches the sea. Prior to the mid 20th century, the Colorado River Delta provided a rich estuarine marshland that is now essentially desiccated, but nonetheless is an important ecological resource.

    The image was acquired May 29, 2006, covers an area of 44.3 x 57.5 km, and is located at 32.1 degrees north latitude, 115.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  5. New England: Hudson River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... and recreation area. The Catskills are part of the Appalachian chain. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion ... River location:  United States region:  Eastern United States Order:  13 ...

  6. The rivers of civilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macklin, Mark G.; Lewin, John

    2015-04-01

    The hydromorphic regimes that underpinned Old World river-based civilizations are reviewed in light of recent research. Notable Holocene climatic changes varied from region to region, whilst the dynamics of floodplain environments were equally diverse, with river channel changes significantly affecting human settlement. There were longer-term trends in Holocene hydroclimate and multi-centennial length 'flood-rich' and 'flood-poor' episodes. These impacted on five identified flooding and settlement scenarios: (i) alluvial fans and aprons; (ii) laterally mobile rivers; (iii) rivers with well-developed levees and flood basins; (iv) river systems characterised by avulsions and floodouts; and (v) large river-fed wetlands. This gave a range of changes that were either more or less regular or incremental from year-to-year (and thus potentially manageable) or catastrophic. The latter might be sudden during a flood event or a few seasons (acute), or over longer periods extending over many decades or even centuries (chronic). The geomorphic and environmental impacts of these events on riparian societies were very often irreversible. Contrasts are made between allogenic and autogenic mechanism for imposing environmental stress on riverine communities and a distinction is made between channel avulsion and contraction responses. Floods, droughts and river channel changes can precondition as well as trigger environmental crises and societal collapse. The Nile system currently offers the best set of independently dated Holocene fluvial and archaeological records, and the contrasted effects of changing hydromorphological regimes on floodwater farming are examined. The persistence of civilizations depended essentially on the societies that maintained them, but they were also understandably resilient in some environments (Pharaonic Egypt in the Egyptian Nile), appear to have had more limited windows of opportunity in others (the Kerma Kingdom in the Nubian Nile), or required

  7. Synthetic River Valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R.; Pasternack, G. B.

    2011-12-01

    The description of fluvial form has evolved from anecdotal descriptions to artistic renderings to 2D plots of cross section or longitudinal profiles and more recently 3D digital models. Synthetic river valleys, artificial 3D topographic models of river topography, have a plethora of potential applications in fluvial geomorphology, and the earth sciences in general, as well as in computer science and ecology. Synthetic river channels have existed implicitly since approximately the 1970s and can be simulated from a variety of approaches spanning the artistic and numerical. An objective method of synthesizing 3D stream topography based on reach scale attributes would be valuable for sizing 3D flumes in the physical and numerical realms, as initial input topography for morphodynamic models, stream restoration design, historical reconstruction, and mechanistic testing of interactions of channel geometric elements. Quite simply - simulation of synthetic channel geometry of prescribed conditions can allow systematic evaluation of the dominant relationships between river flow and geometry. A new model, the control curve method, is presented that uses hierarchically scaled parametric curves in over-lapping 2D planes to create synthetic river valleys. The approach is able to simulate 3D stream geometry from paired 2D descriptions and can allow experimental insight into form-process relationships in addition to visualizing past measurements of channel form that are limited to two dimension descriptions. Results are presented that illustrate the models ability to simulate fluvial topography representative of real world rivers as well as how channel geometric elements can be adjusted. The testing of synthetic river valleys would open up a wealth of knowledge as to why some 3D attributes of river channels are more prevalent than others as well as bridging the gap between the 2D descriptions that have dominated fluvial geomorphology the past century and modern, more complete, 3D

  8. Rationing a river

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, J.

    1981-06-01

    The emerging water crisis in the southwestern U.S. is examined. The Colorado River, a major water source for this region, has been allocated and diverted for irrigation, domestic, and other applications. Tunnels and aqueducts carry the water across deserts to various cities, which could not exist without this imported resource. By 1985, water demand in this region is expected to exceed supply. The river's increasing salt content further threatens the value of this dwindling resource. (2 maps, 7 photos)

  9. Paying for healthy rivers.

    PubMed

    Pigram, J J J

    2002-01-01

    Concerted efforts are being made at state and federal levels to restore Australia's rivers and waterways to a healthy condition. Yet, there is little consensus on what constitutes a "healthy river" and even less on how to achieve this, or how far to go towards restoration. Some advocate removal of storages and weirs along rivers to revert to some natural state. Others, particularly water users, question the trade-offs involved in leaving more water in the rivers and how the costs of restoration are to be met. At present it seems that the major share of the costs is borne by irrigators, with the wider community essentially enjoying a "free-ride". This situation is justified on the basis of the impactor pays principle whereby water diversions, primarily for irrigation, are held to have contributed most to degradation of the river systems. The altemative-beneficiary pays principle--is of more relevance where demands are made on resource users to mitigate environmental impacts or bring about environmental improvements, eg. healthy rivers, where the beneficiaries are the wider public and the general community. Many resource users are voluntarily undertaking action on private land to conserve biodiversity and achieve sustainability. In these circumstances, the cost-sharing principle should apply, with governments, interest groups and the community contributing to the investment required to attain the desired resource condition objectives.

  10. [Health assessment of river ecosystem in Haihe River Basin, China].

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-Xia; Sun, Ran-Hao; Chen, Li-Ding

    2014-10-01

    With the development of economy, the health of river ecosystem is severely threatened because of the increasing effects of human activities on river ecosystem. In this paper, the authors assessed the river ecosystem health in aspects of chemical integrity and biological integrity, using the criterion in water quality, nutrient, and benthic macroinvertebrates of 73 samples in Haihe River Basin. The research showed that the health condition of river ecosystem in Haihe River Basin was bad overall since the health situation of 72. 6% of the samples was "extremely bad". At the same time, the health situation in Haihe River Basin exhibited obvious regional gathering effect. We also found that the river water quality was closely related to human activities, and the eutrophication trend of water body was evident in Haihe River Basin. The biodiversity of the benthic animal was low and lack of clean species in the basin. The indicators such as ammonia nitrogen, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were the key factors that affected the river ecosystem health in Haihe River Basin, so the government should start to curb the deterioration of river ecosystem health by controlling these nutrients indicators. For river ecosystem health assessment, the multi-factors comprehensive evaluation method was superior to single-factor method.

  11. 33 CFR 207.380 - Red Lake River, Minn.; logging regulations for portion of river above Thief River Falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Red Lake River, Minn.; logging regulations for portion of river above Thief River Falls. 207.380 Section 207.380 Navigation and Navigable... Red Lake River, Minn.; logging regulations for portion of river above Thief River Falls. (a)...

  12. 50 CFR 226.205 - Critical habitat for Snake River sockeye salmon, Snake River fall chinook salmon, and Snake River...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... salmon, Snake River fall chinook salmon, and Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon. 226.205 Section... Snake River sockeye salmon, Snake River fall chinook salmon, and Snake River spring/summer chinook... River salmon (except reaches above impassable natural falls, and Dworshak and Hells Canyon...

  13. The Colorado River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) true-color image shows the passage of the Colorado River through several southwestern states. The river begins, in this image, in Utah at the far upper right, where Lake Powell is visible as dark pixels surrounded by the salmon-colored rocks of the Colorado Plateau. The Colorado flows southwest through Glen Canyon, to the Glen Canyon Dam, on the Utah-Arizona border. From there it flows south into Arizona, and then turns sharply west where the Grand Canyon of the Colorado cuts through the mountains. The Colorado flows west to the Arizona-Nevada (upper left) border, where it is dammed again, this time by the Hoover Dam. The dark-colored pixels surrounding the bend in the river are Lake Mead. The river flows south along the border of first Nevada and Arizona and then California and Arizona. The Colorado River, which begins in Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, empties into the Gulf of California, seen at the bottom center of this image.

  14. Sharing the rivers. Overview.

    PubMed

    Postel, S

    1996-01-01

    Globally, water use has more than tripled since 1950, and the answer to this rising demand generally has been to build more and bigger water supply projects, particularly dams and river diversions. As population and consumption levels grow, more and more rivers are being dammed, diverted, or overtapped to supply increasing volumes of water to cities, industries, and farms. Among these rivers are the Nile in northeast Africa, the Ganges in south Asia, the Amu Dar'ya and Syr Dar'ya in the Aral Sea basin, the Huang He (Yellow River) in China, and the Colorado. Subsequently, such massive change in the global aquatic environment generated deterioration, decline, and in some cases, collapse in aquatic systems. In addition, competition for water is increasing not only between the human economy and the natural environment, but also between and within countries. Water scarcity is a potential source of conflict. Forces such as the depletion of resources; population growth; and unequal distribution or access can create political conflicts. Achieving more sustainable patterns of water use, restoring and maintaining the integrity of river systems, and cooperation within and between countries will not only protect the aquatic environment, but also avert conflict.

  15. 76 FR 36447 - Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Patuxent River, Patuxent River, MD AGENCY... a temporary safety zone during the ``NAS Patuxent River Air Expo '11'', which consists of aerial practices, performance demonstrations and air shows, to be held over certain waters of the Patuxent...

  16. 33 CFR 117.734 - Navesink River (Swimming River).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Navesink River (Swimming River). 117.734 Section 117.734 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... (Swimming River). The Oceanic Bridge, mile 4.5, shall open on signal; except that, from December 1...

  17. 33 CFR 117.734 - Navesink River (Swimming River).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navesink River (Swimming River). 117.734 Section 117.734 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... (Swimming River). The Oceanic Bridge, mile 4.5, shall open on signal; except that, from December 1...

  18. 33 CFR 117.734 - Navesink River (Swimming River).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Navesink River (Swimming River). 117.734 Section 117.734 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... (Swimming River). The Oceanic Bridge, mile 4.5, shall open on signal; except that, from December 1...

  19. 33 CFR 117.734 - Navesink River (Swimming River).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navesink River (Swimming River). 117.734 Section 117.734 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... (Swimming River). The Oceanic Bridge, mile 4.5, shall open on signal; except that, from December 1...

  20. 33 CFR 117.734 - Navesink River (Swimming River).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navesink River (Swimming River). 117.734 Section 117.734 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... (Swimming River). The Oceanic Bridge, mile 4.5, shall open on signal; except that, from December 1...

  1. The Nile River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of the northern portion of the Nile River was captured by MISR's nadir camera on January 30, 2001 (Terra orbit 5956). The Nile is the longest river in the world, extending for about 6700 kilometers from its headwaters in the highlands of eastern Africa. At the apex of the fertile Nile River Delta is the Egyptian capital city of Cairo. To the west are the Great Pyramids of Giza. North of here the Nile branches into two distributaries, the Rosetta to the west and the Damietta to the east. Also visible in this image is the Suez Canal, a shipping waterway connecting Port Said on the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez. The Gulf is an arm of the Red Sea, and is located on the righthand side of the picture. Image credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team.

  2. Delaware River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    Assessing the quality of water in every location of the Nation would not be practical. Therefore, NAWQA investigations are conducted within 59 selected areas called study units (fig. 1). These study units encompass important river and aquifer systems in the United States and represent the diverse geographic, waterresource, land-use, and water-use characteristics of the Nation. The Delaware River Basin is one of 15 study units in which work began in 1996. Water-quality sampling in the study unit will begin in 1999. This fact sheet provides a brief overview of the NAWQA program, describes the Delaware River Basin study unit, identifies the major water-quality issues in the basin, and documents the plan of study that will be followed during the study-unit investigation.

  3. Osmium in the rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M. |; Wasserburg, G.J.

    1997-12-01

    There is a large uncertainty in our understanding of the behavior of osmium during weathering and transport into deep oceans and the osmium budget of the oceans. The problem stems chiefly from the lack of osmium data on the dissolved load in the rivers and in the estuaries. In this study, the concentration and isotopic composition of osmium have been determined in three North American rivers (the Mississippi, the Columbia, and the Connecticut) and one river draining central Europe and flowing into the Baltic Sea (the Vistula). Osmium concentration in the Mississippi and the Vistula is about 45 femto mol kg{sup -1}; it is about 14 and 15 femto mol kg{sup -1} for the Connecticut and the Columbia, respectively. The {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os ratios estimated for the Mississippi and the Vistula are 10.4 and 10.7, respectively. For the Connecticut and the Columbia {sup 187}Os/{sup 186}Os = 8.8 and 14.4, respectively. Of all the rivers examined, the Mississippi is by far the largest, supplying {approximately}1.6% of the total annual world river flow. Its osmium isotopic composition is identical to the upper Mississippi valley loesses indicating (1) congruent dissolution of the bedrock and (2) little or no impact of anthropogenic sources on the osmium isotopic composition of the dissolved load. The latter observation indicates that the upper limit of the anthropogenic input in the dissolved osmium load of the Mississippi outflow is about 250 g yr{sup -1}. While the osmium concentration of the Vistula is high the isotopic composition does not appear to have been affected by substantial pollution. The river data can be used to put limits on the mean residence time of osmium in the oceans ({bar {tau}}{sub Os}) and on the osmium budget of the oceans. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Regional river sulfur runoff

    SciTech Connect

    Husar, R.B.; Husar, J.D.

    1985-01-20

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m/sup 2//yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m/sup 2//yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1--3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46--85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  5. Regional river sulfur runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Rudolf B.; Husar, Janja Djukic

    1985-01-01

    The water and sulfur runoff data for 54 large river basins were assembled, covering 65% of the nondesert land area of the world. The sulfur concentration ranges from 0.5 mg S/L for the West African rivers Niger and Volta to 100 mg S/L in the Colorado River; the world average is 3.2 mg S/L. The concentrations in central and eastern Europe as well as central and eastern North America exceed 8 mg S/L. The sulfur runoff density is also highest in the river basins over these industrialized regions, exceeding 2 g S/m2/yr. However, high sulfur runoff density in excess of 3 g S/m2/yr is also measured over the Pacific islands New Zealand and New Guinea and the archipelagos of Indonesia and the Philippines. The natural background sulfur runoff was estimated by assuming that South America, Africa, Australia, and the Pacific Islands are unperturbed by man and that the average river sulfur concentration is in the range 1-3 mg S/L. Taking these background concentration values, the man-induced sulfur runoff for Europe ranges between 2 and 8 times the natural flow, and over North America, man's contribution ranges between 1 and 5 times the natural runoff. The global sulfur flow from nondesert land to the oceans and the Caspian Sea is estimated as 131 Tg S/yr, of which 46-85 Tg S/yr is attributed to natural causes. The regional river sulfur runoff pattern discussed in this paper does not have enough spatial resolution to be directly applicable to studies of the environmental effects of man-induced sulfur flows. However, it points to the continental-size regions where those perturbations are most evident and to the magnitude of the perturbations as expressed in units of the natural flows.

  6. Charles River Crossing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-06

    piled shaft or precast concrete caissons can be used to construct the foundation. The pylons are then constructed in-situ using the slip form system...Bridge and River S treet Bridge (Figure 4) are e arth-filled, r einforced concrete arch bridges that cross over the Charles River, which flows between... concrete piers and spread footings set i nto gr anular s oils a nd c lay found unde rneath t he r iver be d s ettlement. It c arries bot h vehicular

  7. 3. ENVIRONMENT, FROM SOUTH, SHOWING RIVER ROAD RIDGE CARRYING CASSELMAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ENVIRONMENT, FROM SOUTH, SHOWING RIVER ROAD RIDGE CARRYING CASSELMAN RIVER ROAD OVER CASSELMAN RIVER - River Road Bridge, Crossing Casselman River on Casselman River Road, Grantsville, Garrett County, MD

  8. Discover the Nile River

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Bordering on the Fantastic. As the longest river on earth, the Nile passes through 10 countries. Presented through a wide range of activities and a winning array of games, it's also unsurpassed at taking young minds into exploring the world of water, as well as natural and man made wonders.

  9. River on Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Thomas R.

    1972-01-01

    Presents controversy over damming of Wyoming's Upper Green River to supply water to the arid basins of eastern Wyoming. Possibilities of wildlife destruction, flooding of valley lands, and opposition to the construction of the Kendall Dam itself are enumerated together with legislative action to date. (BL)

  10. Savannah River Site Robotics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  11. Savannah River Site Robotics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

  12. The River Rock School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gereaux, Teresa Thomas

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1920s, the small Appalachian community of Damascus, Virginia, used private subscriptions and volunteer labor to build a 15-classroom school made of rocks from a nearby river and chestnut wood from nearby forests. The school building's history, uses for various community activities, and current condition are described. (SV)

  13. Amu Darya River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... are losing arable land to soil salinization as a result of rising groundwater levels that accompany crop irrigation. As a consequence ... the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers, water volume in the Aral Sea has dropped by more than 80% since 1960. Increases in water input near the ...

  14. River Pollution: Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Describes a unit on river pollution and analytical methods to use in assessing temperature, pH, flow, calcium, chloride, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, dissolved nitrogen, detergents, heavy metals, sewage pollution, conductivity, and sediment cores. Suggests tests to be carried out and discusses significance of results. (JM)

  15. Colwater fish in rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    A standard sampling protocol to assess the fish assemblages and abundances in large, coldwater rivers is most accurate and precise if consistent gears and levels of effort are used at each site. This requires thorough crew training, quality control audits, and replicate sampling...

  16. Nissitissit River Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweatman, Jon

    Prepared for the student participant, this manual guides a day's exploration of the Nissitissit River. The unit, one of several developed in conjunction with Project Exploration, has the broad goals of promoting--through experiential learning in a variety of environments outside the classroom--the student's self-confidence and ability to work…

  17. The Nation's Rivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolman, M. Gordon

    1971-01-01

    Illustrates difficulties in measuring long term changes in water temperature and content of dissolved oxygen, inorganic ions, radiation, pesticides, and trash and debris by reference to selected U. S. river systems. Concludes that observations to detect polluters may not provide data for assessing trends and trend reversals. (AL)

  18. Ecological River Basin Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Anthony Wayne

    Addressing the Seventh American Water Resources Conference, Washington, D. C., October, 1971, Anthony Wayne Smith, President, National Parks and Conservation Association, presents an expose on how rivers should be managed by methods which restores and preserve the natural life balances of the localities and regions through which they flow. The…

  19. Variation of dissolved organic carbon transported by two Chinese rivers: The Changjiang River and Yellow River.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Pan, Delu; Bai, Yan; He, Xianqiang; Wang, Difeng; Zhang, Lin

    2015-11-15

    Real-time monitoring of riverine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the associated controlling factors is essential to coastal ocean management. This study was the first to simulate the monthly DOC concentrations at the Datong Hydrometric Station for the Changjiang River and at the Lijin Hydrometric Station for the Yellow River from 2000 to 2013 using a multilayer back-propagation neural network (MBPNN), along with basin remote-sensing products and river in situ data. The average absolute error between the modeled values and in situ values was 9.98% for the Changjiang River and 10.84% for the Yellow River. As an effect of water dilution, the variations of DOC concentrations in the two rivers were significantly negatively affected by discharge, with lower values reported during the wet season. Moreover, vegetation growth status and agricultural activities, represented by the gross primary product (GPP) and cropland area percent (CropPer) in the river basin, respectively, also significantly affected the DOC concentration in the Changjiang River, but not the Yellow River. The monthly riverine DOC flux was calculated using modeled DOC concentrations. In particular, the riverine DOC fluxes were affected by discharge, with 71.06% being reported for the Changjiang River and 90.71% for the Yellow River. Over the past decade, both DOC concentration and flux in the two rivers have not shown significant changes.

  20. Atmospheric rivers in Antarctica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukernik, M.; Lynch, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Changes and variability in the surface mass balance signify one of the most puzzling questions of the present and future changes in Antarctica. In particular, understanding accumulation in the Eastern part of Antarctic continent presents a great challenge due to sparse and erratic observational network. Several previous publications reported an anomalously high precipitation in May 2009 in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. This anomaly, supported by weather station data from the Princess Elisabeth station, 71°057' S, 23°021' E, 1392m asl, 173 km inland, also corresponded to anomalously high meridional moisture transport across the Southern Ocean inland. Using data from the ERA-Interim reanalysis project and a modified definition for the polar regions, May 2009 event has been classified as an atmospheric river event. Atmospheric river events, traditionally defined in the midlatitudes, are particularly strong and narrow corridors of moisture in middle atmosphere that can result in intense precipitation events once they reach the coast. May 2009 event was the first atmospheric river identified as far south as the Antarctic continent. In this study we perform a detailed analysis of the May 2009 atmospheric river event utilizing data from ERA -Interim and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations. We assess the role of the large-scale atmospheric circulation, particularly the role of the Zonal Wave 3 anomaly. We also investigate the synoptic-scale development of a storm that led to anomalous precipitation event in East Antarctica. We assess the role of upper and lower level forcing with the help of the quasi-geostrophic omega equation. We believe that such in-depth analysis of the dynamics of an atmospheric river event is crucial for better understanding present and future accumulation in the East Antarctica.

  1. Dynamic reorganization of river basins.

    PubMed

    Willett, Sean D; McCoy, Scott W; Perron, J Taylor; Goren, Liran; Chen, Chia-Yu

    2014-03-07

    River networks evolve as migrating drainage divides reshape river basins and change network topology by capture of river channels. We demonstrate that a characteristic metric of river network geometry gauges the horizontal motion of drainage divides. Assessing this metric throughout a landscape maps the dynamic states of entire river networks, revealing diverse conditions: Drainage divides in the Loess Plateau of China appear stationary; the young topography of Taiwan has migrating divides driving adjustment of major basins; and rivers draining the ancient landscape of the southeastern United States are reorganizing in response to escarpment retreat and coastal advance. The ability to measure the dynamic reorganization of river basins presents opportunities to examine landscape-scale interactions among tectonics, erosion, and ecology.

  2. River-Corridor Habitat Dynamics, Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Intensive management of the Missouri River for navigation, flood control, and power generation has resulted in substantial physical changes to the river corridor. Historically, the Missouri River was characterized by a shifting, multithread channel and abundant unvegetated sandbars. The shifting channel provided a wide variety of hydraulic environments and large areas of connected and unconnected off-channel water bodies. Beginning in the early 1800s and continuing to the present, the channel of the Lower Missouri River (downstream from Sioux City, Iowa) has been trained into a fast, deep, single-thread channel to stabilize banks and maintain commercial navigation. Wing dikes now concentrate the flow, and revetments and levees keep the channel in place and disconnect it from the flood plain. In addition, reservoir regulation of the Missouri River upstream of Yankton, South Dakota, has substantially changed the annual hydrograph, sediment loads, temperature regime, and nutrient budgets. While changes to the Missouri River have resulted in broad social and economic benefits, they have also been associated with loss of river-corridor habitats and diminished populations of native fish and wildlife species. Today, Missouri River stakeholders are seeking ways to restore some natural ecosystem benefits of the Lower Missouri River without compromising traditional economic uses of the river and flood plain.

  3. 77 FR 30589 - SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners LP, SteelRiver Infrastructure Associates LLC, SteelRiver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Surface Transportation Board SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners LP, SteelRiver Infrastructure Associates LLC, SteelRiver Infrastructure Fund North America LP, and Patriot Funding LLC--Control Exemption--Patriot Rail Corp., et al. SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners LP (SRIP LP), SteelRiver...

  4. River networks as biodiversity hotlines.

    PubMed

    Décamps, Henri

    2011-05-01

    For several years, measures to insure healthy river functions and to protect biodiversity have focused on management at the scale of drainage basins. Indeed, rivers bear witness to the health of their drainage basins, which justifies integrated basin management. However, this vision should not mask two other aspects of the protection of aquatic and riparian biodiversity as well as services provided by rivers. First, although largely depending on the ecological properties of the surrounding terrestrial environment, rivers are ecological systems by themselves, characterized by their linearity: they are organized in connected networks, complex and ever changing, open to the sea. Second, the structure and functions of river networks respond to manipulations of their hydrology, and are particularly vulnerable to climatic variations. Whatever the scale considered, river networks represent "hotlines" for sharing water between ecological and societal systems, as well as for preserving both systems in the face of global change. River hotlines are characterized by spatial as well as temporal legacies: every human impact to a river network may be transmitted far downstream from its point of origin, and may produce effects only after a more or less prolonged latency period. Here, I review some of the current issues of river ecology in light of the linear character of river networks.

  5. Investigation of temperature and aridity at different elevations of Mt. Ailao, SW China.

    PubMed

    You, Guangyong; Zhang, Yiping; Liu, Yuhong; Schaefer, Douglas; Gong, Hede; Gao, Jinbo; Lu, Zhiyun; Song, Qinghai; Zhao, Junbin; Wu, Chuansheng; Yu, Lei; Xie, Youneng

    2013-05-01

    Our current understanding is that plant species distribution in the subtropical mountain forests of Southwest China is controlled mainly by inadequate warmth. Due to abundant annual precipitation, aridity has been less considered in this context, yet rainfall here is highly seasonal, and the magnitude of drought severity at different elevations has not been examined due to limited access to higher elevations in this area.In this study, short-term micrometeorological variables were measured at 2,480 m and 2,680 m, where different forest types occur. Drought stress was evaluated by combining measurements of water evaporation demand (E p) and soil volumetric water content (VWC). The results showed that: (1) mean temperature decreased 1 °C from 2,480 m to 2,680 m and the minimum temperature at 2,680 m was above freezing. (2) Elevation had a significant influence on E p; however, the difference in daily E p between 2,480 m and 2,680 m was not significant, which was possibly due to the small difference in elevation between these two sites. (3) VWC had larger range of annual variation at 2,680 m than at 2,480 m, especially for the surface soil layer.We conclude that the decrease in temperature does not effectively explain the sharp transition between these forest types. During the dry season, plants growing at 2,680 m are likely to experience more drought stress. In seeking to understand the mountain forest distribution, further studies should consider the effects of drought stress alongside those of altitude.

  6. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2013-03-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project.

  7. Ancient River revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent flights of the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) mission aboard the space shuttle Endeavour discovered a previously unknown branch of an ancient river. The images, released at AGU's Spring Meeting, show the river channel buried under thousands of years worth of windblown sand in a region of North Africa's Sahara Desert near the Kufra Oasis in southeast Libya, centered at 23.3°N latitude, 22.9°E longitude. The image from the flight last October reveals a system of old, now inactive stream valleys, called “paleodrainage systems,” which carried running water northward across the Sahara during periods of wetter climate.

  8. River Mileages and Drainage Areas for Illinois Streams. Volume 2. Illinois River Basin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    FOREST 50.2 MADISON STREET RIVER FOREST 50.5 IL PT 56 RIVER FOREST 51.0 C & NW RR RIVER FOREST 51.1 LAKE STREET RIVER FOREST 51.6 CHICAGO AVENUE RIVER ... FOREST 51.9 SILVER CREEK R RIVER FOREST 53.9 DAM S35v40NoRI2E RIVER FOREST 54.2 NORTH PUEBLO AVENUE RIVER FOREST 55.1 GRAND AVENUE RIVER FOREST 55.1...USGS GAGE 05530600 AT RIVER GROVE 451 415546 O75040 RIVER

  9. Red River of the North, Reconnaissance Report: Wild Rice River.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Stations Along the Wild Rice River, October, 1977 to September, 1977 ... 30 7 Groundwater Quality of Eight Communities Within the Wild Rice River Subbasin...impair fish propagation (Upper Mississippi River Basin Commission, 1977; North Dakota Statewide 208 Water Quality Management Plan, 1978). The groundwater ...given to this reach not because of its stream fisheries, which only provide moderate amounts of northern pike, yellow perch , crappie, and several

  10. Chesapeake Bay, Potomac River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The nation's capital lies astride the Potomac River (38.5N, 77.5W) at the head of the Potomac Estuary. Baltimore, MD, also in the scene, is connected to Washington by the Baltimore-Washington Parkway. The suburbs of both cities tend to cluster around the Washington and Baltimore Beltways. Most of the countryside in the eastern two-thirds of this scene is either heavily forested or is in farming, dairy operations or poultry production.

  11. Onilahy River, Madagascar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Near the southern tip of Madagascar, the Onilahy River (23.5S, 44E) drains a near barren landscape, the result of rapid deforestation for quick profits from the lumber industry with no regard to the environmental impact. At the turn of the century, the island was a lush tropical paradise with about 90 percent of the surface forested. Now, at the close of the century, only about 10 percent of the forests remain in inaccessible rugged terrain.

  12. Flooding on Elbe River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Heavy rains in Central Europe over the past few weeks have led to some of the worst flooding the region has witnessed in more than a century. The floods have killed more than 100 people in Germany, Russia, Austria, Hungary, and the Czech Republic and have led to as much as $20 billion in damage. This false-color image of the Elbe River and its tributaries was taken on August 20, 2002, by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The floodwaters that inundated Dresden, Germany, earlier this week have moved north. As can be seen, the river resembles a fairly large lake in the center of the image just south of the town of Wittenberg. Flooding was also bad further downriver in the towns of Maqgdeburge and Hitzacker. Roughly 20,000 people were evacuated from their homes in northern Germany. Fifty thousand troops, border police, and technical assistance workers were called in to combat the floods along with 100,000 volunteers. The floodwaters are not expected to badly affect Hamburg, which sits on the mouth of the river on the North Sea. Credit:Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  13. 33 CFR 125.06 - Western rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VESSELS § 125.06 Western rivers. The term western rivers as used in the regulations in this subchapter shall include only the Red River of the North, the Mississippi River and its tributaries above the Huey... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Western rivers. 125.06...

  14. 33 CFR 125.06 - Western rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... VESSELS § 125.06 Western rivers. The term western rivers as used in the regulations in this subchapter shall include only the Red River of the North, the Mississippi River and its tributaries above the Huey... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Western rivers. 125.06...

  15. 33 CFR 125.06 - Western rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... VESSELS § 125.06 Western rivers. The term western rivers as used in the regulations in this subchapter shall include only the Red River of the North, the Mississippi River and its tributaries above the Huey... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Western rivers. 125.06...

  16. 33 CFR 125.06 - Western rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VESSELS § 125.06 Western rivers. The term western rivers as used in the regulations in this subchapter shall include only the Red River of the North, the Mississippi River and its tributaries above the Huey... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Western rivers. 125.06...

  17. 33 CFR 125.06 - Western rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VESSELS § 125.06 Western rivers. The term western rivers as used in the regulations in this subchapter shall include only the Red River of the North, the Mississippi River and its tributaries above the Huey... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Western rivers. 125.06...

  18. Tsunami Impacts in River Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolkova, E.; Tanaka, H.; Roh, M.

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 Chilean and the 2011 Tohoku tsunami events demonstrated the tsunami's ability to penetrate much farther along rivers than the ground inundation. At the same time, while tsunami impacts to the coastal areas have been subject to countless studies, little is known about tsunami propagation in rivers. Here we examine the field data and conduct numerical simulations to gain better understanding of the tsunami impacts in rivers.The evidence which motivated our study is comprised of water level measurements of the aforementioned tsunamis in multiple rivers in Japan, and the 2011 Tohoku and some other tsunamis in the Columbia River in the US. When the available tsunami observations in these very different rivers are brought together, they display remarkably similar patterns not observed on the open coast. Two phenomena were discovered in the field data. First, the phase of the river tide determines the tsunami penetration distance in a very specific way common to all rivers. Tsunami wave progressively disappears on receding tide, whereas high tide greatly facilitates the tsunami intrusion, as seen in the Figure. Second, a strong near-field tsunami causes substantial and prolonged water accumulation in lower river reaches. As the 2011 tsunami intruded rivers in Japan, the water level along rivers rose 1-2 m and stayed high for many hours, with the maximum rise occurring several km from the river mouth. The rise in the water level at some upstream gaging stations even exceeded the tsunami amplitude there.Using the numerical experiments, we attempt to identify the physics behind these effects. We will demonstrate that the nonlinear interactions among the flow components (tsunami, tide, and riverine flow) are an essential condition governing wave dynamics in tidal rivers. Understanding these interactions might explain some previous surprising observations of waves in river environments. Figure: Measurements of the 2010/02/27 tsunami along Naruse and Yoshida rivers

  19. Establishing river basin organisations inVietnam: Red River, Dong Nai River and Lower Mekong Delta.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P; Wright, G

    2001-01-01

    River basin management is receiving considerable attention at present. Part of the debate, now occurring worldwide, concerns the nature of the organisations that are required to manage river basins successfully, and whether special-purpose river basin organisations (RBOs) are always necessary and in what circumstance they are likely to (i) add to the management of the water resources and (ii) be successful. The development of river basin management requires a number of important elements to be developed to a point where the river basin can be managed successfully. These include the relevant laws, the public and non-government institutions, the technical capabilities of the people, the understanding and motivation of people, and the technical capacity and systems, including information. A river basin organisation (or RBO) is taken to mean a special-purpose organisation charged with some part of the management of the water resources of a particular river basin. Generally speaking, such organisations are responsible for various functions related to the supply, distribution, protection and allocation of water, and their boundaries follow the watershed of the river in question. However, the same functions can be carried out by various organisations, which are not configured on the geographical boundaries of a river basin. This paper outlines recent work on river basin organisation in Vietnam, and makes some comparisons with the situation in Australia.

  20. Rehabilitating China's largest inland river.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiqing; Chen, Yaning; Zhang, Yaoqi; Xia, Yang

    2009-06-01

    Wetlands are particularly important for conserving China's biodiversity but riparian wetlands in the Tarim River basin in western China have been reduced by 46% during the last 3 decades. The world's largest habitat for Populus euphratica, which is in the Tarim River basin, significantly shrank. To protect and restore the deteriorated ecosystems along the Tarim River and its associated wetlands, China's government initiated a multimillion dollar river restoration project to release water from upper dams to the dried-up lower reaches of the Tarim River starting in 2000. We monitored the responses of groundwater and vegetation to water recharge in the lower reaches of the river from 2000 to 2006 by establishing nine 1000-m-long transects perpendicular to the river at intervals of 20-45 km along the 320-km river course below the Daxihaizi Reservoir, the source of water conveyance, to Lake Taitema, the terminus of the Tarim River. Water recharges from the Daxihaizi Reservoir to the lower reaches of the Tarim River significantly increased groundwater levels and vegetation coverage at all monitoring sites along the river. The mean canopy size of the endangered plant species P. euphratica doubled after 6 years of water recharge. Some rare migrating birds returned to rest on the restored wetlands in summer along the lower reaches of the Tarim River. The biggest challenge facing decision makers, however, is to balance water allocation and water rights between agricultural and natural ecosystems in a sustainable way. A large number of inhabitants in the Tarim Basin depend on these limited water resources for a living. At the same time, the endangered ecosystems need to be protected. Given the ecological, socioeconomic, and sociopolitical realities in the Tarim Basin, adaptive water policies and strategies are needed for water allocation in these areas of limited water resources.

  1. Wild, scenic, and transcendental rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    “A more lovely stream than this has never flowed on Earth,” 19th century American author Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote about the confluence of the Assabet and Concord Rivers, streams that meander about 40 km west of Boston, Massachusetts.Segments of these streams as well as the Assabet River became the newest additions to the U.S. National Wild and Scenic Rivers System, when President Bill Clinton signed into law the “Sudbury, Assabet, and Concord Wild and Scenic River Act” on April 9.

  2. 36 CFR 7.89 - New River Gorge National River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... valid West Virginia State hunting license or permit, or are exempt under provisions of West Virginia law... Superintendent for reasons of public safety, resource protection, or other management considerations. (2) Do West Virginia state hunting laws apply within New River Gorge National River? Yes, non-conflicting State...

  3. Methane Emission from Tropical Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawakuchi, H. O.; Rasera, M. F. F. L.; Krusche, A. V.; Ballester, M. V. R.

    2012-04-01

    Inland water is already known as an important source of methane to atmosphere. Methane is produced in anaerobic environments usually find in lakes and floodplain bottom sediment. It is the main reason that almost all information regarding methane flux come from this environments. However, while floodplain dries during low water season reducing methanogenesis, rivers keep the capacity to emit methane throughout the year. Here we present preliminary results of CH4 flux measurements done in 6 large tropical rivers within the Amazon basin. We measured 17 areas using floating chamber during dry (low water) season, between September and November of 2011, in Amazon river mainstem, Araguaia, Xingu, Tapajós, Madeira, and Negro Rivers. Measured fluxes of all rivers ranged from 59.3 to 2974.4 mmol m-2 yr-1. Geomorphologic structure of channels is one important factor that contributes to this high heterogeneity due to development of low flow velocity depositional settings allowing formation of anoxic zones in rivers. Hydraulic and sediment barriers in the confluence of river channels promote the generation of natural dams which function as a trap for the suspension load favoring the deposition of organic rich muds. This kind of environment is very different from common river channels and has a stronger potential of methane emission. Average values of our flux measurements for this two river environments show that depositional areas can have much higher fluxes than the main channel, 1089.6 and 163.1 mmol m-2 yr-1, respectively. Hence, CH4 flux from these depositional zones is similar to some tropical floodplain lakes and reservoirs. Although the low flux from channel, the area covered by water is very large resulting in a significant contribution to the regional methane emission to the atmosphere. Moreover, mapping the area of these depositional river zones will give us a better idea of the magnitude of methane flux from tropical rivers.

  4. River Capture in Disequilibrium Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, S. W.; Perron, J.; Willett, S.; Goren, L.

    2013-12-01

    The process of river piracy or river capture has long drawn interest as a potential mechanism by which drainage basins large and small evolve towards an equilibrium state. River capture transfers both drainage area and drainage lines from one river basin to another, which can cause large, abrupt shifts in network topology, drainage divide positions, and river incision rates. Despite numerous case studies in which river capture has been proposed to have occurred, there is no general, mechanistic framework for understanding the controls on river capture, nor are there quantitative criteria for determining if capture has occurred. Here we use new metrics of landscape disequilibrium to first identify landscapes in which drainage reorganization is occurring. These metrics are based on a balance between an integral of the contributing drainage area and elevation. In an analysis of rivers in the Eastern United States we find that many rivers are in a state of disequilibrium and are experiencing recent or ongoing area exchange between basins. In these disequilibrium basins we find widespread evidence for network rearrangement via river capture at multiple scales. We then conduct numerical experiments with a 2-D landscape evolution model to explore the conditions in which area exchange among drainage basins is likely to occur as discrete capture events as opposed to continuous divide migration. These experiments indicate that: (1) capture activity increases with the degree of disequilibrium induced by persistent spatial gradients in tectonic forcing or by temporal changes in climate or tectonic forcing; (2) capture activity is strongly controlled by the initial planform drainage network geometry; and (3) capture activity scales with the fluvial incision rate constant in the river power erosion law.

  5. Taunton River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John R.; Willey, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    This report presents in tabular form selected records of wells, test wells, and borings collected during a study of the basin from 1966 to 1968 in cooperation with the Massachusetts Water Resources Commission, and during earlier studies. This report is released in order to make available to the public and to local, state, and federal agencies basic ground-water information that may aid in planning water-resources development. Basic records contained in this report will complement an interpretative report on the Taunton River basin to be released at a later date.

  6. River Ice Data Instrumentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    measurement of river ice velocity. USA Cold Re- gions Research and Engineering Laboratory, CRREL Report 95-21. Ford, J.S., S . Beltaos , W.J. Moody...moke the measurements. Existing end cBvelcpinginstrumeTtoticnv^ s edudedfain-situend remote sensing ccpcälities. Methods of Ironsmitting storing end...rrril häp@dicnnil rr6acB" s @dicnril WWW http/AMMA/cScdarril/ Al alhas rrcy ace repcrls lacughlheNalicnd Technicd Infarrdicn Sevice NTIS 5285 PCRT

  7. 7. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, PERSPECTIVE LOOKING EAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, PERSPECTIVE LOOKING EAST. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  8. 2. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 20 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 20 DEGREES NORTH. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  9. 6. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION, LOOKING 306 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION, LOOKING 306 DEGREES NORTHWEST. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  10. 1. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 18 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, SOUTH END, LOOKING 18 DEGREES NORTH. SAME PHOTO AS OR-36-1. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  11. 5. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION DETAIL, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, EAST ELEVATION DETAIL, LOOKING 6 DEGREES NORTH. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  12. 3. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 184 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 184 DEGREES SOUTH. SAME PHOTO AS OR-36-2. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  13. 4. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 224 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SANDY RIVER BRIDGE AT TROUTDALE, NORTH END, LOOKING 224 DEGREES SOUTHWEST. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Sandy River Bridge at Troutdale, Historic Columbia River Highway spanning Sandy River, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  14. River meanders and vorticity theorem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere

    1953-01-01

    The serpentine windings of rivers, which in certain reaches attain a remarkable symmetry and are then called meanders, must represent one aspect of the tendency for establishment of quasi-equilibrium in natural streams. With the increase in knowledge of the interaction of forces operating in rivers, this tendency toward equilibrium has assumed a greater significance.

  15. Flooding on Russia's Lena River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nearly every year in the late spring, ice blocks the flow of water at the mouth of the Lena River in northeastern Russia and gives rise to floods across the Siberian plains. This year's floods can be seen in this image taken on June 2, 2002, by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. The river runs down the left side of the image, and its delta is shrouded in ice (red) at the top of the image. Normally, the river would resemble a thin black line in MODIS imagery. The river, which is Russia's longest, flows 2,641 miles (4,250 kilometers) south to north through Siberia and into the Laptev Sea. In the winter, the river becomes nearly frozen. In the spring, however, water upstream thaws earlier than water at the mouth of the river. As the southern end of the river begins to melt, blocks of ice travel downstream to the still frozen delta, pile up, and often obstruct the flow of water. Flooding doesn't always occur on the same parts of the river. The floods hit further south last year. If the flooding grows severe enough, explosive charges are typically used to break up the ice jams. In these false-color images land areas are a dull, light green or tan, and water is black. Clouds appear pink, and ice comes across as bright red. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  16. 33 CFR 165.510 - Delaware Bay and River, Salem River, Christina River and Schuylkill River-Regulated Navigation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Schuylkill River, in an area bounded on the south by a line drawn across the entrance to the Delaware Bay... Cape Henlopen, and bounded on the north by a line drawn across the Delaware River between Trenton, NJ... propulsion; (7) While moored within the regulated navigation area, ensure that at least two wire...

  17. Treasure Along the Parker River.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Ann-Marie; And Others

    Designed so that 100 to 125 heterogeneously grouped 7th and 8th grade students and a team of 5 core teachers might experience and discover the natural and historical "treasure" in the Parker River area of Massachusetts, this interdisciplinary unit centers on a hike to Parker River (6.7 miles) and visits to a cemetery, a monument, and Old…

  18. Niagara River Toxics Management Plan

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This 2007 Progress Report of the Niagara River Toxics Management Plan (NRTMP) summarizes progress made by the four parties in dealing with the 18 “Priority Toxics” through reductions in point and non-point sources to the Niagara River.

  19. Geomorphology and River Dynamics of the Lower Copper River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, Timothy P.; Conaway, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Located in south-central Alaska, the Copper River drains an area of more than 24,000 square miles. The average annual flow of the river near its mouth is 63,600 cubic feet per second, but is highly variable between winter and summer. In the winter, flow averages approximately 11,700 cubic feet per second, and in the summer, due to snowmelt, rainfall, and glacial melt, flow averages approximately 113,000 cubic feet per second, an order of magnitude higher. About 15 miles upstream of its mouth, the Copper River flows past the face of Childs Glacier and enters a large, broad, delta. The Copper River Highway traverses this flood plain, and in 2008, 11 bridges were located along this section of the highway. The bridges cross several parts of the Copper River and in recent years, the changing course of the river has seriously damaged some of the bridges. Analysis of aerial photography from 1991, 1996, 2002, 2006, and 2007 indicates the eastward migration of a channel of the Copper River that has resulted in damage to the Copper River Highway near Mile 43.5. Migration of another channel in the flood plain has resulted in damage to the approach of Bridge 339. As a verification of channel change, flow measurements were made at bridges along the Copper River Highway in 2005-07. Analysis of the flow measurements indicate that the total flow of the Copper River has shifted from approximately 50 percent passing through the bridges at Mile 27, near the western edge of the flood plain, and 50 percent passing through the bridges at Mile 36-37 to approximately 5 percent passing through the bridges at Mile 27 and 95 percent through the bridges at Mile 36-37 during average flow periods. The U.S. Geological Survey's Multi-Dimensional Surface-Water Modeling System was used to simulate water-surface elevation and velocity, and to compute bed shear stress at two areas where the Copper River is affecting the Copper River Highway. After calibration, the model was used to examine the

  20. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  1. Hood River Passive House

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to reduce home energy use by 30%-50% (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  2. River network routing in all rivers of the Texas Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C. H.; Maidment, D. R.; Hong, S.; Niu, G.; Yang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The mapped rivers and streams of the contiguous United States are available in a high resolution geographic information system (GIS) dataset called NHDPlus. This hydrographic dataset has about 3 million river and water body reaches along with information on how they are connected into networks. A river network model called RAPID is developed for the NHDPlus river network and applied to the 68,143 river reaches of the entire Texas Gulf, whose lateral inflow to the river network is calculated by a land surface model. RAPID allows for a matrix-based calculation of flow and volume of water in all reaches of a river network, with many thousands of reaches. Gages from the USGS National Water Information System are used to assess the quality of model calculations and to automatically determine optimal model parameters with about 1 gage available for each 160 reaches simulated. RAPID is adapted for parallel computing and has been tested on the Lonestar supercomputer (http://www.tacc.utexas.edu/resources/hpcsystems/) although challenges related to parallel computing are significant. The first author was awarded the 2008 Horton (Hydrology) Research Grant for this work.

  3. River-Based Experiential Learning: the Bear River Fellows Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D. E.; Shirley, B.; Roark, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Outdoor Recreation, and Parks and Recreation programs at Utah State University (USU) have partnered to offer a new, unique river-based experiential learning opportunity for undergraduates called the Bear River Fellows Program. The program allows incoming freshmen Fellows to experience a river first hand during a 5-day/4-night river trip on the nearby Bear River two weeks before the start of their first Fall semester. As part of the program, Fellows will navigate the Bear River in canoes, camp along the banks, interact with local water and environmental managers, collect channel cross section, stream flow, vegetation cover, and topological complexity data, meet other incoming freshmen, interact with faculty and graduate students, develop boating and leadership skills, problem solve, and participate as full members of the trip team. Subsequently, Fellows will get paid as undergraduate researchers during their Fall and Spring Freshman semesters to analyze, synthesize, and present the field data they collect. The program is a collaborative effort between two USU academic units and the (non-academic) division of Student Services and supports a larger National Science Foundation funded environmental modelling and management project for the lower Bear River, Utah watershed. We have advertised the program via Facebook and emails to incoming USU freshmen, received 35 applications (60% women), and accepted 5 Fellows into the program (3 female and 2 male). The river trip departs August 14, 2012. The poster will overview the Bear River Fellows Program and present qualitative and preliminary outcomes emerging from the trip and Fellows' work through the Fall semester with the field data they collect. We will also undertake more rigorous and longer longitudinal quantitative evaluation of Program outcomes (for example, in problem-solving and leadership) both in Spring 2013 and in subsequent 2013 and 2014 offerings of the

  4. 33 CFR 207.380 - Red Lake River, Minn.; logging regulations for portion of river above Thief River Falls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... wishing to run logs on Red Lake River must provide storage booms near the head of the river to take care of said logs. (b) No one will be permitted to turn into the river at any time more logs than he can receive at his storage boom. (c) Tows arriving at the head of the river shall turn their logs into...

  5. 75 FR 51938 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Taunton River, Fall River and Somerset, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Taunton River, Fall...) Bridge at mile 1.8, across the Taunton River between Fall River and Somerset, Massachusetts. This final..., across the Taunton River between Fall River and Somerset, Massachusetts, has a vertical clearance in...

  6. 78 FR 49918 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Taunton River, Fall River and Somerset, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Taunton River, Fall... across the Taunton River, mile 2.1, between Fall River and Somerset, Massachusetts. The bridge owner...) entitled, ``Drawbridge Operation Regulation: Taunton River, Fall River and Somerset, MA'' in the...

  7. 29 CFR 1917.126 - River banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false River banks. 1917.126 Section 1917.126 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.126 River banks. (a) This section applies to temporary installations or temporary operations near a river bank. (b) Where working surfaces at river banks slope...

  8. 29 CFR 1917.126 - River banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false River banks. 1917.126 Section 1917.126 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.126 River banks. (a) This section applies to temporary installations or temporary operations near a river bank. (b) Where working surfaces at river banks slope...

  9. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  10. 29 CFR 1917.126 - River banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false River banks. 1917.126 Section 1917.126 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.126 River banks. (a) This section applies to temporary installations or temporary operations near a river bank. (b) Where working surfaces at river banks slope...

  11. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River...

  12. 29 CFR 1917.126 - River banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false River banks. 1917.126 Section 1917.126 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.126 River banks. (a) This section applies to temporary installations or temporary operations near a river bank. (b) Where working surfaces at river banks slope...

  13. PCBs in the Harlem River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent, toxic and bioaccumulated contaminants of great environmental concern. PCB is a tracer of wastewater, stormwater and CSOs inputs; PCBs contamination of fish is a main environmental concern for the Harlem River. PCBs in the Harlem River are from combined sewer overflows (CSOs), stormwater runoff, wastewater, as well as upper Hudson GE (General Electric at Fort Edward)'s release. PCBs affect human health mostly from contaminated fish consumption. Many research focused on PCBs in the Hudson River and New York/New Jersey Harbor. However, PCBs source, transport and environmental impact in the Harlem River-a natural straight that connects the Hudson River and the East River, had not been well studied. In this research, water sample were collected from the Harlem River and analyzed PCBs by HR GC/MS (High resolution gas chromatography mass spectrophotometer). Preliminary results showed that certain PCBs congeners in the water column. Results also indicated that nutrients (phosphorus and ammonia) as well as bacteria levels exceeded EPA standards: Total phosphorus-10μg/L, total nitrogen-0.38mg/L; E.Coli-126 MPN/100ml, Enterococcus- 104MPN/100ml, Fecal Coliform-200 MPN/100ml. This research is under process, and more results could give further detail in near future. This research will help improve water quality of the Harlem River, improve environmental health and raise environmental awareness.SO tank Nutrient and bacterial levels of selected sites in the Harlem RiverCSO: Combined Sewer OverflowWWTP: Waste Water Treatment Plant

  14. Ice Jams the Ob River

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Russia's Ob River flows from south to north, and each summer, it thaws in the same direction. The result is that an ice jam sits downstream from thawed portions of the river, which is laden with heavy runoff from melted snow. On June 29, 2007, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the almost completely thawed Ob River. The scene is typical for early summer. South of the ice jam, the Gulf of Ob is swollen with pent-up run-off, and upstream from that, the river is widened as well. Unable to carve through frozen land, the river has little choice but to overflow its banks. For a comparison of early summer and autumn conditions, see Flooding on the Ob River in the Earth Observatory's Natural Hazards section. Besides the annual overflow, this image captures other circumstances of early summer. Sea ice is retreating from the Kara Sea. A lingering line of snow cover snakes its way along the Ob River, to the west. And while the land is lush and green in the south, it appears barren and brown in the north. Near the mouth of the river and the Kara Sea, the land is cold-adapted tundra, with diminutive plants and a short growing season. Just as the ice plugging the river had yet to thaw in the Far North's short summer, the tundra had not yet to greened up either. In this image it still appears lifeless beige. NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Rapid Response Team, Goddard Space Flight Center

  15. Lena River, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This pair of true- and false-color images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from June 28, 2002, shows numerous burn scars dotting the northern Siberian landscape along the Lena River. In the true-color image, the burn scars appear dark grayish-brown, while in the false-color image they appear red, as does the bare exposed soil of the Verkhoyansk Mountain Range to the east of the north-flowing Lena. A tinge of blue along the mountains in the false-color image means there is some lingering snow or ice, and that the bare soil is due to spring's late arrival there, and not to burn scars. At the top, sea ice still fills the Laptev Sea. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  16. River history and tectonics.

    PubMed

    Vita-Finzi, C

    2012-05-13

    The analysis of crustal deformation by tectonic processes has gained much from the clues offered by drainage geometry and river behaviour, while the interpretation of channel patterns and sequences benefits from information on Earth movements before or during their development. The interplay between the two strands operates at many scales: themes which have already benefited from it include the possible role of mantle plumes in the breakup of Gondwana, the Cenozoic development of drainage systems in Africa and Australia, Himalayan uplift in response to erosion, alternating episodes of uplift and subsidence in the Mississippi delta, buckling of the Indian lithospheric plate, and changes in stream pattern and sinuosity along individual alluvial channels subject to localized deformation. Developments in remote sensing, isotopic dating and numerical modelling are starting to yield quantitative analyses of such effects, to the benefit of geodymamics as well as fluvial hydrology.

  17. [Characteristics of absorption and fluorescence spectra of dissolved organic matter from confluence of rivers: case study of Qujiang River-Jialing River and Fujiang River-Jialing River].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin-Long; Jiang, Tao; Gao, Jie; Wei, Shi-Qiang; Lu, Song; Liu, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy combined with ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra was used to investigate the change characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in confluences water of Qujiang River-Jialing River and Fujiang River-Jialing River, respectively. The results suggested that DOM showed a significant terrestrial input signal in all the sampling sites, FI < 1.4, HIX > 0.8, possibly representing remarkable signals of humus resulted from humic-like component. Moreover, the mixing zone of this study showed a non-conservative mixed behavior, which had a limited contribution, and was not the dominant factor to interpret the change characteristics of DOM in confluences zones. Different land-use types along all the rivers had an obvious impact on DOM inputs. Results of cluster analysis showed that a higher degree of aromaticity and humification components was observed as the predominant contributor to DOM when the land-use type was forest and farmland ecosystem, for example the confluences of Qujiang River-Jialing River. On the other hand, high concentrations of DOM with relative simple structures were found in the water when the urban land-use type was predominant, for example the confluences of Fujiang River-Jialing River. Meanwhile, a new fluorescent signal of protein-like components (peak T) appeared, which manifested a significant effect on the water quality resulted from anthropogenic activities.

  18. Arctic River organic matter transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Peter; Gustafsson, Orjan; Vonk, Jorien; Spencer, Robert; McClelland, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Arctic Rivers have unique hydrology and biogeochemistry. They also have a large impact on the Arctic Ocean due to the large amount of riverine inflow and small ocean volume. With respect to organic matter, their influence is magnified by the large stores of soil carbon and distinct soil hydrology. Here we present a recap of what is known of Arctic River organic matter transport. We will present a summary of what is known of the ages and sources of Arctic River dissolved and particulate organic matter. We will also discuss the current status of what is known about changes in riverine organic matter export due to global change.

  19. Nitrate Trends in Minnesota Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, Dave; Christopherson, Dave; Lorenz, Dave; Martin, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess long-term trends (30 to 35 years) of flow-adjusted concentrations of nitrite+nitrate-N (hereinafter referred to as nitrate) in a way that would allow us to discern changing trends. Recognizing that these trends are commonly different from one river to another river and from one part of the state to another, our objective was to examine as many river monitoring sites across the state as possible for which sufficient long term streamflow and concentration data were available.

  20. Status of river herring stocks in large rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, R.E.; Jessop, B.M.; Hightower, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    We examined long-term data sets from large rivers in the northern, central, and southern parts of the ranges of anadromous river herring (alewife Alosa pseudoharengus and blueback herring A. aestivalis) to assess the current status of these species and for evidence of fishery-induced effects on their demographic characteristics. Both species show signs of overexploitation in all rivers examined, such as reductions in mean age, decreases in percentage of returning spawners, and decreases in abundance. These two species should be managed separately since exploitation within a given river is often biased toward one or the other and there are enough differences in their biology so that a single management option will affect them differently. These species are not distinguished in commercial catches, which hinders understanding of their exploitation. ?? 2003 by the American Fisheries Society.

  1. Red River of the North Reconnaissance Report: Turtle River Subbasin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    formed by glacial Lake Agassiz . The major streamwater features are the Turtle River and its two branches: the North Branch and the South Branch. The...spread out over the nearly level, south-sloping Elk River delta (formed in glacial Lake Agassiz ). The area around Manvel is an essentially flat...transected by a series of elevated geological features called beach ridges, or strandlines, which are associated with the formation of glacial Lake Agassiz

  2. Red River of the North, Reconnaissance Report: Main Stem Subbasin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    different from Report) IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Bois de Sious-Mustinka Rivers; Buffalo River; Devils Lake; Elm River ; Forest River; Goose River; Maple River...corridor for animals moving north and south along the Red River . Forests afford breeding and nesting areas for birds and rank second only 2to wetlands

  3. Flooding on California's Russian River: Role of atmospheric rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ralph, F.M.; Neiman, P.J.; Wick, G.A.; Gutman, S.I.; Dettinger, M.D.; Cayan, D.R.; White, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental observations collected during meteorological field studies conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration near the Russian River of coastal northern California are combined with SSM/I satellite observations offshore to examine the role of landfalling atmospheric rivers in the creation of flooding. While recent studies have documented the characteristics and importance of narrow regions of strong meridional water vapor transport over the eastern Pacific Ocean (recently referred to as atmospheric rivers), this study describes their impact when they strike the U.S. West Coast. A detailed case study is presented, along with an assessment of all 7 floods on the Russian River since the experimental data were first available in October 1997. In all 7 floods, atmospheric river conditions were present and caused heavy rainfall through orographic precipitation. Not only do atmospheric rivers play a crucial role in the global water budget, they can also lead to heavy coastal rainfall and flooding, and thus represent a key phenomenon linkingweather and climate. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Elwha River dam removal-Rebirth of a river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, Jeffrey J.; Warrick, Jonathan A.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    After years of planning for the largest project of its kind, the Department of the Interior will begin removal of two dams on the Elwha River, Washington, in September 2011. For nearly 100 years, the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams have disrupted natural processes, trapping sediment in the reservoirs and blocking fish migrations, which changed the ecology of the river downstream of the dams. All five Pacific salmon species and steelhead-historically present in large numbers-are locally extirpated or persist in critically low numbers. Upstream of the dams, more than 145 kilometers of pristine habitat, protected inside Olympic National Park, awaits the return of salmon populations. As the dams are removed during a 2-3 year project, some of the 19 million cubic meters of entrapped sediment will be carried downstream by the river in the largest controlled release of sediment into a river and marine waters in history. Understanding the changes to the river and coastal habitats, the fate of sediments, and the salmon recolonization of the Elwha River wilderness will provide useful information for society as future dam removals are considered.

  5. Quaternary Morphodynamics for two large rivers: the Fly River, PNG, and the Mekong River, Cambodia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, R. E.; Lauer, J. W.; Darby, S. E.; Goni, M. A.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2014-12-01

    During glacial marine transgressions, sediment & carbon are deposited due to the infilling of lowland fluvial systems, material that is then largely removed during ensuing regressions. Measuring & modelling these processes would help quantify the amount, timing, & preservation of these materials, providing insight into the morphodynamics of lowland fluvial systems in response to sea level change. We investigated the infilling dynamics of the Fly and Strickland Rivers, Papua New Guinea. Field data include: 14C dated deep cores recording base level evolution over the Holocene, sonar imaging of floodbasin stratigraphy, and the observations of blocked valley lakes and weathered erosional remnants from LGM conditions. Similar research was conducted on the Mekong River, Cambodia, where we have imaged basin fill stratigraphy and recorded the extent of blocked valley lakes. Such field data provide tantalizing empirical glimpses into the landscapes & flux buffering exhibited by large tropical rivers during glacial-interglacial transitions. We upscale our observations by modelling river system evolution, employing a GpU Lowland Landscape Evolution Model (GULLEM) to predict the evolution of the entire basin. A novel & powerful (>10 Tflops on an inexpensive computer) simulator, GULLEM models morphodynamics and estimates the accommodation space subsequently infilled during marine transgressions by representing a range of geomorphic processes, including: river & tributary incision, non-linear diffusion, sea level and isostatic change, hydraulic geometry, tectonic deformation, sediment production, transport & deposition, & tracking of the resulting stratigraphy. GULLEM's vectorized approach allows for massively parallel operation on GPUs (Graphics Processing Unit), making it practical to model coupled fluvial-landscape evolution for complex lowland river systems over large temporal and spatial scales. Our combined approach affords estimates for the timing and budgets of sediment

  6. National Rivers and Streams Assessment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The NRSA is a collaborative, statistical survey of the nation's rivers and streams. It is one of four national surveys that EPA and its partners conduct to assess the condition and health of the nation's water resources.

  7. Remote sensing at Savannah River

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses remote sensing systems used at the Savannah River Plant. They include three ground-based systems: ground penetrating radar, sniffers, and lasers; and four airborne systems: multispectral photography, lasers, thermal imaging, and radar systems. (ACR)

  8. Missouri River, Natural Resources Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    Dissertation Abstracts, UnCover, Agricola , and terrestrial habitats adjacent to the river resulted in a variety of bibliographies available on the Internet...106- 232. BUSINESS RESEARCH BUREAU. 1960. 16. Recreational survey of Lewis and Clark Lake and Fort Randall Reservoir. Bus. Res. Bur., 224. BURGESS RL...and 834. HORNER AND SHIFRIN I. 1987. Flood protection zoogeography of the Missouri River Valley in for Missouri Bottoms. Prepared for Business North

  9. 9. LOOKING NW FROM EAST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. LOOKING NW FROM EAST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER. - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Schuylkill River Viaduct, Spanning Schuylkill River, southeast of Roosevelt Boulevard Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. 17. OVERVIEW FROM WEST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. OVERVIEW FROM WEST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER, LOOKING EAST - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Schuylkill River Viaduct, Spanning Schuylkill River, southeast of Roosevelt Boulevard Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. 11. OVERVIEW FROM WEST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER, LOOKING EAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. OVERVIEW FROM WEST BANK OF SCHUYLKILL RIVER, LOOKING EAST. - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Schuylkill River Viaduct, Spanning Schuylkill River, southeast of Roosevelt Boulevard Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  12. Ecosystem Services of Rivers: The Don River (Russian Federation) and the Roanoke River (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concept of ecosystem services recognizes the services, and benefits, provided to people by ecosystems. River systems provide many services to people, including freshwater provisioning, carbon storage, fisheries, recreation, transportation, and biodiversity. Here, we review th...

  13. From eutrophic lake to river: phytoplankton composition changes in river-lake system (Tanglangchuan River, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qian; Chen, Yongcan; Liu, Zhaowei; Zhu, Dejun; van de Giesen, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Due to the fact that the Dianchi Lake is a hypereutrophic lake, we assume it is a potential source of cyanobacteria seed contributing to harmful algal blooms in the upper reach of the Tanglangchuan River (China). However, cyanobacteria, unlikely to survive in the short-retention-time river, are possibly replaced by other fast-growing algae along the river. To determine longitudinal changes of phytoplankton structures from Dianchi Lake to downstream Tanglangchuan River, samplings were carried out in June and September 2013 at 7 different stations. Among these stations, two of them are located in the mouth of Dianchi Lake (D1~D2) while the remaining five are along the main stream of the Tanglangchuan River (T1~T5). Then phytoplankton species were defined. We found that in June cyanobacteria dominated with more than 95% of the total cells in D1 and D2. The cyanobacteria sustained a long distance from T1 to T4 with a clear dominance of the total cells from 85.6% to 90.4%. However, in the last station (T5) which is located about 100km downstream the mouth of the Dianchi Lake, chlorophytes and bacillariophytes took the place of cyanobacteria and dominated (56.3% of the cells were chlorophytes and 27.1% were bacillariophytes). In autumn, the cyanobacteria dominated from D1 to T5 but the percentage and biomass of the cyanobacteria decreased along the river. The dominance of the cyanobacteria in the upper reach of the river indicates that the Dianchi Lake provides the cyanobacteria seed to the downstream river. Additionally, the transition of the algae dominance in the lower reach suggests that longitudinal changes in phytoplankton composition do exist. In view of the high concentration of total nitrogen and total phosphorus, changes of flow velocity and residence time should be key factors causing spatial succession.

  14. Valley evolution by meandering rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Ajay Brian Sanjay

    Fluvial systems form landscapes and sedimentary deposits with a rich hierarchy of structures that extend from grain- to valley scale. Large-scale pattern formation in fluvial systems is commonly attributed to forcing by external factors, including climate change, tectonic uplift, and sea-level change. Yet over geologic timescales, rivers may also develop large-scale erosional and depositional patterns that do not bear on environmental history. This dissertation uses a combination of numerical modeling and topographic analysis to identify and quantify patterns in river valleys that form as a consequence of river meandering alone, under constant external forcing. Chapter 2 identifies a numerical artifact in existing, grid-based models that represent the co-evolution of river channel migration and bank strength over geologic timescales. A new, vector-based technique for bank-material tracking is shown to improve predictions for the evolution of meander belts, floodplains, sedimentary deposits formed by aggrading channels, and bedrock river valleys, particularly when spatial contrasts in bank strength are strong. Chapters 3 and 4 apply this numerical technique to establishing valley topography formed by a vertically incising, meandering river subject to constant external forcing---which should serve as the null hypothesis for valley evolution. In Chapter 3, this scenario is shown to explain a variety of common bedrock river valley types and smaller-scale features within them---including entrenched channels, long-wavelength, arcuate scars in valley walls, and bedrock-cored river terraces. Chapter 4 describes the age and geometric statistics of river terraces formed by meandering with constant external forcing, and compares them to terraces in natural river valleys. The frequency of intrinsic terrace formation by meandering is shown to reflect a characteristic relief-generation timescale, and terrace length is identified as a key criterion for distinguishing these

  15. Rivers, runoff, and reefs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, C.J.; Smith, C.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Bartley, J.D.; Maxwell, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of terrigenous sediment in controlling the occurrence of coral reef ecosystems is qualitatively understood and has been studied at local scales, but has not been systematically evaluated on a global-to-regional scale. Current concerns about degradation of reef environments and alteration of the hydrologic and sediment cycles place the issue at a focal point of multiple environmental concerns. We use a geospatial clustering of a coastal zone database of river and local runoff identified with 0.5?? grid cells to identify areas of high potential runoff effects, and combine this with a database of reported coral reef locations. Coastal cells with high runoff values are much less likely to contain reefs than low runoff cells and GIS buffer analysis demonstrates that this inhibition extends to offshore ocean cells as well. This analysis does not uniquely define the effects of sediment, since salinity, nutrients, and contaminants are potentially confounding variables also associated with runoff. However, sediment effects are likely to be a major factor and a basis is provided for extending the study to higher resolution with more specific variables. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Yazoo River Basin (Lower Mississippi River) Hydrologic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A.; Davidson, G.; Altinakar, M.; Holt, R.

    2004-12-01

    The proposed Yazoo River Basin Hydrologic Observatory consists of the 34,000 square km Yazoo River watershed in northwestern Mississippi and a 320 km segment of the Mississippi River separated from the watershed by a manmade levee. Discharge from the basin flows from the Yazoo River into the Mississippi River north of Vicksburg, MS. Major streams within the basin include the Yazoo, Tallahatchie, Yalobusha, Coldwater, Yocona, and Big Sunflower Rivers. Four large flood control reservoirs (Arkabutla, Enid, Sardis, and Grenada) and two national forests (Delta and Holly Springs) are also located within the basin. The watershed is divided between upland forested hills and intensively cultivated lowlands. The lowland area, locally known as the "Delta", lies on the ancestral floodplain of the Mississippi River. Flooding by the Mississippi River was once a common event, but is now limited by the levee system. Abundant wetlands occupy abandoned stream channels throughout the Delta. The Yazoo River Basin has many unique features that make it an attractive site for an Hydrologic Observatory. Example features and issues of scientific interest include: 1) Extensive system of levees which have altered recharge to the regional aquifer, shifted population centers, and created backwater flooding areas. 2) Abundant wetlands with a century-long history of response to agricultural sediment and chemical fluxes. 3) Erosion of upland streams, and stream sediment loads that are the highest in the nation. 4) Groundwater mining in spite of abundant precipitation due to a regional surface clay layer that limits infiltration. 5) A history of agricultural Best Management Practices enabling evaluation of the effectiveness of such measures. 6) Large scale catfish farming with heavy reliance on groundwater. 7) Near enough to the Gulf coast to be impacted by hurricane events. 8) Already existing network of monitoring stations for stream flow, sediment-load, and weather, including complete coverage

  17. Turbulent forces within river plumes affect spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-08-01

    When rivers drain into oceans through narrow mouths, hydraulic forces squeeze the river water into buoyant plumes that are clearly visible in satellite images. Worldwide, river plumes not only disperse freshwater, sediments, and nutrients but also spread pollutants and organisms from estuaries into the open ocean. In the United States, the Columbia River—the largest river by volume draining into the Pacific Ocean from North America—generates a plume at its mouth that transports juvenile salmon and other fish into the ocean. Clearly, the behavior and spread of river plumes, such as the Columbia River plume, affect the nation's fishing industry as well as the global economy.

  18. The economic value of Trinity River water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas, A.J.; Taylor, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Trinity River, largest tributary of the Klamath River, has its head-waters in the Trinity Alps of north-central California. After the construction of Trinity Dam in 1963, 90% of the Trinity River flow at Lewiston was moved to the Sacramento River via the Clear Creek Tunnel, a manmade conduit. Hydropower is produced at four installations along the route of Trinity River water that is diverted to the Sacramento River, and power production at three of these installations would diminish if no Trinity River water were diverted to the Sacramento River. After Trinity River water reaches the Sacramento River, it flows toward the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and San Francisco Bay. Trinity River water is pumped via Bureau of Reclamation canals and pumps to the northern San Joaquin Valley, where it is used for irrigated agriculture. The social cost of putting more water down the Trinity River is the sum of the value of the foregone consumer surplus from hydropower production as well as the value of the foregone irrigation water. Sharply diminished instream flows have also severely affected the size and robustness of Trinity River salmon, steelhead, shad and sturgeon runs. Survey data were used to estimate the non-market benefits of augmenting Trinity River instream flows by letting more water flow down the Trinity and moving less water to the Sacramento River. Preservation benefits for Trinity River instream flows and fish runs are $803 million per annum for the scenario that returns the most water down the Trinity River, a value that greatly exceeds the social cost estimate.The Trinity River, largest tributary of the Klamath River, has its headwaters in the Trinity Alps of north-central California. After the construction of Trinity Dam in 1963, 90% of the Trinity River flow at Lewiston was moved to the Sacramento River via the Clear Creek Tunnel, a manmade conduit. Hydropower is produced at four installations along the route of Trinity River water that is diverted to the

  19. Flood trends and river engineering on the Mississippi River system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pinter, N.; Jemberie, A.A.; Remo, J.W.F.; Heine, R.A.; Ickes, B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Along >4000 km of the Mississippi River system, we document that climate, land-use change, and river engineering have contributed to statistically significant increases in flooding over the past 100-150 years. Trends were tested using a database of >8 million hydrological measurements. A geospatial database of historical engineering construction was used to quantify the response of flood levels to each unit of engineering infrastructure. Significant climate- and/or land use-driven increases in flow were detected, but the largest and most pervasive contributors to increased flooding on the Mississippi River system were wing dikes and related navigational structures, followed by progressive levee construction. In the area of the 2008 Upper Mississippi flood, for example, about 2 m of the flood crest is linked to navigational and flood-control engineering. Systemwide, large increases in flood levels were documented at locations and at times of wing-dike and levee construction. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sacramento River Water Treatment Plant Intake Pier & Access Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River approximately 175 feet west of eastern levee on river; roughly .5 mile downstream from confluence of Sacramento & American Rivers, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  1. 8. Detail view of girders and Southernmost river pier, Southernmost ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail view of girders and Southernmost river pier, Southernmost deck-girder span, underside of deck, looking North - Elk River Bridge, Spanning Elk River at Main Street, Elk River, Sherburne County, MN

  2. 1. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT DAM, VIEW OF NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT DAM, VIEW OF NORTH ELEVATION OF INTAKE ON EAST SIDE OF DAM - Snake River Valley Irrigation District, East Side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Shelley, Bingham County, ID

  3. Past, present, and future concepts in large river ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.L.; Richardson, W.B.; Naimo, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    How rivers function and how human activities influence river processes. Many important questions are likely to require natural experiments or large-scale manipulations that compare rivers or river reaches.

  4. Intermittent ephemeral river-breaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reniers, A. J.; MacMahan, J. H.; Gallagher, E. L.; Shanks, A.; Morgan, S.; Jarvis, M.; Thornton, E. B.; Brown, J.; Fujimura, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2011 we performed a field experiment in Carmel River State Beach, CA, at a time when the intermittent natural breaching of the ephemeral Carmel River occurred due to an unusually rainy period prior to the experiment associated with El Nino. At this time the river would fill the lagoon over the period of a number of days after which a breach would occur. This allowed us to document a number of breaches with unique pre- and post-breach topographic surveys, accompanying ocean and lagoon water elevations as well as extremely high flow (4m/s) velocities in the river mouth during the breaching event. The topographic surveys were obtained with a GPS-equipped backpack mounted on a walking human and show the evolution of the river breaching with a gradually widening and deepening river channel that cuts through the pre-existing beach and berm. The beach face is qualified as a steep with an average beach slope of 1:10 with significant reflection of the incident waves (MacMahan et al., 2012). The wave directions are generally shore normal as the waves refract over the deep canyon that is located offshore of the beach. The tide is mixed semi-diurnal with a range on the order of one meter. Breaching typically occurred during the low-low tide. Grain size is highly variable along the beach with layers of alternating fine and coarse material that could clearly be observed as the river exit channel was cutting through the beach. Large rocky outcroppings buried under the beach sand are also present along certain stretches of the beach controlling the depth of the breaching channel. The changes in the water level measured within the lagoon and the ocean side allows for an estimate of the volume flux associated with the breach as function of morphology, tidal elevation and wave conditions as well as an assessment of the conditions and mechanisms of breach closure, which occurred on the time scale of O(0.5 days). Exploratory model simulations will be presented at the

  5. Colloids in the River Inn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Baumann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    In the light of an increasing number of technical applications using nanoparticles and reports of adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles, research on the occurrence and stability of particles in all compartments has to be intensified. Colloids in river water represent the geologic setting, environmental conditions, and the anthropogenic use in its catchment. The river not only acts as a sink for nanoparticles but also as the source term due to exchange in the hyporheic zone and in bank filtration setups. The concentration, size distribution and elemental composition of particles in the River Inn were studied from the source in the Swiss Alps to the river mouth at Passau. Samples were collected after each tributary from a sub-catchment and filtered on-site. The elemental composition was determined after acid digestion with ICP/MS. SEM/EDX analyses provided morphological and elemental information for single particles. A complementary chemical analysis of the river water was performed to assess the geochemical stability of indvidual particles. Particles in the upper, rural parts mainly reveal changes in the geological setting of the tributary catchments. Not unexpectedly, particles originating from crystalline rocks, were more stable than particles originating from calcareous rocks. Anthropogenic and industrial influences increase in the lower parts. This went together with a change of the size distribution, an increase of the number of organic particles, and a decrease of the microfauna. Interestingly, specific leisure activities in a sub-catchment, like extensive downhill skiing, manifest itself in the particle composition.

  6. Towards a sociogeomorphology of rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashmore, Peter

    2015-12-01

    While human impacts on rivers and other landforms have long been a component of geomorphic research, little of this work explicitly includes insights into human agency from social science or recognises that in many cases rivers can be considered to be hybrid co-productions or 'socio-natures'. A socio-geomorphic approach proposed here has parallels with some aspects of sociohydrology and can extend and enrich existing geomorphic explanations of the morphology of, for example, urban rivers by explicitly recognising and working with the co-evolution of the human and natural systems. Examples from recent literature illustrate ways in which these relationships can be understood and analyzed, showing a range of socio-natural influences in particular contexts that have material consequences for river morphology and recognising that events in the system have many forms. The approach recognises the importance of contingency in time and place together with the role and nature of both local and global knowledge. An important element of this approach is that it provides ways for understanding the nature, position and intention of geomorphic and other scientific interventions as part of the system, for example in the case of river restoration. This also leads to the need for reflexivity by geomorphologists and reconsideration of the nature of geomorphological knowledge by those involved in such work and with respect to sociogeomorphology as a whole.

  7. Morphodynamics: Rivers beyond steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M.; Ferguson, R. I.

    2015-04-01

    The morphology of an alluvial river channel affects the movement of water and sediment along it, but in the longer run is shaped by those processes. This interplay has mostly been investigated empirically within the paradigm of Newtonian mechanics. In rivers, this has created an emphasis on equilibrium configurations with simple morphology and uniform steady flow. But transient adjustment, whether between equilibrium states or indefinitely, is to be expected in a world in which hydrology, sediment supply, and base level are not fixed. More fundamentally, water flows and all the phenomena that accompany them are inherently unsteady, and flows in natural channels are characteristically nonuniform. The morphodynamics of alluvial river channels is the striking consequence. In this paper, we develop the essential connection between the episodic nature of bed material transport and the production of river morphology, emphasizing the fundamental problems of sediment transport, the role of bar evolution in determining channel form, the role of riparian vegetation, and the wide range of time scales for change. As the key integrative exercise, we emphasize the importance of physics-based modeling of morphodynamics. We note consequences that can be of benefit to society if properly understood. These include the possibility to better be able to model how varying flows drive morphodynamic change, to understand the influence of the sediments themselves on morphodynamics, and to recognize the inherent necessity for rivers that transport bed material to deform laterally. We acknowledge pioneering contributions in WRR and elsewhere that have introduced some of these themes.

  8. Tsunami Bores in Kitakami River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolkova, Elena; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku tsunami entered the Kitakami river and propagated there as a train of shock waves, recorded with a 1-min interval at water level stations at Fukuchi, Iino, and the weir 17.2 km from the mouth, where the bulk of the wave was reflected back. The records showed that each bore kept its shape and identity as it traveled a 10.9-km-path Fukuchi-Iino-weir-Iino. Shock handling based on the cross-river integrated classical shock conditions was applied to reconstruct the flow velocity time histories at the measurement sites, to estimate inflow into the river at each site, to evaluate the wave heights of incident and reflected tsunami bores near the weir, and to estimate propagation speed of the individual bores. Theoretical predictions are verified against the measurements. We discuss experiences of exercising the shock conditions with actual tsunami measurements in the Kitakami river, and test applicability of the shallow-water approximation for describing tsunami bores with heights ranging from 0.3 to 4 m in a river segment with a depth of 3-4 m.

  9. The River Danube: An Examination of Navigation on the River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. W.

    One of the definitions of Navigation that gets little attention in this Institute is (Oxford English Dictionary), and which our French friends call La Navigation. I have always found this subject fascinating, and have previously navigated the Rivers Mekong, Irrawaddy, Hooghly, Indus, Shatt-al-Arab, Savannah and RhMainKanal (RMDK) and the River Danube, a distance of approximately 4000 km. This voyage has only recently become possible with the opening of the connecting RMDK at the end of 1992, but has been made little use of because of the civil war in the former Yugoslavia.

  10. Mighty Microbes Where Rivers Run

    ScienceCinema

    Stegen, James

    2016-07-12

    Microbes and their influential role in Earth’s climate take center stage in the area where river water and groundwater mix – an area known as the hyporheic zone. PNNL ecologist James Stegen discusses his team’s research in his “laboratory” – the zone along the Columbia, one of the nation’s largest rivers. It’s a squishy, porous lab, better known for soaking feet than serving as the “river’s liver.” Read more: http://www.pnl.gov/news/release.aspx?...

  11. Nelson River and Hudson Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Rivers that empty into large bodies of water can have a significant impact on the thawing of nearshore winter ice. This true-color Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 18, 2001, shows the Nelson River emptying spring runoff from the Manitoba province to the south into the southwestern corner of Canada's Hudson Bay. The warmer waters from more southern latitudes hasten melting of ice near the shore, though some still remained, perhaps because in shallow coastal waters, the ice could have been anchored to the bottom. High volumes of sediment in the runoff turned the inflow brown, and the rim of the retreating ice has taken on a dirty appearance even far to the east of the river's entrance into the Bay. The sediment would have further hastened the melting of the ice because its darker color would have absorbed more solar radiation than cleaner, whiter ice. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  12. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R

    2005-04-30

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 The past and future implications for salmon habitat.

  13. 33 CFR 117.755 - Shrewsbury River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.755 Shrewsbury River. The draw of the Monmouth County highway bridge at mile 4.0, across the Shrewsbury River at Sea Bright, New Jersey,...

  14. 33 CFR 117.755 - Shrewsbury River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.755 Shrewsbury River. The draw of the Monmouth County highway bridge at mile 4.0, across the Shrewsbury River at Sea Bright, New Jersey,...

  15. 33 CFR 117.755 - Shrewsbury River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.755 Shrewsbury River. The draw of the Monmouth County highway bridge at mile 4.0, across the Shrewsbury River at Sea Bright, New Jersey,...

  16. 33 CFR 117.755 - Shrewsbury River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.755 Shrewsbury River. The draw of the Monmouth County highway bridge at mile 4.0, across the Shrewsbury River at Sea Bright, New Jersey,...

  17. Savannah River Site Environmental Implentation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    This report describes the organizational responsibilities for the Savannah River Site Environmental program. Operations, Engineering and projects, Environment, safety, and health, Quality assurance, and the Savannah River Laboratory are described.

  18. Siletz River nutrients: Effects of biosolids application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream water nutrients were measured in the Siletz River, Oregon, with the goal of comparing dissolved nutrient concentrations, primarily the nitrogenous nutrients nitrate and ammonium, with previously collected data for the Yaquina and Alsea Rivers for the nutrient criteria prog...

  19. 77 FR 45653 - Yakima River Basin Conservation Advisory Group; Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... Conservation Advisory Group; Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project, Yakima, WA AGENCY: Bureau of... Committee Act, the Yakima River Basin Conservation Advisory Group, Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement... River Basin Water Conservation Program. DATES: The meeting will be held on Tuesday, August 21,...

  20. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Bridge, SR 204, mile 592.9 near Savannah. The draw will open as necessary on the hour from 7 a.m. to 9...

  1. 33 CFR 117.911 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. 117.911 Section 117.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.911 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. (a) General. Public vessels...

  2. 33 CFR 100.732 - Annual River Race Augusta; Savannah River, Augusta GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; Savannah River, Augusta GA. 100.732 Section 100.732 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... River Race Augusta; Savannah River, Augusta GA. (a) Definitions: (1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah River at the U.S. Highway 1 Bridge at...

  3. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Bridge, SR 204, mile 592.9 near Savannah. The draw will open as necessary on the hour from 7 a.m. to 9...

  4. 33 CFR 100.732 - Annual River Race Augusta; Savannah River, Augusta GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; Savannah River, Augusta GA. 100.732 Section 100.732 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... River Race Augusta; Savannah River, Augusta GA. (a) Definitions: (1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah River at the U.S. Highway 1 Bridge at...

  5. 33 CFR 100.732 - Annual River Race Augusta; Savannah River, Augusta GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Savannah River, Augusta GA. 100.732 Section 100.732 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... River Race Augusta; Savannah River, Augusta GA. (a) Definitions: (1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah River at the U.S. Highway 1 Bridge at...

  6. 33 CFR 100.732 - Annual River Race Augusta; Savannah River, Augusta GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Savannah River, Augusta GA. 100.732 Section 100.732 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... River Race Augusta; Savannah River, Augusta GA. (a) Definitions: (1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah River at the U.S. Highway 1 Bridge at...

  7. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Bridge, SR 204, mile 592.9 near Savannah. The draw will open as necessary on the hour from 7 a.m. to 9...

  8. 33 CFR 100.732 - Annual River Race Augusta; Savannah River, Augusta GA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; Savannah River, Augusta GA. 100.732 Section 100.732 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... River Race Augusta; Savannah River, Augusta GA. (a) Definitions: (1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed by a line drawn directly across the Savannah River at the U.S. Highway 1 Bridge at...

  9. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Bridge, SR 204, mile 592.9 near Savannah. The draw will open as necessary on the hour from 7 a.m. to 9...

  10. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Bridge, SR 204, mile 592.9 near Savannah. The draw will open as necessary on the hour from 7 a.m. to 9...

  11. 33 CFR 117.911 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. 117.911 Section 117.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.911 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. (a) General. Public vessels...

  12. 78 FR 22423 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Taunton River, Fall River and Somerset, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Taunton River, Fall River and... Brightman Street Bridge across the Taunton River, mile 1.8, between Fall River and Somerset,...

  13. 75 FR 32351 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Taunton River, Fall River and Somerset, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Taunton River, Fall...) Bridge at mile 1.8, between Fall River and Somerset, Massachusetts, to help relieve the bridge owner from... Taunton River between Fall River and Somerset, Massachusetts, has a vertical clearance in the...

  14. 78 FR 31457 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Taunton River, Fall River and Somerset, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    .... USCG-2013-0291] RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Taunton River, Fall River and Somerset..., mile 2.1, between Fall River and Somerset, Massachusetts. The bridge owner, Massachusetts Department of... between Somerset and Fall River, Massachusetts, has a vertical clearance of 60 feet at mean high water...

  15. ALWAYS A RIVER - SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM ON THE OHIO RIVER AND WATER GRADES K - 12

    EPA Science Inventory

    This curriculum was developed as a significant component of the project, Always a River: The Ohio River and the American Experience, a six-state collaboration devoted to exploring the historical and cultural development of the Ohio River. The Always a River project is being joint...

  16. Aerial view of the entire bridge crossing the Tennessee River ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of the entire bridge crossing the Tennessee River looking up river. The swing bridge, when open, permits river navigational traffic to ply the river. Construction of a replacement bridge, to be located 93.27 feet down river, has now started. - Bridgeport Swing Span Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River, Bridgeport, Jackson County, AL

  17. 4. ENVIRONMENT, FROM NORTH, SHOWING RIVER ROAD BRIDGE CARRYING CASSELMAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. ENVIRONMENT, FROM NORTH, SHOWING RIVER ROAD BRIDGE CARRYING CASSELMAN RIVER ROAD OVER CASSELMAN RIVER, WITH MARYLAND GEOLOGICAL SURVEY STREAM-GAUGING STATION AT NORTHEAST CORNER OF BRIDGE - River Road Bridge, Crossing Casselman River on Casselman River Road, Grantsville, Garrett County, MD

  18. Advances in river ice hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltaos, Spyros

    2000-06-01

    River ice is present in nearly all Canadian rivers, for periods ranging from days to many months. Whether moving or stationary, it interacts with the river flow in various ways, resulting in multiple impacts on the economy and ecosystem, and posing a major flood threat to riverside communities. In the past 4 years, Canadian research and development efforts have been directed at a variety of problems. A strong focus on ice breakup and ice jam processes resulted in improved understanding of the salient geomorphological and hydroclimatic factors, enhanced modelling and prediction capabilities, and development of techniques for in situ measurement of ice jam properties. Key contributions in the area of ecological impacts of river ice and ice jams have led not only to solid advances in knowledge, but also to an appreciation of the vast scope of this subject and its numerous links to environmental science. A closely related topic, the flux of suspended sediment in ice-laden rivers was studied for the first time, in order to delineate the effects of the ice on sediment and associated contaminant loads. In response to growing concern about climate change and variability, several studies addressed implications to ice regime, and thence, to ecology and economy. Although not fully explored, the potential impacts appear to be numerous and significant, owing to the high sensitivity of river ice processes to climatic factors. In the foreseeable future, research is likely to continue along the above noted lines, although an increased emphasis on climatic and ecological aspects is probable. Insights gained on the mechanisms of breakup and jamming may lead to increased modelling applications and testing of theoretical concepts.

  19. River Sinuosity Classification - The method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovszki, J.; Székely, B.; Timár, G.

    2012-04-01

    We introduced a new evaluation method, the classification of multiple window-size based sinuosity spectrum. If the river is long enough for the analysis, the classification could be as useful, as the sinuosity spectrum, but sometimes it is more straightforward. Furthermore, for the classification, we did not need the main parameters of the river, e.g. the bankfull discharge. Each sinuosity calculation that was performed for a given window size, has been considered as one band (one channel) of a multichannel "image". Then, the sinuosity spectrums became multichannel images are of size 1 X N where N represents the length of the actual river in pixels. Using this multichannel input unsupervised ISOCLASS classification was carried out on these data, using ER Mapper software. The requested number of classes was set to 5. The results of the sinuosity calculations are scalars. Earlier, it was a subjective decision to divide the sinuosity values into the categories (low, medium-low, medium, medium-high, and high), while the new method provides integer numbers (1 to 5) itself. These numbers are calculated from the sinuosity values, but are not equal to them. Analysing the results of the classification, it is important to note that the method typically splits the river course into contiguous sections that belong to the same class. Boundaries of these classes can be considered as points of considerable change in the river course, because the method uses statistically relevant amount of data of the river course in a robust way to detect changes. Some specific classes or their boundaries seem to be correlated to tectonically active zones. The research is made in the frame of project OTKA-NK83400 (SourceSink Hungary). The European Union and the European Social Fund also have provided financial support to the project under the grant agreement no. TÁMOP 4.2.1./B-09/1/KMR-2010-0003.

  20. Nile River, Lake Nasser, Aswan Dam, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Egypt's High Aswan Dam on the Nile River at the first cataracts, Nile River, (24.0N, 33.0E) was completed in 1971 to provide cheap hydroelectric power and to regulate the historically uneven flow of the Nile River. The contrast between the largely base rock desert east of the Nile versus the sand covered desert west of the river and the ancient irrigated floodplain downstream from the damsite is clearly shown.

  1. Columbia River Component Data Evaluation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    C.S. Cearlock

    2006-08-02

    The purpose of the Columbia River Component Data Compilation and Evaluation task was to compile, review, and evaluate existing information for constituents that may have been released to the Columbia River due to Hanford Site operations. Through this effort an extensive compilation of information pertaining to Hanford Site-related contaminants released to the Columbia River has been completed for almost 965 km of the river.

  2. American River Watershed Investigation, California. Reconnaisance Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    River, and sometimes from the American River via the Sacramento Weir. When the combined flow of the Sacramento and Feather Rivers and the Sutter Bypass...goods and services in the American River watershed will continue as currently projected. The population growth rate in the City of Sacramento and...Sacramento, El Dorado, and Placer Counties is projected to exceed the growth rate for the State of California through the year 2020. lable 6 shows the

  3. Floods in the Raccoon River basin, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinitz, Albert J.

    1980-01-01

    Evaluation of flood hazards, and the planning, design, and operation of various facilities on flood plains requires information on floods. This report provides information on flood stages and discharges, flood magnitude and frequency, bench mark data, and flood profiles for the Raccoon River and some of its tributaries. Ir covers the Raccoon River, the North Raccoon River to the northern boundary of Sac County and the lower reaches of the Middle and South Raccoon Rivers.

  4. Polarimetric Backscattering Behavior of River Ice Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermoz, S.; Gherboudj, I.; Allain, S.; Bernier, M.; Pottier, E.

    2009-04-01

    In many northern rivers of Canada, the formation of the ice covers leads to important situations: ice jamming, and then flooding of large areas. Thus, the monitoring of river ice is necessary. Gherboudj has developed a model in order to understand the interactions of the radar signal with the river ice cover. The model is improved to simulate the fully polarimetric response of a river ice cover. The aim of this work is to analyse the results of the simulations.

  5. Columbia River Impact Evaluation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, S.G.

    1994-03-01

    A preliminary impact evaluation was conducted to assess the adequacy of existing data and proposed data collection programs for evaluating cumulative health and environmental impacts to the Columbia River due to past practices at the Hanford Site. The results of this evaluation were used to develop this plan to ensure collection of sufficient data for adequate characterization of the Columbia River along the 100 Area for CERCLA purposes. The evaluation used to develop the plan is not a risk assessment; the plan presented here is only a mechanism to collect additional data to support a future risk assessment.

  6. Mighty Microbes Where Rivers Run

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, James

    2016-04-07

    Microbes and their influential role in Earth’s climate take center stage in the area where river water and groundwater mix – an area known as the hyporheic zone. PNNL ecologist James Stegen discusses his team’s research in his “laboratory” – the zone along the Columbia, one of the nation’s largest rivers. It’s a squishy, porous lab, better known for soaking feet than serving as the “river’s liver.” Read more: http://www.pnl.gov/news/release.aspx?...

  7. River enhancement in the Upper Mississippi River basin: Approaches based on river uses, alterations, and management agencies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Donnell, T. K.; Galat, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    The Upper Mississippi River is characterized by a series of locks and dams, shallow impoundments, and thousands of river channelization structures that facilitate commercial navigation between Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Cairo, Illinois. Agriculture and urban development over the past 200 years have degraded water quality and increased the rate of sediment and nutrient delivery to surface waters. River enhancement has become an important management tool employed to address causes and effects of surface water degradation and river modification in the Upper Mississippi River Basin. We report information on individual river enhancement projects and contrast project densities, goals, activities, monitoring, and cost between commercially non-navigated and navigated rivers (Non-navigated and Navigated Rivers, respectively). The total number of river enhancement projects collected during this effort was 62,108. Cost of all projects reporting spending between 1972 and 2006 was about US$1.6 billion. Water quality management was the most cited project goal within the basin. Other important goals in Navigated Rivers included in-stream habitat improvement and flow modification. Most projects collected for Non-navigated Rivers and their watersheds originated from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the USDA were important sources for projects in Navigated Rivers. Collaborative efforts between agencies that implement projects in Non-navigated and Navigated Rivers may be needed to more effectively address river impairment. However, the current state of data sources tracking river enhancement projects deters efficient and broad-scale integration. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2007 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  8. Home on the Big River: Great River Habitat Quality Indices

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program sampled the Upper Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio Rivers from 2004 through 2006 as part of an integrated assessment of ecological condition. We developed fish habitat indices by dividing the components of habitat into four ca...

  9. Red River of the North Reconnaissance Report: Ottertail River Subbasin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    32 8 Possible Sediment and Nutrient Source Types in the Ottertail River Subbasin ...... .................. ... 34 9 Groundwater ... groundwater quality, high iron and manganese concentrations have bea reported in certain areas (Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, 1975; Minnesota Water...contains 1.5 million acre feet of water in storage; however, only a relatively small amount is economically recoverable. Some groundwater supplies are

  10. Red River of the North Reconnaissance Report: Buffalo River Subbasin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    October 1977 and April 1978 .... .............. . . . 35 10 Groundwater Quality Data from Comuunities in the Buffalo River Subbasin...weed and insect control. Groundwater quality problems are related to high concentrations of iron and manganese, dissolved solids, and sulfate (Upper...unable to meet water supply needs g(because of inadequate storage potentials). Communities in the subbasin 14 use groundwater for all municipal needs

  11. River flow regimes and vegetation dynamics along a river transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doulatyari, Behnam; Basso, Stefano; Schirmer, Mario; Botter, Gianluca

    2014-11-01

    Ecohydrological processes occurring within fluvial landscapes are strongly affected by natural streamflow variability. In this work the patterns of vegetation biomass in two rivers characterized by contrasting flow regimes were investigated by means of a comprehensive stochastic model which explicitly couples catchment-scale hydroclimatic processes, morphologic attributes of the river transect and in-stream bio-ecological features. The hydrologic forcing is characterized by the probability distribution (pdf) of streamflows and stages resulting from stochastic precipitation dynamics, rainfall-runoff transformation and reach scale morphologic attributes. The model proved able to reproduce the observed pdf of river flows and stages, as well as the pattern of exposure/inundation along the river transect in both regimes. Our results suggest that in persistent regimes characterized by reduced streamflow variability, mean vegetation biomass is chiefly controlled by the pattern of groundwater availability along the transect, leading to a marked transition between aquatic and terrestrial environments. Conversely, erratic regimes ensure wider aquatic-terrestrial zones in which optimal elevation ranges for species with different sensitivity to flooding and access to groundwater are separated. Patterns of mean biomass in erratic regimes were found to be more sensitive to changes in the underlying hydroclimatic conditions, notwithstanding the reduced responsiveness of the corresponding flow regimes. The framework developed highlights the important role played by streamflow regimes in shaping riverine environments, and may eventually contribute to identifying the influence of landscape, climate and morphologic features on in-stream ecological dynamics.

  12. Rivers Run Through It: Discovering the Interior Columbia River Basin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Shelley; Wojtanik, Brenda Lincoln; Rieben, Elizabeth

    1998-01-01

    Explores the Columbia River Basin, its ecosystems, and challenges faced by natural resource managers. By studying the basin's complexity, students can learn about common scientific concepts such as the power of water and effects of rain shadows. Students can also explore social-scientific issues such as conflicts between protecting salmon runs and…

  13. 33 CFR 117.391 - Chicago River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chicago River. 117.391 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.391 Chicago River. The draws of the bridges operated by the City of Chicago over the Main Branch of Chicago River, the bridges on the...

  14. River as a part of ground battlefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vračar, Miodrag S.; Pokrajac, Ivan; Okiljević, Predrag

    2013-05-01

    The rivers are in some circumstances part of the ground battlefield. Microseisms induced at the riverbed or ground at the river surrounding might be consequence of military activities (military ground transports, explosions, troop's activities, etc). Vibrations of those fluid-solid structures are modeled in terms of solid displacement and change of fluid pressure. This time varying fluid pressure in river, which originates from ground microseisms, is possible to detect with hydrophones. Therefore, hydroacoustic measurements in rivers enables detecting, identification and localization various types of military noisy activities at the ground as and those, which origin is in the river water (hydrodynamics of water flow, wind, waves, river vessels, etc). In this paper are presented river ambient noise measurements of the three great rivers: the Danube, the Sava and the Tisa, which flows in north part of Serbia in purpose to establish limits in detection of the ground vibrations in relatively wide frequency range from zero to 20 kHz. To confirm statement that the river is a part of ground battlefield, and that hydroacoustic noise is possible to use in detecting and analyzing ground microseisms induced by civil or military activities, some previous collected data of hydroacoustic noise measurement in the rivers are used. The data of the river ambient noise include noise induced by civil engineering activities, that ordinary take place in large cities, noise that produced ships and ambient noise of the river when human activities are significantly reduced. The poly spectral method was used in analysis such events.

  15. 33 CFR 117.570 - Sassafras River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sassafras River. 117.570 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.570 Sassafras River. The draw of the Sassafras River (Route 213) bridge, mile 10.0 at Georgetown, Maryland, shall open on signal; except...

  16. 33 CFR 117.570 - Sassafras River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sassafras River. 117.570 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.570 Sassafras River. The draw of the Sassafras River (Route 213) bridge, mile 10.0 at Georgetown, Maryland, shall open on signal; except...

  17. 33 CFR 117.570 - Sassafras River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sassafras River. 117.570 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.570 Sassafras River. The draw of the Sassafras River (Route 213) bridge, mile 10.0 at Georgetown, Maryland, shall open on signal; except...

  18. 33 CFR 117.570 - Sassafras River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sassafras River. 117.570 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.570 Sassafras River. The draw of the Sassafras River (Route 213) bridge, mile 10.0 at Georgetown, Maryland, shall open on signal; except...

  19. 33 CFR 117.570 - Sassafras River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sassafras River. 117.570 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.570 Sassafras River. The draw of the Sassafras River (Route 213) bridge, mile 10.0 at Georgetown, Maryland, shall open on signal; except...

  20. 33 CFR 117.300 - Manatee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manatee River. 117.300 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.300 Manatee River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Manatee River, mile 4.5 Bradenton, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  1. 33 CFR 117.189 - Sacramento River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sacramento River. 117.189 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.189 Sacramento River. (a) The draws of each bridge from Isleton to American River junction shall open on signal from May 1...

  2. 33 CFR 117.391 - Chicago River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chicago River. 117.391 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.391 Chicago River. The draws of the bridges operated by the City of Chicago over the Main Branch of Chicago River, the bridges on the...

  3. 33 CFR 117.118 - Tombigbee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tombigbee River. 117.118 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.118 Tombigbee River. The draw of the Meridian and Bigbee Railroad (MNBR) vertical lift span bridge across the Tombigbee River, mile 128.6...

  4. 46 CFR 90.10-33 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rivers. 90.10-33 Section 90.10-33 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-33 Rivers. Under this designation shall be included all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals exclusively, and to such other waters as may...

  5. 33 CFR 117.397 - Wabash River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wabash River. 117.397 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.397 Wabash River. The draws of the bridges across the Wabash River need not be opened for the passage of vessels. Indiana...

  6. 33 CFR 117.424 - Belle River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Belle River. 117.424 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.424 Belle River. The draw of the S70 bridge, mile 23.8 (Landside Route) near Belle River, shall open on signal; except that, from 10 p.m. to 6...

  7. 33 CFR 117.337 - Trout River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trout River. 117.337 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.337 Trout River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Trout River, mile 0.9 at Jacksonville, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  8. 46 CFR 151.03-45 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rivers. 151.03-45 Section 151.03-45 Shipping COAST GUARD... HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-45 Rivers. A designation for all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals, exclusively....

  9. 33 CFR 117.424 - Belle River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Belle River. 117.424 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.424 Belle River. The draw of the S70 bridge, mile 23.8 (Landside Route) near Belle River, shall open on signal; except that, from 10 p.m. to 6...

  10. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  11. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  12. 33 CFR 117.359 - Chattahoochee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chattahoochee River. 117.359... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.359 Chattahoochee River. See § 117.107, Chattahoochee River, listed under Alabama....

  13. 33 CFR 117.183 - Old River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Old River. 117.183 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.183 Old River. The draw of the California... notice is given to the drawtender at the Rio Vista bridge across the Sacramento River, mile 12.8....

  14. 33 CFR 117.175 - Mokelumne River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mokelumne River. 117.175 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.175 Mokelumne River. (a) The draw of the California Department of Transportation highway bridge, the Mokelumne River Bridge, mile 3.0,...

  15. 33 CFR 117.175 - Mokelumne River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mokelumne River. 117.175 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.175 Mokelumne River. (a) The draw of the California Department of Transportation highway bridge, the Mokelumne River Bridge, mile 3.0,...

  16. 33 CFR 117.258 - Apalachicola River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Apalachicola River. 117.258... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.258 Apalachicola River. The draw of the CSX Railroad bridge, mile 105.9, at River Junction shall open on signal Monday through Friday from 8...

  17. 33 CFR 117.359 - Chattahoochee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chattahoochee River. 117.359... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.359 Chattahoochee River. See § 117.107, Chattahoochee River, listed under Alabama....

  18. 46 CFR 90.10-33 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rivers. 90.10-33 Section 90.10-33 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-33 Rivers. Under this designation shall be included all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals exclusively, and to such other waters as may...

  19. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  20. 33 CFR 117.189 - Sacramento River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sacramento River. 117.189 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.189 Sacramento River. (a) The draws of each bridge from Isleton to the American River junction except for the Sacramento County...

  1. 46 CFR 188.10-61 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rivers. 188.10-61 Section 188.10-61 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-61 Rivers. Under this designation shall be included all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals exclusively, and to such other waters as may...

  2. 33 CFR 117.299 - Loxahatchee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loxahatchee River. 117.299... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.299 Loxahatchee River. The draw of the Florida East Coast Railway bridge across the Loxahatchee River, mile 1.2 at Jupiter, operates as...

  3. 33 CFR 117.337 - Trout River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trout River. 117.337 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.337 Trout River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Trout River, mile 0.9 at Jacksonville, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  4. 33 CFR 117.258 - Apalachicola River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Apalachicola River. 117.258... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.258 Apalachicola River. (a) The draw of..., mile 105.9, at River Junction shall open on signal if at least eight hours notice is given....

  5. 33 CFR 117.527 - Kennebunk River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kennebunk River. 117.527 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.527 Kennebunk River. The Dock Square drawbridge at mile 1.0, across the Kennebunk River, between Kennebunk and Kennebunkport, Maine, need not...

  6. 33 CFR 117.527 - Kennebunk River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kennebunk River. 117.527 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.527 Kennebunk River. The Dock Square drawbridge at mile 1.0, across the Kennebunk River, between Kennebunk and Kennebunkport, Maine, need not...

  7. 33 CFR 117.397 - Wabash River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wabash River. 117.397 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.397 Wabash River. The draws of the bridges across the Wabash River need not be opened for the passage of vessels. Indiana...

  8. 33 CFR 117.424 - Belle River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Belle River. 117.424 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.424 Belle River. The draw of the S70 bridge, mile 23.8 (Landside Route) near Belle River, shall open on signal; except that, from 10 p.m. to 6...

  9. 33 CFR 117.424 - Belle River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Belle River. 117.424 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.424 Belle River. The draw of the S70 bridge, mile 23.8 (Landside Route) near Belle River, shall open on signal; except that, from 10 p.m. to 6...

  10. 33 CFR 117.299 - Loxahatchee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Loxahatchee River. 117.299... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.299 Loxahatchee River. The draw of the Florida East Coast Railway bridge across the Loxahatchee River, mile 1.2 at Jupiter, operates as...

  11. 33 CFR 117.337 - Trout River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trout River. 117.337 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.337 Trout River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Trout River, mile 0.9 at Jacksonville, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  12. 46 CFR 188.10-61 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rivers. 188.10-61 Section 188.10-61 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-61 Rivers. Under this designation shall be included all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals exclusively, and to such other waters as may...

  13. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  14. 33 CFR 117.300 - Manatee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manatee River. 117.300 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.300 Manatee River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Manatee River, mile 4.5 Bradenton, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  15. 33 CFR 117.359 - Chattahoochee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chattahoochee River. 117.359... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.359 Chattahoochee River. See § 117.107, Chattahoochee River, listed under Alabama....

  16. 33 CFR 117.118 - Tombigbee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tombigbee River. 117.118 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Alabama § 117.118 Tombigbee River. The draw of the Meridian and Bigbee Railroad (MNBR) vertical lift span bridge across the Tombigbee River, mile 128.6...

  17. 33 CFR 117.397 - Wabash River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wabash River. 117.397 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.397 Wabash River. The draws of the bridges across the Wabash River need not be opened for the passage of vessels. Indiana...

  18. 33 CFR 117.189 - Sacramento River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sacramento River. 117.189 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.189 Sacramento River. (a) The draws of each bridge from Isleton to American River junction shall open on signal from May 1...

  19. 33 CFR 117.527 - Kennebunk River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kennebunk River. 117.527 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.527 Kennebunk River. The Dock Square drawbridge at mile 1.0, across the Kennebunk River, between Kennebunk and Kennebunkport, Maine, need not...

  20. 46 CFR 90.10-33 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rivers. 90.10-33 Section 90.10-33 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-33 Rivers. Under this designation shall be included all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals exclusively, and to such other waters as may...

  1. 33 CFR 117.527 - Kennebunk River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kennebunk River. 117.527 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.527 Kennebunk River. The Dock Square drawbridge at mile 1.0, across the Kennebunk River, between Kennebunk and Kennebunkport, Maine, need not...

  2. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  3. 46 CFR 151.03-45 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rivers. 151.03-45 Section 151.03-45 Shipping COAST GUARD... HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-45 Rivers. A designation for all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals, exclusively....

  4. 33 CFR 117.299 - Loxahatchee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Loxahatchee River. 117.299... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.299 Loxahatchee River. The draw of the Florida East Coast Railway bridge across the Loxahatchee River, mile 1.2 at Jupiter, operates as...

  5. 33 CFR 117.175 - Mokelumne River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mokelumne River. 117.175 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.175 Mokelumne River. (a) The draw of the California Department of Transportation highway bridge, the Mokelumne River Bridge, mile 3.0,...

  6. 33 CFR 117.359 - Chattahoochee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chattahoochee River. 117.359... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.359 Chattahoochee River. See § 117.107, Chattahoochee River, listed under Alabama....

  7. 33 CFR 117.299 - Loxahatchee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Loxahatchee River. 117.299... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.299 Loxahatchee River. The draw of the Florida East Coast Railway bridge across the Loxahatchee River, mile 1.2 at Jupiter, operates as...

  8. 33 CFR 117.258 - Apalachicola River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Apalachicola River. 117.258... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.258 Apalachicola River. (a) The draw of..., mile 105.9, at River Junction shall open on signal if at least eight hours notice is given....

  9. 33 CFR 117.397 - Wabash River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wabash River. 117.397 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.397 Wabash River. The draws of the bridges across the Wabash River need not be opened for the passage of vessels. Indiana...

  10. 33 CFR 117.299 - Loxahatchee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Loxahatchee River. 117.299... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.299 Loxahatchee River. The draw of the Florida East Coast Railway bridge across the Loxahatchee River, mile 1.2 at Jupiter, operates as...

  11. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  12. 33 CFR 117.183 - Old River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Old River. 117.183 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.183 Old River. The draw of the California... notice is given to the drawtender at the Rio Vista bridge across the Sacramento River, mile 12.8....

  13. 46 CFR 188.10-61 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rivers. 188.10-61 Section 188.10-61 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-61 Rivers. Under this designation shall be included all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals exclusively, and to such other waters as may...

  14. 33 CFR 117.183 - Old River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Old River. 117.183 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.183 Old River. The draw of the California... notice is given to the drawtender at the Rio Vista bridge across the Sacramento River, mile 12.8....

  15. 33 CFR 117.300 - Manatee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Manatee River. 117.300 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.300 Manatee River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Manatee River, mile 4.5 Bradenton, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  16. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  17. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  18. 33 CFR 117.424 - Belle River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Belle River. 117.424 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.424 Belle River. The draw of the S70 bridge, mile 23.8 (Landside Route) near Belle River, shall open on signal; except that, from 10 p.m. to 6...

  19. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  20. 33 CFR 117.175 - Mokelumne River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mokelumne River. 117.175 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.175 Mokelumne River. (a) The draw of the California Department of Transportation highway bridge, the Mokelumne River Bridge, mile 3.0,...

  1. 33 CFR 117.397 - Wabash River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wabash River. 117.397 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.397 Wabash River. The draws of the bridges across the Wabash River need not be opened for the passage of vessels. Indiana...

  2. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  3. 46 CFR 151.03-45 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rivers. 151.03-45 Section 151.03-45 Shipping COAST GUARD... HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-45 Rivers. A designation for all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals, exclusively....

  4. 33 CFR 117.183 - Old River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Old River. 117.183 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.183 Old River. The draw of the California... notice is given to the drawtender at the Rio Vista bridge across the Sacramento River, mile 12.8....

  5. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  6. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  7. 33 CFR 117.300 - Manatee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manatee River. 117.300 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.300 Manatee River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Manatee River, mile 4.5 Bradenton, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  8. 46 CFR 151.03-45 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rivers. 151.03-45 Section 151.03-45 Shipping COAST GUARD... HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-45 Rivers. A designation for all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals, exclusively....

  9. 33 CFR 117.258 - Apalachicola River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Apalachicola River. 117.258... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.258 Apalachicola River. The draw of the CSX Railroad bridge, mile 105.9, at River Junction shall open on signal Monday through Friday from 8...

  10. 46 CFR 151.03-45 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rivers. 151.03-45 Section 151.03-45 Shipping COAST GUARD... HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-45 Rivers. A designation for all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals, exclusively....

  11. 46 CFR 90.10-33 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rivers. 90.10-33 Section 90.10-33 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-33 Rivers. Under this designation shall be included all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals exclusively, and to such other waters as may...

  12. 33 CFR 117.359 - Chattahoochee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chattahoochee River. 117.359... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia § 117.359 Chattahoochee River. See § 117.107, Chattahoochee River, listed under Alabama....

  13. 33 CFR 117.183 - Old River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Old River. 117.183 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.183 Old River. The draw of the California... notice is given to the drawtender at the Rio Vista bridge across the Sacramento River, mile 12.8....

  14. 46 CFR 90.10-33 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rivers. 90.10-33 Section 90.10-33 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 90.10-33 Rivers. Under this designation shall be included all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals exclusively, and to such other waters as may...

  15. 33 CFR 117.175 - Mokelumne River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mokelumne River. 117.175 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.175 Mokelumne River. (a) The draw of the California Department of Transportation highway bridge, the Mokelumne River Bridge, mile 3.0,...

  16. 33 CFR 117.189 - Sacramento River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sacramento River. 117.189 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.189 Sacramento River. (a) The draws of each bridge from Isleton to American River junction shall open on signal from May 1...

  17. 33 CFR 117.337 - Trout River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trout River. 117.337 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.337 Trout River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Trout River, mile 0.9 at Jacksonville, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  18. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak Bridge... the Bush River Yacht Club no later than noon on the Friday just preceding the day of opening or,...

  19. 33 CFR 117.547 - Bush River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bush River. 117.547 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.547 Bush River. The draw of the Amtrak bridge... Superintendent at 301-291-4278 by an authorized representative of the Bush River Yacht Club by noon on the...

  20. 46 CFR 188.10-61 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rivers. 188.10-61 Section 188.10-61 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-61 Rivers. Under this designation shall be included all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals exclusively, and to such other waters as may...

  1. 33 CFR 117.391 - Chicago River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chicago River. 117.391 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Illinois § 117.391 Chicago River. The draws of the bridges operated by the City of Chicago over the Main Branch of Chicago River, the bridges on the...

  2. 33 CFR 117.300 - Manatee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manatee River. 117.300 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.300 Manatee River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Manatee River, mile 4.5 Bradenton, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  3. 33 CFR 117.527 - Kennebunk River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kennebunk River. 117.527 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maine § 117.527 Kennebunk River. The Dock Square drawbridge at mile 1.0, across the Kennebunk River, between Kennebunk and Kennebunkport, Maine, need not...

  4. 33 CFR 117.258 - Apalachicola River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Apalachicola River. 117.258... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.258 Apalachicola River. The draw of the CSX Railroad bridge, mile 105.9, at River Junction shall open on signal Monday through Friday from 8...

  5. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  6. 46 CFR 188.10-61 - Rivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rivers. 188.10-61 Section 188.10-61 Shipping COAST GUARD... Terms Used in This Subchapter § 188.10-61 Rivers. Under this designation shall be included all vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or canals exclusively, and to such other waters as may...

  7. 33 CFR 117.337 - Trout River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trout River. 117.337 Section 117... OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.337 Trout River. The draw of the CSX Railroad Bridge across the Trout River, mile 0.9 at Jacksonville, operates as follows: (a) The bridge is...

  8. 33 CFR 117.189 - Sacramento River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sacramento River. 117.189 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements California § 117.189 Sacramento River. (a) The draws of each bridge from Isleton to the American River junction except for the Sacramento County...

  9. The science and practice of river restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen; Lane, Stuart N.; Wilcox, Andrew C.

    2015-08-01

    River restoration is one of the most prominent areas of applied water-resources science. From an initial focus on enhancing fish habitat or river appearance, primarily through structural modification of channel form, restoration has expanded to incorporate a wide variety of management activities designed to enhance river process and form. Restoration is conducted on headwater streams, large lowland rivers, and entire river networks in urban, agricultural, and less intensively human-altered environments. We critically examine how contemporary practitioners approach river restoration and challenges for implementing restoration, which include clearly identified objectives, holistic understanding of rivers as ecosystems, and the role of restoration as a social process. We also examine challenges for scientific understanding in river restoration. These include: how physical complexity supports biogeochemical function, stream metabolism, and stream ecosystem productivity; characterizing response curves of different river components; understanding sediment dynamics; and increasing appreciation of the importance of incorporating climate change considerations and resiliency into restoration planning. Finally, we examine changes in river restoration within the past decade, such as increasing use of stream mitigation banking; development of new tools and technologies; different types of process-based restoration; growing recognition of the importance of biological-physical feedbacks in rivers; increasing expectations of water quality improvements from restoration; and more effective communication between practitioners and river scientists.

  10. 33 CFR 117.936 - Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Savannah River. 117.936 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.936 Savannah River. See § 117.371, Savannah River, listed under Georgia....

  11. 33 CFR 117.936 - Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Savannah River. 117.936 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.936 Savannah River. See § 117.371, Savannah River, listed under Georgia....

  12. 33 CFR 117.936 - Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Savannah River. 117.936 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.936 Savannah River. See § 117.371, Savannah River, listed under Georgia....

  13. 33 CFR 117.936 - Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Savannah River. 117.936 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.936 Savannah River. See § 117.371, Savannah River, listed under Georgia....

  14. 33 CFR 117.936 - Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Savannah River. 117.936 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.936 Savannah River. See § 117.371, Savannah River, listed under Georgia....

  15. 33 CFR 117.333 - Suwannee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Suwannee River. 117.333 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.333 Suwannee River. The draw of Suwannee River bridge, mile 35 at Old Town need not be opened for the passage of vessels, however, the draw...

  16. 33 CFR 117.333 - Suwannee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Suwannee River. 117.333 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.333 Suwannee River. The draw of Suwannee River bridge, mile 35 at Old Town need not be opened for the passage of vessels, however, the draw...

  17. 33 CFR 117.723 - Hackensack River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hackensack River. 117.723 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.723 Hackensack River. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across the Hackensack River: (1) Public vessels of the...

  18. 33 CFR 117.333 - Suwannee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Suwannee River. 117.333 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.333 Suwannee River. The draw of Suwannee River bridge, mile 35 at Old Town need not be opened for the passage of vessels, however, the draw...

  19. 33 CFR 117.723 - Hackensack River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hackensack River. 117.723 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.723 Hackensack River. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across the Hackensack River: (1) Public vessels of the...

  20. 33 CFR 117.723 - Hackensack River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hackensack River. 117.723 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.723 Hackensack River. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across the Hackensack River: (1) Public vessels of the...

  1. 33 CFR 117.333 - Suwannee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Suwannee River. 117.333 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.333 Suwannee River. The draw of Suwannee River bridge, mile 35 at Old Town need not be opened for the passage of vessels, however, the draw...

  2. 33 CFR 117.723 - Hackensack River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hackensack River. 117.723 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.723 Hackensack River. Link to an... across the Hackensack River: (1) Public vessels of the United States, state or local vessels used...

  3. 33 CFR 117.723 - Hackensack River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hackensack River. 117.723 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.723 Hackensack River. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across the Hackensack River: (1) Public vessels of the...

  4. 33 CFR 117.333 - Suwannee River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Suwannee River. 117.333 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.333 Suwannee River. The draw of Suwannee River bridge, mile 35 at Old Town need not be opened for the passage of vessels, however, the draw...

  5. The Chena River Watershed Hydrology Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    of the Chena River Watershed located in central Alaska is described. The flow in the Chena River is controlled by the Moose Creek Dam project... Moose Creek Dam Pro- ject and determine the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) hydrograph. The Chena River water- shed covers 2115 mi2. It is characterized...2  2.1  The Moose Creek Dam

  6. RiverCare: towards self-sustaining multifunctional rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustijn, Denie; Schielen, Ralph; Hulscher, Suzanne

    2014-05-01

    Rivers are inherently dynamic water systems involving complex interactions among hydrodynamics, morphology and ecology. In many deltas around the world lowland rivers are intensively managed to meet objectives like safety, navigation, hydropower and water supply. With the increasing pressure of growing population and climate change it will become even more challenging to reach or maintain these objectives and probably also more demanding from a management point of view. In the meantime there is a growing awareness that rivers are natural systems and that, rather than further regulation works, the dynamic natural processes should be better utilized (or restored) to reach the multifunctional objectives. Currently many integrated river management projects are initiated all over the world, in large rivers as well as streams. Examples of large scale projects in the Netherlands are 'Room for the River' (Rhine), the 'Maaswerken' (Meuse), the Deltaprogramme and projects originating from the European Water Framework Directive (WFD). These projects include innovative measures executed never before on this scale and include for example longitudinal training dams, side channels, removal of bank protection, remeandering of streams, dredging/nourishment and floodplain rehabilitation. Although estimates have been made on the effects of these measures for many of the individual projects, the overall effects on the various management objectives remains uncertain, especially if all projects are considered in connection. For all stakeholders with vested interests in the river system it is important to know how that system evolves at intermediate and longer time scales (10 to 100 years) and what the consequences will be for the various river functions. If the total, integrated response of the system can be predicted, the system may be managed in a more effective way, making optimum use of natural processes. In this way, maintenance costs may be reduced, the system remains more natural

  7. Profiling river surface velocities and volume flow estimation with bistatic UHF RiverSonde radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Lilleboe, P.; Cheng, R.; Gartner, J.; ,

    2003-01-01

    From the velocity profiles across the river, estimates of total volume flow for the four methods were calculated based on a knowledge of the bottom depth vs position across the river. It was found that the flow comparisons for the American River were much closer, within 2% of each other among all of the methods. Sources of positional biases and anomalies in the RiverSonde measurement patterns along the river were identified and discussed.

  8. Climatic control of bedrock river incision.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, Ken L; Huppert, Kimberly L; Perron, J Taylor

    2013-04-11

    Bedrock river incision drives the development of much of Earth's surface topography, and thereby shapes the structure of mountain belts and modulates Earth's habitability through its effects on soil erosion, nutrient fluxes and global climate. Although it has long been expected that river incision rates should depend strongly on precipitation rates, quantifying the effects of precipitation rates on bedrock river incision rates has proved difficult, partly because river incision rates are difficult to measure and partly because non-climatic factors can obscure climatic effects at sites where river incision rates have been measured. Here we present measurements of river incision rates across one of Earth's steepest rainfall gradients, which show that precipitation rates do indeed influence long-term bedrock river incision rates. We apply a widely used empirical law for bedrock river incision to a series of rivers on the Hawaiian island of Kaua'i, where mean annual precipitation ranges from 0.5 metres to 9.5 metres (ref. 12)-over 70 per cent of the global range-and river incision rates averaged over millions of years can be inferred from the depth of river canyons and the age of the volcanic bedrock. Both a time-averaged analysis and numerical modelling of transient river incision reveal that the long-term efficiency of bedrock river incision across Kaua'i is positively correlated with upstream-averaged mean annual precipitation rates. We provide theoretical context for this result by demonstrating that our measurements are consistent with a linear dependence of river incision rates on stream power, the rate of energy expenditure by the flow on the riverbed. These observations provide rare empirical evidence for the long-proposed coupling between climate and river incision, suggesting that previously proposed feedbacks among topography, climate and tectonics may occur.

  9. ALWAYS A RIVER - ACTIVITY BOOKLET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cincinnati has the privilege of being a part of a very special celebration this summer. We are one of several cities that will welcome a floating barge exhibition entitled "Always a River", between July 15 and 22,1991. Once aboard the barge you will enter the magic and mystery ...

  10. Colloids in the River Inn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In the light of an increasing number of technical applications using nanoparticles and reports of adverse effects of engineered nanoparticles, research on the occurrence and stability of particles in all compartments has to be intensified. Colloids in river water represent the geologic setting, environmental conditions, and the anthropogenic use in its catchment. The river not only acts as a sink for nanoparticles but also as the source term due to exchange in the hyporheic zone and in bank filtration setups. The concentration, size distribution and elemental composition of particles in the River Inn were studied from the source in the Swiss Alps to the river mouth at Passau from 2008 to 2014. Samples were collected after each tributary from a sub-catchment and filtered on site using a new filtration device for gentle filtration. The elemental composition was determined after acid digestion with ICP/MS. SEM/EDX analysis provided morphological and elemental information for single particles. A complementary chemical analysis of the river water was performed to assess the geochemical stability of individual particles. As presented at EGU 2014, particles in the upper, rural parts mainly reveal changes in the geological setting of the tributary catchments. Not unexpectedly, particles originating from crystalline rocks, were more stable than particles originating from calcareous rocks. Anthropogenic and industrial influences increase in the lower parts. This went together with a change of the size distribution, an increase of the number of organic particles, and a decrease of the microfauna. Interestingly, specific leisure activities in a sub-catchment, like extensive downhill skiing, manifest itself in the particle composition. This general setting was validated in last year's sampling campaigns. An interesting change in on site parameters and hydrochemical composition was seen during all sampling campaigns at an inflow from the valley Kaunertal, Austria. Therefore

  11. The Amazon, measuring a mighty river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1967-01-01

    The Amazon, the world's largest river, discharges enough water into the sea each day to provide fresh water to the City of New York for over 9 years. Its flow accounts for about 15 percent of all the fresh water discharged into the oceans by all the rivers of the world. By comparison, the Amazon's flow is over 4 times that of the Congo River, the world's second largest river. And it is 10 times that of the Mississippi, the largest river on the North American Continent.

  12. Floods in the English River basin, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinitz, A.J.; Riddle, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    Information describing floods is essential for proper planning, design, and operation of bridges and other structures on or over streams and their flood plains. This report provides information on flood stages and discharges, flood magnitude and frequency, bench mark data, and flood profiles for the English River and some of its tributaries. It covers the English River, the North English River to near Guernsey, the south Eaglish River to Barnes City and the lower reaches of the Biddle English and Deep Rivers

  13. Health evaluation indicator system for urban landscape rivers, case study of the Bailianjing River in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Yue; Yang, Haizhen; Lu, Zhibo; Xu, Xiaotian

    2010-11-01

    The River Bailianjing is an iconic landscape feature known to all residents in Pudong area and running through the Shanghai Expo 2010 Park. The river and its basin was a complex living ecosystem which supports a unique variety of flora and fauna several decades ago. However, as a result of unsuccessful pollution source control, sewage and first flow of the storm water is directly coming into the river in some catchment. The water quality of the river is seriously organically polluted now. The typical organic pollutants are COD, NH3-N, TN and TP, which cause the extinction of the water plants and aquatic. Furthermore, the artificial hard river banks isolate the river course and the land, which damaged the whole ecological system totally. The nature of the River Bailianjing and its history has resulted in many government departments and authorities and non government organizations having jurisdiction and/or an interest in the river's management. As a new tool to improve river management, the river health assessment has become the major focus of ecological and environmental science. Consequently, research on river health evaluation and its development on river management are of great theoretical and practical significance. In order to evaluate the healthy status of the River Bailianjing and prepare comprehensive scientific background data for the integrated river ecological rehabilitation planning, the health evaluation indicator system for River Bailianjing is brought forward. The indicator system has three levels: the first is target layer; the second is criteria layer, including five fields: water quality characteristics, hydrology characteristics, river morphology, biological characteristics and river scenic beauty; the third is an index layer, a total of 15 specific indicators included. Fuzzy AHP method is used to evaluate the target river's health status, and five grades are set up to describe it: healthy, sub health, marginal, unhealthy and pathological. The

  14. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  15. Limnological aspects of the St. Clair River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffiths, Ronald W.; Thornley, Stewart; Edsall, Thomas A.

    1991-01-01

    To better characterize neoplasm epizootics in the Great Lakes basin and their association with families of contaminants, we sampled five locations: the Fox and Menominee rivers, Lake Michigan; Munuscong Lake, St. Mary's River; and the Black and Cuyahoga rivers, Lake Erie. Frequencies of external and liver tumors were determined for brown bullhead (Ictalurus nebulosus) from all locations except the Black River and for walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) from the Lake Michigan and St. Mary's River sites. Sediment samples were analyzed for metals, polychlorinated aromatics, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Liver neoplasms occurred in brown bullhead from the Cuyahoga River and Munuscong Lake; brown bullhead captured from Munuscong Lake were older than those collected from the other locations. Brown bullhead from these same two rivers had elevated hepatosomatic indexes. No liver neoplasms were found in brown bullhead from the Fox and Menominee rivers, although polychlorinated aromatics were highest in both Fox River sediment and Fox and Menominee brown bullhead, and arsenic was highest in Menominee River sediment and fish. Liver neoplasms in brown bullhead from the Cuyahoga River fit the prevailing hypothesis that elevated PAH in sediment can induce cancer in wild fish. The cause of the liver neoplasms in Munuscong Lake brown bullhead is undetermined.

  16. Social benchmarking to improve river ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Cary, John; Pisarski, Anne

    2011-01-01

    To complement physical measures or indices of river health a social benchmarking instrument has been developed to measure community dispositions and behaviour regarding river health. This instrument seeks to achieve three outcomes. First, to provide a benchmark of the social condition of communities' attitudes, values, understanding and behaviours in relation to river health; second, to provide information for developing management and educational priorities; and third, to provide an assessment of the long-term effectiveness of community education and engagement activities in achieving changes in attitudes, understanding and behaviours in relation to river health. In this paper the development of the social benchmarking instrument is described and results are presented from the first state-wide benchmark study in Victoria, Australia, in which the social dimensions of river health, community behaviours related to rivers, and community understanding of human impacts on rivers were assessed.

  17. Initial river test of a monostatic RiverSonde streamflow measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teague, C.C.; Barrick, D.E.; Lilleboe, P.M.; Cheng, R.T.; ,

    2003-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted on May 7-8, 2002 using a CODAR RiverSonde UHF radar system at Vernalis, California on the San Joaquin River. The monostatic radar configuration on one bank of the river, with the antennas looking both upriver and downriver, provided very high-quality data. Estimates of both along-river and cross-river surface current were generated using several models, including one based on normal-mode analysis. Along-river surface velocities ranged from about 0.6 m/s at the river banks to about 1.0 m/s near the middle of the river. Average cross-river surface velocities were 0.02 m/s or less.

  18. A Miocene river in northern Arizona and its implications for the Colorado River and Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, I.; Holm, R.F.; Lucchitta, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    The southwesterly course of the pre–late Miocene Crooked Ridge River can be traced continuously for 48 km and discontinuously for 91 km in northern Arizona. It is visible today in inverted relief. Pebbles in the river gravel came from at least as far northeast as the San Juan Mountains. The river valley was carved out of easily eroded Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks, whose debris overloaded the river with abundant detritus, possibly steepening the gradient. After the river became inactive, the regional drainage network was rearranged twice, and the Four Corners region was lowered by erosion 1–2 km. The river provides constraints on the history of the Colorado River and Grand Canyon; its continuation into lakes in Arizona or Utah is unlikely, as is integration of the Colorado River through Grand Canyon by lake spillover. The downstream course of the river was probably across the Kaibab Arch in a valley roughly coincident with the present eastern Grand Canyon.

  19. Trace Elements in River Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillardet, J.; Viers, J.; Dupré, B.

    2003-12-01

    Trace elements are characterized by concentrations lower than 1 mg L-1 in natural waters. This means that trace elements are not considered when "total dissolved solids" are calculated in rivers, lakes, or groundwaters, because their combined mass is not significant compared to the sum of Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H4SiO4, HCO3-, CO32-, SO42-, Cl-, and NO3-. Therefore, most of the elements, except about ten of them, occur at trace levels in natural waters. Being trace elements in natural waters does not necessarily qualify them as trace elements in rocks. For example, aluminum, iron, and titanium are major elements in rocks, but they occur as trace elements in waters, due to their low mobility at the Earth's surface. Conversely, trace elements in rocks such as chlorine and carbon are major elements in waters.The geochemistry of trace elements in river waters, like that of groundwater and seawater, is receiving increasing attention. This growing interest is clearly triggered by the technical advances made in the determination of concentrations at lower levels in water. In particular, the development of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has considerably improved our knowledge of trace-element levels in waters since the early 1990s. ICP-MS provides the capability of determining trace elements having isotopes of interest for geochemical dating or tracing, even where their dissolved concentrations are extremely low.The determination of trace elements in natural waters is motivated by a number of issues. Although rare, trace elements in natural systems can play a major role in hydrosystems. This is particularly evident for toxic elements such as aluminum, whose concentrations are related to the abundance of fish in rivers. Many trace elements have been exploited from natural accumulation sites and used over thousands of years by human activities. Trace elements are therefore highly sensitive indexes of human impact from local to global scale. Pollution

  20. Hydrologic data from Nation, Kandik, and Yukon rivers, Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, Timothy P.

    2001-01-01

    Flow data were collected from two adjacent rivers in Yukon?Charley Rivers National Preserve, Alaska?the Nation River (during 1991?2000) and the Kandik River (1994?2000)?and from the Yukon River (1950?2000) at Eagle, Alaska, upstream from the boundary of the preserve. These flow records indicate that most of the runoff from these rivers occurs from May through September and that the average monthly discharge during this period ranges from 1,172 to 2,210 cubic feet per second for the Nation River, from 1,203 to 2,633 cubic feet per second for the Kandik River, and from 112,000 to 224,000 cubic feet per second for the Yukon River. Water-quality data were collected for the Nation River and several of its tributaries from 1991 to 1992 and for the Yukon River at Eagle from 1950 to 1994. Three tributaries to the Nation River (Waterfall Creek, Cathedral Creek, and Hard Luck Creek) have relatively high concentrations of calcium, magnesium, and sulfate. These three watersheds are underlain predominantly by Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks. The Yukon River transports 33,000,000 tons of suspended sediment past Eagle each year. Reflecting the inputs from its major tributaries, the water of the Yukon River at Eagle is dominated by calcium?magnesium bicarbonate.

  1. Notes on the geology of Green River Valley between Green River, Wyoming, and Green River, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeside, J.B.

    1925-01-01

    During July, August, and part of September, 1922, I had the privilege of accompanying a party sent out jointly by the Utah Power & Light Co. and the United States Geological Survey to gather such data as were still needed to complete a study of the power resources of Green River between Green River, Wyo., and Green River, Utah. The chief deficiency to be supplied was a continuous topographic map of the valley in sufficient detail to permit calculation of the storage capacity of any reservoir site that might be used, the stream gradient, and similar features. Maps on a satisfactory scale of a number of isolated stretches of the river had already been made by public or private agencies, and it was necessary to verify them and connect them on a uniform datum. Inasmuch as it was deemed unlikely that a dam higher than 300 feet would be constructed anywhere on the part of the river to be examined, a plane 300 feet above the water surface was made the upper limit of mapping. Over such parts of the valley as had been mapped already the progress of the party was naturally very rapid, and even where no mapping had previously been done, the 300-foot limit set upon the work and the usual narrowness of the valley combined to reduce the extent of the area to be mapped, so that the speed maintained was relatively high. Under this condition of rapid movement it was seldom possible to make more than the most cursory examination of the rocks, though occasionally circumstances permitted more or less detailed observation. The notes here recorded are therefore mostly of a rather generalized character, but as they pertain in part to localities that are difficult of access and not often visited by geologists, and that are at the same time classic in the history of American geology, I venture to to record them for whatever value they may have to other geologists.

  2. Red River of the North Reconnaissance Report: Two Rivers Subbasin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    glacial Lake Agassiz . Although the -. land is flat, in the eastern portion of the subbasin there is a fall toward the west of 12 to 15 feet per mile...Several recessional beaches of Lake Agassiz cross the subbasin. The most prominent 4" C.~ is Campbell Beach, which crosses extreme southwestern Kittson...Four major wetland zones are found in the subbasin: Red River Valley Lake Plain, Glacial Lake Agassiz Beachlines, Aspen Parklands, and Glacial Lake

  3. Red River of the North Reconnaissance Report: Red Lake River.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    The two lakes are remnants of glacial Lake Agassiz and together comprise the largest lake area wholly contained in Minnesota. Biology The principal...Red River Valley Laku Plain, Glacial Lake Agassiz Beachlines, Aspen Parklands, Glacial Lake Agassiz Lowlands, Border-Prairie Transition, and North...Areas of particular aesthetic appeal include Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge, seven state forests, Upper and Lower Red Lakes, and the natural wooded

  4. Red River of the North Reconnaissance Report: Pembina River.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    lakes in the upper valley, in effect , absorb runoff from the area above their outlets so that flood peaks downstream are reduced. Two separate types of...to protect, conserve, and enhance where possible these sensitive ecosystems in the subbasin (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1979). i ’d. Low flows...natural ecosystems are found in the Pembina River Valley: 1. Bottomland hardwood forests. This community extends into the valley along the floodplain and on

  5. Terrestrial teleconnections link global rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Loughlin, F.; Howden, N. J.; Woods, R. A.; Bates, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    We present analyses of river discharge data from across the world, which we used to identify links between annual river flow regimes across different continents. Our hypothesis was that, as atmospheric processes are subject to large-scale teleconnection patterns, and because these atmospheric processes are inherently linked to precipitation regimes across the world, there should be identifiable links between river flow regimes driven by these atmospheric processes. We used discharge data from the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC) to identify cross-correlations (and accounted for serial dependence) between 23 of the world's largest river basins where overlapping data were available over a period of 12 years or more: two in South America; five in Africa; one in Australasia; five in North America and ten in Eurasia. The selected river basins drain approximately a third of the Earth's landmass at their furthest downstream gauging station. Where significant cross-correlations were found, we compared these to known patterns associated with the ENSO and NAO teleconnections. In total, 85 of the 253 possible correlations were deemed significant at p<0.05, this reduced to 36 at p<0.01 and 21 at p<0.001. Of the significant correlations (p<0.05), 22 were classified as strong (r ≥× 0.5), 45 as moderate (×0.5< r ≥×0.25) and 18 as weak (×0.25< r >0). We compared these significant cross-correlations with known atmospheric teleconnection patterns, and while these were consistent for the majority of cases, we found a number of significant correlations that are inconsistent with the anticipated effects of known atmospheric teleconnections. Our results provide new insight into the inter-continental links between global river systems and the way in which these are controlled by large-scale atmospheric processes. We suggest this may be useful for global industries, such as insurers or aid agencies, who seek to understand correlations between the magnitudes of extreme events

  6. Elwha River Restoration: Sediment Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrel, S.; Bountry, J.; Randle, T. J.; Ritchie, A.; Huginin, H.; Torrance, A.

    2013-12-01

    The removal of Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams on the Elwha River relies on controlled reservoir drawdown increments and natural river flows to erode and redistribute the reservoir sediment, estimated to be a total of 23 (× 3) million m3. To mitigate for the predicted sediment effects, facilities have been constructed for water quality and flood protection. A sediment monitoring program is being implemented by an interdisciplinary team from Reclamation and National Park Service to integrate real-time measurements with continually updated numerical model predictions. The most recent numerical reservoir modeling and monitoring results indicate about 20 to 25 percent of the reservoir sediment has been released since the start of dam removal. Monitoring results in 2012 and early 2013 confirmed that controlled reservoir drawdown increments have induced sufficient vertical and lateral erosion of delta surfaces behind both dams. Predam channel and floodplain surface has been exposed in numerous portions of Lake Aldwell, with the release of coarse and fine sediment in the first few pools below Elwha Dam. The material released from Lake Aldwell has included organic material. With the removal of about three quarters of Glines Canyon Dam and the disappearance of Lake Mills, coarse bedload sediment has been continually released into the downstream river since late fall 2012. Field measurements and numerical modeling are being used to track the progression of the sediment wave downstream to the Elwha River mouth. Initial findings are that the aggradation was greatest immediately downstream of Glines Canyon Dam, and filled pools and transformed river planform from step-pool to glide for most of the 7 mile reach between Lake Mills and Lake Aldwell. Although there has not been a major flood, winter flows and spring snowmelt have significantly reworked the released sediment and remnants of the pre-sediment release pools and rapids have re-emerged. Large wood and organics have also

  7. Groundwater and river water interaction on Cikapundung River: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darul, A.; Irawan, D. E.; Trilaksono, N. J.

    2015-09-01

    The interaction between groundwater and Cikapundung river water has not changed significantly in 16 years of period. This paper revisit the similar research based on 43 measurement points: 13 dug wells, 2 springs, and 24 river, distributed along the riverbank at Curug Dago to Batununggal segment. The field measurements were taken in rainy season of April to May 2014 using portable instruments. Six parameters were measured: water level, temperature, total dissolved solids (TDS), dissolved-oxygen (DO), and pH. The new model is unable to detect significant change in water flow, however it finds two local anomalies in Dago Pojok and Cikapayang area. Both locations show local drawdown circle which can induce influent stream in overal effluent environment. Moreover, water quality parameters indicate mixing processes between groundwater and river water, with erratic pattern both in effluent and influent stream. Also some DO and TDS readings exceed the permissible limit. These values suggest a lifted groundwater mineralization from organic and non-organic sources and change of chemical stability. The source of contamination is still under further examination.

  8. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  9. Constructing river stage-discharge rating curves using remotely sensed river cross-sectional inundation areas and river bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Feifei; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing from satellites and airborne platforms provides valuable data for monitoring and gauging river discharge. One effective approach first estimates river stage from satellite-measured inundation area based on the inundation area-river stage relationship (IARSR), and then the estimated river stage is used to compute river discharge based on the stage-discharge rating (SDR) curve. However, this approach is difficult to implement because of a lack of data for constructing the SDR curves. This study proposes a new method to construct the SDR curves using remotely sensed river cross-sectional inundation areas and river bathymetry. The proposed method was tested over a river reach between two USGS gauging stations, i.e., Kingston Mines (KM) and Copperas Creek (CC) along the Illinois River. First a polygon over each of two cross sections was defined. A complete IARSR curve was constructed inside each polygon using digital elevation model (DEM) and river bathymetric data. The constructed IARSR curves were then used to estimate 47 river water surface elevations at each cross section based on 47 river inundation areas estimated from Landsat TM images collected during 1994-2002. The estimated water surface elevations were substituted into an objective function formed by the Bernoulli equation of gradually varied open channel flow. A nonlinear global optimization scheme was applied to solve the Manning's coefficient through minimizing the objective function value. Finally the SDR curve was constructed at the KM site using the solved Manning's coefficient, channel cross sectional geometry and the Manning's equation, and employed to estimate river discharges. The root mean square error (RMSE) in the estimated river discharges against the USGS measured river discharges is 112.4 m3/s. To consider the variation of the Manning's coefficient in the vertical direction, this study also suggested a power-law function to describe the vertical decline of the Manning

  10. Mutagenicities of Bangkok and Tokyo river waters.

    PubMed

    Kusamran, W R; Wakabayashi, K; Oguri, A; Tepsuwan, A; Nagao, M; Sugimura, T

    1994-11-01

    Samples of water from the Chao Phraya river and some connected canals in Bangkok, Thailand, and from the Sumida and Ara rivers in Tokyo, Japan, were tested for mutagenicity using blue rayon to adsorb the mutagens. The samples from the Chao Phraya river and connected canals at sites located 50-150 km from the river mouth taken in May 1993 showed a mutagenicity of 87-1213 revertants per 0.05 g blue rayon extract towards S. typhimurium YG1024 in the presence of S9 mix. Samples from most sites taken in December 1993, which follows the rainy season, showed a lower mutagenicity than those taken in May, possibly due to dilution by the larger volume of water in the river and canals in December. Water samples from the Sumida river were collected in July 1993 and February 1994, and those from the Ara river in January 1994. Mutagenicity of samples from all sites of the Sumida and Ara rivers, which were located 2-30 and 2-20 km, respectively, from the river mouth was also clearly detected in the presence of S9 mix and did not differ much, being 155-748 revertants of YG1024 per 0.05 g blue rayon extract. These results demonstrated that the water in all three rivers contained some frameshift mutagens.

  11. [Spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates in Xiangxi River].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wan-xiang; Cai, Qing-hua; Tang, Tao; Wu, Nai-cheng; Fu, Xiao-cheng; Li, Feng-qing; Liu, Rui-qiu

    2008-11-01

    An investigation was made from July 2005 to June 2006 to understand the spatial distribution of macroinvertebrates in Xiangxi River, the largest tributary in Hubei portion of Three Gorges Reservoir. The results showed that Ephemeroptera baetis spp., Ephemeroptera epeorus spp., and Plecoptera nemoura spp. were the dominant taxa. There existed greater differences in the habitat characters and in the community structure of macroinvertebrates among the major tributaries of Xiangxi River, and the relative abundance of functional feeding groups could reflect the characters of different habitats. A comparison of the diversity of dominant taxa and their tolerance towards pollution among the major tributaries showed that Jiuchong River had the best habitat, followed by the main stream of Xiangxi River, and Gaolan River and Gufu River. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that the NH4+ -N concentration in the main stream of Xiangxi River, the pH, turbidity, water depth, SiO2, conductance, and alkalinity in Jiuchong River, the turbidity in Gaolan River, and the NH4+ -N and NO3- -N concentrations in Gufu River had significant impact on the community structure of macroinvertebrates.

  12. Hyperspectral Imaging of River Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    correction. The HyperPRO data together with other data collected on each station including HPLC pigments , productivity, CDOM, suspended sediments...derivatives, to target products --- sediment, chlorophyll, or sampled pixels know to contain pigments of interest, such as phycocyanin commonly found in...derivative at 540 nm is highly sensitive to the sediment in the river plume. 9 The method for our sediment and pigment products from HICO is similar

  13. Union Lake Bourbeuse River, Missouri.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    However, there is flexibility in policies regarding clearing of timber and consideration will be given all possible clearing combinations. The...with thle revised 1962 Joint Land Acquisit ion Policy - Of the Departments of tile [nterior and Army adopted in February 1962. u)NlK- I0 In general...Missouri Long-tailed weasel Rare in Missouri Spotted skunk Undetermined status in Missouri River otter Lndangered in Missouri Red wolf E-ndangered or

  14. Hyperspectral Imaging of River Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    plume. The 300 m MERIS pixels do a much better job of imaging the river mouth. 3 The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO; Corson et...radiances, L1B data is supplied by NRL’s HICOTM team [ Corson 2010]. (b) At-sensor radiance for black pixel in Fig. 1 (a). The raw data is indicated...that goal. RELATED PROJECTS I continue to collaborate regularly with colleagues at the NRL Remote Sensing Division (Code 7200; Mike Corson and

  15. Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, Robert J.

    2012-07-30

    Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. (FRB) proposed to construct a demonstration biomass-to-liquids (BTL) biorefinery in Park Falls, Wisconsin. The biorefinery was to be co-located at the existing pulp and paper mill, Flambeau River Papers, and when in full operation would both generate renewable energy – making Flambeau River Papers the first pulp and paper mill in North America to be nearly fossil fuel free – and produce liquid fuels from abundant and renewable lignocellulosic biomass. The biorefinery would serve to validate the thermochemical pathway and economic models for BTL production using forest residuals and wood waste, providing a basis for proliferating BTL conversion technologies throughout the United States. It was a project goal to create a compelling new business model for the pulp and paper industry, and support the nation’s goal for increasing renewable fuels production and reducing its dependence on foreign oil. FRB planned to replicate this facility at other paper mills after this first demonstration scale plant was operational and had proven technical and economic feasibility.

  16. Raft River geoscience case study

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  17. 3. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT, PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF DRAWING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT, PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF DRAWING, PROFILE AND ALIGNMENT OF DAM ACROSS WEST CHANNEL OF SNAKE RIVER, SHEET 3 OF 5, 1924 (on file at the Idaho State Office of Water Resources, Boise, Idaho) - Snake River Valley Irrigation District, East Side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Shelley, Bingham County, ID

  18. 4. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT, PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF DRAWING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SNAKE RIVER VALLEY IRRIGATION DISTRICT, PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF DRAWING, PROPOSED SECTION OF DIVERSION DAM ACROSS SNAKE RIVER, SHEET 1 OF 5, 1924 (on file at the Idaho State Office of Water Resources, Boise, Idaho) - Snake River Valley Irrigation District, East Side of Snake River (River Mile 796), Shelley, Bingham County, ID

  19. Home on the Big River, Part II: Great River Habitat Quality Indices

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA’s EMAP sampled the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers from 2004 through 2006 as part of an integrated assessment of ecological condition. These Great Rivers are important human recreational destinations and transportation corridors, and represent significant wild...

  20. Priority River Metrics for Urban Residents of the Santa Cruz River Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indicator selection is a persistent question in river and stream assessment and management. We employ qualitative research techniques to identify features of rivers and streams important to urban residents recruited from the general public in the Santa Cruz watershed. Interviews ...

  1. Organic Acid Concentrations in Rivers Within the Amazon River Drainage Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, A.

    2007-12-01

    The composition of the dissolved organic matter pool in both fresh and marine waters is largely unknown. Concentrations of low-molecular-weight organic acids (oxalate, citrate, glycolate, formate, acetate, succinate) have been determined in Brasilian (18 rivers sampled) and Peruvian (19 rivers sampled) rivers within the Amazon River drainage basin. Succinate concentrations were below the detection limit in all rivers. The dominant acid varied among the sampled rivers, indicating that organic acid concentrations depend on river basin characteristics. Organic-acid carbon comprised a highly significant, but variable, fraction of total dissolved carbon, with a range of 3-90%, indicating that organic-acid-derived carbon may be an important source of biologically labile carbon within the Amazon River drainage basin.

  2. Rare earth elements in river waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Steven J.; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    1988-01-01

    To characterize the input to the oceans of rare earth elements (REE) in the dissolved and the suspended loads of rivers, the REE concentrations were measured in samples of Amazon, Indus, Mississippi, Murray-Darling, and Ohio rivers and in samples of smaller rivers that had more distinct drainage basin lithology and water chemistry. It was found that, in the suspended loads of small rivers, the REE pattern was dependent on drainage basin geology, whereas the suspended loads in major rivers had relatively uniform REE patterns and were heavy-REE depleted relative to the North American Shale composite (NASC). The dissolved loads in the five major rivers had marked relative heavy-REE enrichments, relative to the NASC and the suspended material, with the (La/Yb)N ratio of about 0.4 (as compared with the ratio of about 1.9 in suspended loads).

  3. Decline of radionuclides in Columbia River biota

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, C.E.; Watson, D.G.; Scott, A.J.; Gurtisen, J.M.

    1980-03-01

    In January 1971, the last of nine plutonium production reactors using direct discharge of once-through cooling waters into the Columbia River was closed. Sampling was initiated at three stations on the Columbia River to document the decline of the radionuclide body burdens in the biota of the Columbia River ecosystem. The data show that in a river-reservoir complex, the measurable body burden of fission-produced radionuclides decreased to essentially undetectable levels within 18 to 24 mo after cessation of discharge of once-through cooling water into the river. On the basis of data from the free-flowing station, we believe that this decrease would be even more rapid in an unimpounded river.

  4. The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

  5. The Upper Mississippi River System—Topobathy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Jayme M.; Hanson, Jenny L.; Sattler, Stephanie R.

    2017-03-23

    The Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS), the navigable part of the Upper Mississippi and Illinois Rivers, is a diverse ecosystem that contains river channels, tributaries, shallow-water wetlands, backwater lakes, and flood-plain forests. Approximately 10,000 years of geologic and hydrographic history exist within the UMRS. Because it maintains crucial wildlife and fish habitats, the dynamic ecosystems of the Upper Mississippi River Basin and its tributaries are contingent on the adjacent flood plains and water-level fluctuations of the Mississippi River. Separate data for flood-plain elevation (lidar) and riverbed elevation (bathymetry) were collected on the UMRS by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (USACE) Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program. Using the two elevation datasets, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center (UMESC) developed a systemic topobathy dataset.

  6. 33 CFR 165.T01-0876 - Regulated Navigation Area-Weymouth Fore River, Fore River Bridge Construction, Weymouth and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-Weymouth Fore River, Fore River Bridge Construction, Weymouth and Quincy, MA. 165.T01-0876 Section 165.T01... River, Fore River Bridge Construction, Weymouth and Quincy, MA. (a) Location. The following is a regulated navigation area: all U.S. navigable waters surrounding the Weymouth Fore River bridge (Mile...

  7. Mouth of the Ob River, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra satellite shows the cause and effect of the large-scale seasonal flooding experienced on rivers throughout Siberia each year. Because many Siberian rivers flow from south to north, they flood regularly in the spring as meltwater from southern latitudes backs up against the still-frozen northern reaches of the rivers.These images show the Ob' River on the western edge of the Central Siberian Plateau. The images from June 20, 2002, show the mouth of the Ob' River (large river at left) where it empties into Kara Sea. In the false-color image, Vegetation appears in bright green, water appears dark blue or black, and ice appears bright blue. The ice is still choking the river's outlet to the sea.The effect of this ice block on the more southern stretches of the river can be seen in the images captured on June 17. In the false-color image, water is black, vegetation is in shades of gold and green, and clouds are pale orange. In the northernmost portion of the Ob' visible in this image (the Ob' runs southeast to northwest in the image), what is normally a fine mesh of braided streams and branches of the river channel has become almost a lake in places. The flood waters have engorged the river to 52 kilometers (32 miles) wide in places. Rivers can back up for hundreds of miles, and cause devastating flooding for towns and villages along the banks. Often, explosives are dropped into ice jams in an effort to free the river and give the flood waters a chance to escape. The spring and summer floods of 2002 have proven to be quite severe and perhaps as many as 100,000 people have been affected across the country. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  8. Ecological management of urban rivers in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junhong; Hou, Xin; Xu, Yiping

    2017-03-01

    At present, China's urban river is widespread with serious pollution, poor water quality, poor water mobility and other issues. In this article, we analyzed the root causes of urban river water environment problems systematically, then puts forward the ways to solve the problems, which including implement the "river length system", strengthen the control of pollution sources, persist in ecological concepts, establish long-term mechanism and strengthen publicity and education.

  9. Model for the evolution of river networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leheny, Robert L.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    1993-08-01

    We have developed a model, which includes the effects of erosion both from precipitation and from avalanching of soil on steep slopes, to simulate the formation and evolution of river networks. The avalanches provide a mechanism for competition in growth between neighboring river basins. The changing morphology follows many of the characteristics of evolution set forth by Glock. We find that during evolution the model maintains the statistical characteristics measured in natural river systems.

  10. A comparative study on riverine DOC export fluxes from the Mississippi River and Pearl River (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Zhou, Z.

    2013-12-01

    River carbon export fluxes represent a major component in marine carbon budge, affecting water quality, carbon dynamics, and biogeochemical processes in coastal marine environments. Quantitative determination of composition, transformation and export fluxes of carbon species from rivers is thus essential. Using our time series data, we examined riverine chromophoric-DOM composition, carbon yields, and DOC export fluxes between two contrasting river systems: the Mississippi River, a large river with extensive anthropogenic impact, and the Pearl River, a small blackwater river with cypress swamps in the lower basin. Compared to the Pearl River, DOM in the lower Mississippi River exhibited lower aromaticity and lower chromophoric-DOM abundance with low seasonal variability, but higher protein-type fluorophores and non-CDOM components, indicating the effects of prolonged water residence time, increased in situ production, and enhanced photochemical degradation in the Mississippi River. Protein-like CDOM components decreased with increasing discharge, showing dilution effect during high flow. In addition to higher bulk DOM abundance and higher aromaticity, Pearl River waters contained higher high-molecular-weight (HMW) DOM with higher seasonal variability. The drainage area in the Mississippi River basin is ~140 times as large as that in the Pearl River, with ~70 times its freshwater discharge. Nevertheless, annual DOC export fluxes (in g-C/yr) into the Gulf of Mexico and DOC yield (in g-C/m2/yr) from the Mississippi River basin were only 28 times and 0.3 times of those of the Pearl River. Small rivers with higher forest and swamp in the lower basin may play an important role in riverine carbon export, contributing higher aromatic DOM and HMW-DOM components into marine environments.

  11. Monitoring river discharge with remotely sensed imagery using river island area as an indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Feng; Cai, Xiaobin; Li, Wenbo; Xiao, Fei; Li, Xiaodong; Du, Yun

    2012-01-01

    River discharge is an important parameter in understanding water cycles, and consistent long-term discharge records are necessary for related research. In practice, discharge records based on in situ measurement are often limited because of technological, economic, and institutional obstacles. Satellite remote sensing provides an attractive alternative way to measure river discharge by constructing an empirical rating curve between the parameter provided by remote sensing techniques and simultaneous ground discharge data. River width is a popular parameter for constructing the empirical curve, since change in river discharge can be represented by a change in river width. In some rectangular channels, however, river width does not change significantly with river discharge, so an alternative parameter is necessary. We analyze a novel technique using river island area as an indicator of discharge. A river island often has a flat terrain, and its area decreases with higher discharge. This technique is validated by three river islands in the Yangtze River in China. All 61 remotely sensed images acquired by the HuanJing (HJ) satellites from 2009 to 2010 were correlated with corresponding in situ discharge of the nearby Zhicheng hydrological station. The performance of fitted curves for inferring river discharge is validated using 36 HJ images taken in 2011, and the influence of remotely sensed imagery and river islands is discussed. All three river islands can be used as indicators of river discharge, although their performances are much different. For the river island with the best result, the mean accuracy of the estimates is less than 10% of the observed discharge, and all relative errors are within 20%, validating the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Flood characteristics for the New River in the New River Gorge National River, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, J.B.; Cunningham, M.K.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency and magnitude of flooding of the New River in the New River Gorge National River was studied. A steady-state, one-dimensional flow model was applied to the study reach. Rating curves, cross sections, and Manning's roughness coefficients that were used are presented in this report. Manning's roughness coefficients were evaluated by comparing computed elevations (from application of the steady-state, one-dimensional flow model) to rated elevations at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations and miscellaneous-rating sites. Manning's roughness coefficients ranged from 0.030 to 0.075 and varied with hydraulic depth. The 2-, 25-, and 100-year flood discharges were esti- mated on the basis of information from flood- insurance studies of Summers County, Fayette County, and the city of Hinton, and flood-frequency analysis of discharge records for the USGS streamflow-gaging stations at Hinton and Thurmond. The 100-year discharge ranged from 107,000 cubic feet per second at Hinton to 150,000 cubic feet per second at Fayette.

  13. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  14. Flooding of the Ob River, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A mixture of heavy rainfall, snowmelt, and ice jams in late May and early June of this year caused the Ob River and surrounding tributaries in Western Siberia to overflow their banks. The flooding can be seen in thess image taken on June 16, 2002, by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. Last year, the river flooded farther north. Normally, the river resembles a thin black line, but floods have swollen the river considerably. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  15. Tritium hydrology of the Mississippi River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Robert L.

    2004-05-01

    In the early 1960s, the US Geological Survey began routinely analysing river water samples for tritium concentrations at locations within the Mississippi River basin. The sites included the main stem of the Mississippi River (at Luling Ferry, Louisiana), and three of its major tributaries, the Ohio River (at Markland Dam, Kentucky), the upper Missouri River (at Nebraska City, Nebraska) and the Arkansas River (near Van Buren, Arkansas). The measurements cover the period during the peak of the bomb-produced tritium transient when tritium concentrations in precipitation rose above natural levels by two to three orders of magnitude. Using measurements of tritium concentrations in precipitation, a tritium input function was established for the river basins above the Ohio River, Missouri River and Arkansas River sampling locations. Owing to the extent of the basin above the Luling Ferry site, no input function was developed for that location. The input functions for the Ohio and Missouri Rivers were then used in a two-component mixing model to estimate residence times of water within these two basins. (The Arkansas River was not modelled because of extremely large yearly variations in flow during the peak of the tritium transient.) The two components used were: (i) recent precipitation (prompt outflow) and (ii) waters derived from the long-term groundwater reservoir of the basin. The tritium concentration of the second component is a function of the atmospheric input and the residence times of the groundwaters within the basin. Using yearly time periods, the parameters of the model were varied until a best fit was obtained between modelled and measured tritium data. The results from the model indicate that about 40% of the flow in the Ohio River was from prompt outflow, as compared with 10% for the Missouri River. Mean residence times of 10 years were calculated for the groundwater component of the Ohio River versus 4 years for the Missouri River. The mass flux of

  16. Tritium hydrology of the Mississippi River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the early 1960s, the US Geological Survey began routinely analysing river water samples for tritium concentrations at locations within the Mississippi River basin. The sites included the main stem of the Mississippi River (at Luling Ferry, Louisiana), and three of its major tributaries, the Ohio River (at Markland Dam, Kentucky), the upper Missouri River (at Nebraska City, Nebraska) and the Arkansas River (near Van Buren, Arkansas). The measurements cover the period during the peak of the bomb-produced tritium transient when tritium concentrations in precipitation rose above natural levels by two to three orders of magnitude. Using measurements of tritium concentrations in precipitation, a tritium input function was established for the river basins above the Ohio River, Missouri River and Arkansas River sampling locations. Owing to the extent of the basin above the Luling Ferry site, no input function was developed for that location. The input functions for the Ohio and Missouri Rivers were then used in a two-component mixing model to estimate residence times of water within these two basins. (The Arkansas River was not modelled because of extremely large yearly variations in flow during the peak of the tritium transient.) The two components used were: (i) recent precipitation (prompt outflow) and (ii) waters derived from the long-term groundwater reservoir of the basin. The tritium concentration of the second component is a function of the atmospheric input and the residence times of the groundwaters within the basin. Using yearly time periods, the parameters of the model were varied until a best fit was obtained between modelled and measured tritium data. The results from the model indicate that about 40% of the flow in the Ohio River was from prompt outflow, as compared with 10% for the Missouri River. Mean residence times of 10 years were calculated for the groundwater component of the Ohio River versus 4 years for the Missouri River. The mass flux of

  17. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  18. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  19. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  20. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  1. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  2. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  3. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    SciTech Connect

    2001-04-01

    The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwest—from fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the region’s electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

  4. Geomorphology of the lower Copper River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, Timothy P.

    1997-01-01

    The Copper River, located in southcentral Alaska, drains an area of more than 24,000 square miles. About 30 miles above its mouth, this large river enters Miles Lake, a proglacial lake formed by the retreat of Miles Glacier. Downstream from the outlet of Miles Lake, the Copper River flows past the face of Childs Glacier before it enters a large, broad, alluvial flood plain. The Copper River Highway traverses this flood plain and in 1995, 11 bridges were located along this section of the highway. These bridges cross parts of the Copper River and in recent years, some of these bridges have sustained serious damage due to the changing course of the Copper River. Although the annual mean discharge of the lower Copper River is 57,400 cubic feet per second, most of the flow occurs during the summer months from snowmelt, rainfall, and glacial melt. Approximately every six years, an outburst flood from Van Cleve Lake, a glacier-dammed lake formed by Miles Glacier, releases approximately 1 million acre-feet of water into the Copper River. When the outflow rate from Van Cleve Lake reaches it peak, the flow of the Copper River will increase between 150,000 to 190,000 cubic feet per second. Data collected by bedload sampling and continuous seismic reflection indicated that Miles Lake traps virtually all the bedload being transported by the Copper River as it enters the lake from the north. The reservoir-like effect of Miles Lake results in the armoring of the channel of the Copper River downstream from Miles Lake, past Childs Glacier, until it reaches the alluvial flood plain. At this point, bedload transport begins again. The lower Copper River transports 69 million tons per year of suspended sediment, approximately the same quantity as the Yukon River, which drains an area of more than 300,000 square miles. By correlating concurrent flows from a long-term streamflow-gaging station on the Copper River with a short-term streamflow-gaging station at the outlet of Miles Lake

  5. Geomorphology of the lower Copper River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Copper River, located in southcentral Alaska, drains an area of more than 24,000 square miles. About 30 miles above its mouth, this large river enters Miles Lake, a proglacial lake formed by the retreat of Miles Glacier. Downstream from the outlet of Miles Lake, the Copper River flows past the face of Childs Glacier before it enters a large, broad, alluvial flood plain. The Copper River Highway traverses this flood plain and in 1996, 11 bridges were located along this section of the highway. These bridges cross parts or all of the Copper River and in recent years, some of these bridges have sustained serious damage due to the changing course of the Copper River. Although the annual mean discharge of the lower Copper River is 57,400 cubic feet per second, most of the flow occurs during the summer months from snowmelt, rainfall, and glacial melt. Approximately every six years, an outburst flood from Van Cleve Lake, a glacier-dammed lake formed by Miles Glacier, releases approximately 1 million acre-feet of water into the Copper River. At the peak outflow rate from Van Cleve Lake, the flow of the Copper River will increase an additional 140,000 and 190,000 cubic feet per second. Bedload sampling and continuous seismic reflection were used to show that Miles Lake traps virtually all the bedload being transported by the Copper River as it enters the lake from the north. The reservoir-like effect of Miles Lake results in the armoring of the channel of the Copper River downstream from Miles Lakes, past Childs Glacier, until it reaches the alluvial flood plain. At this point, bedload transport begins again. The lower Copper River transports 69 million tons per year of suspended sediment, approximately the same quantity as the Yukon River, which drains an area of more than 300,000 square miles. By correlating concurrent flows from a long-term streamflow- gaging station on the Copper River with a short-term streamflow-gaging station at the outlet of Miles Lake, long

  6. 33 CFR 207.10 - Charles River, Mass.; dam of Charles River Basin Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Charles River, Mass.; dam of Charles River Basin Commission. 207.10 Section 207.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.10 Charles River, Mass.; dam...

  7. 33 CFR 207.10 - Charles River, Mass.; dam of Charles River Basin Commission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Charles River, Mass.; dam of Charles River Basin Commission. 207.10 Section 207.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.10 Charles River, Mass.; dam...

  8. 76 FR 75543 - Missisquoi River Technologies; Missisquoi River Hydro LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Missisquoi River Technologies; Missisquoi River Hydro LLC; Notice of... issued June 29, 1989,\\1\\ has been transferred to Missisquoi River Hydro LLC. The project is located...

  9. Red River of the North Reconnaissance Report: Sand Hill River Subbasin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    River Subbasin. . . . 28 7 Groundwater Quality Data From Cmunities in the Sand Hill River Subbasin. . . . . . .................. .. 30 8 Comparison of...be significant. Groundwater quality problems are related to excessive concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfates, and total dissolved solids (Upper...is little natural storage potential for surface water supplies in the subbasin. Groundwater contributions to the river are minimal in the western

  10. 78 FR 41689 - Safety Zone; Skagit River Bridge, Skagit River, Mount Vernon, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... safety, Navigation (water), Reporting and Recordkeeping requirements, Security measures, Waterways. For... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Skagit River Bridge, Skagit River, Mount... establishing a safety zone around the Skagit River Bridge located in Mount Vernon, WA. This action is...

  11. 76 FR 24914 - Digital River Education Services, Inc., a Division of Digital River, Inc., Including Workers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration Digital River Education Services, Inc., a Division of Digital River... Marketing (JEM), Including On-Site Lease Workers From Serenity Staffing, Accountemps, Silicon Valley, and... Assistance on January 28, 2011, applicable to workers of Digital River Education Services, Inc., a...

  12. 76 FR 40616 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Old River Channel of the Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... regulations governing the operation of the Willow Street Bridge at mile 1.02 across the Old River Channel of... INFORMATION: The Willow Street Bridge, at mile 1.02 across the Old River Channel of the Cuyahoga River, at... deviation to be the least disruptive to their operations. Under this temporary deviation, the Willow...

  13. 33 CFR 165.903 - Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED... § 165.903 Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH. (a) Location. The waters of...

  14. 33 CFR 165.903 - Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED... § 165.903 Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH. (a) Location. The waters of...

  15. 33 CFR 165.903 - Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED... § 165.903 Safety Zones: Cuyahoga River and Old River, Cleveland, OH. (a) Location. The waters of...

  16. Challenges of river basin management: Current status of, and prospects for, the River Danube from a river engineering perspective.

    PubMed

    Habersack, Helmut; Hein, Thomas; Stanica, Adrian; Liska, Igor; Mair, Raimund; Jäger, Elisabeth; Hauer, Christoph; Bradley, Chris

    2016-02-01

    In the Danube River Basin multiple pressures affect the river system as a consequence of river engineering works, altering both the river hydrodynamics and morphodynamics. The main objective of this paper is to identify the effects of hydropower development, flood protection and engineering works for navigation on the Danube and to examine specific impacts of these developments on sediment transport and river morphology. Whereas impoundments are characterised by deposition and an excess of sediment with remobilisation of fine sediments during severe floods, the remaining five free flowing sections of the Danube are experiencing river bed erosion of the order of several centimetres per year. Besides the effect of interruption of the sediment continuum, river bed degradation is caused by an increase in the sediment transport capacity following an increase in slope, a reduction of river bed width due to canalisation, prohibition of bank erosion by riprap or regressive erosion following base level lowering by flood protection measures and sediment dredging. As a consequence, the groundwater table is lowered, side-arms are disconnected, instream structures are lost and habitat quality deteriorates affecting the ecological status of valuable floodplains. The lack of sediments, together with cutting off meanders, leads also to erosion of the bed of main arms in the Danube Delta and coastal erosion. This paper details the causes and effects of river engineering measures and hydromorphological changes for the Danube. It highlights the importance of adopting a basin-wide holistic approach to river management and demonstrates that past management in the basin has been characterised by a lack of integration. To-date insufficient attention has been paid to the wide-ranging impacts of river engineering works throughout the basin: from the basin headwaters to the Danube Delta, on the Black Sea coast. This highlights the importance of new initiatives that seek to advance knowledge

  17. 5. View showing Crooked River High Bridge in background and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View showing Crooked River High Bridge in background and Ralph Modjeski railroad bridge in foreground - Crooked River High Bridge, Spanning Crooked River Gorge at Dalles-California Highway, Terrebonne, Deschutes County, OR

  18. VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF APALACHICOLA RIVER BRIDGE WEST APPROACH (CALHOUN COUNTY SIDE) SHOWING SPAN (BAY) BETWEEN SOLID CONCRETE BENT AND STEEL COLUMN BENT, SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTH - Apalachicola River Bridge, State Route 20 spanning the Apalachicola River, Blountstown, Calhoun County, FL

  19. 13. NEW YORK SIDE, HUDSON RIVER VENTILATION BUILDING ACROSS HUDSON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. NEW YORK SIDE, HUDSON RIVER VENTILATION BUILDING ACROSS HUDSON RIVER IN BACKGROUND, WITH SOUTH WALL OF NEW JERSEY SIDE OF VENTILATION BUILDING IN FOREGROUND - Holland Tunnel, Beneath Hudson River between New York & Jersey City, New York County, NY

  20. Rapid river classification using GIS-delineated functional process zones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional classification of rivers does not take into consideration how rivers function within the ecosystem. Using factors such as hydrology and geomorphology that directly affect ecosystem structure and function, provides a means of classifying river systems into hydrogeomorp...

  1. 83. VIEW SHOWING DRIFTWOOD LODGED AGAINST SHOOFLY BRIDGE, WITH RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. VIEW SHOWING DRIFTWOOD LODGED AGAINST SHOOFLY BRIDGE, WITH RIVER AT FLOOD STAGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, April 8, 1935 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  2. 3. NORTH SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. NORTH SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER SHOWING HEADGATE ON THE NORTH BANK. VIEW IS TO THE NORTH-NORTHWEST. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  3. 2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. UPSTREAM SIDE OF DIVERSION DAM ON THE SNAKE RIVER, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. NOTE BANK REINFORCEMENT ON LEFT AND SPILLWAY ON RIGHT. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  4. View of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River Bridge, showing support girders for life house, looking east - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  5. 1. OVERVIEW OF BRIDGE STRUCTURE ON ESCALANTE RIVER, LOOKING NORTHNORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERVIEW OF BRIDGE STRUCTURE ON ESCALANTE RIVER, LOOKING NORTH-NORTHWEST - Escalante River Bridge, Spanning Escalante River at State Route 12, 9.5 miles East of Escalante, Escalante, Garfield County, UT

  6. 77 FR 65619 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Taunton River, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... Memorial Bridge across the Taunton River, mile 2.1, between Fall River and Somerset, Massachusetts. This... and Purpose The Veterans Memorial Bridge at mile 2.1, across the Taunton River between Somerset...

  7. 25. LOOKING UP THE SALT RIVER FROM THE INTAKE GATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. LOOKING UP THE SALT RIVER FROM THE INTAKE GATES OF THE SALT RIVER POWER CANAL, SHOWING HEADWORKS OF POWER CANAL Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, October 17, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  8. 5. Monighan dragline at work in the Salt River at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Monighan dragline at work in the Salt River at Mormon Flat. Photographer unknown, 1923. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. 8. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE RIVER ARM OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM FROM THE RIVER ARM OF THE COFFERDAM NEAR STATION (September 1936) - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 13, Upper Mississippi River, Fulton, Whiteside County, IL

  10. 61. View of the Agua Fria River stream bed from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. View of the Agua Fria River stream bed from atop Waddell Dam. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. 74. View of flume crossing the Agua Fria River from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. View of flume crossing the Agua Fria River from the east embankment. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  12. View of Tensaw River Bridge, looking northeast. Photograph taken from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Tensaw River Bridge, looking northeast. Photograph taken from observation deck of Battleship USS Alabama - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  13. 25. Camp housing, downstream and south of river, at Mormon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Camp housing, downstream and south of river, at Mormon Flat Dam. Photographer Mark Durben, 1988. Source: Salt River Project. - Mormon Flat Dam, On Salt River, Eastern Maricopa County, east of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 5. GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTH BANK OF SNAKE RIVER LYONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTH BANK OF SNAKE RIVER LYONS FERRY BRIDGE TO THE RIGHT, JOSO HIGH (UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD) BRIDGE TO THE LEFT - Snake River Bridge at Lyons' Ferry, State Route 261 spanning Snake River, Starbuck, Columbia County, WA

  15. N. River Street, east side of street at Sound End ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    N. River Street, east side of street at Sound End - River Street Historic District, Bounded by West Saint James Street, West Santa Clara Street, Pleasant Street, & Guadalupe River, San Jose, Santa Clara County, CA

  16. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF BRIDGE AND MISSISSIPPI RIVER, FROM WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF BRIDGE AND MISSISSIPPI RIVER, FROM WEST RIVER-BANK. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  17. 28. VIEW SHOWING NORTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW SHOWING NORTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  18. 27. VIEW SHOWING SOUTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW SHOWING SOUTH SIDE OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  19. 30. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE, LE CLAIRE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND, LOOKING EAST - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  20. 3. Down river view of lock and dam to southwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Down river view of lock and dam to southwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  1. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF BRIDGE AND MISSISSIPPI RIVER, FROM EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF BRIDGE AND MISSISSIPPI RIVER, FROM EAST RIVER-BANK. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  2. 3. OVERALL VIEW OF BRIDGE AND MISSISSIPPI RIVER, FROM WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OVERALL VIEW OF BRIDGE AND MISSISSIPPI RIVER, FROM WEST RIVER-BLUFF. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  3. Field Projects with Rivers for Introductory Physical-Geology Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordua, William S.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses exercises using a river for the study of river processes and landforms. Although developed for college, they can be adapted for other levels. Exercises involve discharge measurement, flood prediction, and application of the Hjulstrom diagram to river sediments. (JN)

  4. 29. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. INTERIOR VIEW OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER RECREATION OFFICE BUILDING, LE CLAIRE BASE COMPOUND, LOOKING WEST - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 14, Upper Mississippi River, Le Claire, Scott County, IA

  5. [Dynamics of soil inorganic nitrogen in middle mountain moist evergreen broadleaf forest under different disturbance intensities in Ailao Mountain].

    PubMed

    Li, Guicai; Han, Xingguo; Huang, Jianhui; Wamg, Changyao

    2003-08-01

    The effects of three different intensities of disturbance on soil NH4(+)-N and NO3(-).N contents were studied in three community types (primary Lithocarpus xylocarpus forest, secondary oak forest, and tea plantation, which represent three different intensities of disturbance). The results showed that the contents of inorganic nitrogen in soil (0-15 cm) of three community types had marked differences. Soil organic matter and total nitrogen decreased, while C/N ratio increased, with the increasing intensity of the disturbance. Simultaneously, the potential lose of NO3(-)-N increased. It suggested that the disturbance was not in favor of the retainment of soil fertility and the positive development of community succession. The soil organic matter, total nitrogen and C/N ratio were basically same at different spatial sites in same community, while the NO3(-)-N contents were obvious difference. This implied that soil NO3(-)-N content was less stable than NH4(+)-N. In addition, NH4(+)-N was the major component of the soil inorganic nitrogen, accounted for 95.5%-99.3% of the total content of soil inorganic nitrogen.

  6. Nitrogen and phosphorus in the Upper Mississippi River: Transport, processing, and effects on the river ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.; Richardson, W.B.

    2010-01-01

    Existing research on nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) in the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) can be organized into the following categories: (1) Long-term changes in nutrient concentrations and export, and their causes; (2) Nutrient cycling within the river; (3) Spatial and temporal patterns of river nutrient concentrations; (4) Effects of elevated nutrient concentrations on the river; and (5) Actions to reduce river nutrient concentrations and flux. Nutrient concentration and flux in the Mississippi River have increased substantially over the last century because of changes in land use, climate, hydrology, and river management and engineering. As in other large floodplain rivers, rates of processes that cycle nitrogen and phosphorus in the UMR exhibit pronounced spatial and temporal heterogeneity because of the complex morphology of the river. This spatial variability in nutrient processing creates clear spatial patterns in nutrient concentrations. For example, nitrate concentrations generally are much lower in off-channel areas than in the main channel. The specifics of in-river nutrient cycling and the effects of high rates of nutrient input on UMR have been less studied than the factors affecting nutrient input to the river and transport to the Gulf of Mexico, and important questions concerning nutrient cycling in the UMR remain. Eutrophication and resulting changes in river productivity have only recently been investigated the UMR. These recent studies indicate that the high nutrient concentrations in the river may affect community composition of aquatic vegetation (e. g., the abundance of filamentous algae and duckweeds), dissolved oxygen concentrations in off-channel areas, and the abundance of cyanobacteria. Actions to reduce nutrient input to the river include changes in land-use practices, wetland restoration, and hydrological modifications to the river. Evidence suggests that most of the above methods can contribute to reducing nutrient concentration in

  7. Uncertainty of natural tracer methods for quantifying river-aquifer interaction in a large river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yueqing; Cook, Peter G.; Shanafield, Margaret; Simmons, Craig T.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of river-aquifer interaction is critical to the conjunctive management of surface water and groundwater, in particular in the arid and semiarid environment with much higher potential evapotranspiration than precipitation. A variety of natural tracer methods are available to quantify river-aquifer interaction at different scales. These methods however have only been tested in rivers with relatively low flow rates (mostly less than 5 m3 s-1). In this study, several natural tracers including heat, radon-222 and electrical conductivity were measured both on vertical riverbed profiles and on longitudinal river samples to quantify river-aquifer exchange flux at both point and regional scales in the Heihe River (northwest China; flow rate 63 m3 s-1). Results show that the radon-222 profile method can estimate a narrower range of point-scale flux than the temperature profile method. In particular, three vertical radon-222 profiles failed to estimate the upper bounds of plausible flux ranges. Results also show that when quantifying regional-scale river-aquifer exchange flux, the river chemistry method constrained the flux (5.20-10.39 m2 d-1) better than the river temperature method (-100 to 100 m2 d-1). The river chemistry method also identified spatial variability of flux, whereas the river temperature method did not have sufficient resolution. Overall, for quantifying river-aquifer exchange flux in a large river, both the temperature profile method and the radon-222 profile method provide useful complementary information at the point scale to complement each other, whereas the river chemistry method is recommended over the river temperature method at the regional scale.

  8. Human impacts on river water quality- comparative research in the catchment areas of the Tone River and the Mur River-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, K.

    2013-12-01

    Human activities in river basin affect river water quality as water discharges into river with pollutant after we use it. By detecting pollutants source, pathway, and influential factor of human activities, it will be possible to consider proper river basin management. In this study, material flow analysis was done first and then nutrient emission modeling by MONERIS was conducted. So as to clarify land use contribution and climate condition, comparison of Japanese and European river basin area has been made. The model MONERIS (MOdelling Nutrient Emissions in RIver Systems; Behrendt et al., 2000) was applied to estimate the nutrient emissions in the Danube river basin by point sources and various diffuse pathways. Work for the Mur River Basin in Austria was already carried out by the Institute of Water Quality, Resources and Waste Management at the Vienna University of Technology. This study treats data collection, modelling for the Tone River in Japan, and comparative analysis for these two river basins. The estimation of the nutrient emissions was carried out for 11 different sub catchment areas covering the Tone River Basin for the time period 2000 to 2006. TN emissions into the Tone river basin were 51 kt/y. 67% was via ground water and dominant for all sub catchments. Urban area was also important emission pathway. Human effect is observed in urban structure and agricultural activity. Water supply and sewer system make urban water cycle with pipeline structure. Excess evapotranspiration in arable land is also influential in water cycle. As share of arable land is 37% and there provides agricultural products, it is thought that N emission from agricultural activity is main pollution source. Assumption case of 10% N surplus was simulated and the result was 99% identical to the actual. Even though N surplus reduction does not show drastic impact on N emission, it is of importance to reduce excess of fertilization and to encourage effective agricultural activity

  9. Elk River Watershed - Flood Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, C. C.; Byrne, J. M.; MacDonald, R. J.; Lewis, D.

    2014-12-01

    Flooding has the potential to cause significant impacts to economic activities as well as to disrupt or displace populations. Changing climate regimes such as extreme precipitation events increase flood vulnerability and put additional stresses on infrastructure. Potential flooding from just under 100 (2009 NPRI Reviewed Facility Data Release, Environment Canada) toxic tailings ponds located in Canada increase risk to human safety and the environment. One such geotechnical failure spilt billions of litres of toxic tailings into the Fraser River watershed, British Columbia, when a tailings pond dam breach occurred in August 2014. Damaged and washed out roadways cut access to essential services as seen by the extensive floods that occurred in Saskatchewan and Manitoba in July 2014, and in Southern Alberta in 2013. Recovery efforts from events such as these can be lengthy, and have substantial social and economic impacts both in loss of revenue and cost of repair. The objective of this study is to investigate existing conditions in the Elk River watershed and model potential future hydrological changes that can increase flood risk hazards. By analyzing existing hydrology, meteorology, land cover, land use, economic, and settlement patterns a baseline is established for existing conditions in the Elk River watershed. Coupling the Generate Earth Systems Science (GENESYS) high-resolution spatial hydrometeorological model with flood hazard analysis methodology, high-resolution flood vulnerability base line maps are created using historical climate conditions. Further work in 2015 will examine possible impacts for a range of climate change and land use change scenarios to define changes to future flood risk and vulnerability.

  10. Aquatic habitats in relation to river flow in the Apalachicola River floodplain, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, Helen M.; Darst, Melanie R.; Grubbs, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    This study is part of a larger effort to identify fresh water needs throughout the region and develop a mechanism for basinwide water management. Quantitative estimates of the amount of aquatic habitat in the floodplain in relation to river flow are presented. Plates show streams, lakes, and floodplain forests connected to the main river channel at selected flows; an analysis of long-term flow record in the Apalachicola River; and a review of the literature regarding fishes in floodplains of the Apalachicola River and other rivers of the Eastern United States. Examples show how this report can be used to assess impacts of flow alterations on aquatic habitats and fishes.

  11. River Mileages and Drainage Areas for Illinois Streams. Volume 1. Illinois Except Illinois River Basin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    8E MATTOON 9.4 TOPOGRAPHIC DIVIDE MATTOON KICKAPOO CREEK (MOUTH AT EMAARRAS RIVER MILE 115.5)COLES COUNTY 0.6 ROAD S35.TI2N9R 9E TOLEDO 0.6 USGS GAGE...TOPOGRAPHIC DIVIDE MATTOON RILEY CREEK (MOUTH AT KICKAPOO CREEK MILE 5.3 ) COLES COUNTY 0.2 ROAD S21,T12NR 9E TOLEDO 0.5 ROAD S21,TI2NR 9E TOLEDO 1.3 N Y C...311-312 Kellogg Ravine Lake Michigan St. Lawrence River... 131 Kent Creek Rock River Rock River ........... 312 Kickapoo Creek Embarras River

  12. Hood River Passive House, Hood River, Oregon (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-02-01

    The Hood River Passive Project was developed by Root Design Build of Hood River Oregon using the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) to meet all of the requirements for certification under the European Passive House standards. The Passive House design approach has been gaining momentum among residential designers for custom homes and BEopt modeling indicates that these designs may actually exceed the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program to "reduce home energy use by 30%-50%" (compared to 2009 energy codes for new homes). This report documents the short term test results of the Shift House and compares the results of PHPP and BEopt modeling of the project. The design includes high R-Value assemblies, extremely tight construction, high performance doors and windows, solar thermal DHW, heat recovery ventilation, moveable external shutters and a high performance ductless mini-split heat pump. Cost analysis indicates that many of the measures implemented in this project did not meet the BA standard for cost neutrality. The ductless mini-split heat pump, lighting and advanced air leakage control were the most cost effective measures. The future challenge will be to value engineer the performance levels indicated here in modeling using production based practices at a significantly lower cost.

  13. 76 FR 49431 - Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee will meet...

  14. Overview from west bank of Schuykill River. Philadelphia & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview from west bank of Schuykill River. - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Bridge at West Falls, Spanning Schuylkill River, southeast of Roosevelt Boulevard Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  15. 23. VIEW SHOWING SALT RIVER PROJECT CREWS SLIPFORMING LATERAL DURING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW SHOWING SALT RIVER PROJECT CREWS SLIPFORMING LATERAL DURING REHABILITATION AND BETTERMENT PROGRAM Photographer: unknown. April 1968 - Arizona Canal, North of Salt River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. Mississippi River Headwaters Lakes in Minnesota. Feasibility Study. Appendices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    at Days High Landing 1,203.8 - 3,175 Mississippi River at Pokegama Dam 1,183.8 - 3,265 Prairie River (mouth) 1,177.5 446 3,900 Swan River (mouth...30.0 200 at Jacobson, approxi- mately one-half mile downstream from Swan River mouth (1) UM = Upper Mississippi. SW = Swan River. (2) Values listed...River reaches, the Prairie River, and Swan River were studied by approximate methods. C-1 c. A current study by the Department of Housing and Urban

  17. Inundation risk for embanked rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupczewski, W. G.; Kochanek, K.; Bogdanowicz, E.; Markiewicz, I.

    2013-03-01

    The Flood Frequency Analysis (FFA) concentrates on probability distribution of peak flows of flood hydrographs. However, examination of floods that haunted and devastated the large parts of Poland lead us to revision of the views on the assessment of flood risk of Polish rivers. It turned out that flooding is caused not only by overflow of the levees' crest but mostly due to the prolonged exposure to high water on levees structure causing dangerous leaks and breaches that threaten their total destruction. This is because, the levees are weakened by long-lasting water pressure and as a matter of fact their damage usually occurs after the culmination has passed the affected location. The probability of inundation is the total of probabilities of exceeding embankment crest by flood peak and the probability of washout of levees. Therefore, in addition to the maximum flow one should consider also the duration of high waters in a river channel. In the paper the new two-component model of flood dynamics: "Duration of high waters-Discharge Threshold-Probability of non-exceedance" (DqF), with the methodology of its parameters estimation was proposed as a completion to the classical FFA methods. Such model can estimate the duration of stages (flows) of an assumed magnitude with a given probability of exceedance. The model combined with the technical evaluation of probability of levees breach due to the d-days duration of flow above alarm stage gives the annual probability of inundation caused by the embankment breaking. The results of theoretical investigation were illustrated by a practical example of the model implementation to the series of daily flow of the Vistula River at Szczucin. Regardless promising results, the method of risk assessment due to prolonged exposure of levees to high water is still in its infancy despite its great cognitive potential and practical importance. Therefore, we would like to point out the need for and usefulness of the DqF model as

  18. Inundation risk for embanked rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupczewski, W. G.; Kochanek, K.; Bogdanowicz, E.; Markiewicz, I.

    2013-08-01

    The Flood Frequency Analysis (FFA) concentrates on probability distribution of peak flows of flood hydrographs. However, examination of floods that haunted and devastated the large parts of Poland lead us to revision of the views on the assessment of flood risk of Polish rivers. It turned out that flooding is caused not only by the overflow of the levee crest but also due to the prolonged exposure to high water on levees structure causing dangerous leaks and breaches that threaten their total destruction. This is because the levees are weakened by long-lasting water pressure and as a matter of fact their damage usually occurs after the culmination has passed the affected location. The probability of inundation is the total of probabilities of exceeding embankment crest by flood peak and the probability of washout of levees. Therefore, in addition to the maximum flow one should also consider the duration of high waters in a river channel. In the paper the new two-component model of flood dynamics: "Duration of high waters-Discharge Threshold-Probability of non-exceedance" (DqF), with the methodology of its parameter estimation was proposed as a completion to the classical FFA methods. Such a model can estimate the duration of stages (flows) of an assumed magnitude with a given probability of exceedance. The model combined with the technical evaluation of the probability of levee breaches due to the duration (d) of flow above alarm stage gives the annual probability of inundation caused by the embankment breaking. The results of theoretical investigation were illustrated by a practical example of the model implementation to the series of daily flow of the Vistula River at Szczucin. Regardless of promising results, the method of risk assessment due to prolonged exposure of levees to high water is still in its infancy despite its great cognitive potential and practical importance. Therefore, we would like to point out the need for and usefulness of the DqF model as

  19. Balancing hydropower production and river bed incision in operating a run-of-river hydropower scheme along the River Po

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denaro, Simona; Dinh, Quang; Bizzi, Simone; Bernardi, Dario; Pavan, Sara; Castelletti, Andrea; Schippa, Leonardo; Soncini-Sessa, Rodolfo

    2013-04-01

    Water management through dams and reservoirs is worldwide necessary to support key human-related activities ranging from hydropower production to water allocation, and flood risk mitigation. Reservoir operations are commonly planned in order to maximize these objectives. However reservoirs strongly influence river geomorphic processes causing sediment deficit downstream, altering the flow regime, leading, often, to process of river bed incision: for instance the variations of river cross sections over few years can notably affect hydropower production, flood mitigation, water supply strategies and eco-hydrological processes of the freshwater ecosystem. The river Po (a major Italian river) has experienced severe bed incision in the last decades. For this reason infrastructure stability has been negatively affected, and capacity to derive water decreased, navigation, fishing and tourism are suffering economic damages, not to mention the impact on the environment. Our case study analyzes the management of Isola Serafini hydropower plant located on the main Po river course. The plant has a major impact to the geomorphic river processes downstream, affecting sediment supply, connectivity (stopping sediment upstream the dam) and transport capacity (altering the flow regime). Current operation policy aims at maximizing hydropower production neglecting the effects in term of geomorphic processes. A new improved policy should also consider controlling downstream river bed incision. The aim of this research is to find suitable modeling framework to identify an operating policy for Isola Serafini reservoir able to provide an optimal trade-off between these two conflicting objectives: hydropower production and river bed incision downstream. A multi-objective simulation-based optimization framework is adopted. The operating policy is parameterized as a piecewise linear function and the parameters optimized using an interactive response surface approach. Global and local

  20. Contamination of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in Chao Phraya River and Bangpakong River, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kunacheva, Chinagarn; Boontanon, Suwanna Kitpati; Fujii, Shigeo; Tanaka, Shuhei; Musirat, Chanatip; Artsalee, Chattakarn; Wongwattana, Thana

    2009-01-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have been used for many years, and are distributed all over the world. This study focused on occurrences of PFCs, especially perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctonoic acid (PFOA) in Thai rivers and industrial estate discharges, while comparing results with rivers of other Asian countries (Japan, China, and Malaysia). Surveys were conducted in Chao Phraya River, Bangpakong River and three industrial estates. A solid phase extraction (SPE) and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS were used for the analysis of these chemicals. The average concentrations of PFOS and PFOA were 1.9 and 4.7 ng/L, respectively in Chao Phraya River, while lower concentrations were detected in Bangpakong River with the averages of 0.7 ng/L for both PFOS and PFOA. Higher concentrations were detected in all industrial estate discharges with the averages of 64.3 ng/L for PFOA and 17.9 ng/L for PFOS., Total loadings from three industrial estates were 1.93 g/d for PFOS and 11.81 g/d for PFOA. The concentration levels in Thai rivers were less than rivers in Japan, China, and Malaysia. However, PFCs loading rate of Chao Phraya River was much higher than Yodo River (Japan), due to the higher flow rate. The other six PFCs were found above the Limit of Quantification (LOQ) in most samples. PFHxS and PFNA were also highly detected in some river samples.

  1. Establishing a context for river rehabilitation, North Fork Gunnison River, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Jaquette, Christopher; Wohl, Ellen; Cooper, David

    2005-05-01

    Initial river rehabilitation efforts along the North Fork Gunnison River in Colorado focused on the use of in-stream structures and channel stabilization to create a single-thread channel with pools along a braided river. These efforts were based on the assumption that the river's braided planform results primarily from land use during the past century. In order to establish a context for further rehabilitation, we evaluated the possibility that the river might be braided as a result of processes independent of land use. We estimated volume, grain-size distribution, and lithology of sediment sources along the river corridor and evaluated the planform stability of the river during the past century using historical sources, aerial photographs covering 1939-1997, and comparison of bankfull discharge and gradient in the study area to values published for braided and meandering rivers. Our results indicate that the North Fork Gunnison River has been primarily braided in its lower reaches during the past few hundred years, although the channel planform tends toward a single-thread channel during decades of lower precipitation and discharge. Although land use is not the primary cause of braiding along the North Fork Gunnison River, it has decreased channel stability, and rehabilitation efforts should be designed to reduce these effects. Our results illustrate the importance of planning river rehabilitation measures within a historical context that accounts for both catchment-scale and reach-scale controls on channel processes and planform.

  2. South Fork Holston River basin 1988 biomonitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Saylor, C.F.; Ahlstedt, S.A.

    1990-06-01

    There is concern over the effects of shifts in land use use practices on the aquatic fauna of streams in the South Fork Holston River basin in northwestern North Carolina and southwestern Virginia. Trout reproduction has noticeably declined in the Watauga River subbasin. The Watauga River and Elk River subbasins have been subjected to commercial and resort development. The Middle fork Holston River and the upper South Fork Holston River subbasins have been affected by agricultural and mining activities, respectively (Cox, 1986). To aid reclamation and management of the South Fork Holston basin, Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) biologists conducted biomonitoring--including index of biotic integrity and macroinvertebrate sampling--on the Middle Fork Holston, South Fork Holston, Watauga, and Elk Rivers to assess cumulative impairment related to changes in habitat and pollutant loading in these subbasins. Biomonitoring can detect environmental degradation, help document problem areas, and assist in development of strategies for managing water quality. This report discusses the methods and materials and results of the biomonitoring of South Fork Holston River Basin. 13 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. 33 CFR 117.313 - New River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New River. 117.313 Section 117.313 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.313 New River. (a) The draw of the SE....

  4. 33 CFR 117.739 - Passaic River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the drawtender at Upper Hack Bridge mile 6.9, across the Hackensack River at Secaucus, N.J. In the event the HX drawtender is at the Lower Hack Bridge, mile 3.4 on the Hackensack River, at Jersey...

  5. 33 CFR 117.739 - Passaic River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the drawtender at Upper Hack Bridge mile 6.9, across the Hackensack River at Secaucus, N.J. In the event the HX drawtender is at the Lower Hack Bridge, mile 3.4 on the Hackensack River, at Jersey...

  6. 33 CFR 117.739 - Passaic River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the drawtender at Upper Hack Bridge mile 6.9, across the Hackensack River at Secaucus, N.J. In the event the HX drawtender is at the Lower Hack Bridge, mile 3.4 on the Hackensack River, at Jersey...

  7. 33 CFR 117.711 - Cohansey River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cohansey River. 117.711 Section 117.711 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.711 Cohansey River. The draw of...

  8. 33 CFR 117.716 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.716 Section 117.716 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.716 Delaware River. The...

  9. 33 CFR 117.759 - Wading River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wading River. 117.759 Section 117.759 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.759 Wading River. The draw of the...

  10. 33 CFR 117.730 - Maurice River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maurice River. 117.730 Section 117.730 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.730 Maurice River. The draw of...

  11. 33 CFR 117.716 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.716 Section 117.716 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.716 Delaware River. The...

  12. 33 CFR 117.711 - Cohansey River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cohansey River. 117.711 Section 117.711 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.711 Cohansey River. The draw of...

  13. 33 CFR 117.731 - Mullica River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mullica River. 117.731 Section 117.731 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.731 Mullica River. The draws of...

  14. 33 CFR 117.730 - Maurice River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maurice River. 117.730 Section 117.730 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.730 Maurice River. The draw of...

  15. 33 CFR 117.758 - Tuckahoe River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tuckahoe River. 117.758 Section 117.758 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.758 Tuckahoe River. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.756 - South River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false South River. 117.756 Section 117.756 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.756 South River. The draw of the Conrail...

  17. 33 CFR 117.756 - South River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false South River. 117.756 Section 117.756 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.756 South River. The draw of the Conrail...

  18. 33 CFR 117.711 - Cohansey River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cohansey River. 117.711 Section 117.711 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.711 Cohansey River. The draw of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.731 - Mullica River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mullica River. 117.731 Section 117.731 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.731 Mullica River. The draws of...

  20. 33 CFR 117.758 - Tuckahoe River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tuckahoe River. 117.758 Section 117.758 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.758 Tuckahoe River. The draw of...

  1. 33 CFR 117.713 - Cooper River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cooper River. 117.713 Section 117.713 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.713 Cooper River. (a) The drawspans for...

  2. 33 CFR 117.756 - South River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false South River. 117.756 Section 117.756 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.756 South River. The draw of the Conrail...

  3. 33 CFR 117.716 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.716 Section 117.716 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.716 Delaware River. The...

  4. 33 CFR 117.730 - Maurice River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maurice River. 117.730 Section 117.730 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.730 Maurice River. The draw of...

  5. 33 CFR 117.730 - Maurice River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maurice River. 117.730 Section 117.730 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.730 Maurice River. The draw of...

  6. 33 CFR 117.730 - Maurice River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maurice River. 117.730 Section 117.730 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.730 Maurice River. The draw of...

  7. 33 CFR 117.713 - Cooper River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cooper River. 117.713 Section 117.713 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.713 Cooper River. (a) The drawspans for...

  8. 33 CFR 117.713 - Cooper River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cooper River. 117.713 Section 117.713 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.713 Cooper River. (a) The drawspans for...

  9. 33 CFR 117.731 - Mullica River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mullica River. 117.731 Section 117.731 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.731 Mullica River. The draws of...

  10. 33 CFR 117.756 - South River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false South River. 117.756 Section 117.756 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.756 South River. The draw of the Conrail...

  11. 33 CFR 117.758 - Tuckahoe River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tuckahoe River. 117.758 Section 117.758 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.758 Tuckahoe River. The draw of...

  12. 33 CFR 117.759 - Wading River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wading River. 117.759 Section 117.759 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.759 Wading River. The draw of the...

  13. 33 CFR 117.731 - Mullica River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mullica River. 117.731 Section 117.731 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.731 Mullica River. The draws of...

  14. 33 CFR 117.711 - Cohansey River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cohansey River. 117.711 Section 117.711 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.711 Cohansey River. The draw of...

  15. 33 CFR 117.758 - Tuckahoe River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tuckahoe River. 117.758 Section 117.758 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.758 Tuckahoe River. The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.756 - South River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false South River. 117.756 Section 117.756 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.756 South River. The draw of the Conrail...

  17. 33 CFR 117.731 - Mullica River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mullica River. 117.731 Section 117.731 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.731 Mullica River. The draws of...

  18. 33 CFR 117.758 - Tuckahoe River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tuckahoe River. 117.758 Section 117.758 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.758 Tuckahoe River. The draw of...

  19. 33 CFR 117.716 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.716 Section 117.716 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.716 Delaware River. The...

  20. 33 CFR 117.759 - Wading River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wading River. 117.759 Section 117.759 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.759 Wading River. The draw of the...