Science.gov

Sample records for ailments including cancer

  1. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    2012-05-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002, registered in 89 population-based cancer registries (CRs) and followed-up to 31st December 2003. Over 17,688 cases of rare thoracic cancers were selected based on the list of the RACECARE project. Mesothelioma was the most common tumour (19 per million per year) followed by epithelial tumours of the trachea and thymus (1.3 and 1.7, respectively). The age standardised incidence rates of epithelial tumours of the trachea was double in Eastern and Southern Europe versus the other European regions: 2 per million per year. Epithelial tumours of the thymus had the lowest incidence in Northern and Eastern Europe and UK and Ireland(1) and somewhat higher incidence in Central and Southern Europe.(2) Highest incidence in mesothelioma was seen in UK and Ireland(23) and lowest in Eastern Europe.(4) Patients with tumours of the thymus had the best prognosis (1-year survival 85%, 66% at 5 years). Five year survival was lowest for the mesothelioma 5% compared to 14% of patients with tumours of the trachea. Mesothelioma was the most prevalent rare cancer (12,000 cases), followed by thymus (7000) and trachea (1400). Cancer Registry (CR) data play an important role in revealing the burden of rare thoracic cancers and monitoring the effect of regulations on asbestos use and smoking related policies.

  2. Pharmacist-led minor ailment programs: a Canadian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jeff Gordon; Joubert, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacists have a long history of helping Canadians with minor ailments. This often has involved management with over-the-counter medications. If pharmacists felt that the best care required something more robust, they would refer the patient to a physician. In hopes of improving the care of such ailments, Canadian provinces have granted pharmacists the option of selecting medications traditionally under physician control. This review examines the Canadian perspective on pharmacists prescribing for minor ailments and the evidence of value for these programs. It might provide guidance for other jurisdictions contemplating such a move. PMID:27570460

  3. Cheating in medical school: the unacknowledged ailment.

    PubMed

    Kusnoor, Anita V; Falik, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    The reported prevalence of cheating among US medical students ranges from 0% to 58%. Cheating behaviors include copying from others, using unauthorized notes, sharing information about observed structured clinical encounters, and dishonesty about performing physical examinations on patients. Correlates of cheating in medical school include prior cheating behavior, burnout, and inadequate understanding about what constitutes cheating. Institutional responses include expulsion, reprimands, counseling, and peer review. Preventing cheating requires establishing standards for acceptable behavior, focusing on learning rather than assessment, involving medical students in peer review, and creating a culture of academic integrity. Cheating in medical school may have serious long-term consequences for future physicians. Institutions should develop environments that promote integrity.

  4. Remedies for common family ailments: 9. Haemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A

    1995-01-01

    Haemorrhoids or piles are varicosities in the anal canal caused by local pressure. Sometimes they prolapse. Symptoms may include itching, discomfort, pain and bleeding. Haemorrhoids are common in pregnancy. Constipation aggravates piles, so a healthy diet with plenty of water and fibre is advisable. Some sufferers need an appropriate laxative as well. Cleanliness of the anal area is important. Proprietary moist toilet tissues are sold for this purpose and can be soothing and helpful. Relief of symptoms is by haemorrhoid creams, ointments and suppositories. Active ingredients typically include antiseptics, anti-inflammatories, anti-pruritics and local anaesthetics. Many are available from pharmacies without a prescription. If in doubt, always refer the patient to a doctor. For example, rectal bleeding may be due to some more serious condition, or pruritus to anal thrush. In the case of children the advice of a doctor should be sought.

  5. Incidence of and risk factors for skin ailments among farmers working with wastewater-fed agriculture in Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Trang, Do Thuy; Mølbak, Kåre; Cam, Phung Dac; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2007-05-01

    The use of wastewater in agriculture and aquaculture is widespread in many developing countries, but limited information is available about the health hazards associated with this practice. To study the occurrence of skin ailments in relation to wastewater use in agriculture and aquaculture, an open cohort of 636 adults aged 15-70 years living in a wastewater-irrigated area in Hanoi, Vietnam, was followed by weekly visits for 12 months. A nested case-control study with 108 case/control pairs was conducted to investigate possible risk factors for skin ailments. The incidence rate of skin ailments was 32.5 episodes per 100 person-years at risk. Independent determinants of skin ailments included wastewater contact in the past 7 days (odds ratio (OR=2.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-5.82), female gender (OR=2.48, 95% CI 1.06-5.76), fish farming-related jobs (OR=3.47, 95% CI 1.27-9.50) and lack of protective measures (OR=2.24, 95% CI 1.21-4.12). It is likely that effective promotion of personal protective measures and improved hygiene practices amongst wastewater users will mitigate the risk of dermatological problems and will thus be of benefit to public health in communities that rely on the use of wastewater for agricultural and aquacultural productions.

  6. Does and should breast cancer genetic counselling include lifestyle advice?

    PubMed

    Albada, Akke; Vernooij, Madelèn; van Osch, Liesbeth; Pijpe, Anouk; van Dulmen, Sandra; Ausems, Margreet G E M

    2014-03-01

    To optimally inform counselees about their and their relatives' risks, information about lifestyle risk factors, e.g. physical activity and alcohol consumption, might be discussed in breast cancer genetic counselling. This study explored whether lifestyle was discussed, on whose initiative, whether information and/or advice was given, and whether discussion of lifestyle was related to counselees' characteristics and their causal attributions. First and follow-up consultations with 192 consecutive counselees for breast cancer genetic counselling were videotaped and coded for discussion of lifestyle topics. Counselees completed web-based questionnaires before the initial and after the final consultation. With 52 (27%) counselees lifestyle was discussed, either in the first, or the final consultation, or both. Counselees mostly raised the topic (60%). Counsellors provided information about lifestyle risk factors to 19% and lifestyle advice to 6% of the counselees. Discussion of lifestyle was not associated with counselees' characteristics or causal attributions. Post-counselling, more affected counselees considered lifestyle as a cause of their breast cancer (29%) compared to pre-counselling (15%; p = 0.003). Information and advice about lifestyle risk factors was infrequently provided, both with breast cancer unaffected and affected counselees and with those who did and did not consider their lifestyle as a cause of their breast cancer. Modifiable lifestyle factors could be discussed more frequently to optimally inform counselees about possible ways to reduce their risk. Counsellors should be educated about effects of lifestyle and research should be conducted on how to best integrate lifestyle information in breast cancer genetic counselling.

  7. 42 CFR 81.25 - Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cancers. 81.25 Section 81.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Estimate Probability of Causation § 81.25 Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers. For claims including two or more primary cancers, DOL will use NIOSH-IREP to calculate the...

  8. 42 CFR 81.25 - Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cancers. 81.25 Section 81.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Estimate Probability of Causation § 81.25 Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers. For claims including two or more primary cancers, DOL will use NIOSH-IREP to calculate the...

  9. 42 CFR 81.25 - Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cancers. 81.25 Section 81.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Estimate Probability of Causation § 81.25 Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers. For claims including two or more primary cancers, DOL will use NIOSH-IREP to calculate the...

  10. 42 CFR 81.25 - Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cancers. 81.25 Section 81.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Estimate Probability of Causation § 81.25 Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers. For claims including two or more primary cancers, DOL will use NIOSH-IREP to calculate the...

  11. 42 CFR 81.25 - Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cancers. 81.25 Section 81.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Estimate Probability of Causation § 81.25 Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers. For claims including two or more primary cancers, DOL will use NIOSH-IREP to calculate the...

  12. TCGA's Pan-Cancer Efforts and Expansion to Include Whole Genome Sequence - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Carolyn Hutter, Ph.D., Program Director of NHGRI's Division of Genomic Medicine, discusses the expansion of TCGA's Pan-Cancer efforts to include the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PAWG) project.

  13. Anti-cancer scopes and associated mechanisms of Scutellaria extract and flavonoid wogonin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extracts of Scutellaria species have been used in Eastern traditional medicine as well in the Americas for the treatment of several human ailments, including cancer. Crude extracts or flavonoids derived from Scutellaria have been scientifically studied for potential anti-cancer activity using in vit...

  14. The Cancer Experience Map: An Approach to Including the Patient Voice in Supportive Care Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The perspective of the patient, also called the “patient voice”, is an essential element in materials created for cancer supportive care. Identifying that voice, however, can be a challenge for researchers and developers. A multidisciplinary team at a health information company tasked with addressing this issue created a representational model they call the “cancer experience map”. This map, designed as a tool for content developers, offers a window into the complex perspectives inside the cancer experience. Informed by actual patient quotes, the map shows common overall themes for cancer patients, concerns at key treatment points, strategies for patient engagement, and targeted behavioral goals. In this article, the team members share the process by which they created the map as well as its first use as a resource for cancer support videos. The article also addresses the broader policy implications of including the patient voice in supportive cancer content, particularly with regard to mHealth apps. PMID:26022846

  15. The cancer experience map: an approach to including the patient voice in supportive care solutions.

    PubMed

    Hall, Leslie Kelly; Kunz, Breanne F; Davis, Elizabeth V; Dawson, Rose I; Powers, Ryan S

    2015-05-28

    The perspective of the patient, also called the "patient voice", is an essential element in materials created for cancer supportive care. Identifying that voice, however, can be a challenge for researchers and developers. A multidisciplinary team at a health information company tasked with addressing this issue created a representational model they call the "cancer experience map". This map, designed as a tool for content developers, offers a window into the complex perspectives inside the cancer experience. Informed by actual patient quotes, the map shows common overall themes for cancer patients, concerns at key treatment points, strategies for patient engagement, and targeted behavioral goals. In this article, the team members share the process by which they created the map as well as its first use as a resource for cancer support videos. The article also addresses the broader policy implications of including the patient voice in supportive cancer content, particularly with regard to mHealth apps.

  16. Panacea seed "Nigella": A review focusing on regenerative effects for gastric ailments.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahida A; Khan, Aziz M; Karim, Sajjad; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Damanhouri, Ghazi A; Mirza, Zeenat

    2016-07-01

    Nigella sativa (NS) or black cumin is a dark, thin, and crescent-shaped, seeded shrub belonging to the Ranunculaceae family commonly growing on Mediterranean coasts in Saudi Arabia, northern Africa and Asia. They have amazing curative and therapeutic features that make them one of the most popular, safe, non-detrimental, and cytoprotective medicinal plant that can be used for prevention and treatment of many complicated diseases. Originally, N. sativa was used to treat migraines and allergy, and researches have shown its effectiveness in destroying cancer cells as well. The gastro protective effect of NS oil and its constituents has also been reported earlier; however, the complete perception on etiology and pathogenesis of gastric ulcer is not yet clear. Herein, we attempt to unveil some of the potential mechanisms exhibited by NS in preventing problems related to gastric ulcers. Gastric ailments like ulcers and tumors are the most common disorders of the gastro-intestinal tract in the present day life of the industrialized world. Gastric ulcer being a multifaceted problem exhibits complex etiology and is the fourth most common cause of cancer mortality. Drug interactions and toxicity are the main hindrances in chemotherapy. The existing merits and demerits of modern-day drugs make us turn toward the plant kingdom which may provide a valuable resource of novel potent natural compounds for pharmaceuticals or alternately, as dietary supplements. In this context, the revered phytotherapeutic N. sativa comes as a promising savior in today's times. This review aims to summarize, both the functional and disease-related effects in the area of gastroenterology. PMID:27298589

  17. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events.

  18. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Medical exposures, including hormone therapy, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Friis, Søren; Kesminiene, Ausrele; Espina, Carolina; Auvinen, Anssi; Straif, Kurt; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    The 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends limiting - or avoiding when possible - the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because of the increased risk of cancer, nevertheless acknowledging that prescription of HRT may be indicated under certain medical conditions. Current evidence shows that HRT, generally prescribed as menopausal hormone therapy, is associated with an increased risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, and ovary, with the risk pattern depending on factors such as the type of therapy (oestrogen-only or combined oestrogen-progestogen), duration of treatment, and initiation according to the time of menopause. Carcinogenicity has also been established for anti-neoplastic agents used in cancer therapy, immunosuppressants, oestrogen-progestogen contraceptives, and tamoxifen. Medical use of ionising radiation, an established carcinogen, can provide major health benefits; however, prudent practices need to be in place, with procedures and techniques providing the needed diagnostic information or therapeutic gain with the lowest possible radiation exposure. For pharmaceutical drugs and medical radiation exposure with convincing evidence on their carcinogenicity, health benefits have to be balanced against the risks; potential increases in long-term cancer risk should be considered in the context of the often substantial and immediate health benefits from diagnosis and/or treatment. Thus, apart from HRT, no general recommendations on reducing cancer risk were given for carcinogenic drugs and medical radiation in the 4th edition of European Code against Cancer. It is crucial that the application of these measures relies on medical expertise and thorough benefit-risk evaluation. This also pertains to cancer-preventive drugs, and self-medication with aspirin or other potential chemopreventive drugs is strongly discouraged because of the possibility of serious, potentially lethal, adverse events. PMID:26390952

  19. An 8-gene signature, including methylated and down-regulated glutathione peroxidase 3, of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglan; Yang, Jung-Jin; Kim, Yoon Sun; Kim, Ki-Yeol; Ahn, Woong Shick; Yang, Sanghwa

    2010-02-01

    We have identified an 8-gene signature with significant expression differences between gastric cancer and normal gastric tissues. This 8-gene set can predict the normal and cancer status of gastric tissues with more than 96% accuracy in a totally independent microarray dataset. The 8 genes are composed of down-regulated KLF4, GPX3, SST and LIPF, together with up-regulated SERPINH1, THY1 and INHBA in gastric cancer. To corroborate the differential gene expression pattern, we chose GPX3 and examined its expression pattern in detail. A comparison of GPX3 expression pattern shows a broader down-regulated pattern in multiple types of cancers, including cervical, thyroid, head and neck, lung cancers and melanoma than in healthy controls. An immuno-histostaining analysis in tissue microarrays confirms GPX3 down-regulation in gastric cancer. Mechanism-wise GPX3 down-regulation in gastric cancer is due to promoter hypermethylation. Collectively, these results show a correct identification of 8 genes as gastric cancer biomarkers. PMID:20043075

  20. Remedies for common family ailments: 5. Sunscreen creams and lotions.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A

    1994-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to strong sunlight significantly increases the risk of skin cancer. Sunscreens provide useful protection from sunburn if correctly used. Some sunscreens contain chemical compounds which work by absorbing UVB wavelengths. Others contain chemicals which act as reflectants of UVA waves, eg titanium dioxide. Stars on the packet indicate how much UVA protection the product provides-the more stars, the more protection. Products are labelled with their sunscreen protection factor (SPF). The higher the factor, the greater the protection. Products used on children should have an SPF of at least 15. Fair-skinned and freckled people also need a high SPF as they burn easily. Use products according to the manufacturer's instructions and reapply at intervals and after swimming. Some products combine sunscreen properties with being water resistant perspiration-resistant or insect-repellent. Avoid folklore remedies like coconut oil. It is better to go or a scientifically formulated, branded product. A properly formulated after-sun lotion is advisable in order to counteract the drying effects of the sun on the skin.

  1. Ethnomedicinal plants used to treat human ailments in the prehistoric place of Harla and Dengego valleys, eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional medicines remained as the most affordable and easily accessible source of treatment in the primary health care system among diverse communities in Ethiopia. The Oromo community living in the prehistoric Harla and Dengego valleys has long history of ethnomedicinal know-how and practice against human and livestock ailments. However, this rich ethnomedicinal knowledge had been remained unexplored hitherto. This study focus on the comprehensive ethnomedicinal investigation in an attempt to safeguard the deteriorating ethnomedicinal knowledge that can be used as a steppingstone for phytochemical and pharmacological analysis. Methods Fifty five (44 male and 11 female) systematically selected informants including ten traditional herbalists (key informants) were participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews, discussions and guided field walk constituted the data collection methods. Factor of informant consensus (Fic), frequency of citation (F%), and binomial test were employed in data analysis. Medicinal plant specimens were collected, identified and kept at Herbarium of Haramaya University (HHU). Results A total of 83 traditional medicinal plant species against human ailments in 70 genera and 40 Families were recorded. Twelve medicinal plants were marketable in open market places of the nearby towns. Formulations recorded added to 140 remedies for 81 human ailments. Concoction accounts 50.7% of the total preparations followed by fluids extraction (10.7%) and infusion (6.4%). Fifteen different plant parts were used for remedies preparation wherein leaves accounted 46.4%, stem 9.2%, fruits and roots each 7.8%. Most of the remedies (90.7%) were prepared from single plant species like, aphrodisiac fresh rhizome of Kleinia abyssinica (A. Rich.) A. Berger chewed and swallowed few hours before sexual performance for a man having problem of erectile dysfunction. The Fic value ranges between 1.0 (gastritis and heartburn/pyrosis) and 0.77 (swollen

  2. Efficacy of short-term Yoga therapy program on quality of life in patients with psychosomatic ailments

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sumit; Ramya, C. S.; Shankar, Vinutha; Kutty, Karthiyanee

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to study the effect of short-term Yoga therapy program on quality of life in patients suffering from psychosomatic ailments. Methods: Sample size and Study period: All the subjects coming to SVYASA AROGYADHAMA in month of July 2011 for Yoga therapy for various psychosomatic ailments and were free of any primary psychiatric illness and volunteering to participate were enrolled in the study after taking informed consent. Their physical condition was healthy enough to practice Yoga as judged clinically. All subjects (n = 94) who were enrolled in the study underwent Integrated Approach to Yoga Therapy, which included Asanas, Pranayamas, meditation, Kriyas and lectures on practice of Yoga and derived special techniques in their respective sections. The quality of life was assessed by SF-12 questionnaire and thereby calculating Physical and Mental Composite Scores (PCS and MCS) before and after 1 week of Yoga therapy. Data thus obtained was analyzed using paired t-test. Results: A significant improvement (P < 0.001) was seen in the study group in both PCS (from mean ± SD of 37.50 ± 9.58 to 43.7 ± 8.73) and MCS (from 45.87 ± 9.57 to 53.35 ± 7.9.) with minor variations in patients of various departments. Conclusion: A short-term Yoga therapy program leads to a remarkable improvement in the quality of life of the subjects and can contribute favorably in the management of psychosomatic disorders. PMID:25657461

  3. Protein-energy malnutrition: a risk factor for various ailments.

    PubMed

    Batool, Rizwana; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Sultan, Muhammad Tauseef; Saeed, Farhan; Naz, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    The wheel of industrialization that spun throughout the last century resulted in urbanization coupled with modifications in lifestyles and dietary habits. However, the communities living in developing economies are facing many problems related to their diet and health. Amongst, the prevalence of nutritional problems especially protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and micronutrients deficiencies are the rising issues. Moreover, the immunity or susceptibility to infect-parasitic diseases is also directly linked with the nutritional status of the host. Likewise, disease-related malnutrition that includes an inflammatory component is commonly observed in clinical practice thus affecting the quality of life. The PEM is treatable but early detection is a key for its appropriate management. However, controlling the menace of PEM requires an aggressive partnership between the physician and the dietitian. This review mainly attempts to describe the pathophysiology, prevalence and consequences of PEM and aims to highlight the importance of this clinical syndrome and the recent growth in our understanding of the processes behind its development. Some management strategies/remedies to overcome PEM are also the limelight of the article. In the nutshell, early recognition, prompt management, and robust follow up are critical for best outcomes in preventing and treating PEM.

  4. Selective Non-nucleoside Inhibitors of Human DNA Methyltransferases Active in Cancer Including in Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are important enzymes involved in epigenetic control of gene expression and represent valuable targets in cancer chemotherapy. A number of nucleoside DNMT inhibitors (DNMTi) have been studied in cancer, including in cancer stem cells, and two of them (azacytidine and decitabine) have been approved for treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, only a few non-nucleoside DNMTi have been identified so far, and even fewer have been validated in cancer. Through a process of hit-to-lead optimization, we report here the discovery of compound 5 as a potent non-nucleoside DNMTi that is also selective toward other AdoMet-dependent protein methyltransferases. Compound 5 was potent at single-digit micromolar concentrations against a panel of cancer cells and was less toxic in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than two other compounds tested. In mouse medulloblastoma stem cells, 5 inhibited cell growth, whereas related compound 2 showed high cell differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, 2 and 5 are the first non-nucleoside DNMTi tested in a cancer stem cell line. PMID:24387159

  5. Aeroallergens and viable microbes in sandstorm dust. Potential triggers of allergic and nonallergic respiratory ailments.

    PubMed

    Kwaasi, A A; Parhar, R S; al-Mohanna, F A; Harfi, H A; Collison, K S; al-Sedairy, S T

    1998-03-01

    Aeroallergens and antigens in sandstorm dust, extracts of which were skin prick test (SPT) positive in allergic patients, were detected by rocket immunoelectrophoresis and ELISA. Fungi and bacteria isolated by agar settle plates and soil dilution and soil washing methods were enumerated and identified. Cat dander, Acacia, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chenopodium, Cladosporium, Bermuda grass, Pithecellobium, Prosopis, Rumex, cultivated rye, and Washingtonia palm allergens were detected by both methods. Viable microbes including 1892 +/- 325 colony-forming units (cfu) of bacteria, and 869 +/- 75 cfu of fungi were isolated per gram of dust by the soil dilution method. Randomly selected microbial colonies on streaking and subculture were found to consist of between two and seven mixed colonies. Fungi including Alternaria, Aspergillus, Botrytis, Cladosporium, Mortierella, Mucor, Mycelia sterilia, Penicillium, Pythium, Ulocladium, Verticillium, and some yeasts were isolated. Actinomyces, Bacillus, Pseudomonas, and mostly coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were identified, but the bulk of unidentified bacterial isolates were mainly mixed colonies of rods, cocci, coccobacilli, and some filamentous types. Six-hour agar settle-plate counts during sandstorms were 100 and 40% higher for bacteria and fungi, respectively, than without sandstorms. The most abundant aeroallergens were those of Acacia, Alternaria, Aspergillus, Bermuda grass, Cladosporium, cultivated rye, Prosopis, and cat dander. Pithecellobium dulce, Rumex crispus, and Washingtonia palm allergens were detectable for the first time in Riyadh. IgE reactivities of the dust in man were demonstrated by ELISA using sera from atopic, exposed, and normal subjects. These results indicate that sandstorm dust is a prolific source of potential triggers of allergic and nonallergic respiratory ailments, and the methods mentioned here should be routinely used for quick sampling of the environment. PMID:9542605

  6. Which domains should be included in a cancer pain classification system? Analyses of longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Anne Kari; Brunelli, Cinzia; Klepstad, Pål; Aass, Nina; Apolone, Giovanni; Corli, Oscar; Montanari, Mauro; Caraceni, Augusto; Kaasa, Stein

    2012-03-01

    The overall aim of the present study was to further develop an evidence-based platform for the content of an international cancer pain classification system. Data from a multicentre, observational longitudinal study of cancer patients were analysed. Analyses were carried out in 2 samples: (A) Cross-sectional data of patients on opioids at inclusion, and (B) patients just admitted to palliative care. Outcome measures in the models we investigated were pain on average, worst pain, and pain relief at inclusion, and at day 14, respectively. Uni- and multivariate regression models were applied to test the explicative power on pain outcomes of a series of known pain domains, including incident pain, psychological distress, neuropathic pain, pain localisation, sleep disturbances, total morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD), and cancer diagnosis. In the 2 analyses, 1529 (A) and 352 (B) patients were included, respectively. Incident pain, pain localisation, MEDD, use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and sleep were associated with one or more of the pain outcomes in analysis A, while initial pain intensity, initial pain relief, incident pain, localisation of pain, cancer diagnosis, and age were predictors in the longitudinal analysis. Identified domains explained 16% to 24% of the variability of the pain outcome. Initial pain intensity emerged as the strongest predictor of pain outcome after 2 weeks, and incident pain was confirmed to be a relevant domain. The regression models explained only a minor part of the variability of pain outcomes.

  7. Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2015 for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer.

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Shinichi; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Okamoto, Aikou; Ito, Kiyoshi; Morishige, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Nao; Kaneuchi, Masanori; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The fourth edition of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer was published in 2015. The guidelines contain seven chapters and six flow charts. The major changes in this new edition are as follows-(1) the format has been changed from reviews to clinical questions (CQ), and the guidelines for optimal clinical practice in Japan are now shown as 41 CQs and answers; (2) the 'flow charts' have been improved and placed near the beginning of the guidelines; (3) the 'basic points', including tumor staging, histological classification, surgical procedures, chemotherapy, and palliative care, are described before the chapter; (4) the FIGO surgical staging of ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, and primary peritoneal cancer was revised in 2014 and the guideline has been revised accordingly to take the updated version of this classification into account; (5) the procedures for examination and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer are described; (6) information on molecular targeting therapy has been added; (7) guidelines for the treatment of recurrent cancer based on tumor markers alone are described, as well as guidelines for providing hormone replacement therapy after treatment. PMID:27142770

  8. Selective inhibition of cancer cells' proliferation by compounds included in extracts from Baltic Sea cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Pawlik, Anna; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Toruńska-Sitarz, Anna; Narajczyk, Magdalena; Richert, Malwina; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna

    2015-12-15

    Cyanobacteria are a rich source of biologically active compounds used in pharmacology and biotechnology. Due to their high capacity of adaptation, which is reflected in the production of diverse metabolites, including toxins, these microorganisms are able to inhabit very different environments. In this work, water and ethanol extracts from 11 cyanobacterial strains derived from the Baltic Sea (Microcystis, Synechocystis, Leptolyngbya, Pseudanabaena, Lyngbya, Phormidium, Nodularia and Anabaena genera) were screened for anticancer activity. MCF-7 human breast cancer and HeLa cervical cancer cell lines, as well as HDFa normal human fibroblasts, were used. Three extracts derived from Pseudanabaena sp., Pseudanabaena cf. galeata and Microcystis aeruginosa revealed potent and selective antiproliferative activities against cancer cells. The mechanism of the anticancer activity was explored in MCF-7 cells, and was found to rely on the inhibition of the pro-survival Akt kinase and induction of cell death. The peptide profiles of selected cyanobacterial extracts were determined using LC-MS/MS, and classes of bioactive compounds that might be potentially responsible for the observed anticancer activities are presented.

  9. Combined Modality Therapy Including Intraoperative Electron Irradiation for Locally Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Haddock, Michael G.; Miller, Robert C.; Nelson, Heidi; Pemberton, John H.; Dozois, Eric J.; Alberts, Steven R.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival, relapse patterns, and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer relapse treated with curative-intent therapy, including intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT). Methods and Materials: From April 1981 through January 2008, 607 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer received IOERT as a component of treatment. IOERT was preceded or followed by external radiation (median dose, 45.5 Gy) in 583 patients (96%). Resection was classified as R0 in 227 (37%), R1 in 224 (37%), and R2 in 156 (26%). The median IOERT dose was 15 Gy (range, 7.5-30 Gy). Results: Median overall survival was 36 months. Five- and 10-year survival rates were 30% and 16%, respectively. Survival estimates at 5 years were 46%, 27%, and 16% for R0, R1, and R2 resection, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that R0 resection, no prior chemotherapy, and more recent treatment (in the second half of the series) were associated with improved survival. The 3-year cumulative incidence of central, local, and distant relapse was 12%, 23%, and 49%, respectively. Central and local relapse were more common in previously irradiated patients and in those with subtotal resection. Toxicity Grade 3 or higher partially attributable to IOERT was observed in 66 patients (11%). Neuropathy was observed in 94 patients (15%) and was more common with IOERT doses exceeding 12.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survival and disease control was achievable in patients with locally recurrent colorectal cancer. Continued evaluation of curative-intent, combined-modality therapy that includes IOERT is warranted in this high-risk population.

  10. Ethnobotany of medicinal plants used by Assamese people for various skin ailments and cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Abinash Pratim; Ryakala, Venkat Kishore; Sharma, Pragya; Goswami, Pranab; Bora, Utpal

    2006-06-30

    The present paper deals with the medicinal plants used by the people of Assam for curing different skin ailments and for cosmetics. A total of 85 plants belonging to 49 families have been documented for their therapeutic use against skin diseases and as herbal care. The herbal medicines were prepared from various plant parts of single plant, or multiple plants. The majority of the preparation was made using water as the medium. The mode of application was topical, but in many cases it was also administered orally. In several cases the pure herbal preparations was administered along with milk, ghee, honey, coconut oil, curd, etc. Remedies for 18 skin ailments were documented through this study. About 14 plants are known for their use to cure multiple skin diseases. Among these Curcuma longa and Melia azaderach constitute the major plants. The herbal cosmetic products used by the people of Assam ranges from the enhancement of skin colour, hair care, removal of ugly spots, colouring of nails, palms, and teeth. However, many of the plant preparations used for enhancing beauty were also applied for therapeutic use. Herbal remedies were also available for skin burns, prickly heat and pimples. Information on nine plants used for managing dry skin also emerged from this study.

  11. Ethnobotany of medicinal plants used by Assamese people for various skin ailments and cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Abinash Pratim; Ryakala, Venkat Kishore; Sharma, Pragya; Goswami, Pranab; Bora, Utpal

    2006-06-30

    The present paper deals with the medicinal plants used by the people of Assam for curing different skin ailments and for cosmetics. A total of 85 plants belonging to 49 families have been documented for their therapeutic use against skin diseases and as herbal care. The herbal medicines were prepared from various plant parts of single plant, or multiple plants. The majority of the preparation was made using water as the medium. The mode of application was topical, but in many cases it was also administered orally. In several cases the pure herbal preparations was administered along with milk, ghee, honey, coconut oil, curd, etc. Remedies for 18 skin ailments were documented through this study. About 14 plants are known for their use to cure multiple skin diseases. Among these Curcuma longa and Melia azaderach constitute the major plants. The herbal cosmetic products used by the people of Assam ranges from the enhancement of skin colour, hair care, removal of ugly spots, colouring of nails, palms, and teeth. However, many of the plant preparations used for enhancing beauty were also applied for therapeutic use. Herbal remedies were also available for skin burns, prickly heat and pimples. Information on nine plants used for managing dry skin also emerged from this study. PMID:16473486

  12. Changes in prostate cancer grading: Including a new patient-centric grading system.

    PubMed

    Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2016-04-01

    The first structured approach to grade prostate cancer based on the underlying histological architecture was developed by Donald Gleason who in 1966 proposed a morphologic classification of prostate cancer and in 1974 demonstrated its clinical significance based on prostate cancer-specific death. Contemporarily referred to as the Gleason grading system, it has gained worldwide recognition allowing a more individualized approach to patients with prostate cancer. In 2005, the International Society of Urologic Pathology (ISUP) made the first revisions to the grading system. Subsequently, based on the new discoveries in pathologic and clinical aspects of prostate cancer, as well as the changing nature of the prostate cancer in part due to a robust screening, there was a need for experts to re-visit the approach to grade prostate cancer. In November 2014, the ISUP experts and clinical leaders in prostate cancer from 17 countries conducted a consensus conference in Chicago, IL, USA. The consensus conference defined various grade patterns and proposed the adoption of a new grading system of prostate cancer. Herein, we describe the background and rationale for the changes and provide guidelines to their clinical implementation.

  13. Growing up Kennedy: the role of medical ailments in the life of JFK, 1920-1957.

    PubMed

    Giglio, James N

    2006-10-01

    As a result of the opening of new materials at the John F Kennedy Library relating to John F Kennedy's medical problems, we have a better understanding of the specific nature of those ailments, how they were treated, and how he responded to them. Most important, this study focuses on how his medical problems affected his relationship with his parents, especially his father, in the context of an older sibling who personified what a Kennedy should be: bright, athletic, and healthy. John Kennedy's response to family expectations produced a sometimes rebellious and detached youth who learned to rely on his charm, wit, intellect, and inner toughness to overcome adversity. In the process of dealing with serious medical issues into adulthood, John Kennedy revealed both courage and fortitude-traits that would eventually carry him to the White House.

  14. Reassessing the NTCTCS Staging Systems for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer, Including Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Donald S.A.; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Brierley, James D.; Ain, Kenneth B.; Cooper, David S.; Fein, Henry G.; Haugen, Bryan R.; Ladenson, Paul W.; Magner, James; Ross, Douglas S.; Skarulis, Monica C.; Steward, David L.; Xing, Mingzhao; Litofsky, Danielle R.; Maxon, Harry R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thyroid cancer is unique for having age as a staging variable. Recently, the commonly used age cut-point of 45 years has been questioned. Objective: This study assessed alternate staging systems on the outcome of overall survival, and compared these with current National Thyroid Cancer Treatment Cooperative Study (NTCTCS) staging systems for papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. Methods: A total of 4721 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer were assessed. Five potential alternate staging systems were generated at age cut-points in five-year increments from 35 to 70 years, and tested for model discrimination (Harrell's C-statistic) and calibration (R2). The best five models for papillary and follicular cancer were further tested with bootstrap resampling and significance testing for discrimination. Results: The best five alternate papillary cancer systems had age cut-points of 45–50 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. No significant difference in C-statistic was found between the best alternate and current NTCTCS systems (p = 0.200). The best five alternate follicular cancer systems had age cut-points of 50–55 years, with the highest scoring model using 50 years. All five best alternate staging systems performed better compared with the current system (p = 0.003–0.035). There was no significant difference in discrimination between the best alternate system (cut-point age 50 years) and the best system of cut-point age 45 years (p = 0.197). Conclusions: No alternate papillary cancer systems assessed were significantly better than the current system. New alternate staging systems for follicular cancer appear to be better than the current NTCTCS system, although they require external validation. PMID:26203804

  15. Detection of eight BRCA1 mutations in 10 breast/ovarian cancer families, including 1 family with male breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sruewing, J.P.; Brody, L.C.; Erdos, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Genetic epidemiological evidence suggests that mutations in BRCA1 may be responsible for approximately one half of early onset familial breast cancer and the majority of familial breast/ovarian cancer. The recent cloning of BRCA1 allows for the direct detection of mutations, but the feasibility of presymptomatic screening for cancer susceptibility is unknown. We analyzed genomic DNA from one affected individual from each of 24 families with at least three cases of ovarian or breast cancer, using SSCP assays. Variant SSCP bands were subcloned and sequenced. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization was used to verify sequence changes and to screen DNA from control individuals. Six frameshift and two missense mutations were detected in 10 different families. A frameshift mutation was detected in a male proband affected with both breast and prostate cancer. A 40-bp deletion was detected in a patient who developed intra-abdominal carcinomatosis 1 year after prophylactic oophorectomy. Mutations were detected throughout the gene, and only one was detected in more than a single family. These results provide further evidence that inherited breast and ovarian cancer can occur as a consequence of a wide array of BRCA1 mutations. These results suggests that development of a screening test for BRCA1 mutations will be technically challenging. The finding of a mutation in a family with male breast cancer, not previously thought to be related to BRCA1, also illustrates the potential difficulties of genetic counseling for individuals known to carry mutations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. The FDA guidance on therapeutic cancer vaccines: the need for revision to include preventive cancer vaccines or for a new guidance dedicated to them.

    PubMed

    Finn, Olivera J; Khleif, Samir N; Herberman, Ronald B

    2015-11-01

    Cancer vaccines based on antigens derived from self molecules rather than pathogens have been under basic and clinical investigations for many years. Up until very recently, they had been tested primarily in the setting of metastatic disease with the goal to engage the immune system in slowing down disease progression. Many therapeutic vaccine trials, either investigator initiated or led by pharmaceutical companies, have been completed and many are currently ongoing, following the FDA Guidance on therapeutic cancer vaccines published in 2011. In recent years, the target of cancer vaccines is being shifted to early cancer and even premalignant disease with the goal of preventing cancer. Although some issues addressed in the FDA Guidance on therapeutic vaccines apply to preventive vaccines, many do not. Here, we discuss a set of recommendations for revising the current Guidance to also cover preventive vaccines, or to include in a new Guidance dedicated specifically to vaccines for cancer prevention.

  17. Volatile anaesthetics enhance the metastasis related cellular signalling including CXCR2 of ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaffer, Tanweer; Unwith, Sandeep; Benzonana, Laura; Lian, Qingquan; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro; Ma, Daqing

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian cancer patients relapse after surgical resection. Evidence is accumulating regarding the role of surgery in disseminating cancer cells; in particular anaesthesia may have an impact on cancer re-occurrence. Here, we have investigated the metastatic potential of volatile anaesthetics isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane on ovarian cancer cells. Human ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV3) were exposed to isoflurane (2%), sevoflurane (3.6%) or desflurane (10.3%) for 2 hours. Metastatic related gene expression profiles were measured using the Tumour Metastasis PCR Array and qRT-PCR. Subsequently vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), matrix metalloproteinase 11 (MMP11), transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) proteins expression were determined using immunofluorescent staining. The migratory capacities of SK-OV3 cells were assessed with a scratch assay and the potential role of CXCR2 in mediating the effects of volatile anaesthetics on cancer cell biology were further investigated with CXCR2 knockdown by siRNA. All three volatile anaesthetics altered expression of 70 out of 81 metastasic related genes with significant increases in VEGF-A, MMP-11, CXCR2 and TGF-β genes and protein expression with a magnitude order of desflurane (greatest), sevoflurane and isoflurane. Scratch analysis revealed that exposure to these anesthetics increased migration, which was abolished by CXCR2 knockdown. Volatile anaesthetics at clinically relevant concentrations have strong effects on cancer cell biology which in turn could enhance ovarian cancer metastatic potential. This work raises the urgency for further in vivo studies and clinical trials before any conclusions can be made in term of the alteration of clinical practice. PMID:27028996

  18. Socio-economic status and lung cancer risk including histologic subtyping--a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Ekberg-Aronsson, Marie; Nilsson, Peter M; Nilsson, Jan-Ake; Pehrsson, Kerstin; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran

    2006-01-01

    We investigated prospectively the risk of lung cancer in relation to socio-economic status (SES) in 22,387 middle-aged individuals who attended a screening program in the city of Malmö, Sweden between 1974 and 1992. We also examined the relationship between SES and histologic subtype in smokers. By 2003, a total of 550 lung cancer cases had been identified. Relative risks (RR) were calculated with adjustment for age, current smoking, inhalation habits and marital status at baseline in the low SES group compared to high SES group. Among smokers, the RR (95% confidence interval (CI)) for lung cancer in the low SES group of men was 1.39 (1.11-1.73), and women 1.56 (1.04-2.34). Also among smokers, low SES was associated with an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma in men; RR 1.89 (1.16-2.81) and women; RR 7.10 (1.63-30.86), and with an increased risk of mesothelioma in men RR 9.97 (1.29-76.96). We conclude that low SES groups run an increased risk of lung cancer despite accounting for smoking habits. Furthermore, low SES was positively associated with squamous cell carcinoma and mesothelioma. Our results suggest that the association between low SES and lung cancer could be mediated by unaccounted for smoking exposure, lifestyle or occupational hazards.

  19. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Desrichard, Alexis; Li, Huili; Henke, Christine; Akman, Benjamin; Hein, Alexander; Rote, Neal S.; Cope, Leslie M.; Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Buhu, Sadna; Slamon, Dennis J.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Mergoub, Taha; Chan, Timothy A.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Summary We show that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) upregulate immune signaling in cancer through the viral defense pathway. In ovarian cancer (OC), DNMTis trigger cytosolic sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) causing a Type I Interferon response and apoptosis. Knocking down dsRNA sensors TLR3 and MAVS reduces this response twofold, and blocking interferon beta or its receptor abrogates it. Upregulation of hypermethylated endogenous retrovirus (ERV) genes accompanies the response and ERV overexpression activates the response. Basal levels of ERV and viral defense gene expression significantly correlate in primary OC and the latter signature separates primary samples for multiple tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into low versus high expression groups. In melanoma patients treated with an immune checkpoint therapy, high viral defense signature expression in tumors significantly associates with durable clinical response and DNMTi treatment sensitizes to anti-CTLA4 therapy in a pre-clinical melanoma model. PMID:26317466

  20. The Role of Capillaries in the Lesser Ailments of Old Age and in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia: The Potential of Pro-Therapeutic Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Charles T

    2016-07-01

    Apart from chronic diseases (arthritis, diabetes, etc.), old age is generally characterized by three lesser ailments: muscle weakness, minor memory lapses, and cold intolerance. This trio of complaints may have a common, underlying cause, namely, the age-associated reduced microcirculation in muscles, brain, skin, and elsewhere in the body. The Angiogenesis Hypothesis proposes that old age is in part a deficiency disease due to the decline in angiogenic (AG) factors, resulting in a reduced capillary density (CD) throughout the body. Over fifty published papers document waning levels of AG factors and/or decreased CD in various organ systems of aged animals and people, including those with Alzheimer's disease. The deficiency of AG factors is analogous to that of certain hormones (e.g., testosterone) whose blood levels also decline with age. In theory, therapeutic angiogenesis employing recombinant AG factors is a tenable treatment for the lesser ailments of old age and may improve the later years of human life. An optimal administration route may be intranasal. PMID:27392865

  1. The Role of Capillaries in the Lesser Ailments of Old Age and in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia: The Potential of Pro-Therapeutic Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Charles T

    2016-07-01

    Apart from chronic diseases (arthritis, diabetes, etc.), old age is generally characterized by three lesser ailments: muscle weakness, minor memory lapses, and cold intolerance. This trio of complaints may have a common, underlying cause, namely, the age-associated reduced microcirculation in muscles, brain, skin, and elsewhere in the body. The Angiogenesis Hypothesis proposes that old age is in part a deficiency disease due to the decline in angiogenic (AG) factors, resulting in a reduced capillary density (CD) throughout the body. Over fifty published papers document waning levels of AG factors and/or decreased CD in various organ systems of aged animals and people, including those with Alzheimer's disease. The deficiency of AG factors is analogous to that of certain hormones (e.g., testosterone) whose blood levels also decline with age. In theory, therapeutic angiogenesis employing recombinant AG factors is a tenable treatment for the lesser ailments of old age and may improve the later years of human life. An optimal administration route may be intranasal.

  2. Curability of cancer by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, including in neuraxial neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Rakesh; Munshi, Anusheel; Arora, Brijesh

    2009-01-01

    In the October of 1996, Lance Armstrong, celebrated cyclist and one of the greatest athletes the world has ever seen, at the age of 24, was diagnosed with metastatic testicular cancer with disease having already spread to his abdomen, lungs and brain. Lance underwent four cycles of chemotherapy, actually the pretty standard one, pioneered at the Indiana University and not only did he get completely cured of his cancer, he remains extremely well till date, 12 years later. He sure did have a few adverse effects during those cycles of chemotherapy in the form of nausea, vomiting, weakness and fall in blood count but he knew and experienced them only for a short transient time and emerged triumphant and strong. In fact, he went on to win six awe-inspiring and incredible successive Tours de France victories from 1999-2005, one of the most grueling sporting events testing the endurance of the very fittest. After his retirement, he has been so inspired that he has completely devoted himself to educate people about the common myths about cancer, and promised to raise awareness and generate money for furthering research into surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy for cancer through his foundation. He says "I am indebted to the doctors, nurses and medicine and would want to pay them back for all their energy and caring." In his successful journey of overcoming cancer, he captures the essence of its treatment so well by declaring "Pain is temporary, it may last a minute, or an hour, or a day, or a year, but eventually, it will subside and something else will take its place. If I quit, however, it will last forever". PMID:19305070

  3. Salmonella as a biological "Trojan horse" for neoplasia: future possibilities including brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk, Gregory S A; Berg, Carrie A; Withrock, Isabelle C; Fick, Meghan E; Anderson, Stephen J; Laboissonniere, Lauren A; Jefferson, Matthew A; Brewer, Matthew T; Stock, Matthew L; Lange, Jennifer K; Luna, K C; Acharya, Sreemoyee; Kanuri, Sriharsha; Sharma, Shaunik; Kondru, Naveen C; McCormack, Garrett R; Carlson, Steve A

    2014-09-01

    This manuscript considers available evidence that a specific Salmonella strain could be used as an effective orally-administered option for cancer therapy involving the brain. It has been established that Salmonella preferentially colonizes neoplastic tissue and thrives as a facultative anaerobe in the intra-tumor environment. Although Salmonella accumulates in tumors by passive processes, it is still possible for lipopolysaccharide to cause sepsis and endotoxic shock during the migration of bacteria to the tumor site. An LPS-free version of a recently identified Salmonella isolate may have the capability to circumvent the blood brain barrier and provide a safer method of reaching brain tumors. This isolate merits further research as a "Trojan horse" for future oral biotherapy of brain cancer.

  4. Cancer risks related to low-level RF/MW exposures, including cell phones.

    PubMed

    Szmigielski, Stanislaw

    2013-09-01

    For years, radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) radiations have been applied in the modern world. The rapidly increasing use of cellular phones called recent attention to the possible health risks of RF/MW exposures. In 2011, a group of international experts organized by IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon) concluded that RF/MW radiations should be listed as a possible carcinogen (group 2B) for humans. Three meta-analyses of case-control studies have concluded that using cell phones for more than ten years was associated with an increase in the overall risk of developing a brain tumor. The Interphone Study, the largest health-related case-control international study of use of cell phones and head and neck tumors, showed no statistically significant increases in brain cancers related to higher amounts of cell phone use, but excess risk in a small subgroup of more heavily exposed users associated with latency and laterality was reported. So far, the published studies do not show that mobile phones could for sure increase the risk of cancer. This conclusion is based on the lack of a solid biological mechanism, and the fact that brain cancer rates are not going up significantly. However, all of the studies so far have weaknesses, which make it impossible to entirely rule out a risk. Mobile phones are still a new technology and there is little evidence about effects of long-term use. For this reason, bioelectromagnetic experts advise application of a precautionary resources. It suggests that if people want to use a cell phone, they can choose to minimize their exposure by keeping calls short and preferably using hand-held sets. It also advises discouraging children from making non essential calls as well as also keeping their calls short.

  5. Risk of Cancer in relation to Natural Radiation, including Radon: Evidence from Epidemiological Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baysson, Hélène; Tirmarche, Margot; Laurier, Dominique

    2008-08-01

    A review of recently published epidemiological studies on populations exposed to natural background ionizing radiation is proposed. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of epidemiological studies as well as the uncertainty linked to multiple exposures are discussed. As radon is the greatest source of natural radiation, particular attention is given to quantification of risk obtained through cohort studies of uranium miners and after joint analysis of case-control studies on lung cancer and residential radon.

  6. Risk of Cancer in relation to Natural Radiation, including Radon: Evidence from Epidemiological Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Baysson, Helene; Tirmarche, Margot; Laurier, Dominique

    2008-08-07

    A review of recently published epidemiological studies on populations exposed to natural background ionizing radiation is proposed. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of epidemiological studies as well as the uncertainty linked to multiple exposures are discussed. As radon is the greatest source of natural radiation, particular attention is given to quantification of risk obtained through cohort studies of uranium miners and after joint analysis of case-control studies on lung cancer and residential radon.

  7. MicroRNAs in neutrophils: potential next generation therapeutics for inflammatory ailments.

    PubMed

    Gurol, Theodore; Zhou, Wenqing; Deng, Qing

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play fundamental roles in both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, and directly contribute to the immune pathologies in both infectious and autoimmune ailments. MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate homeostasis in health and disease by fine tuning the expression of a network of genes through post-transcriptional regulation. Many miRs are expressed in restricted tissues, regulated by stress and disease, and are emerging as mediators for intercellular communication. MiR profiles have been recently utilized as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognostic purposes. In addition, several miRs are in clinical development for various diseases. A short list of miRs that regulate hematopoiesis and neutrophil development is identified. Unfortunately, very limited information is available regarding how miRs regulate neutrophil migration and activation in vivo. Extensive future work is required, especially in animal models such as mice, to illustrate the pivotal and complex miR-mediated regulatory network. In addition, zebrafish, a vertebrate model organism with conserved innate immunity, potentiated by the availability of imaging and genetic tools, will provide a platform for rapid discovery and characterization of miRs that are relevant to neutrophilic inflammation. Advances in this field are expected to provide the foundation for highly selective miR-based therapy to manipulate neutrophils in infection and inflammatory disorders. PMID:27558326

  8. 5-HTTLPR and use of antidepressants after colorectal cancer including a meta-analysis of 5-HTTLPR and depression after cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suppli, N P; Bukh, J D; Moffitt, T E; Caspi, A; Johansen, C; Albieri, V; Tjønneland, A; Kessing, L V; Dalton, S O

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) is one of the most extensively investigated candidates to be involved in gene–environment interaction associated with depression. Nevertheless, the interaction remains controversial. In an original study, we tested the hypothesis that risk for use of antidepressants following a diagnosis of colorectal cancer is associated with bi- and triallelic genotypes of 5-HTTLPR. In addition, in an inclusive meta-analysis, we tested the hypothesis that depression following a diagnosis of cancer is associated with biallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype. We created an exposed-only cohort of 849 colorectal cancer patients from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study. The hypothesized association was investigated with Cox regression models and competing risk analyses. Five studies comprising a total of 1484 cancer patients were included in the meta-analysis. Nationwide registries provided information on dates of diagnosis of colorectal cancer and use of antidepressants. Unadjusted odds ratios of depression according to the biallelic 5-HTTLPR genotype were included in the meta-analysis. 5-HTTLPR genotypes were not associated with use of antidepressants after colorectal cancer. Estimated hazard ratios ranged 0.92–1.08, and we observed no statistically significant associations across biallelic and triallelic genotypes in crude as well as adjusted models. The meta-analysis showed no statistically significant associations of 5-HTTLPR biallelic genotype with depression after cancer. Our findings in an original study and a meta-analysis do not support the hypothesis of an association between the 5-HTTLPR genotype and depression after cancer. PMID:26327689

  9. A meta-analysis including dose-response relationship between night shift work and the risk of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Ji, Alin; Zhu, Yi; Liang, Zhen; Wu, Jian; Li, Shiqi; Meng, Shuai; Zheng, Xiangyi; Xie, Liping

    2015-09-22

    A meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively evaluate the correlation between night shift work and the risk of colorectal cancer. We searched for publications up to March 2015 using PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases, and the references of the retrieved articles and relevant reviews were also checked. OR and 95% CI were used to assess the degree of the correlation between night shift work and risk of colorectal cancer via fixed- or random-effect models. A dose-response meta-analysis was performed as well. The pooled OR estimates of the included studies illustrated that night shift work was correlated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (OR = 1.318, 95% CI 1.121-1.551). No evidence of publication bias was detected. In the dose-response analysis, the rate of colorectal cancer increased by 11% for every 5 years increased in night shift work (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 1.03-1.20). In conclusion, this meta-analysis indicated that night shift work was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Further researches should be conducted to confirm our findings and clarify the potential biological mechanisms.

  10. Comparison of Various Radiation Therapy Techniques in Breast Cancer Where Target Volume Includes Mammaria Interna Region

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Mehmet Hakan; Zincircioglu, Seyit Burhanedtin Zorlu, Faruk

    2009-04-01

    In breast cancer radiotherapy, the internal mammary lymphatic chain is treated in the target volume in a group of patients with high-risk criteria. Because of the variability of the anatomic region and structures in the irradiation field, there are a number of different techniques in breast radiotherapy. While irradiating the target volume, we also consider minimizing the dose to critical structures such as heart, lung, and contralateral breast tissue. In this study, we evaluated the dose distribution of different radiotherapy techniques in patients with left-sided breast cancer who had breast-conserving surgery. A three-dimensional computerized planning system (3DCPS) was used for each patient to compare wide-field, oblique photon-electron, and perpendicular photon-electron techniques in terms of dose homogeneities in the target volume; the doses received by the contralateral breast, heart, and lung; and the coverage of the internal mammary chain. Data from 3DCPS were controlled by the Rando-phantom and thermoluminescence dosimetry. Critical structures were irradiated with acceptable dose percentages in addition to the internal mammary chain with both wide-field and photon-electron techniques. We detected more frequent hot spots in the oblique photon-electron technique than in the other techniques, and this situation necessitated changing the junctions. The wide-field technique was easy to perform and exposed less radiation dose to the heart than photon-electron techniques. In conclusion, we suggest the use of the wide-field technique in breast irradiation when the internal mammary area is in the target volume.

  11. Dosimetric evaluation of three adaptive strategies for prostate cancer treatment including pelvic lymph nodes irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cantin, Audrey; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Lachance, Bernard; Foster, William; Goudreault, Julie

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The movements of the prostate relative to the pelvic lymph nodes during intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment can limit margin reduction and affect the protection of the organs at risk (OAR). In this study, the authors performed an analysis of three adaptive treatment strategies that combine information from both bony and gold marker registrations. The robustness of those treatments against the interfraction prostate movements was evaluated. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on five prostate cancer patients with 7–13 daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). The clinical target volumes (CTVs) consisting of pelvic lymph nodes, prostate, and seminal vesicles as well as the OARs were delineated on each CBCT and the initial CT. Three adaptive strategies were analyzed. Two of these methods relied on a two-step patient positioning at each fraction. First step: a bony registration was used to deliver the nodal CTV prescription. Second step: a gold marker registration was then used either to (1) complete the dose delivered to the prostate (complement); (2) or give almost the entire prescription to the prostate with a weak dose gradient between the targets to compensate for possible motions (gradient). The third method (COR) used a pool of precalculated plans based on images acquired at previous treatment fractions. At each new fraction, a plan is selected from that pool based on the daily position of prostate center-of-mass. The dosimetric comparison was conducted and results are presented with and without the systematic shift in the prostate position on the CT planning. The adaptive strategies were compared to the current clinical standard where all fractions are treated with the initial nonadaptive plan. Results: The minimum daily prostate D{sub 95%} is improved by 2%, 9%, and 6% for the complement, the gradient, and the COR approaches, respectively, compared to the nonadaptive method. The average nodal CTV D{sub 95%} remains constant across the

  12. Inhibition of collagen peptidase in HeLa cells and human tumours by compounds including drugs used in cancer therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Boggust, W. A.; McGauley, H.

    1978-01-01

    Collagen-peptidase activity in extracts of HeLa cells and human tumours is inactivated by Razoxane (ICRF-159), cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, thiotepa, aprotinin, EDTA and phenanthroline. As this activity, in association with other enzymes, may contribute to tissue lysis in cancers, chemical intervention may reduce invasiveness and modify the processes of infiltration and metastasis. Accordingly, some drugs used in therapy or for the prevention of metastasis may produce their observed effects by a combination of factors including enzyme inhibition. PMID:212092

  13. Oncogenic functions of IGF1R and INSR in prostate cancer include enhanced tumor growth, cell migration and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Kern, Johann; Ofer, Philipp; Klocker, Helmut; Massoner, Petra

    2014-05-15

    We scrutinized the effect of insulin receptor (INSR) in addition to IGF1R in PCa using in vitro and in vivo models. In-vitro overexpression of IGF1R and INSRA, but not INSRB increased cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and resistance to apoptosis in prostate cancer cells (DU145, LNCaP, PC3). Opposite effects were induced by downregulation of IGF1R and total INSR, but not INSRB. In contrast to tumor cells, non-cancerous epithelial cells of the prostate (EP156T, RWPE-1) were inhibited on overexpression and stimulated by knockdown of receptors. In-vivo analyses using the chicken allantoic membrane assay confirmed the tumorigenic effects of IGF1R and INSR. Apart of promoting tumor growth, IGF1R and INSR overexpression also enhanced angiogenesis indicated by higher vessel density and increased number of desmin-immunoreactive pericytes. Our study underscores the oncogenic impact of IGF1R including significant effects on tumor growth, cell migration, sensitivity to apoptotic/chemotherapeutic agents and angiogenesis, and characterizes the INSR, in particular the isoform INSRA, as additional cancer-promoting receptor in prostate cancer. Both, the insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 and the insulin receptor exert oncogenic functions, thus proposing that both receptors need to be considered in therapeutic settings.

  14. Extent of Use of Aloe vera Locally Extracted Products for Management of Ailments in Communities of Kitagata Sub-county in Sheema District, Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Kamukama; Eliot, Twineomujuni; Gerald, Agaba

    2015-01-01

    Aloe vera is widely used locally in communities in Uganda as a medicinal plant. It is said to contain various nutrient substances and vitamins that have curative properties. It is said to heal a variety of diseases in various communities. However the extent of use of this potential medicinal plant in Uganda and the various ailments for which it is used and the treatment outcomes are not clearly established and documented. In this cross-sectional study, carried out in August 2012 in Kitagata sub-county in Sheema district in western Uganda, data was collected from 131 randomly selected adult respondents using an interviewer administered semi-structured questionnaire. Key informants interviews and focused group discussions were also carried out with purposively selected participants. Data were collected on social demographic characteristics, practices and beliefs about Aloe vera. The data were analyzed using Excel version 2007 and Epi_Info software. To get the proportion of the community that use Aloe vera, the number of respondents that use aloe vera was expressed as a percentage of the total number of respondents. It was found out that all the respondents (100%) know aloe vera plant, 96.1% think that it can cure and 84.7% have ever used it. 90.9% of the respondents believe that Aloe vera is effective in curing ailments. 82.9% of these strongly believe in Aloe vera’s effectiveness. The diseases reported included malaria (31%), wounds (23%), abdominal pains (16%) and skin diseases (9%) among others. It was significantly noted that all the participants who had ever used Aloe vera still believe in it. 92.0% respondents reported that they can recommend aloe vera to a friend or relative. Only one participant strongly disagrees that Aloe vera has any curative properties and has never used it. PMID:26855960

  15. Managing Minor Ailments; The Public’s Preferences for Attributes of Community Pharmacies. A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Mandy; Bond, Christine; Watson, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Background Demand for health services continues to rise. Greater use of community pharmacy services instead of medical services for minor ailments could help relieve pressure on healthcare providers in high-cost settings. Community pharmacies are recognised sources of treatment and advice for people wishing to manage these ailments. However, increasing the public’s use of pharmacy services may depend on attributes of pharmacies and their staff. This study aimed to determine the general public’s relative preferences for community pharmacy attributes using a discrete choice experiment (DCE). Method A UK-wide DCE survey of the general public was conducted using face-to-face computer-assisted personal interviews. Attributes and levels for the DCE were informed by a literature review and a cohort study of community pharmacy customers. The context for the experiment was a minor ailment scenario describing flu-like symptoms. The DCE choice sets described two hypothetical community pharmacy services; respondents were asked to choose which (if either) of the two pharmacies they would prefer to help them manage symptoms. Data from 1,049 interviews were analysed using an error components logit model. Willingness to pay (WTP), a monetary measure of benefit, was estimated for the different attribute levels. Results When seeking help or treatment for flu-like symptoms, respondents most valued a pharmacy service that would improve their understanding and management of symptoms (WTP = £6.28), provided by staff who are trained (WTP (pharmacist) = £2.63: WTP(trained assistant) = £3.22), friendly and approachable (WTP = £3.38). Waiting time, pharmacy location and availability of parking also contributed to respondents’ preferences. WTP for a service comprising the best possible combination of attributes and levels was calculated as £55.43. Conclusion Attributes of a community pharmacy and its staff may influence people’s decisions about which pharmacy they would visit to

  16. CONSENSUS REPORT: Recognizing non-melanoma skin cancer, including actinic keratosis, as an occupational disease - A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    John, S M; Trakatelli, M; Gehring, R; Finlay, K; Fionda, C; Wittlich, M; Augustin, M; Hilpert, G; Barroso Dias, J M; Ulrich, C; Pellacani, G

    2016-04-01

    1. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is by far the most common cancer diagnosed in westernized countries, and one of the few almost preventable cancers if detected and treated early as up to 90% of NMSC may be attributed to excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation. 2. The incidence of NMSC is increasing: 2-3 million people are diagnosed worldwide annually, with an average yearly increase of 3-8% among white populations in Australia, Europe, the US and Canada over the last 30 years. 3. The link between solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and certain forms of NMSC is clearly recognized. It is estimated that outdoor workers are exposed to an UV radiation dose 2-3 times higher than indoor workers, and there is a growing body of research linking UV radiation exposure in outdoor workers to NMSC: I. Occupationally UV-exposed workers are at least at a 43% higher risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and almost doubled risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) compared to the average population, with risk increasing with decreasing latitude. II. The risk for BCC, SCC and actinic keratosis (AK) among workers who have worked outdoors for more than 5 years is 3-fold higher than the risk among those with no years of working outdoors. 4. Primary prevention, early detection, treatment and regular follow-up of skin cancer (NMSC and melanoma) are shown to be beneficial from a health economic perspective. 5. Action is needed at international, European and national level to legislate for recognizing AK and NMSC as an occupational disease, which has the potential to improve access to compensation and drive preventative activities. 6. This report is a Call to Action for: I. The engagement of key stakeholders, including supranational institutions, national governments, trade organizations, employers, workers and patient organizations to drive change in prevention and protection of at-risk groups. II. Employers should be obliged to prevent outdoor worker's UV exposure from exceeding limit values

  17. CONSENSUS REPORT: Recognizing non-melanoma skin cancer, including actinic keratosis, as an occupational disease - A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    John, S M; Trakatelli, M; Gehring, R; Finlay, K; Fionda, C; Wittlich, M; Augustin, M; Hilpert, G; Barroso Dias, J M; Ulrich, C; Pellacani, G

    2016-04-01

    1. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is by far the most common cancer diagnosed in westernized countries, and one of the few almost preventable cancers if detected and treated early as up to 90% of NMSC may be attributed to excessive exposure to ultraviolet radiation. 2. The incidence of NMSC is increasing: 2-3 million people are diagnosed worldwide annually, with an average yearly increase of 3-8% among white populations in Australia, Europe, the US and Canada over the last 30 years. 3. The link between solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation and certain forms of NMSC is clearly recognized. It is estimated that outdoor workers are exposed to an UV radiation dose 2-3 times higher than indoor workers, and there is a growing body of research linking UV radiation exposure in outdoor workers to NMSC: I. Occupationally UV-exposed workers are at least at a 43% higher risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and almost doubled risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) compared to the average population, with risk increasing with decreasing latitude. II. The risk for BCC, SCC and actinic keratosis (AK) among workers who have worked outdoors for more than 5 years is 3-fold higher than the risk among those with no years of working outdoors. 4. Primary prevention, early detection, treatment and regular follow-up of skin cancer (NMSC and melanoma) are shown to be beneficial from a health economic perspective. 5. Action is needed at international, European and national level to legislate for recognizing AK and NMSC as an occupational disease, which has the potential to improve access to compensation and drive preventative activities. 6. This report is a Call to Action for: I. The engagement of key stakeholders, including supranational institutions, national governments, trade organizations, employers, workers and patient organizations to drive change in prevention and protection of at-risk groups. II. Employers should be obliged to prevent outdoor worker's UV exposure from exceeding limit values

  18. Connectivity mapping using a combined gene signature from multiple colorectal cancer datasets identified candidate drugs including existing chemotherapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background While the discovery of new drugs is a complex, lengthy and costly process, identifying new uses for existing drugs is a cost-effective approach to therapeutic discovery. Connectivity mapping integrates gene expression profiling with advanced algorithms to connect genes, diseases and small molecule compounds and has been applied in a large number of studies to identify potential drugs, particularly to facilitate drug repurposing. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a commonly diagnosed cancer with high mortality rates, presenting a worldwide health problem. With the advancement of high throughput omics technologies, a number of large scale gene expression profiling studies have been conducted on CRCs, providing multiple datasets in gene expression data repositories. In this work, we systematically apply gene expression connectivity mapping to multiple CRC datasets to identify candidate therapeutics to this disease. Results We developed a robust method to compile a combined gene signature for colorectal cancer across multiple datasets. Connectivity mapping analysis with this signature of 148 genes identified 10 candidate compounds, including irinotecan and etoposide, which are chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat CRCs. These results indicate that we have discovered high quality connections between the CRC disease state and the candidate compounds, and that the gene signature we created may be used as a potential therapeutic target in treating the disease. The method we proposed is highly effective in generating quality gene signature through multiple datasets; the publication of the combined CRC gene signature and the list of candidate compounds from this work will benefit both cancer and systems biology research communities for further development and investigations. PMID:26356760

  19. Comparison of Two Old Phytochemicals versus Two Newly Researched Plant-Derived Compounds: Potential for Brain and Other Relevant Ailments

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Mei; Yew, D. T.

    2014-01-01

    Among hundreds of formulae of Chinese herbal prescriptions and recently extracted active components from the herbs, some of which had demonstrated their functions on nervous system. For the last decade or more, Gingko biloba and Polygala tenuifolia were widely studied for their beneficial effects against damage to the brain. Two compounds extracted from Apium graveolens and Rhizoma coptidis, butylphthalide and berberine, respectively, received much attention recently as potential neuroprotective agents. In this review, the two traditionally used herbs and the two relatively new compounds will be discussed with regard to their potential advantages in alleviating brain and other relevant ailments. PMID:24949079

  20. Long-term follow-up of pulmonary function in patients cured from testicular cancer with combination chemotherapy including bleomycin.

    PubMed Central

    Lehne, G.; Johansen, B.; Fosså, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    A follow-up study of pulmonary function in two groups of patients with testicular cancer was performed 6-12 years after treatment. Both groups, 47 patients in each, had undergone retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND). Patients with pathological stage (ps) II had also received bleomycin (median 270 mg) and cisplatin (median 540 mg) in three or four courses which included vinblastine or etoposide. Patients in ps I and II were similar with respect to age, general health, observation period, inspired oxygen fraction (FiO2) and maximal arterial oxygen pressure (pO2) at RPLND, but four (8.2%) with psII disease developed densities on chest X-ray during chemotherapy. At the long-term follow-up the groups were similar with respect to physical exercise, smoking pattern, present drug treatment and history of cardiopulmonary disease. In both groups forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and single breath transfer factor for carbon monoxide (TLCO) were within normal limits, and no difference was found between the groups. The combined data for both groups showed that smoking was highly associated with impairment in TLCO (P = 0.005), and smoking frequency was negatively correlated to TLCO (P = 0.002). We conclude that 3-4 courses with bleomycin, cisplatin and etoposide/vinblastine in testicular cancer patients do not lead to long-term impairment of pulmonary function. PMID:7688978

  1. Compound K, a Ginsenoside Metabolite, Inhibits Colon Cancer Growth via Multiple Pathways Including p53-p21 Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Du, Guang-Jian; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Calway, Tyler; Li, Zejuan; He, Tong-Chuan; Du, Wei; Bissonnette, Marc; Musch, Mark W.; Chang, Eugene B.; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2013-01-01

    Compound K (20-O-beta-d-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol, CK), an intestinal bacterial metabolite of ginseng protopanaxadiol saponins, has been shown to inhibit cell growth in a variety of cancers. However, the mechanisms are not completely understood, especially in colorectal cancer (CRC). A xenograft tumor model was used first to examine the anti-CRC effect of CK in vivo. Then, multiple in vitro assays were applied to investigate the anticancer effects of CK including antiproliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. In addition, a qPCR array and western blot analysis were executed to screen and validate the molecules and pathways involved. We observed that CK significantly inhibited the growth of HCT-116 tumors in an athymic nude mouse xenograft model. CK significantly inhibited the proliferation of human CRC cell lines HCT-116, SW-480, and HT-29 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also observed that CK induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase in HCT-116 cells. The processes were related to the upregulation of p53/p21, FoxO3a-p27/p15 and Smad3, and downregulation of cdc25A, CDK4/6 and cyclin D1/3. The major regulated targets of CK were cyclin dependent inhibitors, including p21, p27, and p15. These results indicate that CK inhibits transcriptional activation of multiple tumor-promoting pathways in CRC, suggesting that CK could be an active compound in the prevention or treatment of CRC. PMID:23434653

  2. Association between matrix metalloproteinase 1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism and cancer risk: a meta-analysis including 19706 subjects.

    PubMed

    Han, Guoda; Wei, Zhijiang; Lu, Zhiliang; Cui, Haibin; Bai, Xiyong; Ge, Huai'e; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The association between MMP1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism and cancer risk has been reported, but results remained controversial and ambiguous. To assess the association between MMP1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism and cancer risk, a meta-analysis was performed. Based on comprehensive searches of the PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), and Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), we identified outcome data from all articles estimating the association between MMP1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism and cancer risk. The pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Thirty-eight studies involving 10178 cases and 9528 controls were included. Overall, significant association between MMP1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism and cancer susceptibility was observed for additive model (OR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.09-1.35), for codominant model (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.10-1.63), for dominant model (OR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.34), for recessive model (OR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.14-1.52). In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, the significant association was found among Asians but not among Caucasians. In the subgroup analysis by site of cancer, significant associations were found among lung cancer, colorectal cancer, head and neck cancer and bladder cancer. This meta-analysis demonstrated that the MMP1 -1607 1G>2G polymorphism was significantly associated with cancer risk.

  3. Questions about Common Ailments. Nutrition in Health Promotion Series, Number 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosser, Gail Hoddlebrink; Molleson, Ann L.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  4. A meta-analysis of the relationship between glutathione S-transferase T1 null/presence gene polymorphism and the risk of lung cancer including 31802 subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua-Fu; Feng, Xu; Zheng, Bao-Shi; Qian, Jun; He, Wei

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) null/presence gene polymorphism and the risk of lung cancer from the published reports are still conflicting. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between GSTT1 null/presence gene polymorphism and the risk of lung cancer using meta-analysis method. The association studies were identified from PubMed, and Cochrane Library on July 1, 2012, and eligible investigations were included and synthesized using meta-analysis method. 51 reports were recruited into this meta-analysis for the association of null genotype of GSTT1 with lung cancer susceptibility, consisting of 15,140 patients with lung cancer and 16,662 controls. There was a marked association between GSTT1 null genotype and lung cancer risk in overall populations (OR = 1.15, 95 % CI 1.04-1.27, P = 0.007). Furthermore, GSTT1 null genotype was associated with the lung cancer risk in Asians (OR = 1.47, 95 % CI 1.23-1.76, P < 0.0001). However, GSTT1 null genotype was not associated with the risk of lung cancer in Caucasians, Brazilian population and Africans. In conclusion, GSTT1 null genotype is associated with the lung cancer in overall populations and in Asians.

  5. [THE COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTIC OF KAOLIN-ACTIVATED THROMBOELASTOGRAPHY IN HEALTHY NEWBORNS AND NEWBORNS WITH HEART AILMENTS].

    PubMed

    Leonov, N P; Karas'kov, A M; Litasova, E E; Strunin, O V; Karmadonova, N A; Akopov, G D; Vishegorodtseva, L I

    2016-02-01

    The study was carried out to diferentiate reference values for kaolin-activated thromboelastography in newborns with congenital heart disease. The study included two groups ofpatients. The first one consisted of 62 newborns with congenital heart disease and the second one consisted of 35 healthy newborns. The results of kaolin-activated thromboelastography implemented in groups are evaluated as condition of normal coagulation. The valuable diferences of homeostasis system in healthy newborns and newborns with congenital heart disease (without severe concomitant pathology) are not established. They have similar indicators of kaolin-activated thromboelastography. The derived results can be applied as standards in full-term newborns with congenital heart disease. PMID:27455561

  6. Common injuries and ailments of the female athlete; pathophysiology, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Hilibrand, Miryl J; Hammoud, Sommer; Bishop, Meghan; Woods, Daniel; Fredrick, Robert W; Dodson, Christopher C

    2015-11-01

    With increasing numbers of women competing in high school and collegiate athletics, it is important that physicians become familiar with injury patterns and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. Observations and clinical data have elucidated unique biomechanical, anatomic and hormonal factors that predispose skeletally mature female athletes to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, patellofemoral disorders and lower extremity stress fractures. Additionally, younger female athletes are particularly at risk of developing components of the "Female Athlete Triad" (more recently included under the syndrome of "Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport" [RED-S]): disordered eating, amenorrhea and osteoporosis. An understanding of the pathophysiology of these conditions has led to the development of programs that can treat their underlying causes, decrease susceptibility to injury, and improve the long-term health of the female athlete. This paper is intended to provide physicians with a review of the sex-specific etiology, prevention and treatment of injuries common to the female athlete. PMID:26458108

  7. Does an asymmetric lobe in digital rectal examination include any risk for prostate cancer? results of 1495 biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ömer; Kurul, Özgür; Ates, Ferhat; Soydan, Hasan; Aktas, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Despite the well-known findings related to malignity in DRE such as nodule and induration, asymmetry of prostatic lobes, seen relatively, were investigated in a few studies as a predictor of prostate cancer so that there is no universally expected conclusion about asymmetry. We aimed to compare cancer detection rate of normal, asymmetric or suspicious findings in DRE by using biopsy results. Materials and Methods: Data of 1495 patients underwent prostate biopsy between 2006-2014 were searched retrospectively. Biopsy indications were abnormal DRE and or elevated PSA level(>4ng/mL). DRE findings were recorded as Group 1: Benign DRE, Group 2: Asymmetry and Group 3: Nodule/induration. Age, prostatic volume, biopsy results and PSA levels were recorded. Results: Mean age, prostate volume and PSA level were 66.72, 55.98 cc and 18.61ng/ mL respectively. Overall cancer detection rate was 38.66 % (575 of 1495). PSA levels were similar in group 1 and 2 but significantly higher in group 3. Prostatic volume was similar in group 1 and 2 and significantly lower in Group 3. Malignity detection rate of group 1,2 and 3 were 28.93%, 34.89% and 55.99% respectively. Group 1 and 2 were similar (p=0.105) but 3 had more chance for cancer detection. Conclusion: Nodule is the most important finding in DRE for cancer detection. Only an asymmetric prostate itself does not mean malignity. PMID:27564280

  8. Regulation of the proliferation of colon cancer cells by compounds that affect glycolysis, including 3-bromopyruvate, 2-deoxyglucose and biguanides.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael A; Qureshi, Mehreen S; Buxhoeveden, Michael; Gengel, Nicolette; Kleinschmit, Jessica; Desbordes, Charles

    2013-02-01

    In previous studies performed by our group, we observed that 2-deoxyglucose blocked the acidification of the medium used for culture of colon cancer cells caused by incubation with biguanides and it had an additive inhibitory effect on growth. In the present work, we found that 3-bromopyruvate can also prevent the lowering of pH caused by biguanide treatment. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited colonic cancer cell proliferation, but the effect was not always additive to that of biguanides and an additive effect was more notable in combined treatment with 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose. The induction of alkaline phosphatase activity by butyrate was not consistently affected by combination with other agents that modified glucose metabolism. The drug combinations that were examined inhibited proliferation of wild-type and p53-null cells and affected colonic cancer lines with different growth rates.

  9. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  10. Acquired Mitochondrial Abnormalities, Including Epigenetic Inhibition of Superoxide Dismutase 2, in Pulmonary Hypertension and Cancer: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    There is no cure for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Therapies lack efficacy and/or are toxic, reflecting a failure to target disease abnormalities that are distinct from processes vital to normal cells. NSCLC and PAH share reversible mitochondrial-metabolic abnormalities which may offer selective therapeutic targets. The following mutually reinforcing, mitochondrial abnormalities favor proliferation, impair apoptosis, and are relatively restricted to PAH and cancer cells: (1) Epigenetic silencing of superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2) by methylation of CpG islands creates a pseudohypoxic redox environment that causes normoxic activation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α). (2) HIF-1α increases expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), which impairs oxidative metabolism and promotes a glycolytic metabolic state. (3) Mitochondrial fragmentation, partially due to mitofusin-2 downregulation, promotes proliferation. This review focuses on the recent discovery that decreased expression of SOD2, a putative tumor-suppressor gene and the major source of H2O2, results from hypermethylation of CpG islands. In cancer and PAH hypermethylation of a site in the enhancer region of intron 2 inhibits SOD2 transcription. In normal PASMC, SOD2 siRNA decreases H2O2 and activates HIF-1α. In PAH, reduced SOD2 expression decreases H2O2, reduces the cytosol and thereby activates HIF-1α. This causes a glycolytic shift in metabolism and increases the proliferation/apoptosis ratio by downregulating Kv1.5 channels, increasing cytosolic calcium, and inhibiting caspases. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, which restores SOD2 expression, corrects the proliferation/apoptosis imbalance in PAH and cancer cells. The specificity of PAH for lung vessels may relate to the selective upregulation of DNA methyltransferases that mediate CpG methylation in PASMC (DNA MT-1A and -3B). SOD2 augmentation inactivates HIF-1α in PAH

  11. Development of a robust DNA damage model including persistent telomere-associated damage with application to secondary cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Rastgou Talemi, Soheil; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has been instrumental to understand kinetics of radiation-induced DNA damage repair and associated secondary cancer risk. The widely accepted two-lesion kinetic (TLK) model assumes two kinds of double strand breaks, simple and complex ones, with different repair rates. Recently, persistent DNA damage associated with telomeres was reported as a new kind of DNA damage. We therefore extended existing versions of the TLK model by new categories of DNA damage and re-evaluated those models using extensive data. We subjected different versions of the TLK model to a rigorous model discrimination approach. This enabled us to robustly select a best approximating parsimonious model that can both recapitulate and predict transient and persistent DNA damage after ionizing radiation. Models and data argue for i) nonlinear dose-damage relationships, and ii) negligible saturation of repair kinetics even for high doses. Additionally, we show that simulated radiation-induced persistent telomere-associated DNA damage foci (TAF) can be used to predict excess relative risk (ERR) of developing secondary leukemia after fractionated radiotherapy. We suggest that TAF may serve as an additional measure to predict cancer risk after radiotherapy using high dose rates. This may improve predicting risk-dose dependency of ionizing radiation especially for long-term therapies. PMID:26359627

  12. Development of a robust DNA damage model including persistent telomere-associated damage with application to secondary cancer risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Rastgou Talemi, Soheil; Kollarovic, Gabriel; Lapytsko, Anastasiya; Schaber, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical modelling has been instrumental to understand kinetics of radiation-induced DNA damage repair and associated secondary cancer risk. The widely accepted two-lesion kinetic (TLK) model assumes two kinds of double strand breaks, simple and complex ones, with different repair rates. Recently, persistent DNA damage associated with telomeres was reported as a new kind of DNA damage. We therefore extended existing versions of the TLK model by new categories of DNA damage and re-evaluated those models using extensive data. We subjected different versions of the TLK model to a rigorous model discrimination approach. This enabled us to robustly select a best approximating parsimonious model that can both recapitulate and predict transient and persistent DNA damage after ionizing radiation. Models and data argue for i) nonlinear dose-damage relationships, and ii) negligible saturation of repair kinetics even for high doses. Additionally, we show that simulated radiation-induced persistent telomere-associated DNA damage foci (TAF) can be used to predict excess relative risk (ERR) of developing secondary leukemia after fractionated radiotherapy. We suggest that TAF may serve as an additional measure to predict cancer risk after radiotherapy using high dose rates. This may improve predicting risk-dose dependency of ionizing radiation especially for long-term therapies. PMID:26359627

  13. Clinicopathological Characteristics of Gynecological Cancer Associated with Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Expression: A Meta-Analysis Including 6,612 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaowei; Liang, Xiaowen; Liu, Xin; Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background Gynecological cancer is characterized by tumor hypoxia. However, the role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) in gynecological cancer remains unclear. Method Electronic databases including Cochrane Library, PUBMED, Web of Knowledge and clinical trial registries were searched from inception through October 2014 for published, case-control studies assessing the association between HIF-1α and the clinicopathological characteristics of gynecological cancer. We pooled results from 59 studies using fixed or random-effects models and present results as odds ratios (ORs) following the PRISMA guidelines. Results Our meta-analysis, which included 6,612 women, demonstrated that the expression of HIF-1α was associated with the clinicopathological characteristics of gynecological cancer. The expression of HIF-1α in cancer or borderline tissue was significantly higher than that in normal tissue (cancer vs. normal: odds ratio (OR) =9.59, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.97, 15.39, p<0.00001; borderline vs. normal: OR=4.13, 95% (CI): 2.43, 7.02, p<0.00001; cancer vs. borderline: OR=2.70, 95% (CI): 1.69, 4.31, p<0.0001). The expression of HIF-1α in III‒IV stage or lymph node metastasis was significantly higher than that in I‒II stage or that without lymph node metastasis, respectively (OR=2.66, 95% (CI): 1.87,3.79, p<0.00001; OR= 3.98, 95% (CI): 2.10,12.89, p<0.0001). HIF-1α was associated with histological grade of cancer (Grade 3 vs. Grade 1: OR=3.77, 95% (CI): 2.76,5.16, p<0.00001; Grade 3 vs. Grade 2: OR=1.62, 95% (CI): 1.20,2.19, p=0.002; Grade 2 vs. Grade 1: OR=2.34, 95% (CI): 1.82,3.00, p<0.00001),5-years disease free survival (DFS) rates (OR=2.93, 95% (CI):1.43,6.01, p=0.001) and 5-years overall survival (OS) rates (OR=5.53, 95% (CI): 2.48,12.31, p<0.0001). Conclusion HIF-1α is associated with the malignant degree, FIGO stage, histological grade, lymph node metastasis, 5-years survival rate and recurrence rate of gynecological cancer. It may play

  14. Effective treatment of glioblastoma requires crossing the blood-brain barrier and targeting tumors including cancer stem cells: The promise of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Harford, Joe B; Pirollo, Kathleen F; Chang, Esther H

    2015-12-18

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal type of brain tumor. Both therapeutic resistance and restricted permeation of drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) play a major role in the poor prognosis of GBM patients. Accumulated evidence suggests that in many human cancers, including GBM, therapeutic resistance can be attributed to a small fraction of cancer cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs have been shown to have stem cell-like properties that enable them to evade traditional cytotoxic therapies, and so new CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies are needed. Nanoparticles have been designed to selectively deliver payloads to relevant target cells in the body, and there is considerable interest in the use of nanoparticles for CSC-directed anti-cancer therapies. Recent advances in the field of nanomedicine offer new possibilities for overcoming CSC-mediated therapeutic resistance and thus significantly improving management of GBM. In this review, we will examine the current nanomedicine approaches for targeting CSCs and their therapeutic implications. The inhibitory effect of various nanoparticle-based drug delivery system towards CSCs in GBM tumors is the primary focus of this review.

  15. Ethnomedicinal study of plants used for human ailments in Ankober District, North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankober District has long been inhabited by people who have a long tradition of using medicinal plants to treat human ailments. Overexploitation of medicinal plants coupled with an ever-increasing population growth, deforestation and agricultural land expansion threatens plants in the area. Hence, this study aimed at documenting and analyzing the plant-based ethnomedicinal knowledge of the people in order to preserve the dwindling indigenous knowledge. Methods Ethnobotanical data were collected using semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, participant observation and walk-in-the-woods. Quantitative approaches were used to determine Informant Consensus Factor (ICF) and Fidelity level (FL) values. Statistical tests were used to compare the indigenous knowledge on medicinal plants among different informant categories. Results A total of 135 medicinal plant species belonging to 128 genera and 71 botanical families were reported to treat human diseases in the District. Families Asteraceae (12 species, 9%) and Fabaceae (10, 7.4%) were found to be best represented in the area. About 44% of preparations were reported to be obtained from roots. Significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed on the mean number of medicinal plants reported by groups of respondents compared within age, literacy level and experience parameters. Highest ICF values were recorded for gastro-intestinal & parasitic and dermatological disease categories (0.70 each) indicating best agreement among informants knowledge on medicinal plants used to treat aliments in these categories. Highest fidelity level values were recorded for Zehneria scabra (95%) and Hagenia abyssinica (93.75%) showing conformity of knowledge on species of best healing potential. Podocarpus falcatus was ranked first in a direct matrix ranking exercise of multipurpose medicinal plants. The output of preference ranking exercise indicated that Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata was the most preferred species to

  16. Increased Mortality of Respiratory Diseases, Including Lung Cancer, in the Area with Large Amount of Ashfall from Mount Sakurajima Volcano

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Kenta; Koriyama, Chihaya; Akiba, Suminori

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Mount Sakurajima in Japan is one of the most active volcanoes in the world. This work was conducted to examine the effect of volcanic ash on the chronic respiratory disease mortality in the vicinity of Mt. Sakurajima. Methods. The present work examined the standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of respiratory diseases during the period 1968–2002 in Sakurajima town and Tarumizu city, where ashfall from the volcano recorded more than 10.000 g/m2/yr on average in the 1980s. Results. The SMR of lung cancer in the Sakurajima-Tarumizu area was 1.61 (95% CI = 1.44–1.78) for men and 1.67 (95% CI = 1.39–1.95) for women while it was nearly equal to one in Kanoya city, which neighbors Tarumizu city but located at the further position from Mt. Sakurajima, and therefore has much smaller amounts of ashfall. Sakurajima-Tarumizu area had elevated SMRs for COPDs and acute respiratory diseases while Kanoya did not. Conclusions. Cristobalite is the most likely cause of the increased deaths from those chronic respiratory diseases since smoking is unlikely to explain the increased mortality of respiratory diseases among women since the proportion of smokers in Japanese women is less than 20%, and SPM levels in the Sakurajima-Tarumizu area were not high. Further studies seem warranted. PMID:22536275

  17. Magnitude of arsenic toxicity in tube-well drinking water in Bangladesh and its adverse effects on human health including cancer: evidence from a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khan, M M H; Sakauchi, Fumio; Sonoda, Tomoko; Washio, Masakazu; Mori, Mitsuru

    2003-01-01

    Only after a decade from 1993, arsenic contamination of groundwater in Bangladesh has been reported as the biggest arsenic catastrophe in the world. It is a burning public health issue in this country. More than 50 percent of the total population is estimated at risk of contamination. Already thousands of people have been affected by the disease arsenicosis. Many more may be on the way to manifest lesions in future. We conducted a review of previous studies and published articles including MEDLINE database on this issue. We found that 59 districts out of 64 have been already affected by arsenic in underground drinking water, where this particular source of drinking water is the main source for 97 percent of the rural people. The water is unfortunately now a great threat for the human being due to high level of arsenic. Continuous arsenic exposure can lead people to develop arsenicosis, which in turn elevates the risk of cancer. Skin lesions are the most common manifestations in arsenicosis patients. Relatively poor rural people and other socio-economically disadvantaged groups are more affected by this exposure. Until now cancer patients have been relatively limited in Bangladesh. One of the reasons may be that several years are needed to show cancer manifestations from the beginning of arsenic exposure. But it is suspected that after some years a large number of patients will appear with cancer in different sites for arsenic exposure in drinking water. Various studies have been conducted in arsenic affected countries - notably in Argentina, Chile, China, Japan, and Taiwan -to find the potential of arsenic exposure to cause development of cancer. Among the arsenic related cancers, liver, lung, skin, bladder and kidney cancers are reported to be prevalent in these countries. Unfortunately no scientific study has been yet conducted in Bangladesh to find the relationship between arsenic exposure and cancers in different sites of the body. So our aim is to conduct an

  18. Ethno-medicinal study of plants used for treatment of human and livestock ailments by traditional healers in South Omo, Southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants have traditionally been used for treatment of human and livestock ailments in Ethiopia by different ethnic and social groups. However, this valuable source of knowledge is not adequately documented, which impedes their widespread use, evaluation and validation. Here, we recorded indigenous knowledge and standard practices for human and livestock disease control, of three ethnic groups (Aari, Maale and Bena-Tsemay) in South Omo Zone of Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples Regional State, Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out using a semi-structured questionnaire to document knowledge of 50 traditional healers (40 male and 10 female) in medicinal plant use for treatment of human and livestock ailments. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze and summarize the ethno-botanical data. Results Ninety-one plants, with claimed medicinal properties against a total of 34 human and livestock ailments, were reported and botanically identified as belonging to 57 genera and 33 plant families. Most of the plant species reported belonged to one of seven major families: Lamiaceae, Solanaceae, Menispermiaceae, Fabaceae, Asteraceae, Plumbaginaceae and Geraniaceae. Woody plants (shrubs 21% and trees 29%) were the major growth form used, whilst roots (40%) and leaves (35%) were the major plant parts used in the study areas. Healers mostly practice oral administration of plant preparations (65%). Multiple medicinal plants were cited against particular ailments, and mixing of two or more different medicinal plants (14.3%) against a single ailment was also commonly reported. Conclusion This study showed that traditional medicine, mainly involving the use of medicinal plants, is playing a significant role in meeting the primary healthcare needs of the three ethnic groups. Acceptance of traditional medicine and limited access to modern healthcare facilities could be considered as the main factors for the continuation of the practice

  19. Planar optical waveguide based sandwich assay sensors and processes for the detection of biological targets including early detection of cancers

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.; Shively, John E.; Li, Lin

    2009-06-02

    An assay element is described including recognition ligands adapted for binding to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) bound to a film on a single mode planar optical waveguide, the film from the group of a membrane, a polymerized bilayer membrane, and a self-assembled monolayer containing polyethylene glycol or polypropylene glycol groups therein and an assay process for detecting the presence of CEA is described including injecting a possible CEA-containing sample into a sensor cell including the assay element, maintaining the sample within the sensor cell for time sufficient for binding to occur between CEA present within the sample and the recognition ligands, injecting a solution including a reporter ligand into the sensor cell; and, interrogating the sample within the sensor cell with excitation light from the waveguide, the excitation light provided by an evanescent field of the single mode penetrating into the biological target-containing sample to a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide thereby exciting any bound reporter ligand within a distance of less than about 200 nanometers from the waveguide and resulting in a detectable signal.

  20. [Cancer].

    PubMed

    de la Peña-López, Roberto; Remolina-Bonilla, Yuly Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases which represents a significant public health problem in Mexico and worldwide. In Mexico neoplasms are the second leading cause of death. An increased morbidity and mortality are expected in the next decades. Several preventable risk factors for cancer development have been identified, the most relevant including tobacco use, which accounts for 30% of the cancer cases; and obesity, associated to another 30%. These factors, in turn, are related to sedentarism, alcohol abuse and imbalanced diets. Some agents are well knokn to cause cancer such as ionizing radiation, viruses such as the papilloma virus (HPV) and hepatitis virus (B and C), and more recently environmental pollution exposure and red meat consumption have been pointed out as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC). The scientific evidence currently available is insufficient to consider milk either as a risk factor or protective factor against different types of cancer. PMID:27603890

  1. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions: Comparable

  2. The Association Between TP53 Arg72pro Polymorphism and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis Including 7,107 Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xueling; Yang, Baohong; Liu, Ya; Xu, Shanshan; Li, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Background: The p53 gene is a critical molecular in the protection of cells from DNA damage due to Ultraviolet (UV) exposure, and TP53 mutation is very common in non-melanoma skin cancer. Objectives: To assess the association between the TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphism and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) risk. Methods: We performed this meta–analysis with 13 case-control studies involving 3,520 cases and 3,587 controls. Results: Our meta-analysis showed that TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphism was not associated with non-melanoma skin cancer susceptibility in overall population.(for Arg/Arg vs. Pro/Pro: OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.80-1.19; for Arg/Pro vs. Pro/Pro: OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.84-1.17; for the recessive model Arg/Arg vs. Arg/Pro + Pro/Pro: OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.89-1.35; for the dominant model Arg/Arg + Arg/Pro vs. Pro/Pro: OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.85-1.18). We also detected no effect of this polymorphism on any subtype of non-melanoma skin cancer, such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Furthermore, no significant association in any subgroup was detected in stratified analyses according to ethnicity. However, in the stratified analysis by sample collection resources, Arg/Arg carriers from tumor tissue subgroup had 3.42 times risk of cancer (95% CI, 1.19 to 9.84) as compared with the variant type Pro/Pro in NMSC. Conclusions: TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphism may have little involvement in the pathogenesis of NMSC, regardless of type, including SCC, and BCC. PMID:23723465

  3. Mimicking Metastases Including Tumor Stroma: A New Technique to Generate a Three-Dimensional Colorectal Cancer Model Based on a Biological Decellularized Intestinal Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Nietzer, Sarah; Baur, Florentin; Sieber, Stefan; Hansmann, Jan; Schwarz, Thomas; Stoffer, Carolin; Häfner, Heide; Gasser, Martin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Walles, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Tumor models based on cancer cell lines cultured two-dimensionally (2D) on plastic lack histological complexity and functionality compared to the native microenvironment. Xenogenic mouse tumor models display higher complexity but often do not predict human drug responses accurately due to species-specific differences. We present here a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro colon cancer model based on a biological scaffold derived from decellularized porcine jejunum (small intestine submucosa+mucosa, SISmuc). Two different cell lines were used in monoculture or in coculture with primary fibroblasts. After 14 days of culture, we demonstrated a close contact of human Caco2 colon cancer cells with the preserved basement membrane on an ultrastructural level as well as morphological characteristics of a well-differentiated epithelium. To generate a tissue-engineered tumor model, we chose human SW480 colon cancer cells, a reportedly malignant cell line. Malignant characteristics were confirmed in 2D cell culture: SW480 cells showed higher vimentin and lower E-cadherin expression than Caco2 cells. In contrast to Caco2, SW480 cells displayed cancerous characteristics such as delocalized E-cadherin and nuclear location of β-catenin in a subset of cells. One central drawback of 2D cultures—especially in consideration of drug testing—is their artificially high proliferation. In our 3D tissue-engineered tumor model, both cell lines showed decreased numbers of proliferating cells, thus correlating more precisely with observations of primary colon cancer in all stages (UICC I-IV). Moreover, vimentin decreased in SW480 colon cancer cells, indicating a mesenchymal to epithelial transition process, attributed to metastasis formation. Only SW480 cells cocultured with fibroblasts induced the formation of tumor-like aggregates surrounded by fibroblasts, whereas in Caco2 cocultures, a separate Caco2 cell layer was formed separated from the fibroblast compartment beneath. To foster tissue

  4. Mimicking Metastases Including Tumor Stroma: A New Technique to Generate a Three-Dimensional Colorectal Cancer Model Based on a Biological Decellularized Intestinal Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Nietzer, Sarah; Baur, Florentin; Sieber, Stefan; Hansmann, Jan; Schwarz, Thomas; Stoffer, Carolin; Häfner, Heide; Gasser, Martin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Walles, Heike; Dandekar, Gudrun

    2016-07-01

    Tumor models based on cancer cell lines cultured two-dimensionally (2D) on plastic lack histological complexity and functionality compared to the native microenvironment. Xenogenic mouse tumor models display higher complexity but often do not predict human drug responses accurately due to species-specific differences. We present here a three-dimensional (3D) in vitro colon cancer model based on a biological scaffold derived from decellularized porcine jejunum (small intestine submucosa+mucosa, SISmuc). Two different cell lines were used in monoculture or in coculture with primary fibroblasts. After 14 days of culture, we demonstrated a close contact of human Caco2 colon cancer cells with the preserved basement membrane on an ultrastructural level as well as morphological characteristics of a well-differentiated epithelium. To generate a tissue-engineered tumor model, we chose human SW480 colon cancer cells, a reportedly malignant cell line. Malignant characteristics were confirmed in 2D cell culture: SW480 cells showed higher vimentin and lower E-cadherin expression than Caco2 cells. In contrast to Caco2, SW480 cells displayed cancerous characteristics such as delocalized E-cadherin and nuclear location of β-catenin in a subset of cells. One central drawback of 2D cultures-especially in consideration of drug testing-is their artificially high proliferation. In our 3D tissue-engineered tumor model, both cell lines showed decreased numbers of proliferating cells, thus correlating more precisely with observations of primary colon cancer in all stages (UICC I-IV). Moreover, vimentin decreased in SW480 colon cancer cells, indicating a mesenchymal to epithelial transition process, attributed to metastasis formation. Only SW480 cells cocultured with fibroblasts induced the formation of tumor-like aggregates surrounded by fibroblasts, whereas in Caco2 cocultures, a separate Caco2 cell layer was formed separated from the fibroblast compartment beneath. To foster tissue

  5. Preferences Regarding Return of Genomic Results to Relatives of Research Participants, Including after Participant Death: Empirical Results from a Cancer Biobank

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Gloria M.; Wolf, Susan M.; Chaffee, Kari G.; Robinson, Marguerite E.; Gordon, Deborah R.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Koenig, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Data are lacking with regard to participants’ perspectives on return of genetic research results to relatives, including after the participant’s death. This paper reports descriptive results from 3,630 survey respondents: 464 participants in a pancreatic cancer biobank, 1,439 family registry participants, and 1,727 healthy individuals. Our findings indicate that most participants would feel obligated to share their results with blood relatives while alive and would want results to be shared with relatives after their death. PMID:26479556

  6. Vulva cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer ... is rare. Risk factors include: Human papilloma virus (HPV, or genital warts ) infection in women under age ...

  7. High-throughput LC-MS/MS based simultaneous determination of polyamines including N-acetylated forms in human saliva and the diagnostic approach to breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Haruhito; Mochizuki, Toshiki; Inoue, Koichi; Toyama, Tatsuya; Yoshimoto, Nobuyasu; Endo, Yumi; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2013-12-17

    The determination of polyamines and their N-acetylated forms was performed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The polyamines efficiently reacted with 4-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-7-fluoro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (DBD-F) in 0.1 M borax (pH 9.3) at 60 °C for 30 min. The resulting derivatives were analyzed by electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS and sensitively detected by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Furthermore, a rapid separation of the polyamine derivatives within 10 min was performed by UPLC using an antipressurized column packed with 1.7-μm octadecylsilyl (ODS) silica gel. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) on the SRM chromatograms were at the attomole level (9-43 amol). This procedure was used to successfully determine 11 polyamines, including their N-acetylated forms, in the saliva of patients with primary and relapsed breast cancer and healthy volunteers. The level of several polyamines (Ac-PUT, Ac-SPD, Ac-SPM, DAc-SPD, and DAc-SPM) increases in breast cancer patients. Furthermore, the levels of three polyamines (Ac-SPM, DAc-SPD, and DAc-SPM) were significantly higher only in the relapsed patients. The present method proved highly sensitive and is characterized by specificity and feasibility for sample analysis. Consequently, the proposed method is useful for the noninvasive salivary diagnosis of cancer patients and could be applied to determine polyamines in several specimens of biological nature. PMID:24274257

  8. Re-engineering Cytochrome P450 2B11dH for Enhanced Metabolism of Several Substrates Including the Anti-cancer Prodrugs Cyclophosphamide and Ifosfamide

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ling; Chen, Chong S.; Waxman, David J.; Liu, Hong; Halpert, James R.; Kumar, Santosh

    2007-01-01

    Based on recent directed evolution of P450 2B1, six P450 2B11 mutants at three positions were created in an N-terminal modified construct termed P450 2B11dH and characterized for enzyme catalysis using five substrates. Mutant I209A demonstrated a 3.2-fold enhanced kcat/Km for 7-ethoxy-4-trifluoromethylcourmarin O-deethylation, largely due to a dramatic decrease in Km (0.72 vs. 18 μM). I209A also demonstrated enhanced selectivity for testosterone 16β-hydroxylation over 16α-hydroxylation. In contrast, V183L showed a 4-fold increased kcat for 7-benzyloxyresorufin debenzylation and a 4.7-fold increased kcat/Km for testosterone 16α-hydroxylation. V183L also displayed a 1.7-fold higher kcat/Km than P450 2B11dH with the anti-cancer prodrugs cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide, resulting from a ~4-fold decrease in Km. Introduction of the V183L mutation into full-length P450 2B11 did not enhance the kcat/Km. Overall, the re-engineered P450 2B11dH enzymes exhibited enhanced catalytic efficiency with several substrates including the anti-cancer prodrugs. PMID:17254539

  9. PREFACE: 9th International Fröhlich's Symposium: Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells (Including Microtubule Coherent Modes and Cancer Cell Physics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifra, Michal; Pokorný, Jirí; Kucera, Ondrej

    2011-12-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the International Fröhlich's Symposium entitled 'Electrodynamic Activity of Living Cells' (1-3 July 2011, Prague, Czech Republic). The Symposium was the 9th meeting devoted to physical processes in living matter organized in Prague since 1987. The hypothesis of oscillation systems in living cells featured by non-linear interaction between elastic and electrical polarization fields, non-linear interactions between the system and the heat bath leading to energy downconversion along the frequency scale, energy condensation in the lowest frequency mode and creation of a coherent state was formulated by H Fröhlich, founder of the theory of dielectric materials. He assumed that biological activity is based not only on biochemical but also on biophysical mechanisms and that their disturbances form basic links along the cancer transformation pathway. Fröhlich outlined general ideas of non-linear physical processes in biological systems. The downconversion and the elastic-polarization interactions should be connected in a unified theory and the solution based on comprehensive non-linear characteristics. Biochemical and genetic research of biological systems are highly developed and have disclosed a variety of cellular and subcellular structures, chemical reactions, molecular information transfer, and genetic code sequences - including their pathological development. Nevertheless, the cancer problem is still a big challenge. Warburg's discovery of suppressed oxidative metabolism in mitochondria in cancer cells suggested the essential role of physical mechanisms (but his discovery has remained without impact on cancer research and on the study of physical properties of biological systems for a long time). Mitochondria, the power plants of the cell, have several areas of activity-oxidative energy production is connected with the formation of a strong static electric field around them, water ordering, and liberation of non

  10. Radical Prostatectomy versus External Beam Radiotherapy for cT1-4N0M0 Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Patient Outcomes Including Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Satoru; Fukuhara, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Kenshiro; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Morikawa, Teppei; Kakutani, Shigenori; Takeshima, Yuta; Miyazaki, Hideyo; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kume, Haruki; Homma, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background Although radical prostatectomy (RP) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) have been considered as comparable treatments for localized prostate cancer (PC), it is controversial which treatment is better. The present study aimed to compare outcomes, including mortality, of RP and EBRT for localized PC. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 891 patients with cT1-4N0M0 PC who underwent either RP (n = 569) or EBRT (n = 322) with curative intent at our single institution between 2005 and 2012. Of the EBRT patients, 302 (93.8%) underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Related to these, other-cause mortality (OCM) was also calculated. Biochemical recurrence-free survival was assessed as a secondary endpoint. Cox proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis. Results Median follow-up durations were 53 and 45 months, and median ages were 66 and 70 years (P <0.0001), in the RP and EBRT groups, respectively. As a whole, significantly better prognoses of the RP group than the EBRT group were observed for both OS and CSS, although OCM was significantly higher in the EBRT group. There was no death from PC in men with low and intermediate D’Amico risks, except one with intermediate-risk in the EBRT group. In high-risk patients, significantly more patients died from PC in the EBRT group than the RP group. Multivariate analysis demonstrated the RP group to be an independent prognostic factor for better CSS. On the other hand, the EBRT group had a significantly longer biochemical recurrence-free survival than the RP group. Conclusions Mortality outcomes of both RP and EBRT were generally favorable in low and intermediate risk patients. Improvement of CSS in high risk patients was seen in patients receiving RP over those receiving EBRT. PMID:26506569

  11. Germline MLH1 and MSH2 mutational spectrum including frequent large genomic aberrations in Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families: Implications for genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Janos; Kovacs, Marietta E; Olah, Edith

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the prevalence of germline MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutations and evaluate the clinical characteristics of Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families. METHODS: Thirty-six kindreds were tested for mutations using conformation sensitive gel electrophoreses, direct sequencing and also screening for genomic rearrangements applying multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). RESULTS: Eighteen germline mutations (50%) were identified, 9 in MLH1 and 9 in MSH2. Sixteen of these sequence alterations were considered pathogenic, the remaining two were non-conservative missense alterations occurring at highly conserved functional motifs. The majority of the definite pathogenic mutations (81%, 13/16) were found in families fulfilling the stringent Amsterdam I/II criteria, including three rearrangements revealed by MLPA (two in MSH2 and one in MLH1). However, in three out of sixteen HNPCC-suspected families (19%), a disease-causing alteration could be revealed. Furthermore, nine mutations described here are novel, and none of the sequence changes were found in more than one family. CONCLUSION: Our study describes for the first time the prevalence and spectrum of germline mismatch repair gene mutations in Hungarian HNPCC and suspected-HNPCC families. The results presented here suggest that clinical selection criteria should be relaxed and detection of genomic rearrangements should be included in genetic screening in this population. PMID:17569143

  12. Imaging surveillance programs for women at high breast cancer risk in Europe: Are women from ethnic minority groups adequately included? (Review).

    PubMed

    Belkić, Karen; Cohen, Miri; Wilczek, Brigitte; Andersson, Sonia; Berman, Anne H; Márquez, Marcela; Vukojević, Vladana; Mints, Miriam

    2015-09-01

    Women from ethnic minority groups, including immigrants and refugees are reported to have low breast cancer (BC) screening rates. Active, culturally-sensitive outreach is vital for increasing participation of these women in BC screening programs. Women at high BC risk and who belong to an ethnic minority group are of special concern. Such women could benefit from ongoing trials aimed at optimizing screening strategies for early BC detection among those at increased BC risk. Considering the marked disparities in BC survival in Europe and its enormous and dynamic ethnic diversity, these issues are extremely timely for Europe. We systematically reviewed the literature concerning European surveillance studies that had imaging in the protocol and that targeted women at high BC risk. The aim of the present review was thereby to assess the likelihood that women at high BC risk from minority ethnic groups were adequately included in these surveillance programs. Twenty-seven research groups in Europe reported on their imaging surveillance programs for women at increased BC risk. The benefit of strategies such as inclusion of magnetic resonance imaging and/or more intensive screening was clearly documented for the participating women at increased BC risk. However, none of the reports indicated that sufficient outreach was performed to ensure that women at increased BC risk from minority ethnic groups were adequately included in these surveillance programs. On the basis of this systematic review, we conclude that the specific screening needs of ethnic minority women at increased BC risk have not yet been met in Europe. Active, culturally-sensitive outreach is needed to identify minority women at increased BC risk and to facilitate their inclusion in on-going surveillance programs. It is anticipated that these efforts would be most effective if coordinated with the development of European-wide, population-based approaches to BC screening. PMID:26134040

  13. Nutritional status and feeding-tube placement in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy-based larynx preservation program.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Alexandre; Benezery, Karen; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Ettaiche, Marc; Vandersteen, Clair; Dassonville, Olivier; Poissonnet, Gilles; Riss, Jean-Christophe; Hannoun-Lévi, Jean-Michel; Chand, Marie-Eve; Leysalle, Axel; Saada, Esma; Sudaka, Anne; Haudebourg, Juliette; Hebert, Christophe; Falewee, Marie-Noelle; Demard, François; Santini, José; Peyrade, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the nutritional status and determine its impact on clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced hypopharyngeal cancer included in an induction chemotherapy (ICT)-based larynx preservation program without prophylactic feeding-tube placement. All patients with locally advanced (T3/4, N0-3, M0) hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, technically suitable for total pharyngolaryngectomy, treated by docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (TPF)-ICT for larynx preservation at our institution between 2004 and 2013, were included in this retrospective study. Patients' nutritional status was closely monitored. Enteral nutrition was used if and when a patient was unable to sustain per-oral nutrition and hydration. The impact of nutritional status on clinical outcomes was investigated in univariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 53 patients (42 men and 11 women, mean age = 58.6 ± 8.2 years) were included in this study. Six (11.3 %) patients had lost more than 10 % of their usual body weight before therapy. Compared with patients' usual weight, the mean maximum patient weight loss during therapeutic management was 8.7 ± 4.5 kg. Enteral nutrition was required in 17 patients (32 %). We found no influence of the tested nutritional status-related factors on response to ICT, toxicity of ICT, overall, cause-specific and recurrence-free survival, and on post-therapeutic swallowing outcome. Maximum weight loss was significantly associated with a higher risk of enteral tube feeding during therapy (p = 0.03) and of complications (grade ≥3, p = 0.006) during RT. Without prophylactic feeding-tube placement, approximately one-third of the patients required enteral nutrition. There was no significant impact of nutritional status on oncologic or functional outcomes.

  14. Imaging surveillance programs for women at high breast cancer risk in Europe: Are women from ethnic minority groups adequately included? (Review).

    PubMed

    Belkić, Karen; Cohen, Miri; Wilczek, Brigitte; Andersson, Sonia; Berman, Anne H; Márquez, Marcela; Vukojević, Vladana; Mints, Miriam

    2015-09-01

    Women from ethnic minority groups, including immigrants and refugees are reported to have low breast cancer (BC) screening rates. Active, culturally-sensitive outreach is vital for increasing participation of these women in BC screening programs. Women at high BC risk and who belong to an ethnic minority group are of special concern. Such women could benefit from ongoing trials aimed at optimizing screening strategies for early BC detection among those at increased BC risk. Considering the marked disparities in BC survival in Europe and its enormous and dynamic ethnic diversity, these issues are extremely timely for Europe. We systematically reviewed the literature concerning European surveillance studies that had imaging in the protocol and that targeted women at high BC risk. The aim of the present review was thereby to assess the likelihood that women at high BC risk from minority ethnic groups were adequately included in these surveillance programs. Twenty-seven research groups in Europe reported on their imaging surveillance programs for women at increased BC risk. The benefit of strategies such as inclusion of magnetic resonance imaging and/or more intensive screening was clearly documented for the participating women at increased BC risk. However, none of the reports indicated that sufficient outreach was performed to ensure that women at increased BC risk from minority ethnic groups were adequately included in these surveillance programs. On the basis of this systematic review, we conclude that the specific screening needs of ethnic minority women at increased BC risk have not yet been met in Europe. Active, culturally-sensitive outreach is needed to identify minority women at increased BC risk and to facilitate their inclusion in on-going surveillance programs. It is anticipated that these efforts would be most effective if coordinated with the development of European-wide, population-based approaches to BC screening.

  15. Genomic markers of panitumumab resistance including ERBB2/HER2 in a phase II study of KRAS wild-type (wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC)

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Garrett S.; Cheang, Maggie C.; Chang, Hector Li; Kennecke, Hagen F.

    2016-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted to identify biomarkers associated with resistance to panitumumab monotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with previously treated, codon 12/13 KRAS wt, mCRC were prospectively administered panitumumab 6 mg/kg IV q2weeks. Of 34 panitumumab-treated patients, 11 (32%) had progressive disease at 8 weeks and were classified as non-responders. A Nanostring nCounter-based assay identified a 5-gene expression signature (ERBB2, MLPH, IRX3, MYRF, and KLK6) associated with panitumumab resistance (P = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization determined that the HER2 (ERBB2) protein was overexpressed in 4/11 non-responding and 0/21 responding cases (P = 0.035). Two non-responding tumors had ERBB2 gene amplification only, and one demonstrated both ERBB2 amplification and mutation. A non-codon 12/13 KRAS mutation occurred in one panitumumab-resistant patient and was mutually exclusive with ERBB2/HER2 abnormalities. This study identifies a 5-gene signature associated with non-response to single agent panitumumab, including a subgroup of non-responders with evidence of aberrant ERBB2/HER2 signaling. KRAS wt tumors resistant to EGFRi may be identified by gene signature analysis, and the HER2 pathway plays an important role in resistance to therapy. PMID:26980732

  16. In a patient with biclonal Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia only one clone expands in three-dimensional culture and includes putative cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Julia; Thulien, Kyle J; Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2011-02-01

    A small percentage of cases of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) present with biclonality, defined here as the rearrangement of two distinct VDJ gene segments. Here we investigated the expansion of two clones from a patient with WM expressing molecularly detectable clonotypic gene rearrangements, one V(H)3 and one V(H)4. Biclonality was determined in blood and bone marrow mononuclear cells using real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR). V(H)4 expressing cells but not V(H)3 expressing cells underwent clonal expansion in 3-D culture of reconstructed WM bone marrow. After 3-D culture, secondary culture in a colony forming unit assay, and RQ-PCR, only the V(H)4 clone was shown to harbor a subpopulation with characteristics of cancer stem cells, including proliferative quiescence, self-regeneration, and the ability to generate clonotypic progeny, suggesting that the V(H)4, but not the V(H)3, clone is clinically significant. Enrichment of potential WM stem cells in 3-D cultures holds promise for monitoring their response to treatment and for testing new therapies.

  17. Androgen Receptor (AR) Positive vs Negative Roles in Prostate Cancer Cell Deaths including Apoptosis, Anoikis, Entosis, Necrosis and Autophagic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Simeng; Niu, Yuanjie; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays pivotal roles in the prostate development and homeostasis as well as in the progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with anti-androgens remains as the main treatment of PCa, and it has been shown to effectively suppress PCa growth during the first 12–24 months. However, ADT eventually fails and tumors may re-grow and progress into the castration resistant stage. Recent reports revealed that AR might play complicated and even opposite roles in PCa progression that might depend on cell types and tumor stages. Importantly, AR may influence PCa progression via differential modulation of various cell deaths including apoptosis, anoikis, entosis, necrosis, and autophagic cell deaths. Targeting AR may induce PCa cell apoptosis, autophagic cell deaths and programmed necrosis, yet targeting AR may also suppress cell deaths via anoikis and entosis that may potentially lead to increased metastasis. These differential functions of AR in various types of PCa cell death might challenge the current ADT with anti-androgens treatment. Further detailed dissection of molecular mechanisms by which AR modulates different PCa cell deaths will help us to develop a better therapy to battle PCa. PMID:23993415

  18. The ethanol extract of Scutellaria baicalensis and the active compounds induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis including upregulation of p53 and Bax in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jiayu; Morgan, Winston A.; Sanchez-Medina, Alberto; Corcoran, Olivia

    2011-08-01

    Despite a lack of scientific authentication, Scutellaria baicalensis is clinically used in Chinese medicine as a traditional adjuvant to chemotherapy of lung cancer. In this study, cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that crude ethanolic extracts of S. baicalensis were selectively toxic to human lung cancer cell lines A549, SK-LU-1 and SK-MES-1 compared with normal human lung fibroblasts. The active compounds baicalin, baicalein and wogonin did not exhibit such selectivity. Following exposure to the crude extracts, cellular protein expression in the cancer cell lines was assessed using 2D gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS/Protein Fingerprinting. The altered protein expression indicated that cell growth arrest and apoptosis were potential mechanisms of cytotoxicity. These observations were supported by PI staining cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry and Annexin-V apoptotic analysis by fluorescence microscopy of cancer cells treated with the crude extract and pure active compounds. Moreover, specific immunoblotting identification showed the decreased expression of cyclin A results in the S phase arrest of A549 whereas the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase arrest in SK-MES-1 cells results from the decreased expression of cyclin D1. Following treatment, increased expression in the cancer cells of key proteins related to the enhancement of apoptosis was observed for p53 and Bax. These results provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical use of this herb as an adjuvant to lung cancer therapy. - Research Highlights: > Scutellaria baicalensis is a clinical adjuvant to lung cancer chemotherapy in China. > Scutellaria ethanol extracts selectively toxic to A549, SK-LU-1 and SK-MES-1. > Baicalin, baicalein and wogonin were toxic to all lung cancer cell lines. > Proteomics identified increased p53 and BAX in response to Scutellaria extracts.

  19. Pilot evaluation of physical and psychological effects of a physical trek programme including a dog sledding expedition in children and teenagers with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vallet, Clothilde; André, Nicolas; Gentet, Jean-Claude; Verschuur, Arnauld; Michel, Gérard; Sotteau, Frédéric; Martha, Cécile; Grélot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To evaluate the feasibility and to measure the effects of a six-week-long adapted physical activity programme (APAP), including 5 days of intense dog sledding, on the physical and psychological health of children and adolescents treated for cancer. Methods Eleven children and teenagers (4 girls, 7 boys; mean age 14.3 ± 2.9 years) participated in this monocentric pilot programme of adapted physical activities from February 2013 to March 2013. Seven were still on treatment. The programme lasted 6 weeks. A series of physical tests and psychological questionnaires were carried out before and after the programme. Results All children and teenagers completed the full programme. An improvement in all physical and psychological parameters was observed. Statistically significant differences were observed for global self-esteem (6.2 ± 2.1 to 7.7 ± 1.8; p = 0.02), perceived sport competence (5.3 ± 3.2 to 7.4 ± 2; p = 0.02) and perceived physical strength (5.6 ± 2.5 to 7.1 ± 1.8; p = 0.001). Regarding physical tests, the physical training led to statistically significant improvement for sit-ups (13.8 ± 2.6 to 21.75 ± 5.4; p = 0.01), muscle tone (76 ± 23.7 to 100 ± 22.9; p = 0.01), and resting heart rate (96.1 ± 3.2 to 91.6 ± 4.5; p = 0.03). Conclusion This programme is feasible in children and adolescents even during their oncologic treatment. During the 6-week programme, children and adolescents improved their physical and psychological health, and the putative benefits of the APAP are discussed. A larger randomised trial started in 2014. PMID:26284122

  20. Association of tobacco habits, including bidi smoking, with overall and site-specific cancer incidence: results from the Mumbai cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Pednekar, Mangesh S.; Gupta, Prakash C.; Yeole, Balkrishna B.; Hébert, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Bidis are hand-rolled cigarettes commonly smoked in South Asia and are marketed to Western populations as a safer alternative to conventional cigarettes. This study examined the association between bidis and other forms of tobacco use and cancer incidence in an urban developing country population. Methods Using data from the large, well-characterized Mumbai cohort study, adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed from Cox proportional hazards regression models in order to compare the relative effect of various forms of tobacco use on cancer incidence. Results During 649,228 person-years of follow-up 1,267 incident cancers occurred in 87,222 male cohort members. Incident oral cancer in bidi smokers (HR = 3.55; 95% CI = 2.40,5.24) was 42% higher than in cigarette smokers (HR = 2.50;95% CI = 1.65,3.78). For all respiratory and intrathoracic organs combined, the increase was 69% (HR = 5.54; 95% CI = 3.46,8.87 vs. HR = 3.28; 95% CI = 1.99,5.39); for lung and larynx, the increases were 35 and 112%, respectively. Smokeless tobacco use was associated with cancers of the lip, oral cavity, pharynx, digestive, respiratory, and intrathoracic organs. Conclusions Despite marketing claims to the contrary, we found that smokeless tobacco use and bidi smoking are at least as harmful as cigarette smoking for all incident cancers and are associated with increased risk of oral and respiratory/intrathoracic cancers. PMID:21431915

  1. [Occupational arm ailments in musicians].

    PubMed

    Tubiana, R; Chamagne, P

    1993-02-01

    We began our specific interest in this subject in 1975 and to date have seen and treated over 600 musicians with functional problems of the upper limb. These are common problems affecting over one third of instrumental musicians. Every instrument may have its own specific repercussions. However certain factors may influence their onset: intensive practice; a technique requiring non-physiological positioning; a change in technique, instrument or habits; pre-existing trauma; psychological predisposition; inappropriate physique. The presentations are varied and the limits imprecise. Muscles, tendons, joints and nerves may be involved. The commonest, and easiest to cure are due to pain resulting from overuse syndromes cover a multitude of sins resulting from marked physical effort in excess of the normal physiological capacity of the body. Joint instability and degenerative disease pose their own specific problems. Peripheral nerve lesions can be related to overuse syndromes or to the adoption of non-physiological or harmful positions. The most difficult problems to deal with are those related to a loss of motor control when performing the same repetitive movement--functional dystonia. Their origin remains obscure with the major discussion revolving around either a neurological or organic aetiology. Our intensive experience of instrumentalists with these problems secondary to bad positioning or posture, has led us to propose a therapeutic regime based on structured re-education and relaxation. The great majority of sufferers overuse syndromes or functional dystonias have been able to resume their professional activities. It is clear that functional dystonias are curable if treatment is instituted early and that the lesions are not too long standing.

  2. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your life Being exposed to chemicals that can cause cancer Being at risk for skin cancer Depending on ... than nonsmokers. Other forms of tobacco can also cause cancer, such as cigars, chewing tobacco and snuff. If ...

  3. [Four cases of 5-fluorouracil-related hyperammonemia in patients with large intestinal cancer and multiple liver metastases, including a case of hyperammonemia treated using hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomoya; Wagatsuma, Kohei; Tani, Motohiro; Sasaki, Hajime; Naganawa, Yumiko; Isshiki, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Kayo; Satoh, Shuji; Shimizu, Haruo; Kaneto, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    Systemic chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a standard treatment for unresectable or recurrent large intestinal cancer. Although hyperammonemia is a known side effect of 5-FU that can cause serious pathological conditions, only a few cases have been reported. We describe 4 cases of 5-FU-related hyperammonemia with impairment of consciousness in patients who received 5-FU chemotherapy for large intestinal cancer with multiple liver metastases. Hemodialysis was effective in 1 severe case. There have been no detailed reports on the use of hemodialysis for hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU. Renal dysfunction is considered to be a risk factor for hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU and it is necessary to pay particular attention in patients with renal dysfunction who receive chemotherapy with 5-FU. Here we summarize our cases together with 16 previously reported cases of hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU in Japan.

  4. SU-D-BRB-06: Treating Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) as a Chronic Disease: Implication of Temporal-Spatial Dose Fractionation Optimization Including Cancer Stem Cell Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Pajonk, F; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Steinberg, M; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of improving GBM treatment outcome with temporal-spatial dose optimization of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) that models the differentiation and distinct radiosensitivity between cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The ODE was formulated into a non-convex optimization problem with the objective to minimize remaining total cancer cells 500 days from the onset of radiotherapy when the total cancer cell number was 3.5×10{sup 7}, while maintaining normal tissue biological effective dose (BED) of 100Gy resulted from standard prescription of 2Gyx30. Assuming spatially separated CSC and DCC, optimization was also performed to explore the potential benefit from dose-painting the two compartments. Dose escalation to a sub-cell-population in the GTV was also examined assuming that a 2 cm margin around the GTV allows sufficient dose drop-off to 100Gy BED. The recurrence time was determined as the time at which the total cancer cell number regrows to 10{sup 9} cells. Results: The recurrence time with variable fractional doses administered once per week, bi-week and month for one year were found to be 615, 593 and 570 days, superior to the standard-prescription recurrence time of 418 days. The optimal dose-fraction size progression for both uniform and dose-painting to the tumor is low and relatively constant in the beginning and gradually increases to more aggressive fractions at end of the treatment course. Dose escalation to BED of 200Gy to the whole tumor alongside with protracted weekly treatment was found to further delay recurrence to 733 days. Dose-painting of 200 and 500Gy BED to CSC on a year-long weekly schedule further extended recurrence to 736 and 1076 days, respectively. Conclusion: GBM treatment outcome can possibly be improved with a chronic treatment approach. Further dose escalation to the entire tumor or CSC targeted killing is needed to achieve total tumor control. This work

  5. Long-term quality of life after intensified multi-modality treatment of oral cancer including intra-arterial induction chemotherapy and adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Adorján F.; Stefenelli, Ulrich; Thorn, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) studies are well established when accompanying trials in head and neck cancer, but studies on long-term survivors are rare. Aims: The aim was to evaluate long-term follow-up patients treated with an intensified multi-modality therapy. Setting and Design: Cross-sectional study, tertiary care center. Patients and Methods: A total of 135 oral/oropharyngeal cancer survivors having been treated with an effective four modality treatment (intra-arterial induction chemotherapy, radical surgery, adjuvant radiation, concurrent systemic chemotherapy) filled European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and HN35 questionnaires. Mean distance to treatment was 6.1 (1.3–16.6) years. Results were compared with a reference patient population (EORTC reference manual). In-study group comparison was also carried out. Statistical Analysis: One-sample t-test, Mann–Whitney-test, Kruskal–Wallis analysis. Results: QoL scores of both populations were well comparable. Global health status, cognitive and social functioning, fatigue, social eating, status of teeth, mouth opening and dryness, and sticky saliva were significantly worse in the study population; pain and need for pain killers, cough, need for nutritional support, problems with weight loss and gain were judged to be significantly less. Patients 1-year posttreatment had generally worse scores as compared to patients with two or more years distance to treatment. Complex reconstructive measures and adjuvant (chemo) radiation were main reasons for significant impairment of QoL. Conclusion Subjective disease status of patients following a maximized multi-modality treatment showed an expectable high degree of limitations, but was generally comparable to a reference group treated less intensively, suggesting that the administration of an intensified multi-modality treatment is feasible in terms of QoL/effectivity ratio. PMID:26389030

  6. Cancer cell signaling pathways targeted by spice-derived nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, cardamonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. PMID:22149093

  7. Cancer Cell Signaling Pathways Targeted by Spice-Derived Nutraceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, car-damonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. PMID:22149093

  8. Cancer cell signaling pathways targeted by spice-derived nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, cardamonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer.

  9. Proposal for therapeutic approach based on prognostic factors including morphometric and flow-cytometric features in stage III-IV ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wils, J; van Geuns, H; Baak, J

    1988-05-01

    In 73 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage III and IV ovarian cancer the prognostic significance of morphometric and flow-cytometric features has been evaluated in comparison with more commonly used prognostic factors such as stage and tumor mass. Single features associated with prognosis were as follows: FIGO stage, bulky disease, mean and standard deviation of nuclear area, cellular DNA content, mitotic activity index, and volume percentage epithelium. Multivariate analysis showed that the most significant prognostic combination of features consisted of mean nuclear area, presence or absence of bulky disease, and FIGO stage (in sequence of decreasing importance; Mantel-Cox = 23.07, P less than 0.00001). On the basis of these factors patients with a poor prognosis can be identified. On the other hand two features were associated with an excellent prognosis namely a low mitotic index and a low-volume percentage epithelium. It is concluded that morphometric and flow-cytometric analysis in combination with clinical features can provide significant information to predict the prognosis of patients with advanced ovarian cancer treated with debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. On the basis of our data a tentative proposal for future therapeutic approaches is made.

  10. GLI1 Confers Profound Phenotypic Changes upon LNCaP Prostate Cancer Cells That Include the Acquisition of a Hormone Independent State

    PubMed Central

    Nadendla, Sandeep K.; Hazan, Allon; Ward, Matt; Harper, Lisa J.; Moutasim, Karwan; Bianchi, Lucia S.; Naase, Mahmoud; Ghali, Lucy; Thomas, Gareth J.; Prowse, David M.; Philpott, Michael P.; Neill, Graham W.

    2011-01-01

    The GLI (GLI1/GLI2) transcription factors have been implicated in the development and progression of prostate cancer although our understanding of how they actually contribute to the biology of these common tumours is limited. We observed that GLI reporter activity was higher in normal (PNT-2) and tumourigenic (DU145 and PC-3) androgen-independent cells compared to androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells and, accordingly, GLI mRNA levels were also elevated. Ectopic expression of GLI1 or the constitutively active ΔNGLI2 mutant induced a distinct cobblestone-like morphology in LNCaP cells that, regarding the former, correlated with increased GLI2 as well as expression of the basal/stem-like markers CD44, β1-integrin, ΔNp63 and BMI1, and decreased expression of the luminal marker AR (androgen receptor). LNCaP-GLI1 cells were viable in the presence of the AR inhibitor bicalutamide and gene expression profiling revealed that the transcriptome of LNCaP-GLI1 cells was significantly closer to DU145 and PC-3 cells than to control LNCaP-pBP (empty vector) cells, as well as identifying LCN2/NGAL as a highly induced transcript which is associated with hormone independence in breast and prostate cancer. Functionally, LNCaP-GLI1 cells displayed greater clonal growth and were more invasive than control cells but they did not form colonies in soft agar or prostaspheres in suspension suggesting that they do not possess inherent stem cell properties. Moreover, targeted suppression of GLI1 or GLI2 with siRNA did not reverse the transformed phenotype of LNCaP-GLI1 cells nor did double GLI1/GLI2 knockdowns activate AR expression in DU145 or PC-3 cells. As such, early targeting of the GLI oncoproteins may hinder progression to a hormone independent state but a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms that maintain this phenotype is required to determine if their inhibition will enhance the efficacy of anti-hormonal therapy through the induction of a luminal phenotype and

  11. Response to Therapy and Outcomes in Oropharyngeal Cancer Are Associated With Biomarkers Including Human Papillomavirus, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, Gender, and Smoking

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhavna; Cordell, Kitrina G.; Lee, Julia S.; Prince, Mark E.; Tran, Huong H.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Urba, Susan G.; Worden, Francis P.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Tsien, Christina I.; Taylor, Jeremy; D'Silva, Nisha J.; Yang, Kun; Kurnit, David M.; Bradford, Carol R.

    2007-10-01

    Induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiation for responders or immediate surgery for non-responders is an effective treatment strategy head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) of the larynx and oropharynx. Biomarkers that predict outcome would be valuable in selecting patients for therapy. In this study, the presence and titer of high risk human papilloma virus (HPV) and expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in pre-treatment biopsies, as well as smoking and gender were examined in oropharynx cancer patients enrolled in an organ sparing trial. HPV16 copy number was positively associated with response to therapy and with overall and disease specific survival, whereas EGFR expression, current or former smoking behavior, and female gender (in this cohort) were associated with poor response and poor survival in multivariate analysis. Smoking cessation and strategies to target EGFR may be useful adjuncts for therapy to improve outcome in the cases with the poorest biomarker profile.

  12. Recent Research Progress on Garlic (大蒜 dà suàn) as a Potential Anticarcinogenic Agent Against Major Digestive Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, Rajasekaran; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Garlic (大蒜 dà suàn; the bulb of Allium sativum), bestowed with an array of organosulfur compounds finds its application in treating many ailments including cardiovascular problems, common cold, bacterial and fungal infections and cancer. Numerous epidemiological evidences document the beneficial effects of various bioactive organosulfur compounds of garlic against different types of cancer. Studies involving the animal and cell models indicate garlic bioactive compounds could be effective in treating all the stages of cancer. This review gives an update on the recent pre-clinical and clinical trials, carried out to evaluate the efficacy of various garlic bioactive compounds along with the mechanism of action pertaining to major digestive cancers including liver, gastric and colorectal cancers. The major anti-carcinogenic mechanisms are caspase dependent and/or independent induction of apoptosis, anti-proliferative, anti-metastasis, anti-oxidant and immunomodulative properties. Form the clinical trials an increase in the garlic consumption of 20 g/day reduced the risk of gastric and colorectal cancer. In summary, increased uptake of garlic in diet may prevent the incidence of digestive cancers. PMID:24716132

  13. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms ... be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors ...

  14. Ginger-derived phenolic substances with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Na, Hye-Kyung; Surh, Young-Joon

    2009-01-01

    Ginger, the rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae), has widely been used as a spice and condiment in different societies. Besides its food-additive functions, ginger has a long history of medicinal use for the treatment of a variety of human ailments including common colds, fever, rheumatic disorders, gastrointestinal complications, motion sickness, diabetes, cancer, etc. Ginger contains several nonvolatile pungent principles viz. gingerols, shogaols, paradols and zingerone, which account for many of its health beneficial effects. Studies conducted in cultured cells as well as in experimental animals revealed that these pungent phenolics possess anticarcinogenic properties. This chapter summarizes updated information on chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects of ginger-derived phenolic substances and their underlying mechanisms. PMID:19367122

  15. Neurotransmitter transporter family including SLC6A6 and SLC6A13 contributes to the 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced accumulation of protoporphyrin IX and photodamage, through uptake of ALA by cancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tai Tien; Mu, Anfeng; Adachi, Yuka; Adachi, Yasushi; Taketani, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    δ-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin accumulation is widely used in the treatment of cancer, as photodynamic therapy (PDT). To clarify the mechanisms of ALA uptake by tumor cells, we have examined the ALA-induced accumulation of protoporphyrin by the treatment of colon cancer DLD-1 and epithelial cancer HeLa cells with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-related compounds. When the cells were treated with GABA, taurine and β-alanine, the level of protoporphyrin was decreased, suggesting that plasma membrane transporters involved in the transport of neurotransmitters contribute to the uptake of ALA. By transfection with neurotransmitter transporters SLC6A6, SLC6A8 and SLC6A13 cDNA, the ALA- and ALA methylester-dependent accumulation of protoporphyrin markedly increased in HEK293T cells, dependent on an increase in the uptake of ALA. When ALA-treated cells were exposed to white light, the extent of photodamage increased in SLC6A6- and SLC6A13-expressing cells. Conversely, knockdown of SLC6A6 or SLC6A13 with siRNAs in DLD-1 and HeLa cells decreased the ALA-induced accumulation. The expression of SLC6A6 and SLC6A13 was found in some cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the presence of these transporters was elevated in colon cancerous cells. These results indicated that neurotransmitter transporters including SLC6A6 and SLC6A13 mediate the uptake of ALA and can play roles in the enhancement of ALA-induced accumulation of protoporphyrin in cancerous cells.

  16. Use of intravesical valrubicin in clinical practice for treatment of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer, including carcinoma in situ of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sam S.; Lihou, Christine; Li, Thomas; Harper, Samira Q.; Lang, Zhihui; Tutrone, Ronald F.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective was to conduct a US multicenter, retrospective medical record study examining the effectiveness, safety, and patterns of use of valrubicin for treatment of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) by clinicians since the 2009 reintroduction of valrubicin. Methods: Patients ≥ 18 years with NMIBC who received had one or more instillations of valrubicin (October 2009– September 2011) were eligible. The primary endpoint was event-free survival (EFS). Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Results: The medical records of 113 patients met the inclusion criteria; 100 patients (88.5%) completed valrubicin treatment. The median age was 75 years (range 42–95 years). The median NMIBC duration was 31 months since diagnosis: 51.3% (58/113) had carcinoma in situ (CIS) alone, and 31.9% (36/113) had unspecified NMIBC. Most patients, 94.7% (107/113), had more than three valrubicin instillations and 70.8% (80/113) completed a full course. The EFS rate (95% confidence interval) was 51.6% (40.9–61.3%), 30.4% (20.4–41.1%), and 16.4% (7.9–27.5%) at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Median time to an event was 3.5 (2.5–4.0) months after the first valrubicin instillation. Local adverse reactions (LARs) were experienced by 49.6% (56/113) of patients; most LARs were mild (93.6%). The most frequent LARs were hematuria, pollakiuria, micturition urgency, bladder spasm, and dysuria. In total, 4.4% (5/113) of patients discontinued valrubicin because of adverse events or LARs. Conclusions: Data from the present retrospective study are consistent with previous prospective clinical trials that demonstrated valrubicin effectiveness and tolerability for select patients with CIS, before considering cystectomy. Additional prospective studies are warranted to evaluate valrubicin safety and efficacy in the broader patient population with NMIBC. PMID:25276228

  17. Comparative cytotoxicity of artemisinin and cisplatin and their interactions with chlorogenic acids in MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suberu, John O; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Sullivan, Neil; Lapkin, Alexei A; Barker, Guy C

    2014-12-01

    In parts of Africa and Asia, self-medication with a hot water infusion of Artemisia annua (Artemisia tea) is a common practice for a number of ailments including malaria and cancer. In our earlier work, such an extract showed better potency than artemisinin alone against both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant parasites. In this study, in vitro tests of the infusion in MCF7 cells showed high IC50 values (>200 μM). The combination of artemisinin and 3-caffeoylquinic acid (3CA), two major components in the extract, was strongly antagonistic and gave a near total loss of cytotoxicity for artemisinin. We observed that the interaction of 3CAs with another cytotoxic compound, cisplatin, showed potentiation of activity by 2.5-fold. The chelation of cellular iron by 3CA is hypothesized as a possible explanation for the loss of artemisinin activity.

  18. Comparative Cytotoxicity of Artemisinin and Cisplatin and Their Interactions with Chlorogenic Acids in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suberu, John O; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Sullivan, Neil; Lapkin, Alexei A; Barker, Guy C

    2014-01-01

    In parts of Africa and Asia, self-medication with a hot water infusion of Artemisia annua (Artemisia tea) is a common practice for a number of ailments including malaria and cancer. In our earlier work, such an extract showed better potency than artemisinin alone against both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant parasites. In this study, in vitro tests of the infusion in MCF7 cells showed high IC50 values (>200 μm). The combination of artemisinin and 3-caffeoylquinic acid (3CA), two major components in the extract, was strongly antagonistic and gave a near total loss of cytotoxicity for artemisinin. We observed that the interaction of 3CAs with another cytotoxic compound, cisplatin, showed potentiation of activity by 2.5-fold. The chelation of cellular iron by 3CA is hypothesized as a possible explanation for the loss of artemisinin activity. PMID:25209896

  19. Comparative cytotoxicity of artemisinin and cisplatin and their interactions with chlorogenic acids in MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Suberu, John O; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Sullivan, Neil; Lapkin, Alexei A; Barker, Guy C

    2014-12-01

    In parts of Africa and Asia, self-medication with a hot water infusion of Artemisia annua (Artemisia tea) is a common practice for a number of ailments including malaria and cancer. In our earlier work, such an extract showed better potency than artemisinin alone against both chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant parasites. In this study, in vitro tests of the infusion in MCF7 cells showed high IC50 values (>200 μM). The combination of artemisinin and 3-caffeoylquinic acid (3CA), two major components in the extract, was strongly antagonistic and gave a near total loss of cytotoxicity for artemisinin. We observed that the interaction of 3CAs with another cytotoxic compound, cisplatin, showed potentiation of activity by 2.5-fold. The chelation of cellular iron by 3CA is hypothesized as a possible explanation for the loss of artemisinin activity. PMID:25209896

  20. Carcinoma showing thymus-like elements of the thyroid gland: report of three cases including one case with breast cancer history.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanjun; Liu, Xi; Huang, Wei; Li, Xiaofeng; Johnstone, Marianne; Deng, Yuan; Ke, Yongqiang; Nunes, Quentin M; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Yili; Zhang, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma showing thymus-like elements (CASTLE) is a rare malignant tumor of the thyroid or adjacent neck soft tissues, whose histogenesis is still debated. It may resemble other primary or metastatic poorly differentiated tumors histologically and the differential diagnosis is crucial for CASTLE has a better prognosis. However, CASTLE as a second primary tumor has not been reported in the literature. We report three cases of thyroid CASTLE, including a unique tumor following breast-conserving surgery for early-stage breast invasive carcinoma. There were two female and one male. All three tumors were located in the right lobe of the thyroid, and one tumor showed extension into the surrounding soft tissue. Histologically, all tumors showed expansive growth and consisted of cords, nests or sheets of epithelial cells divided into irregularly shaped lobules by fibrous connective tissue with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration. Focal squamous differentiation resembling Hassall's corpuscles were observed. All cases stained positively for CD5, CD117, high molecular weight cytokeratin, cytokeratin, P63, carcinoembryonic antigen and epithelial membrane antigen. Positive staining for Bcl-2 in two cases and chromogranin A in one case was noted. Ki-67 expression ranged from 15 to 25%. Thyroid transcription factor and CD3 were negative. There was no evidence of recurrent or metastatic disease at following surgery. These features demonstrated CASTLE may arise from branchial pouch remnants, the thyroid solid cell nests. CASTLE is a rare entity, awareness of its occurrence as a second primary tumor is important to avoid overtreatment because it is associated with a favorable prognosis.

  1. Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... weight Minimizing your exposure to radiation and toxic chemicals Not smoking or chewing tobacco Reducing sun exposure, especially if you burn easily Cancer screenings, such as mammography and breast ...

  2. Mapping patients' experiences from initial change in health to cancer diagnosis: a qualitative exploration of patient and system factors mediating this process.

    PubMed

    Molassiotis, A; Wilson, B; Brunton, L; Chandler, C

    2010-01-01

    Delays in the diagnosis of cancer are common, and they are attributed to both patient and healthcare system factors. Minimizing such delays and improving early detection rates is a key goal of the new cancer reform strategy in England, in light of recent data showing that survival rates in the UK are low. The aim of this study was to explore the pathway from initial persistent change in health to diagnosis of cancer in a sample of patients from seven diagnostic groups in the UK and the factors mediating this process. Qualitative interviews with patients diagnosed with cancer were carried out. Seventy-five cancer patients discussed their pre-diagnosis experience as part of a broader exploration of their symptom experience for a larger study. Data were analysed by using content analysis and chart events. A broader range of mediating factors affecting and extending the patient pathway to diagnosis were reported in relation to lung, gastrointestinal and head and neck cancers and lymphoma, compared with breast, gynaecological and brain cancer patients. Many of the mediating factors were patient-related (e.g. misattribution of symptoms to common ailments, underestimation of the seriousness of the symptoms, self-medication or monitoring of symptoms, etc.). Primary care practitioner-factors were also prominent, including the exploration of firstly more common possibilities for treating the presenting symptoms without follow-up of persisting symptoms. Public health education about common cancer signs and symptoms, educational approaches in primary care to improve early diagnoses of cancer and updated guidelines for referral of suspected cancers should be enhanced before we can see any improvements in survival rates from cancer in the UK. PMID:19552730

  3. 34 CFR 303.15 - Include; including.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include; including. 303.15 Section 303.15 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS...

  4. Natural Products as a Vital Source for the Discovery of Cancer Chemotherapeutic and Chemopreventive Agents.

    PubMed

    Cragg, Gordon M; Pezzuto, John M

    2016-01-01

    Throughout history, natural products have played a dominant role in the treatment of human ailments. For example, the legendary discovery of penicillin transformed global existence. Presently, natural products comprise a large portion of current-day pharmaceutical agents, most notably in the area of cancer therapy. Examples include Taxol, vinblastine, and camptothecin. These structurally unique agents function by novel mechanisms of action; isolation from natural sources is the only plausible method that could have led to their discovery. In addition to terrestrial plants as sources for starting materials, the marine environment (e.g., ecteinascidin 743, halichondrin B, and dolastatins), microbes (e.g., bleomycin, doxorubicin, and staurosporin), and slime molds (e.g., epothilone B) have yielded remarkable cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Irrespective of these advances, cancer remains a leading cause of death worldwide. Undoubtedly, the prevention of human cancer is highly preferable to treatment. Cancer chemoprevention, the use of vaccines or pharmaceutical agents to inhibit, retard, or reverse the process of carcinogenesis, is another important approach for easing this formidable public health burden. Similar to cancer chemotherapeutic agents, natural products play an important role in this field. There are many examples, including dietary phytochemicals such as sulforaphane and phenethyl isothiocyanate (cruciferous vegetables) and resveratrol (grapes and grape products). Overall, natural product research is a powerful approach for discovering biologically active compounds with unique structures and mechanisms of action. Given the unfathomable diversity of nature, it is reasonable to suggest that chemical leads can be generated that are capable of interacting with most or possibly all therapeutic targets. PMID:26679767

  5. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (epoetin and darbepoetin) for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia (including review of technology appraisal no. 142): a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Crathorne, Louise; Huxley, Nicola; Haasova, Marcela; Snowsill, Tristan; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Hoyle, Martin; Briscoe, Simon; Coelho, Helen; Long, Linda; Medina-Lara, Antonieta; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Napier, Mark; Hyde, Chris

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anaemia is a common side effect of cancer treatments and can lead to a reduction in quality of life. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are licensed for use in conjunction with red blood cell transfusions to improve cancer treatment-induced anaemia (CIA). OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESAs in anaemia associated with cancer treatment (specifically chemotherapy). DATA SOURCES The following databases were searched from 2004 to 2013: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, British Nursing Index, Health Management Information Consortium, Current Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites were also searched. Bibliographies of included papers were scrutinised for further potentially includable studies. REVIEW METHODS The clinical effectiveness review followed principles published by the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or systematic reviews of RCTs, of ESAs (epoetin or darbepoetin) for treating people with CIA were eligible for inclusion in the review. Comparators were best supportive care, placebo or other ESAs. Anaemia- and malignancy-related outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. When appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis. An empirical health economic model was developed comparing ESA treatment with no ESA treatment. The model comprised two components: one evaluating short-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (while patients are anaemic) and one evaluating long-term QALYs. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Probabilistic and univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Of 1457 titles and abstracts screened, 23 studies assessing ESAs within their licensed

  6. Pelvic Lymph Node Irradiation Including Pararectal Sentinel Nodes for Prostate Cancer Patients: Treatment Optimization Comparing Intensity Modulated X-rays, Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy, and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Vees, Hansjörg; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Nouet, Philippe; Zilli, Thomas; Cozzi, Luca; Miralbell, Raymond

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to assess the dosimetric impact of advanced delivery radiotherapy techniques using either intensity modulated x-ray beams (IMXT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), or intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), for high-risk prostate cancer patients with sentinel nodes in the pararectal region. Twenty high-risk prostate cancer patients were included in a prospective trial evaluating sentinel nodes on pelvic SPECT acquisition. To be eligible for the dosimetric study, patients had to present with pararectal sentinel nodes usually not included in the clinical target volume encompassing the pelvic lymph nodes. Radiotherapy-plans including the prostate, the seminal vesicles, and the pelvic lymph nodes with the pararectal sentinel nodes were optimized for 6 eligible patients. IMXT and IMPT were delivered with 7 and 3 beams respectively and VMAT with 2 arcs. Results were assessed with Dose-Volume Histograms and predictive normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) models between the three competing treatment modalities aiming to deliver a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy daily fractions. Target coverage was optimized with IMPT when compared to IMXT and VMAT. Coverage of the sentinel node was slightly better with IMXT (D98% 5 57.3 ± 5.1 Gy) when compared with VMAT (D98% 5 56.2 ± 4.1 Gy). The irradiation of rectal, bladder, small bowel, and femoral heads volumes was significantly reduced with IMPT when compared to IMXT and VMAT. NTCPs rates for rectal and bladder ≥ grade-3 late toxicity were better with IMPT (0.4 ± 0.0% and 0.0 ± 0.0%) compared with IMXT (4.6 ± 3.3% and 1.4 ± 1.1%), and VMAT (4.5 ± 4.0% and 1.6 ± 1.6%), respectively. Acceptable dose-volume distributions and low rectal and urinary NTCPs were estimated to geometrically complex pelvic volumes such as the ones proposed in this study using IMXT, VMAT and IMPT. IMPT succeeded, however, to propose the best physical and biological treatment plans compared to both X-ray derived plans.

  7. Participatory Epidemiology of Ethnoveterinary Practices Fulani Pastoralists Used to Manage Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia and Other Cattle Ailments in Niger State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Alhaji, N B; Babalobi, O O

    2015-01-01

    Ethnoveterinary practices are locally available and affordable to Fulani pastoralists in Niger State, Nigeria, to whom conventional veterinary services are often not readily available and are relatively expensive. This study was designed to identify and document medicinal plant and nonplant materials used by this group in the management of cattle diseases. Participatory rural appraisal tools of checklist, semistructured interview, probing, transect, and triangulations were used to assess Fulani pastoralists existing knowledge on traditional veterinary practices in nine pastoral communities spread across the state. Fifty medicinal materials and seven traditional preventive practices are in use against CBPP and other cattle disease conditions. Of these, 38 (76.0%) are medicinal plants and 12 (24.0%) are nonplant materials (edible earth materials and minerals). Family Fabaceae was most commonly mentioned while leaves were the most common parts used. Most of these materials are administered by drenching with few others mixed with feed. Proportions of plant parts used include leaves (47.4%), barks (31.6%), roots (10.6%), and 2.6% of each of rhizomes, fruits, seeds, and whole plants. Of recently used ingredients are kerosene and spent engine oil. Further research into the active ingredients of ethnoveterinary materials and dosages is necessary to guide their usage. PMID:26464953

  8. Participatory Epidemiology of Ethnoveterinary Practices Fulani Pastoralists Used to Manage Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia and Other Cattle Ailments in Niger State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Alhaji, N. B.; Babalobi, O. O.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnoveterinary practices are locally available and affordable to Fulani pastoralists in Niger State, Nigeria, to whom conventional veterinary services are often not readily available and are relatively expensive. This study was designed to identify and document medicinal plant and nonplant materials used by this group in the management of cattle diseases. Participatory rural appraisal tools of checklist, semistructured interview, probing, transect, and triangulations were used to assess Fulani pastoralists existing knowledge on traditional veterinary practices in nine pastoral communities spread across the state. Fifty medicinal materials and seven traditional preventive practices are in use against CBPP and other cattle disease conditions. Of these, 38 (76.0%) are medicinal plants and 12 (24.0%) are nonplant materials (edible earth materials and minerals). Family Fabaceae was most commonly mentioned while leaves were the most common parts used. Most of these materials are administered by drenching with few others mixed with feed. Proportions of plant parts used include leaves (47.4%), barks (31.6%), roots (10.6%), and 2.6% of each of rhizomes, fruits, seeds, and whole plants. Of recently used ingredients are kerosene and spent engine oil. Further research into the active ingredients of ethnoveterinary materials and dosages is necessary to guide their usage. PMID:26464953

  9. Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ in your lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer occurs in the lining of the bladder. It ... urinate Low back pain Risk factors for developing bladder cancer include smoking and exposure to certain chemicals in ...

  10. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallowing A lump in your neck An earache Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  11. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  13. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  14. An unusual case of metastatic male breast cancer to the nasopharynx-review of literature.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Swati; Jayant, Kumar; Agarwal, Rajendra Kumar; Dayama, Kalyan G; Arora, Seema

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic breast carcinoma has been described to the various areas in the head and neck region. However, these metastases are rarely found in nasopharynx. Herein we are presenting the first case of male breast carcinoma with the longest survival secondary to distant metastases in right maxillary sinus and extending to the nasopharynx with extensive skeletal & lung metastases. Here we present a case of 65-year-old male with past medical history of right breast carcinoma, presented clinically with symptoms of recurrent sinusitis. Physical examination revealed a mass in the nasopharynx, which subsequently proved to be hormonal receptor positive high-grade adenocarcinoma secondary to metastasis of primary breast cancer on biopsy. The patient received three cycles of palliative chemotherapy based on Doxorubicin with Paclitaxel weekly. In spite of that, he developed pulmonary, liver and bone metastases. Later, treatment regimen was changed to Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel and injectable Zolendronate with calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Still he didn't show any improvement and later, he developed febrile neutropenia. Then, he refused further chemotherapy and died after 12 months of receiving the best hospice care. Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in terms of incidence and mortality; breast cancer deserves extensive studies and research in different aspects. Breast cancer metastasizing to nasopharynx would be the last diagnosis that comes to mind for a male patient presenting with clinical features suggestive of recurrent sinusitis infection. As recurrent sinusitis is a very common ailment affecting human kind and is mostly due to benign causes. Metastasis, although rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of nasopharyngeal lesion since it may clinically mimic a benign neoplasm or primary carcinoma. Based on our clinical experience and review of literature, although it is a very rare possibility in a patient with sinusitis, still we advise

  15. 1985 Cancer Facts and Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Cancer Society, Inc., New York, NY.

    Information and statistical data about cancer are provided in seven categories. They include: (1) basic cancer data (considering how cancer works, trends in diagnosis and treatment, new cancer cases and deaths for 1985, and other areas); (2) major cancer sites (discussing lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, 5-year survival rates/trends…

  16. The neuropsychiatric ailment of Vincent Van Gogh.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B; Rai, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Vincent Van Gogh is one of the most celebrated creative artists of all time. All his life, he was afflicted by some kind of neurological or psychiatric disorder, which remains a mystery even today. Many historians and his personal physicians believe that he suffered from epilepsy while others felt that he was affected by Ménière's disease. Features such as hypergraphia, atypical sexuality, and viscosity of thinking suggest the possibility of Gastaut-Geschwind phenomenon, a known complication of complex partial seizure. On the contrary, some historians feel that he was forced to sever his right ear in order to get relief from troublesome tinnitus, a complication of Ménière's disease. He was addicted to the liquor absinthe, which is known to lead to xanthopsia, and many authorities argue that this was the reason for his penchant for the deep and bright yellow color in many of his paintings. Others have suggested the possibility of bipolar disorder, sunstroke, acute intermittent porphyria, and digitalis toxicity as well.

  17. The neuropsychiatric ailment of Vincent Van Gogh

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.; Rai, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Vincent Van Gogh is one of the most celebrated creative artists of all time. All his life, he was afflicted by some kind of neurological or psychiatric disorder, which remains a mystery even today. Many historians and his personal physicians believe that he suffered from epilepsy while others felt that he was affected by Ménière's disease. Features such as hypergraphia, atypical sexuality, and viscosity of thinking suggest the possibility of Gastaut-Geschwind phenomenon, a known complication of complex partial seizure. On the contrary, some historians feel that he was forced to sever his right ear in order to get relief from troublesome tinnitus, a complication of Ménière's disease. He was addicted to the liquor absinthe, which is known to lead to xanthopsia, and many authorities argue that this was the reason for his penchant for the deep and bright yellow color in many of his paintings. Others have suggested the possibility of bipolar disorder, sunstroke, acute intermittent porphyria, and digitalis toxicity as well. PMID:25745302

  18. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    SciTech Connect

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  19. Light, Including Ultraviolet

    PubMed Central

    Maverakis, Emanual; Miyamura, Yoshinori; Bowen, Michael P.; Correa, Genevieve; Ono, Yoko; Goodarzi, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is intricately linked to the functional status of the cutaneous immune system. In susceptible individuals, UV radiation can ignite pathogenic inflammatory pathways leading to allergy or autoimmunity. In others, this same UV radiation can be used as a phototherapy to suppress pathogenic cutaneous immune responses. These vastly different properties are a direct result of UV light’s ability to ionize molecules in the skin and thereby chemically alter them. Sometimes these UV-induced chemical reactions are essential, the formation of pre-vitamin D3 from 7-dehydrocholesterol, for example. In other instances they can be potentially detrimental. UV radiation can ionize a cell’s DNA causing adjacent pyrimidine bases to chemically bond to each other. To prevent malignant transformation, a cell may respond to this UV-induced DNA damage by undergoing apoptosis. Although this pathway prevents skin cancer it also has the potential of inducing or exacerbating autoreactive immune responses by exposing the cell’s nuclear antigens. Ultaviolet-induced chemical reactions can activate the immune system by a variety of other mechanisms as well. In response to UV irradiation keratinocytes secrete cytokines and chemokines, which activate and recruit leukocytes to the skin. In some individuals UV-induced chemical reactions can synthesize novel antigens resulting in a photoallergy. Alternatively, photosensitizing molecules can damage cells by initiating sunburn-like phototoxic reactions. Herein we review all types of UV-induced skin reactions, especially those involving the immune system. PMID:20018479

  20. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  1. Testicular Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin behind the penis. You can get cancer in one or both testicles. Testicular cancer mainly affects young men between the ages of ... undescended testicle Have a family history of the cancer Symptoms include pain, swelling, or lumps in your ...

  2. Listening to Include

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veck, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to make important connections between listening and inclusive education and the refusal to listen and exclusion. Two lines of argument are advanced. First, if educators and learners are to include each other within their educational institutions as unique individuals, then they will need to listen attentively to each other.…

  3. Vaginal foreign body mimicking cervical cancer in postmenopausal woman - case study.

    PubMed

    Ciebiera, Michał; Słabuszewska-Jóźwiak, Aneta; Ledowicz, Witold; Jakiel, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    We present a case report of a 73-year-old, postmenopausal woman with detailed history of breast cancer and oncology treatment including tamoxifen therapy. She presented at the clinic of gynecology and obstetrics with recurrent inflammation of the urinary and genital tract and suspicion of a cervical mass. She also presented occasional abdominal complaints and malodorous vaginal discharge. These symptoms were observed in the patient for several years. Before hospitalization she received many kinds of empirical, antimicrobial treatment such as chlorquinaldol, metronidazole, nifuratel, and nystatin. She did not receive further guidance from doctors about the causes of ailments and further diagnostic and treatment capabilities. In our clinic a detailed diagnostic process including ultrasound transvaginal examination and a minisurgical procedure revealed the presence of a vaginal foreign body (which turned out to be a plastic, shampoo bottle cap) surrounded by a mass of inflamed tissue mimicking a cervical tumor. All symptoms and complaints subsided after surgical removal of the foreign body and antibacterial therapy with metronidazole and cefuroxime. Our study draws attention to the need of thorough gynecological care including prophylaxis, especially in the case of complaints of an intimate nature. Even trivial, frequently occurring disorders can be dangerous and require proper and responsible doctor's supervision and management through the healing process. PMID:26528112

  4. Vaginal foreign body mimicking cervical cancer in postmenopausal woman – case study

    PubMed Central

    Słabuszewska-Jóźwiak, Aneta; Ledowicz, Witold; Jakiel, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 73-year-old, postmenopausal woman with detailed history of breast cancer and oncology treatment including tamoxifen therapy. She presented at the clinic of gynecology and obstetrics with recurrent inflammation of the urinary and genital tract and suspicion of a cervical mass. She also presented occasional abdominal complaints and malodorous vaginal discharge. These symptoms were observed in the patient for several years. Before hospitalization she received many kinds of empirical, antimicrobial treatment such as chlorquinaldol, metronidazole, nifuratel, and nystatin. She did not receive further guidance from doctors about the causes of ailments and further diagnostic and treatment capabilities. In our clinic a detailed diagnostic process including ultrasound transvaginal examination and a minisurgical procedure revealed the presence of a vaginal foreign body (which turned out to be a plastic, shampoo bottle cap) surrounded by a mass of inflamed tissue mimicking a cervical tumor. All symptoms and complaints subsided after surgical removal of the foreign body and antibacterial therapy with metronidazole and cefuroxime. Our study draws attention to the need of thorough gynecological care including prophylaxis, especially in the case of complaints of an intimate nature. Even trivial, frequently occurring disorders can be dangerous and require proper and responsible doctor's supervision and management through the healing process. PMID:26528112

  5. Vaginal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer; Cancer - vagina; Tumor - vaginal ... Most vaginal cancers occur when another cancer, such as cervical or endometrial cancer , spreads. This is called secondary vaginal cancer. Cancer ...

  6. Cancer Prevention Overview (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been linked to some cancers: Links between air pollution and cancer risk have been found. These include ... between lung cancer and secondhand tobacco smoke , outdoor air pollution, and asbestos . Drinking water that contains a large ...

  7. Breast cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... there is no cancer. This is called a false-positive result. For women who have had cancer in ... easier to treat. Risks of screenings can include: False-positive results . This occurs when a test shows cancer ...

  8. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  9. Oral Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... South Asia and Southeast Asia, including China and India. Personal history of head and neck cancer A ... such as “NCI’s PDQ cancer information summary about breast cancer prevention states the risks in the following way: [ ...

  10. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: promises for diagnosis and treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Sophie; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, significant scientific research efforts have led to a significant growth in understanding of cancer at the genetic, molecular, and cellular levels providing great opportunities for diagnosis and treatment of cancer diseases. The hopes for fast cancer diagnosis and treatment were significantly increased by the entrance of nanoparticles to the medical sciences. Nanoparticles are attractive due to their unique opportunities together with negligible side effects not only in cancer therapy but also in the treatment of other ailments. Among all types of nanoparticles, surface-engineered superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been attracted a great attention for cancer therapy applications. This review covers the recent advances in the development of SPIONs together with their opportunities and challenges, as theranosis agents, in cancer treatment. PMID:22199999

  11. Impact of natural resources and research on cancer treatment and prevention: A perspective from Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Orang-Ojong, Barnabas Bessem; Munyangaju, Jose Edward; Wei, Ma Shang; Lin, Miao; Wei, Fan Guan; Foukunang, Charles; Zhu, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is a significant public health concern and treatment poses a problem and is frequently unsuccessful. As such, continuous efforts in the search for new agents and therapies to improve survival are required. A considerable number of plant extracts and isolated compounds possess significant anti-proliferative or pro-apoptotic effects. The majority of biologically active compounds belong to terpenoids, phenolics and alkaloids. Terpenoid plants such as Hypericum lanceolatum and a few alkaloid plants have been found to be potent anti-parasitic agents but have exhibited poor antimicrobial effects. The screening of medicinal plants for anticancer drugs has provided modern medicine with effective cytotoxic pharmaceuticals. Numerous medicinal plants have traditionally been used for the treatment of various ailments. However, a number of these medicinal plants have not been standardized and their mechanisms of actions are generally unknown. Active drug discovery research using local medicinal plants is ongoing. Some of these plant-derived compounds, including 3,39-dimethoxy-49-O-β-d-xylopyronosylellagic acid, have been tested for their potential use as anticancer agents. This review discussed the scope and possibility of natural products as anticancer remedy.

  12. Impact of natural resources and research on cancer treatment and prevention: A perspective from Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Orang-Ojong, Barnabas Bessem; Munyangaju, Jose Edward; Wei, Ma Shang; Lin, Miao; Wei, Fan Guan; Foukunang, Charles; Zhu, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is a significant public health concern and treatment poses a problem and is frequently unsuccessful. As such, continuous efforts in the search for new agents and therapies to improve survival are required. A considerable number of plant extracts and isolated compounds possess significant anti-proliferative or pro-apoptotic effects. The majority of biologically active compounds belong to terpenoids, phenolics and alkaloids. Terpenoid plants such as Hypericum lanceolatum and a few alkaloid plants have been found to be potent anti-parasitic agents but have exhibited poor antimicrobial effects. The screening of medicinal plants for anticancer drugs has provided modern medicine with effective cytotoxic pharmaceuticals. Numerous medicinal plants have traditionally been used for the treatment of various ailments. However, a number of these medicinal plants have not been standardized and their mechanisms of actions are generally unknown. Active drug discovery research using local medicinal plants is ongoing. Some of these plant-derived compounds, including 3,39-dimethoxy-49-O-β-d-xylopyronosylellagic acid, have been tested for their potential use as anticancer agents. This review discussed the scope and possibility of natural products as anticancer remedy. PMID:24649217

  13. The Antiproliferative Effect of Moringa oleifera Crude Aqueous Leaf Extract on Human Esophageal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tiloke, Charlette; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2016-04-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is commonly diagnosed in South Africa (SA), with high incidences occurring in SA's black population. Moringa oleifera (MO), a multipurpose tree, is used traditionally for its nutritional and medicinal properties. It has been used for the treatment of a variety of ailments, including cancer. We investigated the antiproliferative effect of MO crude aqueous leaf extract (MOE) on a cancerous esophageal cell line (SNO). SNO cells were exposed to a range of MOE dilutions to evaluate cytotoxicity (MTT assay). Oxidative stress was determined using the TBARS assay. The comet assay was used to assess DNA damage. We then determined cell death mechanisms by measuring phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization (flow cytometry), caspase-3/7 and caspase-9 activities, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels (luminometry). Protein expression of Smac/DIABLO and PARP-1 was determined by western blotting. SNO cells were treated with a range of MOE dilutions to obtain an IC50 value of 389.2 μg/mL MOE (24 h), which was used in all subsequent assays. MOE significantly increased lipid peroxidation (P < .05) and DNA fragmentation (P < .0001) in SNO cells. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by the increase in PS externalization (P < .0001), caspase-9 (P < .05) and caspase-3/7 (P = .22) activities, and decreased ATP levels (P < .0001). MOE significantly increased both the expression of Smac/DIABLO protein and cleavage of PARP-1, resulting in an increase in the 24-kDa fragment (P < .001). MOE possesses antiproliferative effects on SNO EC cells by increasing lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, and induction of apoptosis. PMID:27074620

  14. The Antiproliferative Effect of Moringa oleifera Crude Aqueous Leaf Extract on Human Esophageal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tiloke, Charlette; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Chuturgoon, Anil A

    2016-04-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is commonly diagnosed in South Africa (SA), with high incidences occurring in SA's black population. Moringa oleifera (MO), a multipurpose tree, is used traditionally for its nutritional and medicinal properties. It has been used for the treatment of a variety of ailments, including cancer. We investigated the antiproliferative effect of MO crude aqueous leaf extract (MOE) on a cancerous esophageal cell line (SNO). SNO cells were exposed to a range of MOE dilutions to evaluate cytotoxicity (MTT assay). Oxidative stress was determined using the TBARS assay. The comet assay was used to assess DNA damage. We then determined cell death mechanisms by measuring phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization (flow cytometry), caspase-3/7 and caspase-9 activities, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels (luminometry). Protein expression of Smac/DIABLO and PARP-1 was determined by western blotting. SNO cells were treated with a range of MOE dilutions to obtain an IC50 value of 389.2 μg/mL MOE (24 h), which was used in all subsequent assays. MOE significantly increased lipid peroxidation (P < .05) and DNA fragmentation (P < .0001) in SNO cells. The induction of apoptosis was confirmed by the increase in PS externalization (P < .0001), caspase-9 (P < .05) and caspase-3/7 (P = .22) activities, and decreased ATP levels (P < .0001). MOE significantly increased both the expression of Smac/DIABLO protein and cleavage of PARP-1, resulting in an increase in the 24-kDa fragment (P < .001). MOE possesses antiproliferative effects on SNO EC cells by increasing lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, and induction of apoptosis.

  15. Phytochemical, Antioxidant and Anti-Cancer Properties of Euphorbia tirucalli Methanolic and Aqueous Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Benjamin; Vuong, Quan V.; Chalmers, Anita C.; Goldsmith, Chloe D.; Bowyer, Michael C.; Scarlett, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Euphorbia tirucalli is a succulent shrub or small tree that is native to the African continent, however, it is widely cultivated across the globe due to its use in traditional medicines to treat ailments, ranging from scorpion stings to HIV. Recent studies have identified compounds present in the latex of the plant, including a range of bi- and triterpenoids that exhibit bioactivity, including anticancer activity. This study aimed to optimize water extraction conditions for high-yield total phenolic content recovery, to prepare methanol and aqueous extracts from the aerial sections of the plant, and to test the phytochemical, antioxidant, and anti-cancer properties of these extracts. Water extraction of total phenolic compounds (TPC) was optimized across a range of parameters including temperature, extraction time, and plant mass-to-solvent ratio. The water extract of the E. tirucalli powder was found to contain TPC of 34.01 mg GAE (gallic acid equivalents)/g, which was approximately half that of the methanol extract (77.33 mg GAE/g). The results of antioxidant assays showed a uniform trend, with the methanol extract’s antioxidant reducing activity exceeding that of water extracts, typically by a factor of 2:1. Regression analysis of the antioxidant assays showed the strongest correlation between extract TPC and antioxidant activity for the ABTS (2,2-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) methods. The methanol extract also showed greater growth inhibition capacity towards the MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cell line. These data suggest that further investigations are required to confirm the source of activity within the E. tirucalli leaf and stems for potential use in the nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:26783950

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate, Including Pre- and Postinterventions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pritesh; Oto, Aytekin

    2016-09-01

    This article systematically reviews the rationale for magnetic resonance imaging in prostate cancer, in detection and following various treatment methods. A basic discussion of the identification of prostate cancer is imperative to understand postintervention imaging. Each available therapy, including surgery, radiation, hormone therapy, and focal therapies will be discussed along with associated imaging findings, providing the reader with a better understanding of current interventions in prostate cancer and imaging. PMID:27582606

  17. Nomogram including the total tumoral load in the sentinel nodes assessed by one-step nucleic acid amplification as a new factor for predicting nonsentinel lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Isabel T; Espinosa-Bravo, Martin; Rodrigo, Maxi; Amparo Viguri Diaz, Maria; Hardisson, David; Sagasta, Amaia; Dueñas, Basilio; Peg, Vicente

    2014-09-01

    Several models have been developed to predict non-sentinel nodes (NSLN) metastasis in patients with a positive sentinel node (SLN) that incorporates a standard pathology examination of the SLN. It has been reported that total tumoral load (TTL) in the SLNs assessed by one-step nucleic acid amplification (OSNA) is a predictive factor for additional NSLN metastasis in the axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). The objective was to develop a nomogram that predicts patient´s risk of additional NSLN metastasis incorporating TTL in the SLNs assessed by OSNA. Six hundred and ninety-seven consecutive patients with positive SLN evaluation by OSNA and a completion ALND were recruited. Pathologic features of the primary tumor and SLN metastases, including TTL were collected. Multivariate logistic regression identified factors predictive of non-SLN metastasis. A nomogram was developed with these variables and validated in an external cohort. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, tumor size, number of affected SLN, Her2 overexpression, lymphovascular invasion, and TTL were each associated with the likelihood of additional NSLN metastasis (p < 0.05). The overall predictive accuracy of the nomogram, as measured by the AUC was 0.7552 (95 %CI 0.7159-0.7945). When applied to the external cohort the nomogram was accurate with an AUC = 0.678 (95 %CI 0.621-0.736). This novel nomogram that incorporates TTL assessed by OSNA performs well and may help clinicians to make decisions about ALND for individual patients. Moreover, the standardization of pathologic assessment by OSNA may help to achieve interinstitutional reproducibility among nomograms. PMID:25164972

  18. Lactobacillus acidophilus could modulate the immune response against breast cancer in murine model.

    PubMed

    Maroof, Hamidreza; Hassan, Zuhir Mohammad; Mobarez, Ashraf Mohabati; Mohamadabadi, Maryam Azimi

    2012-12-01

    Cancer immune-therapy is an interesting avenue of studying the effects of deviating immune system responses to achieve the desired result. Lactobacilli are inhabitants of the GI tract which have shown beneficial health effects on various ailments including malignancies. Their mechanisms of action comprise a very intense area of research. In this study we evaluated the immunomodulatory effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus in in vivo model of breast cancer. Lactobacillus acidophilus (L.a) was isolated from traditional home-made yogurt and also from neonatal stool by aerobic overnight culture at 37°C in MRS broth. Delayed Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) assay was performed to find the best immunostimulant dose. 4T1 tumour bearing mice were treated with 2 × 10(8) cfu of isolated L. acidophilus and 20 mg/kg Cyclophosphamide for 15 consecutive days. Tumour volume was measured using a digital vernier calliper. Lymphocyte proliferation was done using MTT proliferation assay. Production of IFNγ, IL-4 and TGF-β from cultured Splenocytes was assessed in the presence of purified tumour antigen. According to results administration of L.a induced a significant decrease in tumour growth pattern (P value = 0.00). Significant alterations in splenocyte production of IFN-γ, IL-4 and TGf-β (P values < 0.05) and also lymphocyte proliferation in L.a treated animals was evident (P value < 0.05). This study indicated that oral administration of L.a is able to alter the cytokine production in tumour bearing mice into a Th1 protective pattern, favourable to anti tumour immunity. Reduced tumour growth rate and increased lymphocyte proliferation are also thus supportive. Further studies are required to elucidate the exact mechanism by which local actions of probiotics affect the systemic immune responses against transformed cells. PMID:22711009

  19. Global cancer statistics, 2012.

    PubMed

    Torre, Lindsey A; Bray, Freddie; Siegel, Rebecca L; Ferlay, Jacques; Lortet-Tieulent, Joannie; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2015-03-01

    Cancer constitutes an enormous burden on society in more and less economically developed countries alike. The occurrence of cancer is increasing because of the growth and aging of the population, as well as an increasing prevalence of established risk factors such as smoking, overweight, physical inactivity, and changing reproductive patterns associated with urbanization and economic development. Based on GLOBOCAN estimates, about 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million deaths occurred in 2012 worldwide. Over the years, the burden has shifted to less developed countries, which currently account for about 57% of cases and 65% of cancer deaths worldwide. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among males in both more and less developed countries, and has surpassed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer death among females in more developed countries; breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among females in less developed countries. Other leading causes of cancer death in more developed countries include colorectal cancer among males and females and prostate cancer among males. In less developed countries, liver and stomach cancer among males and cervical cancer among females are also leading causes of cancer death. Although incidence rates for all cancers combined are nearly twice as high in more developed than in less developed countries in both males and females, mortality rates are only 8% to 15% higher in more developed countries. This disparity reflects regional differences in the mix of cancers, which is affected by risk factors and detection practices, and/or the availability of treatment. Risk factors associated with the leading causes of cancer death include tobacco use (lung, colorectal, stomach, and liver cancer), overweight/obesity and physical inactivity (breast and colorectal cancer), and infection (liver, stomach, and cervical cancer). A substantial portion of cancer cases and deaths could be prevented by broadly

  20. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Eye Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Eye Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Eye Cancer Overview Statistics ...

  1. Cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov

  2. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals including radium-223.

    PubMed

    Brady, Darren; Parker, Chris C; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2013-01-01

    Bone-seeking radionuclides including samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate and strontium-89 have been used for decades in the palliation of pain from bone metastases especially from prostate cancer. Emerging evidence of improved survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the first-in-class α-radionuclide, radium-223 (Ra) has rekindled interest in the role of bone-seeking radionuclide therapy.We review the literature for randomized controlled trials of bone-seeking radionuclides and explore some of the issues regarding the optimal use of these agents. In particular, we discuss dose, dose rate, radiobiology, and quality of radiation and postulate on potential future directions in particular combination schedules. β-Emitting, bone-seeking radionuclides have proven ability to control pain in prostate cancer metastatic to bone with pain response rates in the order of 60% to 70% when used as single agents. Most of the published trials were underpowered to detect differences in survival; however, there is evidence of the potential for disease modification when these agents are used in combination with chemotherapy or in multiple cycles.Data from the recent phase III ALSYMPCA trial that compared Ra to placebo in symptomatic CRPC demonstrate a significant improvement in median overall survival of 3.6 months for patients with symptomatic CRPC metastatic to bone treated with 6 cycles of the α-emitting radionuclide Ra compared with placebo. The success of Ra in improving survival in CRPC will lead this agent to become part of the treatment paradigm for this disease, and with such an excellent safety profile, Ra has huge potential in combination strategies as well as for use earlier in the natural history of metastatic prostate cancer.

  3. Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity includes efforts to identify individual toxicity risks and prevention strategies support the National Cancer Insitute's goal of reducing the burden of cancer diagnoses and treatment outcomes.

  4. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Discovery – Preventing Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer research includes stopping cancer before it spreads. NCI funded the development of the Melanoma Risk Assessment Tool and the ABC method. Both help to diagnose high-risk patients and prevent melanoma earlier in the fight against skin cancer.

  6. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. SEER Cancer Stat Fact Sheets

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  8. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  9. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  14. Prostate cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment of prostate cancer varies depending on the stage of the cancer (i.e., spread) and may include surgical removal, radiation, chemotherapy, hormonal manipulation or a combination of these treatments.

  15. Skin Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  16. Stages of Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  17. Stages of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  18. Coping - Adjusting to Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Information that helps you and your family face life’s changes from cancer. Includes talking with your doctors, talking to children, changes for the family, and information on cancer support groups.

  19. Stages of Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto ... cancer may include the following: Local resection . External-beam radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy . If cancer ...

  20. Anal Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto ... cancer may include the following: Local resection . External-beam radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy . If cancer ...

  1. Adrenal Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Most adrenal gland tumors are ... and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland cancers are uncommon. Types of tumors include Adrenocortical carcinoma - ...

  2. [Biophysical Characterization of Biopharmaceuticals, Including Antibody Drugs].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals, including antibody drugs, are now popular because of their high specificity with low adverse effects, especially in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases. However, because the active pharmaceutical ingredients of biopharmaceuticals are proteins, biophysical characterization of these therapeutic proteins should be required. In this manuscript, methods of chemical and physical characterization of therapeutic proteins are described. In terms of chemical characterization, analysis of chemical modifications of the constituent amino acids is explained. Physical characterization includes higher order structural analysis and assessment of protein aggregates. Quantification methods of aggregates with different sizes, recently encouraged by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are introduced. As for the stability of therapeutic proteins, the importance of chemical and physical stability is explained. Finally, the contribution of colloidal and structural stability to the production of an antibody drug less prone to aggregation is introduced.

  3. The rise, the fall and the renaissance of vitamin E

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review deals with the expectations of vitamin E ability of preventing or curing, as a potent antioxidant, alleged oxidative stress based ailments including cardiovascular disease, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, cataracts, macular degeneration and more. The results obtained with clinical in...

  4. Cancer Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  5. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  6. Therapeutic cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Melief, Cornelis J M; van Hall, Thorbald; Arens, Ramon; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-09-01

    The clinical benefit of therapeutic cancer vaccines has been established. Whereas regression of lesions was shown for premalignant lesions caused by HPV, clinical benefit in cancer patients was mostly noted as prolonged survival. Suboptimal vaccine design and an immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment are the root causes of the lack of cancer eradication. Effective cancer vaccines deliver concentrated antigen to both HLA class I and II molecules of DCs, promoting both CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. Optimal vaccine platforms include DNA and RNA vaccines and synthetic long peptides. Antigens of choice include mutant sequences, selected cancer testis antigens, and viral antigens. Drugs or physical treatments can mitigate the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment and include chemotherapeutics, radiation, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) inhibitors, inhibitors of T cell checkpoints, agonists of selected TNF receptor family members, and inhibitors of undesirable cytokines. The specificity of therapeutic vaccination combined with such immunomodulation offers an attractive avenue for the development of future cancer therapies.

  7. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  8. Including Conflict in Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvin, Martin

    Conflict is the basis of all stories and thus should appear in some form in the first sentence. There are three kinds of conflict: people vs. people; people vs. nature; and people vs. themselves. Conflict must be repeated in all the various elements of the story's structure, including the plot, which is the plan of action telling what happens to…

  9. Family Living, Including Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlano, George

    This volume describes and evaluates 21 selected New York City Board of Education Umbrella Programs for the 1974-1975 school year. The programs include: (1) the parent resource center, (2) the teacher self-help program, (3) the East Harlem pre-kindergarten center, (4) the Brooklyn College volunteer tutoring program, (5) the parent education for…

  10. Cancer care in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat; Attiga, Fadwa; Mansour, Asem

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in Jordan after cardiovascular diseases. Due to increase in life expectancy and prolonged exposure to risk factors, cancer mortality and morbidity are expected to increase as the young population ages. This increase will constitute a challenging burden on healthcare systems in Jordan and many other neighboring countries. Planning is key to managing the expected rise in the demand for cancer care, and this will require public health initiatives to guarantee access to quality cancer care. Over the past decade, cancer care in Jordan has witnessed remarkable improvement through access to advanced diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we address the history of cancer care in Jordan, including cancer statistics, infrastructure, workforce as well as cancer care outcomes. We also discuss many of the challenges that we face and offer suggestions for the improvement of cancer management in Jordan and the region.

  11. Cancer Statistics: Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 60,050 % of All New Cancer Cases 3.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 10,470 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 635,437 women living with endometrial cancer in ...

  12. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Carole A.; McErlean, Aoife M.; Ginsberg, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Incidence and mortality attributed to lung cancer has risen steadily since the 1930s. Efforts to improve outcomes have not only led to a greater understanding of the etiology of lung cancer, but also the histologic and molecular characteristics of individual lung tumors. This article describes this evolution by discussing the extent of the current lung cancer epidemic including contemporary incidence and mortality trends, the risk factors for development of lung cancer, and details of promising molecular targets for treatment. PMID:24436524

  13. The In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Cancer Activities of a Standardized Quassinoids Composition from Eurycoma longifolia on LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Kind Leng; Chan, Kit Lam; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Low, Bin Seng; Ma, Hai Qiu; Wong, Pooi Fong

    2015-01-01

    Quassinoids are a group of diterpenoids found in plants from the Simaroubaceae family. They are also the major bioactive compounds found in Eurycoma longifolia which is commonly used as traditional medicine in South East Asia to treat various ailments including sexual dysfunction and infertility. These uses are attributed to its ability to improve testosterone level in men. Chronic consumption of E. longifolia extracts has been reported to increase testosterone level in men and animal model but its effect on prostate growth remains unknown. Therefore, the present study investigates the effects of a standardized total quassinoids composition (SQ40) containing 40% of the total quassinoids found in E. longifolia on LNCaP human prostate cancer cell line. SQ40 inhibited LNCaP cell growth at IC50 value of 5.97 μg/mL while the IC50 on RWPE-1 human prostate normal cells was 59.26 μg/mL. SQ40 also inhibited 5α-dihydrotestosterone-stimulated growth in LNCaP cells dose-dependently. The inhibitory effect of SQ40 in anchorage-independent growth of LNCaP cells was also demonstrated using soft agar assay. SQ40 suppressed LNCaP cell growth via G0/G1 phase arrest which was accompanied by the down-regulation of CDK4, CDK2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D3 and up-regulation of p21Waf1/Cip1 protein levels. SQ40 at higher concentrations or longer treatment duration can cause G2M growth arrest leading to apoptotic cell death as demonstrated by the detection of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage in LNCaP cells. Moreover, SQ40 also inhibited androgen receptor translocation to nucleus which is important for the transactivation of its target gene, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and resulted in a significant reduction of PSA secretion after the treatment. In addition, intraperitoneal injection of 5 and 10 mg/kg of SQ40 also significantly suppressed the LNCaP tumor growth on mouse xenograft model. Results from the present study suggest that the standardized total quassinoids composition from E

  14. Silica, silicosis, and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, D.F.; Winn, D.M.; Shy, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on occupational exposure. Topics include: measurement of silica dust, mortality in granite workers, effects of quartz in coal mine dust, pneumoconiosis, and lung cancer.

  15. Impact of Phytolacca americana extracts on gene expression of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Maness, L; Goktepe, I; Chen, H; Ahmedna, M; Sang, S

    2014-02-01

    Native Americans have used Phytolacca americana to treat breast ailments, gastrointestinal disorders, rashes, and inflammation. Some anti-cancer and anti-viral research has been reported on this perennial herb, but none has been published concerning the effects of its extracts on cancer cell genes. In this study, changes in gene expression at the transcription level were evaluated in HCT-116 colon cancer cells after exposure to P. americana ethanol extract and its water fraction using the Human Cancer Pathway Finder PCR Array. Of the genes significantly affected in HCT-116 cells exposed to the ethanol extract at 3200 µg/ml, changes in expression of MYC, PLAU, and TEK may benefit the treatment of colon cancer. Exposing the cells to 1600 µg/ml of the water fraction resulted in several gene changes that may also be beneficial in the treatment of colon cancer: NME4, TEK, and THBS1. A few genes on this array that are known to play a specific role in colon cancer had activities changed in a way that may be detrimental in the treatment of colon cancer. Further studies should be performed to understand how these changes would impact colon cancer treatment.

  16. Oral cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... Oral cancer most commonly involves the lips or the tongue. It may also occur on the: Cheek lining Floor ...

  17. Neoclassical Transport Including Collisional Nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.; Belli, E. A.

    2011-06-10

    In the standard {delta}f theory of neoclassical transport, the zeroth-order (Maxwellian) solution is obtained analytically via the solution of a nonlinear equation. The first-order correction {delta}f is subsequently computed as the solution of a linear, inhomogeneous equation that includes the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This equation admits analytic solutions only in extreme asymptotic limits (banana, plateau, Pfirsch-Schlueter), and so must be solved numerically for realistic plasma parameters. Recently, numerical codes have appeared which attempt to compute the total distribution f more accurately than in the standard ordering by retaining some nonlinear terms related to finite-orbit width, while simultaneously reusing some form of the linearized collision operator. In this work we show that higher-order corrections to the distribution function may be unphysical if collisional nonlinearities are ignored.

  18. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  19. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... colon cancer. Photo: AP Photo/Ron Edmonds Colorectal Cancer Cancer of the colon (large intestine) or rectum ( ...

  20. Cancer screening in the United States, 2016: A review of current American Cancer Society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A; Andrews, Kimberly; Brooks, Durado; DeSantis, Carol E; Fedewa, Stacey A; Lortet-Tieulent, Joannie; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Brawley, Otis W; Wender, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Each year the American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes a summary of its guidelines for early cancer detection, data and trends in cancer screening rates, and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, we summarize current ACS cancer screening guidelines, including the update of the breast cancer screening guideline, discuss quality issues in colorectal cancer screening and new developments in lung cancer screening, and provide the latest data on utilization of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey.

  1. Podophyllum hexandrum as a potential botanical supplement for the medical management of nuclear and radiological emergencies (NREs) and free radical-mediated ailments: leads from in vitro/in vivo radioprotective efficacy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajesh; Chawla, Raman; Dhaker, Atlar Singh; Adhikari, Manish; Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Shikha; Gupta, Damodar; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh K; Tripathi, Rajender P

    2010-03-01

    Management of radiation-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species requires a holistic approach to mitigate the deleterious effects of free radicals. Flora of the Himalayas, which prevails under extreme climatic conditions, has been explored for its potential utility to develop radioprotective drugs. The Himalayan high altitude medicinal plant, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle, was selected on the basis of its unique properties, and a novel fractionated nonpolar extract (REC-2003) was prepared and evaluated for radioprotective efficacy, in vitro as well as in vivo. The free radical scavenging activity of REC-2003 was found to be > 75% (20 μg/ml) with maximum superoxide scavenging activity (57.56 ± 1.38%) recorded at 1 mg/ml concentration (tetrazolium-based estimation). More than 30% inhibition of nitric oxide radicals was observed at concentrations > 0.5 mg/ml, while hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (deoxy-D-ribose assay) exhibited a dose-dependent (100-600 μg/ml) increase. Significantly high (90%) protection to human erythrocytes was observed at 75 μg/ml, which was found to be the most optimized dose. Similarly, more than 90% inhibition was observed against lipid peroxidation (evaluated by estimating levels of malondialdehyde). The significant antihemolytic potential of REC-2003 could be attributed to its ability to scavenge free radicals, reduce peroxidative stress on lipid membranes, and render protection to DNA (evaluated using plasmid relaxation assay). All these activities holistically contributed toward the radioprotective ability. REC-2003 (8 mg/kg BW; intraperitoneal (i.p.), -30 min) rendered > 80% total-body protection in Swiss Albino Strain 'A' mice [against lethal radiation (10 Gy)] in a 30-day survival assay. Phytochemical characterization of the constituents of REC-2003 revealed the presence of polyphenolics (flavonoids). The characterized constituents also included the aryl-tetralin lignans like podophyllotoxin, its glycoside, 4'-demethyl derivative

  2. Including Magnetostriction in Micromagnetic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Fabian, Karl; Nagy, Lesleis

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic anomalies that identify crustal spreading are predominantly recorded by basalts formed at the mid-ocean ridges, whose magnetic signals are dominated by iron-titanium-oxides (Fe3-xTixO4), so called "titanomagnetites", of which the Fe2.4Ti0.6O4 (TM60) phase is the most common. With sufficient quantities of titanium present, these minerals exhibit strong magnetostriction. To date, models of these grains in the pseudo-single domain (PSD) range have failed to accurately account for this effect. In particular, a popular analytic treatment provided by Kittel (1949) for describing the magnetostrictive energy as an effective increase of the anisotropy constant can produce unphysical strains for non-uniform magnetizations. I will present a rigorous approach based on work by Brown (1966) and by Kroner (1958) for including magnetostriction in micromagnetic codes which is suitable for modelling hysteresis loops and finding remanent states in the PSD regime. Preliminary results suggest the more rigorously defined micromagnetic models exhibit higher coercivities and extended single domain ranges when compared to more simplistic approaches.

  3. Cancer patterns in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, D T; Mao, Y; Semenciw, R; Morrison, H I

    1986-01-01

    Cancer is diagnosed in about 70 000 Canadians each year and is the leading cause of the loss of potential years of life before age 75 among women. Life-threatening forms of cancer will develop in at least one of every three Canadian newborns during their lifetimes if current cancer risks are not reduced. Lung and breast cancers are, respectively, the leading causes of premature death due to cancer among men and women. Compared with other countries Canada has low death rates for stomach cancer but high rates for certain smoking-related cancers (those of the lung and of the mouth and throat), leukemia and cancers of the colon, breast and lymphatic tissues. Newfoundland has the highest rates of death from stomach cancer and the lowest rates of death from prostatic cancer, whereas the western provinces have the opposite pattern. The rates of death from lung cancer among men are highest in Quebec, the province with the highest prevalence of smoking. In Canada the overall rates of death from cancer increased by 32% among men from 1951 to 1983. However, among women they declined by 12% from 1951 to 1976 and increased from 1976 to 1983, particularly among those aged 55 to 74. The rising rates of death due to lung cancer were primarily responsible for these increases. Lung cancer will likely displace breast cancer as the leading cancer killer of Canadian women by 1990. Given the relatively low survival rates for cancers caused by smoking and the lack of substantial improvement in rates for the most frequent types of cancer, preventive strategies that include effective measures to reduce tobacco consumption are urgently required. PMID:3942929

  4. Luffa echinata Roxb. Induced Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Cell (SW-480) in the Caspase-dependent Manner and Through a Mitochondrial Apoptosis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Li-Hua; Yu, Yan; Che, De-Hai; Pan, Bo; Jin, Shi; Zou, Xiao-Long

    2016-01-01

    Background: Luffa echinata Roxb. (LER) (Cucurbitaceae) showed tremendous medicinal importance and are being used for the treatment of different ailments. Objective: In this study, the antiproliferative properties and cell death mechanism induced by the extract of the fruits of LER were investigated. Materials and Methods: MTT and LDH assay were used to test the antiproliferative and cytotoxicity of LER extract, respectively. The intracellular ROS were measured by a fluorometric assay. The expression of several apoptotic-related proteins in SW-480 cells treated by LER was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Results: The methanolic extract of LER fruits inhibited the proliferation of human colon cancer cells (SW-480) in both dose- and time-dependent manners. The LER-treated cells showed obvious characteristics of cell apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, destruction of the monolayer, and condensed chromatin. In addition, treatments of various concentrations of LER extracts caused the release of lactate dehydrogenase as a dose-dependent manner via stimulation of the intracellular metabolic system. LER induced apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, and cellular ROS accumulation in SW-480 cells. Treatment of LER on SW-480 cells promoted the expression of caspases, Bax, Bad, and p53 proteins and decreased the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. Conclusions: These results indicated that treatment with LER-induced cell death in mitochondrial apoptosis pathway by regulating pro-apoptotic proteins via the up regulation of the p53 protein. These findings highlight the potentials of LER in the treatment of human colon cancer. SUMMARY LER induced apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, and cellular ROS accumulation in SW-480 cells. Treatment of LER on SW-480 cells promoted the expression of caspases, Bax, Bad, and p53 proteins and decreased the levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. PMID:27019558

  5. The antiproliferative effect of Moringa oleifera crude aqueous leaf extract on cancerous human alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of lung cancer is expected to increase due to increases in exposure to airborne pollutants and cigarette smoke. Moringa oleifera (MO), a medicinal plant found mainly in Asia and South Africa is used in the traditional treatment of various ailments including cancer. This study investigated the antiproliferative effect of MO leaf extract (MOE) in cancerous A549 lung cells. Methods A crude aqueous leaf extract was prepared and the cells were treated with 166.7 μg/ml MOE (IC50) for 24 h and assayed for oxidative stress (TBARS and Glutathione assays), DNA fragmentation (comet assay) and caspase (3/7 and 9) activity. In addition, the expression of Nrf2, p53, Smac/DIABLO and PARP-1 was determined by Western blotting. The mRNA expression of Nrf2 and p53 was assessed using qPCR. Results A significant increase in reactive oxygen species with a concomitant decrease in intracellular glutathione levels (p < 0.001) in MOE treated A549 cells was observed. MOE showed a significant reduction in Nrf2 protein expression (1.89-fold, p < 0.05) and mRNA expression (1.44-fold). A higher level of DNA fragmentation (p < 0.0001) was seen in the MOE treated cells. MOE’s pro-apoptotic action was confirmed by the significant increase in p53 protein expression (1.02-fold, p < 0.05), p53 mRNA expression (1.59-fold), caspase-9 (1.28-fold, p < 0.05), caspase-3/7 (1.52-fold) activities and an enhanced expression of Smac/DIABLO. MOE also caused the cleavage and activation of PARP-1 into 89 KDa and 24 KDa fragments (p < 0.0001). Conclusion MOE exerts antiproliferative effects in A549 lung cells by increasing oxidative stress, DNA fragmentation and inducing apoptosis. PMID:24041017

  6. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Thyroid Cancer Thyroid Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Thyroid Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Thyroid Cancer Overview Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors Symptoms ...

  7. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Anal Cancer Anal Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Anal Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Anal Cancer Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention Screening ...

  8. Cancer Statistics: Pancreas Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Pancreatic Cancer - Did you know that an estimated 46,000 Americans were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 53,070 % of All ...

  9. About the Cancer Biomarkers Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Biomarkers Research Group promotes research to identify, develop, and validate biological markers for early cancer detection and cancer risk assessment. Activities include development and validation of promising cancer biomarkers, collaborative databases and informatics systems, and new technologies or the refinement of existing technologies. NCI DCP News Note Consortium on Imaging and Biomarkers (CIB) Created: Eight Grants Awarded to Improve Accuracy of Cancer Screening, Detection, and Diagnosis |

  10. 78 FR 64507 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... National Cancer Institute and the Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer... of individual other conducted by the National Cancer Institute, including consideration of...

  11. Selective Cytotoxicity and Pro-apoptotic Activity of Stem Bark of Wrightia tinctoria (Roxb.) R. Br. in Cancerous Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shilpee; Devkar, Raviraj Anand; Bhere, Deepak; Setty, Manganahalli Manjunath; Pai, Karkala Sreedhara Ranganath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Wrightia tinctoria (Roxb.) R. Br. is a widely available shrub in India used traditionally in various ailments, including cancer. However, the anticancer activity of the bioactive fractions has not been validated scientifically. Objective: To investigate the anticancer potential of stem bark of W. tinctoria and establish its phytochemical basis. Materials and Methods: The ethanol extract and subsequent fractions, petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and aqueous were prepared by standard methods. In vitro cytotoxicity was determined in MCF-7 (breast) and HeLa (cervical) adenocarcinoma cells, and V79 (nontumor fibroblast) cells and apoptogenic activity in MCF-7 cells by acridine orange (AO)/ethidium bromide (EB) staining. Additionally, the antioxidant potential was evaluated using suitable methods. High-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis was performed for identification of active phytoconstituents. Results: Petroleum ether and ethyl acetate fractions were most potent with IC50 values of 37.78 and 29.69 μg/ml in HeLa and 31.56 and 32.63 μg/ml in MCF-7 cells respectively in the sulforhodamine B assay. Comparable results were obtained in HeLa cells in 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and interestingly, the fractions were found to be safe to noncancerous fibroblast cells. Both fractions induced significant (P < 0.05) apoptotic morphological changes observed by AO/EB staining. Moreover, extract/fractions exhibited excellent inhibition of lipid peroxidation with the ethyl acetate fraction being most active (IC50:23.40 μg/ml). HPTLC confirmed the presence of two anti-cancer triterpenoids, lupeol, and β-sitosterol in active fractions. Conclusion: Extract/fractions of W. tinctoria exhibit selective cytotoxicity against cancerous cells that is mediated by apoptosis. Fractions are less toxic to noncancerous cells; hence, they can be developed as safer chemopreventive agents. SUMMARY Petroleum ether

  12. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  14. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  15. More Fact Sheets - SEER Cancer Statistics

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Statistical Fact Sheets are summaries of common cancer types developed to provide an overview of frequently-requested cancer statistics including incidence, mortality, survival, stage, prevalence, and lifetime risk.

  16. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Cancer starts when cells in ... the parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  17. MicroRNA in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azizian, Azadeh; Gruber, Jens; Ghadimi, B Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In rectal cancer, one of the most common cancers worldwide, the proper staging of the disease determines the subsequent therapy. For those with locally advanced rectal cancer, a neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is recommended before any surgery. However, response to CRT ranges from complete response (responders) to complete resistance (non-responders). To date we are not able to separate in advance the first group from the second, due to the absence of a valid biomarker. Therefore all patients receive the same therapy regardless of whether they reap benefits. On the other hand almost all patients receive a surgical resection after the CRT, although a watch-and-wait procedure or an endoscopic resection might be sufficient for those who responded well to the CRT. Being highly conserved regulators of gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs) seem to be promising candidates for biomarkers. Many studies have been analyzing the miRNAs expressed in rectal cancer tissue to determine a specific miRNA profile for the ailment. Unfortunately, there is only a small overlap of identified miRNAs between different studies, posing the question as to whether different methods or differences in tissue storage may contribute to that fact or if the results simply are not reproducible, due to unknown factors with undetected influences on miRNA expression. Other studies sought to find miRNAs which correlate to clinical parameters (tumor grade, nodal stage, metastasis, survival) and therapy response. Although several miRNAs seem to have an impact on the response to CRT or might predict nodal stage, there is still only little overlap between different studies. We here aimed to summarize the current literature on rectal cancer and miRNA expression with respect to the different relevant clinical parameters. PMID:27190581

  18. A prospective randomized trial: a comparison of the analgesic effect and toxicity of 153Sm radioisotope treatment in monotherapy and combined therapy including local external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) among metastatic castrate resistance prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients with painful bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Baczyk, M; Milecki, P; Pisarek, M; Gut, P; Antczak, A; Hrab, M

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases in prostate cancer constitute the most frequent cause of systemic failure in treatment, which results in numerous complications and finally leads to patient's death. Pain is one of the first and most important clinical symptoms of bone metastases and can be found among more than 80% of patients. Therefore, the most analgetic effective and simultaneously the least toxic treatment is an important point of therapeutic management in this group of patients. The aim of this prospective clinical trial was a comparison of analgetic effectiveness and toxicity of monotherapy with 153Sm isotope to combined therapy (153Sm + EBRT) among patients diagnosed with multiple painful bone metastases due to CRPC (mCRPC). 177 patients with mCRPC were included into the prospective randomised clinical trial in which 89 patients were assigned to the 153Sm isotope monotherapy, while 88 patients were assigned to the combined therapy including 153Sm isotope therapy and EBRT. All patients were diagnosed (bone scan and X-ray or/and CT or/and MRI) with painful bone metastases (bone pain intensity >= 6 according to VAS classification). The following additional inclusion criteria were established: histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of prostate, multifocal bone metastases, no prior chemotherapy or palliative radiotherapy to bone. All patients signed informed consent.The combination of the isotope therapy with EBRT was more effective analgetic treatment than isotope therapy alone. The highest pain decline was noticed in the first weeks after treatment termination. In the whole group, a total or partial analgesic effect was observed among 154 (87%) patients while among 23 (13%) patients there was a lack of analgesic effect or even pain intensification. The results of this clinical trial demonstrated that for patients with multiple mCRPC it is recommended to combine the 153Sm isotope therapy with local EBRT because of a greater analgetic effect. It is important to note that

  19. Orthoses: Not the Sole Solution for Running Ailments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    Orthotic devices are an important element of treatment for biomechanically disadvantaged runners, but alignment problems are multifaceted and require multifaceted solutions. Appropriate uses of orthoses are discussed. (MT)

  20. The many ailments of Herman Melville (1819-91).

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2008-02-01

    Herman Melville developed debilitating physical and psychiatric disorders in middle age after writing, perhaps, the greatest of American novels, Moby Dick. This article critically examines claims that Melville had bipolar affective disorder and alcoholism, and suggests he may also have suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder. Melville was active and vigorous in youth but in middle age he developed recurrent attacks of eye pain, photophobia and disabling low back pain. Melville's contemporaries usually attributed his physical problems to 'neurasthenia' and his biographers have often dismissed them as psychosomatic. However, Melville's clinical course, abnormally rigid posture, loss of 1(3/8) inches in height between the ages of 30 and 37, and a family history of rheumatological disease, suggest a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:18463061

  1. The many ailments of Herman Melville (1819-91).

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2008-02-01

    Herman Melville developed debilitating physical and psychiatric disorders in middle age after writing, perhaps, the greatest of American novels, Moby Dick. This article critically examines claims that Melville had bipolar affective disorder and alcoholism, and suggests he may also have suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder. Melville was active and vigorous in youth but in middle age he developed recurrent attacks of eye pain, photophobia and disabling low back pain. Melville's contemporaries usually attributed his physical problems to 'neurasthenia' and his biographers have often dismissed them as psychosomatic. However, Melville's clinical course, abnormally rigid posture, loss of 1(3/8) inches in height between the ages of 30 and 37, and a family history of rheumatological disease, suggest a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis.

  2. Amyand's Hernia: Rare Presentation of a Common Ailment

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sanjeev; Singhal, Anu; Negi, Sanjay Singh; Tugnait, Rahul; Arora, Pankaj Kumar; Tiwari, Bishwanath; Malik, Pawan; Gupta, Lav; Bimal, Amit; Gupta, Abhishek; Gupta, Rahul; Chouhan, Pushkar; Singh, ChandraKant

    2015-01-01

    Inguinal hernia with vermiform appendix as content is known as Amyand's hernia. It is a rare entity but we encountered four cases within six months. A 52-year-old female had high grade fever and evidence of inflammatory pathology involving the ileocaecal region. She was initially managed conservatively and subsequently underwent exploratory laparatomy. The appendix was perforated and herniating in the inguinal canal. Appendectomy was done with herniorrhaphy without mesh placement. A 74-year-old male with bilateral inguinal hernia, of which, the right side was more symptomatic, underwent open exploration. Operative findings revealed a lipoma of the sac and a normal appearing appendix as content. Contents were reduced without appendectomy and mesh hernioplasty was performed. A 63-year-old male with an obstructed right sided hernia underwent emergency inguinal exploration which revealed edematous caecum and appendix as content without any inflammation. Contents were reduced without any resection. Herniorrhaphy was performed without mesh placement. A 66-year-old male with an uncomplicated right inguinal hernia underwent elective surgery. The sac revealed an appendix with adhesions at the neck. Contents were reduced after adhesiolysis and hernioplasty was performed with mesh placement. Emphasis is made to the rarity of disease, variation in presentation, and difference in treatment modalities depending upon the state of appendix. PMID:26576304

  3. Home - The Cancer Genome Atlas - Cancer Genome - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) is a comprehensive and coordinated effort to accelerate our understanding of the molecular basis of cancer through the application of genome analysis technologies, including large-scale genome sequencing.

  4. Statins and cancers.

    PubMed

    Stryjkowska-Góra, Aleksandra; Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Góra, Tomasz; Krawczak, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Statins (inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase) are a group of drugs used to treat lipid disorders. They inhibit cholesterol synthesis at an early stage of the biosynthesis pathway, thus eliminating numerous metabolites involved in the cycle. Numerous studies point to different possible effects of statins on cancer cells. Statins inhibit growth of a tumor, invasion and metastasis formation. They block the production of isoprenoids, which are necessary for post-translational modifications of many proteins, including those involved in normal cell signaling. They also contribute to the reduction in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, sensitize tumor cells to NK cell activity, and modify the body inflammatory response. Due to different pharmacokinetic properties of individual statins, they may have opposite effects on the risk of cancer. Currently, most information on the effects of statins on the risk of developing cancer is obtained from observational studies. The studies have different results depending on the location of cancer. The protective effect of statins was observed in the meta-analysis of numerous studies including prostate cancer, stomach cancer, esophagus cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma; however, it has not yet been confirmed that statins influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer, breast cancer, or lung cancer. The protective effect of statins on the development of many kinds of cancer can be a valuable and easy way to reduce morbidity. However, further research is necessary to thoroughly determine the value of this group of drugs. PMID:26557755

  5. Prevention of skin reactions due to teletherapy in women with breast cancer: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Marceila; Clapis, Maria José; do Nascimento, Talita Garcia; Gozzo, Thaís de Oliveira; de Almeida, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    One of the possible courses of cancer treatment is teletherapy, and one of the most important adverse side effects are skin reactions, an ailment more commonly called radiodermatitis. The main purpose of this study is to analyze knowledge of the evidence about topical products used in the prevention of radiodermatitis, to support care delivery to women with breast cancer during teletherapy. The research method used here is the comprehensive literature review. Four databases were used to select the bibliography. The sample consists of 15 articles. The data shows that, among the topical products analyzed here, Calendula, corticosteroids and Xclair have shown significant protective effects, underlining their actions. The lack of articles published in Brazil highlights the need for further research in this area, seeking better care quality through the use of products with scientifically proven efficiency.

  6. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  7. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  8. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  9. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  10. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Ovarian Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, ... rare fallopian tube cancer.) This fact sheet about ovarian cancer is part of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  11. Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer statistics across the world. U.S. Cancer Mortality Trends The best indicator of progress against cancer is ... the number of cancer survivors has increased. These trends show that progress is being made against the ...

  12. Testicular cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - testes; Germ cell tumor; Seminoma testicular cancer; Nonseminoma testicular cancer ... The exact cause of testicular cancer is unknown. Factors that may ... increases if he has: Abnormal testicle development Exposure ...

  13. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  14. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  15. Cancer: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve significantly with treatment. Changes in Thinking or Memory Some people who are treated for cancer experience “ ... helpful in cancer pain. These include: acupuncture biofeedback hypnosis heat or cold applications massage imagery meditation relaxation ...

  16. General Information about Oropharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  17. Genomic Datasets for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    A variety of datasets from genome-wide association studies of cancer and other genotype-phenotype studies, including sequencing and molecular diagnostic assays, are available to approved investigators through the Extramural National Cancer Institute Data Access Committee.

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  19. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  20. News | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    News about scientific advances in cancer prevention, program activities, and new projects are included here in NCI press releases and fact sheets, articles from the NCI Cancer Bulletin, and Clinical Trial News from the NCI website.

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Anal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto ... cancer may include the following: Local resection . External-beam radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy . If cancer ...

  2. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  3. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337

  4. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  5. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  6. Therapeutic intervention of silymarin on the migration of non-small cell lung cancer cells is associated with the axis of multiple molecular targets including class 1 HDACs, ZEB1 expression, and restoration of miR-203 and E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tripti; Prasad, Ram; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and its metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality world-wide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for about 90% of total lung cancer cases. Despite advancements in therapeutic approaches, only limited improvement has been achieved. Therefore, alternative strategies are required for the management of lung cancer. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effect of silymarin, a phytochemical from milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum L. Gaertn.), on NSCLC cell migration using metastatic human NSCLC cell lines (A549, H1299 and H460) together with the molecular targets underlying these effects. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we found that treatment of human NSCLC cells (A549, H1299 and H460) with silymarin (0, 5, 10 and 20 µg/mL) for 24 h resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, which was associated with the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and reduced levels of class 1 HDAC proteins (HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3 and HDAC8) and concomitant increases in the levels of histone acetyltransferase activity (HAT). Known HDAC inhibitors (sodium butyrate and trichostatin A) exhibited similar patterns of therapeutic effects on the lung cancer cells. Treatment of A549 and H460 cells with silymarin reduced the expression of the transcription factor ZEB1 and restored expression of E-cadherin. The siRNA knockdown of ZEB1 also reduced the expression of HDAC proteins and enhanced re-expression of the levels of E-cadherin in NSCLC cells. MicroRNA-203 (miR-203) acts as a tumor suppressor, regulates tumor cell invasion and is repressed by ZEB1 in cancer cells. Silymarin treatment restored the levels of miR-203 in NSCLC cells. These findings indicate that silymarin can effectively inhibit lung cancer cell migration and provide a coherent model of its mechanism of action suggesting that silymarin may be an important therapeutic option for the prevention or treatment of lung cancer metastasis when administered either

  7. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the ...

  8. Hispanics and Pancreatic Cancer: Things to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... These include: • What You Need to Know About Cancer of the Pancreas – an online publication about exocrine pancreatic cancer – at www. cancer. gov/ cancertopics/ wyntk/ pancreas • NCI’s summary page about pancreatic cancerincluding links ...

  9. Immunoscore in Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Cancer of the Rectum; Neoplasms, Rectal; Rectal Cancer; Rectal Tumors; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Melanoma; Breast Cancer; Renal Cell Cancer; Lung Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Thyroid Cancer

  10. What Causes Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » What Causes Cancer? Cancer is a complex group of diseases with ... cancer. Learn About Cancer Topics Cancer Basics What Causes Cancer? Breast Cancer Colon/Rectum Cancer Lung Cancer Prostate ...

  11. [Lung cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening.

  12. Genetics of Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Cancer) (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of kidney cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for kidney cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease.

  13. About the Gastrointestinal and Other Cancers Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Gastrointestinal and Other Cancers Research Group conducts and supports prevention and early detection research on colorectal, esophageal, liver, pancreatic, and hematolymphoid cancers, as well as new approaches to clinical prevention studies including cancer immunoprevention. |

  14. Cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2015-04-22

    Cancer vaccines are designed to promote tumor specific immune responses, particularly cytotoxic CD8 positive T cells that are specific to tumor antigens. The earliest vaccines, which were developed in 1994-95, tested non-mutated, shared tumor associated antigens that had been shown to be immunogenic and capable of inducing clinical responses in a minority of people with late stage cancer. Technological developments in the past few years have enabled the investigation of vaccines that target mutated antigens that are patient specific. Several platforms for cancer vaccination are being tested, including peptides, proteins, antigen presenting cells, tumor cells, and viral vectors. Standard of care treatments, such as surgery and ablation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, can also induce antitumor immunity, thereby having cancer vaccine effects. The monitoring of patients' immune responses at baseline and after standard of care treatment is shedding light on immune biomarkers. Combination therapies are being tested in clinical trials and are likely to be the best approach to improving patient outcomes.

  15. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  16. Skin cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Kornek, Thomas; Augustin, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Prevention signifies the avoidance of diseases. It also includes the early detection of diseases and taking measures to avoid worsening of an existing disease. Prevention is divided into primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. The prevention of skin cancer is particularly important due to the rising incidence of skin cancer in recent years. In Germany, 195.000 new cases of skin cancer, including non melanoma skin cancer and melanoma are occurring. Therefore, skin cancer is among the most common cancer diseases. Primary prevention comprises the reduction of skin cancer risk behavior, including education about the danger of UV exposure and the right way of dealing with natural and artificial UV radiation. The implementation of a systematic skin cancer screening in Germany contributes to secondary prevention. First data from the initial project in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany's most northern state, indicate for the first time that the incidence and mortality of melanoma can be reduced by secondary prevention. For tertiary prevention, the national associations recommend a risk-adapted, evidence-based follow-up for all types of skin cancer. From the perspectives of the payers and from the patients, prevention is assessed positively. Prevention can contribute to a reduction of disease burden.

  17. Funded Projects | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Breast Cancer (vaccines)Plac1 vaccine for breast cancer preventionEfficacy of a multi-antigen vaccine in the prevention of methynitrosourea-induced mammary cancers (ER+) in female Sprague-Dawley rats Breast Cancer (small molecules and biomarkers)Chemopreventive effects in both standard chow diets and high-fat diets of known positive- and negative-chemopreventive agents employing both high-risk (but histologically normal) mammary epithelium and mammary cancers including correlative biomarkers | Breast Cancer (vaccines) Cervical Cancer (small molecule) Colon Cancer (small molecules, vaccine, biomarker) Lung Cancer (small molecules, vaccine, biomarker, vaccine) Pancreatic Cancer (small molecule) Prostate Cancer (small molecule) Oral Cancer (small molecule) Skin Cancer (small molecule)

  18. Familial pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Klein, A P; Hruban, R H; Brune, K A; Petersen, G M; Goggins, M

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States and will be responsible for an estimated 28,900 deaths in 2001. Relatively little is known of its etiology, and the only well-established risk factor is cigarette smoking. Studies over the past 3 decades have shown that 4%-16% of patients with pancreatic cancer have a family history of the disease. A small fraction of this aggregation can be accounted for in inherited cancer syndromes, including familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer, hereditary pancreatitis, and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. These syndromes arise as a result of germline mutations in the BRCA2, pl6 (familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma), mismatch repair (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), and STK11 (Peutz-Jeghers syndrome) genes. In addition, hereditary plays a role in predisposing certain patients with apparently sporadic pancreatic cancer. Many patients with pancreatic cancers caused by a germline mutation in a cancer-causing gene do not have a pedigree that is suggestive of a familial cancer syndrome. A recent prospective analysis of the pedigrees in the National Familial Pancreatic Tumor Registry found that individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer in multiple first-degree relatives have a high risk of pancreatic cancer themselves. The identification of such high-risk individuals will help clinicians target screening programs and develop preventive interventions with the hope of reducing the mortality of pancreatic cancer in these families.

  19. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008. PMID:19230248

  20. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008.

  1. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of stomach cancer. Some studies show that eating fruits and vegetables that are high in vitamin C and beta carotene may lower the risk ... take can prevent cancer. These may include eating fruits and vegetables, exercising, ... vitamins, minerals, or food supplements. New ways to prevent ...

  2. Palliation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kruse, E James

    2010-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is rarely curable, and because of its location causes significant symptoms for patients in need of palliation. The common problems of incurable pancreatic cancer are biliary obstruction, duodenal obstruction, and pain. Approaches include surgical, endoscopic and radiologic interventions. This article discusses the palliative options and controversies related to these symptoms.

  3. Biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Danil V; Loeb, Stacy; Getzenberg, Robert H; Partin, Alan W

    2009-01-01

    The development of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, detection, and prognostication has revolutionized the management of this disease. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a useful, though not specific, biomarker for detecting prostate cancer. We review the literature on prostate cancer biomarkers, including serum markers (PAP, tPSA, fPSA, proPSA, PSAD, PSAV, PSADT, EPCA, and EPCA-2), tissue markers (AMACR, methylated GSTP1, and the TMPRSS2-ETS gene rearrangement), and a urine marker (DD3PCA3/UPM-3). Future research should focus on validation of already existing biomarkers and the discovery of new markers to identify men with aggressive prostate cancer.

  4. New Strategies in Cancer Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    We review recent progress in cancer nanomedicine, including stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems and nanoparticles responding to light for phototherapy or tumor imaging. In addition, several new strategies to improve the circulation of nanoparticles in vivo, tumor penetration, and tumor targeting are discussed. The application of nanomedicine in cancer immunology, a relatively new type of cancer therapy, is also highlighted.

  5. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. Gastric cancer and trastuzumab: first biologic therapy in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gunturu, Krishna S.; Woo, Yanghee; Beaubier, Nike; Remotti, Helen E.

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains difficult to cure and has a poor overall prognosis. Chemotherapy and multimodality therapy has shown some benefit in the treatment of gastric cancer. Current therapies for gastric cancer have their limitations; thus, we are in need of newer treatment options including targeted therapies. Here, we review the biologic therapy with trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)+ gastric cancer. PMID:23450234

  8. Burden of malignancy after a primary skin cancer: recurrence, multiple skin cancers and second primary cancers.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Hans; Williams, Dan

    2010-01-01

    The current paper summarizes relevant recent research on the high risk of recurrence, multiple skin cancers and second primary cancers in the growing number of people with a history of skin cancer; the ultimate purpose is to better assess the burden of malignancy following skin cancer. A number of challenges exist in identifying and tracking both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) cases. Most jurisdictions do not routinely track NMSC cases and, even if they do, it is customary to only include the first diagnosis. There are variable rules for counting multiple melanoma cancers, and recurrences are not considered for either major type of skin cancer. Applying insights from recent studies of this issue to Canadian cancer statistics would increase reported diagnoses of NMSC by about 26% and melanoma by 10% in this country. This approach to a fuller assessment of the burden of skin cancers has been called a "diagnosis-based incidence approach" as compared with a "patient-based incidence approach". A further issue that is not usually taken into account when assessing the burden of skin cancers is the 20% to 30% elevated risk of noncutaneous second primary cancers following a primary skin tumour. In summary, individuals with skin cancer are subject to a high risk of recurrence, multiple skin cancers and second primary cancers. This burden should be a special concern in the large and growing pool of individuals with a history of skin cancer, as well as among prevention planners.

  9. Inherited Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kastrinos, Fay; Syngal, Sapna

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most common gastrointestinal malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. Most colorectal cancer cases diagnosed annually are due to sporadic events but up to 5% are attributed to known monogenic disorders including Lynch syndrome, Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, MYH-associated polyposis, and the rare hamartomatous polyposis syndromes. These inherited colorectal cancer syndromes confer a markedly increased risk for the development of multiple cancers and predictive genetic testing is available to identify mutation carriers and at-risk family members. Through personalized strategies for diagnosis and management, a substantial reduction in morbidity and mortality has been appreciated among patients at highest risk for the development of colorectal cancer. PMID:22157284

  10. Biomarkers, genetics and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Anton-Guirgis, H.; Lynch, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    Biological markers can greatly facilitate identification of individuals at high cancer risk. This volume surveys the entire field of biological markers and how they promote early diagnosis of various hereditary cancer forms. Chapters written in down-to-earth style make the data relevant to practicing clinicians as well as research scientists. Markers for site-specific tumors are investigated from the standpoints of etiology and carcinogenesis. Particular attention is given to cancer genetic settings that could serve as models for further research. Methods of identifying both those at high cancer risk and those in a pre-cancerous state are clearly explained. Specific areas covered include polymorphic markers, multiple biological markers, hereditary adenomatosis, and carcino-embryonic antigens. Research findings from studies of twins, families, and first degree relatives offer valuable insights into heritable cancer syndromes.

  11. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lang, Michaela; Gasche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has become one of the most prevalent malignant diseases for both men and women. Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or certain inherited cancer syndromes are at high risk of developing colorectal cancer and have naturally the highest need for cancer prevention. In familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome, most of the underlying germline mutations can be detected by DNA sequencing, and medical counselling of affected individuals involves both surveillance tests and chemopreventive measures. However, as the mechanisms leading to colorectal cancer differ in these high-risk groups, the molecular action of chemopreventive drugs needs to be adjusted to the certain pathway of carcinogenesis. In the last decades, a number of drugs have been tested, including sulindac, aspirin, celecoxib, and mesalazine, but some of them are still controversially discussed. This review summarizes the advances and current standards of colorectal cancer prevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, FAP and Lynch syndrome. PMID:25531498

  12. Tenascin-C and integrins in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Toshimichi; Akatsuka, Tatsuya; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC) is highly expressed in cancer tissues. Its cellular sources are cancer and stromal cells, including fibroblasts/myofibroblasts, and also vascular cells. TNC expressed in cancer tissues dominantly contains large splice variants. Deposition of the stroma promotes the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, proliferation, and migration of cancer cells. It also facilitates the formation of cancer stroma including desmoplasia and angiogenesis. Integrin receptors that mediate the signals of TNC have also been discussed. PMID:25793576

  13. Tenascin-C and integrins in cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Toshimichi; Akatsuka, Tatsuya; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko

    2015-01-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC) is highly expressed in cancer tissues. Its cellular sources are cancer and stromal cells, including fibroblasts/myofibroblasts, and also vascular cells. TNC expressed in cancer tissues dominantly contains large splice variants. Deposition of the stroma promotes the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, proliferation, and migration of cancer cells. It also facilitates the formation of cancer stroma including desmoplasia and angiogenesis. Integrin receptors that mediate the signals of TNC have also been discussed. PMID:25793576

  14. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    . For colorectal cancer, the stage at diagnosis of cases diagnosed in northeast Pennsylvania was compared to data from prior years. A population-based interview study of healthy adults was conducted to document the status of cancer screening and to estimate the prevalence of established cancer risk factors in this community. This study is similar in design to that used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES: This program includes two distinct but related projects. The first project uses existing data to conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania, and the second is a population-based study of cancer risk factors and cancer screening behaviors in this same population. HUMAN SUBJECTS CONSIDERATIONS This program includes two projects: cancer surveillance and a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior. The cancer surveillance project involves only the use of existing aggregate data or de-identified data. As such, the surveillance project is exempt from human subjects considerations. The study of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors includes data from a random sample of adult residents of northeast Pennsylvania who are 18 or more years of age. All races, ethnicities and both sexes are included in proportion to their representation in the population. Subjects are interviewed anonymously by telephone; those who are unable to complete an interview in English are ineligible. This project has been reviewed and approved by the Scranton-Temple Residency Program IRB (IRB00001355), which is the IRB for the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute.

  15. Cancer - penis

    MedlinePlus

    ... an organ that makes up part of the male reproductive system. Causes The exact cause is unknown. Smegma, a ... Squamous cell cancer - penis Images Male reproductive anatomy Male reproductive system References National Comprehensive Cancer Network. National Comprehensive Cancer ...

  16. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  17. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  18. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  19. Anal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Anal Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Whether you (or ... the topics below to get started. What Is Anal Cancer? What is anal cancer? What are the ...

  20. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  1. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink per day (women at high risk for breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) ... Services Task Force. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and ... cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date ...

  2. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  3. Stomach cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - stomach; Gastric cancer; Gastric carcinoma; Adenocarcinoma of the stomach ... Several types of cancer can occur in the stomach. The most common type is called adenocarcinoma. It starts from one of the cell ...

  4. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pregnant. There are different types of uterine cancer. The most common type starts in the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. This type of cancer is sometimes called endometrial cancer. The symptoms of ...

  5. Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people ... Smoke cigarettes Have a family history of stomach cancer It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in ...

  6. Cancer Moonshot

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Moonshot, led by Vice President Joe Biden, will marshal resources across the federal government to speed progress in cancer research and lead to improved cancer prevention, detection, and treatment.

  7. Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... body work normally. There are several types of cancer of the thyroid gland. You are at greater ... imaging tests, and a biopsy to diagnose thyroid cancer. Treatment depends on the type of cancer you ...

  8. Food and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sugimura, Takashi

    2002-12-27

    Food is an important factor in determining cancer incidence in many countries and regions. Food components relevant to cancer development can be divided into macro- and microcomponents. The former tends to act indirectly. The latter usually has a clearly defined action, for example as genotoxic agents. Food can have both positive (carcinogenic) and negative (preventive) effects. Total calory intake appears to have a strong positive influence on cancer incidence. Food typical of advanced nations including fat-rich food is associated with increases in breast, colon and prostate cancers. Vegetables rich in antioxidants and fibers tend to reduce cancer incidence. Carcinogenic plant alkaloids, myctoxins and other food contaminants frequently enter our bodies. Heat-cooking generates genotoxicants, including aromatic hydrocarbons (via combustion) and heterocyclic amines (HCAs) through reactions involving creatin(in)e, sugar and amino acids in meat. HCAs are relatively newcomers as food genotoxicants and can produce breast, colon and prostate cancers in rodents. Some epidemiological investigations positively correlate HCA intake and cancer incidence. HCAs can produce other toxicological effects including salivary gland atrophy and myocardial degeneration. Improved food, better life styles and developments in the functional food industry are all crucila to cancer prevention.

  9. Advances in cancer control

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.N. ); Engstrom, P.F. ); Mortenson, L.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the sixth annual meeting on Advances in Cancer Control. Included are the following articles: Barriers and facilitators to compliance with routine mammographic screening, Preliminary report of an intervention to improve mammography skills of radiologists.

  10. Skin Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body's largest organ . It protects against heat, sunlight, injury, and infection . Skin also helps control body ... cancer risk factors include: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  11. Laryngeal (Voice Box) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited alcohol exposure. Other risk factors for laryngeal cancer include certain viruses, such as human papilloma virus (HPV), and likely acid reflux. Vitamin A and beta-carotene may play a protective role. Signs and Symptoms ...

  12. Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of hypopharyngeal cancer include a sore throat and ear pain. These and other signs and ... A change in voice. Tests that examine the throat and neck are used to help detect (find) ...

  13. Stages of Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of hypopharyngeal cancer include a sore throat and ear pain. These and other signs and ... A change in voice. Tests that examine the throat and neck are used to help detect (find) ...

  14. Stages of Laryngeal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of laryngeal cancer include a sore throat and ear pain. These and other signs and ... hoarseness in the voice. Tests that examine the throat and neck are used to help detect (find), ...

  15. What Is Vulvar Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is vulvar cancer? The vulva is the outer part of the female genitals. The vulva includes ... vagina (sometimes called the vestibule ), the labia majora (outer lips), the labia minora (inner lips), and the ...

  16. Cancer treatment - early menopause

    MedlinePlus

    Premature menopause; Primary ovarian insufficiency; POI ... Cancer treatments that can cause early menopause include: Surgery. Having both ovaries removed causes menopause to happen right away. If you are age 50 or younger, your provider may ...

  17. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  18. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  19. Ghrelin and cancer.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Lisa; Walpole, Carina; Seim, Inge; Cunningham, Peter; Murray, Rachael; Whiteside, Eliza; Josh, Peter; Herington, Adrian

    2011-06-20

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that was originally isolated from the stomach as the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Ghrelin has many functions, including the regulation of appetite and gut motility, growth hormone release from the anterior pituitary and roles in the cardiovascular and immune systems. Ghrelin and its receptor are expressed in a number of cancers and cancer cell lines and may play a role in processes associated with cancer progression, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell invasion and migration.

  20. About the Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers, as well as new approaches to clinical prevention studies including cancer immunoprevention.Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials ProgramThe group jointly administers the Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program evaluating new agents, surrogate biomarkers, and technologies to identify premalignant lesions, and related cancers.  |

  1. Cancer Research Repository for Individuals With Cancer Diagnosis and High Risk Individuals.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-12

    Pancreatic Cancer; Thyroid Cancer; Lung Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Thymus Cancer; Colon Cancer; Rectal Cancer; GIST; Anal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Liver Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Peritoneal Surface Malignancies; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Lynch Syndrome; Bladder Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Penile Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Testicular Cancer; Ureter Cancer; Urethral Cancer; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Laryngeal Cancer; Lip Cancer; Oral Cavity Cancer; Nasopharyngeal Cancer; Oropharyngeal Cancer; Paranasal Sinus Cancer; Nasal Cavity Cancer; Salivary Gland Cancer; Skin Cancer; CNS Tumor; CNS Cancer; Mesothelioma

  2. Including Young Children With "New" Chronic Illnesses in an Early Childhood Education Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauvre, Mary

    1988-01-01

    Presents suggestions for successfully including young children with "new" life-threatening, chronic illnesses -- various types of cancer, heart, liver, and kidney diseases -- in early childhood education classes. (BB)

  3. Urologic cancer in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Umbas, Rainy; Safriadi, Ferry; Mochtar, Chaidir A; Djatisoesanto, Wahjoe; Hamid, Agus Rizal A H

    2015-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases, including cancer, start to become more common in Indonesia. According to the government statement, incidence of malignant diseases increased annually up to 8% in the last decade and these diseases become the seventh leading cause of death in Indonesia. On the basis of the latest Globocan report on cancer incidence in Indonesia, prostate cancer ranks sixth; followed by bladder (12th) and kidney (18th). More than half of patients with kidney cancer are diagnosed in the advanced stage. Besides renal cell carcinoma, there are significant number of people affected with squamous cell and transitional cell carcinoma because of kidney stones. Radical nephrectomy or cytoreductive nephrectomy was the primary treatment, mostly done as an open procedure. Transitional cell carcinoma is the commonest histology type in bladder cancer cases followed by squamous cell carcinoma, which almost always related to bladder stones. Unfortunately, >70% of our cases were diagnosed with muscle invasive bladder cancer, and ∼60% of these patients refused further radical treatment. Incidence of prostate cancer is increasing rapidly and it becomes the third most common cancer in men. However, most of our patients are diagnosed in the advanced stage. Radical prostatectomy or external beam radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in localized disease. Nearly 40% of the elderly patients are treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy. Therefore, it requires more research by the Indonesian urologists and other healthcare providers to diagnose these cancers in earlier stage as well as community education for prevention. PMID:26085688

  4. Neutrophils in cancer.

    PubMed

    Treffers, Louise W; Hiemstra, Ida H; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Matlung, Hanke L

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in cancer. This does not only relate to the well-established prognostic value of the presence of neutrophils, either in the blood or in tumor tissue, in the context of cancer progression or for the monitoring of therapy, but also to their active role in the progression of cancer. In the current review, we describe what is known in general about the role of neutrophils in cancer. What is emerging is a complex, rather heterogeneous picture with both pro- and anti-tumorigenic roles, which apparently differs with cancer type and disease stage. Furthermore, we will discuss the well-known role of neutrophils as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and also on the role of neutrophils as important effector cells during antibody therapy in cancer. It is clear that neutrophils contribute substantially to cancer progression in multiple ways, and this includes both direct effects on the cancer cells and indirect effect on the tumor microenvironment. While in many cases neutrophils have been shown to promote tumor progression, for instance by acting as MDSC, there are also protective effects, particularly when antibody immunotherapy is performed. A better understanding of the role of neutrophils is likely to provide opportunities for immunomodulation and for improving the treatment of cancer patients. PMID:27558343

  5. Urologic cancer in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Umbas, Rainy; Safriadi, Ferry; Mochtar, Chaidir A; Djatisoesanto, Wahjoe; Hamid, Agus Rizal A H

    2015-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases, including cancer, start to become more common in Indonesia. According to the government statement, incidence of malignant diseases increased annually up to 8% in the last decade and these diseases become the seventh leading cause of death in Indonesia. On the basis of the latest Globocan report on cancer incidence in Indonesia, prostate cancer ranks sixth; followed by bladder (12th) and kidney (18th). More than half of patients with kidney cancer are diagnosed in the advanced stage. Besides renal cell carcinoma, there are significant number of people affected with squamous cell and transitional cell carcinoma because of kidney stones. Radical nephrectomy or cytoreductive nephrectomy was the primary treatment, mostly done as an open procedure. Transitional cell carcinoma is the commonest histology type in bladder cancer cases followed by squamous cell carcinoma, which almost always related to bladder stones. Unfortunately, >70% of our cases were diagnosed with muscle invasive bladder cancer, and ∼60% of these patients refused further radical treatment. Incidence of prostate cancer is increasing rapidly and it becomes the third most common cancer in men. However, most of our patients are diagnosed in the advanced stage. Radical prostatectomy or external beam radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in localized disease. Nearly 40% of the elderly patients are treated with primary androgen deprivation therapy. Therefore, it requires more research by the Indonesian urologists and other healthcare providers to diagnose these cancers in earlier stage as well as community education for prevention.

  6. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective.

    PubMed

    Ghadyalpatil, Nikhil Suresh; Supriya, Chopra; Prachi, Patil; Ashwin, Dsouza; Avanish, Saklani

    2016-01-01

    GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC), colorectal cancer (CRC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), esophageal cancer (EC), and pancreatic cancer (PC). Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist, these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes. The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach) to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs) need focussed attention

  7. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghadyalpatil, Nikhil Suresh; Supriya, Chopra; Prachi, Patil; Ashwin, Dsouza; Avanish, Saklani

    2016-01-01

    GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC), colorectal cancer (CRC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), esophageal cancer (EC), and pancreatic cancer (PC). Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist, these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes. The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach) to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs) need focussed attention

  8. Gastrointestinal cancers in India: Treatment perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghadyalpatil, Nikhil Suresh; Supriya, Chopra; Prachi, Patil; Ashwin, Dsouza; Avanish, Saklani

    2016-01-01

    GI cancer is not one cancer but is a term for the group of cancers that affect the digestive system including gastric cancer (GC), colorectal cancer (CRC), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), esophageal cancer (EC), and pancreatic cancer (PC). Overall, the GI cancers are responsible for more cancers and more deaths from cancer than any other organ. 5 year survival of these cancers remains low compared to western world. Unlike the rest of the world where organ based specialities hepatobiliary, pancreatic, colorectal and esophagogastric exist, these cancers are managed in India by either a gastrointestinal surgeons, surgical oncologist, or a general surgeon with varying outcomes. The aim of this review was to collate data on GI cancers in indian continent. In colorectal cancers, data from tertiary care centres identifies the unique problem of mucinous and signet colorectal cancer. Results of rectal cancer resection in terms of technique (intersphincteric resection, extralevator aper, minimal invasive approach) to be comparable with world literature. However long term outcome and data regarding colon cancers and nationally is needed. Gastric cancer at presentation are advanced and in surgically resected patients, there is need for a trial to compare chemoradiation vs chemotherapy alone to prevent loco regional recurrence. Data on minimal invasive gastric cancer surgery may be sparse for the same reason. Theree is a lot of data on surgical techniques and perioperatve outcomes in pancreatic cancer. There is a high volume of locally advanced gallbladder cancers with efforts on to decide whether neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is better for down staging. Considering GI cancers, a heterogeneous disease with site specific treatment options and variable outcomes, the overall data and outcomes are extremely variable. Young patients with pathology unique to the Indian subcontinent (for example, signet ring rectal cancer, GBCs) need focussed attention

  9. Gynecological cancer in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Aziz, M Farid

    2009-03-01

    To overview the status of gynecologic cancer in Indonesia. Information regarding Indonesia obtained from World Bank Report and Statistical Yearbook of Indonesia 2007, epidemiological data obtained from Histopathological Data of Cancer in Indonesia 2002, Department of Health-Registry Body of Indonesian Specialist of Pathology Association-Indonesian Cancer Society; Various Hospitals in big Cities in Indonesia. Indonesia is an Archipelago with a total area of 1,922,570.00 km(2), the population is 222,192,000 (2006), the fourth world rank. Female is 49.86% with life expectancy 69 years. Gross National Product per Capita is 690.00 USD. Histopathological report in 2002 revealed that cervical cancer, ovarian cancer and uterine cancer were the most frequent cancer among female, which were the first (2,532 cases), the third (829 cases) and the eighth (316 cases) rank respectively. The peak age for cervical, uterine and ovarian cancer was 45-54 years. HPV 16, 18 were found in 82% of invasive cervical. Data from various academic hospitals in 2007 showed that cervical cancer is the most common malignancy followed by ovary, uterus, vulva and vagina. Five-year survival rate of stage I, II, III, IV cervical cancer were 50%, 40%, 20%, and 0% respectively. Overall five-year survival rate of carcinoma of the ovary was 54.8%. If sub-classified by stage, five-year survival rate are 94.3%, 75.0%, 31%, and 11.7% for stage I, II, III, and IV respectively. Five-year disease-free survival rate of endometrial cancer was 71.9%. Indonesia is the biggest Archipelago with a dense population but the income per capita still low (poor country). The most common gynecologic cancer is cervical cancer, followed by ovarian and uterine cancer. These cancers are included in top ten cancers in Indonesia. HPV 16, 18 were the most cause of cervical cancer. The five-year survival rates are comparable with world report.

  10. Environmental Sustainability - Including Land and Water Use

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessments of environmental sustainability can be conducted in many ways with one of the most quantitative methods including Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). While historically LCIA has included a comprehensive list of impact categories including: ozone depletion, global c...

  11. Diabetes and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Holden, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and cancer are common conditions, affecting 384 million and 33 million people worldwide, respectively. Therefore, there is great potential for overlap, with people with diabetes also developing cancer and vice versa. However, people with diabetes may be at increased risk of developing cancer when compared with the general population. This is due to both shared risk factors associated with the two diseases and the metabolic derangements associated with diabetes, such as hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia and oxidative stress. Glucose-lowering therapies may influence the risk of cancer in people with type 2 diabetes due to these therapies' effects on risk factors that are common to both conditions, including hyperglycaemia and obesity, as well as effects that are specific to the class of drug or drugs. Drugs that reduce circulating insulin levels, such as metformin, may reduce cancer risk, and drugs that increase circulating insulin levels, including exogenous insulin and insulin secretagogues, may increase cancer risk. The influence of glucose-lowering therapies on cancer risk may become an important consideration when selecting glucose-lowering therapies to treat people with type 2 diabetes and a high risk of cancer occurrence or recurrence.

  12. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries. PMID:27535387

  13. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries.

  14. [The epidemiology of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2010-10-31

    Pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon tumor, but even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high, explaining why this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. There are no screening tests for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It is more common in men than women and is predominantly a disease of elderly people. There is wide variation in the incidence of pancreatic cancer around the world, suggesting that environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, while dietary factors seem to be less important. Other possible risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inherited germ line mutations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. Polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens and metabolic pathways may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Factor models for cancer signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel method for extracting cancer signatures by applying statistical risk models (http://ssrn.com/abstract=2732453) from quantitative finance to cancer genome data. Using 1389 whole genome sequenced samples from 14 cancers, we identify an "overall" mode of somatic mutational noise. We give a prescription for factoring out this noise and source code for fixing the number of signatures. We apply nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) to genome data aggregated by cancer subtype and filtered using our method. The resultant signatures have substantially lower variability than those from unfiltered data. Also, the computational cost of signature extraction is cut by about a factor of 10. We find 3 novel cancer signatures, including a liver cancer dominant signature (96% contribution) and a renal cell carcinoma signature (70% contribution). Our method accelerates finding new cancer signatures and improves their overall stability. Reciprocally, the methods for extracting cancer signatures could have interesting applications in quantitative finance.

  16. Gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Douglass, H.O. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Radiation therapy for gastric cancer; Experimental stomach cancer: Drug selection based on in vitro testing; Western surgical adjuvant trials in gastric cancers: Lessons from current trials to be applied in the future; and Chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

  17. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread of the cancer. But it does not cure the cancer. If prostate cancer spreads even after hormone therapy, ... the Gleason score) when you are diagnosed. A cure is possible if the cancer has not spread. Hormone treatment can improve survival, ...

  18. Vaginal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal cancer is a rare type of cancer. It is more common in women 60 and older. You are also more likely to get it if you have had a human ... test can find abnormal cells that may be cancer. Vaginal cancer can often be cured in its ...

  19. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  20. Future directions in cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Umar, Asad; Dunn, Barbara K; Greenwald, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Prevention of cancer remains the most promising strategy for reducing both its incidence and the mortality due to this disease. For more than four decades, findings from epidemiology, basic research and clinical trials have informed the development of lifestyle and medical approaches to cancer prevention. These include selective oestrogen receptor modulators and aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer, the 5-α-reductase inhibitors finasteride and dutasteride for prostate cancer, and the development of vaccines for viruses that are associated with specific cancers. Future directions include genetic, proteomic and other molecular approaches for identifying pathways that are associated with cancer initiation and development, as well as refining the search for immunologically modifiable causes of cancer. PMID:23151603

  1. Oral environment and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Yasusei; Tada, Hidesuke; Fujiwara, Natsumi; Tada, Yoshiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Miyake, Yoichiro; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is now the leading cause of death in Japan. A rapid increase in cancer mortality is expected as Japan is facing a super-aged society. Many causes of cancer are known to be closely linked to life style factors, such as smoking, drinking, and diet. The oral environment is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and development of various diseases such as bronchitis, pneumonia, diabetes, heart disease, and dementia. Because the oral cavity acts as the bodily entrance for air and food, it is constantly exposed to foreign substances, including bacteria and viruses. A large number of bacteria are endemic to the oral cavity, and indigenous oral flora act to prevent the settlement of foreign bacteria. The oral environment is influenced by local factors, including dental plaque, tartar, teeth alignment, occlusion, an incompatible prosthesis, and bad lifestyle habits, and systemic factors, including smoking, consumption of alcohol, irregular lifestyle and eating habits, obesity, stress, hormones, and heredity. It has recently been revealed that the oral environment is associated with cancer. In particular, commensal bacteria in the oral cavity are involved in the development of cancer. Moreover, Candida, human papilloma virus and Epstein-Barr virus as well as commensal bacteria have been reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of cancer. In this review, we introduce recent findings of the correlation between the oral environment and cancer. PMID:27482300

  2. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  3. Radon and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  5. NCI Designated Cancer Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Cancer Center History Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners ... Profiles in Cancer Research Outstanding Investigator Award Recipients ...

  6. Endometrial Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  7. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  8. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  9. Diet and cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber and cancer; Cancer and fiber; Nitrates and cancer; Cancer and nitrates ... DIET AND BREAST CANCER The link between nutrition and breast cancer has been well studied. To reduce risk of breast cancer the American ...

  10. NIH study confirms risk factors for male breast cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Pooled data from studies of about 2,400 men with breast cancer and 52,000 men without breast cancer confirmed that risk factors for male breast cancer include obesity, a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter syndrome, and gynecomastia.

  11. [Genes associated to cancer].

    PubMed

    Peralta-Rodríguez, Raúl; Valdivia, Alejandra; Mendoza, Mónica; Rodríguez, Jade; Marrero, Daniel; Paniagua, Lucero; Romero, Pablo; Taniguchi, Keiko; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, in a cancer genes census, 291 genes were enumerated. These represent near to the 1 % of the total genes, for which there is enough biological evidence that they belong to a new genes classification, known as the cancer genes. These have been defined as the causal genes for sporadic or familiar cancer, when they mutate. The mutation types for these genes includes amplifications, point mutations, deletions, genomic rearranges, amongst others, which lead to a protein over-expression, muting, production of chimeric proteins or a de novo expression. In conjunction these genomic alterations or those of the genetic expression, when they affect specific genes which contribute to the development of cancer, are denominated as cancer genes. It is possible that the list of these alterations will grow longer due to new strategies being developed, for example, the genomic analysis.

  12. Mitochondria and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wei-Xing; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; White, Eileen

    2016-03-01

    Decades ago, Otto Warburg observed that cancers ferment glucose in the presence of oxygen, suggesting that defects in mitochondrial respiration may be the underlying cause of cancer. We now know that the genetic events that drive aberrant cancer cell proliferation also alter biochemical metabolism, including promoting aerobic glycolysis, but do not typically impair mitochondrial function. Mitochondria supply energy; provide building blocks for new cells; and control redox homeostasis, oncogenic signaling, innate immunity, and apoptosis. Indeed, mitochondrial biogenesis and quality control are often upregulated in cancers. While some cancers have mutations in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes that produce oncogenic metabolites, there is negative selection for pathogenic mitochondrial genome mutations. Eliminating mtDNA limits tumorigenesis, and rare human tumors with mutant mitochondrial genomes are relatively benign. Thus, mitochondria play a central and multifunctional role in malignant tumor progression, and targeting mitochondria provides therapeutic opportunities.

  13. The cancerous translation apparatus.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Craig R; Ruggero, Davide

    2011-08-01

    Deregulations in translational control are critical features of cancer initiation and progression. Activation of key oncogenic pathways promotes rapid and dramatic translational reprogramming, not simply by increasing overall protein synthesis, but also by modulating specific mRNA networks that promote cellular transformation. Additionally, ribosomopathies caused by mutations in ribosome components alter translational regulation leading to specific pathological features, including cancer susceptibility. Exciting advances in our understanding of translational control in cancer have illuminated a striking specificity innate to the translational apparatus. Characterizing this specificity will provide novel insights into how cells normally utilize translational control to modulate gene expression, how it is deregulated in cancer, and how these processes can be targeted to develop new cancer therapies. PMID:21543223

  14. Mitochondria and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wei-Xing; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; White, Eileen

    2016-03-01

    Decades ago, Otto Warburg observed that cancers ferment glucose in the presence of oxygen, suggesting that defects in mitochondrial respiration may be the underlying cause of cancer. We now know that the genetic events that drive aberrant cancer cell proliferation also alter biochemical metabolism, including promoting aerobic glycolysis, but do not typically impair mitochondrial function. Mitochondria supply energy; provide building blocks for new cells; and control redox homeostasis, oncogenic signaling, innate immunity, and apoptosis. Indeed, mitochondrial biogenesis and quality control are often upregulated in cancers. While some cancers have mutations in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes that produce oncogenic metabolites, there is negative selection for pathogenic mitochondrial genome mutations. Eliminating mtDNA limits tumorigenesis, and rare human tumors with mutant mitochondrial genomes are relatively benign. Thus, mitochondria play a central and multifunctional role in malignant tumor progression, and targeting mitochondria provides therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26942671

  15. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:27766137

  16. Profiling the cancer genome.

    PubMed

    Cowin, Prue A; Anglesio, Michael; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Bowtell, David D L

    2010-01-01

    Cancer profiling studies have had a profound impact on our understanding of the biology of cancers in a number of ways, including providing insights into the biological heterogeneity of specific cancer types, identification of novel oncogenes and tumor suppressors, and defining pathways that interact to drive the growth of individual cancers. Several large-scale genomic studies are underway that aim to catalog all biologically significant mutational events in each cancer type, and these findings will allow researchers to understand how mutational networks function within individual tumors. The identification of molecular predictive and prognostic tools to facilitate treatment decisions is an important step for individualized patient therapy and, ultimately, in improving patient outcomes. Whereas there are still significant challenges to implementing genomic testing and targeted therapy into routine clinical practice, rapid technological advancements provide hope for overcoming these obstacles.

  17. Cancer as a metabolic disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that impaired cellular energy metabolism is the defining characteristic of nearly all cancers regardless of cellular or tissue origin. In contrast to normal cells, which derive most of their usable energy from oxidative phosphorylation, most cancer cells become heavily dependent on substrate level phosphorylation to meet energy demands. Evidence is reviewed supporting a general hypothesis that genomic instability and essentially all hallmarks of cancer, including aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), can be linked to impaired mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. A view of cancer as primarily a metabolic disease will impact approaches to cancer management and prevention. PMID:20181022

  18. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer. PMID:27178684

  19. [Early and individualized cancer rehabilitation important].

    PubMed

    Dunberger, Gail; Hellbom, Maria; Bergmark, Karin; Ahlberg, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Survivors of gynecological cancer experience physical, psychological and existential consequences. Late gastrointestinal and urinary bladder symptoms, sexual dysfunction, including underlying physical and relational aspects, as well as lymphedema and fatigue, are common complaints. This may lead to reduced quality of life and social functioning and cancer rehabilitation is needed. Cancer rehabilitation, focusing on the individual cancer survivor and her specific needs, starting at diagnosis and continuing throughout cancer treatment and at follow-ups, is necessary. PMID:26646958

  20. What You Need to Know about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Breast Cancer This booklet is about breast cancer. Learning about your cancer can help you take ... This booklet covers: Basics about breast anatomy and breast cancer Treatments for breast cancer, including taking part in ...

  1. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Diet and cancer.

    PubMed

    Norat, Teresa; Scoccianti, Chiara; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Anderson, Annie; Berrino, Franco; Cecchini, Michele; Espina, Carolina; Key, Tim; Leitzmann, Michael; Powers, Hilary; Wiseman, Martin; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Lifestyle factors, including diet, have long been recognised as potentially important determinants of cancer risk. In addition to the significant role diet plays in affecting body fatness, a risk factor for several cancers, experimental studies have indicated that diet may influence the cancer process in several ways. Prospective studies have shown that dietary patterns characterised by higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain foods, and lower intakes of red and processed meats and salt, are related to reduced risks of death and cancer, and that a healthy diet can improve overall survival after diagnosis of breast and colorectal cancers. There is evidence that high intakes of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancers of the aerodigestive tract, and the evidence that dietary fibre protects against colorectal cancer is convincing. Red and processed meats increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Diets rich in high-calorie foods, such as fatty and sugary foods, may lead to increased calorie intake, thereby promoting obesity and leading to an increased risk of cancer. There is some evidence that sugary drinks are related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Taking this evidence into account, the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends that people have a healthy diet to reduce their risk of cancer: they should eat plenty of whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruits; limit high-calorie foods (foods high in sugar or fat); avoid sugary drinks and processed meat; and limit red meat and foods high in salt.

  2. European Code against Cancer 4th Edition: Diet and cancer.

    PubMed

    Norat, Teresa; Scoccianti, Chiara; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Anderson, Annie; Berrino, Franco; Cecchini, Michele; Espina, Carolina; Key, Tim; Leitzmann, Michael; Powers, Hilary; Wiseman, Martin; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Lifestyle factors, including diet, have long been recognised as potentially important determinants of cancer risk. In addition to the significant role diet plays in affecting body fatness, a risk factor for several cancers, experimental studies have indicated that diet may influence the cancer process in several ways. Prospective studies have shown that dietary patterns characterised by higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain foods, and lower intakes of red and processed meats and salt, are related to reduced risks of death and cancer, and that a healthy diet can improve overall survival after diagnosis of breast and colorectal cancers. There is evidence that high intakes of fruit and vegetables may reduce the risk of cancers of the aerodigestive tract, and the evidence that dietary fibre protects against colorectal cancer is convincing. Red and processed meats increase the risk of colorectal cancer. Diets rich in high-calorie foods, such as fatty and sugary foods, may lead to increased calorie intake, thereby promoting obesity and leading to an increased risk of cancer. There is some evidence that sugary drinks are related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Taking this evidence into account, the 4th edition of the European Code against Cancer recommends that people have a healthy diet to reduce their risk of cancer: they should eat plenty of whole grains, pulses, vegetables and fruits; limit high-calorie foods (foods high in sugar or fat); avoid sugary drinks and processed meat; and limit red meat and foods high in salt. PMID:26164653

  3. Frontiers of cancer care in Asia-Pacific region: cancer care in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Koh, ES; Do, VT; Barton, MB

    2008-01-01

    Cancer has a significant impact on the Australian community. One in three men and one in four women will develop cancer by the age of 75. The estimated annual health expenditure due to cancer in 2000-1 in Australia was $2.7 billion, representing 5.5% of the country’s total healthcare expenditure. An historical overview of the national cancer control strategies in Australia is provided. In males, the five most common cancers in order of decreasing incidence are: prostate cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, melanoma and lymphoma, while for Australian women, breast cancer is the most common cancer. Key epidemiologic information about these common cancers, current management issues and comprehensive national clinical practice guidelines (where available) are highlighted. Aspects of skin cancer, a particularly common cancer in the Australian environment – with a focus on melanoma – are also included. Cancer outcomes in Australia, measured by selected outcomes, are among the best in the world. However, there is still evidence of health inequalities, especially among patients residing in regional and remote areas, the indigenous population and people from lower socio-economic classes. Limitations of current cancer care practices in Australia, including provision of oncology services, resources and other access issues, as well as suggested improvements for future cancer care, are summarised. Ongoing implementation of national and state cancer control plans and evaluation of their effectiveness will be needed to pursue the goal of optimal cancer care in Australia. PMID:21611000

  4. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  5. Cancer survivorship in adults.

    PubMed

    Kiserud, Cecilie E; Dahl, Alv A; Loge, Jon Håvard; Fosså, Sophie D

    2014-01-01

    With the favorable trend regarding survival of cancer in the Western world, there is an increasing focus among patients, clinicians, researchers, and politicians regarding cancer survivors' health and well-being. Their number is rapidly growing and more than 3 % of the adult populations in Western countries have survived cancer for 5 years or more. Cancer survivors are at increased risk for a variety of late effects after treatment, some life-threatening such as secondary cancer and cardiac diseases, others might negatively impact on their daily functioning and quality of life. The latter might include fatigue, anxiety disorders and difficulties returning to work while depression does not seem to be more common among survivors than in the general population. Still, the majority of survivors regain their health and social functioning. The field of cancer survivorship research has been rapidly growing. Models for follow-up care of cancer survivors have been proposed, but how to best integrate the knowledge of the field into clinical practice with adequate follow-up of cancer survivors at risk for developing late effects is still an unsolved question. PMID:24305772

  6. Autophagy and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Basal autophagy plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and genomic integrity by degrading aged or malfunctioning organelles and damaged or misfolded proteins. However, autophagy also plays a complicated role in tumorigenesis and treatment responsiveness. It can be tumor-suppressing during the early stages of tumorigenesis (i.e., it is an anti-tumor mechanism), as reduced autophagy is found in tumor cells and may be associated with malignant transformation. In this case, induction of autophagy would seem to be beneficial for cancer prevention. In established tumors, however, autophagy can be tumor-promoting (i.e., it is a pro-tumor mechanism), and cancer cells can use enhanced autophagy to survive under metabolic and therapeutic stress. The pharmacological and/or genetic inhibition of autophagy was recently shown to sensitize cancer cells to the lethal effects of various cancer therapies, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies, suggesting that suppression of the autophagic pathway may represent a valuable sensitizing strategy for cancer treatments. In contrast, excessive stimulation of autophagy may also provide a therapeutic strategy for treating resistant cancer cells having high apoptotic thresholds. In order for us to develop successful autophagy-modulating strategies against cancer, we need to better understand how the roles of autophagy differ depending on the tumor stage, cell type and/or genetic factors, and we need to determine how specific pathways of autophagy are activated or inhibited by the various anti-cancer therapies. PMID:22257886

  7. Thyroid cancer around Chernobyl

    SciTech Connect

    Beral, V.

    1997-03-01

    The author`s presentation on thyroid cancer around Chernobyl will focus on four different things. First will be the time trends, or the pattern of thyroid cancer occurrence before and after the accident. It is now very well known that the increase in thyroid cancer in children in several areas has been unprecedented. Second, the author discusses thyroid cancer in general and patterns of thyroid cancer around the world before the Chernobyl accident, including differences by age and pathology. Third, the author presents relatively crude analyses of risk according to dose to the thyroid gland. And last, the author attempts to contrast the findings for thyroid cancer in relation to the internal radioiodine dose in Chernobyl studies with analyses of the effects of external dose on thyroid cancer incidence. The bottom line to be developed is similar to that presented by Elaine Ron with regard to effects of external dose on thyroid cancer. The similarities between the childhood finding from Chernobyl studies and external radiation studies appear more remarkable than the differences.

  8. Diet and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koriech, Osama M.

    1994-01-01

    Environrnental and lifestyle factors, including diet, pray be responsible for the recognised worldwide variation in tire incidence of specific types or cancer. Chemical carcinogenesis is a multistage process occurring over a relatively long period or time. The mechanisms are complex as different factors damage develops following exposure to carcinogenic agents. Progression to malignancy is, at this stage, not inevitable. Specific agents are needed to ‘promote’, and induce ‘progression’ or inhibit subsequent changes to develop invasive malignancy. Understanding the roles played by different agents and mechanisms in the overall carcinogenic process For cc specific cancer nary form the basis for risk assessment and eventual prevention. The multistep process of carcinogenesis including initiation, promotion, and progression, are all needed for clinically invasive cancer to develop. Efforts directed to any of these phases can prevent the development of cancer. A variety of carcinogenic and mutagenic substances ore present in our diet. Some are found naturally in the food ingredients, whereas others result from pesticide residues, environmental pollution, food additives, preparation and processing procedures, curd fungal contamination. The control of these factors may render some cancers potentially avoidable. The role of macro and micro-nutrients in the causation of cancer and eventually in its prevention is complicated by their combined distribution in food products. Intensive research into the nature of cancer prevention by nutrient components and their synthetic analogs is still in its infancy. As cancer induction, promotion and progression is a slow mechanism that could take many years, it is uncertain what time-period of dietary intake is most relevant. Currently, recommended prevention strategies include choose more/choose less approach, through emphasizing a shift away from high fat, low-fiber foods that may increase cancer risks, toward foods low in fat

  9. Occupational respiratory cancer in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Eun; Kim, Hyoung Ryoul

    2010-12-01

    Malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer are representative examples of occupational cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, and the incidence of malignant mesothelioma is expected to increase sharply in the near future. Although information about lung carcinogen exposure is limited, it is estimated that the number of workers exposed to carcinogens has declined. The first official case of occupational cancer was malignant mesothelioma caused by asbestos exposure in the asbestos textile industry in 1992. Since then, compensation for occupational respiratory cancer has increased. The majority of compensated lung cancer was due to underlying pneumoconiosis. Other main causative agents of occupational lung cancer included asbestos, hexavalent chromium, and crystalline silica. Related jobs included welders, foundry workers, platers, plumbers, and vehicle maintenance workers. Compensated malignant mesotheliomas were associated with asbestos exposure. Epidemiologic studies conducted in Korea have indicated an elevated risk of lung cancer in pneumoconiosis patients, foundry workers, and asbestos textile workers. Occupational respiratory cancer has increased during the last 10 to 20 yr though carcinogen-exposed population has declined in the same period. More efforts to advance the systems for the investigation, prevention and management of occupational respiratory cancer are needed. PMID:21258597

  10. Cancer, Physical Activity, and Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Justin C.; Winters-Stone, Kerri; Lee, Augustine; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2014-01-01

    This review examines the relationship between physical activity and cancer along the cancer continuum, and serves as a synthesis of systematic and meta-analytic reviews conducted to date. There exists a large body of epidemiologic evidence that conclude those who participate in higher levels of physical activity have a reduced likelihood of developing a variety of cancers compared to those who engage in lower levels of physical activity. Despite this observational evidence, the causal pathway underling the association between participation in physical activity and cancer risk reduction remains unclear. Physical activity is also a useful adjunct to improve the deleterious sequelae experienced during cancer treatment. These deleterious sequelae may include fatigue, muscular weakness, deteriorated functional capacity, including many others. The benefits of physical activity during cancer treatment are similar to those experienced after treatment. Despite the growing volume of literature examining physical activity and cancer across the cancer continuum, a number of research gaps exist. There is little evidence on the safety of physical activity among all cancer survivors, as most trials have selectively recruited participants. It is also unclear the specific dose of exercise needed that is optimal for primary cancer prevention or symptom control during and after cancer treatment. PMID:23720265

  11. TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG CANCER.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and lung cancer as comorbidities has been extensively discussed in many studies. In the past, it was well known that lung cancer is a specific epidemiological successor of PTB and that lung cancer often develops in scars caused by PTB. In recent years, the relevance of the two diseases has drawn attention in terms of the close epidemiological connection and chronic inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. In Japanese case series studies, most lung cancer patients with tuberculous sequelae received supportive care alone in the past, but more recently, the use of aggressive lung cancer treatment is increasing. Many studies on PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities have revealed that active PTB is noted in 2-5% of lung cancer cases, whereas lung cancer is noted in 1-2% of active PTB cases. In such instances of comorbidity, many active PTB cases showed Type II (non-extensively cavitary disease) and Spread 2-3 (intermediate-extensive diseases) on chest X-rays, but standard anti-tuberculosis treatment easily eradicates negative conversion of sputum culture for M. tuberculosis; lung cancer cases were often stage III- IV and squamous cell carcinoma predominant, and the administration of aggressive treatment for lung cancer is increasing. The major clinical problems associated with PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities include delay in diagnosis (doctor's delay) and therapeutic limitations. The former involves two factors of radiographic interpretation: the principles of parsimony (Occam's razor) and visual search; the latter involves three factors of lung cancer treatment: infectivity of M.tuberculosis, anatomical limitation due to lung damage by tuberculosis, and drug-drug interactions between rifampicin and anti-cancer drugs, especially molecularly targeted drugs. The comorbidity of these two diseases is an important health-related issue in Japan. In the treatment of PTB, the possibility of concurrent lung cancer should be kept

  12. Integrative medicine for cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... not standard care. It includes things like acupuncture, meditation, and massage. Standard care for cancer includes surgery, ... therapist should avoid any areas of your body. Meditation. Practicing meditation has been shown to ease anxiety, ...

  13. Parotidectomy for Parotid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cracchiolo, Jennifer R; Shaha, Ashok R

    2016-04-01

    Parotidectomy for parotid cancer includes management of primary salivary cancer, metastatic cancer to lymph nodes, and direct extension from surrounding structures or cutaneous malignancies. Preoperative evaluation should provide surgeons with enough information to plan a sound operation and adequately counsel patients. Facial nerve sacrifice is sometimes required; but in preoperative functioning nerves, function should be preserved. Although nerve involvement predicts poor outcome, survival of around 50% has been reported for primary parotid malignancy. Metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is a high-grade aggressive histology whereby local control for palliation with extended parotidectomy can be achieved; however, overall survival remains poor. PMID:26895698

  14. Characteristics of breast cancer in an incident cancer population

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, E.L.; Threatt, B.

    1984-08-01

    The effectiveness of film mammography is a source of concern to radiologists because neither the ribs nor retromammary space is included on the films in good quality examinations. One hundred seven incident cancers were detected in 10,034 self-referred women followed at the University of Michigan Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (UM-BCDDP) for 5 years. These cancers were analyzed for location on the film, method of detection, size, histology, and the number of films required for detection. Mammography alone detected 52 (49%) of the cancers, whereas physical examination alone detected 15 (14%). The other 40 cancers were detectable on both examinations. All of the 92 cancers detected by mammography were visible in both the mediolateral and the craniocaudal views. Mammography consistently detected cancer in the breast, regardless of tumor size, histologic type, or location within the breast.

  15. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Cancer Skin color and being exposed to sunlight can increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer ... carcinoma include the following: Being exposed to natural sunlight or artificial sunlight (such as from tanning beds) ...

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Oropharyngeal Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjuvant therapy . New types of surgery, including transoral robotic surgery , are being studied for the treatment of oropharyngeal cancer. Transoral robotic surgery may be used to remove cancer from ...

  17. Type of Cancer Treatment: Targeted Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Information about the role that targeted therapies play in cancer treatment. Includes how targeted therapies work against cancer, who receives targeted therapies, common side effects, and what to expect when having targeted therapies.

  18. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models. PMID:27011048

  19. Cancer Stem Cells and Radioresistance: Rho/ROCK Pathway Plea Attention.

    PubMed

    Pranatharthi, Annapurna; Ross, Cecil; Srivastava, Sweta

    2016-01-01

    Radiation is the most potent mode of cancer therapy; however, resistance to radiation therapy results in tumor relapse and subsequent fatality. The cancer stem cell (CSC), which has better DNA repair capability, has been shown to contribute to tumor resistance and is an important target for treatment. Signaling molecules such as Notch, Wnt, and DNA repair pathways regulate molecular mechanisms in CSCs; however, none of them have been translated into therapeutic targets. The RhoGTPases and their effector ROCK-signaling pathway, though important for tumor progression, have not been well studied in the context of radioresistance. There are reports that implicate RhoA in radioresistance. ROCK2 has also been shown to interact with BRCA2 in the regulation of cell division. Incidentally, statins (drug for cardiovascular ailment) are functional inhibitors of RhoGTPases. Studies suggest that patients on statins have a better prognosis in cancers. Data from our lab suggest that ROCK signaling regulates radioresistance in cervical cancer cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that Rho/ROCK signaling may be important for radiation resistance. In this review, we enumerate the role of Rho/ROCK signaling in stemness and radioresistance and highlight the need to explore these molecules for a better understanding of radioresistance and development of therapeutics. PMID:27597870

  20. Cancer Stem Cells and Radioresistance: Rho/ROCK Pathway Plea Attention

    PubMed Central

    Pranatharthi, Annapurna; Ross, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    Radiation is the most potent mode of cancer therapy; however, resistance to radiation therapy results in tumor relapse and subsequent fatality. The cancer stem cell (CSC), which has better DNA repair capability, has been shown to contribute to tumor resistance and is an important target for treatment. Signaling molecules such as Notch, Wnt, and DNA repair pathways regulate molecular mechanisms in CSCs; however, none of them have been translated into therapeutic targets. The RhoGTPases and their effector ROCK-signaling pathway, though important for tumor progression, have not been well studied in the context of radioresistance. There are reports that implicate RhoA in radioresistance. ROCK2 has also been shown to interact with BRCA2 in the regulation of cell division. Incidentally, statins (drug for cardiovascular ailment) are functional inhibitors of RhoGTPases. Studies suggest that patients on statins have a better prognosis in cancers. Data from our lab suggest that ROCK signaling regulates radioresistance in cervical cancer cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that Rho/ROCK signaling may be important for radiation resistance. In this review, we enumerate the role of Rho/ROCK signaling in stemness and radioresistance and highlight the need to explore these molecules for a better understanding of radioresistance and development of therapeutics.

  1. Cancer Stem Cells and Radioresistance: Rho/ROCK Pathway Plea Attention

    PubMed Central

    Pranatharthi, Annapurna; Ross, Cecil

    2016-01-01

    Radiation is the most potent mode of cancer therapy; however, resistance to radiation therapy results in tumor relapse and subsequent fatality. The cancer stem cell (CSC), which has better DNA repair capability, has been shown to contribute to tumor resistance and is an important target for treatment. Signaling molecules such as Notch, Wnt, and DNA repair pathways regulate molecular mechanisms in CSCs; however, none of them have been translated into therapeutic targets. The RhoGTPases and their effector ROCK-signaling pathway, though important for tumor progression, have not been well studied in the context of radioresistance. There are reports that implicate RhoA in radioresistance. ROCK2 has also been shown to interact with BRCA2 in the regulation of cell division. Incidentally, statins (drug for cardiovascular ailment) are functional inhibitors of RhoGTPases. Studies suggest that patients on statins have a better prognosis in cancers. Data from our lab suggest that ROCK signaling regulates radioresistance in cervical cancer cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that Rho/ROCK signaling may be important for radiation resistance. In this review, we enumerate the role of Rho/ROCK signaling in stemness and radioresistance and highlight the need to explore these molecules for a better understanding of radioresistance and development of therapeutics. PMID:27597870

  2. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  3. Lung Cancer in Never Smokers.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel Alberto; Wakelee, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is predominantly associated with cigarette smoking; however, a substantial minority of patients with the disease have never smoked. In the US it is estimated there are 17,000-26,000 annual deaths from lung cancer in never smokers, which as a separate entity would be the seventh leading cause of cancer mortality. Controversy surrounds the question of whether or not the incidence of lung cancer in never-smokers is increasing, with more data to support this observation in Asia. There are several factors associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in never smokers including second hand smoke, indoor air pollution, occupational exposures, and genetic susceptibility among others. Adenocarcinoma is the most common histology of lung cancer in never smokers and in comparison to lung cancer in smokers appears less complex with a higher likelihood to have targetable driver mutations. PMID:26667338

  4. The genetic basis of Muir-Torre syndrome includes the hMLH1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Bapat, B.; Xia, L.; Mitri, A.

    1996-09-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) (McKusick 158320) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of sebaceous gland tumors and skin cancers, including keratoacanthomas and basal cell carcinomas. Affected family members may manifest a wide spectrum of internal malignancies, which include colorectal, endometrial, urologic, and upper gastrointestinal neoplasms. Sebaceous gland tumors, which are rare in the general population, are considered to be the hallmark of MTS and may arise prior to the development of other visceral cancers. Despite the high incidence of synchronous and metachronous tumors, prognosis is often favorable. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is one of the most common autosomal dominantly inherited colorectal cancer susceptibility syndromes. In some HNPCC families, extracolonic tumors of the endometrium, ovary, small bowel, and renal and biliary tract occur at an increased frequency. On the basis of similarities in clinical symptoms of MTS and HNPCC, it is proposed that these two syndromes may have a common genetic basis. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Cadmium and renal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Il'yasova, Dora; Schwartz, Gary G. . E-mail: gschwart@wfubmc.edu

    2005-09-01

    Background: Rates of renal cancer have increased steadily during the past two decades, and these increases are not explicable solely by advances in imaging modalities. Cadmium, a widespread environmental pollutant, is a carcinogen that accumulates in the kidney cortex and is a cause of end-stage renal disease. Several observations suggest that cadmium may be a cause of renal cancer. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature on cadmium and renal cancer using MEDLINE for the years 1966-2003. We reviewed seven epidemiological and eleven clinical studies. Results: Despite different methodologies, three large epidemiologic studies indicate that occupational exposure to cadmium is associated with increased risk renal cancer, with odds ratios varying from 1.2 to 5.0. Six of seven studies that compared the cadmium content of kidneys from patients with kidney cancer to that of patients without kidney cancer found lower concentrations of cadmium in renal cancer tissues. Conclusions: Exposure to cadmium appears to be associated with renal cancer, although this conclusion is tempered by the inability of studies to assess cumulative cadmium exposure from all sources including smoking and diet. The paradoxical findings of lower cadmium content in kidney tissues from patients with renal cancer may be caused by dilution of cadmium in rapidly dividing cells. This and other methodological problems limit the interpretation of studies of cadmium in clinical samples. Whether cadmium is a cause of renal cancer may be answered more definitively by future studies that employ biomarkers of cadmium exposure, such as cadmium levels in blood and urine.

  6. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  7. Lactoferrin and cancer in different cancer models.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Jessica A; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2011-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is a multifunctional protein and an essential element of innate immunity. Cancer is a major killer in today's world accounting for around 13% of all deaths according to the World Health Organisation (W.H.O.). The five most common forms of cancer include lung, colorectal, stomach, liver and breast cancer. Lactoferrin is a natural forming iron-binding glycoprotein with antibacterial, antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic effects. It is produced in exocrine glands and is secreted in many external fluids as a first line of defence. Lactoferrin also has the capacity to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation in cancer cells as well as restore white and red blood cell levels after chemotherapy. This review focuses on the therapeutic effect bovine sourced lactoferrin has on various forms of cancer in various models. It also focuses on the benefits of 3D in vitro cell culture. 3D cell culture has vast advantages over 2D models including demonstration of realistic therapeutic results and heightened resistance that 2D models fail to display. PMID:21622257

  8. Eye Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer of the eye is uncommon. It can affect the outer parts of the eye, such as the eyelid, which are made up ... adults are melanoma and lymphoma. The most common eye cancer in children is retinoblastoma, which starts in ...

  9. Occupational Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Carcinogen List Cancer Clusters Cancer Policy at NIOSH Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) Related Topics Asbestos ... Toxicology Program Report on Carcinogens NIOSH Pocket Guide Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) Recent NIOSH Research ...

  10. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  11. Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... use. Some oral cancers are linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) infections of the mouth and throat. ... The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to human papilloma virus (HPV) has risen dramatically over the past ...

  12. Thymus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell. These cells help protect you from infections. Cancer of the thymus is rare. You are more ... Sometimes there are no symptoms. Other times, thymus cancer can cause A cough that doesn't go ...

  13. Gallbladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... your gallbladder and liver to your small intestine. Cancer of the gallbladder is rare. It is more ... the abdomen It is hard to diagnose gallbladder cancer in its early stages. Sometimes doctors find it ...

  14. Cancer Disparities

    Cancer.gov

    Basic information about cancer disparities in the U.S., factors that contribute to the disproportionate burden of cancer in some groups, and examples of disparities in incidence and mortality among certain populations.

  15. Colorectal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  16. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  17. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  18. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  19. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  20. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... below 470 MHz, including those licensed pursuant to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band... Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 48533, August 15, 2014. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to the...

  1. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  2. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  3. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  4. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL JUSTICE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Federal Systems and Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record information maintained in the III System and the FIRS shall include serious and/or significant adult...

  5. 28 CFR 20.32 - Includable offenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Exchange of Criminal History Record Information § 20.32 Includable offenses. (a) Criminal history record... by a § 20.32(a) offense. These exclusions may not be applicable to criminal history records maintained in state criminal history record repositories, including those states participating in the NFF....

  6. Metastatic Male Ductal Breast Cancer Mimicking Obstructing Primary Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koleilat, Issam; Syal, Anil; Hena, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Male breast cancer comprises only about 1% of all breast cancers. Commonly, sites of metastases include the central nervous system, lungs, bones, and even liver. In females, extrahepatic gastrointestinal metastases are unusual but have been reported with various clinical presentations. We are reporting the first case of a male patient with a history of ductal breast carcinoma that developed colonic metastasis and presented with mechanical large bowel obstruction masquerading as primary colon cancer. PMID:23675178

  7. Effects of irradiation for cervical cancer on subsequent breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, L.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous research suggests that cervical cancer patients have a lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population. Possible explanations include opposing risk factors for cervical cancer and breast cancer, the effect of irradiation used to treat cervical cancer, or both. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between irradiation for cervical cancer and the subsequent development of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant relationship between radiation to the ovarian area and the risk of breast cancer in this study. However, the results were consistent with a 19% reduction in risk for women irradiated for cervical cancer when compared to nonirradiated women. In a dose-response analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend of decreased risk of breast cancer with increased radiation up to 1800 rad. There was no consistent pattern for higher doses. The trend, although nonsignificant, differed by age. Women <60 years of age at irradiation were generally at a lower risk of breast cancer than nonirradiated women. Women over 59 years were at an increased risk. There are some potentially important findings from this study which might influence medical care. These should be examined in the larger International Radiation Study.

  8. Comprehensive update on cancer scenario of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed Md Akram

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh, at 142 million people, is the ninth most populous country in the world. There are 13 to 15 lakh cancer patients in Bangladesh, with about two lakh patients newly diagnosed with cancer each year. As an overview, lung cancer and mouth-oropharynx cancer rank as the top two prevalent cancers in males. Other types of cancers are esophagus cancer and stomach cancer. In women, cancer cervix uteri and breast cancer are most prevalent. Other cancer types, which affect women, are mouth and oropharynx cancer, lung cancer, and esophagus cancer. There are around 150 qualified clinical oncologists and 16 pediatric oncologists working in the different parts of the country. Regular cancer treatment is available in 19 hospitals and 465 hospital beds are attached as indoor or day care facilities for chemotherapy in the oncology/radiotherapy departments. There are about 15 linear accelerators, 12 Co-60 teletherapy and 12 brachytherapy units currently available. Approximately, 56 cancer chemotherapeutic agents are obtainable in Bangladesh. Research facilities are available at tertiary care centers and a few multi country collaborative research activities are ongoing. Bangladesh has a unique National Cancer Control Strategy and Plan of Action 2009-2015 formulated with the assistance of WHO with an objective to develop and implement continuum of cancer care through a comprehensive cancer control programe. Preventive measures taken to reduce the incidence of cancer include reduced tobacco smoking, change of dietary habit and reduced food adulteration, ensuring reproductive hygiene, increased physical activity, and reduced occupational hazard. Awareness buildup and media campaign are going on by organizing the general people, opinion leaders of the society, and boy and girl scout. Training of general physicians on cancer warning signs and setup of early cancer detection centers at each medical college and district levels are ongoing. Beside these, some other major cancer

  9. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics for prostate cancer What is prostate cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  10. National Cancer Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  11. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  12. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  13. Secondhand Smoke and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  14. Psychological Stress and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  15. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  16. Snapshot of Stomach Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  17. Electromagnetic Fields and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  18. Antioxidants and Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  19. Biological Therapies for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  20. Snapshot of Pediatric Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  1. Head and Neck Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  2. Helicobacter pylori and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  3. Snapshot of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  4. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  5. Throat or larynx cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... use tobacco are at risk of developing throat cancer. Drinking too much alcohol over a long time ...

  6. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysplasia of the cervix, vagina, or vulva • A family history of cervical cancer •Smoking •Certain sexually transmitted infections , such as chlamydia • ... to treat your cancer, you still need cervical cancer screening. Cells are taken from the upper vagina ... smallest units of a structure in the body; the building blocks for all ...

  7. Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cancer. It forms in a woman's external genitals, called the vulva. The cancer usually grows slowly over several years. First, precancerous ... papillomavirus (HPV) infection or have a history of genital warts. Your health ... diagnoses vulvar cancer with a physical exam and a biopsy. Treatment ...

  8. Cancer Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cells , tiny units that make up all living things. Cancer (also known as malignancy , pronounced: muh-LIG- ... cancer and cancer treatments can disrupt a person's life for a while. People ... to take care of the things they have to get done. For example, teens ...

  9. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  10. Selenium for preventing cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vinceti, Marco; Dennert, Gabriele; Crespi, Catherine M; Zwahlen, Marcel; Brinkman, Maree; Zeegers, Maurice PA; Horneber, Markus; D'Amico, Roberto; Del Giovane, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Background This review is an update of the first Cochrane publication on selenium for preventing cancer (Dennert 2011). Selenium is a metalloid with both nutritional and toxicological properties. Higher selenium exposure and selenium supplements have been suggested to protect against several types of cancers. Objectives Two research questions were addressed in this review: What is the evidence for: an aetiological relation between selenium exposure and cancer risk in humans? andthe efficacy of selenium supplementation for cancer prevention in humans? Search methods We conducted electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2013, Issue 1), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1966 to February 2013 week 1), EMBASE (1980 to 2013 week 6), CancerLit (February 2004) and CCMed (February 2011). As MEDLINE now includes the journals indexed in CancerLit, no further searches were conducted in this database after 2004. Selection criteria We included prospective observational studies (cohort studies including sub-cohort controlled studies and nested case-control studies) and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with healthy adult participants (18 years of age and older). Data collection and analysis For observational studies, we conducted random effects meta-analyses when five or more studies were retrieved for a specific outcome. For RCTs, we performed random effects meta-analyses when two or more studies were available. The risk of bias in observational studies was assessed using forms adapted from the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for cohort and case-control studies; the criteria specified in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions were used to evaluate the risk of bias in RCTs. Main results We included 55 prospective observational studies (including more than 1,100,000 participants) and eight RCTs (with a total of 44,743 participants). For the observational studies, we found lower cancer incidence (summary odds ratio (OR) 0

  11. The tumor proteasome as a novel target for gold(III) complexes: implications for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Milacic, Vesna; Dou, Q. Ping

    2009-01-01

    Although cisplatin plays a vital role in the treatment of several types of human cancer, its wide use is limited by the development of drug resistance and associated toxic side effects. Gold and gold complexes have been used to treat a wide range of ailments for many centuries. In recent years, the use of gold(III) complexes as an alternative to cisplatin treatment was proposed due to the similarities of gold and platinum. Gold(III) is isoelectronic with platinum(II) and gold(III) complexes have the same square-planar geometries as platinum(II) complexes, such as cisplatin. Although it was originally thought that gold(III) complexes might have the same molecular target as cisplatin, several lines of data indicated that proteins, rather than DNA, are targeted by gold complexes. We have recently evaluated cytotoxic and anti-cancer effects of several gold(III) dithiocarbamates against human breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We have identified the tumor proteasome as an important target for gold(III) complexes and have shown that proteasome inhibition by gold(III) complexes is associated with apoptosis induction in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, treatment of human breast tumor-bearing nude mice with a gold(III) dithiocarbamate complex was associated with tumor growth inhibition, supporting the significance of its potential development for breast cancer treatment. PMID:20047011

  12. Ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Deevya L; Saladi, Rao N; Fox, Joshua L

    2010-09-01

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in fair-skinned populations in many parts of the world. The incidence, morbidity and mortality rates of skin cancers are increasing and, therefore, pose a significant public health concern. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the major etiologic agent in the development of skin cancers. UVR causes DNA damage and genetic mutations, which subsequently lead to skin cancer. A clearer understanding of UVR is crucial in the prevention of skin cancer. This article reviews UVR, its damaging effects on the skin and its relationship to UV immunosuppression and skin cancer. Several factors influence the amount of UVR reaching the earth's surface, including ozone depletion, UV light elevation, latitude, altitude, and weather conditions. The current treatment modalities utilizing UVR (i.e. phototherapy) can also predispose to skin cancers. Unnecessary exposure to the sun and artificial UVR (tanning lamps) are important personal attributable risks. This article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of skin cancer with an emphasis on carefully evaluated statistics, the epidemiology of UVR-induced skin cancers, incidence rates, risk factors, and preventative behaviors & strategies, including personal behavioral modifications and public educational initiatives.

  13. Underlying conditions in chronic pulmonary aspergillosis including simple aspergilloma.

    PubMed

    Smith, N L; Denning, D W

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) is a condition caused by the ubiquitous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus in non-immunocompromised individuals. Numerous underlying conditions have been associated with CPA. Details of the underlying conditions of 126 CPA patients attending our tertiary referral clinic from all over the UK were extracted from the clinical notes, and the distribution of these underlying conditions was analysed. For those with several underlying pulmonary conditions, one was nominated as the primary condition. Many patients presented with multiple underlying conditions, and a total of 232 underlying conditions were identified for the 126 patients. Previous classical tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection were the most common primary underlying conditions (15.3% and 14.9%, respectively). Others included allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), chronic obstructive pulmonary condition (COPD) and/or emphysema, pneumothorax and prior treated lung cancer. Some conditions were found more often as one of multiple underlying conditions, while others were found only as secondary underlying conditions. Tuberculosis, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection and ABPA remain the predominant risk factors for development of CPA, with COPD, prior pneumothorax or treated lung cancer also relatively common among our referrals. Many patients have multiple underlying pulmonary conditions. CPA should be considered when upper lobe cavitary or fibrotic disease and systemic symptoms are present in those with lung disease. PMID:20595150

  14. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Mukesh; Patel, Payal; Verma, Mudit

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person's genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed. PMID:24213111

  15. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

  16. Include Passive Solar in Your Renovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Gerald F.; Probasco, Jack F.

    1981-01-01

    A checklist covers potential energy saving modifications in a building scheduled for renovation, and includes suggestions for room utilization, landscaping, and building envelope, solar control, and active system modifications. (Author)

  17. Haemophilus influenzae Disease (Including Hib) Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... is considered invasive. Symptoms of pneumonia usually include: Fever and chills Cough Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing Sweating ... the blood. It can cause symptoms such as: Fever and chills Excessive tiredness Pain in the belly Nausea with ...

  18. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  19. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  20. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  1. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... create difficulties in communication. (e) Respiratory therapy services. (1) Respiratory therapy services... cardiopulmonary function. (2) Respiratory therapy services include the following: (i) Application of...

  2. Nanotechnology in cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironidou-Tzouveleki, Maria; Imprialos, Konstantinos; Kintsakis, Athanasios

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current evolutions on nanotechnology and its applications on cancer theragnostics.Rapid advances and emerging technologies in nanotechnology are having a profound impact on cancer treatment. Applications of nanotechnology, which include liposomes, nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, nanocantilever, carbon nanotubes and quantum dots have significantly revolutionized cancer theragnostics. From a pharmaceutical viewpoint, it is critical that the biodistribution of active agents has to be controlled as much as possible. This aspect is vital in order to assure the proper efficiency and safety of the anticancer agents. These biocompatible nanocomposites provide specific biochemical interactions with receptors expressed on the surface of cancer cells. With passive or active targeting strategies, an increased intracellular concentration of drugs can be achieved in cancer cells , while normal cells are being protected from the drug simultaneously. Thus, nanotechnology restricts the extent of the adverse effects of the anticancer therapy. Treatment for metastatic breast cancer, sarcoma in AIDS patients, ovarian and lung cancer is already on market or under final phases of many clinical trials, showing remarkable results. As nanotechnology is perfected, side effects due to normal cell damage will decrease, leading to better results and lengthening patient's survival.

  3. [Nutrition and cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Katsuramaki, T; Hirata, K; Isobe, M

    1998-03-01

    Nutritional therapy for cancer patients includes various objectives such as improvement of cachexia, elucidation of the mechanism of malnutrition, development of therapy for anorexia, nutrition support during chemotherapy or radiotherapy, and inhibition of tumor growth under controlled caloric intake. This review describes recent remarkable developments in nutritional therapy for cancer patients. Cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor which induce proteolysis and lipolysis are involved in the cause of malnutrition and cachexia in cancer patients. IL-1 also plays a significant role in the development of cancer anorexia via direct action in the brain. For anorexia therapy, progestogens have been shown to improve appetite and food intake in cancer patients. Moreover, glutamine supplementation improves the host protein metabolism without enhancement of tumor growth during chemotherapy. Among the effects of caloric intake on anticancer therapy, AO-90, a methionine-free intravenous amino acid solution, has been shown to increase the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil in clinical studies. From these observations, recent progress in nutritional therapy for cancer patients has been remarkable. Further study of nutritional therapy is required in order to maintain or improve the quality of life of cancer patients in the future.

  4. Management of Vulvar Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajaram, Shalini; Gupta, Bindiya

    2015-01-01

    Vulvar cancer is an uncommon malignancy and accounts for around 5% of all gynecologic cancers. Incidence rates have increased for young adults and may be linked to increasing HPV prevalence. Treatment of vulvar cancer has evolved from 'en-bloc' surgery with high morbidity to more conservative approaches without compromising oncological safety. In recent years sentinel node evaluation has been advocated in early stage cancers to reduce complications of inguino-femoral lymphadenectomy. Minimising extent of radical excision for the vulvar growth and separate incisions for groin dissection have reduced the number of wound breakdowns, infection, lymphocoele and chronic lymphedema but complication rate is still as high as 60%. Incorporating sentinel node evaluation into clinical practice has brought down complications to less than 10% for both lymphedema and wound infection. Role of imaging is increasing in vulvar cancer, especially for locally advanced disease as a result of transition from exenterative and extensive surgery to use of neoadjuvant chemoradiation and a less moribund approach to management. Locally advanced vulvar cancer includes large primary tumors or locally advanced disease i.e. FIGO stages III and IV. Treatment decision here is still a challenge as there is no standard recommended treatment strategy. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation is an effective modality for locally advanced vulvar cancer, as it reduces tumor size and renders the lesion operable. Primary chemoradiation without post treatment surgery has been used as an alternative treatment to avoid extensive radical surgery and complex reconstructive procedures. PMID:26411953

  5. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  6. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  7. Communications circuit including a linear quadratic estimator

    DOEpatents

    Ferguson, Dennis D.

    2015-07-07

    A circuit includes a linear quadratic estimator (LQE) configured to receive a plurality of measurements a signal. The LQE is configured to weight the measurements based on their respective uncertainties to produce weighted averages. The circuit further includes a controller coupled to the LQE and configured to selectively adjust at least one data link parameter associated with a communication channel in response to receiving the weighted averages.

  8. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15.2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US $6.2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery--e.g., pathology and imaging--are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning.

  9. Familial cancer among consecutive uterine cancer patients in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Uterine cancer (UC) represents 5.1% of all female malignancies in Sweden. Accumulation of UC in families occurs in around 5% of cases. We wanted to identify any familial association between UC and other selected cancers and to study the frequency of Lynch,Cowden and cancer syndromes among consecutive UC patients in Sweden. Methods 481 UC patients were included. Information on the cancer diagnoses of their relatives (first- (FDRs) and second-degree (SDRs) relatives and first cousins) was obtained. The relative frequencies of different cancers among relatives were compared to those in the Swedish general cancer population in 1970 and 2010. Families that fulfilled the criteria for hereditary cancer syndromes were tested for mutations in the causative genes. Families with at least one case of UC in addition to the index patient were compared to families with no additional cases to investigate possible characteristics of putative hereditary cancer syndromes. Results There was an increased prevalence of UC in our study population compared to the Swedish general cancer population in 1970 and 2010 (6% vs. 4% and 3%, respectively). Seven families had Lynch Syndrome according to the Amsterdam II criteria. No families fulfilled the criteria for Cowden syndrome. In total 13% of index patients had at least one relative with UC and these families tended to have more cases of early onset cancer among family members. In addition, 16% of index patients were diagnosed with at least one other cancer. No families fulfilled the criteria for Cowden syndrome. Conclusion We showed a familial clustering of UC among relatives of our index patients. Of the seven families with mutation-verified Lynch Syndrome, only one had been previously diagnosed, highlighting the need to increase gynecologists’ awareness of the importance of taking family history. Our data on multiple cancers and young age of onset in families with uterine cancer is compatible with the existence of additional

  10. Global cancer surgery: delivering safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Alatise, Olusegun Isaac; Anderson, Benjamin O; Audisio, Riccardo; Autier, Philippe; Aggarwal, Ajay; Balch, Charles; Brennan, Murray F; Dare, Anna; D'Cruz, Anil; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Fleming, Kenneth; Gueye, Serigne Magueye; Hagander, Lars; Herrera, Cristian A; Holmer, Hampus; Ilbawi, André M; Jarnheimer, Anton; Ji, Jia-Fu; Kingham, T Peter; Liberman, Jonathan; Leather, Andrew J M; Meara, John G; Mukhopadhyay, Swagoto; Murthy, Shilpa S; Omar, Sherif; Parham, Groesbeck P; Pramesh, C S; Riviello, Robert; Rodin, Danielle; Santini, Luiz; Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Shrime, Mark; Thomas, Robert; Tsunoda, Audrey T; van de Velde, Cornelis; Veronesi, Umberto; Vijaykumar, Dehannathparambil Kottarathil; Watters, David; Wang, Shan; Wu, Yi-Long; Zeiton, Moez; Purushotham, Arnie

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is essential for global cancer care in all resource settings. Of the 15.2 million new cases of cancer in 2015, over 80% of cases will need surgery, some several times. By 2030, we estimate that annually 45 million surgical procedures will be needed worldwide. Yet, less than 25% of patients with cancer worldwide actually get safe, affordable, or timely surgery. This Commission on global cancer surgery, building on Global Surgery 2030, has examined the state of global cancer surgery through an analysis of the burden of surgical disease and breadth of cancer surgery, economics and financing, factors for strengthening surgical systems for cancer with multiple-country studies, the research agenda, and the political factors that frame policy making in this area. We found wide equity and economic gaps in global cancer surgery. Many patients throughout the world do not have access to cancer surgery, and the failure to train more cancer surgeons and strengthen systems could result in as much as US $6.2 trillion in lost cumulative gross domestic product by 2030. Many of the key adjunct treatment modalities for cancer surgery--e.g., pathology and imaging--are also inadequate. Our analysis identified substantial issues, but also highlights solutions and innovations. Issues of access, a paucity of investment in public surgical systems, low investment in research, and training and education gaps are remarkably widespread. Solutions include better regulated public systems, international partnerships, super-centralisation of surgical services, novel surgical clinical trials, and new approaches to improve quality and scale up cancer surgical systems through education and training. Our key messages are directed at many global stakeholders, but the central message is that to deliver safe, affordable, and timely cancer surgery to all, surgery must be at the heart of global and national cancer control planning. PMID:26427363

  11. Cancer in children.

    PubMed

    Hsu, E Y

    1992-02-01

    Cancer is a relatively unusual disease entity in children. However, its diagnosis often proves devastating for the families of afflicted youngsters. The types of cancer seen in children are very different from those found in adults. Primarily, they include leukemias, lymphomas and brain tumors. In most cases, the cause(s) of these cancers is unknown. Standard treatment modalities include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Treatment is generally provided by a multidisciplinary team which deals with attempts to eradicate cancer and provides support when there are complications of disease and treatment. The team also pays attention to the psychosocial needs of the child and the entire family unit. With recent improvements in cancer therapy, many children are now considered to be "cures." Treatment is tailored to the different subgroups of each disease entity in order to improve response. Research on the etiology of cancer and the treatment of patients with resistant disease is continuously being carried out by cooperative groups. Attention is being directed at the long-term complications occurring in the increasing number of children who have been cured of this still devastating disease.

  12. Immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Homma, Sadamu; Namiki, Yoshihisa; Takakura, Kazuki; Saito, Keisuke; Ito, Zensho; Kobayashi, Hiroko; Kajihara, Mikio; Uchiyama, Kan; Arihiro, Seiji; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Masato; Gong, Jianlin; Tajiri, Hisao

    2013-12-14

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is on the rise, and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although chemotherapy and radiation therapy can improve survival rates, it is imperative to integrate alternative strategies such as immunotherapy to improve outcomes for patients with advanced CRC. In this review, we will discuss the effect of immunotherapy for inducing cytotoxic T lymphocytes and the major immunotherapeutic approaches for CRC that are currently in clinical trials, including peptide vaccines, dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines, whole tumor cell vaccines, viral vector-based cancer vaccines, adoptive cell transfer therapy, antibody-based cancer immunotherapy, and cytokine therapy. The possibility of combination therapies will also be discussed along with the challenges presented by tumor escape mechanisms. PMID:24379570

  13. Ramucirumab for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Kohei; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, various molecular target agents have been investigated for gastric cancer. VEGF is one of the most potent angiogenic factors and is a signaling molecule secreted by many solid tumors. High VEGF expression is one of the characteristic features of gastric carcinomas, thus targeting VEGF is considered a promising strategy for gastric cancer. Ramucirumab, an anti-VEGF receptor antibody, has proven to be effective for previously treated advanced gastric cancer. Details of ramucirumab, including two pivotal Phase III studies, will be discussed in this review. Ramucirumab, with or without chemotherapy, improved survival in gastric cancer after previous systemic chemotherapy, thus becoming the standard of care for this patient population. Optimal timing of ramucirumab use and adequate biomarkers for patient selection as well as mechanism of resistance should be explored in future research.

  14. Imaging of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, R; DuBrow, R

    2004-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a relatively uncommon gastrointestinal malignancy but carries a poor prognosis unless it is of early stage and can be surgically resected for cure. Resectability is determined by the stage of disease at diagnosis and therefore accurate staging is of importance in patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer. Imaging studies that play a role in the evaluation of esophageal cancer include barium studies, computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound and positron emission tomography. Imaging provides important information regarding the local extent and any distant spread of disease, which in turn helps in determining optimal management for these patients. This review discusses the imaging findings that may be encountered with various imaging modalities in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of esophageal cancer. PMID:18250021

  15. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, W E; Bissada, N K

    2003-01-01

    Choice of management for patients with prostate cancer is influenced by patient and disease characteristics and life expectancy. Management options include expectance (watchful waiting), radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CSAP). The role of cryotherapy in the management of prostate cancer is still evolving. Continued research has allowed the introduction of efficient and safe cryosurgical equipment exemplified by the current third-generation cryosurgical machines. CSAP can be performed in an ambulatory surgery setting or as inpatient surgery with overnight stay. The procedure is performed under continuous ultrasonic monitoring. Mature data from the use of second-generation cryosurgical equipment indicate that CSAP is an effective therapeutic modality for managing patients with prostate cancer. Current data with the third-generation cryosurgical equipment are not mature. However, the favorable side effect profile and the good early responses seem to indicate that this modality will have a prominent role in the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  16. Rectal cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Mohammad Sadegh; Keramati, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Rectal cancer is the second most common cancer in large intestine. The prevalence and the number of young patients diagnosed with rectal cancer have made it as one of the major health problems in the world. With regard to the improved access to and use of modern screening tools, a number of new cases are diagnosed each year. Considering the location of the rectum and its adjacent organs, management and treatment of rectal tumor is different from tumors located in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract or even the colon. In this article, we will review the current updates on rectal cancer including epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentations, screening, and staging. Diagnostic methods and latest treatment modalities and approaches will also be discussed in detail. PMID:26034724

  17. Pubertal induction in hypogonadism: Current approaches including use of gonadotrophins.

    PubMed

    Zacharin, Margaret

    2015-06-01

    Primary disorders of the gonad or those secondary to abnormalities of the hypothalamic pituitary axis result in hypogonadism. The range of health problems of childhood and adolescence that affect this axis has increased, as most children now survive chronic illness, but many have persisting deficits in gonadal function as a result of their underlying condition or its treatment. An integrated approach to hormone replacement is needed to optimize adult hormonal and bone health, and to offer opportunities for fertility induction and preservation that were not considered possible in the past. Timing of presentation ranges from birth, with disorders of sexual development, through adolescent pubertal failure, to adult fertility problems. This review addresses diagnosis and management of hypogonadism and focuses on new management strategies to address current concerns with fertility preservation. These include Turner syndrome, and fertility presevation prior to childhood cancer treatment. New strategies for male hormone replacement therapy that may impinge upon future fertility are emphasized.

  18. Pubertal induction in hypogonadism: Current approaches including use of gonadotrophins.

    PubMed

    Zacharin, Margaret

    2015-06-01

    Primary disorders of the gonad or those secondary to abnormalities of the hypothalamic pituitary axis result in hypogonadism. The range of health problems of childhood and adolescence that affect this axis has increased, as most children now survive chronic illness, but many have persisting deficits in gonadal function as a result of their underlying condition or its treatment. An integrated approach to hormone replacement is needed to optimize adult hormonal and bone health, and to offer opportunities for fertility induction and preservation that were not considered possible in the past. Timing of presentation ranges from birth, with disorders of sexual development, through adolescent pubertal failure, to adult fertility problems. This review addresses diagnosis and management of hypogonadism and focuses on new management strategies to address current concerns with fertility preservation. These include Turner syndrome, and fertility presevation prior to childhood cancer treatment. New strategies for male hormone replacement therapy that may impinge upon future fertility are emphasized. PMID:26051297

  19. Haemochromatosis and gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lagergren, Katarina; Wahlin, Karl; Mattsson, Fredrik; Alderson, Derek; Lagergren, Jesper

    2016-10-15

    Iron overload in patients with haemochromatosis is a strong risk factor for liver cancer, but its influence on other gastrointestinal cancer risk is unclear. The aim was to assess the relative risk of luminal gastrointestinal cancer among patients diagnosed with haemochromatosis. This population-based, nationwide Swedish cohort study included patients with haemochromatosis in Sweden in 1965-2013. The incidence of gastrointestinal cancers was assessed through the Swedish Cancer Registry. The measure of relative risk was the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) with 95% confidence interval (CI), that is, the ratio of the observed number of gastrointestinal cancers in the haemochromatosis cohort divided by the expected number of such cancers, calculated from the entire corresponding background population of Sweden. Among 6,849 patients in the haemochromatosis cohort with up to 48 years of follow-up, the SIRs were 3-fold increased for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SIR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-6.6; n = 7) and 40% increased for colon adenocarcinoma (SIR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.9; n = 54). No associations were found between haemochromatosis and the risk of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus (SIR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.0-2.5; n = 1), stomach (SIR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.3-1.4; n = 8), small bowel (SIR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.0-6.7; n = 1) or rectum (SIR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.6-1.6; n = 21). These findings indicate that haemochromatosis increases the risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma, but might not influence the risk of other types of luminal gastrointestinal cancer. These findings should encourage further research examining the role of iron overload in cancer aetiology.

  20. Weather information network including graphical display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Daniel R. (Inventor); Burdon, David (Inventor); Son, Robert S. (Inventor); Martin, Kevin D. (Inventor); Harrison, John (Inventor); Hughes, Keith R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus for providing weather information onboard an aircraft includes a processor unit and a graphical user interface. The processor unit processes weather information after it is received onboard the aircraft from a ground-based source, and the graphical user interface provides a graphical presentation of the weather information to a user onboard the aircraft. Preferably, the graphical user interface includes one or more user-selectable options for graphically displaying at least one of convection information, turbulence information, icing information, weather satellite information, SIGMET information, significant weather prognosis information, and winds aloft information.

  1. Transmission line including support means with barriers

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1982-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

  2. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  3. Translational potential of cancer stem cells: A review of the detection of cancer stem cells and their roles in cancer recurrence and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2015-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of cancer cells with many clinical implications in most cancer types. One important clinical implication of CSCs is their role in cancer metastases, as reflected by their ability to initiate and drive micro and macro-metastases. The other important contributing factor for CSCs in cancer management is their function in causing treatment resistance and recurrence in cancer via their activation of different signalling pathways such as Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, Hedgehog, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and JAK/STAT pathways. Thus, many different therapeutic approaches are being tested for prevention and treatment of cancer recurrence. These may include treatment strategies targeting altered genetic signalling pathways by blocking specific cell surface molecules, altering the cancer microenvironments that nurture cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation of CSCs, immunotherapy based on CSCs associated antigens, exploiting metabolites to kill CSCs, and designing small interfering RNA/DNA molecules that especially target CSCs. Because of the huge potential of these approaches to improve cancer management, it is important to identify and isolate cancer stem cells for precise study and application of prior the research on their role in cancer. Commonly used methodologies for detection and isolation of CSCs include functional, image-based, molecular, cytological sorting and filtration approaches, the use of different surface markers and xenotransplantation. Overall, given their significance in cancer biology, refining the isolation and targeting of CSCs will play an important role in future management of cancer.

  4. 34 CFR 300.20 - Include.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Include. 300.20 Section 300.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH...

  5. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band (part 95 of this chapter); (aa) The Local... Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of... (part 27 of this chapter); (j) The Wireless Communications Service in the 698-746 MHz band (part 27...

  6. 47 CFR 1.9005 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to 47 CFR 90.187(b)(2)(v)); (z) The 218-219 MHz band (part 95 of this chapter); (aa) The Local... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Spectrum Leasing Scope and Authority § 1.9005 Included services. The spectrum leasing policies and rules of this subpart apply to...

  7. Nuclear Chemistry: Include It in Your Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Charles H.; Sheline, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the topics that might be included in a nuclear chemistry section are explored. Offers radioactivity, closed shells in nuclei, energy of nuclear processes, nuclear reactions, and fission and fusion as topics of interest. Provided are ideas and examples for each. (MVL)

  8. 46 CFR 289.2 - Vessels included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Merchant Marine Act, 1936, as amended; (c) All vessels which have previously been constructed with... Merchant Marine Act of 1936, as amended, and later adjusted in price pursuant to section 9 of the Merchant... ADJUSTED UNDER THE MERCHANT SHIP SALES ACT 1946 § 289.2 Vessels included. Vessels subject to the...

  9. Multicultural Resources: Including Technology and the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Bryan

    2004-01-01

    In the fourteen years since the 1990 MENC pre-conference symposium on Multicultural Approaches to Music Education in Washington, D.C., music educators have come to recognize the need to include a variety of world musics in all music curricula, from elementary classrooms to advanced performing ensembles. Accordingly, a significant increase in the…

  10. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  11. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  12. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  13. 13 CFR 125.1 - Programs included.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 125.1 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING PROGRAMS § 125.1 Programs included. The regulations in this part relate to the Government contracting assistance... businesses in obtaining a fair share of Federal Government contracts, subcontracts, and property sales....

  14. Including Children Dependent on Ventilators in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jack M.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for including ventilator-dependent children in school are offered, based on experience with six such students at a New York State school. Guidelines stress adherence to the medical management plan, the school-family partnership, roles of the social worker and psychologist, orientation, transportation, classroom issues, and steps toward…

  15. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... function or dysfunction of the neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems; and... body organ or external body member (including contiguous tissue) or replace all or part of the...

  16. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  17. Hair Dyes and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... including aromatic amines that were found to cause cancer in animals. In the mid- to late 1970s, however, manufacturers changed the components in dye products to eliminate some of these chemicals ... in hair dyes can cause cancer. Given the widespread use of hair dye products, ...

  18. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Genitourinary Tract Cancer, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1987-01-01

    An update of the state of the art of cancer chemotherapeutic treatment of genitourinary tract cancer is described in this multi-part series. Included in the review are cancers of the kidney, bladder, prostate, testicle, ovary, uterus, vulva, and gestational trophoblastic neoplasms. Part 1 focuses on the kidney. In this heterogeneous group of tumors, the major triumphs of cancer chemotherapy are in the control of the less common of these tumors, namely, gestational trophoblastic neoplasms in women, in combination with surgery in the control of the embryonal cell cancer of the testis in men, and in combination with surgery and radiation therapy in the control of the Wilms' tumor in children. Important progress is being made in the control of the other tumors of the genitourinary tract with the use of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:3323538

  19. Cancer procoagulant (CP) in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rucińska, M; Skrzydlewski, Z; Zaremba, E; Furman, M; Kasacka, I

    1997-01-01

    Lung cancers (squamous cell carcinoma, microcellular carcinoma, macrocellular carcinoma and adenocarcinoma) show procoagulant activity. It mainly depends on the presence of cancer procoagulant (CP) in lung cancer cells.

  20. Etiology, biology, and epidemiology of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, T R; Piver, M S

    1994-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer kills more women per year than all other gynecologic cancers combined. Pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, and tubal ligation decrease the risk of the disease, whereas risk is increased for women whose family history is consistent with one of the familial ovarian cancer syndromes. Several theories have been postulated concerning the etiology of ovarian cancer, including the incessant ovulation theory and that based on the model of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Chromosomal abnormalities and allele losses have been described in ovarian cancers. Involvement of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes has been investigated as well. Genetic linkage studies are ongoing in families whose history is consistent with one of the familial ovarian cancer syndromes.

  1. Breast Cancer, Version 3.2013

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Richard L.; Carlson, Robert W.; Allred, Craig; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Burstein, Harold J.; Edge, Stephen B.; Farrar, William B.; Forero, Andres; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Goldstein, Lori J.; Gradishar, William J.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Isakoff, Steven J.; Ljung, Britt-Marie E.; Mankoff, David A.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Mayer, Ingrid A.; McCormick, Beryl; Pierce, Lori J.; Reed, Elizabeth C.; Schwartzberg, Lee S.; Smith, Mary Lou; Soliman, Hatem; Somlo, George; Ward, John H.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Zellars, Richard; Shead, Dorothy A.; Kumar, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates specific to the management of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer in the 2013 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Breast Cancer. These include new first-line and subsequent therapy options for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23847214

  2. The Cancer Moonshot Summit: Reaching New Heights

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog from acting NCI Director Dr. Doug Lowy on the Cancer Moonshot national summit hosted by Vice President Joe Biden in Washington, D.C., including a summary of the NCI-related activities stimulated by the Cancer Moonshot.

  3. Driving Discovery | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Progress against cancer depends on many types of research—including basic, translational, and clinical—across different research areas, from the biology of cancer cells to studies of large populations. Regardless of the research type or area, supporting the best science and the best scientists is of paramount importance to NCI. Learn more about driving progress against cancer. |

  4. The cancer secretome: a reservoir of biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hua; Lu, Bingjian; Lai, Maode

    2008-01-01

    Biomarkers are pivotal for cancer detection, diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring. However, currently available cancer biomarkers have the disadvantage of lacking specificity and/or sensitivity. Developing effective cancer biomarkers becomes a pressing and permanent need. The cancer secretome, the totality of proteins released by cancer cells or tissues, provides useful tools for the discovery of novel biomarkers. The focus of this article is to review the recent advances in cancer secretome analysis. We aim to elaborate the approaches currently employed for cancer secretome studies, as well as its applications in the identification of biomarkers and the clarification of carcinogenesis mechanisms. Challenges encountered in this newly emerging field, including sample preparation, in vivo secretome analysis and biomarker validation, are also discussed. Further improvements on strategies and technologies will continue to drive forward cancer secretome research and enable development of a wealth of clinically valuable cancer biomarkers. PMID:18796163

  5. Prostate Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Suzanne; Garrett, Bernie; Bottorff, Joan L.; McKenzie, Michael; Han, Christina S.; Ogrodniczuk, John S.

    2015-01-01

    To understand prostate cancer (PCa) specialists’ views about prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs), a volunteer sample of Canada-based PCa specialists (n = 150), including urologists (n = 100), radiation oncologists (n = 40), and medical oncologists (n = 10) were surveyed. The 56-item questionnaire used in this study included six sets of attitudinal items to measure prostate cancer specialists’ beliefs about positive and negative influences of PCSGs, reasons for attending PCSGs, the attributes of effective PCSGs, and the value of face-to-face and web-based PCSGs. In addition, an open-ended question was included to invite additional input from participants. Results showed that PCSGs were positively valued, particularly for information sharing, education and psychosocial support. Inclusivity, privacy, and accessibility were identified as potential barriers, and recommendations were made for better marketing PCSGs to increase engagement. Findings suggest prostate cancer specialists highly valued the role and potential benefits of face-to-face PCSGs. Information provision and an educational role were perceived as key benefits. Some concerns were expressed about the ability of web-based PCSGs to effectively engage and educate men who experience prostate cancer. PMID:25061087

  6. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  7. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOEpatents

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  8. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  9. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOEpatents

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  10. New STD recommendations include HIV management.

    PubMed

    1998-03-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated its 1993 guidelines for STDs, adding new recommendations for treating primary and recurrent genital warts and for managing patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. The guidelines grew out of research into microbiologic cures, alleviating signs and symptoms, preventing sequelae, and preventing transmission. The guidelines recommend that people seeking treatment for STDs should be offered HIV testing and counseling. Results of a recent Alan Guttmacher Institute study of STD public health programs are included.

  11. Temporary agency contracts: what should they include?

    PubMed

    Sferrella, Sheila M

    2002-01-01

    The AHRA Board committed to provide some tools to help our members with agency contracts. This article provides the sections for a contract and what they should include. Of course, the language will have to comply with your organization's requirements. To comply with HIPAA regulations for contracts, I've also included language for business associates. JCAHO requires that the following documentation be on file for all contracted personnel: 1. Hospital job description or formal contract outlining the job responsibilities. 2. All licenses, certifications and registrations are reviewed and a process is developed to ensure that they remain current. 3. Competency is evaluated and maintained. 4. Evidence that personnel received a general orientation. 5. Evidence that personnel received a departmental orientation. 6. Safety and infection control standards must be met. In order to aid with compliance when utilizing contracted personnel, my organization developed a Contractor Personnel Administrative Compliance Checklist, which identifies requirements for compliance, a reference for assistance, and places to record that the requirement has been met for each of the areas listed in the previous item. Our standard contract includes sections on general definition of engagement, credentials and work experience; health, including immunization and drug testing; corporation; JCAHO; terms of the contract; and, non-disclosure of information. A business associate agreement may be necessary to comply with HIPAA regulations. Using the template has made my job much easier than trying to read each contract that crosses my desk. If an agency refuses to sign our contract, then we do not conduct business with that company. If an agency requests changes to the contract, depending on the language, we may or may not agree to it. This information is not intended to be legal advice, but rather an educational overview. As with any contract, the reader should consult with legal counsel at his or her

  12. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  13. Temporary agency contracts: what should they include?

    PubMed

    Sferrella, Sheila M

    2002-01-01

    The AHRA Board committed to provide some tools to help our members with agency contracts. This article provides the sections for a contract and what they should include. Of course, the language will have to comply with your organization's requirements. To comply with HIPAA regulations for contracts, I've also included language for business associates. JCAHO requires that the following documentation be on file for all contracted personnel: 1. Hospital job description or formal contract outlining the job responsibilities. 2. All licenses, certifications and registrations are reviewed and a process is developed to ensure that they remain current. 3. Competency is evaluated and maintained. 4. Evidence that personnel received a general orientation. 5. Evidence that personnel received a departmental orientation. 6. Safety and infection control standards must be met. In order to aid with compliance when utilizing contracted personnel, my organization developed a Contractor Personnel Administrative Compliance Checklist, which identifies requirements for compliance, a reference for assistance, and places to record that the requirement has been met for each of the areas listed in the previous item. Our standard contract includes sections on general definition of engagement, credentials and work experience; health, including immunization and drug testing; corporation; JCAHO; terms of the contract; and, non-disclosure of information. A business associate agreement may be necessary to comply with HIPAA regulations. Using the template has made my job much easier than trying to read each contract that crosses my desk. If an agency refuses to sign our contract, then we do not conduct business with that company. If an agency requests changes to the contract, depending on the language, we may or may not agree to it. This information is not intended to be legal advice, but rather an educational overview. As with any contract, the reader should consult with legal counsel at his or her

  14. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Rouse, Carl A.; Simnad, Massoud T.

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  15. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Snitchler, Gregory L.; Gamble, Bruce B.; Voccio, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  16. Americans' view of cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J; Blanchard, J; Harvey, C

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of the town hall meeting and discusses how it can be used as a forum for those who have been touched by cancer. It can be a platform for people to express their views about cancer, not only in the community but also nationally. Empowerment is the hallmark of a town hall meeting. Those who are in leadership positions in health care and elected officials and community leaders are given the opportunity to hear the opinions of people who represent a broad-based constituency of individuals affected by cancer. The idea of holding a town hall meeting was first introduced in the cancer community by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship NCCS) as a means of identifying issues, exchanging information and considering creative solutions to problems. The first town hall meeting was held in 1994 in conjunction with the NCCS annual assembly. Since then, utilizing the guidelines set forth by the NCCS, 30 or more town hall meetings have been held across the United States. Cancer survivors have, by and large, been responsible for garnering the necessary support for conducting a town hall in their local area. Organizations such as the American Cancer Society, the Leukemia Society of America, hospitals, clinics, pharmaceutical and healthcare companies and also noncancer groups, such as the YMCA, churches, and radio/T.V. stations, join with the cancer survivors in organizing the meeting, planning related displays, and advertising the event. In 1998, seven town hall meetings were sponsored jointly by OnCare and NCCS in advance and support of the upcoming THE MARCH- Coming Together To Conquer Cancer, a national rally held in Washington, D.C. in September 1998. Attendees at the meetings included not only cancer survivors and their families, but also healthcare professionals, local and state legislators, community leaders and the media. Results of the 1998 town hall meetings are discussed and compared with the topics identified during the meetings

  17. Americans' view of cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J; Blanchard, J; Harvey, C

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of the town hall meeting and discusses how it can be used as a forum for those who have been touched by cancer. It can be a platform for people to express their views about cancer, not only in the community but also nationally. Empowerment is the hallmark of a town hall meeting. Those who are in leadership positions in health care and elected officials and community leaders are given the opportunity to hear the opinions of people who represent a broad-based constituency of individuals affected by cancer. The idea of holding a town hall meeting was first introduced in the cancer community by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship NCCS) as a means of identifying issues, exchanging information and considering creative solutions to problems. The first town hall meeting was held in 1994 in conjunction with the NCCS annual assembly. Since then, utilizing the guidelines set forth by the NCCS, 30 or more town hall meetings have been held across the United States. Cancer survivors have, by and large, been responsible for garnering the necessary support for conducting a town hall in their local area. Organizations such as the American Cancer Society, the Leukemia Society of America, hospitals, clinics, pharmaceutical and healthcare companies and also noncancer groups, such as the YMCA, churches, and radio/T.V. stations, join with the cancer survivors in organizing the meeting, planning related displays, and advertising the event. In 1998, seven town hall meetings were sponsored jointly by OnCare and NCCS in advance and support of the upcoming THE MARCH- Coming Together To Conquer Cancer, a national rally held in Washington, D.C. in September 1998. Attendees at the meetings included not only cancer survivors and their families, but also healthcare professionals, local and state legislators, community leaders and the media. Results of the 1998 town hall meetings are discussed and compared with the topics identified during the meetings

  18. Amino acid management in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsun, Zhi-Yang; Possemato, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids have a dual role in cellular metabolism, as they are both the building blocks for protein synthesis and intermediate metabolites which fuel other biosynthetic reactions. Recent work has demonstrated that deregulation of both arms of amino acid management are common alterations seen in cancer. Among the most highly consumed nutrients by cancer cells are the amino acids glutamine and serine, and the biosynthetic pathways that metabolize them are required in various cancer subtypes and the object of current efforts to target cancer metabolism. Also altered in cancer are components of the machinery which sense amino acid sufficiency, nucleated by the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a key regulator of cell growth via modulation of key processes including protein synthesis and autophagy. The precise ways in which altered amino acid management supports cellular transformation remain mostly elusive, and a fuller mechanistic understanding of these processes will be important for efforts to exploit such alterations for cancer therapy. PMID:26277542

  19. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Desmedt, Christine; Yates, Lucy; Kulka, Janina

    2016-03-01

    With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing, deeper insights are being gained into the molecular evolution that underlies the development and clinical progression of breast cancer. It is apparent that during evolution, breast cancers acquire thousands of mutations including single base pair substitutions, insertions, deletions, copy number aberrations, and structural rearrangements. As a consequence, at the whole genome level, no two cancers are identical and few cancers even share the same complement of "driver" mutations. Indeed, two samples from the same cancer may also exhibit extensive differences due to constant remodeling of the genome over time. In this review, we summarize recent studies that extend our understanding of the genomic basis of cancer progression. Key biological insights include the following: subclonal diversification begins early in cancer evolution, being detectable even in in situ lesions; geographical stratification of subclonal structure is frequent in primary tumors and can include therapeutically targetable alterations; multiple distant metastases typically arise from a common metastatic ancestor following a "metastatic cascade" model; systemic therapy can unmask preexisting resistant subclones or influence further treatment sensitivity and disease progression. We conclude the review by describing novel approaches such as the analysis of circulating DNA and patient-derived xenografts that promise to further our understanding of the genomic changes occurring during cancer evolution and guide treatment decision making.

  20. Curcumin Induces Apoptosis of Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer Cells by Targeting Multiple Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Amin, A. R. M. Ruhul; Haque, Abedul; Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Khuri, Fadlo Raja; Shin, Dong Moon

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural compound isolated from the Indian spice "Haldi" or "curry powder", has been used for centuries as a traditional remedy for many ailments. Recently, the potential use of curcumin in cancer prevention and therapy urges studies to uncover the molecular mechanisms associated with its anti-tumor effects. In the current manuscript, we investigated the mechanism of curcumin-induced apoptosis in upper aerodigestive tract cancer cell lines and showed that curcumin-induced apoptosis is mediated by the modulation of multiple pathways such as induction of p73, and inhibition of p-AKT and Bcl-2. Treatment of cells with curcumin induced both p53 and the related protein p73 in head and neck and lung cancer cell lines. Inactivation of p73 by dominant negative p73 significantly protected cells from curcumin-induced apoptosis, whereas ablation of p53 by shRNA had no effect. Curcumin treatment also strongly inhibited p-AKT and Bcl-2 and overexpression of constitutively active AKT or Bcl-2 significantly inhibited curcumin-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings suggest that curcumin-induced apoptosis is mediated via activating tumor suppressor p73 and inhibiting p-AKT and Bcl-2. PMID:25910231

  1. Thymoquinone induces apoptosis and increase ROS in ovarian cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Taha, M M E; Sheikh, B Y; Salim, L Z A; Mohan, S; Khan, A; Kamalidehghan, B; Ahmadipour, F; Abdelwahab, S I

    2016-01-01

    Nigella sativa is also known for its properties as a traditional herbal healing for many ailments. In this study, the anticancer properties of thyomquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of N. sativa, were studied using ovarian cancer cell line (Caov-3 cells). The anti-proliferative activity of TQ was determined using MTT and the apoptosis was investigated using Flowcytometry and Annexin-V Assays. Multiparameteric cytotoxicity bioassays were used to quantify the changes in cell permeability and mitochondrial membrane potential. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis-involved cell markers were examined to verify cell death mechanism. The MTT-assay showed that TQ induces anti-proliferative activity on Caov-3 with an IC50 of 6.0±0.03 μg/mL, without any cytotoxic activity towards WRL-68 normal hepatocytes. A significant induction of early phase of apoptosis was shown by annexin-V analysis. Treatment of Caov-3 cells with TQ induces decreases in plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial membrane potential. Visible decrease in the nuclear area was also observed. A significant decrease is observed in Bcl-2 while Bax is down-regulated. TQ-triggered ROS-mediated has found to be associated with Hsp70 dysregulation, an indicator of oxidative injury. We found that TQ induced anti-cancer effect involves intrinsic pathway of apoptosis and cellular oxidative stress. Our results considered collectively indicated that thyomquinone may be a potential agent for ovarian cancer drug development. PMID:27262811

  2. Holistic cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Magarey, C

    1983-01-01

    Medical technology has not reduced the death rate from cancer for 50 yrs, in spite of its physical and psychological morbidity. A broader approach is required and investigation of certain apparently successful unorthodox holistic cancer therapies suggests that the personality of the therapist is crucial. The spiritually convinced, charismatic healer has all the qualities of a meditator, and physiological measurement demonstrates that such a healer induces the state of meditation in his patients. Meditation is associated not only with physiological rest and stability, but also with the reduction of psychological stress and the development of a more positive attitude to life with an inner sense of calmness, strength and fulfilment. Holistic cancer therapy should include meditation, especially by the therapist; and psychosomatic research, like physics, should include the study of consciousness.

  3. [Two cases of anaerobic empyema including Actinomyces].

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Satoru; Takiguchi, Yasuo

    2009-03-01

    We report 2 cases of empyema including Actinomyces spp. Case 1 was a 66-year-old man with fever and left pleural effusion, Actinomyces israelii and 2 other microbes were isolated. Case 2 was a 52-year-old male inpatient who developed empyema during treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Actinomyces odontolyticus and 3 other microbes were cultured in pleural effusion. Empyema caused by Actinomyces spp. is rare, in particular Actinomyces odontolyticus is rarely isolated and only 4 cases have been reported in Japan.

  4. Inverse transonic airfoil design including viscous interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical technique was developed for the analysis of specified transonic airfoils or for the design of airfoils having a prescribed pressure distribution, including the effect of weak viscous interaction. The method uses the full potential equation, a stretched Cartesian coordinate system, and the Nash-MacDonald turbulent boundary layer method. Comparisons with experimental data for typical transonic airfoils show excellent agreement. An example shows the application of the method to design a thick aft-cambered airfoil, and the effects of viscous interaction on its performance are discussed.

  5. View of northeastern Italy including Venice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A near vertical view of northeastern Italy including the Venice (Venezia) area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) infrared photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The mountainous area is the Dolomite Alps. The most conspicuous stream northeast of Venice is the Piave River. The city near the center of the picture on the Brenta River is Bassano del Grappa. The large city of Padua (Padova) is on the western bank of the Grenta near the clock.

  6. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Michael P.

    2013-03-01

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  7. Ocean management plan includes array of recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    When U.S. President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore appeared in Monterey, California in June 1998 for a National Oceans Conference, some of the salt water spray from the Pacific Ocean must have clung to them.As a follow-up to the conference, the Clinton Administration on September 2 issued an interagency report to help guide federal efforts in establishing a comprehensive ocean policy.The report, which touches upon a number of global issues including the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, contains nearly 150 recommendations.

  8. Fuel delivery system including heat exchanger means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel delivery system is presented wherein first and second heat exchanger means are each adapted to provide the transfer of heat between the fuel and a second fluid such as lubricating oil associated with the gas turbine engine. Valve means are included which are operative in a first mode to provide for flow of the second fluid through both first and second heat exchange means and further operative in a second mode for bypassing the second fluid around the second heat exchanger means.

  9. Cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the role of family physicians in screening for cancer of the cervix, to review the evidence for screening, in particular, frequency and technique for screening, and to review the reasons cervical cancer has not been prevented and the role of family physicians in addressing these failures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The value of screening has been established with level II evidence. Many of the unresolved issues are not supported either way by good evidence; level II and III evidence predominates. MAIN FINDINGS: In Canada, 1350 women were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer of the cervix in 1996. Most of these women had not been screened. Minority, rural, low-income, and older women face important barriers to screening. Family physicians have a role in reaching out to these women to provide effective health care, including cancer screening. When cancer screening is performed, it should conform to recommended techniques with appropriate follow up of abnormal test results. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians have an important role in preventing cancer of the cervix. Efforts should be concentrated on encouraging a greater proportion of eligible women to be screened. Criteria are suggested for effective screening. PMID:9721422

  10. Immunity, ageing and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Derhovanessian, Evelyna; Solana, Rafael; Larbi, Anis; Pawelec, Graham

    2008-01-01

    Compromised immunity contributes to the decreased ability of the elderly to control infectious disease and to their generally poor response to vaccination. It is controversial as to how far this phenomenon contributes to the well-known age-associated increase in the occurrence of many cancers in the elderly. However, should the immune system be important in controlling cancer, for which there is a great deal of evidence, it is logical to propose that dysfunctional immunity in the elderly would contribute to compromised immunosurveillance and increased cancer occurrence. The chronological age at which immunosenescence becomes clinically important is known to be influenced by many factors, including the pathogen load to which individuals are exposed throughout life. It is proposed here that the cancer antigen load may have a similar effect on "immune exhaustion" and that pathogen load and tumor load may act additively to accelerate immunosenescence. Understanding how and why immune responsiveness changes in humans as they age is essential for developing strategies to prevent or restore dysregulated immunity and assure healthy longevity, clearly possible only if cancer is avoided. Here, we provide an overview of the impact of age on human immune competence, emphasizing T-cell-dependent adaptive immunity, which is the most sensitive to ageing. This knowledge will pave the way for rational interventions to maintain or restore appropriate immune function not only in the elderly but also in the cancer patient. PMID:18816370

  11. Criticality and Cancer Dormancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Kirlin, Vladimir; Tamita, Corina; Levin, Simon; Sturm, James; Austin, Robert

    The presence of driver mutations and subsequent clonal expansion by Darwinian evolution does not explain dormancy and re-emergence of cancer from a community of cancer and stromal cells. Dormancy appears to be a collective property of multiple cell communities including non-cancerous cells. At the simplest level, we view cancer cells interacting with stromal cells via complex, non-linear population dynamics, dynamics which can lead to very non-intuitive but perhaps deterministic and understandable progression dynamics of cancer. We explore here the dynamics of stromal-cancer cell populations in the presence of a chemotherapy drug gradient to determine to what extent the time-dependence of the populations can be quantitively understood in spite of the underlying complexity of the individual agents. The surprising result is that a basic understanding, in a quantitive and predictive manner, can be achieved. It will be intriguing to move to predictive drug dosages, the population dynamics presented here provide a model system for the clinic.

  12. Active Immunotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Clinical progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy has been slow for many years but within the last 5 years, breakthrough successes have brought immunotherapy to the forefront in cancer therapy. Promising results have been observed in a variety of cancers including solid tumors and hematological malignancies with adoptive cell therapy using natural host tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, host cells that have been genetically engineered with antitumor T-cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors, immune checkpoint inhibitors like anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1 or PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies and oncolytic virus-based immunotherapy. However, most treatment modalities have shown limited efficacy with single therapy. The complex nature of cancer with intra- and inter-tumor antigen and genomic heterogeneity coupled with the immune suppressive microenvironment emphasizes the prospect of personalized targeted immunotherapy to manipulate the patient's own immune system against cancer. For successful, robust and long-lasting cure of cancer, a multi-modal approach is essential, combining anti-tumor cell therapy with manipulation of multiple pathways in the tumor microenvironment to ameliorate tumor-induced immunosuppression. PMID:26575466

  13. Diet and cancer.

    PubMed

    Divisi, Duilio; Di Tommaso, Sergio; Salvemini, Salvatore; Garramone, Margherita; Crisci, Roberto

    2006-08-01

    The aim of our study is to evaluate the relationship between diet and cancer development. It has been estimated that 30-40% of all kinds of cancer can be prevented with a healthy lifestyle and dietary measures. A low use of fibres, the intake of red meat and an imbalance of Omega-3 and Omega-6 fats may contribute to increase the risk of cancer. On the other hand, the assumption of lots of fruit and vegetables may lower the risk of cancer. Protective elements in a cancer-preventive diet include selenium, folic acid, vitamin B12, vitamin D, chlorophyll and antioxidants such as carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, cryptoxanthin). Ascorbic acid has limited benefits if taken orally, but it effective through intravenous injection. A supplementary use of oral digestive enzymes and probiotics is also an anticancer dietary measure. A diet drawn up according to the proposed guidelines could decrease the incidence of breast, colon-rectal, prostate and bronchogenic cancer.

  14. New advances in genitourinary cancer: evidence gathered in 2014.

    PubMed

    Suárez, C; Puente, J; Gallardo, E; Méndez-Vidal, M J; Climent, M A; León, L; Olmos, D; García del Muro, X; González-Billalabeitia, E; Grande, E; Bellmunt, J; Mellado, B; Maroto, P; González del Alba, A

    2015-09-01

    This review provides updated information published in 2014 regarding advances and major achievements in genitourinary cancer. Sections include the best in prostate cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, and germ cell tumors. In the field of prostate cancer, data related to treatment approach of hormone-sensitive disease, castrate-resistant prostate cancer, mechanisms of resistance, new drugs, and molecular research are presented. In relation to renal cancer, relevant aspects in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma, immunotherapy, and molecular research, including angiogenesis and von Hippel-Lindau gene, molecular biology of non-clear cell histologies, and epigenetics of clear renal cell cancer are described. New strategies in the management of muscle-invasive localized bladder cancer and metastatic disease are reported as well as salient findings of biomolecular research in urothelial cancer. Some approaches intended to improve outcomes in poor prognosis patients with metastatic germ cell cancer are also reported. Results of clinical trials in these areas are discussed. PMID:26227584

  15. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  16. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Genitourinary Tract Cancer, Part 2: Wilms' Tumor and Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1988-01-01

    An update of the state of the art of cancer chemotherapeutic treatment of genitourinary tract cancer is described in this multi-part series. Included in the review are cancers of the kidney, bladder, prostate, testicle, ovary, uterus, vulva, and gestational trophoblastic neoplasms. Part 2 focuses on Wilms' tumor and bladder cancer. Major advances have been made in the control of Wilms' tumor in children. The combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy have significantly improved survival rates. Likewise, the early diagnosis and control of bladder cancer has also improved survival. Surgery predominates among the treatment modalities for carcinoma of the bladder. Important progress is being made in the control of these conditions, as well as with other tumors of the genitourinary tract, with the use of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:2853770

  17. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Genitourinary Tract Cancer, Part 4: Testicular Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1988-01-01

    An update of the state of the art of cancer chemotherapeutic treatment of genitourinary tract cancer is described in this multi-part series: included are cancers of the kidney, bladder, prostate, testicle, ovary, uterus, vulva, and gestational trophoblastic neoplasms. Part 4 is a review of treatments for cancer of the testicles. Testicular cancer is highly curable and responds well to both surgery and chemotherapy. Patients with stage I and stage II nonseminomatous germ-cell tumors may be cured by surgery alone or in combination with chemotherapy. In patients with pathologic stage II disease, the use of adjuvant chemotherapy with two courses of platinum-based combination drugs has been successful in preventing relapse. Further refinements in management and research could banish the problem of testicular cancer. PMID:3290501

  18. Cost trajectories for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wodchis, W.P.; Arthurs, E.; Khan, A.I.; Gandhi, S.; MacKinnon, M.; Sussman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care spending is known to be highly skewed, with a small subset of the population consuming a disproportionate amount of health care resources. Patients with cancer are high-cost users because of high incremental health care costs for treatment and the growing prevalence of cancer. The objectives of the present study included characterizing cancer-patient trajectories by cost, and identifying the patient and health system characteristics associated with high health system costs after cancer treatment. Methods This retrospective cohort study identified Ontario adults newly diagnosed with cancer between 1 April 2009 and 30 September 2010. Costs of health care use before, during, and after cancer episodes were used to develop trajectories of care. Descriptive analyses examined differences between the trajectories in terms of clinical and health system characteristics, and a logistic regression approach identified predictors of being a high-cost user after a cancer episode. Results Ten trajectories were developed based on whether patients were high- or low-cost users before and after their cancer episode. The most common trajectory represented patients who were low-cost in the year before cancer, survived treatment, and continued to be low-cost in the year after cancer (31.4%); stage ii cancer of the male genital system was the most common diagnosis within that trajectory. Regression analyses identified increases in age and in multimorbidity and low continuity of care as the strongest predictors of high-cost status after cancer. Conclusions Findings highlight an opportunity to proactively identify patients who might transition to high-cost status after cancer treatment and to remediate that transition. PMID:26985150

  19. Lactate Dehydrogenase B Controls Lysosome Activity and Autophagy in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Lucie; Bański, Piotr; Sboarina, Martina; Dethier, Coralie; Danhier, Pierre; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Van Hée, Vincent F; Vazeille, Thibaut; Tardy, Morgane; Falces, Jorge; Bouzin, Caroline; Porporato, Paolo E; Frédérick, Raphaël; Michiels, Carine; Copetti, Tamara; Sonveaux, Pierre

    2016-09-12

    Metabolic adaptability is essential for tumor progression and includes cooperation between cancer cells with different metabolic phenotypes. Optimal glucose supply to glycolytic cancer cells occurs when oxidative cancer cells use lactate preferentially to glucose. However, using lactate instead of glucose mimics glucose deprivation, and glucose starvation induces autophagy. We report that lactate sustains autophagy in cancer. In cancer cells preferentially to normal cells, lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), catalyzing the conversion of lactate and NAD(+) to pyruvate, NADH and H(+), controls lysosomal acidification, vesicle maturation, and intracellular proteolysis. LDHB activity is necessary for basal autophagy and cancer cell proliferation not only in oxidative cancer cells but also in glycolytic cancer cells. PMID:27622334

  20. Fertility Preservation Options for Men and Women With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skaznik-Wikiel, Malgorzata E; Gilbert, Sara Babcock; Meacham, Randall B; Kondapalli, Laxmi A

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 0.2% of Americans aged 20 to 39 years are childhood cancer survivors. Advances in cancer detection and therapy have greatly improved survival rates for young cancer patients; however, treatment of childhood cancers can adversely impact reproductive function. Many cancer patients report a strong desire to be informed of existing options for fertility preservation and future reproduction prior to initiation of gonadotoxic cancer therapies, including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. This article discusses, in detail, the effects of cancer treatment on fertility in men and women, and outlines both current and experimental methods of fertility preservation among cancer patients. PMID:26839518