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Sample records for ailments including diabetes

  1. Treating one's own ailments.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M I

    1996-01-01

    A small survey in Peninsular Malaysia indicates a marked tendency among the general population to treat minor ailments by self-medication with over-the-counter drugs and/or traditional medicines. The use of over-the-counter drugs appears to be favoured for skin conditions, general health care, aches and pains, and problems affecting the eyes, ears, mouth, gastrointestinal tract and respiratory tract. A doctor is usually consulted if self-medication fails.

  2. Shoes and Orthotics for Diabetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot Treatments Injections and other Procedures Treatments of the ... the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot Currently selected Ailments and Conditions: A Complete List ...

  3. The Geriatric Headache: A Unique Clinical Ailment

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Donald F.; Purdy, R. Allan

    1986-01-01

    The “geriatric headache” may be a unique clinical ailment. A change in a chronic headache pattern or a new onset headache should raise suspicion immediately in an elderly patient. Temporal arteritis occurs almost exclusively in the elderly population. Because of its grave prognosis and ease of treatment, this condition should always be considered a possibility in the elderly patient with headache. A throbbing non-migranous headache may indicate an impending cerebrovascular event. Other causes of headache, such as mass lesions (tumours, subdural hematomas), drugs (nitrates, estrogens) and depression, take on greater significance in the elderly. While migraine and cluster headaches are more common in young adults, they may begin in older persons; indeed, transient migraine accompaniments are “TIA mimics”. The authors hope that this overview of the “geriatric headache” will facilitate early recognition of this ailment which often leads to diagnostic confusion. PMID:20469461

  4. Student Actor Ailments: Ten Ills and How To Cure Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Barbara Long

    2000-01-01

    Lists the top ten acting ailments often encountered in student actors, and offers advice to cure these ailments: the split personality, the beauty queen and the leading man, the comedian, the director in training, the moody one, the character-clueless, the loner, the mimic, the stage-frightened, and the opening night artist. (SR)

  5. Pharmacist-led minor ailment programs: a Canadian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jeff Gordon; Joubert, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacists have a long history of helping Canadians with minor ailments. This often has involved management with over-the-counter medications. If pharmacists felt that the best care required something more robust, they would refer the patient to a physician. In hopes of improving the care of such ailments, Canadian provinces have granted pharmacists the option of selecting medications traditionally under physician control. This review examines the Canadian perspective on pharmacists prescribing for minor ailments and the evidence of value for these programs. It might provide guidance for other jurisdictions contemplating such a move. PMID:27570460

  6. Travelling diabetics.

    PubMed

    Chełmińska, Katarzyna; Jaremin, Bogdan

    2002-01-01

    During the past several decades, the number of both business and tourist travels has greatly increased. Among them are persons suffering from chronic diseases, including diabetics for whom travels pose the additional health-hazard. Irrespective of better education, self-control and constantly improving quality of specialistic equipment available, diabetics still are the group of patients requiring particular attention. In the case of travelling diabetics, problems may occur concerning the transport and storage of insulin, as well as control of glycaemia, all caused by irregularity of meals, variable diet, physical activity, stress, kinetosis (sea voyages), and the change of time zones. The travel may as well evoke ailments caused by the change of climate and concomitant diseases such as traveller's diarrhoea, malaria, etc. Apart from avoiding glycaemia fluctuations, important for retaining health of diabetics is the prevention of other diseases and carrying the necessary drugs.

  7. Raising positive expectations helps patients with minor ailments: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Fassaert, Thijs; van Dulmen, Sandra; Schellevis, François; van der Jagt, Liesbeth; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-01-01

    Background Consultations for minor ailments constitute a large part of the workload of general practitioners (GPs). As medical interventions are not always available, specific communication strategies, such as active listening and positive communication, might help GPs to handle these problems adequately. This study examines to what extent GPs display both strategies during consultations for minor ailments and investigates how each of these relate to the patients' perceived health, consultation frequency and medication adherence. Methods 524 videotaped consultations between Dutch GPs and patients aged 18 years or older were selected. All patients presented a minor ailment, and none of them suffered from a diagnosed chronic illness. The observation protocol included the validated Active Listening Observation Scale (ALOS-global), as well as three domains of positive communication, i.e. providing reassurance, a clear explanation, and a favourable prognosis. Patients completed several questionnaires before, immediately after, and two weeks after the consultation. These included measures for state anxiety (STAI), functional health status (COOP/WONCA charts) and medication adherence (MAQ). Consultation frequency was available from an ongoing patient registration. Data were analysed using multivariate regression analyses. Results Reassurance was related to patients' better overall health. Providing a favourable prognosis was linked to patients feeling better, but only when accompanied by a clear explanation of the complaints. A clear explanation was also related to patients feeling better and less anxious, except when patients reported a low mood pre-visit. Active listening alone was positively associated with patients feeling worse. Among patients in a good mood state, active listening was associated with less adherence. Conclusion To some extent, it seems helpful when GPs are at the same time clear and optimistic about the nature and course of minor ailments. Yet, it

  8. [The treatment of respiratory ailments with essential oils of some aromatic medicinal plants].

    PubMed

    Rakover, Yoseph; Ben-Arye, Eran; Goldstein, Lee H

    2008-10-01

    In-vitro and clinical studies suggest the therapeutic potential of aromatic herbs in the treatment of respiratory ailments. The pharmacological and clinical activity of Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus globulus, Mentha piperita, Origanum syriacum, Salvia fruticosa and Rosmarinus officinalis, include anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-viral activities. Some of these herbs have direct activity on the respiratory tract, the coughing reflex and the airflow in the nasal tract. This article reviews the evidence on the efficacy and safety of aromatic trees and herbs which grow in Israel, in the scope of the field of otorhinolaryngology.

  9. Analysis: including visually impaired participants in validation design studies of diabetes technology.

    PubMed

    Uslan, Mark; Blubaugh, Morgan

    2010-09-01

    In an article in this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Sherwyn Schwartz, M.D., presents a study to validate the design of the ClikSTAR® insulin pen from sanofi-aventis and demonstrates that the device can be used correctly by participants with diabetes. Concern with this article lies with the selection of participants, which was meant to reflect the intended audience for the insulin pen device but does not address the inclusion of visually impaired individuals, who comprise over 20% of the adult diabetes population. Visually impaired individuals need to be included as part of the intended audience for insulin administration technology, and manufacturers of these devices need to design their products for safe use by all people, including those who are visually impaired. The study demonstrated successful use of the ClikSTAR insulin pen in a population that did not include subjects with severe visual impairment. We believe that future validation studies for insulin administration technology should also include samples of visually impaired users and that visually impaired patients will embrace the use of insulin pens designed with their needs in mind.

  10. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection). At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:26817004

  11. [The OPTIMISE study (Optimal Type 2 Diabetes Management Including Benchmarking and Standard Treatment]. Results for Luxembourg].

    PubMed

    Michel, G

    2012-01-01

    The OPTIMISE study (NCT00681850) has been run in six European countries, including Luxembourg, to prospectively assess the effect of benchmarking on the quality of primary care in patients with type 2 diabetes, using major modifiable vascular risk factors as critical quality indicators. Primary care centers treating type 2 diabetic patients were randomized to give standard care (control group) or standard care with feedback benchmarked against other centers in each country (benchmarking group). Primary endpoint was percentage of patients in the benchmarking group achieving pre-set targets of the critical quality indicators: glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol after 12 months follow-up. In Luxembourg, in the benchmarking group, more patients achieved target for SBP (40.2% vs. 20%) and for LDL-cholesterol (50.4% vs. 44.2%). 12.9% of patients in the benchmarking group met all three targets compared with patients in the control group (8.3%). In this randomized, controlled study, benchmarking was shown to be an effective tool for improving critical quality indicator targets, which are the principal modifiable vascular risk factors in diabetes type 2.

  12. Scientific reasons for including persons with disabilities in clinical and translational diabetes research.

    PubMed

    Moore, Shirley M

    2012-03-01

    Despite disparities in health problems and outcomes, people with disabilities are underrepresented in diabetes research. This results in a lack of evidence-based knowledge regarding best approaches in caring for this population. This article addresses the need for research that includes people with disabilities and describes the common reasons persons with disabilities are not included in research, including scientists' concerns regarding threats to a study's internal validity and cost. Arguments are provided as to how involving people with disabilities in research will improve our science and reduce disparities in this population. In addition to the ethical reasons for including persons with disabilities in research, the ability to generalize study findings to this population and thus speed our development and translation of this knowledge for use by clinicians is discussed. The bias in study conclusions that arise from study samples that do not include persons with disabilities and its possible effect on care delivery are presented. Two strategies that researchers can use to increase the inclusion of persons with disabilities in research are described: (1) Universal Design of Research and (2) intervention optimization study designs. Universal Design of Research includes research design processes such as the use of multisensory formats for recruiting participants, approaches to designing and presenting research instruments and interventions, and methods of data collection to promote the inclusion of participants with a wide range of abilities in research studies. Intervention optimization study designs offer an efficient way for scientists to rapidly build the most potent interventions for a wide range of people, including those with disabilities participating in mainstream research.

  13. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-09-23

    Essential facts Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect 3.2 million people in the UK. Diabetes is associated with serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, which can lead to disability and premature death. It is the leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age in the UK. A quarter of people with diabetes will have kidney disease at some point in their lives, and the condition increases the risk of amputation. Good diabetes management has been shown to reduce the incidence of these serious complications.

  14. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  15. Benefits of caloric restriction for cardiometabolic health, including type 2 diabetes mellitus risk.

    PubMed

    Soare, Andreea; Weiss, Edward P; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    In the United States, life expectancy has markedly increased during the past century, and population ageing is expected to double within the next 25 years. The process of ageing in a population is associated with the development of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, that can be prevented, and even reversed, with the implementation of healthy lifestyle interventions. The evidence to date, consolidated by the numerous epidemiological studies and clinical trials conducted, suggests that caloric restriction is an effective nutritional intervention for preventing most of these age-related conditions. At a metabolic level, caloric restriction with adequate nutrition has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity, reduce fasting glucose and insulin concentration and prevent obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and chronic inflammation. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge of the metabolic and clinical implications of caloric restriction with adequate nutrition for the prevention of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  16. Disruption of aromatase homeostasis as the cause of a multiplicity of ailments: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema

    2017-04-01

    Human health is beset with a legion of ailments, which is exacerbated by lifestyle errors. Out of the numerous enzymes in human body, aromatase, a cytochrome P450 enzyme is particularly very critical. Occurring at the crossroads of multiple signalling pathways, its homeostasis is vital for optimal health. Unfortunately, medications, hormone therapy, chemical additives in food, and endocrine-disrupting personal care products are oscillating the aromatase concentration beyond the permissible level. As this enzyme converts androgens (C19) into estrogens (C18), its agitation has different outcomes in different genders and age groups. Some common pathologies associated with aromatase disruption include breast cancer, prostate cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, osteoporosis, ovarian cancer, gastric cancer, pituitary cancer, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, male hypogonadism, and transgender issues. Several drugs, cosmetics and pesticides act as the activators and suppressors of this enzyme. This carefully-compiled critical review is expected to increase public awareness regarding the threats resultant of the perturbations of this enzyme and to motivate researchers for further investigation of this field.

  17. Ethnomedicinal plants used to treat human ailments in the prehistoric place of Harla and Dengego valleys, eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional medicines remained as the most affordable and easily accessible source of treatment in the primary health care system among diverse communities in Ethiopia. The Oromo community living in the prehistoric Harla and Dengego valleys has long history of ethnomedicinal know-how and practice against human and livestock ailments. However, this rich ethnomedicinal knowledge had been remained unexplored hitherto. This study focus on the comprehensive ethnomedicinal investigation in an attempt to safeguard the deteriorating ethnomedicinal knowledge that can be used as a steppingstone for phytochemical and pharmacological analysis. Methods Fifty five (44 male and 11 female) systematically selected informants including ten traditional herbalists (key informants) were participated in the study. Semi-structured interviews, discussions and guided field walk constituted the data collection methods. Factor of informant consensus (Fic), frequency of citation (F%), and binomial test were employed in data analysis. Medicinal plant specimens were collected, identified and kept at Herbarium of Haramaya University (HHU). Results A total of 83 traditional medicinal plant species against human ailments in 70 genera and 40 Families were recorded. Twelve medicinal plants were marketable in open market places of the nearby towns. Formulations recorded added to 140 remedies for 81 human ailments. Concoction accounts 50.7% of the total preparations followed by fluids extraction (10.7%) and infusion (6.4%). Fifteen different plant parts were used for remedies preparation wherein leaves accounted 46.4%, stem 9.2%, fruits and roots each 7.8%. Most of the remedies (90.7%) were prepared from single plant species like, aphrodisiac fresh rhizome of Kleinia abyssinica (A. Rich.) A. Berger chewed and swallowed few hours before sexual performance for a man having problem of erectile dysfunction. The Fic value ranges between 1.0 (gastritis and heartburn/pyrosis) and 0.77 (swollen

  18. Parent’s knowledge and management of their children’s ailments in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Omar T.; Ibrahim, Mohamed I. M.; Palaian, Subish

    2009-01-01

    Minor ailments like sore throat, fever, cough and diarrhea can be relieved with over-the-counter (OTC) medications such as paracetamol or other traditional remedies, without seeking for consultation from general practitioners. Parents usually take the responsibility to come up with some kind of treatment for their children. Objective (1) to evaluate the parents’ medical knowledge about OTC medicines which are usually used by the parents to treat their children and (2) to evaluate the parents’ management in dealing with their children’s ailments, and (3) to evaluate the association between medical knowledge and the management of children’s ailments related to medicine use among the parents. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted to measure the parents’ knowledge about their children’s ailments. Subjects were selected and information was obtained in September 2008. Non-probability convenient sampling method was used. Parents were recruited from the general public to answer the questionnaires. Results 197 parents filled in the questionnaires. From the total respondents, 48.2% of them were male. This study showed that most respondents have medium knowledge (6.11 SD=3.6) and a moderate management (4.39 SD=2.7). The results showed that there is a significant difference between the knowledge and the management level of ailments (P=0.033). Regarding the education level of the parents and the socioeconomic status, the p-value showed there was a significant difference between parents’ knowledge and their education level (P=0.012). Conclusion This study showed that parents have inadequate knowledge and some misconception about how to go about treating their children when they are unwell. It is hoped that by identifying weak areas in parents’ management to their children’s ailments, better planned educational and behavioral modification efforts can be made to elevate the knowledge level among the parents when they medically treat their children. PMID

  19. Prenyltransferase Inhibitors: Treating Human Ailments from Cancer to Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ochocki, Joshua D.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of protein prenylation is a covalent lipid modification on the C-terminus of substrate proteins that serves to enhance membrane affinity. Oncogenic proteins such as Ras have this modification and significant effort has been placed into developing inhibitors of the prenyltransferase enzymes for clinical therapy. In addition to cancer therapy, prenyltransferase inhibitors have begun to find important therapeutic uses in other diseases, including progeria, hepatitis C and D, parasitic infections, and other maladies. This review will trace the evolution of prenyltransferase inhibitors from their initial use as cancer therapeutics to their expanded applications for other diseases. PMID:25530833

  20. Prenyltransferase Inhibitors: Treating Human Ailments from Cancer to Parasitic Infections.

    PubMed

    Ochocki, Joshua D; Distefano, Mark D

    2013-03-01

    The posttranslational modification of protein prenylation is a covalent lipid modification on the C-terminus of substrate proteins that serves to enhance membrane affinity. Oncogenic proteins such as Ras have this modification and significant effort has been placed into developing inhibitors of the prenyltransferase enzymes for clinical therapy. In addition to cancer therapy, prenyltransferase inhibitors have begun to find important therapeutic uses in other diseases, including progeria, hepatitis C and D, parasitic infections, and other maladies. This review will trace the evolution of prenyltransferase inhibitors from their initial use as cancer therapeutics to their expanded applications for other diseases.

  1. Proteasome inhibitors, including curcumin, improve pancreatic β-cell function and insulin sensitivity in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Weisberg, S; Leibel, R; Tortoriello, D V

    2016-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes stems from obesity-associated insulin resistance, and in the genetically susceptible, concomitant pancreatic β-cell failure can occur, which further exacerbates hyperglycemia. Recent work by our group and others has shown that the natural polyphenol curcumin attenuates the development of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia in mouse models of hyperinsulinemic or compensated type 2 diabetes. Although several potential downstream molecular targets of curcumin exist, it is now recognized to be a direct inhibitor of proteasome activity. We now show that curcumin also prevents β-cell failure in a mouse model of uncompensated obesity-related insulin resistance (Leprdb/db on the Kaliss background). Results: In this instance, dietary supplementation with curcumin prevented hyperglycemia, increased insulin production and lean body mass, and prolonged lifespan. In addition, we show that short-term in vivo treatment with low dosages of two molecularly distinct proteasome inhibitors celastrol and epoxomicin reverse hyperglycemia in mice with β-cell failure by increasing insulin production and insulin sensitivity. Conclusions: These studies suggest that proteasome inhibitors may prove useful for patients with diabetes by improving both β-cell function and relieving insulin resistance. PMID:27110686

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy ameliorates diabetic nephropathy via the paracrine effect of renal trophic factors including exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Nagaishi, Kanna; Mizue, Yuka; Chikenji, Takako; Otani, Miho; Nakano, Masako; Konari, Naoto; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have contributed to the improvement of diabetic nephropathy (DN); however, the actual mediator of this effect and its role has not been characterized thoroughly. We investigated the effects of MSC therapy on DN, focusing on the paracrine effect of renal trophic factors, including exosomes secreted by MSCs. MSCs and MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) as renal trophic factors were administered in parallel to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetic mice and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced insulin-deficient diabetic mice. Both therapies showed approximately equivalent curative effects, as each inhibited the exacerbation of albuminuria. They also suppressed the excessive infiltration of BMDCs into the kidney by regulating the expression of the adhesion molecule ICAM-1. Proinflammatory cytokine expression (e.g., TNF-α) and fibrosis in tubular interstitium were inhibited. TGF-β1 expression was down-regulated and tight junction protein expression (e.g., ZO-1) was maintained, which sequentially suppressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tubular epithelial cells (TECs). Exosomes purified from MSC-CM exerted an anti-apoptotic effect and protected tight junction structure in TECs. The increase of glomerular mesangium substrate was inhibited in HFD-diabetic mice. MSC therapy is a promising tool to prevent DN via the paracrine effect of renal trophic factors including exosomes due to its multifactorial action. PMID:27721418

  3. Mercurial, metallic and mineral prparations for the ailments of alimentary canal through the perspective of "basavarajiyam".

    PubMed

    Murthy, P H

    1984-07-01

    Basavarajiyam is one of the authoritative works on Ayurvedic treatment widely used in telugu region of India. The work describes the mercurial preparations and its efficacy vividly. The author scans here the work and highlights various mercurial preparations administered for the ailments of alimentary canal.

  4. Fine-mapping diabetes-related traits, including insulin resistance, in heterogeneous stock rats.

    PubMed

    Solberg Woods, Leah C; Holl, Katie L; Oreper, Daniel; Xie, Yuying; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Valdar, William

    2012-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of relative insulin deficiency resulting from both insulin resistance and beta cell failure. We have previously used heterogeneous stock (HS) rats to fine-map a locus for glucose tolerance. We show here that glucose intolerance in the founder strains of the HS colony is mediated by different mechanisms: insulin resistance in WKY and an insulin secretion defect in ACI, and we demonstrate a high degree of variability for measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in HS rats. As such, our goal was to use HS rats to fine-map several diabetes-related traits within a region on rat chromosome 1. We measured blood glucose and plasma insulin levels after a glucose tolerance test in 782 male HS rats. Using 97 SSLP markers, we genotyped a 68 Mb region on rat chromosome 1 previously implicated in glucose and insulin regulation. We used linkage disequilibrium mapping by mixed model regression with inferred descent to identify a region from 198.85 to 205.9 that contains one or more quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fasting insulin and a measure of insulin resistance, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. This region also encompasses loci identified for fasting glucose and Insulin_AUC (area under the curve). A separate <3 Mb QTL was identified for body weight. Using a novel penalized regression method we then estimated effects of alternative haplotype pairings under each locus. These studies highlight the utility of HS rats for fine-mapping genetic loci involved in the underlying causes of T2D.

  5. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidneys & How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Diabetes Insipidus What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that ... produce more urine. What are the types of diabetes insipidus? The types of diabetes insipidus include central ...

  6. An Aboriginal-driven program to prevent, control and manage nutrition-related "lifestyle" diseases including diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gracey, Michael; Bridge, Ernie; Martin, David; Jones, Timothy; Spargo, Randolph M; Shephard, Mark; Davis, Elizabeth A

    2006-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes and other nutrition-related so-called "lifestyle" diseases, including obesity, and cardiovascular and chronic renal disease, are very prevalent in Australian Aboriginal people and contribute to their high rates of chronic illness and premature mortality. An Aboriginal-driven, community-based health protection, health promotion and improved disease detection, management and care program was introduced in four remote, discrete communities in the far north of Western Australia (WA) in order to attempt to prevent these disorders through community-based lifestyle modification. More energetic screening for early risk factors is involved as well as early dietary and exercise interventions and medical treatment, when indicated. Distinctive features of this program include its Aboriginal initiatives and perspectives, committed partnerships between the communities, the Unity of First People of Australia of Australia (UFPA) and its carers, the communities' health care providers, external clinical specialists, other external agencies and a locally-operated point-of-care (POC) pathology testing capability that is conducted by local and UFPA personnel. The POC component is quality managed by Flinders University. These features have ensured the viability of the program in three of the communities; the other one decided not to continue with the program despite risks of serious long-term health consequences. The pre-program prevalence of diabetes in screened adults was almost 40% and in adults aged (35 years was almost 60%. After several months of the program's operation, there have been positive changes in knowledge about food, nutrition, exercise and disease and altered attitudes and behaviours related to dietary and exercise patterns. There have also been improvements in weight control and in pathology test results relevant to the risk of subsequent development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  7. [Effective communication with the mentally challenged person during treatment of minor ailments].

    PubMed

    Scrooby, B; Roos, S D; Gmeiner, A C

    2000-09-01

    The research objectives were to explore and describe the nature of communication with the mentally retarded adult during treatment of minor ailments; and to describe guidelines for the community nurse in order to facilitate more effective communication during the treatment of minor ailments in the mentally retarded adult for the promotion, maintenance and restoration of the mentally retarded individual's health. The community nurse pays attention to the protection of the mentally retarded individual's health, and identifies and treats minor ailments encountered by the mentally retarded individual. Because of the disability of the adults, lacking communication and obstacles in the exchange and interpretation of communication, could take place between the community nurse and the mentally retarded adult. The responsibility lies with the community nurse to facilitate effective communication, since the mentally retarded individual is not always capable of speaking on his/her own behalf. Guidelines are needed for the facilitation of effective communication between the community nurse and the mentally retarded adult during the treatment of minor ailments. In this research, use were made of a qulitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design. The research method consisted of participative observation during which video recording and the taking of field notes were applied. Two themes were identified during data analysis, namely: Verbal communication is aimed at the treatment of wounds. The more functional and task-orientated the community nurse's interaction with the mentally retarded individual, the more the mentally retarded individual would generate symptoms to establish emotional contact and interaction; The non-verbal behaviour of the community nurse focuses on the treatment of wounds and organisation of the environment. The more structure is created, the more play-out-behaviour is shown by the mentally retarded individual in need of contact. The researcher

  8. Ethnobotany of medicinal plants used by Assamese people for various skin ailments and cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Abinash Pratim; Ryakala, Venkat Kishore; Sharma, Pragya; Goswami, Pranab; Bora, Utpal

    2006-06-30

    The present paper deals with the medicinal plants used by the people of Assam for curing different skin ailments and for cosmetics. A total of 85 plants belonging to 49 families have been documented for their therapeutic use against skin diseases and as herbal care. The herbal medicines were prepared from various plant parts of single plant, or multiple plants. The majority of the preparation was made using water as the medium. The mode of application was topical, but in many cases it was also administered orally. In several cases the pure herbal preparations was administered along with milk, ghee, honey, coconut oil, curd, etc. Remedies for 18 skin ailments were documented through this study. About 14 plants are known for their use to cure multiple skin diseases. Among these Curcuma longa and Melia azaderach constitute the major plants. The herbal cosmetic products used by the people of Assam ranges from the enhancement of skin colour, hair care, removal of ugly spots, colouring of nails, palms, and teeth. However, many of the plant preparations used for enhancing beauty were also applied for therapeutic use. Herbal remedies were also available for skin burns, prickly heat and pimples. Information on nine plants used for managing dry skin also emerged from this study.

  9. [Bladder stones and lithotomy: a vanished ailment as the basis of urology].

    PubMed

    Keeman, J N

    2006-12-23

    Urinary bladder stones have played a role in medicine for ages. Many examples of this disease can be found in Dutch history. The need to cure this ailment led to the development of extremely painful interventions, for which self-appointed specialists very soon came forward and were then employed in this capacity in the cities. The various interventions were: perineal lithotomy using either the 'apparatus minor' or the 'apparatus major', lateral lithotomy, cutting for stone 'in two trips', suprapubic cystotomy, and ultimately lithotripsy. Bladder stones have largely disappeared from contemporary medicine and now represent only 5% of all urinary-tract stones, the main groups at risk being men with prostate hypertrophy, whether or not surgically treated, and women previously operated on for incontinence. Bladder stones are now seen mainly in developing countries. The dangerous operations via an extravesicular route have now been replaced by transurethral procedures in which the stone is disintegrated with the aid of an electric charge, shock waves or ultrasound. In an early stage, this ailment was the incentive for the development of a separate medical specialty: urology.

  10. Recent technological developments in proteomics shed new light on translational research on diabetic microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhang; Yang, Cheng; Tao, Yimin; Zhou, Hu; Wang, Yufan

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic microangiopathy has become a heavy social burden worldwide, but at present it is still difficult to predict and diagnose this ailment at an early stage. Various proteomics approaches have been applied to the pathophysiological study of diabetic microangiopathy. Conventional proteomics methods, including gel-based methods, exhibit limited sensitivity and robustness and have typically been used in high- or middle-abundance biomarker discovery. Clinical samples from patients with diabetic microangiopathy, such as biopsy samples, are minute in size. Therefore sample preparation, quantitative labelling and mass spectrometry technologies need to be optimized for low-abundance protein detection, multiple-sample processing and precision quantitation. In this review, we briefly introduce the recent technological developments in proteomics methods and summarize current proteomics-based, translational research on diabetic microangiopathy. Recent technological developments in proteomics tools may shed new light on the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy and biomarkers and therapeutic targets related to this condition.

  11. Growing up Kennedy: the role of medical ailments in the life of JFK, 1920-1957.

    PubMed

    Giglio, James N

    2006-10-01

    As a result of the opening of new materials at the John F Kennedy Library relating to John F Kennedy's medical problems, we have a better understanding of the specific nature of those ailments, how they were treated, and how he responded to them. Most important, this study focuses on how his medical problems affected his relationship with his parents, especially his father, in the context of an older sibling who personified what a Kennedy should be: bright, athletic, and healthy. John Kennedy's response to family expectations produced a sometimes rebellious and detached youth who learned to rely on his charm, wit, intellect, and inner toughness to overcome adversity. In the process of dealing with serious medical issues into adulthood, John Kennedy revealed both courage and fortitude-traits that would eventually carry him to the White House.

  12. No identifiable Hb1Ac or lifestyle change after a comprehensive diabetes programme including motivational interviewing: A cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To study the effectiveness of a comprehensive diabetes programme in general practice that integrates patient-centred lifestyle counselling into structured diabetes care. Design and setting Cluster randomised trial in general practices. Intervention Nurse-led structured diabetes care with a protocol, record keeping, reminders, and feedback, plus training in motivational interviewing and agenda setting. Subjects Primary care nurses in 58 general practices and their 940 type 2 diabetes patients with an HbA1c concentration above 7%, and a body mass index (BMI) above 25 kg/m2. Main outcome measures HbA1c, diet, and physical activity (medical records and patient questionnaires). Results Multilevel linear and logistic regression analyses adjusted for baseline outcomes showed that despite active nurse participation in the intervention, the comprehensive programme was no more effective than usual care after 14 months, as shown by HbA1c levels (difference between groups = 0.13; CI 20.8–0.35) and diet (fat (difference between groups = 0.19; CI 20.82–1.21); vegetables (difference between groups = 0.10; CI-0.21–0.41); fruit (difference between groups = 20.02; CI 20.26–0.22)), and physical activity (difference between groups = 21.15; CI 212.26–9.97), or any of the other measures of clinical parameters, patient's readiness to change, or quality of life. Conclusion A comprehensive programme that integrated lifestyle counselling based on motivational interviewing principles integrated into structured diabetes care did not alter HbA1c or the lifestyle related to diet and physical activity. We thus question the impact of motivational interviewing in terms of its ability to improve routine diabetes care in general practice. PMID:23659710

  13. Herbal medicines used by Bapedi traditional healers to treat reproductive ailments in the Limpopo Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Semenya, Ss; Maroyi, A; Potgieter, Mj; Erasmus, Ljc

    2013-01-01

    The current study focussed on documenting the ethnobotanical knowledge of herbal medicines used by the Bapedi traditional healers to treat reproductive ailments in the Limpopo Province, South Africa. Fifty one healers from 17 municipalities covering Capricorn, Sekhukhune and Waterberg districts of the Limpopo Province were interviewed between January and July 2011. Semi-structured interviews, observations and guided field surveys with the healers were employed. Thirty-six medicinal plant species belonging to 35 genera and 20 families were documented. The most used species were Zanthoxylum humile (25.5%), Catha edulis (21.6%), Ozoroa sphaerocarpa (15.7%), Hypoxis hemerocallidea (13.7%), Hypoxis obtusa (11.7%), Gomphocarpus fruticosus subsp. fruticosus and Gymnosporia senegalensis (9.8% each). The dominant growth forms among the reported medicinal plants were herbs (39%), followed by shrubs and trees with 33% and 28%, respectively. The preferred plant parts were roots (63.9%), followed by bark (13.9%), whole plant (11.1%), tubers (8.3%), bulbs (5.6%), fruits, leaves, stems and twigs (2.8% each). The majority of the species were used to treat gender specific reproductive ailments; while a minority were used for treating reproductive ailments of both genders. Twenty-two species (61.1%) are supported by reports of similar uses in other countries or have proven biological activity. This study illustrates that Bapedi traditional healers possess remarkable knowledge on medicinal plants used for treating and managing reproductive ailments.

  14. Comparison of breath gases, including acetone, with blood glucose and blood ketones in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Blaikie, Tom P J; Edge, Julie A; Hancock, Gus; Lunn, Daniel; Megson, Clare; Peverall, Rob; Richmond, Graham; Ritchie, Grant A D; Taylor, David

    2014-11-25

    Previous studies have suggested that breath gases may be related to simultaneous blood glucose and blood ketone levels in adults with type 2 and type 1 diabetes. The aims of this study were to investigate these relationships in children and young people with type 1 diabetes in order to assess the efficacy of a simple breath test as a non-invasive means of diabetes management. Gases were collected in breath bags and measurements were compared with capillary blood glucose and ketone levels taken at the same time on a single visit to a routine hospital clinic in 113 subjects (59 male, age 7 years 11 months-18 years 3 months) with type 1 diabetes. The patients were well-controlled with relatively low concentrations of the blood ketone measured (β hydroxybutyrate, 0-0.4 mmol l(-1)). Breath acetone levels were found to increase with blood β hydroxybutyrate levels and a significant relationship was found between the two (Spearman's rank correlation ρ = 0.364, p < 10(-4)). A weak positive relationship was found between blood glucose and breath acetone (ρ = 0.16, p = 0.1), but led to the conclusion that single breath measurements of acetone do not provide a good measure of blood glucose levels in this cohort. This result suggests a potential to develop breath gas analysis to provide an alternative to blood testing for ketone measurement, for example to assist with the management of type 1 diabetes.

  15. Implication of homocysteine in diabetes and impact of folate and vitamin B12 in diabetic population.

    PubMed

    Mursleen, M Tahir; Riaz, Samreen

    2016-12-13

    Diabetes mellitus is an acutely debilitating ailment affecting a large population of the world. At present, over 415 million people around the world including 7 million people in Pakistan suffering from diabetes. Homocysteine is an amino acid that is inversely related to vitamin B12 and folate, and raised level of homocysteine is implicated in many adverse health conditions. In this study, the potential role of homocysteine in diabetes and the epidemiology of hyperhomocysteinaemia, and vitamin B12 and folate deficiency is reviewed along with the impact of folate and vitamin B12 in regulation of homocysteine level. Deficiency of vitamin B12 and folate is rare in developed countries and the countries which adopted fortification programs, but deficiency of these vitamins is found to be highly prevalent in developing world, particularly in Pakistan. Several studies have found an association of high homocysteine levels and diabetes, but a few studies found contrary results. Hence, further epidemiological studies are recommended for homocysteine involvement in diabetes and vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, so that an urgent action can be taken to control the hyperhomocysteinaemia and consequently the ever increasing burden of disease and specifically diabetes.

  16. Efficacy of interventions that include diet, aerobic and resistance training components for type 2 diabetes prevention: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Elroy J; Morgan, Philip J; Collins, Clare E; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Callister, Robin

    2014-01-15

    Current recommendations for the prevention of type 2 diabetes advise modification of diet and exercise behaviors including both aerobic and resistance training. However, the efficacy of multi-component interventions involving a combination of these three components has not been established. The aims of this review were to systematically review and meta-analyze the evidence on multi-component (diet + aerobic exercise + resistance training) lifestyle interventions for type 2 diabetes prevention. Eight electronic databases (Medline, Embase, SportDiscus, Web of Science, CINAHL, Informit health collection, Cochrane library and Scopus) were searched up to June 2013. Eligible studies 1) recruited prediabetic adults or individuals at risk of type 2 diabetes; 2) conducted diet and exercise [including both physical activity/aerobic and resistance training] programs; and 3) reported weight and plasma glucose outcomes. In total, 23 articles from eight studies were eligible including five randomized controlled trials, one quasi-experimental, one two-group comparison and one single-group pre-post study. Four studies had a low risk of bias (score ≥ 6/10). Median intervention length was 12 months (range 4-48 months) with a follow-up of 18 months (range 6.5-48 months). The diet and exercise interventions varied slightly in terms of their specific prescriptions. Meta-analysis favored interventions over controls for weight loss (-3.79 kg [-6.13, -1.46; 95% CI], Z = 3.19, P = 0.001) and fasting plasma glucose (-0.13 mmol.L⁻¹ [-0.24, -0.02; 95% CI], Z = 2.42, P = 0.02). Diabetes incidence was only reported in two studies, with reductions of 58% and 56% versus control groups. In summary, multi-component lifestyle type 2 diabetes prevention interventions that include diet and both aerobic and resistance exercise training are modestly effective in inducing weight loss and improving impaired fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, dietary and exercise outcomes

  17. Efficacy of interventions that include diet, aerobic and resistance training components for type 2 diabetes prevention: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Current recommendations for the prevention of type 2 diabetes advise modification of diet and exercise behaviors including both aerobic and resistance training. However, the efficacy of multi-component interventions involving a combination of these three components has not been established. The aims of this review were to systematically review and meta-analyze the evidence on multi-component (diet + aerobic exercise + resistance training) lifestyle interventions for type 2 diabetes prevention. Eight electronic databases (Medline, Embase, SportDiscus, Web of Science, CINAHL, Informit health collection, Cochrane library and Scopus) were searched up to June 2013. Eligible studies 1) recruited prediabetic adults or individuals at risk of type 2 diabetes; 2) conducted diet and exercise [including both physical activity/aerobic and resistance training] programs; and 3) reported weight and plasma glucose outcomes. In total, 23 articles from eight studies were eligible including five randomized controlled trials, one quasi-experimental, one two-group comparison and one single-group pre-post study. Four studies had a low risk of bias (score ≥ 6/10). Median intervention length was 12 months (range 4–48 months) with a follow-up of 18 months (range 6.5 - 48 months). The diet and exercise interventions varied slightly in terms of their specific prescriptions. Meta-analysis favored interventions over controls for weight loss (-3.79 kg [-6.13, -1.46; 95% CI], Z = 3.19, P = 0.001) and fasting plasma glucose (-0.13 mmol.L-1 [-0.24, -0.02; 95% CI], Z = 2.42, P = 0.02). Diabetes incidence was only reported in two studies, with reductions of 58% and 56% versus control groups. In summary, multi-component lifestyle type 2 diabetes prevention interventions that include diet and both aerobic and resistance exercise training are modestly effective in inducing weight loss and improving impaired fasting glucose, glucose tolerance, dietary and exercise

  18. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lomberk, Gwen

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatologists have often divided research of the pancreas based upon the origin of the function or disease, namely the endocrine or exocrine pancreas. In fact, as a result, many of our meetings and conferences have followed separate paths. Interestingly, among patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both disorders of the exocrine pancreas, diabetes is common. However, the clinical features of the diabetes associated with these two differ. Peripheral insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the predominant diabetic traits in pancreatic cancer, while reduced islet cell mass and impaired insulin secretion are observed more often in chronic pancreatitis. The causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer remains an intriguing but unanswered question. Since diabetes often precedes pancreatic cancer, it is regarded as a potential risk factor for malignancy. On the other hand, there remains the possibility that pancreatic cancer secretes diabetogenic factors. Regardless of how the science ultimately illuminates this issue, there is increasing interest in utilizing screening for diabetes to aid early detection of pancreatic tumor lesions. Therefore, in this issue of Pancreatology and the Web, we explore the topic of diabetes to keep us alert to this very important association, even if we study diseases of the exocrine pancreas.

  19. Types of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, ... in children, teenagers or young adults. Treatment for type 1 diabetes includes taking insulin shots or using an insulin ...

  20. An overview of Indian novel traditional medicinal plants with anti-diabetic potentials.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rahul; Bajpai, Kumar Gaurav; Johri, Samta; Saxena, A M

    2007-10-27

    Diabetes mellitus is a global metabolic epidemic affecting essential biochemical activities in almost every age group. Indian literatures like Ayurveda have already mentioned herbal remediation for a number of human ailments. Among Indian traditional medicinal plants several potential anti-diabetic plants and herbs are being used as part of our diet since prehistoric time. India has a long list of native medicinal plants with confirmed blood sugar lowering property. Some of these have proved remarkable for cure of diabetes and its complications. The current paper is aimed at providing a review on clinical and experimental studies carried out on the most effective and commonly used hypoglycemic plants and herbs species from traditional Indian flora. This write-up includes hypoglycemic and anti-hyperglycemic activities of plants, active hypoglycemic compounds and constituents along with their available toxicity status.

  1. DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Loki

    2015-01-01

    A new study shows that statin therapy before diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is not associated with an increased risk of microvascular disease and might even be beneficial for retinopathy and neuropathy. These data suggest a potential protective effect of statins in specific complications, which should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:25366041

  2. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... retinopathy gets worse, it may lead to blindness.Laser surgery can often be used to treat or slow down retinopathy, especially if the problem is found early. People who have diabetes should have an eye exam once a year.Warning signs of eye problemsCall your doctor if you ...

  3. Multi-Biomarkers for Early Detection of Type 2 Diabetes, Including 10- and 12-(Z,E)-Hydroxyoctadecadienoic Acids, Insulin, Leptin, and Adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Umeno, Aya; Yoshino, Kohzoh; Hashimoto, Yoshiko; Shichiri, Mototada; Kataoka, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Yasukazu

    2015-01-01

    We have previously found that fasting plasma levels of totally assessed 10- and 12-(Z,E)-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE) correlated well with levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT); these levels were determined via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry after reduction and saponification. However, 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE alone cannot perfectly detect early impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and/or insulin resistance, which ultimately lead to diabetes. In this study, we randomly recruited healthy volunteers (n = 57) who had no known history of any diseases, and who were evaluated using the OGTT, the HODE biomarkers, and several additional proposed biomarkers, including retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4), adiponectin, leptin, insulin, glycoalbumin, and high sensitivity-C-reactive protein. The OGTT revealed that our volunteers included normal individuals (n = 44; Group N), "high-normal" individuals (fasting plasma glucose 100-109 mg/dL) with IGT (n = 11; Group HN+IGT), and diabetic individuals (n = 2; Group D). We then used these groups to evaluate the potential biomarkers for the early detection of type 2 diabetes. Plasma levels of RBP4 and glycoalbumin were higher in Group HN+IGT, compared to those in Group N, and fasting levels of 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE/linoleic acids were significantly correlated with levels of RBP4 (p = 0.003, r = 0.380) and glycoalbumin (p = 0.006, r = 0.316). Furthermore, we developed a stepwise multiple linear regression models to predict the individuals' insulin resistance index (the Matsuda Index 3). Fasting plasma levels of 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE/linoleic acids, glucose, insulin, and leptin/adiponectin were selected as the explanatory variables for the models. The risks of type 2 diabetes, early IGT, and insulin resistance were perfectly predicted by comparing fasting glucose levels to the estimated Matsuda Index 3 (fasting levels of 10- and 12-(Z,E)-HODE/linoleic acids, insulin, and leptin/adiponectin).

  4. The modulative effects of microcurrent electrical nerve stimulation on diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Chang, Wen-Chieh; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Huang, Chun-Feng; Huang, Chi-Chang; Kao, Cheng-Yan; Lin, Che-Li

    2017-02-28

    Diabetes (one of non-communicable diseases) is serious due to its complications, such like, cardiovascular ailments, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy, wound gangrene and sexual impotence. Diabetes and associated chronic conditions are rapidly emerging as major health problems. In clinical, there were different drugs for diabetes treatment on different mechanisms. However, there were limited studies on the efficacy of electric stimulations on diabetes therapeutic application. In current study, we try to evaluate the effect of microcurrent electrical nerve stimulator (MENS) on diabetes modulation as an alternative medicine. A total of 36 male ICR mice of 6 weeks old were randomly divided into 4 groups [1] Control, [2] MENS only, [3] DM, [4] DM with MENS. During 8 weeks treatments, the diabetes-associated assessments included body weight, diet utilization, blood glucose measurement, other biochemistries and histopathological observations. The diabetes animal model induced by STZ had 180 mg/dl fasting blood glucose (GLU-AC) before MENS intervention. After 3 and 6 weeks administration, the GLU-AC of DM+MENS group significantly decreased 31.97% and 50.82% (P < 0.0001), respectively, as compared to DM group and the OGTT also demonstrated the similar significant results. The diabetic syndromes of polydipsia and polyphagia were also significantly ameliorated by MENS intervention. In other biochemical indexes, the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), hyperinsulinemia, liver functions (AST & ALT) and kidneys function (BUN & Creatinine) were also significantly mitigated by MENS under diabetes model. The histological observation also showed the MENS administration improved the diabetes-related pathological characteristics in liver, kidney and pancreas tissues. Our results suggest that administration of MENS could significantly improve diabetes animal model on blood sugar homeostasis, diabetic polydipsia, biochemistries, and tissue damage. In the health conditions, the MENS didn

  5. Stages of change for physical activity and dietary habits in persons with type 2 diabetes included in a mobile health intervention: the Norwegian study in RENEWING HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Holmen, Heidi; Wahl, Astrid; Torbjørnsen, Astrid; Jenum, Anne Karen; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Ribu, Lis

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate stages of change for physical activity and dietary habits using baseline data from persons with type 2 diabetes included in a mobile health intervention. We examined the associations between stages of change for physical activity change and dietary change, and between stages of change for each behavior and individual characteristics, health-related quality of life, self-management, depressive symptoms, and lifestyle. Research design and methods We examined 151 persons with type 2 diabetes with an glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level ≥7.1%, aged ≥18 years at baseline of a randomized controlled trial, before testing a mobile app with or without health counseling. Stages of change were dichotomized into ‘pre-action’ and ‘action’. Self-management was measured using the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ) where a higher score reflects increased self-management, and health-related quality of life was measured with the Short-Form-36 (SF-36). Logistic regression modeling was performed. Results The median HbA1c level was 7.9% (7.1–12.4), 90% were overweight or obese, and 20% had ≥3 comorbidities. 58% were in the preaction stage for physical activity change and 79% in the preaction stage for dietary change. Higher scores of self-management were associated with an increased chance of being in the action stage for both dietary change and physical activity change. Higher body mass index was associated with an 8% reduced chance of being in the action stage for physical activity change (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.99). Conclusions Being in the action stage was associated with higher scores of self-management, crucial for type 2 diabetes. Over half of the participants were in the preaction stage for physical activity and dietary change, and many had a high disease burden with comorbidities and overweight. Trial registration number NCT01315756. PMID:27239317

  6. A systematic review of the impact of including both waist and hip circumference in risk models for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and mortality.

    PubMed

    Cameron, A J; Magliano, D J; Söderberg, S

    2013-01-01

    Both a larger waist and narrow hips are associated with heightened risk of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and premature mortality. We review the risk of these outcomes for levels of waist and hip circumferences when terms for both anthropometric measures were included in regression models. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched (last updated July 2012) for studies reporting the association with the outcomes mentioned earlier for both waist and hip circumferences (unadjusted and with both terms included in the model). Ten studies reported the association between hip circumference and death and/or disease outcomes both unadjusted and adjusted for waist circumference. Five studies reported the risk associated with waist circumference both unadjusted and adjusted for hip circumference. With the exception of one study of venous thromboembolism, the full strength of the association between either waist circumference or hip circumference with morbidity and/or mortality was only apparent when terms for both anthropometric measures were included in regression models. Without accounting for the protective effect of hip circumference, the effect of obesity on risk of death and disease may be seriously underestimated. Considered together (but not as a ratio measure), waist and hip circumference may improve risk prediction models for cardiovascular disease and other outcomes.

  7. Questions about Common Ailments. Nutrition in Health Promotion Series, Number 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosser, Gail Hoddlebrink; Molleson, Ann L.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  8. [THE COMPARATIVE CHARACTERISTIC OF KAOLIN-ACTIVATED THROMBOELASTOGRAPHY IN HEALTHY NEWBORNS AND NEWBORNS WITH HEART AILMENTS].

    PubMed

    Leonov, N P; Karas'kov, A M; Litasova, E E; Strunin, O V; Karmadonova, N A; Akopov, G D; Vishegorodtseva, L I

    2016-02-01

    The study was carried out to diferentiate reference values for kaolin-activated thromboelastography in newborns with congenital heart disease. The study included two groups ofpatients. The first one consisted of 62 newborns with congenital heart disease and the second one consisted of 35 healthy newborns. The results of kaolin-activated thromboelastography implemented in groups are evaluated as condition of normal coagulation. The valuable diferences of homeostasis system in healthy newborns and newborns with congenital heart disease (without severe concomitant pathology) are not established. They have similar indicators of kaolin-activated thromboelastography. The derived results can be applied as standards in full-term newborns with congenital heart disease.

  9. Common injuries and ailments of the female athlete; pathophysiology, treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Hilibrand, Miryl J; Hammoud, Sommer; Bishop, Meghan; Woods, Daniel; Fredrick, Robert W; Dodson, Christopher C

    2015-11-01

    With increasing numbers of women competing in high school and collegiate athletics, it is important that physicians become familiar with injury patterns and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. Observations and clinical data have elucidated unique biomechanical, anatomic and hormonal factors that predispose skeletally mature female athletes to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries, patellofemoral disorders and lower extremity stress fractures. Additionally, younger female athletes are particularly at risk of developing components of the "Female Athlete Triad" (more recently included under the syndrome of "Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport" [RED-S]): disordered eating, amenorrhea and osteoporosis. An understanding of the pathophysiology of these conditions has led to the development of programs that can treat their underlying causes, decrease susceptibility to injury, and improve the long-term health of the female athlete. This paper is intended to provide physicians with a review of the sex-specific etiology, prevention and treatment of injuries common to the female athlete.

  10. [Validation of the questionnaire for adolescents concerning ailments of lumbosacral region. Part III: validity].

    PubMed

    Baczkiewicz, Maja; Demczuk-Włodarczyk, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    The third part of the series of articles includes the results of validity and coherence check conducted over the LBP questionnaire designed for pupils aged 13-18. 22 adolescents aged 13-17 were randomly chosen from the group of 124 pupils, who filled in the questionnaire using stratification to 3 groups: without LBP, LBP in a life time, but not in the week preceding the testing and LBP in the preceding week. The validity of questions was tested by comparison to the data obtained from parents and in clinical testing conducted by a physiotherapist, which took place within two weeks from the first questionnaire session. The questions were found valid if the answers or indexes counted from the answers were consistent with data from clinical testing and from parents. For birth date, height and weight data from parents were used. Data from clinical testing served to verify: height, weight, presence and location of pain (local symptoms of overloading were palpated), faulty posture and directional preference according to McKenzie. With reference to some questions the coherence check was performed, by comparing the answers to questions logically linked. As a result of validity and coherence check rejected were the questions about: intensive growth period (small number of answers together with many incoherent ones), about beginning of pain episode (lack of coherence), about directional preference (differences with clinical testing) and about faulty posture (not consistent with findings in clinical testing). On the other hand the question about presence of LBP proved to be highly specific, good results were also found as to the questions about birth date, height and weight. The rest of the questions tested were found acceptable.

  11. Indian Herbs and Herbal Drugs Used for the Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Modak, Manisha; Dixit, Priyanjali; Londhe, Jayant; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Paul A. Devasagayam, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Traditional Medicines derived from medicinal plants are used by about 60% of the world’s population. This review focuses on Indian Herbal drugs and plants used in the treatment of diabetes, especially in India. Diabetes is an important human ailment afflicting many from various walks of life in different countries. In India it is proving to be a major health problem, especially in the urban areas. Though there are various approaches to reduce the ill effects of diabetes and its secondary complications, herbal formulations are preferred due to lesser side effects and low cost. A list of medicinal plants with proven antidiabetic and related beneficial effects and of herbal drugs used in treatment of diabetes is compiled. These include, Allium sativum, Eugenia jambolana, Momordica charantia Ocimum sanctum, Phyllanthus amarus, Pterocarpus marsupium, Tinospora cordifolia, Trigonella foenum graecum and Withania somnifera. One of the etiologic factors implicated in the development of diabetes and its complications is the damage induced by free radicals and hence an antidiabetic compound with antioxidant properties would be more beneficial. Therefore information on antioxidant effects of these medicinal plants is also included. PMID:18398493

  12. Ethnomedicinal study of plants used for human ailments in Ankober District, North Shewa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankober District has long been inhabited by people who have a long tradition of using medicinal plants to treat human ailments. Overexploitation of medicinal plants coupled with an ever-increasing population growth, deforestation and agricultural land expansion threatens plants in the area. Hence, this study aimed at documenting and analyzing the plant-based ethnomedicinal knowledge of the people in order to preserve the dwindling indigenous knowledge. Methods Ethnobotanical data were collected using semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, participant observation and walk-in-the-woods. Quantitative approaches were used to determine Informant Consensus Factor (ICF) and Fidelity level (FL) values. Statistical tests were used to compare the indigenous knowledge on medicinal plants among different informant categories. Results A total of 135 medicinal plant species belonging to 128 genera and 71 botanical families were reported to treat human diseases in the District. Families Asteraceae (12 species, 9%) and Fabaceae (10, 7.4%) were found to be best represented in the area. About 44% of preparations were reported to be obtained from roots. Significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed on the mean number of medicinal plants reported by groups of respondents compared within age, literacy level and experience parameters. Highest ICF values were recorded for gastro-intestinal & parasitic and dermatological disease categories (0.70 each) indicating best agreement among informants knowledge on medicinal plants used to treat aliments in these categories. Highest fidelity level values were recorded for Zehneria scabra (95%) and Hagenia abyssinica (93.75%) showing conformity of knowledge on species of best healing potential. Podocarpus falcatus was ranked first in a direct matrix ranking exercise of multipurpose medicinal plants. The output of preference ranking exercise indicated that Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata was the most preferred species to

  13. Analysis of the glucokinase gene in Mexican families displaying early-onset non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus including MODY families.

    PubMed

    del Bosque-Plata, L; García-García, E; Ramírez-Jiménez, S; Cabello-Villegas, J; Riba, L; Gómez-León, A; Vega-Hernández, G; Altamirano-Bustamante, N; Calzada-León, R; Robles-Valdés, C; Mendoza-Morfín, F; Curiel-Pérez, O; Tusié-Luna, M T

    1997-11-12

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 5% of the general population. Genetic factors play an important role in the development of the disease. While in other populations NIDDM is usually diagnosed after the fifth decade of life, in Mexico a large proportion of patients develop the disease at an early age (between the third and the fourth decade). In Caucasian population, mutations in the glucokinase gene, the TCF1, and TCF14 genes, have been identified in a subgroup of early-onset NIDDM patients denominated MODY (maturity-onset diabetes of the young), which show an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. As a first step in the molecular characterization of Mexican families displaying early-onset NIDDM we searched for mutations in the glucokinase gene through SSCP analysis and/or direct sequencing in 26 individuals from 22 independent families, where at least four can be classified as MODY. No mutations were detected in the exons or the intron-exon boundaries of the gene in any of the screened individuals. The phenotype and clinical profile of some of the studied patients is compatible with that of patients carrying mutations in the TCF1 or TCF14 genes, while others may carry mutations in different loci. Through computer simulation analysis we identified at least four informative families which will be used for further linkage studies.

  14. Ethno-medicinal study of plants used for treatment of human and livestock ailments by traditional healers in South Omo, Southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants have traditionally been used for treatment of human and livestock ailments in Ethiopia by different ethnic and social groups. However, this valuable source of knowledge is not adequately documented, which impedes their widespread use, evaluation and validation. Here, we recorded indigenous knowledge and standard practices for human and livestock disease control, of three ethnic groups (Aari, Maale and Bena-Tsemay) in South Omo Zone of Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples Regional State, Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out using a semi-structured questionnaire to document knowledge of 50 traditional healers (40 male and 10 female) in medicinal plant use for treatment of human and livestock ailments. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze and summarize the ethno-botanical data. Results Ninety-one plants, with claimed medicinal properties against a total of 34 human and livestock ailments, were reported and botanically identified as belonging to 57 genera and 33 plant families. Most of the plant species reported belonged to one of seven major families: Lamiaceae, Solanaceae, Menispermiaceae, Fabaceae, Asteraceae, Plumbaginaceae and Geraniaceae. Woody plants (shrubs 21% and trees 29%) were the major growth form used, whilst roots (40%) and leaves (35%) were the major plant parts used in the study areas. Healers mostly practice oral administration of plant preparations (65%). Multiple medicinal plants were cited against particular ailments, and mixing of two or more different medicinal plants (14.3%) against a single ailment was also commonly reported. Conclusion This study showed that traditional medicine, mainly involving the use of medicinal plants, is playing a significant role in meeting the primary healthcare needs of the three ethnic groups. Acceptance of traditional medicine and limited access to modern healthcare facilities could be considered as the main factors for the continuation of the practice

  15. [Validation of the questionnaire for adolescents concerning ailments of lumbosacral region. Part I: reliability of questions about presence and character of pain].

    PubMed

    Baczkiewicz, Maja; Demczuk-Włodarczyk, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    The first part of the series of articles is dedicated to the process and the results of reliability testing of the questionnaire designed for pupils aged 13-18, the tested questions concerning ailments of the lumbosacral region (LBP) and their characteristics. 124 persons aged 13-17 took part in the research. The "test-retest" method was used, the questionannaires being filled in twice by every pupil in no more than 7-day period. Questions were asked about LBP, the accompanying ailments, the intensity of pain, the length of the episode, the cause of the beginning, the constant pain, the activities that worsen or reduce symptoms, the necessity of therapy, the presence of functional disorders connected with LBP, height, weight and basic ,,red flags" which could indicate pain of specific origin. Results that were obtained in the process of testing indicated that reasoning was invalid when based on questions about the length of episode (60% repeatable, rank correlation 0.3) and on questions about activities that worsen or reduce pain (respectively 34 i 35% repeatable answers). The rest of questions were found acceptably reliable.

  16. Report: Antioxidant and hypoglycemic activity of strawberry fruit extracts against alloxan induced diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdulazeez, Sheriff Sheik; Ponnusamy, Ponmurugan

    2016-01-01

    The strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa) of Rosaceae family are an accomplished source of bioactive compounds such as ascorbic acid and diverse range of polyphenols including anthocyanins, phenolic acids, flavonols, ellagitannins etc. These phenolic compounds classify strawberry as an important health promoting food. Strawberries are proved to have potent antioxidant capacity in various in vitro assay systems. The in vivo beneficial effects are getting explored against various ailments including cancer, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular diseases. The present research study was designed to analyze the effect of strawberry fruit extracts (water and methanol) against alloxan induced hyperglycemia in albino rats of Wister strain. Upon alloxan (150mg/kg body weight) induction, the diabetic animals showed marked increase in the values of plasma glucose, urea, uric acid, creatinine and concomitant decrease in body weight and plasma insulin level. The oral administration of strawberry extracts for 45 days in diabetic animals reversed the biochemical changes significantly (P0.05) to near normal. Furthermore, the restoration of body weight loss was also observed. The results suggest that the strawberry extract has effective hypoglycemic activity against alloxan diabetes. The poly phenolic antioxidant contents of the strawberry fruit extracts are responsible for the observed biological effect.

  17. Comparison of Different Treatment Modalities for Type 1 Diabetes, Including Sensor-Augmented Insulin Regimens, in 52 Weeks of Follow-Up: A COMISAIR Study

    PubMed Central

    Petruželková, Lenka; Flekač, Milan; Pelcl, Tomáš; Matoulek, Martin; Daňková, Martina; Škrha, Jan; Svačina, Štěpán; Prázný, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To compare different treatment modalities for patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) based on real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) or self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) combined with multiple daily injections (MDIs) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). Research Design and Methods: Sixty-five T1D patients were followed up for a year. Of these, 27 started RT-CGM as part of a sensor-augmented insulin regimen (SAIR); within this SAIR group, 15 subjects started sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy and the remaining 12 continued with MDIs (MDIs + RT-CGM). A second group of 20 patients initiated CSII without RT-CGM, while a third group of 18 subjects continued on MDIs and SMBG. The main endpoints were reduction of HbA1c, glycemic variability (GV), and incidence of hypoglycemia. Results: After a year, the baseline mean HbA1c in the SAIR group (8.3%) decreased to 7.1% (P < 0.0001); both SAIR subgroups, SAP and MDIs + RT-CGM, showed comparable improvement. The CSII group also had reduced HbA1c (8.4% ± 0.9% vs. 7.9% ± 0.7%; P < 0.05). Both SAIRs were superior to MDIs (P = 0.002) and CSII (P = 0.0032). GV was also lowered, both in the SAIR (P < 0.0001) and CSII (P < 0.05) groups. Reduced incidence of hypoglycemia was observed only with SAIR (8% ± 4% vs. 6% ± 3%; P < 0.01). Conclusion: Both SAIRs, SAP and MDIs + RT-CGM, provided significant and comparable decrease of HbA1c with concurrent reduction of hypoglycemia. This improvement was greater than that seen with CSII. The combination of RT-CGM and MDIs can be a suitable alternative to SAP for some patients. PMID:27482825

  18. Preliminary studies on the hypoglycemic effect of Peganum harmala L. Seeds ethanol extract on normal and streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar B; Chaturvedi, J P; Narender, T; Srivastava, Arvind K

    2008-10-01

    Peganum harmala L. (Zygophyllaceae) is a traditional medicine used for the treatment of variety of human ailments, including antidepression, hallucination, antileishmaniasis etc. We report for first time the hypoglycemic activity of the ethanolic extract of this plant at two dose levels of 150 and 250mg/kg bw in sucrose challenged normal as well as in rats with streptozotocin induced diabetes. The oral administration of ethanolic extract causes maximum fall of blood glucose level to 22.9% (p<0.05) and 29.4% (p<0.01) respectively with the two doses in normal and 30.3% (p<0.01) and 48.4% (p<0.001) in diabetic rats. The standard drug metformin treated group showed 28.0% (p<0.01) and 45.5% (p<0.001) respectively in normal and diabetic rats. The above results show that the ethanolic extract of P. harmala is as effective as metformin in reducing the blood glucose levels of normoglycemic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

  19. Diabetic Pets

    MedlinePlus

    ... made by a veterinarian. Because older dogs and cats are more likely to develop age-related diseases ... cataracts, which commonly develop in diabetic dogs and cats. Other problems that can occur include hind leg ...

  20. Anti-Diabetic Potential of Noni: The Yin and the Yang.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, Pratibha V; Hwang, Phoebe W; Saksa, Erik

    2015-09-25

    Escalating trends of chronic diseases such as type-2 diabetes (T2D) have sparked a renewed interest in complementary and alternative medicine, including herbal products. Morinda citrifolia (noni) has been used for centuries by Pacific Islanders to treat various ailments. Commercial noni fruit juice has been marketed as a dietary supplement since 1996. In 2003, the European Commission approved Tahitian noni juice as a novel food by the Health and Consumer Protection Directorate General. Among noni's several health benefits, others and we have demonstrated the anti-diabetic effects of fermented noni fruit juice in animal models. Unfortunately, noni's exciting journey from Polynesian medicine to the research bench does not reach its final destination of successful clinical outcomes when translated into commercial products. Noni products are perceived to be safe due to their "natural" origin. However, inadequate evidence regarding bioactive compounds, molecular targets, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, long-term safety, effective dosages, and/or unanticipated side effects are major roadblocks to successful translation "from bench side to bedside". In this review we summarize the anti-diabetic potential of noni, differences between traditional and modern use of noni, along with beneficial clinical studies of noni products and challenges in clinical translation of noni's health benefits.

  1. Diabetes and Insulin

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have. There are three main types of diabetes: • Type 1 occurs when the pancreas stops making insulin. It ... but may occur later in life. People with type 1 diabetes need insulin to survive. Treatment includes changes in ...

  2. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  3. Diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, V; Kalita, J; Misra, U K

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) refers to symptoms and signs of neuropathy in a patient with diabetes in whom other causes of neuropathy have been excluded. Distal symmetrical neuropathy is the commonest accounting for 75% DN. Asymmetrical neuropathies may involve cranial nerves, thoracic or limb nerves; are of acute onset resulting from ischaemic infarction of vasa nervosa. Asymmetric neuropathies in diabetic patients should be investigated for entrapment neuropathy. Diabetic amyotrophy, initially considered to result from metabolic changes, and later ischaemia, is now attributed to immunological changes. For diagnosis of DN, symptoms, signs, quantitative sensory testing, nerve conduction study, and autonomic testing are used; and two of these five are recommended for clinical diagnosis. Management of DN includes control of hyperglycaemia, other cardiovascular risk factors; α lipoic acid and L carnitine. For neuropathic pain, analgesics, non‐steroidal anti‐inflammatory drugs, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants are recommended. The treatment of autonomic neuropathy is symptomatic. PMID:16461471

  4. [Diabetic eye disease].

    PubMed

    Henriques, José; Vaz-Pereira, Sara; Nascimento, João; Rosa, Paulo Caldeira

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by sustained hyperglycemia leading to macro and microvascular complications. The eye is one of the main organs affected by this disease, being diabetic retinopathy the most well-known microvascular complication and the leading cause of blindness in the working age population. However, diabetic ocular disease is not only characterized by diabetic retinopathy. Other important ocular manifestations of diabetes mellitus include cataract, glaucoma, ischemic optic neuropathy, cranial nerve palsies and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome. Here, we emphasize diabetic retinopathy as the most important and characteristic complication of diabetes mellitus, but also review less well-known complications with the aim to alert and sensitize non-ophthalmologist clinicians that treat diabetic individuals, in order to promote an early diagnosis and treatment of the sight-threatening complications of diabetes.

  5. Diabetes - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  6. Elderly ailment.(LEADERSHIP LITE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Administrator, 2005

    2005-01-01

    A 1"-grader entered the health room at Wayside Elementary School in Potomac, Md., with an odd complaint."I feel bloated," the boy reported to Diane Arkin, a health aide.Arkin, trying to keep a straight face, asked the 6-year-old, "What does bloated feel like?"He thought for a second. "It feels like I'm 51 ."(Source: Bulletin, Montgomery County,…

  7. Diabetic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment can correct diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome within hours. Treatment typically includes: Intravenous fluids to counter dehydration Intravenous insulin to lower your blood sugar levels Intravenous potassium, ...

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetic Retinopathy What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Click for more information Can Cause Vision ... vision loss and even blindness can result. Other Diabetic Eye Diseases In addition to diabetic retinopathy, other ...

  9. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments Taking insulin or other diabetes medicines is ... also available. What medicines might I take for diabetes? The medicine you take will vary by your ...

  10. Race/Ethnic Difference in Diabetes and Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Spanakis, Elias K.; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2013-01-01

    Health disparities in diabetes and its complications and co-morbidities exist globally. A recent Endocrine Society Scientific Statement described the Health Disparities in several endocrine disorders, including type 2 diabetes. In this review we summarize that statement and provide novel updates on race/ethnic differences in children and adults with type 1 diabetes, children with type 2 diabetes and in Latino subpopulations. We also review race/ethnic differences in the epidemiology of diabetes, prediabetes, and diabetes complications and mortality in the United States and globally. Finally we discuss biological, behavioral, social, environmental, and health system contributors to diabetes disparities in order to identify areas for future preventive interventions. PMID:24037313

  11. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes . Use of some HIV medicines may increase blood glucose levels and lead to type 2 diabetes. Other risk factors for type 2 diabetes include a family history of diabetes, being overweight, and lack of physical ...

  12. Diabetes in HFE Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Acton, Ronald T.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes in whites of European descent with hemochromatosis was first attributed to pancreatic siderosis. Later observations revealed that the pathogenesis of diabetes in HFE hemochromatosis is multifactorial and its clinical manifestations are heterogeneous. Increased type 2 diabetes risk in HFE hemochromatosis is associated with one or more factors, including abnormal iron homeostasis and iron overload, decreased insulin secretion, cirrhosis, diabetes in first-degree relatives, increased body mass index, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. In p.C282Y homozygotes, serum ferritin, usually elevated at hemochromatosis diagnosis, largely reflects body iron stores but not diabetes risk. In persons with diabetes type 2 without hemochromatosis diagnoses, serum ferritin levels are higher than those of persons without diabetes, but most values are within the reference range. Phlebotomy therapy to achieve iron depletion does not improve diabetes control in all persons with HFE hemochromatosis. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes diagnosed today in whites of European descent with and without HFE hemochromatosis is similar. Routine iron phenotyping or HFE genotyping of patients with type 2 diabetes is not recommended. Herein, we review diabetes in HFE hemochromatosis and the role of iron in diabetes pathogenesis in whites of European descent with and without HFE hemochromatosis. PMID:28331855

  13. Health and diabetes self-efficacy: a study of diabetic and non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Myers, Kyl; Nourian, Maziar M; Ashby, Jeanie; Greenwood, Jessica L J; Reel, Justine J

    2014-08-01

    Free clinics across the country provide free or reduced fee healthcare to individuals who lack access to primary care and are socio-economically disadvantaged. This study examined perceived health status among diabetic and non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members of the patients. Diabetes self-efficacy among diabetic free clinic patients was also investigated with the goal of developing appropriate diabetes health education programs to promote diabetes self-management. English or Spanish speaking patients and family members (N = 365) aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey. Physical and mental health and diabetes self-efficacy were measured using standardized instruments. Diabetic free clinic patients reported poorer physical and mental health and higher levels of dysfunction compared to non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members. Having a family history of diabetes and using emergency room or urgent care services were significant factors that affected health and dysfunction among diabetic and non-diabetes free clinic patients and family members. Diabetic free clinic patients need to receive services not only for diabetes, but also for overall health and dysfunction issues. Diabetes educational programs for free clinic patients should include a component to increase diabetes empowerment as well as the knowledge of treatment and management of diabetes. Non-diabetic patients and family members who have a family history of diabetes should also participate in diabetes education. Family members of free clinic patients need help to support a diabetic family member or with diabetes prevention.

  14. Biomarkers in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Alicia J; Joglekar, Mugdha V; Hardikar, Anandwardhan A; Keech, Anthony C; O'Neal, David N; Januszewski, Andrzej S

    2015-01-01

    There is a global diabetes epidemic correlating with an increase in obesity. This coincidence may lead to a rise in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. There is also an as yet unexplained increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes, which is not related to adiposity. Whilst improved diabetes care has substantially improved diabetes outcomes, the disease remains a common cause of working age adult-onset blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is the most frequently occurring complication of diabetes; it is greatly feared by many diabetes patients. There are multiple risk factors and markers for the onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy, yet residual risk remains. Screening for diabetic retinopathy is recommended to facilitate early detection and treatment. Common biomarkers of diabetic retinopathy and its risk in clinical practice today relate to the visualization of the retinal vasculature and measures of glycemia, lipids, blood pressure, body weight, smoking, and pregnancy status. Greater knowledge of novel biomarkers and mediators of diabetic retinopathy, such as those related to inflammation and angiogenesis, has contributed to the development of additional therapeutics, in particular for late-stage retinopathy, including intra-ocular corticosteroids and intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors ('anti-VEGFs') agents. Unfortunately, in spite of a range of treatments (including laser photocoagulation, intraocular steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, and more recently oral fenofibrate, a PPAR-alpha agonist lipid-lowering drug), many patients with diabetic retinopathy do not respond well to current therapeutics. Therefore, more effective treatments for diabetic retinopathy are necessary. New analytical techniques, in particular those related to molecular markers, are accelerating progress in diabetic retinopathy research. Given the increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, and the limited capacity of healthcare systems to screen and treat

  15. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  16. A double-blind, randomized trial, including frequent patient–physician contacts and Ramadan-focused advice, assessing vildagliptin and gliclazide in patients with type 2 diabetes fasting during Ramadan: the STEADFAST study

    PubMed Central

    Hassanein, Mohamed; Abdallah, Khalifa; Schweizer, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Background Several observational studies were conducted with vildagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) fasting during Ramadan, showing significantly lower incidences of hypoglycemia with vildagliptin versus sulfonylureas, including gliclazide. It was of interest to complement the existing real-life evidence with data from a randomized, double-blind, clinical trial. Clinical Trials Identifier NCT01758380. Methods This multiregional, double-blind study randomized 557 patients with T2DM (mean glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c], 6.9%), previously treated with metformin and any sulfonylurea to receive either vildagliptin (50 mg twice daily) or gliclazide plus metformin. The study included four office visits (three pre-Ramadan) and multiple telephone contacts, as well as Ramadan-focused advice. Hypoglycemic events were assessed during Ramadan; HbA1c and weight were analyzed before and after Ramadan. Results The proportion of patients reporting confirmed (<3.9 mmol/L and/or severe) hypoglycemic events during Ramadan was 3.0% with vildagliptin and 7.0% with gliclazide (P=0.039; one-sided test), and this was 6.0% and 8.7%, respectively, for any hypoglycemic events (P=0.173). The adjusted mean change pre- to post-Ramadan in HbA1c was 0.05%±0.04% with vildagliptin and −0.03%±0.04% with gliclazide, from baselines of 6.84% and 6.79%, respectively (P=0.165). In both groups, the adjusted mean decrease in weight was −1.1±0.2 kg (P=0.987). Overall safety was similar between the treatments. Conclusion In line with the results from previous observational studies, vildagliptin was shown in this interventional study to be an effective, safe, and well-tolerated treatment in patients with T2DM fasting during Ramadan, with a consistently low incidence of hypoglycemia across studies, accompanied by good glycemic and weight control. In contrast, gliclazide showed a lower incidence of hypoglycemia in the present interventional than the previous observational studies. This

  17. Preventive and Protective Properties of Zingiber officinale (Ginger) in Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Complications, and Associated Lipid and Other Metabolic Disorders: A Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiming; Tran, Van H; Duke, Colin C; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2012-01-01

    Zingiber officinale (ginger) has been used as herbal medicine to treat various ailments worldwide since antiquity. Recent evidence revealed the potential of ginger for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Data from in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials has demonstrated the antihyperglycaemic effect of ginger. The mechanisms underlying these actions are associated with insulin release and action, and improved carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. The most active ingredients in ginger are the pungent principles, gingerols, and shogaol. Ginger has shown prominent protective effects on diabetic liver, kidney, eye, and neural system complications. The pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, and the safety issues of ginger are also discussed in this update.

  18. Diabetes - tests and checkups

    MedlinePlus

    ... High blood pressure Microalbuminuria test Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions ACE inhibitors Diabetes and exercise Diabetes - eye care Diabetes - foot ulcers Diabetes - keeping ...

  19. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  20. Fenofibrate and Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Knickelbein, Jared E; Abbott, Akshar B; Chew, Emily Y

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common and sight-threatening microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus, is a leading cause of blindness among working-aged adults. Medical therapies including intensive control of hyperglycemia and hypertension have been shown to reduce the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. The association of dyslipidemia and treatment with statins with diabetic retinopathy is inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. However, two recent randomized clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of systemic fenofibrate therapy in reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy independently of serum lipid levels. These findings suggest that fenofibrate may be an effective strategy for reducing the progression of diabetic retinopathy, thus reducing the large and growing public health burden of treating the sight-threatening complications of diabetic retinopathy.

  1. The inflammatory status score including IL-6, TNF-α, osteopontin, fractalkine, MCP-1 and adiponectin underlies whole-body insulin resistance and hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Daniele, G; Guardado Mendoza, R; Winnier, D; Fiorentino, T V; Pengou, Z; Cornell, J; Andreozzi, F; Jenkinson, C; Cersosimo, E; Federici, M; Tripathy, D; Folli, F

    2014-02-01

    A state of subclinical systemic inflammation is characteristically present in obesity/insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of the study was to develop an integrated measure of the circulating cytokines involved in the subclinical systemic inflammation and evaluate its relation with whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in T2DM. T2DM patients (n = 17, M/F 13/4, age = 55.0 ± 1.7 years, BMI = 33.5 ± 1.5 kg/m(2), HbA(1c) = 7.7 ± 0.3%) and normal glucose-tolerant (NGT) subjects (n = 15, M/F 7/8, age = 49.1 ± 2.5 years, BMI = 31.8 ± 1.2 kg/m(2), HbA(1c) = 5.6 ± 0.1%) were studied in a cross-sectional design. Whole-body insulin sensitivity was quantified by the euglycemic clamp. Beta-cell function [disposition index (DI)] was calculated using insulin and glucose values derived from an oral glucose tolerance test and the euglycemic clamp. Body fat mass was evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Plasma cytokine [TNF-α, IL-6, MCP-1, osteopontin, fractalkine and adiponectin] values were divided into quintiles. A score ranging from 0 (lowest quintile) to 4 (highest quintile) was assigned. The inflammatory score (IS) was the sum of each cytokine score from which adiponectin score was subtracted in each study subject. Inflammatory cytokine levels were all higher in T2DM. IS was higher in T2DM as compared to NGT (10.0 ± 1.1 vs. 4.8 ± 0.8; p < 0.001). IS positively correlated with fasting plasma glucose (r = 0.638, p < 0.001), 1-h plasma glucose (r = 0.483, p = 0.005), 2-h plasma glucose (r = 0.611, p < 0.001) and HbA1c (r = 0.469, p = 0.007). IS was inversely correlated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.478, p = 0.006) and DI (r = -0.523, p = 0.002). IS did not correlate with BMI and body fat mass. IS was an independent predictor of fasting plasma glucose and had a high sensibility and sensitivity to predict insulin resistance (M/I < 4). A state of subclinical inflammation defined and quantifiable by inflammatory score

  2. Zinc Prevents the Development of Diabetic Cardiomyopathy in db/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shudong; Wang, Bowei; Wang, Yuehui; Tong, Qian; Liu, Quan; Sun, Jian; Zheng, Yang; Cai, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is highly prevalent in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Zinc is an important essential trace metal, whose deficiency is associated with various chronic ailments, including vascular diseases. We assessed T2DM B6.BKS(D)-Leprdb/J (db/db) mice fed for six months on a normal diet containing three zinc levels (deficient, adequate, and supplemented), to explore the role of zinc in DCM development and progression. Cardiac function, reflected by ejection fraction, was significantly decreased, along with increased left ventricle mass and heart weight to tibial length ratio, in db/db mice. As a molecular cardiac hypertrophy marker, atrial natriuretic peptide levels were also significantly increased. Cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy were accompanied by significantly increased fibrotic (elevated collagen accumulation as well as transforming growth factor β and connective tissue growth factor levels) and inflammatory (enhanced expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, caspase recruitment domain family member 9, and B-cell lymphoma/leukemia 10, and activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) responses in the heart. All these diabetic effects were exacerbated by zinc deficiency, and not affected by zinc supplementation, respectively. Mechanistically, oxidative stress and damage, mirrored by the accumulation of 3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, was significantly increased along with significantly decreased expression of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidants (NQO-1 and catalase). This was also exacerbated by zinc deficiency in the db/db mouse heart. These results suggested that zinc deficiency promotes the development and progression of DCM in T2DM db/db mice. The exacerbated effects by zinc deficiency on the heart of db/db mice may be related to further suppression of Nrf2 expression and function. PMID:28272348

  3. Spectrum of renal disease in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Teng, Jessie; Dwyer, Karen M; Hill, Prue; See, Emily; Ekinci, Elif I; Jerums, George; MacIsaac, Richard J

    2014-09-01

    The spectrum of renal disease in patients with diabetes encompasses both diabetic kidney disease (including albuminuric and non-albuminuric phenotypes) and non-diabetic kidney disease. Diabetic kidney disease can manifest as varying degrees of renal insufficiency and albuminuria, with heterogeneity in histology reported on renal biopsy. For patients with diabetes and proteinuria, the finding of non-diabetic kidney disease alone or superimposed on the changes of diabetic nephropathy is increasingly reported. It is important to identify non-diabetic kidney disease as some forms are treatable, sometimes leading to remission. Clinical indications for a heightened suspicion of non-diabetic kidney disease and hence consideration for renal biopsy in patients with diabetes and nephropathy include absence of diabetic retinopathy, short duration of diabetes, atypical chronology, presence of haematuria or other systemic disease, and the nephrotic syndrome.

  4. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Méndez Abreu, Angel A.; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Martínez Marín, Maria Isabel; Pérez Fernández, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features. PMID:26239683

  5. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthcare Professionals Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  6. Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Macular Edema.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven R; Gardner, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema result from chronic damage to the neurovascular structures of the retina. The pathophysiology of retinal damage remains uncertain but includes metabolic and neuroinflammatory insults. These mechanisms are addressed by intensive metabolic control of the systemic disease and by the use of ocular anti-inflammatory agents, including vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and corticosteroids. Improved understanding of the ocular and systemic mechanisms that underlie diabetic retinopathy will lead to improved means to diagnose and treat retinopathy and better maintain vision.

  7. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of diabetic neuropathy may become severe enough to cause depression in some patients. × Prognosis The prognosis for diabetic ... of diabetic neuropathy may become severe enough to cause depression in some patients. View Full Prognosis Clinical Trials ...

  8. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  9. Painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda; Goutman, Stephen A; Callaghan, Brian C

    2014-05-06

    Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease [corrected]. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.

  10. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Francesconi, Claudia; Kofler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    These are the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This diabetic late complication comprises a number of mono- and polyneuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies and autonomic neuropathy. The position statement summarizes characteristic clinical symptoms and techniques for diagnostic assessment of diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for the therapeutic management of diabetic neuropathy, especially for the control of pain in sensorimotor neuropathy, are provided.

  11. Vitamin D and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    PITTAS, ANASTASSIOS G.; DAWSON-HUGHES, BESS

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of evidence from animal and human studies, vitamin D has emerged as a potential risk modifier for type 1 and type 2 diabetes (type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes). Vitamin D is thought to have both direct (through activation of the vitamin D receptor) and indirect (via regulation of calcium homeostasis) effects on various mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of both types of diabetes, including pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, impaired insulin action and systemic inflammation. Observational case-control studies have shown that vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy or early childhood is associated with reduced risk of incident type 1 diabetes. There are no trials on the effect of vitamin D (ergocalciferol or cholecalciferol) on type 1 diabetes. An association between vitamin D insufficiency and incident type 2 diabetes has been reported in longitudinal observational studies, but the association is not consistent. Results from small underpowered trials and post-hoc analyses of data from larger trials designed for bone-specific outcomes show no effect of vitamin D supplementation on glycemia in healthy adults but vitamin D may retard the progression to diabetes in adults with glucose intolerance. Because vitamin D is an excellent marker of general health status, the positive results reported in some observational studies might reflect unmeasured and unaccounted confounding. Therefore, the hypothesis that vitamin D may modify diabetes risk needs to be confirmed in trials specifically designed for that purpose. PMID:20304061

  12. Exotic Fruits as Therapeutic Complements for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Devalaraja, Samir; Jain, Shalini; Yadav, Hariom

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of obesity, type 2-diabetes, and the resultant metabolic syndrome are rapidly increasing. As successful preventive and therapeutic strategies for these life-threatening health ailments often come with adverse side effects, nutritional elements are widely used in many countries as preventive therapies to prevent or manage metabolic syndrome. Fruits are important dietary components, and contain various bioactive constituents. Many of these constituents have been proven to be useful to manage and treat various chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Although exotic fruits are understudied throughout the world due to their limited regional presence, many studies reveal their potent ability to ameliorate metabolic derangements and the resultant conditions i.e. diabetes and obesity. The aim of this article is to review the role of exotic fruits and their constituents in the regulation of metabolic functions, which can beneficially alter diabetes and obesity pathophysiology. PMID:21857774

  13. Gastrointestinal health in Ramadan with special reference to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Zaigham

    2015-05-01

    Fasting in the month of Ramadan can improve a person's health, but if the correct diet is not followed, one is prone to acquire some ailments related to the digestive health. Dyspeptic symptoms are frequently encountered during Ramadan, with indigestion, bloating and heartburns being more common, particularly after eating too much at lftar or Suhur meals. Eating in moderation and elimination of foods that can trigger gastroesophageal reflux are helpful. Empiric therapy with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is recommended in this setting. Duodenal ulcers and duodenitis are more common during Ramadan and the frequency of complications of peptic ulcer is higher. Patients with duodenal ulcer treated with PPI may fast without any symptoms. Ramadan fasting does not impose serious risks on patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Chronic hepatitis patients show non-significant changes in the liver function tests. However, patients with advanced liver disease may decompensate. As gastrointestinal and liver ailments tend to be more common and severe in diabetics compared with the normal individuals, extra vigilance is needed for the people with diabetes who are allowed to fast by their physicians.

  14. Diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Nevoret, Marie-Laure; Casellini, Carolina; Parson, Henri

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common and troublesome complication of diabetes mellitus, leading to the greatest morbidity and mortality and resulting in a huge economic burden for diabetes care. The clinical assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its treatment options are multifactorial. Patients with DN should be screened for autonomic neuropathy, as there is a high degree of coexistence of the two complications. A review of the clinical assessment and treatment algorithms for diabetic neuropathy, painful neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction is provided.

  15. Hyperglycemia in Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Cardiovascular disease Nerve damage (neuropathy) Kidney damage (diabetic nephropathy) or kidney failure Damage to the blood vessels ... supplement if you have high blood sugar. Emergency treatment for severe hyperglycemia If you have signs and ...

  16. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nis; Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard; Schielke, Katja Christina; Bek, Toke; Grauslund, Jakob; Laugesen, Caroline Schmidt; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Andresen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database To monitor the development of diabetic eye disease in Denmark and to evaluate the accessibility and effectiveness of diabetic eye screening programs with focus on interregional variations. Target population The target population includes all patients diagnosed with diabetes. Denmark (5.5 million inhabitants) has ~320,000 diabetes patients with an annual increase of 27,000 newly diagnosed patients. The Danish Registry of Diabetic Retinopathy (DiaBase) collects data on all diabetes patients aged ≥18 years who attend screening for diabetic eye disease in hospital eye departments and in private ophthalmological practice. In 2014–2015, DiaBase included data collected from 77,968 diabetes patients. Main variables The main variables provide data for calculation of performance indicators to monitor the quality of diabetic eye screening and development of diabetic retinopathy. Data with respect to age, sex, best corrected visual acuity, screening frequency, grading of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy at each visit, progression/regression of diabetic eye disease, and prevalence of blindness were obtained. Data analysis from DiaBase’s latest annual report (2014–2015) indicates that the prevalence of no diabetic retinopathy, nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy is 78%, 18%, and 4%, respectively. The percentage of patients without diabetic maculopathy is 97%. The proportion of patients with regression of diabetic retinopathy (20%) is greater than the proportion of patients with progression of diabetic retinopathy (10%). Conclusion The collection of data from diabetic eye screening is still expanding in Denmark. Analysis of the data collected during the period 2014–2015 reveals an overall decrease of diabetic retinopathy compared to the previous year, although the number of patients newly diagnosed with diabetes has been increasing in Denmark. DiaBase is a useful tool to observe the quality of screening

  17. Rheumatologic manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Crispin, José C; Alcocer-Varela, Jorge

    2003-06-15

    Diabetes mellitus has been linked to disorders of bones and joints, including neuroarthropathy, limited joint mobility, and hyperostosis. Some of the relations have known pathogenic mechanisms, but most are based on epidemiologic findings. This article reviews the associations between diabetes mellitus and its putative rheumatologic manifestations, and proposes a classification composed of four categories: consequences of diabetic complications, consequences of metabolic derangements inherent to diabetes, syndromes that may share etiologic mechanisms with microvascular disease, and probable associations. This approach may facilitate a clearer understanding of the musculoskeletal conditions that are prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  18. Management and treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Imam, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Management of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) demands a comprehensive approach which includes diabetes education, an emphasis on life style modification, achievement of good glycemic control, minimization of cardiovascular risk, and avoidance of drugs that can aggravate glucose or lipid metabolism, and screening for diabetes complications. Comprehensive diabetes management can delay the progression of complication and maximize the quality of life. Acquiring knowledge about diabetes is an essential part of diabetes management, and even more important is to make the patient aware of this chronic disease. "For a diabetic patient, knowledge and understanding are not a part of treatment--they are the treatment".

  19. Metformin Still Best as First Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162835.html Metformin Still Best as First Type 2 Diabetes Treatment American College of Physicians updated diabetes guidelines, ... is the first-line drug for people with type 2 diabetes, and that several other medications -- including newer ones -- ...

  20. Diabetic nephropathy and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Landon, Mark B

    2007-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy, the most common etiology for end-stage renal disease, complicates approximately 5% of insulin-dependent diabetic pregnancies. Assessment for vasculopathy is important before pregnancy because nephropathy can increase perinatal risks including potential for preeclampsia and preterm birth. Counseling women receiving renoprotective medications including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors has recently become complicated in light of new information suggesting a teratogenic risk for these agents. Most reproductive age women with overt diabetic nephropathy have preserved renal function and do not seem to have the progression of their disease affected by pregnancy. Perinatal outcomes are excellent for these women who have received care in tertiary institutions. However, there are relatively few women with significant renal impairment included in case series of pregnancies complicated by diabetic nephropathy. For these women, adverse perinatal outcomes are more common, and the effect of pregnancy on the course of their disease is less certain.

  1. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographic (English) Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies) Diabetic Kidney Disease Diabetes and Foot Problems Diabetic ... time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy , that can cause tingling and pain, and can ...

  2. Gestational diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are pregnant and you have symptoms of diabetes . Prevention Getting prenatal care early and having regular checkups helps improve your health and the health of your baby. Having prenatal ... gestational diabetes early. If you are overweight, getting your weight ...

  3. Diabetes Complications

    MedlinePlus

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

  4. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

  5. Diabetes Myths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  6. Diabetes Superfoods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  7. [Diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Bosi, E

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by high levels of blood glucose resulting from defects in insulin production, insulin action, or both. Diabetes is a serious health concern. The number of cases of diabetes mellitus is estimated to grow at a rate of 50% between 2000 and 2010. There are several types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and other specific types of diabetes. Beta cell dysfunction plays a key role in the physiopathology of diabetes, even when insulin resistance, which is often present in several diabetes-related diseases, is considered among the causes of hyperglycemic type 2 diabetes. The prolonged hyperglycemia that is peculiar to all kind of diabetes has long term complications on several organs and systems. The diagnosis of diabetes is based on the evaluation of glucose plasma levels performed under fasting conditions or two hours after the oral ingestion of 75 grams of glucose. Currently, achieving and maintaining normal plasma levels of glucose are the aims of therapy for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Particularly, the therapy for type 1 diabetes is based on the administration of insulin, whereas that of type 2 diabetes changes over the time: diet and physical activity are the first treatments; oral hypoglycemic drugs are used as a second therapeutic step; and the administration of insulin is the last therapeutic option. The principal therapeutic innovation of the past ten years is represented by the tight and flexible control of glucose plasma level obtained by using the insulin analogues produced by recombinant DNA technology.

  8. Diabetes Training for Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Aponte, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background A 2.5-month diabetes education training for community health workers (CHWs) was developed, implemented, and evaluated. Methods Training methods used included case studies, role-playing, and lectures. Exams were used throughout the training for its evaluation. Teaching was delivered by different ways: a one day American Diabetes Association (ADA) course; a five day Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP); Conversation Maps; and a series of seven National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) diabetes education booklets. Results Qualitative and quantitative evaluative methods were used during and after the training. The CHWs’ diabetes knowledge was evaluated by a pre- and post-test Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ). The post-test was conducted one week after completing the training. The findings showed that the diabetes knowledge of the CHWs increased. Conclusions Diabetes competencies and evaluative tools need to be developed specific for CHWs as a way to standardize all CHW diabetes trainings. PMID:27110434

  9. Diabetes insipidus - nephrogenic

    MedlinePlus

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus; Congenital diabetes insipidus; NDI ... of very dilute urine. NDI is rare. Congenital diabetes insipidus is present at birth. It is a ...

  10. Updates in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Juster-Switlyk, Kelsey; Smith, A Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes has become one of the largest global health-care problems of the 21 (st) century. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the population prevalence of diabetes in the US is approaching 10% and is increasing by 5% each year. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication associated with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes causes a broad spectrum of neuropathic complications, including acute and chronic forms affecting each level of the peripheral nerve, from the root to the distal axon. This review will focus on the most common form, distal symmetric diabetic polyneuropathy. There has been an evolution in our understanding of the pathophysiology and the management of diabetic polyneuropathy over the past decade. We highlight these new perspectives and provide updates from the past decade of research.

  11. Updates in diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Juster-Switlyk, Kelsey; Smith, A. Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes has become one of the largest global health-care problems of the 21 st century. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the population prevalence of diabetes in the US is approaching 10% and is increasing by 5% each year. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication associated with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes causes a broad spectrum of neuropathic complications, including acute and chronic forms affecting each level of the peripheral nerve, from the root to the distal axon. This review will focus on the most common form, distal symmetric diabetic polyneuropathy. There has been an evolution in our understanding of the pathophysiology and the management of diabetic polyneuropathy over the past decade. We highlight these new perspectives and provide updates from the past decade of research. PMID:27158461

  12. Bioreactors Addressing Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Minteer, Danielle M.; Gerlach, Jorg C.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies. PMID:25160666

  13. Bioreactors addressing diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Danielle M; Gerlach, Jorg C; Marra, Kacey G

    2014-11-01

    The concept of bioreactors in biochemical engineering is a well-established process; however, the idea of applying bioreactor technology to biomedical and tissue engineering issues is relatively novel and has been rapidly accepted as a culture model. Tissue engineers have developed and adapted various types of bioreactors in which to culture many different cell types and therapies addressing several diseases, including diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2. With a rising world of bioreactor development and an ever increasing diagnosis rate of diabetes, this review aims to highlight bioreactor history and emerging bioreactor technologies used for diabetes-related cell culture and therapies.

  14. Diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Maghnie, Mohamad

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a heterogeneous condition characterized by polyuria and polydipsia caused by a lack of secretion of vasopressin, its physiological suppression following excessive water intake, or kidney resistance to its action. In many patients, it is caused by the destruction or degeneration of the neurons that originate in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. Known causes of these lesions include: germinoma or craniopharyngioma; Langerhans cell histiocytosis and sarcoidosis of the central nervous system; local inflammatory, autoimmune or vascular diseases; trauma following surgery or accident; and, rarely, genetic defects in vasopressin biosynthesis inherited as autosomal dominant or X-linked recessive traits. Thirty to fifty percent of cases are considered idiopathic. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows identification of the posterior pituitary hyperintensity and of hypothalamic-pituitary abnormalities. Thickening of the pituitary stalk is the second most common finding on MRI scans in several local inflammatory pathologies and autoimmune diseases or germinoma, but it is not specific to any single subtype. A progressive increase in the size of the anterior pituitary gland should alert physicians to the possibility that a germinoma is present, whereas a decrease can suggest the presence of an inflammatory or autoimmune process. Most children with acquired central diabetes insipidus and a thickened pituitary stalk have anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies during follow-up. Biopsy of enlarged pituitary stalk should be reserved for patients with a hypothalamic-pituitary mass and progressive thickening of the pituitary stalk, since spontaneous recovery may occur.

  15. Many faces of monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schwitzgebel, Valerie M

    2014-03-23

    Monogenic diabetes represents a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from defects in single genes. Defects are categorized primarily into two groups: disruption of β-cell function or a reduction in the number of β-cells. A complex network of transcription factors control pancreas formation, and a dysfunction of regulators high in the hierarchy leads to pancreatic agenesis. Dysfunction among factors further downstream might cause organ hypoplasia, absence of islets of Langerhans or a reduction in the number of β-cells. Many transcription factors have pleiotropic effects, explaining the association of diabetes with other congenital malformations, including cerebellar agenesis and pituitary agenesis. Monogenic diabetes variants are classified conventionally according to age of onset, with neonatal diabetes occurring before the age of 6 months and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) manifesting before the age of 25 years. Recently, certain familial genetic defects were shown to manifest as neonatal diabetes, MODY or even adult onset diabetes. Patients with neonatal diabetes require a thorough genetic work-up in any case, and because extensive phenotypic overlap exists between monogenic, type 2, and type 1 diabetes, genetic analysis will also help improve diagnosis in these cases. Next generation sequencing will facilitate rapid screening, leading to the discovery of digenic and oligogenic diabetes variants, and helping to improve our understanding of the genetics underlying other types of diabetes. An accurate diagnosis remains important, because it might lead to a change in the treatment of affected subjects and influence long-term complications.

  16. The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and LED therapy in diabetic foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Cristiane R. S.; Martin, Airton A.; Lima, Carlos J.; Conrado, Luis A. L.; Silveira, Fabricio L.; Carvalho, Marcos V.

    2004-07-01

    Chronic foot ulcers are common ailments presented in diabetes, which offer severe complications and are often unresponsive to therapy. In this work it was evaluated the effects of adjunctive Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBO) treatment and LEDtherapy irradiation on ulcer healing (HBO) in addition to conventional treatment. In ulcers of diabetic foot these treatments lead to a reduction in the probability of amputation up to almost four times compared with patients not receiving such co-adjutant treatment. The LEDtherapy irradiation was given concurrently using an energy density of 4J/cm2 for 5 min. During the experiment nine patients with diabetic foot ulcers were submitted for HBO sessions with 2,5 ATM for two hours. The experiment demonstrated the effectiveness of HBO + LEDtherapy treatment by favoring the ulcer healing through an increased fibroblastic response, collagen synthesis and neo-vascularization of the ischaemia, as well as increases in the leukocytic bactericidal activity.

  17. Vitamin D and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    MITRI, JOANNA; PITTAS, ANASTASSIOS G.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis There has been increasing evidence suggesting that vitamin D may play an important role in modifying risk of diabetes. In this regard, Vitamin D has both direct and indirect effects, the latter via regulation of calcium effects on various mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, including pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, impaired insulin action and systemic inflammation. The human evidence comes primarily from many cross-sectional and prospective observational studies, most of which showed an inverse association between vitamin D status and prevalence or incidence of type 2 diabetes. The effect of vitamin D supplementation on glycemia or incident type 2 diabetes has been reported in several trials with mixed results. The present article describes the biological plausibility behind the potential association between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes and summarizes the current evidence supporting a relation between vitamin D and type 2 diabetes and briefly reports on the potential association between vitamin D and type 1 diabetes. PMID:24582099

  18. Diabetes in Asians

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing globally, particularly in Asia. According to the 2013 Diabetes Atlas, an estimated 366 million people are affected by diabetes worldwide; 36% of those affected live in the Western Pacific region, with a significant proportion in East Asia. The reasons for this marked increase in the prevalence of diabetes can be extrapolated from several distinct features of the Asian region. First, the two most populated countries, China and India, are located in Asia. Second, Asians have experienced extremely rapid economic growth, including rapid changes in dietary patterns, during the past decades. As a result, Asians tend to have more visceral fat within the same body mass index range compared with Westerners. In addition, increased insulin resistance relative to reduced insulin secretory function is another important feature of Asian individuals with diabetes. Young age of disease onset is also a distinctive characteristic of these patients. Moreover, changing dietary patterns, such as increased consumption of white rice and processed red meat, contributes to the deteriorated lifestyle of this region. Recent studies suggest a distinctive responsiveness to novel anti-diabetic agents in Asia; however, further research and efforts to reverse the increasing prevalence of diabetes are needed worldwide. PMID:26435131

  19. Participatory Epidemiology of Ethnoveterinary Practices Fulani Pastoralists Used to Manage Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia and Other Cattle Ailments in Niger State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Alhaji, N. B.; Babalobi, O. O.

    2015-01-01

    Ethnoveterinary practices are locally available and affordable to Fulani pastoralists in Niger State, Nigeria, to whom conventional veterinary services are often not readily available and are relatively expensive. This study was designed to identify and document medicinal plant and nonplant materials used by this group in the management of cattle diseases. Participatory rural appraisal tools of checklist, semistructured interview, probing, transect, and triangulations were used to assess Fulani pastoralists existing knowledge on traditional veterinary practices in nine pastoral communities spread across the state. Fifty medicinal materials and seven traditional preventive practices are in use against CBPP and other cattle disease conditions. Of these, 38 (76.0%) are medicinal plants and 12 (24.0%) are nonplant materials (edible earth materials and minerals). Family Fabaceae was most commonly mentioned while leaves were the most common parts used. Most of these materials are administered by drenching with few others mixed with feed. Proportions of plant parts used include leaves (47.4%), barks (31.6%), roots (10.6%), and 2.6% of each of rhizomes, fruits, seeds, and whole plants. Of recently used ingredients are kerosene and spent engine oil. Further research into the active ingredients of ethnoveterinary materials and dosages is necessary to guide their usage. PMID:26464953

  20. PATTERN OF CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Abhishek; Raina, Sujeet; Kaushal, Satinder S; Mahajan, Vikram; Sharma, Nand Lal

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: Xerosis (44%), diabetic dermopathy (36%), skin tags (32%), cutaneous infections (31%), and seborrheic keratosis (30%). Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year. PMID:20418975

  1. Nodular lesions and mesangiolysis in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Shimizu, Miho; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Iwata, Yasunori; Sakai, Yoshio; Kaneko, Shuichi; Furuichi, Kengo

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure all over the world. Advanced human diabetic nephropathy is characterized by the presence of specific lesions including nodular lesions, doughnut lesions, and exudative lesions. Thus far, animal models precisely mimicking advanced human diabetic nephropathy, especially nodular lesions, remain to be fully established. Animal models with spontaneous diabetic kidney diseases or with inducible kidney lesions may be useful for investigating the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Based on pathological features, we previously reported that diabetic glomerular nodular-like lesions were formed during the reconstruction process of mesangiolysis. Recently, we established nodular-like lesions resembling those seen in advanced human diabetic nephropathy through vascular endothelial injury and mesangiolysis by administration of monocrotaline. Here, in this review, we discuss diabetic nodular lesions and its animal models resembling human diabetic kidney lesions, with our hypothesis that endothelial cell injury and mesangiolysis might be required for nodular lesions.

  2. MicroRNAs in diabetes and diabetes-associated complications.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Johan; Kumarswamy, Regalla; Dangwal, Seema; Thum, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus due to its high prevalence and associated complications is a major socioeconomic health problem. Diabetes is characterized by multiple macro- and microvascular complications (e.g. diabetic nephropathy, cardiomyopathy, neuropathy, retinopathy). Research efforts aim to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to the disease process. MicroRNAs are endogenous small single stranded molecules regulating targets through mRNA cleavage or translational inhibition. MicroRNAs regulate many biological cellular functions and are often deregulated during diseases. The aim of the present article is to summarize the current knowledge of the impact of microRNAs on the development of diabetes and its associated complications including endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction, diabetic cardiomyopathy, diabetic nephropathy, regulation of pancreatic beta cell function as well as skeletal muscle and hepatic involvement.

  3. Diabetes eye exams

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic retinopathy - eye exams; Diabetes - eye exams; Glaucoma - diabetic eye exam; Macular edema - diabetic eye exam ... if the doctor who takes care of your diabetes checks your eyes, you need an eye exam ...

  4. Types of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your ... is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type ...

  5. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Diabetes A-Z Pregnancy if You Have Diabetes If you have diabetes and plan to have ... are pregnant, you have gestational diabetes . How can diabetes affect my baby? A baby’s organs, such as ...

  6. Genetics of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

  7. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease of diabetes, or diabetic nephropathy. How does diabetes cause kidney disease? High blood glucose , also called ... I keep my kidneys healthy if I have diabetes? The best way to slow or prevent diabetes- ...

  8. Renal function in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dabla, Pradeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the kidney disease that occurs as a result of diabetes. Cardiovascular and renal complications share common risk factors such as blood pressure, blood lipids, and glycemic control. Thus, chronic kidney disease may predict cardiovascular disease in the general population. The impact of diabetes on renal impairment changes with increasing age. Serum markers of glomerular filtration rate and microalbuminuria identify renal impairment in different segments of the diabetic population, indicating that serum markers as well as microalbuminuria tests should be used in screening for nephropathy in diabetic older people. The American Diabetes Association and the National Institutes of Health recommend Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculated from serum creatinine at least once a year in all people with diabetes for detection of kidney dysfunction. eGFR remains an independent and significant predictor after adjustment for conventional risk factors including age, sex, duration of diabetes, smoking, obesity, blood pressure, and glycemic and lipid control, as well as presence of diabetic retinopathy. Cystatin-C (Cys C) may in future be the preferred marker of diabetic nephropathy due differences in measurements of serum creatinine by various methods. The appropriate reference limit for Cys C in geriatric clinical practice must be defined by further research. Various studies have shown the importance of measurement of albuminuria, eGFR, serum creatinine and hemoglobin level to further enhance the prediction of end stage renal disease. PMID:21537427

  9. Effectiveness of diabetes education and awareness of diabetes mellitus in combating diabetes in the United Kigdom; a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhammad Junaid; Bojerenu, Micheal Mauton; Safdar, Muhammad; Marwat, Jibran

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose level, and body cannot produce enough insulin, or does not respond to the produced insulin. In spite of the diabetes education campaigns and programmes, a large number of people in the United Kingdom are living with diabetes. The main objective of the study is to evaluate the role of knowledge and awareness of diabetes in fighting against diabetes and to interpret to which extent is diabetes education successful. The systematic review to be carried out will include literature from 2001 to 2011 in the United Kingdom regarding awareness of diabetes among UK population and effectiveness of diabetes education. Literature will be accessed using search database, British medical journals, and library. Good quality papers will be used for the systematic review. Previous studies about diabetes education will consulted and assessed. This study is going to summarize the efficacy of diabetes education campaigns and programmes which are promising to enhance the awareness The outcome of the review will be the guideline for the government, education centres, researchers, and campaigns to implement more diabetic education programmes and easily accessible diabetes services and education interventions to increase the awareness of risk factors and complications of diabetes to overcome the increasing epidemic of diabetes in the United Kingdom. PMID:28197516

  10. The Emerging Diabetes Online Community

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Marisa E.; Sparling, Kerri M.; Hitchcock, Jeff; Oser, Tamara K.; Hood, Korey K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes self-management is complex and demanding, and isolation and burnout are common experiences. The Internet provides opportunities for people with diabetes to connect with one another to address these challenges. The aims of this paper are to introduce readers to the platforms on which Diabetes Online Community (DOC) participants interact, to discuss reasons for and risks associated with diabetes-related online activity, and to review research related to the potential impact of DOC participation on diabetes outcomes. Methods Research and online content related to diabetes online activity is reviewed, and DOC writing excerpts are used to illustrate key themes. Guidelines for meaningful participation in DOC activities for people with diabetes, families, health care providers, and industry are provided. Results Common themes around DOC participation include peer support, advocacy, self-expression, seeking and sharing diabetes information, improving approaches to diabetes data management, and humor. Potential risks include access to misinformation and threats to individuals’ privacy, though there are limited data on negative outcomes resulting from such activities. Likewise, few data are available regarding the impact of DOC involvement on glycemic outcomes, but initial research suggests a positive impact on emotional experiences, attitudes toward diabetes, and engagement in diabetes management behaviors. Conclusion The range of DOC participants, activities, and platforms is growing rapidly. The Internet provides opportunities to strengthen communication and support among individuals with diabetes, their families, health care providers, the health care industry, policy makers, and the general public. Research is needed to investigate the impact of DOC participation on self-management, quality of life, and glycemic control, and to design and evaluate strategies to maximize its positive impact. PMID:25901500

  11. Diabetes Data Management in the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Timothy S.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes data management using a computer has not been widely adopted, even among diabetes-focused professionals. Barriers to adoption include incompatible devices and protocols, time and effort required, and lack of specific reimbursement. A simplified approach used at our clinic to review diabetes data is presented. PMID:19885162

  12. Sexual dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Várkonyi; Kempler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to summarize the etiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and possible treatment options of sexual dysfunction in diabetic patients of both sexes. Details of dysfunction in diabetic women are less conclusive than in men due to the lack of standardized evaluation of sexual function in women. Male sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes, including abnormalities of orgasmic/ejaculatory function and desire/libido in addition to penile erection. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) among diabetic men varies from 35% to 75%. Diabetes-induced ED has a multifactorial etiology including metabolic, neurologic, vascular, hormonal, and psychological components. ED should be regarded as the first sign of cardiovascular disease because it can be present before development of symptomatic coronary artery disease, as larger coronary vessels better tolerate the same amount of plaque compared to smaller penile arteries. The diagnosis of ED is based on validated questionnaires and determination of functional and organic abnormalities. First-, second- and third-line therapy may be applied. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor treatment from the first-line options leads to smooth muscle relaxation in the corpus cavernosum and enhancement in blood flow, resulting in erection during sexual stimulus. The use of PDE-5 inhibitors in the presence of oral nitrates is strictly contraindicated in diabetic men, as in nondiabetic subjects. All PDE-5 inhibitors have been evaluated for ED in diabetic patients with convincing efficacy data. Second-line therapy includes intracavernosal, trans- or intraurethral administration of vasoactive drugs or application of a vacuum device. Third-line therapies are the implantation of penile prosthesis and penile revascularization.

  13. The neuropsychiatric ailment of Vincent Van Gogh

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.; Rai, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Vincent Van Gogh is one of the most celebrated creative artists of all time. All his life, he was afflicted by some kind of neurological or psychiatric disorder, which remains a mystery even today. Many historians and his personal physicians believe that he suffered from epilepsy while others felt that he was affected by Ménière's disease. Features such as hypergraphia, atypical sexuality, and viscosity of thinking suggest the possibility of Gastaut-Geschwind phenomenon, a known complication of complex partial seizure. On the contrary, some historians feel that he was forced to sever his right ear in order to get relief from troublesome tinnitus, a complication of Ménière's disease. He was addicted to the liquor absinthe, which is known to lead to xanthopsia, and many authorities argue that this was the reason for his penchant for the deep and bright yellow color in many of his paintings. Others have suggested the possibility of bipolar disorder, sunstroke, acute intermittent porphyria, and digitalis toxicity as well. PMID:25745302

  14. [Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Bichet, Daniel Georges

    2006-11-01

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus which can be inherited or acquired, is characterized by an inability to concentrate urine despite normal or elevated plasma concentrations of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine-vasopressine (AVP). Polyuria, with hyposthenuria and polydipsia are the cardinal clinical manifestations of the disease. Hypercalcemia, hypokaliemia, lithium administration and chronic renal failure are the principal causes of acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. About 90 percent of patients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus are males with X-linked recessive nephrogenic diabetes insipidus who have mutations in the arginine-vasopressin receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene that codes for the vasopressin V2 receptor. The gene is located in chromosome region Xq28. In about 10 percent of the families studied, congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus has an autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. In these cases, mutations have been identified in the aquaporin-2 gene (AQP2), which is located in chromosome region 12q13 and codes for the vasopressin-sensitive water channel. Other inherited disorders with mild, moderate or severe inability to concentrate urine include Bartter's syndrome and Cystinosis. Identification of the molecular defect underlying congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is of immediate clinical significance because early diagnosis and treatment of affected infants can avert the physical and mental retardation associated with episodes of dehydration.

  15. Where frailty meets diabetes.

    PubMed

    Perkisas, Stany; Vandewoude, Maurits

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that has an effect on multiple organ systems. Frailty is a state of increased vulnerability to stressors and a limited capacity to maintain homeostasis. It is a multidimensional concept and a dynamic condition that can improve or worsen over time. Frailty is either physical or psychological or a combination of these two components. Sarcopenia, which is the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, is the main attributor to the physical form of frailty. Although the pathophysiology of diabetes is commonly focused on impaired insulin secretion, overload of gluconeogenesis and insulin resistance, newer insights broaden this etiologic horizon. Immunologic factors that create a chronic state of low-grade inflammation--'inflammaging'--have an influence on both the ageing process and diabetes. Persons with diabetes mellitus already tend to have an accelerated ageing process that places them at greater risk for developing frailty at an earlier age. The development of frailty--and sarcopenia--is multifactorial and includes nutritional, physical and hormonal elements; these elements are interlinked with those of diabetes. A lower muscle mass will lead to poorer glycaemic control through lower muscle glucose uptake. This leads to higher insulin secretion and insulin resistance, which is the stepping stone for diabetes itself.

  16. Peripheral neuropathy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Majumder, A; Chatterjee, S; Maji, D

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is common complication of diabetes. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy among diabetic patients on the basis of loss of vibration sensation had been studied. Detailed clinical history of each patient including age, gender, duration of diabetes, foot ulcer and biothesiometry was recorded in 211 diabetic patients between 20 and 80 years of age. It was observed that all patients under 30 years age (n = 8) felt vibration below 15 volts (no risk zone); 77% (24 out of 31) of the patients in the age group of 30-39 years were in the no risk zone, and 23% (n = 7) had mild peripheral neuropathy. Sixty per cent of the patients between 40 and 50 years (n = 44) were in the no risk zone, while 32% (n = 24) had mild peripheral neuropathy, 5% (n = 4) had moderate neuropathy and 3% (n = 2) had severe peripheral neuropathy. Amongst patients above 50 years of age, 31% (n = 31) were in no risk zone, 34% (n = 34) had mild peripheral neuropathy, 22% (n = 20) had moderate peripheral neuropathy and 13% (n = 13) had severe peripheral neuropathy. Of the patients with diabetes for less than 5 years, 58% had no neuropathy, and only 3% had severe neuropathy. Of the patients with diabetes for 5 to 15 years, 50% had no neuropathy, 30% had mild, and 10% had severe peripheral neuropathy. When patients with diabetes for over 15 years were studied, only 6% had no neuropathy and 19% had severe peripheral neuropathy. The study re-establishes that the severity of peripheral neuropathy increases with age and vibration perception decreses progressively with increased duration of diabetes. Vibration perception threshold testing helps to identify the high risk subjects who require special counselling and education to protect their feet.

  17. Monogenic Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene. In contrast, the most common types of diabetes—type 1 and type 2—are caused by multiple genes ( ... some children with monogenic diabetes are misdiagnosed with type 1 diabetes and are given insulin. When correctly diagnosed, some ...

  18. Catalpol ameliorates diabetic atherosclerosis in diabetic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiang-Yue; Zheng, Chen-Zhao; Hao, Xin-Ping; Zhang, Dai-Juan; Mao, An-Wei; Yuan, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Catalpol, isolated from the roots of Rehmanniaglutinosa, Chinese foxglove, is an iridoid glycoside with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperglycemic agent. The present study was to investigate the effects of catalpol on diabetic atherosclerosis in alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits. Diabetes was induced in rabbits by a hyperlipidemic diet and intravenous injection of alloxan (100 mg/kg). Rabbits were treated for 12 weeks. The fasting blood glucose, insulin, homeostasis model of insulin resistance, total cholesterol and triglyceride were measured. The thoracic aorta was excised for histology. The plasma and vascular changes including some markers of oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines and fibrosis factors were examined. Plasma levels of fasting blood glucose, insulin and homeostasis model of insulin resistance were significantly decreased in catalpol group. Catalpol treatment ameliorated diabetic atherosclerosis in diabetic rabbits as demonstrated by significantly inhibited neointimal hyperplasia and macrophages recruitment. Catalpol treatment also enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and increased the plasma levels of total antioxidant status, meanwhile reduced the levels of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl groups and advanced glycation end product. Furthermore, catalpol also reduced circulating levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Catalpol also decreased transforming growth factor-β1 and collagen IV mRNA and protein expressions in the vessels. Catalpol exerts an ameliorative effect on atherosclerotic lesion in alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits. The possible mechanisms may be related to inhibition of oxidative stress inflammatory response and anti-fibrosis and reduced aggregation of extracellular matrix. PMID:27830011

  19. Diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Said, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy in the world. Both type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 diabetes are commonly complicated by peripheral nerve disorders. Two main types of neuropathy are observed: the most common is a nerve fiber length-dependent, distal symmetrical sensory polyneuropathy with little motor involvement but frequent, and potentially life threatening, autonomic dysfunction. Alteration of temperature and pain sensations in the feet is an early manifestation of diabetic polyneuropathy. The second pattern is a focal neuropathy, which more commonly complicates or reveals type 2 diabetes. Poor diabetic control increases the risk of neuropathy with subsequent neuropathic pains and trophic changes in the feet, which can be prevented by education of patients.

  20. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Crandall, Jill P.; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Hamman, Richard F.; Montez, Maria G.; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study objective was to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopausal status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. Methods The study population included women in premenopause (n=708), natural postmenopause (n=328), and bilateral oophorectomy (n=201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy (HT) use. Results After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (HR 0.19, 95% CI 0.04, 0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of HT use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.63, 2.64) or placebo arms (HR 1.37, 95% CI 0.74, 2.55). Conclusions Among women at high-risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with decreased diabetes risk. PMID:21709591

  1. Body temperature regulation in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Glen P.; Sigal, Ronald J.; McGinn, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control. Those who are particularly vulnerable include individuals with poor glycemic control and who are affected by diabetes-related complications. On the other hand, good glycemic control and maintenance of aerobic fitness can often delay the diabetes-related complications and possibly the impairments in heat loss. Despite this, it is alarming to note the lack of information regarding diabetes and heat stress given the vulnerability of this population. In contrast, few studies have examined the effects of cold exposure on individuals with diabetes with the exception of its therapeutic potential, particularly for type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of diabetes on heat and cold exposure with respect to the core temperature regulation, cardiovascular adjustments and glycemic control while also considering the beneficial effects of maintaining aerobic fitness. PMID:27227101

  2. Special Problems of People with Diabetes and Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    This article addresses the types of visual impairment caused by diabetes and the unique problems that people with diabetes and visual impairment face. Diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetic optic neuropathy are discussed as causes of visual impairment, and specific problems in basic living are identified, including diet,…

  3. Imaging the effects of diabetes on the genitourinary system.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-de-Velasquez, A; Yoder, I C; Velasquez, P A; Papanicolaou, N

    1995-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common multisystemic disease with serious effects on the genitourinary system. In the radiology literature, little attention has been paid to developing an integral approach to imaging of the genitourinary tract in diabetes. The long-term effects of diabetes on the genitourinary system include diabetic nephropathy, papillary necrosis, renal artery stenosis, diabetic cystopathy, and vas deferens calcification. Diabetes-associated urinary tract infections include renal and perirenal abscesses, gas-forming infections such as emphysematous pyelonephritis and emphysematous cystitis, fungal infections, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. Diabetes-associated genital infections include Fournier gangrene and postmenopausal tubo-ovarian abscess. In a diabetic with fever of unknown origin or in the event of a persistent infection in a diabetic with clinical deterioration despite use of antibiotics, radiologic studies can demonstrate the presence of genitourinary complications. Finally, radiologists should be aware of the risk of contrast material-induced nephropathy in diabetics.

  4. Diabetes Nutrition: Including Sweets in Your Meal Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... plan. The trick is substituting small portions of sweets for other carbohydrates — such as bread, tortillas, rice, crackers, cereal, fruit, juice, milk, yogurt or potatoes — in your meals. To allow room for sweets ...

  5. Outcomes of polytrauma patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of diabetes mellitus in patients with multiple system injuries remains obscure. This study was designed to increase knowledge of outcomes of polytrauma in patients who have diabetes mellitus. Methods Data from the Trauma Audit and Research Network was used to identify patients who had suffered polytrauma during 2003 to 2011. These patients were filtered to those with known outcomes, then separated into those with diabetes, those known to have other co-morbidities but not diabetes and those known not to have any co-morbidities or diabetes. The data were analyzed to establish if patients with diabetes had differing outcomes associated with their diabetes versus the other groups. Results In total, 222 patients had diabetes, 2,558 had no past medical co-morbidities (PMC), 2,709 had PMC but no diabetes. The diabetic group of patients was found to be older than the other groups (P <0.05). A higher mortality rate was found in the diabetic group compared to the non-PMC group (32.4% versus 12.9%), P <0.05). Rates of many complications including renal failure, myocardial infarction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis were all found to be higher in the diabetic group. Conclusions Close monitoring of diabetic patients may result in improved outcomes. Tighter glycemic control and earlier intervention for complications may reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:25026864

  6. Pathogenesis of feline diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lutz, T A; Rand, J S

    1995-05-01

    Cats are one of the few species that develop a form of diabetes mellitus that is clinically and histologically analogous to human type 2 diabetes mellitus. Figure 9 summarizes the etiologic factors thought to be involved in the development of feline and human type 2 diabetes. The main metabolic characteristics of type 2 diabetes mellitus are impaired insulin secretion and resistance to the action of insulin in its target tissues. Impaired beta cell function occurs before histologic changes become evident. The characteristic histologic finding in cats with type 2 diabetes is deposition of amyloid in pancreatic islets. Amyloid deposition occurs before the onset of clinical signs, but does not seem to be the primary defect. Pancreatic amyloid is derived form the recently discovered pancreatic hormone amylin. Amylin is synthesized in pancreatic beta cells, and is co-stored and co-secreted with insulin. Amylin has been postulated to be involved in the pathogenesis of feline diabetes mellitus both through its metabolic effects, which include inhibition of insulin secretion and induction of insulin resistance, and via progressive amyloid deposition and beta cell degeneration. Increased amylin concentration has been documented intracellularly in cats with impaired glucose tolerance and in the plasma of diabetic cats, and supports the hypothesis that amylin is involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Obesity is a common finding in diabetic felines and is a contributing factor to the insulin resistance present in type 2 diabetes. Clinical signs of diabetes develop once total insulin secretion decreases to 20% to 25% of normal levels. Many diabetic cats have been treated successfully with oral hypoglycemics, but 50% to 70% of diabetic cats are insulin dependent. Based on histologic evidence, this is the result of extensive amyloid deposition and subsequent beta cell degeneration, rather than autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells associated with type 1

  7. Consensus statement on diabetes in children

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna Kumar, K. M.; Dev, N. Prabhu; Raman, K. V.; Desai, Rajnanda; Prasadini, T. Geetha; Das, A. K.; Ramoul, Soraya

    2014-01-01

    While T1DM has been traditionally seen as a minor concern in the larger picture of pediatric ailments, new data reveals that the incidence of T1DM has assumed alarming proportions. It has long been clear that while the disease may be diagnosed at an early age, its impact is not isolated to afflicted children. The direct impact of the disease on the patient is debilitating due to the nature of the disease and lack of proper access to treatment in India. But this impact is further compounded by the utter apathy and often times antipathy, which patients withT1DM have to face. Lack of awareness of the issue in all stakeholders, low access to quality healthcare, patient, physician, and system level barriers to the delivery of optimal diabetes care are some of the factors which hinder successful management of T1DM. The first international consensus meet on diabetes in children was convened with the aim of providing a common platform to all the stakeholders in the management of T1DM, to discuss the academic, administrative and healthcare system related issues. The ultimate aim was to articulate the problems faced by children with diabetes in a way that centralized their position and focused on creating modalities of management sensitive to their needs and aspirations. It was conceptualized to raise a strong voice of advocacy for improving the management of T1DM and ensuring that “No child should die of diabetes”. The unique clinical presentations of T1DM coupled with ignorance on the part of the medical community and society in general results in outcomes that are far worse than that seen with T2DM. So there is a need to substantially improve training of HCPs at all levels on this neglected aspect of healthcare. PMID:24944917

  8. Diabetes, biochemical markers of bone turnover, diabetes control, and bone.

    PubMed

    Starup-Linde, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to have late complications including micro vascular and macro vascular disease. This review focuses on another possible area of complication regarding diabetes; bone. Diabetes may affect bone via bone structure, bone density, and biochemical markers of bone turnover. The aim of the present review is to examine in vivo from humans on biochemical markers of bone turnover in diabetics compared to non-diabetics. Furthermore, the effect of glycemic control on bone markers and the similarities and differences of type 1- and type 2-diabetics regarding bone markers will be evaluated. A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, Cinahl, and SveMed+ with the search terms: "Diabetes mellitus," "Diabetes mellitus type 1," "Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus," "Diabetes mellitus type 2," "Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus," "Bone," "Bone and Bones," "Bone diseases," "Bone turnover," "Hemoglobin A Glycosylated," and "HbA1C." After removing duplicates from this search 1,188 records were screened by title and abstract and 75 records were assessed by full text for inclusion in the review. In the end 43 records were chosen. Bone formation and resorption markers are investigated as well as bone regulating systems. T1D is found to have lower osteocalcin and CTX, while osteocalcin and tartrate-resistant acid are found to be lower in T2D, and sclerostin is increased and collagen turnover markers altered. Other bone turnover markers do not seem to be altered in T1D or T2D. A major problem is the lack of histomorphometric studies in humans linking changes in turnover markers to actual changes in bone turnover and further research is needed to strengthen this link.

  9. Weekend therapy in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2016-05-01

    This article introduces the concept of "weekend therapy", which has now become reality in diabetes. It briefly describes injectable and oral drugs which are currently available, or are in advanced stages of development, for use in once weekly administration. These include dulaglutide, exenatide QW, semaglutide, omarigliptin and trelagliptin.

  10. [Diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Handzlik-Orlik, Gabriela; Okopień, Bogusław

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon disorder of water-electrolyte balance characterized by the excretion of abnormally large volumes of diluted urine (polyuria) and increased fluid intake (polydipsia). The disease may result from the insufficient production of vasopressin, its increased degradation, an impaired response of kidneys to vasopressin, or may be secondary to excessive water intake. Patients with severe and uncompensated symptoms may develop marked dehydration, neurologic symptoms and encephalopathy, and therefore diabetes insipidus can be a life-threatening condition if not properly diagnosed and managed. Patients with diabetes insipidus require treatment with desmopressin or drugs increasing sensitivity of the distal nephron to vasopressin, but this treatment may be confusing because of the disorder's variable pathophysiology and side-effects of pharmacotherapy. This review summarizes the current knowledge on different aspects of the pathophysiology, classification, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of diabetes insipidus. The reader is also provided with some practical recommendations on dealing with patients suffering from this disease.

  11. Immunizations - diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... chance of a serious reaction or even death. Hepatitis B Vaccine The hepatitis B vaccine helps protect you from getting a liver infection due to the hepatitis B virus . People with diabetes ages 19 through 59 ...

  12. Diabetic Coma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sometimes, people with diabetes who also have an eating disorder choose not to use their insulin as directed ... 22, 2015 Original article: ... of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  13. Cognitive Interventions for Older Diabetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Sheila; Scogin, Forrest

    1998-01-01

    Older diabetic adults should receive memory training to improve their compliance with medication taking. The intervention should include comprehensible medical instructions, assistance with remembering the nutritional values of food, and higher order skills for disease management. (SK)

  14. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... monitoring in close succession. CDC now recommends the hepatitis B vaccine for adults with diabetes. What is the recommendation ... As with other vaccines, the effectiveness of the hepatitis B vaccine decreases with age. Decisions to vaccinate should include ...

  15. [The diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Hartemann-Heurtier, Agnès; Ha Van, Georges

    2003-05-15

    Diabetic patients are concerned with foot complications when a peripheral neuropathy is present. Screening of predisposed patients may be annually assessed using monofilament testing. Peripheral arterial disease, when associated, increases amputation risk. Ideal treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach with a first-line medical treatment including an optimal off-loading of the diabetic ulcer, ulcer dertersion, glycemic control, and if necessary antibiotic therapy. In case of associated osteomyelitis, a limited surgical resection of the infected bone may be performed. In case of associated arterial disease, a revascularization procedure precede bone resection.

  16. Assessment of awareness of diabetic retinopathy among the diabetics attending the peripheral diabetic clinics in melaka, malaysia.

    PubMed

    Addoor, Krishna R; Krishna, R A; Bhandary, Sulatha V; Khanna, Rajesh; Rao, Lavanya G; Lingam, Kamala D; V S, Binu; Shivaji, Santhosh; Nandannaver, Manjunath

    2011-03-01

    In view of the alarming increase in the incidence of diabetes mellitus in Malaysia, we conducted a study to assess the awareness of complications of diabetes among the diabetics attending the peripheral clinics in Melaka. The study period was from January 2007 to December 2007. 351 patients were included in the study. 79.8% were aware of the complications of diabetes mellitus and 87.2% were aware that diabetes can affect the eyes. However, only 50% of the patients underwent an ophthalmological evaluation. Although awareness was good, the motivation to undergo the assessment was poor.

  17. Diabetic nephropathy: preventing progression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Up to one third of people with type 1 or 2 diabetes will develop microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria after 20 years. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with type 1 diabetes and early nephropathy? What are the effects of treatments in people with type 1 diabetes and late nephropathy? What are the effects of treatments in people with type 2 diabetes and early nephropathy? What are the effects of treatments in people with type 2 diabetes and late nephropathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, glycaemic control, protein restriction, and tight control of blood pressure. PMID:21418671

  18. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Information Diabetic Wound Care What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound that ... key factors in the appropriate treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer: Prevention of infection Taking the pressure off ...

  19. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Nov 4,2016 The following statistics speak ... disease. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  20. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  1. Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. When ... pregnant women in the United States get gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that happens for the ...

  2. Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recruiting Patients & Families Consortia, Networks & Centers Reports & Planning Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Page Content On this page: ... increased risk of developing diabetes. [ Top ] Type 2 Diabetes and Prediabetes Type 2 diabetes is a disorder ...

  3. Women and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Diabetes How to Report Problems with Glucose Meters Diabetes Treatments Some people with diabetes need to take ...

  4. Diabetic Eye Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... visit HHS USAJobs Home > Diabetic Eye Disease Healthy Vision Diabetes Diabetes Home How Much Do You Know? What You Should Know Protecting Against Vision Loss Staying on TRACK Diabetic Eye Disease FAQ ...

  5. Diabetes and kidney disease

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic nephropathy; Nephropathy - diabetic; Diabetic glomerulosclerosis; Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease ... 26696680 . Tong LL, Adler S. Prevention and treatment of diabetic nephropathy. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, eds. ...

  6. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOEpatents

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  7. Diabetes insipidus: The other diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Zargar, Abdul Hamid; Jain, Sunil M.; Sethi, Bipin; Chowdhury, Subhankar; Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Thomas, Nihal; Unnikrishnan, A. G.; Thakkar, Piya Ballani; Malve, Harshad

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a hereditary or acquired condition which disrupts normal life of persons with the condition; disruption is due to increased thirst and passing of large volumes of urine, even at night. A systematic search of literature for DI was carried out using the PubMed database for the purpose of this review. Central DI due to impaired secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) could result from traumatic brain injury, surgery, or tumors whereas nephrogenic DI due to failure of the kidney to respond to AVP is usually inherited. The earliest treatment was posterior pituitary extracts containing vasopressin and oxytocin. The synthetic analog of vasopressin, desmopressin has several benefits over vasopressin. Desmopressin was initially available as intranasal preparation, but now the oral tablet and melt formulations have gained significance, with benefits such as ease of administration and stability at room temperature. Other molecules used for treatment include chlorpropamide, carbamazepine, thiazide diuretics, indapamide, clofibrate, indomethacin, and amiloride. However, desmopressin remains the most widely used drug for the treatment of DI. This review covers the physiology of water balance, causes of DI and various treatment modalities available, with a special focus on desmopressin. PMID:26904464

  8. Diabetes and Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bronsveld, Heleen K.; Jensen, Vibeke; Vahl, Pernille; De Bruin, Marie L.; Cornelissen, Sten; Sanders, Joyce; Auvinen, Anssi; Haukka, Jari; Andersen, Morten; Vestergaard, Peter; Schmidt, Marjanka K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Women with diabetes have a worse survival after breast cancer diagnosis compared to women without diabetes. This may be due to a different etiological profile, leading to the development of more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our aim was to investigate whether insulin and non-insulin treated women with diabetes develop specific clinicopathological breast cancer subtypes compared to women without diabetes. Methods and Findings This cross-sectional study included randomly selected patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed in 2000–2010. Stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis (≤50 and >50 years), women with diabetes were 2:1 frequency-matched on year of birth and age at breast cancer diagnosis (both in 10-year categories) to women without diabetes, to select ~300 patients with tumor tissue available. Tumor MicroArrays were stained by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER, PR), HER2, Ki67, CK5/6, CK14, and p63. A pathologist scored all stains and revised morphology and grade. Associations between diabetes/insulin treatment and clinicopathological subtypes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Morphology and grade were not significantly different between women with diabetes (n = 211) and women without diabetes (n = 101), irrespective of menopausal status. Premenopausal women with diabetes tended to have more often PR-negative (OR = 2.44(95%CI:1.07–5.55)), HER2-negative (OR = 2.84(95%CI:1.11–7.22)), and basal-like (OR = 3.14(95%CI:1.03–9.60) tumors than the women without diabetes, with non-significantly increased frequencies of ER-negative (OR = 2.48(95%CI:0.95–6.45)) and triple negative (OR = 2.60(95%CI:0.88–7.67) tumors. After adjustment for age and BMI, the associations remained similar in size but less significant. We observed no evidence for associations of clinicopathological subtypes with diabetes in postmenopausal women, or with insulin treatment in general. Conclusions We found no

  9. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  10. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  11. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  12. Prevention and treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jonathan Zhang Ming; Ng, Natasha Su Lynn; Thomas, Cecil

    2017-03-01

    The rising prevalence of diabetes estimated at 3.6 million people in the UK represents a major public health and socioeconomic burden to our National Health Service. Diabetes and its associated complications are of a growing concern. Diabetes-related foot complications have been identified as the single most common cause of morbidity among diabetic patients. The complicating factor of underlying peripheral vascular disease renders the majority of diabetic foot ulcers asymptomatic until latter evidence of non-healing ulcers become evident. Therefore, preventative strategies including annual diabetic foot screening and diabetic foot care interventions facilitated through a multidisciplinary team have been implemented to enable early identification of diabetic patients at high risk of diabetic foot complications. The National Diabetes Foot Care Audit reported significant variability and deficiencies of care throughout England and Wales, with emphasis on change in the structure of healthcare provision and commissioning, improvement of patient education and availability of healthcare access, and emphasis on preventative strategies to reduce morbidities and mortality of this debilitating disease. This review article aims to summarise major risk factors contributing to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. It also considers the key evidence-based strategies towards preventing diabetic foot ulcer. We discuss tools used in risk stratification and classifications of foot ulcer.

  13. Diabetes - when you are sick

    MedlinePlus

    ... ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26696680 . Read More Diabetes Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions ACE inhibitors ... Health Topics Diabetes Diabetes in Children and Teens Diabetes Type 1 Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  14. Diabetic dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liya; Parhofer, Klaus G

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic dyslipidemia is characterized by elevated fasting and postprandial triglycerides, low HDL-cholesterol, elevated LDL-cholesterol and the predominance of small dense LDL particles. These lipid changes represent the major link between diabetes and the increased cardiovascular risk of diabetic patients. The underlying pathophysiology is only partially understood. Alterations of insulin sensitive pathways, increased concentrations of free fatty acids and low grade inflammation all play a role and result in an overproduction and decreased catabolism of triglyceride rich lipoproteins of intestinal and hepatic origin. The observed changes in HDL and LDL are mostly sequence to this. Lifestyle modification and glucose control may improve the lipid profile but statin therapy mediates the biggest benefit with respect to cardiovascular risk reduction. Therefore most diabetic patients should receive statin therapy. The role of other lipid lowering drugs, such as ezetimibe, fibrates, omega-3 fatty acids, niacin and bile acid sequestrants is less well defined as they are characterized by largely negative outcome trials. This review examines the pathophysiology of diabetic dyslipidemia and its relationship to cardiovascular diseases. Management approaches will also be discussed.

  15. Plantar Fibroma and Plantar Fibromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot Treatments Injections and other Procedures Treatments of the ... the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot Ailments and Conditions: A Complete List All Site ...

  16. Peroneal Tendinosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot Treatments Injections and other Procedures Treatments of the ... the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot Ailments and Conditions: A Complete List All Site ...

  17. Including Jews in Multiculturalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langman, Peter F.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses reasons for the lack of attention to Jews as an ethnic minority within multiculturalism both by Jews and non-Jews; why Jews and Jewish issues need to be included; and addresses some of the issues involved in the ethical treatment of Jewish clients. (Author)

  18. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes: Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus and Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetes Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Monogenic Forms of Diabetes The most common forms of diabetes, type 1 ... is inherited from each parent. Monogenic Forms of Diabetes Some rare forms of diabetes result from mutations ...

  19. Metabolomics in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Filla, Laura A; Edwards, James L

    2016-04-01

    With a global prevalence of 9%, diabetes is the direct cause of millions of deaths each year and is quickly becoming a health crisis. Major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative stress and dysfunction in multiple metabolic pathways. The most serious complications involve vascular damage and include cardiovascular disease as well as microvascular disorders such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Current clinical analyses like glycated hemoglobin and plasma glucose measurements hold some value as prognostic indicators of the severity of complications, but investigations into the underlying pathophysiology are still lacking. Advancements in biotechnology hold the key to uncovering new pathways and establishing therapeutic targets. Metabolomics, the study of small endogenous molecules, is a powerful toolset for studying pathophysiological processes and has been used to elucidate metabolic signatures of diabetes in various biological systems. Current challenges in the field involve correlating these biomarkers to specific complications to provide a better prediction of future risk and disease progression. This review will highlight the progress that has been made in the field of metabolomics including technological advancements, the identification of potential biomarkers, and metabolic pathways relevant to macro- and microvascular diabetic complications.

  20. Educating supervisors of employees with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia G; Jacobson, Sharol

    2008-06-01

    The worksite presents special challenges not only for employees with diabetes, but also for their supervisors. Supervisors wonder whether certain behaviors are willful misconduct or indicative of health problems, as well as if and how to accommodate employees with diabetes to meet the needs of the employees and the company, within the law. The purpose of this research was to pilot test an innovative educational program for supervisors of employees with diabetes to benefit employees' health and diabetes control while meeting the legal requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Nine supervisors completed a 6-hour program that included innovative teaching strategies--"living the life" of a person with diabetes for 2 days and case studies to practice decision making according to the ADA. The program increased supervisors' reported self-efficacy for supervising employees with diabetes and should improve work life for employees with diabetes, ultimately decreasing employers' health care costs.

  1. Managing diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Sam M; Fan, Stanley L; Yaqoob, M Magdi; Chowdhury, Tahseen A

    2012-03-01

    Burgeoning levels of diabetes are a major concern for dialysis services, as diabetes is now the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed nations. With the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in developing countries, the burden of end stage renal failure due to diabetes is also expected to rise in such countries. Diabetic patients on dialysis have a high burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease, and a higher societal and economic cost compared to non-diabetic subjects on dialysis. Tight glycaemic and blood pressure control in diabetic patients has an important impact in reducing risk of progression to end stage renal disease. The evidence for improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis having an impact on mortality or morbidity is sparse. Indeed, many factors make improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis very challenging, including therapeutic difficulties with hypoglycaemic agents, monitoring difficulties, dialysis strategies that exacerbate hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia, and possibly a degree of therapeutic nihilism or inertia on the part of clinical diabetologists and nephrologists. Standard drug therapy for hyperglycaemia (eg, metformin) is clearly not possible in patients on dialysis. Thus, sulphonylureas and insulin have been the mainstay of treatment. Newer therapies for hyperglycaemia, such as gliptins and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have become available, but until recently, renal failure has precluded their use. Newer gliptins, however, are now licensed for use in 'severe renal failure', although they have yet to be trialled in dialysis patients. Diabetic patients on dialysis have special needs, as they have a much greater burden of complications (cardiac, retinal and foot). They may be best managed in a multidisciplinary diabetic-renal clinic setting, using the skills of diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical nurse specialists in nephrology and diabetes, along with

  2. Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Lu, H A Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Disruption of water and electrolyte balance is frequently encountered in clinical medicine. Regulating water metabolism is critically important. Diabetes insipidus (DI) presented with excessive water loss from the kidney is a major disorder of water metabolism. To understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms and pathophysiology of DI and rationales of clinical management of DI is important for both research and clinical practice. This chapter will first review various forms of DI focusing on central diabetes insipidus (CDI) and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI ) . This is followed by a discussion of regulatory mechanisms underlying CDI and NDI , with a focus on the regulatory axis of vasopressin, vasopressin receptor 2 (V2R ) and the water channel molecule, aquaporin 2 (AQP2 ). The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of various forms of DI will also be discussed with highlights of some of the latest therapeutic strategies that are developed from in vitro experiments and animal studies.

  3. Diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Lozano, M; Salinas, P

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the importance of diabetic retinopathy in the loss of visual function. We exposed the most important risk factors, such as diabetes duration, poor metabolic control, pregnancy, puberty, hypertension, poor control of blood lipids, renal disease, and sleep apnea syndrome. We describe the pathogenesis of the disease, small retinal vessel microangiopathies which produce extravasation, edema and ischemia phenomena. We put special emphasis on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its pathogenic importance. They are also described the main clinical symptoms as microaneurysms, intraretinal hemorrhages, hard and soft exudates, intraretinal microvascular abnormalities (IRMA), venous disorders, formation of new vessels and diabetic macular edema (the latter being the most common cause of vision loss). Finally we describe the latest diagnostic techniques and eye treatment, with special emphasis on obesity surgery importance as more important preventive factor to eliminate the predisposing and precipitating disease symptoms.

  4. Nutritional therapies (including fosteum).

    PubMed

    Nieves, Jeri W

    2009-03-01

    Nutrition is important in promoting bone health and in managing an individual with low bone mass or osteoporosis. In adult women and men, known losses of bone mass and microarchitecture occur, and nutrition can help minimize these losses. In every patient, a healthy diet with adequate protein, fruits, vegetables, calcium, and vitamin D is required to maintain bone health. Recent reports on nutritional remedies for osteoporosis have highlighted the importance of calcium in youth and continued importance in conjunction with vitamin D as the population ages. It is likely that a calcium intake of 1200 mg/d is ideal, and there are some concerns about excessive calcium intakes. However, vitamin D intake needs to be increased in most populations. The ability of soy products, particularly genistein aglycone, to provide skeletal benefit has been recently studied, including some data that support a new medical food marketed as Fosteum (Primus Pharmaceuticals, Scottsdale, AZ).

  5. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to permanent vision loss. What is diabetic macular edema (DME)? DME is the build-up of fluid (edema) in a region of the retina called the ... made to leaking blood vessels in areas of edema near the center of the macula. Laser burns ...

  6. [Obesity and type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Toplak, Hermann; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Wascher, Thomas C; Schindler, Karin; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes are nowadays summarized as "diabesity". That is due to the fact that obesity is frequently preceding and the most important risk factor in the increase of Type 2 Diabetes. The body mass index (BMI) is a crude measure of body fatness. Even normal weight persons can have lack in muscles (sarcopenia), which leads to the recommendation to measure waist und body fatness (e.g. BIA). Lifestyle management including nutrition and physical activity are important for diabetes prevention. In the therapy of Type 2 Diabetes body weight is increasingly used as secondary target. Also the choice of the anti-diabetic medication and concomitant medications is increasingly influenced by body weight. The significance of anti-obesity medications in the therapy of type 2 diabetes will have to be clarified by future studies. Bariatric surgery is at present indicated with a BMI above BMI > 35 kg/m(2) and can lead at least to partial diabetes remission but has to be part of a lifelong care concept.

  7. Diabetes: Models, Signals and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobelli, C.

    2010-07-01

    Diabetes and its complications impose significant economic consequences on individuals, families, health systems, and countries. The control of diabetes is an interdisciplinary endeavor, which includes significant components of modeling, signal processing and control. Models: first, I will discuss the minimal (coarse) models which describe the key components of the system functionality and are capable of measuring crucial processes of glucose metabolism and insulin control in health and diabetes; then, the maximal (fine-grain) models which include comprehensively all available knowledge about system functionality and are capable to simulate the glucose-insulin system in diabetes, thus making it possible to create simulation scenarios whereby cost effective experiments can be conducted in silico to assess the efficacy of various treatment strategies - in particular I will focus on the first in silico simulation model accepted by FDA as a substitute to animal trials in the quest for optimal diabetes control. Signals: I will review metabolic monitoring, with a particular emphasis on the new continuous glucose sensors, on the crucial role of models to enhance the interpretation of their time-series signals, and on the opportunities that they present for automation of diabetes control. Control: I will review control strategies that have been successfully employed in vivo or in silico, presenting a promise for the development of a future artificial pancreas and, in particular, I will discuss a modular architecture for building closed-loop control systems, including insulin delivery and patient safety supervision layers.

  8. Cystic fibrosis related diabetes.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Donal; O'Connell, Jean

    2014-08-01

    Improved life expectancy in cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to an expanding population of adults with CF, now representing almost 50 % of the total CF population. This creates new challenges from long-term complications such as diabetes mellitus (DM), a condition that is present in 40 %-50 % of adults with CF. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) results from a primary defect of insulin deficiency and although sharing features with type 1 (DM1) and type 2 diabetes (DM2), it is a clinically distinct condition. Progression to diabetes is associated with poorer CF clinical outcomes and increased mortality. CFRD is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and the prevalence of microvascular complications is lower than DM1 or DM2. Rather, the primary goal of insulin therapy is the preservation of lung function and optimization of nutritional status. There is increasing evidence that appropriate screening and early intervention with insulin can reverse weight loss and improve pulmonary function. This approach may include targeting postprandial hyperglycemia not detected by standard diagnostic tests such as the oral glucose tolerance test. Further clinical research is required to guide when and how much to intervene in patients who are already dealing with the burden of one chronic illness.

  9. [Obesity and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Tron'ko, N D; Zak, K P

    2013-12-01

    New literature data and the results of own researches concerning the role of excessive body weight and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans are presented in the analytical review. Inaccordance with current insights, obesity and type 2 diabetes are considered diseases of inflammatory nature, characterized by systemic chronic low-grade inflammation, where different kinds of cytokines are cardinally involved. Unfavourable life style, i.e. excessive, high-energy, and irrational nutrition--an excessive consumption of animal fats and foods containing the high amount of glucose and starch with an insufficient use of high fiber vegetables, fish and vitamin D, and also sedentary, inactive life style leads to adipocyte hypertrophy and migration of M1 macrophages into the adipose tissue (AT). As a result, there is a low-grade inflammation accompanied by an increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, etc.), adipokines (leptin, resistin, visfatin etc.) and chemokines (CCL2, CCL5, CCL26 and CX3C). Under the influence of these cytokines, on the one hand, IR "is emerged", and on the other--there is apoptosis of the β-cells, that should be followed by the occurrence of clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes. However, there is also the opposite system in humans, protecting the organism from the development of type 2 diabetes, and including an increase in the formation of M2 macrophages and the increased formation of secretion of antidiabetic cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, etc.) and adiponectin.

  10. The Comorbidity of Diabetes Mellitus and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Katon, Wayne J.

    2009-01-01

    Several factors, including sedentary lifestyle, obesity, and an aging population, contribute to epidemic rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Depression frequently occurs comorbidly with diabetes although it is unrecognized and untreated in approximately two thirds of patients with both conditions. The course of depression in patients with both diabetes and depression is chronic and severe. Up to 80% of patients with diabetes and depression will experience a relapse of depressive symptoms over a 5-year period. Depression is associated with nonadherence to diabetes self-care—including following dietary restrictions, medication compliance, and blood glucose monitoring—resulting in worse overall clinical outcomes. Due to potential negative health consequences associated with comorbid diabetes and depression, both conditions should be optimally treated to maximize patient outcomes. PMID:18954592

  11. Erectile Dysfunction and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 22202 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383) Copyright 1995-2017. American Diabetes Association. All rights reserved. Use of this website constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy « American Diabetes Association Diabetes Forecast Stop Diabetes Step ...

  12. Diabetes meanings among those without diabetes: explanatory models of immigrant Latinos in rural North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Skelly, Anne H; Gesler, Wilbert M; Dougherty, Molly C

    2004-12-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in the United States, particularly among minority individuals. Primary prevention programs for diabetes must be designed to address the beliefs of the populations they target. Little research has investigated the beliefs of those who do not have diabetes. This analysis uses in-depth interviews collected from Latino immigrants, not diagnosed with diabetes, living in a rural US community. Structured by the explanatory models [EM] of Illness framework, this analysis delineates the EMs of diabetes in this community. A significant number of the participants had little knowledge and few beliefs about diabetes. The EMs of those with knowledge of diabetes were varied, but several beliefs were widely held: (a) diabetes is a serious disease that is based on heredity or is inherent in all persons, (b) diabetes can result from several factors, including strong emotions and lifestyle characteristics (an unhealthy diet, not taking care of oneself), (c) beliefs about strong emotion and the importance of blood are related to diabetes causes, symptoms and treatment, and (d) a major and undesirable outcome of diabetes is weight loss. These results provide information for the design of health programs for the prevention of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Refraction, including prisms.

    PubMed

    Hiatt, R L

    1991-02-01

    The literature in the past year on refraction is replete with several isolated but very important topics that have been of interest to strabismologists and refractionists for many decades. The refractive changes in scleral buckling procedures include an increase in axial length as well as an increase in myopia, as would be expected. Tinted lenses in dyslexia show little positive effect in the nonasthmatic patients in one study. The use of spectacles or bifocals as a way to control increase in myopia is refuted in another report. It has been shown that in accommodative esotropia not all patients will be able to escape the use of bifocals in the teenage years, even though surgery might be performed. The hope that disposable contact lenses would cut down on the instance of giant papillary conjunctivitis and keratitis has been given some credence, and the conventional theory that sclerosis alone is the cause of presbyopia is attacked. Also, gas permeable bifocal contact lenses are reviewed and the difficulties of correcting presbyopia by this method outlined. The practice of giving an aphakic less bifocal addition instead of a nonaphakic, based on the presumption of increased effective power, is challenged. In the review of prisms, the majority of articles concern prism adaption. The most significant report is that of the Prism Adaptation Study Research Group (Arch Ophthalmol 1990, 108:1248-1256), showing that acquired esotropia in particular has an increased incidence of stable and full corrections surgically in the prism adaptation group versus the control group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Diabetes and ageing-induced vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Assar, Mariam El; Angulo, Javier; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2016-04-15

    Diabetes and the ageing process independently increase the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Since incidence of diabetes increases as people get older, the diabetic older adults represent the largest population of diabetic subjects. This group of patients would potentially be threatened by the development of CVD related to both ageing and diabetes. The relationship between CVD, ageing and diabetes is explained by the negative impact of these conditions on vascular function. Functional and clinical evidence supports the role of vascular inflammation induced by the ageing process and by diabetes in vascular impairment and CVD. Inflammatory mechanisms in both aged and diabetic vasculature include pro-inflammatory cytokines, vascular hyperactivation of nuclear factor-кB, increased expression of cyclooxygenase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, imbalanced expression of pro/anti-inflammatory microRNAs, and dysfunctional stress-response systems (sirtuins, Nrf2). In contrast, there are scarce data regarding the interaction of these mechanisms when ageing and diabetes co-exist and its impact on vascular function. Older diabetic animals and humans display higher vascular impairment and CVD risk than those either aged or diabetic, suggesting that chronic low-grade inflammation in ageing creates a vascular environment favouring the mechanisms of vascular damage driven by diabetes. Further research is needed to determine the specific inflammatory mechanisms responsible for exacerbated vascular impairment in older diabetic subjects in order to design effective therapeutic interventions to minimize the impact of vascular inflammation. This would help to prevent or delay CVD and the specific clinical manifestations (cognitive decline, frailty and disability) promoted by diabetes-induced vascular impairment in the elderly.

  15. Diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Clara; Karrouz, Wassila; Douillard, Claire; Do Cao, Christine; Cortet, Christine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is characterized by hypotonic polyuria greater than 3 liters/24 hours in adults and persisting even during water deprivation. It is mostly due to a defect in arginin-vasopressin (AVP) synthesis (central DI); other causes are: AVP resistance (nephrogenic DI), abnormal thirst regulation (primary polydipsia) or early destruction of AVP by placental enzymes (gestational DI). A thorough medical history is warranted to investigate nocturnal persistence of polyuria (night waking being a good sign of its organic nature) to specify the onset and duration of the trouble, the medication use and the potential hereditary nature of the disorder. The next step is based on weight and blood pressure measurements and especially the quantification of beverages and diuresis over a 24-hour cycle. Assessment of signs of dehydration, bladder distention, pituitary hormone hyper- or hyposecretion, tumor chiasmatic syndrome, granulomatosis and cancer is required. The diagnosis is based on biological assessment, pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and results of a desmopressin test. In severe forms of DI, urine osmolality remains below 250 mOsmol/kg and serum sodium greater than 145 mmol/L. In partial forms of DI (urine osmolality between 250 and 750), the water deprivation test demonstrating the incapacity to obtain a maximal urine concentration is valuable, together with vasopressin or copeptin measurement. The pituitary MRI is done to investigate the lack of spontaneous hyperintensity signal in the posterior pituitary, which marks the absence of AVP and supports the diagnosis of central DI rather than primary polydipsia (although not absolute); it can also recognize lesions of the pituitary gland or pituitary stalk. Acquired central DI of sudden onset should suggest a craniopharyngioma or germinoma if it occurs before the age of 30 years, and metastasis after the age of 50 years. Fifteen to 20% of head trauma lead to hypopituitarism, including DI in 2% of

  16. [Infection complicated with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Ken-ichi; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are believed to be suspected to be immunocompromized hosts. Many reports have pointed out that diabetic patients are susceptible to certain infections such as surgical site infections, malignant otitis externa, mucormycosis, and necrotizing fasciitis. But their etiology seems to be non-uniform, heterogenous and individualized. Above all, obesity-related infections are also increasing accompanied with the recent rising incidence of obesity. Further studies should be addressed about the relationships between infections and diabetes which include the factors of body mass index, life style, degree of diabetes complications, and poor glycemic control duration. They could live a normal life the same as healthy subjects if good glycemic control is achieved without hypoglycemia.

  17. Gestational diabetes: A clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Ulla; Madsen, Lene Ring; Skajaa, Gitte Oeskov; Iversen, Ditte Smed; Moeller, Niels; Ovesen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing in prevalence in tandem with the dramatic increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in women of childbearing age. Much controversy surrounds the diagnosis and management of gestational diabetes, emphasizing the importance and relevance of clarity and consensus. If newly proposed criteria are adopted universally a significantly growing number of women will be diagnosed as having GDM, implying new therapeutic challenges to avoid foetal and maternal complications related to the hyperglycemia of gestational diabetes. This review provides an overview of clinical issues related to GDM, including the challenges of screening and diagnosis, the pathophysiology behind GDM, the treatment and prevention of GDM and the long and short term consequences of gestational diabetes for both mother and offspring. PMID:26240703

  18. Potential Biochemical Mechanisms of Lung Injury in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that the lung is one of the target organs for microangiopathy in patients with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Diabetes is associated with physiological and structural abnormalities in the diabetic lung concurrent with attenuated lung function. Despite intensive investigations in recent years, the pathogenic mechanisms of diabetic lung injury remain largely elusive. In this review, we summarize currently postulated mechanisms of diabetic lung injury. We mainly focus on the pathogenesis of diabetic lung injury that implicates key pathways, including oxidative stress, non-enzymatic protein glycosylation, polyol pathway, NF-κB pathway, and protein kinase c pathway. We also highlight that while numerous studies have mainly focused on tissue or cell damage in the lung, studies focusing on mitochondrial dysfunction in the diabetic lung have remained sketchy. Hence, further understanding of mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic lung injury should provide invaluable insights into future therapeutic approaches for diabetic lung injury. PMID:28203478

  19. Causes of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... and blood glucose levels rise. Genes and family history As in type 1 diabetes, certain genes may ... can contribute to gestational diabetes. Genes and family history Having a family history of diabetes makes it ...

  20. Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Type 2 diabetes Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent ... your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of ...

  1. "Diabetes Has Instant Consequences..."

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "Diabetes has instant consequences…" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... want to chuck it all. But Diabetes has instant consequences. You learn to be responsible pretty quickly, ...

  2. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... Los carbohidratos y la diabetes Carbs and Blood Sugar Keeping your blood sugar levels on track means ...

  3. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  4. Preventing Diabetes Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Preventing Diabetes Problems View or Print All Sections Heart Disease & ... prevent or delay sexual and urologic problems. Depression & Diabetes Depression is common among people with a chronic, ...

  5. American Diabetes Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... 800-342-2383) Give by Mail Close Fight Diabetes Complications 40% of people with diabetes eventually develop ... Next » « Previous Our Mission: To prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people ...

  6. Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arrives Trouble Getting Pregnant Avoiding Pregnancy Articles Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... diabetes must also take insulin. Problems of Gestational Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well ...

  7. Native Americans with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  8. "Stop Diabetes Now!"

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Stop Diabetes Now!" Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents ... Tips for Seniors at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes Lifestyle changes that lead to weight loss—such ...

  9. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  10. Bronze diabetes.

    PubMed

    L N, Akshatha; Shenoy, Mamatha T; Yadav, Charu; M S, Rukmini; Kamath, Nutan

    2015-04-01

    Thalassemia is a group of disorders characterized by deficient production of the β-globin sub unit of hemoglobin. The mandatory blood transfusions in patients with thalassemia to maintain adequate erythrocyte levels, leads to iron overload. The prevalence of diabetes in patients with thalassemia varies from 6 to 14%. We here by present a known case of thalassemia major in an 18 year old boy. He was diagnosed with thalassemia before the age of one year and is on regular blood transfusion every two weeks since then. The repeated blood transfusion is one of the common causes for haemochromatosis. Iron overload initially leads to glucose abnormalities such as insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, which is followed by impaired secretion of insulin. Diagnosed as a case of bronze diabetes, this patient is on insulin therapy for the last two years. Currently the patient is on iron chelation therapy at Kasturba Medical College Hospital, Mangalore, Karnataka, India.

  11. Diabetic mastopathy as a radiographically occult palpable breast mass.

    PubMed

    Thanarajasingam, Uma; Chen, Beiyun; Tortorelli, Cindy L; Jakub, James W; Ghosh, Karthik

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic mastopathy is an uncommon, benign disease of the breast that can occur in women with diabetes and clinically mimic breast cancer. We describe a patient with long-standing type 1 diabetes who presented with a palpable breast mass with negative imaging findings on mammography, ultrasonography, and breast MRI. Surgical biopsy and histopathology confirmed diabetic mastopathy. We use this case to highlight the recognition, radiographic features, pathology, and management of this benign breast condition and emphasize that, in diabetic patients, the differential diagnosis of a new breast mass should include diabetic mastopathy.

  12. Diagnosis of Diabetes and Prediabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis Your health care professional can diagnose ... cannot diagnose diabetes. Who should be tested for diabetes? Anyone who has symptoms of diabetes should be ...

  13. Diabetes and sexual dysfunction: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Maiorino, Maria Ida; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Esposito, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases in nearly all countries. It has been associated with sexual dysfunction, both in males and in females. Diabetes is an established risk factor for sexual dysfunction in men, as a threefold increased risk of erectile dysfunction was documented in diabetic men, as compared with nondiabetic men. Among women, evidence regarding the association between diabetes and sexual dysfunction are less conclusive, although most studies have reported a higher prevalence of female sexual dysfunction in diabetic women as compared with nondiabetic women. Female sexual function appears to be more related to social and psychological components than to the physiological consequence of diabetes. Hyperglycemia, which is a main determinant of vascular and microvascular diabetic complications, may participate in the pathogenetic mechanisms of sexual dysfunction in diabetes. Moreover, diabetic people may present several clinical conditions, including hypertension, overweight and obesity, metabolic syndrome, cigarette smoking, and atherogenic dyslipidemia, which are themselves risk factors for sexual dysfunction, both in men and in women. The adoption of healthy lifestyles may reduce insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress – all of which are desirable achievements in diabetic patients. Improved well-being may further contribute to reduce and prevent sexual dysfunction in both sexes. PMID:24623985

  14. Efficacy of Osteoporosis Therapies in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes is characterized by increased fracture risk and by reduced bone strength for a given density. Contributing factors may include lower bone turnover and accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts. There are concerns that the pharmacological therapies for osteoporosis, particularly anti-resorptive therapies that suppress bone turnover, may not be as effective in the setting of diabetes. This review considers clinical trials and observational studies that have assessed the efficacy of anti-resorptive and anabolic therapies in diabetic patients. Post hoc analyses of randomized trials indicate that raloxifene has similar efficacy for prevention of vertebral fractures in diabetic compared with non-diabetic patients. Evidence from randomized clinical trials is lacking for anti-fracture efficacy of other osteoporosis therapies in diabetes. However, observational studies suggest that bisphosphonates are effective in preventing fractures in diabetic patients. The great majority of diabetic patients in studies to date have been type 2, and efficacy of osteoporosis therapies in type 1 diabetic patients remains to be addressed. Further evaluation of the efficacy of osteoporosis therapies in the setting of diabetes is needed to provide optimal fracture prevention for this population.

  15. National Childhood Diabetes Program Activities in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Hatun, Şükrü

    2015-01-01

    Recent census figures in Turkey show that out of a population of 76.6 million, 22.7 million (29.7%) are younger than 18 years old. The great majority (>95%) of pediatric cases of diabetes in Turkey are type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). In recent years, with increase in number of pediatric endocrine centers around the country, the important issue of care for diabetic children and adolescents has been revived and major steps have been taken for improvement in pediatric care and its outreach to all diabetic children. The Childhood Diabetes Group continues its activities in cooperation with the Turkish Ministry of Health. A list of areas of interest of the Group include “School programs”, “Incidence/prevalence studies and national registry system”, “Educational guidelines for diabetes in children”, “Increasing the numbers of camps and summer schools for diabetic children”, “Organization of educational programs for the health team”, “National guidelines for transition of diabetic children to adult clinics”, “Improvement of school canteens”, “Educational spots” to improve awareness of diabetes. The activities of the Childhood Diabetes Group will be discussed in detail in this article. PMID:25800469

  16. National childhood diabetes program activities in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Hatun, Şükrü

    2015-03-01

    Recent census figures in Turkey show that out of a population of 76.6 million, 22.7 million (29.7%) are younger than 18 years old. The great majority (>95%) of pediatric cases of diabetes in Turkey are type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). In recent years, with increase in number of pediatric endocrine centers around the country, the important issue of care for diabetic children and adolescents has been revived and major steps have been taken for improvement in pediatric care and its outreach to all diabetic children. The Childhood Diabetes Group continues its activities in cooperation with the Turkish Ministry of Health. A list of areas of interest of the Group include "School programs", "Incidence/prevalence studies and national registry system", "Educational guidelines for diabetes in children", "Increasing the numbers of camps and summer schools for diabetic children", "Organization of educational programs for the health team", "National guidelines for transition of diabetic children to adult clinics", "Improvement of school canteens", "Educational spots" to improve awareness of diabetes. The activities of the Childhood Diabetes Group will be discussed in detail in this article.

  17. Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H.; Freeman, Roy; Veves, Aristidis

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the relationships among large, small, and autonomic fiber neurophysiological measures in a cross-sectional study of patients with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We assessed 130 individuals: 25 healthy subjects and 105 subjects with diabetes. Subjects were classified by the presence or absence of neuropathy by physical examination. All subjects underwent autonomic testing, nerve conduction studies, quantitative sensory testing, and nerve-axon reflex vasodilation in addition to quantifiable neurological examination and symptom scores. Correlation and cluster analysis were used to determine relationships between and among different neurophysiological testing parameters. RESULTS Results of neurophysiological tests were abnormal in patients with clinical evidence of diabetic neuropathy compared with results in healthy control subjects and in those without neuropathy (P < 0.01, all tests). The correlations among individual tests varied widely, both within (r range <0.5–>0.9, NS to <0.001) and between test groups (r range <0.2–>0.5, NS to <0.01). A two-step hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that neurophysiological tests do not aggregate by typical “small,” “large,” or “autonomic” nerve fiber subtypes. CONCLUSIONS The modest correlation coefficients seen between the different testing modalities suggest that these techniques measure different neurophysiological parameters and are therefore not interchangeable. However, the data suggest that only a small number of neurophysiological tests are actually required to clinically differentiate individuals with neuropathy from those without. The natural clustering of both patients and healthy control subjects suggests that variations in the population will need to be considered in future studies of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:20805259

  18. [Gestational Diabetes Mellitus].

    PubMed

    Krejčí, Hana

    2016-01-01

    The present generation of women of childbearing age more frequently suffer from overweight, obesity, initial as well as fully established metabolic syndrome, which together with postponing motherhood until the third decade in life plays an important role in the increasing incidence of gestational diabetes (GDM) that currently affects about 1/5 of pregnant women. However the causal link between diabetes during pregnancy and metabolic diseases in the whole population is mutual. By way of epigenetic changes, maternal diabetes unfavourably programmes metabolism of the offspring, who tend to transfer the disorder to the next generations. Gestational diabetes is therefore an important link fitting into the accumulation curve of the incidence of overweight, obesity, metabolic syndrome and consequently also T2DM among the whole population. Genetic as well as epigenetic factors play a great role in the GDM pathogenesis, which is shown by the fact that this complication also affects women with normal BMI. When it comes to diagnosing GDM, we will need to manage also in future with establishing fasting glycemia and glycemia following glucose challenge (OGTT) that may include a considerable degree of measurement inaccuracy. It is therefore necessary to observe pre-analytical and analytical conditions of measurements in order to obtain a reliable result. It is a positive sign that the Czech professional associations have adopted new international criteria for diagnosing GDM which, as opposed to those valid earlier, better reflect the risk of pregnancy-related and perinatal complications.The care for gestational patients with diabetes at a low risk (due to satisfactory glycemic control through a diet or small pharmacotherapeutic doses, with an eutrophic fetus and without associated complications) is provided by an outpatient gynecologist and a diabetes specialist, they can give birth in standard maternity hospitals. The care for gestational patients with diabetes at a higher risk

  19. Pharmacologic therapies for diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema.

    PubMed

    Rechtman, Ehud; Harris, Alon; Garzozi, Hanna J; Ciulla, Thomas A

    2007-12-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME) are leading causes of blindness in the working-aged population of most developed countries. The increasing number of persons with diabetes worldwide suggests that DR/DME will continue to be major contributors to vision loss and associated functional impairment for years to come. Early detection of retinopathy in persons with diabetes is critical in preventing visual loss, but current methods of screening fail to identify a sizable number of high-risk patients. The control of diabetes-associated metabolic abnormalities (ie, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension) is also important in preserving visual function, as these conditions have been identified as risk factors for both the development and progression of DR/DME. The non-pharmacologic interventions for DR/DME, laser photocoagulation and vitrectomy, only target advanced stages of disease. Several biochemical mechanisms, including increased vascular endothelial growth factor production, protein kinase C beta activation, oxidative stress, and accumulation of intracellular sorbitol and advanced glycosylation end products, may contribute to the vascular disruptions that characterize DR/DME. The inhibition of these pathways holds the promise of the intervention for diabetic retinopathy with higher success rate and also at earlier, non-sight-threatening stages.

  20. Adipokines, diabetes and atherosclerosis: an inflammatory association

    PubMed Central

    Freitas Lima, Leandro C.; Braga, Valdir de Andrade; do Socorro de França Silva, Maria; Cruz, Josiane de Campos; Sousa Santos, Sérgio H.; de Oliveira Monteiro, Matheus M.; Balarini, Camille de Moura

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases can be considered the most important cause of death in diabetic population and diabetes can in turn increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Inflammation process is currently recognized as responsible for the development and maintenance of diverse chronic diseases, including diabetes and atherosclerosis. Considering that adipose tissue is an important source of adipokines, which may present anti and proinflammatory effects, the aim of this review is to explore the role of the main adipokines in the pathophysiology of diabetes and atherosclerosis, highlighting the therapeutic options that could arise from the manipulation of these signaling pathways both in humans and in translational models. PMID:26578976

  1. Schizophrenia, the metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Holt, R I G; Peveler, R C; Byrne, C D

    2004-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is increased in patients with schizophrenia. Although many reasons, including hereditary and lifestyle factors, contribute to this association, recently there has been heightened interest in the subject because of the link between the use of the newer atypical anti-psychotic drugs and the development of diabetes. These drugs cause significant weight gain and this may be one of the mechanisms by which they increase incident diabetes. The increased prevalence of diabetes among people with schizophrenia has implications for the delivery of care by psychiatrists, diabetologists and primary care.

  2. Curcumin and diabetes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Wei; Fu, Min; Gao, Si-Hua; Liu, Jun-Li

    2013-01-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa), a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, has been used for the treatment of diabetes in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine. The active component of turmeric, curcumin, has caught attention as a potential treatment for diabetes and its complications primarily because it is a relatively safe and inexpensive drug that reduces glycemia and hyperlipidemia in rodent models of diabetes. Here, we review the recent literature on the applications of curcumin for glycemia and diabetes-related liver disorders, adipocyte dysfunction, neuropathy, nephropathy, vascular diseases, pancreatic disorders, and other complications, and we also discuss its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The applications of additional curcuminoid compounds for diabetes prevention and treatment are also included in this paper. Finally, we mention the approaches that are currently being sought to generate a "super curcumin" through improvement of the bioavailability to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of diabetes therapeutics.

  3. Diabetes insipidus in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Elizabeth; Kadakia, Rachel; Zimmerman, Donald

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes insipidus, the inability to concentrate urine resulting in polyuria and polydipsia, can have different manifestations and management considerations in infants and children compared to adults. Central diabetes insipidus, secondary to lack of vasopressin production, is more common in children than is nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, the inability to respond appropriately to vasopressin. The goal of treatment in both forms of diabetes insipidus is to decrease urine output and thirst while allowing for appropriate fluid balance, normonatremia and ensuring an acceptable quality of life for each patient. An infant's obligate need to consume calories as liquid and the need for readjustment of medication dosing in growing children both present unique challenges for diabetes insipidus management in the pediatric population. Treatment modalities typically include vasopressin or thiazide diuretics. Special consideration must be given when managing diabetes insipidus in the adipsic patient, post-surgical patient, and in those undergoing chemotherapy or receiving medications that alter free water clearance.

  4. Curcumin and Diabetes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dong-wei; Fu, Min; Gao, Si-Hua; Liu, Jun-Li

    2013-01-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa), a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, has been used for the treatment of diabetes in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine. The active component of turmeric, curcumin, has caught attention as a potential treatment for diabetes and its complications primarily because it is a relatively safe and inexpensive drug that reduces glycemia and hyperlipidemia in rodent models of diabetes. Here, we review the recent literature on the applications of curcumin for glycemia and diabetes-related liver disorders, adipocyte dysfunction, neuropathy, nephropathy, vascular diseases, pancreatic disorders, and other complications, and we also discuss its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The applications of additional curcuminoid compounds for diabetes prevention and treatment are also included in this paper. Finally, we mention the approaches that are currently being sought to generate a “super curcumin” through improvement of the bioavailability to bring this promising natural product to the forefront of diabetes therapeutics. PMID:24348712

  5. Precision diabetes: learning from monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, Andrew T; Patel, Kashyap A

    2017-05-01

    The precision medicine approach of tailoring treatment to the individual characteristics of each patient or subgroup has been a great success in monogenic diabetes subtypes, MODY and neonatal diabetes. This review examines what has led to the success of a precision medicine approach in monogenic diabetes (precision diabetes) and outlines possible implications for type 2 diabetes. For monogenic diabetes, the molecular genetics can define discrete aetiological subtypes that have profound implications on diabetes treatment and can predict future development of associated clinical features, allowing early preventative or supportive treatment. In contrast, type 2 diabetes has overlapping polygenic susceptibility and underlying aetiologies, making it difficult to define discrete clinical subtypes with a dramatic implication for treatment. The implementation of precision medicine in neonatal diabetes was simple and rapid as it was based on single clinical criteria (diagnosed <6 months of age). In contrast, in MODY it was more complex and slow because of the lack of single criteria to identify patients, but it was greatly assisted by the development of a diagnostic probability calculator and associated smartphone app. Experience in monogenic diabetes suggests that successful adoption of a precision diabetes approach in type 2 diabetes will require simple, quick, easily accessible stratification that is based on a combination of routine clinical data, rather than relying on newer technologies. Analysing existing clinical data from routine clinical practice and trials may provide early success for precision medicine in type 2 diabetes.

  6. Macrophages in diabetic gastroparesis– the missing link?

    PubMed Central

    Neshatian, Leila; Gibbons, Simon J.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic gastroparesis results in significant morbidity for patients and major economic burden for society. Treatment options for diabetic gastroparesis are currently directed at symptom control rather than the underlying disease and are limited. The pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis includes damage to intrinsic and extrinsic neurons, smooth muscle and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Oxidative damage in diabetes appears to be one of the primary insults involved in the pathogenesis of several complications of diabetes, including gastroparesis. Recent studies have highlighted the potential role of macrophages as key cellular elements in the pathogenesis of diabetic gastroparesis. Macrophages are important for both homeostasis and defense against a variety of pathogens. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), an enzyme expressed in a subset of macrophages has emerged as a major protective mechanism against oxidative stress. Activation of macrophages with high levels of HO1 expression protects against development of delayed gastric emptying in animal models of diabetes, while activation of macrophages that do not express HO1 are linked to neuromuscular cell injury. Targeting macrophages and HO1 may therefore be a therapeutic option in diabetic gastroparesis. Purpose This report briefly reviews the pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis with a focus on oxidative damage and how activation and polarization of different subtypes of macrophages in the muscularis propria determines development of delay in gastric emptying or protects against its development. PMID:25168158

  7. Weight management in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Siram, Amulya T; Yanagisawa, Robert; Skamagas, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a well known risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at risk for weight gain as a result of multiple influences, including sedentary lifestyle, high-calorie diet, diabetes medications, sociocultural factors, chronic medical and psychiatric illnesses, and a dysregulated enteroendocrine axis. Because both diabetes mellitus and obesity predispose patients to abnormal cardiometabolic profiles and increased cardiovascular disease, management of diabetes mellitus should focus on weight management and optimizing cardiometabolic parameters, concomitant with glycemic control. Lifestyle modification incorporating healthy, calorie-appropriate diets and increased physical activity, in addition to metformin, are central components to diabetes management and weight management. These interventions have been shown to improve body weight, glycemic control, and overall cardiometabolic profile. The weight-neutral and weight-losing diabetes medications include metformin, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 analogs, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and amylin analogs. It is essential that providers understand the metabolic and weight effects of diabetes medications in order to develop strategies for managing diabetes mellitus while helping patients maintain or lose weight in order to improve their overall health outcomes.

  8. Creativity and diabetes education: Essentiality, impact and way forward.

    PubMed

    Sarda, Archana

    2015-04-01

    The changing diabetes in children (CDiC) program is a unique program aimed at children suffering from type 1 diabetes. The whole focus of CDiC is to provide comprehensive care including diabetes education. Various innovative and creative diabetes educational materials have been developed, which makes learning fun. Lot of diabetes camps are held at CDiC, focusing on diabetes education, experience sharing and fun activities. CDiC faces many challenges in an effort to cater to the needs of most deserving children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) throughout the country, to provide comprehensive care including self-sufficiency, to serve children for as long as possible and to ultimately have better outcomes for all children with T1DM. The CDiC program aims to make the child more positive, secure and hopeful and initiate and strive for comprehensive diabetes care for the economically underprivileged children with T1DM.

  9. Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, W. J.; Lemay, C. A.; Hargraves, J. L.; Gorodetsky, T.; Calista, J.

    2012-01-01

    We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included…

  10. Transient diabetes mellitus in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Duhamelle, Alexis; Langlois, Isabelle; Desmarchelier, Marion

    2015-07-01

    A 3.5-year-old spayed female ferret, fed a diet high in refined sugar, was referred for lethargy, polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia. Diabetic ketoacidosis was diagnosed. Treatment included insulin therapy and a low carbohydrate diet. Diabetes mellitus resolved 54 d later, and insulin therapy was discontinued. There has been no recurrence of the diabetes mellitus.

  11. Promoting Healthful Exercise for Visually Impaired Persons with Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzman, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the importance of exercise for many people with visual impairments and diabetes. It lists precautions for the person with visual impairments and diabetes and specifies who should not exercise, explains "diabetes-specific" benefits of exercise, suggests a format for a safe workout, and includes an example of a successful…

  12. Complications of Diabetes and Their Implications for Service Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponchillia, S. V.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents information on the complications of both Type I and Type II diabetes and the implications for the rehabilitation of persons with diabetes and visual impairment. Topics covered include retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma, peripheral neuropathy, carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic hand syndrome, neuropathy of the autonomic nervous…

  13. Tips for Teens with Diabetes: About Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious disease. It means that one's blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Having too much glucose in a person's blood is not healthy. This paper offers tips for managing diabetes.

  14. Pathologic classification of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tervaert, Thijs W Cohen; Mooyaart, Antien L; Amann, Kerstin; Cohen, Arthur H; Cook, H Terence; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Ferrario, Franco; Fogo, Agnes B; Haas, Mark; de Heer, Emile; Joh, Kensuke; Noël, Laure H; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Seshan, Surya V; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bruijn, Jan A

    2010-04-01

    Although pathologic classifications exist for several renal diseases, including IgA nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, and lupus nephritis, a uniform classification for diabetic nephropathy is lacking. Our aim, commissioned by the Research Committee of the Renal Pathology Society, was to develop a consensus classification combining type1 and type 2 diabetic nephropathies. Such a classification should discriminate lesions by various degrees of severity that would be easy to use internationally in clinical practice. We divide diabetic nephropathy into four hierarchical glomerular lesions with a separate evaluation for degrees of interstitial and vascular involvement. Biopsies diagnosed as diabetic nephropathy are classified as follows: Class I, glomerular basement membrane thickening: isolated glomerular basement membrane thickening and only mild, nonspecific changes by light microscopy that do not meet the criteria of classes II through IV. Class II, mesangial expansion, mild (IIa) or severe (IIb): glomeruli classified as mild or severe mesangial expansion but without nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions) or global glomerulosclerosis in more than 50% of glomeruli. Class III, nodular sclerosis (Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions): at least one glomerulus with nodular increase in mesangial matrix (Kimmelstiel-Wilson) without changes described in class IV. Class IV, advanced diabetic glomerulosclerosis: more than 50% global glomerulosclerosis with other clinical or pathologic evidence that sclerosis is attributable to diabetic nephropathy. A good interobserver reproducibility for the four classes of DN was shown (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.84) in a test of this classification.

  15. Comprehensive approach to diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Adler, Sharon G.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with diabetes. This complication reflects a complex pathophysiology, whereby various genetic and environmental factors determine susceptibility and progression to end-stage renal disease. DN should be considered in patients with type 1 diabetes for at least 10 years who have microalbuminuria and diabetic retinopathy, as well as in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes with macroalbuminuria in whom other causes for proteinuria are absent. DN may also present as a falling estimated glomerular filtration rate with albuminuria as a minor presenting feature, especially in patients taking renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system inhibitors (RAASi). The pathological characteristic features of disease are three major lesions: diffuse mesangial expansion, diffuse thickened glomerular basement membrane, and hyalinosis of arterioles. Functionally, however, the pathophysiology is reflected in dysfunction of the mesangium, the glomerular capillary wall, the tubulointerstitium, and the vasculature. For all diabetic patients, a comprehensive approach to management including glycemic and hypertensive control with RAASi combined with lipid control, dietary salt restriction, lowering of protein intake, increased physical activity, weight reduction, and smoking cessation can reduce the rate of progression of nephropathy and minimize the risk for cardiovascular events. This review focuses on the latest published data dealing with the mechanisms, diagnosis, and current treatment of DN. PMID:26894033

  16. Stem cell applications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a devastating disease and the World Health Organization (WHO) expects that the number of diabetic patients will increase to 300 million by the year 2025. Patients with diabetes experience decreased insulin secretion that is linked to a significant reduction in the number of islet cells. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the selective destruction of pancreatic β cells caused by an autoimmune attack. Type 2 diabetes is a more complex pathology that, in addition to β cell loss caused by apoptotic programs, includes β cell de-differentiation and peripheric insulin resistance. The success achieved over the last few years with islet transplantation suggests that diabetes can be cured by the replenishment of deficient β cells. These observations are proof of the concept and have intensified interest in treating diabetes or other diseases not only by cell transplantation but also by stem cells. An increasing body of evidence indicates that, in addition to embryonic stem cells, several potential adult stem/progenitor cells derived from the pancreas, liver, spleen, and bone marrow could differentiate into insulin-producing cells in vitro or in vivo. However, significant controversy currently exists in this field. Pharmacological approaches aimed at stimulating the in vivo/ex vivo regeneration of β cells have been proposed as a way of augmenting islet cell mass. Overexpression of embryonic transcription factors in stem cells could efficiently induce their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells. A new technology, known as protein transduction, facilitates the differentiation of stem cells into insulin-producing cells. Recent progress in the search for new sources of β cells has opened up several possibilities for the development of new treatments for diabetes.

  17. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kashihara, N.; Haruna, Y.; Kondeti, V.K.; Kanwar, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure worldwide. Its morphologic characteristics include glomerular hypertrophy, basement membrane thickening, mesangial expansion, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis and arteriolar thickening. All of these are part and parcel of microvascular complications of diabetes. A large body of evidence indicates that oxidative stress is the common denominator link for the major pathways involved in the development and progression of diabetic micro- as well as macrovascular complications of diabetes. There are a number of macromolecules that have been implicated for increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as, NAD(P)H oxidase, advanced glycation end products (AGE), defects in polyol pathway, uncoupled nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and mitochondrial respiratory chain via oxidative phosphorylation. Excess amounts of ROS modulate activation of protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and various cytokines and transcription factors which eventually cause increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes with progression to fibrosis and end stage renal disease. Activation of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) further worsens the renal injury induced by ROS in diabetic nephropathy. Buffering the generation of ROS may sound a promising therapeutic to ameliorate renal damage from diabetic nephropathy, however, various studies have demonstrated minimal reno-protection by these agents. Interruption in the RAS has yielded much better results in terms of reno-protection and progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this review various aspects of oxidative stress coupled with the damage induced by RAS are discussed with the anticipation to yield an impetus for designing new generation of specific antioxidants that are potentially more effective to reduce reno-vascular complications of diabetes. PMID:20939814

  18. Complication Reducing Effect of the Information Technology-Based Diabetes Management System on Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Lee, Jin-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Ah; Kang, Mi-Ja; Choi, Yoon-Hee; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Chang, Sang-Ah; Cha, Bong-Yun; Son, Ho-Young; Yoon, Kun-Ho

    2008-01-01

    Objective We introduced a new information technology-based diabetes management system, called the Internet-based glucose monitoring system (IBGMS), and demonstrated its short-term and long-term favorable effects. However, there has been no report on clinical effects of such a new diabetes management system on the development of diabetic complications so far. This study was used to simulate the complication reducing effect of the IBGMS, given in addition to existing treatments in patients with type 2 diabetes. Research Design and Methods The CORE Diabetes Model, a peer-reviewed, published, validated computer simulation model, was used to project long-term clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients receiving the IBGMS in addition to their existing treatment. The model combined standard Markov submodels to simulate the incidence and progression of diabetes-related complications. Results The addition of IBGMS was associated with improvements in reducing diabetic complications, mainly microangiopathic complications, including diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, and diabetic foot ulcer. The IBGMS also delayed the development of all diabetic complications for more than 1 year. Conclusions This study demonstrated that the simulated IBGMS, compared to existing treatment, was associated with a reduction of diabetic complications. As a result, it provides valuable evidence for practical application to the public in the world. PMID:19885180

  19. Targeting SGK1 in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, Agnes; Vallon, Volker

    2009-01-01

    Compelling evidence is accumulating pointing to a pathophysiological role of the serum-and-glucocorticoid-inducible-kinase-1 (SGK1) in the development and complications of diabetes. SGK1 is ubiquitously expressed with exquisitely high transcriptional volatility. Stimulators of SGK1 expression include hyperglycemia, cell shrinkage, ischemia, glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids. SGK1 is activated by insulin and growth factors via phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, 3-phosphoinositide dependent kinase PDK1 and mTOR. SGK1 activates ion channels (including ENaC, TRPV5, ROMK, KCNE1/KCNQ1 and CLCKa/Barttin), carriers (including NCC, NKCC, NHE3, SGLT1 and EAAT3), and the Na+/K+-ATPase. It regulates the activity of several enzymes (e.g. glycogen-synthase-kinase-3, ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4-2, phosphomannose-mutase-2), and transcription factors (e.g. forkhead-transcription-factor FOXO3a, β-catenin, nuclear-factor-kappa-B NFκB). A common SGK1 gene variant (~3–5% prevalence in Caucasians, ~10% in Africans) is associated with increased blood pressure, obesity and type 2 diabetes. In patients suffering from type 2 diabetes, SGK1 presumably contributes to fluid retention and hypertension, enhanced coagulation, and increased deposition of matrix proteins leading to tissue fibrosis such as diabetic nephropathy. Accordingly, targeting SGK1 may favourably influence occurrence and course of type 2 diabetes. PMID:19764891

  20. HDL cholesterol and risk of diabetic nephropathy in patient with type 1 diabetes: A meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Zhi, Yunqing; Li, Chengqian; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Lifang; Wang, Yangang; Che, Kui

    2016-12-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the impact of HDL on risk of diabetic nephropathy in T1DM patients. Ten papers containing (7698) participants were included in this meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis suggest that the risk of diabetic nephropathy was decreased with HDL in type 1 diabetes.

  1. Prognostic Value of Admission Blood Glucose in Diabetic and Non-diabetic Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shichao; Pan, Yuesong; Zhao, Xingquan; Liu, Liping; Li, Hao; He, Yan; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Yongjun; Guo, Li

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to validate prognostic value of elevated admission blood glucose (ABG) for clinical outcomes in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a representative large cohort. Data of ICH patients with onset time ≤24 h were derived from the China National Stroke Registry. Clinical outcomes included 3-month poor outcome (death or dependency) and death. Logistic regression was performed for the association between ABG and clinical outcomes, both in the entire cohort and in patients with and without diabetes mellitus. 2951 ICH patients were enrolled, including 267 (9.0%) diabetics. In the entire cohort, there was a trend to increased risk of poor outcome with increasing ABG levels (adjusted OR 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04–1.15; P < 0.001). The risk of poor outcome was significantly greatest for the highest quartile (≥7.53 mmol/L) of ABG (adjusted OR 1.54; 95% CI, 1.17–2.03; p = 0.002, P for trend 0.004). We got similar association in non-diabetics but not in diabetics. Elevated ABG confers a higher risk of poor outcome in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. Elevated ABG is an independent predictor of 3-month poor outcome in ICH patients, the prognostic value of which is greater in non-diabetics than diabetics with similar glucose level. PMID:27562114

  2. Myths about diabetes and its treatment in North Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Mridula; Kishore, Jugal

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myths prevailing about diabetes in the society have become a major hurdle for its proper treatment and control. AIM: To find out about various myths related to diabetes and its treatment in the population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross sectional study was carried out in a teaching hospital of Delhi in 2008. 124 diabetic patients attending the regular diabetic clinic, 78 people who accompanied these patients and 214 non-diabetic people were included in the study. A pre-tested interview schedule with 48 questions was used to get information about sociodemographic characteristics and myths about diabetes. Data was analyzed by Epi info software version 3.2. RESULTS: The most common myth in the population (22%) was that eating more sugar causes diabetes. Others were: diabetes can only occur in old age, soaking feet in water can help control blood sugar, diabetes is a result of past sins and is cured by spiritual treatment. Myths were significantly more common in females, non-diabetics, less educated group. There was a slightly higher prevalence of myths in Muslim population. 12.1% of diabetics were taking herbal medicines. 15.9% of the diabetics and 26% of non diabetics were unaware that complications could occur if diabetes was uncontrolled. 18.5% of diabetics and 30.1% of non-diabetics were unaware about role of diet and lifestyle measures in control of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of myths about diabetes is high in North Indian population which could be associated with poor early health seeking behavior and poor compliance with treatment. PMID:20165650

  3. Visual impairment and blindness in type 2 diabetics: Ife-Ijesa diabetic retinopathy study.

    PubMed

    Onakpoya, O H; Kolawole, B A; Adeoye, A O; Adegbehingbe, B O; Laoye, O

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes and blindness are important health issues globally; we determined the prevalence of blindness, diabetic retinopathy, and other eye diseases in Nigerian-type 2 diabetics. A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted on consenting type 2 diabetic patients who had scheduled comprehensive eye examination including dilated funduscopy with +78DS. Visual status was graded using the WHO criteria. Approval from Institutional Ethics Committee was obtained. Primary outcome measures were the prevalence and causes of blindness as well as prevalence of diabetic retinopathy. Secondary outcome measures were the presence of other eye diseases. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13. Two hundred and sixty-six eyes of 133 type 2 diabetic patients aged 22-89 years were studied; 69 (51.9 %) were males while 64 (48.1 %) were females. Five (3.8 %) patients were blind while 27 (20.3 %) were visually impaired. Cataract was the leading cause of blindness (60 %) and visual impairment was found in 59.3 %. Diabetic retinopathy was present in 37 (27.8 %) diabetic patients of which 5 (3.8 %) were proliferative. Diabetic macular edema was present in 31 (23.3 %) patients. Severe visual impairment and blindness were commoner in those with diabetic retinopathy. Refractive error 67 (25.2 %), cataract 63 (23.7 %), and chronic glaucoma 44 (16.5 %) were the most prevalent non-diabetic retinopathy eye diseases. High prevalence of blindness, diabetic retinopathy, and other diseases are seen in type 2 diabetics. Health education, early diagnosis as well as treatment of diabetic retinopathy and other diseases will largely alleviate these ocular morbidities.

  4. Screening for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy in patients with diabetes: a nationwide survey in Korea.

    PubMed

    Byun, Sang-Ho; Ma, Seung Hyun; Jun, Jae Kwan; Jung, Kyu-Won; Park, Boyoung

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to identify factors associated with screening for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy. Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2007 and 2009 were analyzed. Of 24,871 participants, 1,288 patients diagnosed with diabetes at ≥30 years of age were included. 36.3% received screening for diabetic retinopathy, and 40.5% received screening for diabetic nephropathy during the previous year. Patients living in rural areas, those with less education, those who had not received education about diabetes care, and those who did not receive medical care for diabetes were screened less often for retinopathy or nephropathy. Patients with poorer self-reported health status were screened more often. Occupation, smoking status, and diabetes duration were associated with retinopathy screening. Lower family income was associated with decreased nephropathy screening. Receiving education about diabetes care and receiving medical care for diabetes were significant factors in patients with a shorter duration of diabetes (the significant odds ratio [OR] of not receiving education varied between 0.27 and 0.51, and that of not receiving medical care varied between 0.34 and 0.42). Sociodemographic factors and health-related factors as well as education and medical care influenced screening for diabetic complications among those with a longer duration of diabetes (for retinopathy and nephropathy, the significant OR of living in a rural area varied between 0.56 and 0.61; for retinopathy, the significant OR of current smokers was 0.55, and the p-trend of subjective health status was <0.001; for nephropathy, the significant OR of a monthly household income of <3000 dollars was 0.61 and the p-trends of education and subjective health status were 0.030 and 0.007, respectively). Efforts to decrease sociodemographic disparities should be combined with education about diabetes care to increase the screening, especially for those with a

  5. Exploring salivary proteomes in edentulous patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Border, Michael B; Schwartz, Sarah; Carlson, Jim; Dibble, Christopher F; Kohltfarber, Heidi; Offenbacher, Steven; Buse, John B; Bencharit, Sompop

    2012-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes and tooth loss are linked both epidemiologically and pathophysiologically. We applied label-free differential protein expression analysis using multidimensional liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) to explore the proteomic profile of saliva samples collected from selected type 2 diabetic edentulous patients and non-diabetic controls. Ninety-six peptides corresponding to 52 proteins were differentially expressed between the diabetic edentulous patients and controls (p < 0.05). Some diabetes-related inflammatory biomarkers including glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and serum amyloid A were detected with levels increased in diabetic samples. Other biomarkers including amylase, palate, lung and nasal epithelium associated protein (PLUNC), and serotransferrin levels were decreased in diabetic samples. In contrast with previous findings, salivary carbonic anhydrase 6 and alpha-2 macroglobulin levels, however, were decreased in this diabetic patient population. Cluster analysis and principle component analysis demonstrated a differential pattern of protein biomarker expression between diabetic and control subjects. Western blot analysis was completed to confirm the relatively lower expression level of two biomarkers, including PLUNC and amylase in the diabetic group compared to control subjects. The presence of salivary biomarkers specific for diabetes in edentulous subjects mimics those in serum, especially those related to inflammatory/lipid metabolism. While this exploratory study requires further validation with a larger population, it provides proof-of-principle for salivary proteomics for edentulous subjects with diabetes.

  6. Epigenetic Regulations in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a chronic complication of diabetes and the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease. It has been reported that multiple factors are involved in the pathogenesis of DN, while the molecular mechanisms that lead to DN are still not fully understood. Numerous risk factors for the development of diabetic nephropathy have been proposed, including ethnicity and inherited genetic differences. Recently, with the development of high-throughput technologies, there is emerging evidence that suggests the important role of epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of DN. Epigenetic regulations, including DNA methylation, noncoding RNAs, and histone modifications, play a pivotal role in DN pathogenesis by a second layer of gene regulation. All these findings can contribute to developing novel therapies for DN.

  7. Epidemiology of fractures in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes affects an increasing proportion of older adults, the population that is also at elevated risk of fracture. Type 2 diabetes itself increases the risk of fracture, particularly in African-American and Latino populations. In Western countries, overweight and obesity, associated with reduced fracture risk, are highly prevalent in diabetic patients. Studies in East Asian countries that have a lower prevalence of obesity with diabetes may help to disentangle the effects of diabetes and obesity on the skeleton. Type 2 diabetes is also associated with higher bone density, and as a result standard tools for fracture prediction tend to underestimate fracture risk in this population, an important challenge for risk assessment in the clinical setting. Contributing factors to the increased fracture risk in type 2 diabetes include more frequent falls and deficits in diabetic bone, not captured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), that are as yet not clearly understood. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that poor glycemic control contributes to increased fracture risk although intensive lowering of A1C is not effective in preventing fracture. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Bone and diabetes".

  8. Diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Botero, Diego; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I

    2005-01-01

    Until recently, diabetes in children was virtually synonymous with type 1 diabetes mellitus, whereas type 2 diabetes was a disease of middle age and the elderly. Over the past 10-20 years, an alarming increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been reported from pediatric diabetes centers in North America and elsewhere in the world. Lifestyle factors responsible for the worldwide epidemic of overweight and obesity are responsible for the increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in adults and children. This article briefly discusses the diagnosis and major types of diabetes in children but focuses on aspects of type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents, including demographics, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, screening, prevention and treatment. The identification of children at risk for type 2 diabetes and the implementation of community-wide preventive programs will be essential to reverse the tide. The availability of calorie dense "fast foods," candy, and sugared soft drinks must be restricted in schools and other venues frequented by children. Parents must limit the amount of time their children spend watching television and playing computer games. After-school programs that promote physical activity should be a priority of local and central governmental agencies. Prevention will only succeed if governments and local communities recognize that childhood obesity is an important public health problem and provide an environment that promotes changes in lifestyle that prevent and reverse obesity.

  9. Cutaneous Manifestations of Diabetes Mellitus: A Review.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ana Luiza; Illing, Tanja; Schliemann, Sibylle; Elsner, Peter

    2017-04-03

    Diabetes mellitus is a widespread endocrine disease with severe impact on health systems worldwide. Increased serum glucose causes damage to a wide range of cell types, including endothelial cells, neurons, and renal cells, but also keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Skin disorders can be found in about one third of all people with diabetes and frequently occur before the diagnosis, thus playing an important role in the initial recognition of underlying disease. Noninfectious as well as infectious diseases have been described as dermatologic manifestations of diabetes mellitus. Moreover, diabetic neuropathy and angiopathy may also affect the skin. Pruritus, necrobiosis lipoidica, scleredema adultorum of Buschke, and granuloma annulare are examples of frequent noninfectious skin diseases. Bacterial and fungal skin infections are more frequent in people with diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy and angiopathy are responsible for diabetic foot syndrome and diabetic dermopathy. Furthermore, antidiabetic therapies may provoke dermatologic adverse events. Treatment with insulin may evoke local reactions like lipohypertrophy, lipoatrophy and both instant and delayed type allergy. Erythema multiforme, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, drug eruptions, and photosensitivity have been described as adverse reactions to oral antidiabetics. The identification of lesions may be crucial for the first diagnosis and for proper therapy of diabetes.

  10. Does a Personalized Health Portal for Diabetes Retinal Imaging Positively Affect Motivational Readiness to Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    term complications related to diabetes include diabetic eye disease, nerve damage ( neuropathy ), heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and peripheral ...TITLE: Does a Personalized Health Portal for Diabetes Retinal Imaging Positively Affect Motivational Readiness to Change PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE Does a Personalized Health Portal for Diabetes Retinal Imaging 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-09-2-0166 Positively Affect Motivational

  11. Glycemic Control in a Clinic-Based Sample of Diabetics in M'Bour Senegal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BeLue, Rhonda; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; NDao, Fatou; Ba, Fatou Niass Niang; Diaw, Mor

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) including Senegal is faced with a significant and increasing burden of type 2 diabetes. However, little information is available about diabetes management among Senegalese diabetics. Purpose: The current study aims to describe the level of glycemic control among a convenience sample of diabetics who receive…

  12. Do statins really cause diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Alaa J.; ElMallah, Ahmed I.; Poushuju, Rita J.; Itani, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate and establish the relationship between the use of statin therapy and the risk of development of diabetes. Methods: PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was searched for randomized controlled end-point trials of statins, with more than 1000 subjects and a minimum of one-year follow-up period, published until August 2015. The odds ratio (OR) of diabetes incidence with overall statin therapy as well as with different statins in question was calculated through random effect meta-analysis model. Results: Fourteen studies were included in the analysis with a total of 94,943 participants. Of these, 2392 subjects developed incident diabetes in the statin and 2167 in the placebo groups during a 4-year follow-up. The OR of diabetes incidence with statin therapy was significantly higher as compared with the placebo group (OR=1.11; 95% confidence interval = 1.0 to 1.2; p=0.007). There was an insignificant level of heterogeneity between the included trials (Cochran Q= 19.463, p=0.109, I2=33.20). Subgroup analysis showed that only 2 statins namely, atorvastatin (OR= 1.29; p=0.042) and rosuvastatin (OR = 1.17; px=0.01) were significantly associated. Conclusion: Statin therapy can slightly increase risk of incident diabetes in subjects with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27652354

  13. Gestational diabetes - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy - gestational diabetes; Prenatal care - gestational diabetes ... Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar (glucose) that happens during pregnancy. There are no symptoms in most cases. But ...

  14. Diabetes mellitus in two genetically distinct populations in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Al-Eitan, Laith N.; Nassar, Ahmad M.; Dajani, Rana B.; Almomani, Basima A.; Saadeh, Nesreen A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To compare clinical, anthropometric, and laboratory characteristics in diabetes type 2 patients of 2 genetically-distinct ethnicities living in Jordan, Arabs and Circassians/Chechens. Methods: This cross sectional ethnic comparison study was conducted in King Abdullah University Hospital, Irbid and The National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Genetics, Amman, Jordan between June 2013 and February 2014. A sample of 347 (237 Arab and 110 Circassian/Chechen) people living with diabetes were included in the study. Data were collected through direct interviews with the participants. Clinical data were collected using a questionnaire and anthropometric measurements. Laboratory data were extracted from the patients’ medical records. Results: More Arabs with diabetes had hypertension as a comorbidity than Circassians/Chechens with diabetes. Arabs living with diabetes were generally more obese, whereas Circassians/Chechens living with diabetes had worse lipid control. Arabs with diabetes had higher means of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting blood sugar, and more Arabs with diabetes had unsatisfactory glycemic control (60.6%) than Circassians/Chechens with diabetes (38.2%) (HbA1c ≥7.0%). Most participants (88.8%) had at least one lipid abnormality (dyslipidemia). Conclusion: Multiple discrepancies among the 2 ethnic diabetic populations were found. New diabetes management recommendations and policies should be used when treating people living with diabetes of those ethnicities, particularly in areas of glycemic control, lipid control, and obesity. PMID:28133689

  15. Diabetes 2030: Insights from Yesterday, Today, and Future Trends

    PubMed Central

    Bezold, Clement; Arikan, Yasemin; Byrne, Erin; Krohe, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To forecast future trends in diabetes prevalence, morbidity, and costs in the United States, the Institute for Alternative Futures has updated its diabetes forecasting model and extended its projections to 2030 for the nation, all states, and several metropolitan areas. This paper describes the methodology and data sources for these diabetes forecasts and discusses key implications. In short, diabetes will remain a major health crisis in America, in spite of medical advances and prevention efforts. The prevalence of diabetes (type 2 diabetes and type 1 diabetes) will increase by 54% to more than 54.9 million Americans between 2015 and 2030; annual deaths attributed to diabetes will climb by 38% to 385,800; and total annual medical and societal costs related to diabetes will increase 53% to more than $622 billion by 2030. Improvements in management reducing the annual incidence of morbidities and premature deaths related to diabetes over this time period will result in diabetes patients living longer, but requiring many years of comprehensive management of multiple chronic diseases, resulting in dramatically increased costs. Aggressive population health measures, including increased availability of diabetes prevention programs, could help millions of adults prevent or delay the progression to type 2 diabetes, thereby helping turn around these dire projections. PMID:27124621

  16. Monogenic diabetes: implications for therapy of rare types of disease.

    PubMed

    Malecki, Maciej T; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2008-08-01

    There are two major forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. However, monogenic diabetes, associated with severe beta-cell dysfunction or with severe resistance to insulin action, is diagnosed with increasing frequency by genetic testing. The list of such forms of diabetes includes MODY, mitochondrial diabetes, permanent neonatal diabetes (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes, familial lipodystrophies and some others. These rare forms constitute probably at least a few per cent of all diabetes cases seen in diabetic clinics. The identification of the molecular background of specific forms of diabetes gives new insight into the underlying aetiology. This knowledge helps to optimize treatment in specific clinical situations. The proper differential diagnosis also helps to predict the progress of diabetes in affected individuals and defines the prognosis in the family. For example, in patients with MODY2 because of glucokinase mutations who have very mild diabetes characterized by modest fasting, hyperglycaemia diet is frequently sufficient. Some other forms of monogenic diabetes associated with impaired function of the beta-cell, such as MODY3 and PNDM linked to mutations in Kir6.2 and SUR1 genes, can be successfully managed by sulphonylurea agents. Although the examples of pharmacogenetics seem to be less spectacular in rare syndromes of insulin resistance, those patients can also benefit from genetic testing. In this paper, the aetiology of some monogenic diabetes forms is reviewed together with the clinical aspects of management of the affected individuals.

  17. Summer Savory: From the Selection of Traditional Applications to the Novel Effect in Relief, Prevention, and Treatment of a Number of Serious Illnesses such as Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamidpour, Rafie; Hamidpour, Soheila; Hamidpour, Mohsen; Shahlari, Mina; Sohraby, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Savory (Satureja L.) plant species have been used for centuries as culinary herbs and spices, as well as traditional remedies for the treatment or relief of various common health symptoms in many parts of the world. Recent studies suggest that the use of some Satureja species is effective in protecting the body against oxidative stress, free radical damage, inflammation, microbial infections, etc., A review of many studies suggests that savory species, in addition to treating minor ordinary ailments, can potentially provide a novel natural prevention or treatment for some chronic and serious illnesses such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and Alzheimer's. PMID:25161917

  18. Improved prognosis of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken L; Carstensen, Bendix; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Hovind, Peter; Hansen, Tine W; Rossing, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The natural history of diabetic nephropathy offered an average survival of only 5-7 years. During the past decades, multiple changes in therapy and lifestyle have occurred. The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy after implementing stricter control of blood pressure (including increased use of long-term renin-angiotensin system inhibition), lipids, and glycemia, along with less smoking and other lifestyle and treatment advancements, is inadequately analyzed. To clarify this, we studied 497 patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy at the Steno Diabetes Center and compared them with previous data, obtained using identical criteria at our hospital. The glomerular filtration rate, measured yearly by 51Cr-EDTA plasma clearance, was a mean of 71 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at baseline. The mean glomerular filtration rate decline was significantly reduced by 19% (95% confidence interval 5-34) from previously 4.0 to 3.3 ml/min per 1.73 m2/year. During a median follow-up of 9.1 years, 29% of participants doubled their plasma creatinine or developed end-stage renal disease. Mortality risk was similar to our prior study (hazard ratio 1.05 (0.76-1.43). However, after age adjustment, as both diabetes and nephropathy onset occurred later in life, mortality was reduced by 30%. Risk factors for decline in glomerular filtration rate, death, and other renal end points were generally in agreement with prior studies. Thus, with current treatment of nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, the prognosis and loss of renal function has improved along with better control of modifiable risk factors.

  19. Antioxidant Strategies in the Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oyenihi, Ayodeji Babatunde; Ayeleso, Ademola Olabode; Masola, Bubuya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycaemia (an abnormally high glucose concentration in the blood) resulting from defects in insulin secretion/action, or both, is the major hallmark of diabetes in which it is known to be involved in the progression of the condition to different complications that include diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy (diabetes-induced nerve damage) is the most common diabetic complication and can be devastating because it can lead to disability. There is an increasing body of evidence associating diabetic neuropathy with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress results from the production of oxygen free radicals in the body in excess of its ability to eliminate them by antioxidant activity. Antioxidants have different mechanisms and sites of actions by which they exert their biochemical effects and ameliorate nerve dysfunction in diabetes by acting directly against oxidative damage. This review will examine different strategies for managing diabetic neuropathy which rely on exogenous antioxidants. PMID:25821809

  20. Type 1 Diabetes in Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Maureen; Helgeson, Vicki; Wiebe, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been studied as a chronic illness of childhood. However, young adulthood is a critical time for the development and integration of lifelong diabetes management skills, and research is starting to identify unique challenges faced by youth with diabetes as they age into adulthood. Most young adults experience multiple transitions during this unstable developmental period, including changes in lifestyle (e.g., education, occupation, living situation), changes in health care, and shifting relationships with family members, friends, and intimate others. Young adults with type 1 diabetes must navigate these transitions while also assuming increasing responsibility for their diabetes care and overall health. Despite these critical health and psychosocial concerns, there is a notable lack of evidence-based clinical services and supports for young adults with type 1 diabetes. We review relevant evolving concerns for young adults with type 1 diabetes, including lifestyle considerations, health care transitions, psychosocial needs, and changes in supportive networks, and how type 1 diabetes impacts and is impacted by these key developmental considerations. Specific avenues for intervention and future research are offered. PMID:25901502

  1. The Effect of Perceived Stress and Family Functioning on People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Bhagyashree; Rao, Satheesh; T.S., Sanal

    2013-01-01

    Background: Various studies have suggested that support from a patient’s family can facilitate his/her recovery from a physical illness and improve the ability of the patient to deal with consequences of Type 2 Diabetes. Stress is considered to play a major role in influencing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Aim: To determine the roles of Perceived Stress and Family functioning on behaviours of individuals with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Material and Methods: The present study included 250 Diabetics as per the WHO criteria and 250 Non-Diabetics. Questionnaires were given to them to obtain data. Results: Stress was found to be high among Diabetics (22.17%) as compared to that in non-Diabetics (16.92%). Family assessment showed a significant difference among its subscales when it was compared between Diabetics and Non-Diabetics. Conclusion: Perceived stress influences Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Role played by the Family is significant in managing Diabetes. PMID:24551677

  2. Personal models for diabetes in context and patients' health status.

    PubMed

    Lange, Lori J; Piette, John D

    2006-06-01

    In a diverse sample of 452 adult diabetes patients, we investigated: (1) personal model dimensions for diabetes and expanded upon the literature by indexing fatalism, (2) the relationship between contextual factors and patients' beliefs about the seriousness and controllability of diabetes, and (3) the unique contribution of illness representation combinations to clinical outcomes when controlling for baseline disease severity. Major categories of predictors included patients' sociocultural characteristics, illness history (e.g., co-morbidities, diabetes complications) and recent physical symptoms. Illness representations were measured using the Personal Models of Diabetes Interview and questions that index fatalistic beliefs. Clinical outcome measures included patients' glycemic control (HbA1c) and the patient's physical and mental functions as measured by the SF-12. Analyses corroborated the literature by identifying seriousness and treatment effectiveness cognitive model dimensions for diabetes. Physical symptoms and other disease-related factors were strong predictors of patients' seriousness beliefs for diabetes, whereas sociocultural factors (education, ethnicity) best explained representations related to the controllability of diabetes (i.e., treatment effectiveness, fatalism). Seriousness beliefs were good indicators of actual glucose control, except for cases in which patients were more fatalistic and believed diabetes to be less serious. Although patients had medically consistent views of their diabetes, variations in personal models of diabetes were related to specific contextual factors and independently explained diabetes control.

  3. Barriers to diabetes management: patient and provider factors.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soohyun; Chesla, Catherine; Stotts, Nancy A; Kroon, Lisa; Janson, Susan L

    2011-07-01

    Despite significant advances in diagnosis and treatment, the persistence of inadequate metabolic control continues. Poor glycemic control may be reflected by both the failure of diabetes self-management by patients as well as inadequate intervention strategies by clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize existing knowledge regarding various barriers of diabetes management from the perspectives of both patients and clinicians. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, and PsycINFO identified 1454 articles in English published between 1990 and 2009, addressing type 2 diabetes, patient's barriers, clinician's barriers, and self-management. Patients' adherence, attitude, beliefs, and knowledge about diabetes may affect diabetes self-management. Culture and language capabilities influence the patient's health beliefs, attitudes, health literacy, thereby affecting diabetes self-management. Other influential factors include the patient's financial resources, co-morbidities, and social support. Clinician's attitude, beliefs and knowledge about diabetes also influence diabetes management. Clinicians may further influence the patient's perception through effective communication skills and by having a well-integrated health care system. Identifying barriers to diabetes management is necessary to improve the quality of diabetes care, including the improvement of metabolic control, and diabetes self-management. Further research that considers these barriers is necessary for developing interventions for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Facts about Diabetes: A Leading Cause of Death in the U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Provides statistics on African Americans with diabetes, including death rates, risk factors, and treatment. American Indians and ... American Indians and Alaska Natives with diabetes, including death rates, risk factors, and treatment. Asian Americans and ...

  5. Diabetes Care: 10 Ways to Avoid Diabetes Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diabetes Diabetes care is a lifelong responsibility. Consider 10 strategies to prevent diabetes complications. By Mayo Clinic ... of serious — even life-threatening — complications. Here are 10 ways to take an active role in diabetes ...

  6. Strong diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Young, James; Anwar, Aresh

    2007-01-01

    The case of a 36‐year‐old male professional bodybuilder is reported. He presented to the accident and emergency department with right upper quadrant pain. This was on the background of a 15‐year history of anabolic steroid and growth hormone misuse. Examination revealed mild hepatomegaly and a random blood sugar of 30.2 mmol/l. There was no evidence of ketonuria or acidosis. Biochemical evidence of hepatitis was found, and the patient was in acute renal failure. He was given a sliding scale of insulin and an intravenous infusion of crystalloid. The hepatitis and hyperglycaemia settled with conservative treatment. It is believed that this is the first reported case of frank diabetes precipitated by supraphysiological recreational growth hormone misuse. PMID:17324962

  7. Strong diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Young, James; Anwar, Aresh

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 36-year-old male professional bodybuilder is reported. He presented to the accident and emergency department with right upper quadrant pain. This was on the background of a 15-year history of anabolic steroid and growth hormone misuse. Examination revealed mild hepatomegaly and a random blood sugar of 30.2 mmol/l. There was no evidence of ketonuria or acidosis. Biochemical evidence of hepatitis was found, and the patient was in acute renal failure. He was given a sliding scale of insulin and an intravenous infusion of crystalloid. The hepatitis and hyperglycaemia settled with conservative treatment. It is believed that this is the first reported case of frank diabetes precipitated by supraphysiological recreational growth hormone misuse. PMID:21686671

  8. Detecting and managing gestational diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Blair, M. M.; Noc, A. M.

    1993-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is an asymptomatic metabolic disorder of pregnancy associated with increased morbidity in mother and fetus. Early detection and intervention improve pregnancy outcome. This article reviews the current approach to diagnosis and management. Specific guidelines for nutritional management and insulin use are included. PMID:8495138

  9. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus: a complication of diabetic neuropathy or a different type of diabetes?

    PubMed

    Hardt, Philip D; Ewald, Nils

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a frequently observed phenomenon in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Alterations of exocrine pancreatic morphology can also be found frequently in diabetic patients. Several hypotheses try to explain these findings, including lack of insulin as a trophic factor for exocrine tissue, changes in secretion and/or action of other islet hormones, and autoimmunity against common endocrine and exocrine antigens. Another explanation might be that diabetes mellitus could also be a consequence of underlying pancreatic diseases (e.g., chronic pancreatitis). Another pathophysiological concept proposes the functional and morphological alterations as a consequence of diabetic neuropathy. This paper discusses the currently available studies on this subject and tries to provide an overview of the current concepts of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in diabetes mellitus.

  10. Language barrier and its relationship to diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Language barrier is an important determinant of health care access and health. We examined the associations of English proficiency with type-2 diabetes (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Asian Indians living in Singapore, an urban city where English is the predominant language of communication. Methods This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. T2DM was defined as HbA1c ≥6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal photographs were graded for the severity of DR including vision-threatening DR (VTDR). Presenting visual impairment (VI) was defined as LogMAR visual acuity > 0.30 in the better-seeing eye. English proficiency at the time of interview was assessed. Results The analyses included 2,289 (72.1%) English-speaking and 885 (27.9%) Tamil- speaking Indians. Tamil-speaking Indians had significantly higher prevalence of T2DM (46.2 vs. 34.7%, p < 0.001) and, among those with diabetes, higher prevalence of DR (36.0 vs. 30.6%, p < 0.001), VTDR (11.0 vs. 6.5%, p < 0.001), and VI (32.4 vs. 14.6%) than English speaking Indians. Oaxaca decomposition analyses showed that the language-related discrepancies (defined as the difference in prevalence between persons speaking different languages) in T2DM, DR, and VTDR could not be fully explained by socioeconomic measures. Conclusions In an English dominant society, Tamil-speaking Indians are more likely to have T2DM and diabetic retinopathy. Social policies and health interventions that address language-related health disparities may help reduce the public health impact of T2DM in societies with heterogeneous populations. PMID:22974298

  11. Factors Associated with Consumption of Diabetic Diet among Type 2 Diabetic Subjects from Ahmedabad, Western India

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mayur; Patel, Ina M.; Patel, Yash M.

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the current situation of and factors associated with consumption of diabetic diet among 399 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects from Ahmedabad, Western India. The study was performed with diagnosed (at least one year old) diabetic subjects who attended the Department of Diabetology, All India Institute of Diabetes and Research and Yash Diabetes Specialties Centre (Swasthya Hospital), Ahmedabad during July 2010–November 2010. The subjects completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire included variables, such as sociodemographic factors, family history of diabetes, behavioural profile, risk profile (glycaemic status, hypertension, and obesity), and diet-related history (consumption of diabetic diet, consumption of low fat/skimmed milk, method of cooking, and sources for diet advice). Blood pressure, body mass index, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level, and fasting lipid profile were measured. All analyses including multivariate logistic regression were conducted using SPSS, version 11.5. In total, 399 T2DM subjects (65% male, 35% female) with mean age of 53.16±7.95 years were studied. Although 73% of T2DM subjects were consuming diabetic diet, the good glycaemic control (HbA1c level <7%) was achieved only in 35% of the subjects. The majority (75%) of the subjects had a positive family history of diabetes, and 52% were obese. In 77%, the main source of dietary advice was doctor. In 36%, the main methods of cooking were: boiling and roasting. The final multivariate model showed that visit to dietician, level of education, intake of low fat, and family history of diabetes were independent predictors for diabetic diet consumption among T2DM subjects. However, longitudinal and cohort studies are required to establish the association between consumption of diabetic diet and glycaemic control. PMID:23304911

  12. Predictors of direct cost of diabetes care in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examines factors that predict elevated direct costs of pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods: A cohort of 784 children with type 1 diabetes at least 6 months postdiagnosis and managed by pediatric endocrinologists at Texas Children's Hospital were included in this study. Actual...

  13. Diabetic retinopathy and systemic factors.

    PubMed

    Frank, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, an oculardisease, is governed by systemic as well as local ocular factors. These include primarily chronic levels of blood glucose. Individuals with chronically elevated blood glucose levels have substantially more, and more severe, retinopathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The relationship of blood glucose to retinopathy is continuous, with no threshold although individuals with hemoglobin A1c levels (a measure of chronic glycemia) <6.5%, generally develop little or no retinopathy. Blood pressure levels have been claimed to influence retinopathy development and progression, but multiple controlled clinical trials of antihypertensive agents in diabetic subjects have produced only weak evidence of benefit from blood pressure lowering on the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Elevated blood lipids seem to play a role in the progression of retinopathy, and two trials of fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent that has not proved effective in preventing cardiovascular disease, have shown benefit in preventing retinopathy progression. The mechanism of this effect may not, however, be directly related to the reduction in blood lipids. Finally, there is strong, but only circumstantial, evidence for a genetic or epigenetic influence on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Despite the power of large-scale epidemiologic studies and modern molecular biological and computational techniques, the gene or genes, which predispose or protect against the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy remain elusive.

  14. Diabetic Retinopathy and Systemic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, an oculardisease, is governed by systemic as well as local ocular factors. These include primarily chronic levels of blood glucose. Individuals with chronically elevated blood glucose levels have substantially more, and more severe, retinopathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The relationship of blood glucose to retinopathy is continuous, with no threshold although individuals with hemoglobin A1c levels (a measure of chronic glycemia) <6.5%, generally develop little or no retinopathy. Blood pressure levels have been claimed to influence retinopathy development and progression, but multiple controlled clinical trials of antihypertensive agents in diabetic subjects have produced only weak evidence of benefit from blood pressure lowering on the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Elevated blood lipids seem to play a role in the progression of retinopathy, and two trials of fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent that has not proved effective in preventing cardiovascular disease, have shown benefit in preventing retinopathy progression. The mechanism of this effect may not, however, be directly related to the reduction in blood lipids. Finally, there is strong, but only circumstantial, evidence for a genetic or epigenetic influence on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. Despite the power of large-scale epidemiologic studies and modern molecular biological and computational techniques, the gene or genes, which predispose or protect against the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy remain elusive. PMID:25949071

  15. The genetics of diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Emma; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Groop, Leif C; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-05-01

    The rising global prevalence of diabetes mellitus is accompanied by an increasing burden of morbidity and mortality that is attributable to the complications of chronic hyperglycaemia. These complications include blindness, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. Current therapeutic options for chronic hyperglycaemia reduce, but do not eradicate, the risk of these complications. Success in defining new preventative and therapeutic strategies hinges on an improved understanding of the molecular processes involved in the development of these complications. This Review explores the role of human genetics in delivering such insights, and describes progress in characterizing the sequence variants that influence individual predisposition to diabetic kidney disease, retinopathy, neuropathy and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Numerous risk variants for microvascular complications of diabetes have been reported, but very few have shown robust replication. Furthermore, only limited evidence exists of a difference in the repertoire of risk variants influencing macrovascular disease between those with and those without diabetes. Here, we outline the challenges associated with the genetic analysis of diabetic complications and highlight ongoing efforts to deliver biological insights that can drive translational benefits.

  16. Mathematical models of diabetes progression.

    PubMed

    De Gaetano, Andrea; Hardy, Thomas; Beck, Benoit; Abu-Raddad, Eyas; Palumbo, Pasquale; Bue-Valleskey, Juliana; Pørksen, Niels

    2008-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to model mathematically the progression of type 2 diabetes. A realistic representation of the long-term physiological adaptation to developing insulin resistance is necessary for effectively designing clinical trials and evaluating diabetes prevention or disease modification therapies. Writing a good model for diabetes progression is difficult because the long time span of the disease makes experimental verification of modeling hypotheses extremely awkward. In this context, it is of primary importance that the assumptions underlying the model equations properly reflect established physiology and that the mathematical formulation of the model give rise only to physically plausible behavior of the solutions. In the present work, a model of the pancreatic islet compensation is formulated, its physiological assumptions are presented, some fundamental qualitative characteristics of its solutions are established, the numerical values assigned to its parameters are extensively discussed (also with reference to available cross-sectional epidemiologic data), and its performance over the span of a lifetime is simulated under various conditions, including worsening insulin resistance and primary replication defects. The differences with respect to two previously proposed models of diabetes progression are highlighted, and therefore, the model is proposed as a realistic, robust description of the evolution of the compensation of the glucose-insulin system in healthy and diabetic individuals. Model simulations can be run from the authors' web page.

  17. Diabetes in Children and Teens

    MedlinePlus

    ... teens was type 1. It was called juvenile diabetes. With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... TV, computer, and video Children and teens with type 1 diabetes may need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes ...

  18. How to Treat Gestational Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Listen En Español How to Treat Gestational Diabetes Be sure to see the latest Diabetes Forecast ... and a healthy start for your baby. Gestational Diabetes – Looking Ahead Gestational diabetes usually goes away after ...

  19. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  20. Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity Nutrition and physical activity ... What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going ...

  1. "Control Your Diabetes. For Life."

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes "Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents For information about "Control Your Diabetes. For Life" campaign, visit www.YourDiabetesInfo. ...

  2. Making Diabetes Education Accessible For People With Visual Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ann S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify changes needed to make the diabetes education materials and programs of the Diabetes Association of Greater Cleveland (DAGC) accessible for people who have visual impairment and diabetes (PVID). Methods Using the principles and techniques of participatory action research (PAR), five PVID and four staff members of a local diabetes association met once a month for a year to plan, implement, and evaluate progress towards full accessibility of all diabetes education materials and programs. The researcher served as facilitator. Results Four “transformational moments” are presented through which the PAR process enabled PVID and diabetes professionals to learn to understand and trust each other. Changes made to increase accessibility included: production of two recordings for providing access to print information about diabetes; planning public education program publicity and locations for access; development of guidelines to help speakers make their diabetes education presentations accessible for people who cannot see slides and gestures. and presentation of an inservice for the entire staff of the diabetes association, including information about how they live with visual impairment, and common courtesies that make communication with PVID more effective Implications Diabetes education programs should include planning for full accessibility for PVID. Diabetes organizations should publish teaching materials in accessible format. PMID:19417119

  3. Pathology of human diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Malik, R A

    2014-01-01

    Pathologic study of a disease provides insights into the precise mechanisms and targets of damage and may provide insights into new therapies. The main targets in diabetic neuropathy are myelinated and unmyelinated fibers as dysfunction and damage to them explains the symptoms of painful neuropathy and the major end points of foot ulceration and amputation as well as mortality. Demyelination and axonal degeneration are established hallmarks of the pathology of human diabetic neuropathy and were derived from pioneering light and electronmicroscopic studies of sural nerve biopsies in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Additional abnormalities, which are relevant to the pathogenesis of human diabetic neuropathy, include pathology of the microvessels and extracellular space. Intraepidermal and sudomotor nerve quantification in skin biopsies provides a minimally invasive means for the detection of early nerve damage. Studies of muscle biopsies are limited and show significant alterations in the expression of neurotrophins, but limited changes in muscle fiber size and capillary density.

  4. Microparticles and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leroyer, A S; Tedgui, A; Boulanger, C M

    2008-02-01

    Cell activation or apoptosis leads to plasma membrane blebbing and microparticles (MPs) release in the extracellular space. MPs are submicron membrane vesicles, which harbour a panel of oxidized phospholipids and proteins specific to the cells they derived from. MPs are found in the circulating blood of healthy volunteers. MPs levels are increased in many diseases, including cardiovascular diseases with high thrombotic risk. Exposure of negatively charged phospholipids and tissue factor confers a procoagulant potential to MPs. Elevation of plasma MPs levels, particularly those of endothelial origin, reflects cellular injury and appears now as a surrogate marker of vascular dysfunction. Recent studies demonstrate an elevation of circulating levels of MPs in diabetes. MPs could also be involved in the development of vascular complications in diabetes for they stimulate pro-inflammatory responses in target cells and promote thrombosis, endothelial dysfunction and angiogenesis. Thus, these studies provide new insight in the pathogenesis and treatment of vascular complications of diabetes.

  5. [Control of atherosclerosis in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Quiroz Martínez, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Diabetic patients develop atherosclerosis in an accelerated way as compared to non-diabetic patients. This is due to a generalized metabolic disorder that includes hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidosis, loss of the endothelial regulatory function, a tendency for vasoconstriction, and a prothrombotic state. The main complications are coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease. In all these manifestations and at all severity levels, diabetic patients, in particular post-menopausal women, have the worst prognosis with any type of treatment as compared to non-diabetic patients. These findings lead to consider the sole presentation of diabetes mellitus to be equivalent to cardiovascular risk. The largest reduction in risk is achieved by controlling hypertension, followed by a control of glycemia, reduction of glycosylated hemoglobulin and control of dyslipidosis. Benefits in the cardiovascular realm have not extended to other vascular territories, such as the lower extremities or the brain.

  6. Diabetic foot infections: current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Hobizal, Kimberlee B.; Wukich, Dane K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide a current concept review on the diagnosis and management of diabetic foot infections which are among the most serious and frequent complications encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. A literature review on diabetic foot infections with emphasis on pathophysiology, identifiable risk factors, evaluation including physical examination, laboratory values, treatment strategies and assessing the severity of infection has been performed in detail. Diabetic foot infections are associated with high morbidity and risk factors for failure of treatment and classification systems are also described. Most diabetic foot infections begin with a wound and once an infection occurs, the risk of hospitalization and amputation increases dramatically. Early identification of infection and prompt treatment may optimize the patient's outcome and provide limb salvage. PMID:22577496

  7. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY PART 2: PROXIMAL AND ASSYMMETRIC PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathies consist of a variety of syndromes resulting from different types of damage to peripheral or cranial nerves. Although distal symmetric polyneuropathy is most common type of diabetic neuropathy, there are many other subtypes of diabetic neuropathies which have been defined since the 1800’s. Included in these descriptions are patients with proximal diabetic, truncal, cranial, median, and ulnar neuropathies. Various theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of these neuropathies. The treatment of most of these requires tight and stable glycemic control. Spontaneous recovery is seen in most of these conditions with diabetic control Immunotherapies have been tried in some of these conditions but are quite controversial. PMID:23642718

  8. The ECG vertigo in diabetes and cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Voulgari, Christina; Tentolouris, Nicholas; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2011-01-01

    The importance of diabetes in the epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases cannot be overemphasized. About one third of acute myocardial infarction patients have diabetes, and its prevalence is steadily increasing. The decrease in cardiac mortality in people with diabetes is lagging behind that of the general population. Cardiovascular disease is a broad term which includes any condition causing pathological changes in blood vessels, cardiac muscle or valves, and cardiac rhythm. The ECG offers a quick, noninvasive clinical and research screen for the early detection of cardiovascular disease in diabetes. In this paper, the clinical and research value of the ECG is readdressed in diabetes and in the presence of cardiac autonomic neuropathy.

  9. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  10. Type 2 Diabetes: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us Home Health Information Diabetes English English Español Diabetes Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your ... Diabetes Preventing Diabetes after Pregnancy More Diabetes Topics Diabetes Basics What is Diabetes? Symptoms & Causes of Diabetes ...

  11. Perceptions and practices related to diabetes reported by persons with diabetes attending diabetic care clinics: The India 11-city 9-state study

    PubMed Central

    Gudlavalleti, Murthy V. S.; Anchala, Raghupathy; Gudlavalleti, Aashrai Sai Venkat; Ramachandra, Srikrishna S.; Shukla, Rajan; Jotheeswaran, A. T.; Babu, R. Giridhara; Singh, Vivek; Allagh, Komal; Sagar, Jayanti; Bandyopadhyay, Souvik; Gilbert, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: India has the second largest population of persons with diabetes and a significant proportion has poor glycemic control and inadequate awareness of management of diabetes. Objectives: Determine the level of awareness regarding management of diabetes and its complications and diabetic care practices in India. Methods: The cross-sectional, hospital-based survey was conducted in 11 cities where public and private providers of diabetic care were identified. At each diabetic care facility, 4–6 persons with diabetes were administered a structured questionnaire in the local language. Results: Two hundred and eighty-five persons with diabetes were interviewed. The mean duration since diagnosis of diabetes was 8.1 years (standard deviation ± 7.3). Half of the participants reported a family history of diabetes and 41.7% were hypertensive. Almost 62.1% stated that they received information on diabetes and its management through interpersonal channels. Family history (36.1%), increasing age (25.3%), and stress (22.8%) were the commonest causes of diabetes reported. Only 29.1% stated that they monitored their blood sugar levels at home using a glucometer. The commonest challenges reported in managing diabetes were dietary modifications (67.4%), compliance with medicines (20.5%), and cost of medicines (17.9%). Around 76.5% were aware of complications of diabetes. Kidney failure (79.8%), blindness/vision loss (79.3%), and heart attack (56.4%) were the commonest complications mentioned. Almost 67.7% of the respondents stated that they had had an eye examination earlier. Conclusions: The findings have significant implications for the organization of diabetes services in India for early detection and management of complications, including eye complications. PMID:27144133

  12. Extract of Sesbania grandiflora Ameliorates Hyperglycemia in High Fat Diet-Streptozotocin Induced Experimental Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Ghanshyam; Panda, Chhayakanta; Patra, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sesbania grandiflora has been traditionally used as antidiabetic, antioxidant, antipyretic, and expectorant and in the management of various ailments. Materials and Methods. The study evaluates the antidiabetic activity of methanolic extract of Sesbania grandiflora (MESG) in type 2 diabetic rats induced by low dose streptozotocine and high fat diet. Diabetic rats were given vehicle, MESG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.), and the standard drug, metformin (10 mg/kg), for 28 days. During the experimental period, body weight, abdominal girth, food intake, fasting serum glucose, urine analyses were measured. Insulin tolerance test was carried out on 25th day of drug treatment period. Serum analyses for lipid profile and SGOT and SGPT and serums creatinine, urea, protein, SOD, and MDA were also carried out. At the end of the experiment, animals were euthanized, the liver and pancreas were immediately dissected out, and the ratio of pancreas to body weight and hepatic glycogen were calculated. Results. MESG (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) induced significant reduction (P < 0.05) of raised blood glucose levels in diabetic rats and also restored other parameters to normal level. Conclusion. Therefore, it is concluded that MESG has potential antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipemic activities and alleviate insulin resistance conditions. PMID:27313954

  13. Predicting Diabetes: Clinical, Biological, and Genetic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Balkau, Beverley; Lange, Céline; Fezeu, Leopold; Tichet, Jean; de Lauzon-Guillain, Blandine; Czernichow, Sebastien; Fumeron, Frederic; Froguel, Philippe; Vaxillaire, Martine; Cauchi, Stephane; Ducimetière, Pierre; Eschwège, Eveline

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To provide a simple clinical diabetes risk score and to identify characteristics that predict later diabetes using variables available in the clinic setting as well as biological variables and polymorphisms. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Incident diabetes was studied in 1,863 men and 1,954 women, 30–65 years of age at baseline, with diabetes defined by treatment or by fasting plasma glucose ≥7.0 mmol/l at 3-yearly examinations over 9 years. Sex-specific logistic regression equations were used to select variables for prediction. RESULTS—A total of 140 men and 63 women developed diabetes. The predictive clinical variables were waist circumference and hypertension in both sexes, smoking in men, and diabetes in the family in women. Discrimination, as measured by the area under the receiver operating curves (AROCs), were 0.713 for men and 0.827 for women, a little higher than for the Finish Diabetes Risk (FINDRISC) score, with fewer variables in the score. Combining clinical and biological variables, the predictive equation included fasting glucose, waist circumference, smoking, and γ-glutamyltransferase for men and fasting glucose, BMI, triglycerides, and diabetes in family for women. The number of TCF7L2 and IL6 deleterious alleles was predictive in both sexes, but after including the above clinical and biological variables, this variable was only predictive in women (P < 0.03) and the AROC statistics increased only marginally. CONCLUSIONS—The best clinical predictor of diabetes is adiposity, and baseline glucose is the best biological predictor. Clinical and biological predictors differed marginally between men and women. The genetic polymorphisms added little to the prediction of diabetes. PMID:18689695

  14. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb amputation unless a prompt, rational, multidisciplinary approach to therapy is taken. Factors that affect development and healing of diabetic patients' foot ulcers include the degree of metabolic control, the presence of ischemia or infection, and continuing trauma to feet from excessive plantar pressure or poorly fitting shoes. Appropriate wound care for diabetic patients addresses these issues and provides optimal local ulcer therapy with débridement of necrotic tissue and provision of a moist wound-healing environment. Therapies that have no known therapeutic value, such as foot soaking and topical antiseptics, can actually be harmful and should be avoided. CONCLUSION: Family physicians are often primary medical contacts for patients with diabetes. Patients should be screened regularly for diabetic foot complications, and preventive measures should be initiated for those at risk of ulceration. PMID:11398715

  15. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and exercise impairment.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Jane E B; Bridenstine, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2013-03-01

    Limitations in physical fitness, a consistent finding in individuals with both type I and type 2 diabetes mellitus, correlate strongly with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These limitations may significantly contribute to the persistent excess cardiovascular mortality affecting this group. Exercise impairments in VO2 peak and VO2 kinetics manifest early on in diabetes, even with good glycemic control and in the absence of clinically apparent complications. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction is often present but does not fully explain the observed defect in exercise capacity in persons with diabetes. In part, the cardiac limitations are secondary to decreased perfusion with exercise challenge. This is a reversible defect. Similarly, in the skeletal muscle, impairments in nutritive blood flow correlate with slowed (or inefficient) exercise kinetics and decreased exercise capacity. Several correlations highlight the likelihood of endothelial-specific impairments as mediators of exercise dysfunction in diabetes, including insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, decreased myocardial perfusion, slowed tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and impairment in mitochondrial function. Both exercise training and therapies targeted at improving insulin sensitivity and endothelial function improve physical fitness in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Optimization of exercise functions in people with diabetes has implications for diabetes prevention and reductions in mortality risk. Understanding the molecular details of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may provide specific therapeutic targets for the remediation of this defect. Rat models to test this hypothesis are under study.

  16. Mechanism of hypertension in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhammad Junaid

    2014-01-01

    High prevalence of hypertension is observed in diabetic patients of both the types. Diabetic nephropathy is one of the major reason for high morbidity, mortality and financial burden in such hypertensive diabetic patients. For this review, electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane and Google scholar were searched from 1990-2013. Multiple inter-related factors are responsible for the development of hypertension and therefore nephropathy in the chronic diabetic patients. Majority of such factors are identified to lead to extensive sodium reabsorption and peripheral vasoconstriction and thus leading to microvascular complications like nephropathy. Management of hypertension by targeting such mediators is the highly recommended therapy for controlling and treating diabetic nephropathy. Clinical trials suggests that drugs inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway should be used as the first-line agents for the management of hypertensive diabetic nephropathy patients. These agents are effective in slowing the progression of the end-stage kidney disease as well as lowering albuminuria. Researchers are also investigating the effectiveness of drug combination for better management of hypertension and diabetic nephropathy. The present article is a review of the evidences which explains the underlying pathological changes which leads to the development of nephropathy in a hypertensive diabetic patients. The review also observes the clinical trials for different anti-hypertensive drugs which are recommended for the treatment of such patients. PMID:28197463

  17. Rho kinase inhibition in diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Komers, Radko

    2013-10-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family and their down-stream effectors Rho associated kinases (ROCKs) are the molecules that converge a spectrum of pathophysiological signals triggered by the diabetic milieu and represent promising molecular targets for nephroprotective treatment in diabetes. The review discusses recent studies exploring the consequences of diabetes-induced Rho-ROCK activation in the kidney and the effects of ROCK inhibition (ROCKi) in experimental diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Studies in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes have indicated blood pressure-independent nephroprotective actions of ROCKi in DKD. The underlying mechanisms include attenuation of diabetes-induced increases in renal expression of prosclerotic cytokines and extracellular matrix, anti-oxidant effects and protection of mitochondrial function, resulting in slower development of glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. The studies have also shown antiproteinuric effects of ROCKi that could be related to reductions in permeability of the glomerular barrier and beneficial effects on podocytes. Glomerular haemodynamic mechanisms might also be involved. Despite remaining questions in this field, such as the effects in podocytes later in the course of DKD, specificity of currently available ROCKi, or the roles of individual ROCK isoforms, recent evidence in experimental diabetes suggests that ROCKi might in future broaden the spectrum of treatments available for patients with DKD. This is supported by the evidence generated in models of non-diabetic kidney disease and in clinical studies in patients with various cardiovascular disorders.

  18. Patients’ Perspectives on Factors that Influence Diabetes Self-Care

    PubMed Central

    Shakibazadeh, E; Larijani, B; Shojaeezadeh, D; Rashidian, A; Forouzanfar, MH; Bartholomew, LK

    2011-01-01

    Background Although diabetes mellitus is of high concern in Iran, and the level of control is unacceptable, few qualitative studies have been carried out to reflect the experiences of patients on the barriers and motivators to self-care. This study aimed to explore a culturally based experience of Iranian diabetic patients regarding the personal and environmental barriers to and facilitating factors for diabetes self-care. Methods: Six focus groups were conducted among type 2 diabetic patients in the Charity Foundation for Special Diseases’ diabetes clinic. Purposeful sampling was used. Newly diagnosed patients (less than six months) and all type 1 diabetic patients were excluded. Three focus groups were held on for each sex. A total of 43 patients participated in the study. Frame-work analysis was used to extract the themes from the data. Results: Data analysis showed five main barriers: physical barriers (such as physical effects of diabetes); psychological barriers (such as health beliefs); educational barriers (such as lack of knowledge about diabetes); social barriers (such as group pressure); and care system barriers (such as service availability). Along with the barriers, there were some motivators that the participants mentioned as a stimuli to control their diabetes. They include beliefs about diabetes, perceived responsibility for family, religious beliefs, and the views of significant others. Conclusion: Culturally based interventions are needed to improve diabetes care management in Iran. In addition to personal factors, diabetes health educators should pay attention to the environmental factors when they develop programs. PMID:23113114

  19. Diabetes mellitus in patients with cirrhosis: clinical implications and management.

    PubMed

    Elkrief, Laure; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Sarin, Shiv; Valla, Dominique; Paradis, Valérie; Moreau, Richard

    2016-07-01

    Disorders of glucose metabolism, namely glucose intolerance and diabetes, are frequent in patients with chronic liver diseases. In patients with cirrhosis, diabetes can be either a classical type 2 diabetes mellitus or the so-called hepatogenous diabetes, i.e. a consequence of liver insufficiency and portal hypertension. This review article provides an overview of the possible pathophysiological mechanisms explaining diabetes in patients with cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is associated with portosystemic shunts as well as reduced hepatic mass, which can both impair insulin clearance by the liver, contributing to peripheral insulin resistance through insulin receptors down-regulation. Moreover, cirrhosis is associated with increased levels of advanced-glycation-end products and hypoxia-inducible-factors, which may play a role in the development of diabetes. This review also focuses on the clinical implications of diabetes in patients with cirrhosis. First, diabetes is an independent factor for poor prognosis in patients with cirrhosis. Specifically, diabetes is associated with the occurrence of major complications of cirrhosis, including ascites and renal dysfunction, hepatic encephalopathy and bacterial infections. Diabetes is also associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic liver diseases. Last, the management of patients with concurrent diabetes and liver disease is also addressed. Recent findings suggest a beneficial impact of metformin in patients with chronic liver diseases. Insulin is often required in patients with advanced cirrhosis. However, the favourable impact of controlling diabetes in patients with cirrhosis has not been demonstrated yet.

  20. Comparisons of serum miRNA expression profiles in patients with diabetic retinopathy and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianping; Wang, Jufang; Liu, Yanfen; Wang, Changyi; Duan, Donghui; Lu, Nanjia; Wang, Kaiyue; Zhang, Lu; Gu, Kaibo; Chen, Sihan; Zhang, Tao; You, Dingyun; Han, Liyuan

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the expression levels of serum miRNAs in diabetic retinopathy and type 2 diabetes mellitus. METHODS: Serum miRNA expression profiles from diabetic retinopathy cases (type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with diabetic retinopathy) and type 2 diabetes mellitus controls (type 2 diabetes mellitus patients without diabetic retinopathy) were examined by miRNA-specific microarray analysis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to validate the significantly differentially expressed serum miRNAs from the microarray analysis of 45 diabetic retinopathy cases and 45 age-, sex-, body mass index- and duration-of-diabetes-matched type 2 diabetes mellitus controls. The relative changes in serum miRNA expression levels were analyzed using the 2-ΔΔCt method. RESULTS: A total of 5 diabetic retinopathy cases and 5 type 2 diabetes mellitus controls were included in the miRNA-specific microarray analysis. The serum levels of miR-3939 and miR-1910-3p differed significantly between the two groups in the screening stage; however, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction did not reveal significant differences in miRNA expression for 45 diabetic retinopathy cases and their matched type 2 diabetes mellitus controls. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that miR-3939 and miR-1910-3p may not play important roles in the development of diabetic retinopathy; however, studies with a larger sample size are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:28273235

  1. Comparison of the Hospital Arrival Time and Differences in Pain Quality between Diabetic and Non-Diabetic STEMI Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gradišer, Marina; Dilber, Dario; Cmrečnjak, Jasna; Ostrički, Branko; Bilić-Ćurčić, Ines

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine whether diabetic ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients arrive in the emergency room (ER) later than non-diabetics, compare the differences in pain quality and quantity between those groups, and measure differences in the outcome after an index hospitalization. A total of 266 patients with first presentation of STEMI were included in our study during a period of two years, 62 with diabetes and 204 without diabetes type 2. Pain intensity and quality at admission were measured using a McGill short form questionnaire. Diabetic patients did not arrive significantly later than non-diabetic (χ2; p = 0.105). Most diabetic patients described their pain as “slight” or “none” (χ2; p < 0.01), while most non-diabetic patients graded their pain as “moderate” or “severe” (χ2; p < 0.01). The quality of pain tended to be more distinct in non-diabetic patients, while diabetic patients reported mainly shortness of breath (χ2; p < 0.01). Diabetic patients were more likely to suffer a multi-vessel disease (χ2; p < 0.01), especially in the late arrival group. Therefore, cautious evaluation of diabetic patients and adequate education of target population could improve overall survival while well-organized care like a primary PCI Network program could significantly reduce CV mortality. PMID:25633029

  2. Ficolin B in Diabetic Kidney Disease in a Mouse Model of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Charlotte Berg; Østergaard, Jakob Appel; Axelgaard, Esben; Nielsen, Gitte Krogh; Endo, Yuichi; Thiel, Steffen; Hansen, Troels Krarup

    2015-01-01

    Background. The innate immune system may have adverse effects in diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The complement system seems to play a key role through erroneous complement activation via hyperglycaemia-induced neoepitopes. Recently mannan-binding lectin (MBL) was shown to worsen diabetic kidney changes. We hypothesize that mouse ficolin B exerts detrimental effects in the diabetic kidney as seen for MBL. Methods. We induced diabetes with streptozotocin in female wild-type mice and ficolin B knockout mice and included two similar nondiabetic groups. Renal hypertrophy and excretion of urinary albumin and creatinine were quantified to assess diabetic kidney damage. Results. In the wild-type groups, the kidney weighed 24% more in the diabetic mice compared to the controls. The diabetes-induced increase in kidney weight was 29% in the ficolin B knockout mice, that is, equal to wild-type animals (two-way ANOVA, P = 0.60). In the wild-type mice the albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) was 32.5 mg/g higher in the diabetic mice compared to the controls. The difference was 62.5 mg/g in the ficolin B knockout mice, but this was not significantly different from the wild-type animals (two-way ANOVA, P = 0.21). Conclusions. In conclusion, the diabetes-induced effects on kidney weight and ACR were not modified by the presence or absence of ficolin B. PMID:26339138

  3. Effect of diabetic duration on hemorheological properties and platelet aggregation in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Eunseop; Byeon, Hyeokjun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus with abnormal glucose concentration is associated with changes in hemorheological properties, endothelial function, and platelets hyperactivity. Disturbances may significantly be responsible for diabetes-related vascular complications. In this study, hemorheological and hemodynamic properties were measured according to diabetic duration after streptozotocin treatment in rats. For ex vivo measurements, an extracorporeal model was adopted. Flow rate and blood viscosity were measured using a microfluidic device. Erythrocyte aggregation and morphological parameters of erythrocytes were measured by modified erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the phase-contrast holography under in vitro conditions. The platelet aggregation and mean pressure in the femoral artery were estimated under ex vivo conditions. Hemorheological properties including blood viscosity, erythrocyte aggregation and shape parameters for the control group are significantly different with those for diabetic groups. The changes with respect to diabetic duration were relatively unnoticeable. However, the platelet aggregation is strongly dependent on the diabetic duration. Based on these results, hyperglycemia exposure may induce hemorheological variations in early stages of diabetes mellitus. High platelet aggregation may become more pronounced according to the diabetic duration caused by variations in hemorheological properties resulting in endothelial dysfunction. This study would be helpful in understanding the effects of diabetic duration on biophysical properties. PMID:26898237

  4. Evolution in the Chinese Diabetes Society Standards of Care for Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jianping

    2016-07-01

    China has been experiencing the biggest shift in the world in diabetes and obesity epidemic over the past three decades. Chinese Diabetes Society developed and published four editions of stand of care for type 2 diabetes management as clinical guidance for practice in China in the last twelve years. During the development and implementation of guidelines, the keyword is 'evolution', which includes evolution of evidence, expertise, excellence and endpoints. It will be a complete quality improvement cycle starting with 'understanding the situation' and ending with 'tipping points of diabetes in primary prevention (prevalence), secondary prevention (diabetic complications) and tertiary prevention (diabetes-related death)'. This series of 'Stand of care for type 2 diabetes' allows for a fundamental understanding into the ways in which the domino effects of the epidemic could be curbed. More work for doing with 'Mens et Manus' will be carried out in the near future. This English version will be useful for the international scientific community to glean insights into type 2 diabetes management practices in China, and alternative methods of tackling challenges. © 2016 The Authors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Self–reported diabetes education among Chinese middle–aged and older adults with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hanzhang; Luo, Jianfeng; Wu, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare self–reported diabetes education among Chinese middle–aged and older adults with diabetes in three population groups: urban residents, migrants in urban settings, and rural residents. Methods We used data from the 2011 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. The sample included 993 participants age 45 and older who reported having diabetes diagnosed from a health professional. We performed multilevel regressions performed to examine the associations between characteristics and different aspects of diabetes education received. Findings Our study shows that 20.24% of the participants received no diabetes education at all. Among those who received information, 46.82% of respondents with diabetes received weight control advice from a health care provider, 90.97% received advice on exercise, 60.37% received diet advice, 35.12% were spoken to smoking control, and only 17.89% of persons were informed of foot care. After controlling socioeconomic factors, life style, number of comorbidities and community factors, we found that compared with migrant population and rural residents, urban residents were more likely to receive diabetes education on diet. Urban residents were also more likely to obtain diabetes education and more aspects of diabetes education comparison with migrants and rural residents. Conclusions Our study suggests diabetes education is a serious concern in China, and a significant proportion of the participants did not receive advice on smoking control and foot care. Rural residents and migrants from rural areas received much less diabetes education compared with urban residents. Efforts to improve diabetes educations are urgently needed in China. PMID:27698998

  6. Diabetes and bone health.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulou, Marianna; Bahtiyar, Gül; Banerji, Mary Ann; Sacerdote, Alan S

    2013-11-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes especially type 2 diabetes worldwide is indisputable. Diabetics suffer increased morbidity and mortality, compared to their non-diabetic counterparts, not only because of vascular complications, but also because of an increased fracture incidence. Both types 1 and 2 diabetes and some medications used to treat it are associated with osteoporotic fractures. The responsible mechanisms remain incompletely elucidated. In this review, we evaluate the role of glycemic control in bone health, and the effect of anti-diabetic medications such as thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, DPP-4 inhibitors, and GLP-1 agonists. In addition, we examine the possible role of insulin and metformin as anabolic agents for bone. Lastly, we identify the current and future screening tools that help evaluate bone health in diabetics and their limitations. In this way we can offer individualized treatment, to the at-risk diabetic population.

  7. Treating Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... bodies need many nutrients — in different amounts — to work properly. So when you and the diabetes health ... 2 diabetes. Other times, pills that help insulin work better also need to be taken. These pills ...

  8. Diabetic Kidney Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste ... in your blood instead of leaving your body. Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It ...

  9. Weight in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kenshole, Anne B.

    1972-01-01

    Diabetes is being increasingly detected among the overweight. The author discusses the links between diabetes and obesity, and outlines methods by which satisfactory weight reduction may be achieved. PMID:20468726

  10. Tight Diabetes Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Tight Diabetes Control Keeping your blood glucose levels as close ... and syringes, than before. What About Type 2 Diabetes? The DCCT studied only people with type 1 ...

  11. Glycemic Index and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  12. Non-diabetic renal disease in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yaqub, Sonia; Kashif, Waqar; Hussain, Syed Ather

    2012-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in diabetics worldwide, yet most patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus are not formally evaluated with a renal biopsy. The diagnosis is almost always based on clinical grounds. A wide spectrum of non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD) is reported to occur in patients with type-2 diabetes. It has been estimated that up to one-third of all diabetic patients who present with proteinuria are suffering from NDRD. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the prevalence and etiology of NDRD in patients with type-2 diabetes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with type-2 diabetes who underwent kidney biopsy on clinical suspicion of NDRD (absence of diabetic retinopathy and/or neuropathy; short duration of diabetes, i.e. less than five years) from January 2003 through December 2007 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Based on the biopsy findings, patients were grouped as Group-I, isolated NDRD; Group-II, NDRD with underlying DN; and Group-III, isolated DN. Of 68 patients studied, 75% were males and the mean age was 56 years. The mean duration of diabetes was nine years. Group-I included 34 patients (52%), Group-II included 11 patients (17%) and Group-III included 23 patients (31%). Among the Group-I patients, the mean age was 56 years (41-77 years). The most common NDRDs were acute interstitial nephritis (32%), diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (17%); membranous nephropathy (12%) and crescentic glomerulonephritis (12%). Among Group-II, the mean age was 60 years (46-71 years), and the most common lesion was interstitial nephritis superimposed on underlying DN (63% cases). Among Group-III, the mean age was 53 years (42- 80 years). The mean proteinuria was 5, 6.3 and 7.3 g/24 h of urine collection in Groups I, II and III, respectively (P = NS). The mean duration of diabetes was 7.3, 11.7 and 10.7 years in Groups I, II and III, respectively. The duration of diabetes

  13. Diabetic neuropathic pain: Physiopathology and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Anne K; Nones, Carina FM; Reis, Renata C; Chichorro, Juliana G; Cunha, Joice M

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which affects over 90% of the diabetic patients. Although pain is one of the main symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, its pathophysiological mechanisms are not yet fully known. It is widely accepted that the toxic effects of hyperglycemia play an important role in the development of this complication, but several other hypotheses have been postulated. The management of diabetic neuropathic pain consists basically in excluding other causes of painful peripheral neuropathy, improving glycemic control as a prophylactic therapy and using medications to alleviate pain. First line drugs for pain relief include anticonvulsants, such as pregabalin and gabapentin and antidepressants, especially those that act to inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenaline. In addition, there is experimental and clinical evidence that opioids can be helpful in pain control, mainly if associated with first line drugs. Other agents, including for topical application, such as capsaicin cream and lidocaine patches, have also been proposed to be useful as adjuvants in the control of diabetic neuropathic pain, but the clinical evidence is insufficient to support their use. In conclusion, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying diabetic neuropathic pain will contribute to the search of new therapies, but also to the improvement of the guidelines to optimize pain control with the drugs currently available. PMID:25897354

  14. Trying to understand gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Women with normal glucose tolerance pre-gravid and developing gestational diabetes in late gestation have subclinical metabolic dysfunction prior to conception compared with women with normal glucose tolerance. Because of the 60 % decrease in insulin sensitivity with normal pregnancy, these women develop clinical hyperglycaemia/gestational diabetes in late gestation. The metabolic dysfunction includes impaired insulin response, decreased hepatic suppression of glucose production during insulin infusion and decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, i.e. peripheral insulin resistance. The insulin resistance in normal glucose tolerance pregnancy is related to a decrease in the post-receptor insulin signalling cascade, specifically decreased insulin receptor substrate 1 tyrosine phosphorylation. In women with normal glucose tolerance this is reversed post-partum. In contrast, in gestational diabetes, in addition to the decrease in insulin receptor substrate 1 tyrosine phosphorylation, there is an additional decrease in tyrosine phosphorylation of the intracellular portion of the insulin receptor that is not related to the insulin receptor protein content. Post-partum women with gestational diabetes, who had retention of gestational weight gain, had no significant improvement in insulin sensitivity and increased inflammation expressed as increased plasma and skeletal muscle tumour necrosis factor alpha. The increased inflammation or meta-inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and during pregnancy develops in both white adipose tissue and placenta. Last gene array studies of placenta were associated with alterations in gene expression relating primarily to lipid in contrast to glucose metabolic pathways in gestational diabetes compared with Type 1 diabetes. Future studies are directed at decreasing inflammation prior to and during pregnancy using various lifestyle and nutritional interventions. PMID:24341419

  15. Diabetes: Models, Signals, and Control.

    PubMed

    Cobelli, Claudio; Man, Chiara Dalla; Sparacino, Giovanni; Magni, Lalo; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Kovatchev, Boris P

    2009-01-01

    The control of diabetes is an interdisciplinary endeavor, which includes a significant biomedical engineering component, with traditions of success beginning in the early 1960s. It began with modeling of the insulin-glucose system, and progressed to large-scale in silico experiments, and automated closed-loop control (artificial pancreas). Here, we follow these engineering efforts through the last, almost 50 years. We begin with the now classic minimal modeling approach and discuss a number of subsequent models, which have recently resulted in the first in silico simulation model accepted as substitute to animal trials in the quest for optimal diabetes control. We then review metabolic monitoring, with a particular emphasis on the new continuous glucose sensors, on the analyses of their time-series signals, and on the opportunities that they present for automation of diabetes control. Finally, we review control strategies that have been successfully employed in vivo or in silico, presenting a promise for the development of a future artificial pancreas and, in particular, discuss a modular architecture for building closed-loop control systems, including insulin delivery and patient safety supervision layers. We conclude with a brief discussion of the unique interactions between human physiology, behavioral events, engineering modeling and control relevant to diabetes.

  16. Diabetes: Models, Signals, and Control

    PubMed Central

    Cobelli, Claudio; Man, Chiara Dalla; Sparacino, Giovanni; Magni, Lalo; De Nicolao, Giuseppe; Kovatchev, Boris P.

    2010-01-01

    The control of diabetes is an interdisciplinary endeavor, which includes a significant biomedical engineering component, with traditions of success beginning in the early 1960s. It began with modeling of the insulin-glucose system, and progressed to large-scale in silico experiments, and automated closed-loop control (artificial pancreas). Here, we follow these engineering efforts through the last, almost 50 years. We begin with the now classic minimal modeling approach and discuss a number of subsequent models, which have recently resulted in the first in silico simulation model accepted as substitute to animal trials in the quest for optimal diabetes control. We then review metabolic monitoring, with a particular emphasis on the new continuous glucose sensors, on the analyses of their time-series signals, and on the opportunities that they present for automation of diabetes control. Finally, we review control strategies that have been successfully employed in vivo or in silico, presenting a promise for the development of a future artificial pancreas and, in particular, discuss a modular architecture for building closed-loop control systems, including insulin delivery and patient safety supervision layers. We conclude with a brief discussion of the unique interactions between human physiology, behavioral events, engineering modeling and control relevant to diabetes. PMID:20936056

  17. Hyperglycemia and Diabetic Ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... urine test is positive, contact your child's diabetes health care team. Tests done by a lab or hospital can confirm whether a child has diabetic ketoacidosis , if necessary. Some ... blood for ketones. Ask the diabetes health care team if such a meter is a good ...

  18. Teen Diabetes Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Teens with diabetes should not eat at fast food restaurants. True False Teens get type 2 diabetes because: They have certain genes They are overweight They have a family member who has diabetes They are American Indian, Alaska Native, African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian American, ...

  19. Herpes zoster and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Chawla, Aastha

    2016-08-01

    This review is a succinct description of the relationship between herpes zoster and diabetes. It makes a strong case for screening for diabetes in all patients of herpes zoster, and for using insulin to achieve optimal glycaemic control in persons with concomitant diabetes and herpes zoster. It highlights potential impact of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor therapy and statin usage on herpes zoster incidence.

  20. Dealing with Diabetes Distress

    MedlinePlus

    ... no breaks There are two main types of diabetes -- type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes don't make enough insulin -- a hormone the ... insulin pump worn outside the body. People with type 1 diabetes using shots may need five or six insulin ...

  1. The Student with Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentworth, Samuel M.; Hoover, Joan

    1981-01-01

    Since nearly one million students suffer from diabetes, most teachers are likely to have a diabetic child in class at some time. Though most diabetic children are not likely to require an insulin injection during the day, it is necessary that every teacher be aware of the occasional problems which might arise. (JN)

  2. Diabetes Type 1

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  3. Diabetes Type 2

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not ... You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family ...

  4. Diabetic neuropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes and its complications in children continues to increase due to the rise in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Although overt diabetic neuropathy is rarely present in children and adolescents with diabetes, subclinical diabetic neuropathy has been estimated to occur in approximately half of all children with type 1 diabetes with a duration of 5 years or longer and up to 25% of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed diabetes have abnormal findings on nerve conduction studies. The present review on the state of pediatric diabetic neuropathy covers the definition, prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, risk factors, and possible treatment approaches specific to children and adolescents with diabetes. It also highlights the many unknowns in this field. Nonetheless, new emerging interventions that can either prevent or delay the progression of diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications may become available in the near future. Until specific interventions for diabetic neuropathy are available for use in children, it will be hard to justify screening for neuropathy other than through clinical assessment. Meanwhile, the search for quicker, easily administered, and quantifiable tests for diabetic neuropathy and efforts to establish valid pediatric norms for well-established measures used in adults will need to continue.

  5. Urinary tract infection in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fünfstück, Reinhard; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Hanefeld, Markolf; Naber, Kurt G

    2012-01-01

    Urinary tract infection occurs with increased frequency and severity in patients with diabetes mellitus. General host factors enhancing risk for urinary tract infection in diabetics include age, metabolic control, and long term complications, primarily diabetic nephropathy and cystopathy. Alterations in the innate immune system have been described and may also contribute. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in diabetic patients is not indicated. Early diagnosis and prompt intervention is recommended to limit morbidity of symptomatic infection. Clinical studies comparing management of urinary tract infection in persons with diabetes compared to those without as well as diabetic patients with good or poor glucose control will be necessary to improve care of urinary infection in persons with diabetes mellitus.

  6. Carvedilol protected diabetic rat hearts via reducing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Shan, Jiang; Pan, Xiao-hong; Wang, Hui-ping; Qian, Ling-bo

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Bcl-2 gene has close connection with antioxidant stress destruction in many diseases including diabetes. Carvedilol, an adrenoceptor blocker, also has antioxidant properties. To study the effect of carvedilol on the antioxidant status in diabetic hearts, we investigated carvedilol-administrated healthy and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. After small and large dosage carvedilol-administered for 5 weeks, hemodynamic parameters, the levels of malondialdehyde, activities of antioxidant enzymes and expression of Bcl-2 mRNA in the cardiac tissues were measured. The diabetic rats not only had cardiac disfunction, weaker activities of antioxidant enzymes, but also showed lower expression of Bcl-2. Carvedilol treatment increased activities of antioxidant enzymes and expression of Bcl-2 in healthy rats as well as diabetic rats. These results indicated that carvedilol partly improves cardiac function via its antioxidant properties in diabetic rats. PMID:16909474

  7. Diabetes mellitus induced impairment of male reproductive functions: a review.

    PubMed

    Jangir, Ram Niwas; Jain, Gyan Chand

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents one of the greatest threats to human health all over the world. The incidence of DM is rising rapidly also including children and young persons of reproductive age. Diabetes has been associated with reproductive impairment in both men and women. Diabetes may affect male reproductive functions at multiple levels as a result of its effects on the endocrine control of spermatogenesis, steroidogenesis, sperm maturation, impairment of penile erection and ejaculation. A large number of studies both on diabetic men and experimental diabetic animals have been published on the impact of DM on male reproductive functions during the past few years but many of them have conflicting results. The present review summarizes the research finding of a large number of research papers on the reproductive functions especially on hypothalmo-pituitary-gonadal axis, spermatogenesis, histopathology of testis, synthesis and secretion of testosterone, sperm quality, ejaculatory function and fertility both in diabetic men and experimental diabetic animals.

  8. Streptozotocin, Type I Diabetes Severity and Bone

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    As many as 50% of adults with type I (T1) diabetes exhibit bone loss and are at increased risk for fractures. Therapeutic development to prevent bone loss and/or restore lost bone in T1 diabetic patients requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms accounting for the bone pathology. Because cell culture models alone cannot fully address the systemic/metabolic complexity of T1 diabetes, animal models are critical. A variety of models exist including spontaneous and pharmacologically induced T1 diabetic rodents. In this paper, we discuss the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced T1 diabetic mouse model and examine dose-dependent effects on disease severity and bone. Five daily injections of either 40 or 60 mg/kg STZ induce bone pathologies similar to spontaneously diabetic mouse and rat models and to human T1 diabetic bone pathology. Specifically, bone volume, mineral apposition rate, and osteocalcin serum and tibia messenger RNA levels are decreased. In contrast, bone marrow adiposity and aP2 expression are increased with either dose. However, high-dose STZ caused a more rapid elevation of blood glucose levels and a greater magnitude of change in body mass, fat pad mass, and bone gene expression (osteocalcin, aP2). An increase in cathepsin K and in the ratio of RANKL/OPG was noted in high-dose STZ mice, suggesting the possibility that severe diabetes could increase osteoclast activity, something not seen with lower doses. This may contribute to some of the disparity between existing studies regarding the role of osteoclasts in diabetic bone pathology. Examination of kidney and liver toxicity indicate that the high STZ dose causes some liver inflammation. In summary, the multiple low-dose STZ mouse model exhibits a similar bone phenotype to spontaneous models, has low toxicity, and serves as a useful tool for examining mechanisms of T1 diabetic bone loss. PMID:19495918

  9. [Artificial sweeteners and diabetes: friends or foes?].

    PubMed

    Tran, Christel; Jornayvaz, François R

    2015-06-03

    Sugary drinks consumption is associated with increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Thereby, artificial sweeteners (AS) consumption became increasingly popular and were introduced largely in our diet in order to reduce calorie intake and normalise blood glucose levels without altering our taste for "sweetness". However, the results of published studies on health outcomes secondary to AS intake, including type 2 diabetes risk, are inconsistent. The aim of this article is to focus on the role of AS in glucose homeostasis and diabetes onset.

  10. Bariatric surgery and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Collier, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    Obesity is a relatively new and serious world-wide epidemic. Obesity is a stronger predictor in mortality than either poverty or smoking, and obesity is also now more prevalent than malnutrition. The prevalence of obesity continues to increase, ironically, the rate of increase of obesity is highest amongst the morbidly obesity. Obesity is the result of many factors resulting in concert, including poor dietary habits, reduced physical activity and genetic predisposition. With the rapid increase in obesity there has been a pronounced increase in obesity-related metabolic disorders including type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension and many others. These co-morbidities are responsible for more than 2.5 million deaths, worldwide. The loss of life expectancy due to obesity is profound. In comparison to a normal weight individual Caucasian, a 25-year-old morbidly obese man has a 22% reduction in the expected remaining life span, representing an approximate loss of 12 years of life.

  11. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Maser, Raelene E; Mitchell, Braxton D; Freeman, Roy

    2003-05-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes. Despite its relationship to an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and its association with multiple symptoms and impairments, the significance of DAN has not been fully appreciated. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on the cohort studied and the methods of assessment. In randomly selected cohorts of asymptomatic individuals with diabetes, approximately 20% had abnormal cardiovascular autonomic function. DAN frequently coexists with other peripheral neuropathies and other diabetic complications, but DAN may be isolated, frequently preceding the detection of other complications. Major clinical manifestations of DAN include resting tachycardia, exercise intolerance, orthostatic hypotension, constipation, gastroparesis, erectile dysfunction, sudomotor dysfunction, impaired neurovascular function, "brittle diabetes," and hypoglycemic autonomic failure. DAN may affect many organ systems throughout the body (e.g., gastrointestinal [GI], genitourinary, and cardiovascular). GI disturbances (e.g., esophageal enteropathy, gastroparesis, constipation, diarrhea, and fecal incontinence) are common, and any section of the GI tract may be affected. Gastroparesis should be suspected in individuals with erratic glucose control. Upper-GI symptoms should lead to consideration of all possible causes, including autonomic dysfunction. Whereas a radiographic gastric emptying study can definitively establish the diagnosis of gastroparesis, a reasonable approach is to exclude autonomic dysfunction and other known causes of these upper-GI symptoms. Constipation is the most common lower-GI symptom but can alternate with episodes of diarrhea. Diagnostic approaches should rule out autonomic dysfunction and the well-known causes such as neoplasia. Occasionally, anorectal manometry and other specialized tests typically performed by the gastroenterologist may be helpful. DAN is also

  12. Prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Joon Ho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Jang, Hak C.

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), defined as any degree of glucose intolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy, is characterized by underlying maternal defects in the β-cell response to insulin during pregnancy. Women with a previous history of GDM have a greater than 7-fold higher risk of developing postpartum diabetes compared with women without GDM. Various risk factors for postpartum diabetes have been identified, including maternal age, glucose levels in pregnancy, family history of diabetes, pre-pregnancy and postpartum body mass index, dietary patterns, physical activity, and breastfeeding. Genetic studies revealed that GDM shares common genetic variants with type 2 diabetes. A number of lifestyle interventional trials that aimed to ameliorate modifiable risk factors, including diet, exercise, and breastfeeding, succeeded in reducing the incidence of postpartum diabetes, weight retention, and other obesity-related morbidities. The present review summarizes the findings of previous studies on the incidence and risk factors of postpartum diabetes and discusses recent lifestyle interventional trials that attempted to prevent postpartum diabetes. PMID:28049284

  13. Management of type 2 diabetes: evolving strategies for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A.; Jerkins, Terri W.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.; Kitabchi, Abbas E.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes continues to increase at an alarming rate around the world, with even more people being affected by prediabetes. Although the pathogenesis and long-term complications of type 2 diabetes are fairly well known, its treatment has remained challenging, with only half of the patients achieving the recommended hemoglobin A1c target. This narrative review explores the pathogenetic rationale for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, with the view of fostering better understanding of the evolving treatment modalities. The diagnostic criteria including the role of hemoglobin A1c in the diagnosis of diabetes are discussed. Due attention is given to the different therapeutic maneuvers and their utility in the management of the diabetic patient. The evidence supporting the role of exercise, medical nutrition therapy, glucose monitoring, and antiobesity measures including pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery is discussed. The controversial subject of optimum glycemic control in hospitalized and ambulatory patients is discussed in detail. An update of the available pharmacologic options for the management of type 2 diabetes is provided with particular emphasis on newer and emerging modalities. Special attention has been given to the initiation of insulin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes, with explanation of the pathophysiologic basis for insulin therapy in the ambulatory diabetic patient. A review of the evidence supporting the efficacy of the different preventive measures is also provided. PMID:21134520

  14. Visual complications in diabetes mellitus: beyond retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Khan, A; Petropoulos, I N; Ponirakis, G; Malik, R A

    2017-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss in people with diabetes mellitus; however, other causes of visual impairment/loss include other retinal and non-retinal visual problems, including glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy and cataracts. Additionally, when a person with diabetes complains of visual disturbance despite a visual acuity of 6/6, abnormalities in refraction, contrast sensitivity, straylight and amplitude of accommodation should be considered. We review and highlight these visual problems for physicians who manage people with diabetes to ensure timely referral and treatment to limit visual disability, which can have a significant impact on daily living, especially for those participating in sports and driving.

  15. Spices in the management of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xinyan; Lim, Joseph; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2017-02-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major health care problem worldwide both in developing and developed countries. Many factors, including age, obesity, sex, and diet, are involved in the etiology of DM. Nowadays, drug and dietetic therapies are the two major approaches used for prevention and control of DM. Compared to drug therapy, a resurgence of interest in using diet to manage and treat DM has emerged in recent years. Conventional dietary methods to treat DM include the use of culinary herbs and/or spices. Spices have long been known for their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic properties. This review explores the anti-diabetic properties of commonly used spices, such as cinnamon, ginger, turmeric, and cumin, and the use of these spices for prevention and management of diabetes and associated complications.

  16. Culture brokerage strategies in diabetes education.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gina K; Uz, Sharon W; Hinton, Ivora; Williams, Ishan; Jones, Randy

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the elements of culture brokerage as applied in a recent educational pilot study among rural African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Culture Brokerage is a nursing intervention consisting of mediation between the traditional health beliefs and practices of a patient's culture and the health care system. The intervention of Culture Brokerage holds particular relevance for clinicians who work with chronically ill patients, including those with diabetes. Diabetes prevalence rates continue to rise with alarming swiftness, affecting people of all age groups and ethnicities. The burden of disease, however, disproportionately falls on ethnic minority groups, including African Americans. Notable health disparities in the prevalence and long-term complications of diabetes warrant the attention of health care professionals. One way in which public health nurses can address these disparities is to apply strategies of culture brokerage.

  17. Platelets and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Simeone, Paola; Liani, Rossella; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Platelet activation plays a key role in atherothrombosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and increased in vivo platelet activation with enhanced thromboxane (TX) biosynthesis has been reported in patients with impairment of glucose metabolism even in the earlier stages of disease and in the preclinical phases. In this regards, platelets appear as addresses and players carrying and transducing metabolic derangement into vascular injury. The present review critically addresses key pathophysiological aspects including (i) hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and insulin resistance as determinants and predictors of platelet activation, (ii) inflammatory mediators derived from platelets, such as soluble CD40 ligand, soluble CD36, Dickkopf-1 and probably soluble receptor for advanced glycation-end-products (sRAGE), which expand the functional repertoire of platelets from players of hemostasis and thrombosis to powerful amplifiers of inflammation by promoting the release of cytokines and chemokines, cell activation, and cell-cell interactions; (iii) molecular mechanisms underpinning the less-than-expected antithrombotic protection by aspirin (ASA), despite regular antiplatelet prophylaxis at the standard dosing regimen, and (iv) stratification of patients deserving different antiplatelet strategies, based on the metabolic phenotype. Taken together, these pathophysiological aspects may contribute to the development of promising mechanism-based therapeutic strategies to reduce the progression of atherothrombosis in diabetic subjects.

  18. [Glomerulonephritis in diabetics].

    PubMed

    Mágori, A; Sonkodi, S; Lászik, Z; Mohácsi, G

    1989-10-01

    Diagnosis of glomerulonephritis (GN) is rare among diabetics and few data relevant to this issue can be found in literature. In Institute of Pathology of "Szent-Györgyi Albert" University of Medicine the presence of GN was found in cases during the examination of renal biopsy material of 36 diabetics. All patients have suffered from diabetes mellitus of 2nd type and of less than 10 year existence, requiring no insulin treatment. In 2 cases diffuse diabetic glomerulosclerosis associated with GN. It is emphasized that kidney biopsy and its complex--light and electronmicroscopic and immunhistological--examination are essential to the diagnosis of GN of diabetics.

  19. Mothers’ experience of having children with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Abolhassani, Shahla; Babaee, Sima; Eghbali, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a major health problem, which has a wide prevalence in the world. There is no sign of its stopping, but it is increasing. Diabetes in children is three to four times more common than other childhood diseases. Diagnosis of diabetes for children causes emotional responses in parents and family members. Interventions for children with diabetes involve the family, child, and professionals including physicians, nurses, and nutritionist. Self-care is difficult without direct parents’ participation. According to studies, burden of diabetes for mothers is more than for fathers. This study aimed to explore mothers’ experience of children with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a qualitative content analysis. Study population was recruited through purposeful sampling. Eleven mothers who have a child with diabetes and referring to the “Glands and Metabolism Research Center” and “Al-Zahra Hospital” were selected. Participants were aged 28 to 42 years. Data gathering was done through deep interviews with participants in 2007 that was tape-recorded. Mean average of interviews was 45 minutes. Data analysis was done using conventional qualitative content analysis. Results: Participants’ experience was classified in the two main concepts including reaction at the time of diagnosis and disease consequences for mothers. Conclusion: Mothers of children with diabetes expressed some reactions at the time of diagnosis, which was mainly due to lack of information, and lack of attention to their needs at the time of diagnosis, especially it was due to the sudden diagnosis and lack of enough opportunities for mothers to accept the disease. The disease causes some consequences for mothers that affect their lives. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the needs of families of children with diabetes and to provide support and sufficient information about their child's illness for them. PMID:24403927

  20. Renal morphology in cats with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zini, E; Benali, S; Coppola, L; Guscetti, F; Ackermann, M; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E; Aresu, L

    2014-11-01

    In humans, diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important cause of renal damage, with glomerular lesions being predominant. In cats, although diabetes is a common endocrinopathy, it is yet unknown whether it leads to renal damage. The aim of the study was to compare renal histologic features and parameters of renal function in diabetic cats against a control population matched for age, gender, breed, and body weight. Thirty-two diabetic and 20 control cats were included. Kidney sections from paraffin-embedded kidney samples were stained and examined with optical microscopy to identify glomerular, tubulointerstitial, and vascular lesions and to assess their frequency and severity. Serum creatinine and urea concentrations were also compared. Glomerular lesions were observed in 29 cats overall, with mesangial matrix increase being more common (19 cats). Tubulointerstitial lesions were observed in 42 cats, including lymphocytic infiltration (29), fibrosis (22), or tubular necrosis (21). Vascular lesions were observed in 5 cases. The frequency and severity of histologic lesions did not differ between diabetic and control cats; however, among diabetics, those that survived longer after diagnosis had more glomerular and vascular lesions. Serum creatinine and urea concentrations were similar between groups; in diabetic cats median creatinine was 109 μmol/l (range, 51-1200) and urea was 12 mmol/l (range, 4-63), and in controls creatinine was 126 μmol/l (range, 50-875) and urea 11 mmol/l (range, 3-80). The results suggest that DM in cats does not lead to microscopically detectable kidney lesions or clinically relevant renal dysfunction. The authors hypothesize that the short life expectancy of diabetic cats may be the main reason for the difference from human diabetics.

  1. Toward practical prevention of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2000-05-01

    Even in individuals who are unwilling to make prudent changes in their diets and sedentary habits, the administration of certain nutrients and/or drugs may help to prevent or postpone the onset of type 2 diabetes. The evident ability of fiber-rich cereal products to decrease diabetes risk, as documented in prospective epidemiological studies, may be mediated primarily by the superior magnesium content of such foods. High-magnesium diets have preventive (though not curative) activity in certain rodent models of diabetes; conversely, magnesium depletion provokes insulin resistance. Epidemiology also strongly suggests that regular moderate alcohol consumption has a major favorable impact on diabetes risk, particularly in women; this may reflect a direct insulin-sensitizing effect on muscle and, in women, a reduced risk for obesity. Chromium picolinate can also aid muscle insulin sensitivity, and initial reports suggest that it is an effective therapy for type 2 diabetes. High-dose biotin has shown therapeutic activity in diabetic rats and in limited clinical experience; increased expression of glucokinase in hepatocytes may mediate this benefit. Other nutrients that might prove to aid diabetic glycemic control, and thus have potential for prevention, include coenzyme Q and conjugated linoleic acids (CLA). Since the nutrients cited here - including ethanol in moderation - appear to be quite safe and (with the exception of CLA) quite affordable, supplementation with these nutrients may prove to be a practical strategy for diabetes prevention. Drugs such as metformin and troglitazone, which are expensive and require regular physician monitoring to avoid potentially dangerous side-effects, would appear to be less practical options from cost-effectiveness, convenience and safety standpoints, given the fact that the population at-risk for diabetes is huge.

  2. Does mirtazapine interfere with naturalistic diabetes treatment?

    PubMed

    Song, Hoo Rim; Woo, Young Sup; Wang, Hee-Ryung; Shim, In-Hee; Jun, Tae-Youn; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2014-10-01

    Mirtazapine is known to induce weight gain and possibly leads to exacerbation of diabetic profiles. However, many cases of diabetic patients, who complained of insomnia and depression, were treated with mirtazapine in the clinical situations. Thus, this study aimed to assess any negative effects that treatment with mirtazapine may incur in diabetic patients.This study included 33 patients enrolled in naturalistic diabetes treatment that had also been diagnosed with depression and prescribed mirtazapine for at least 6 months. Another 33 diabetic patients who had not taken any psychiatric medicines were included as a control group. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, triglyceride levels, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein were assessed at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months.The dose of mirtazapine at baseline was 24.3 ± 14.0 mg/d in the mirtazapine group, and the 2 groups did not differ in any baseline characteristics except for total cholesterol levels. Body mass index increased in both groups, and the change in the mirtazapine group (1.0 ± 0.6 kg/m) was significantly greater than that in the control group (0.3 ± 0.4 kg/m, P < 0.001) at 6 months. Only the control group exhibited a decrease in fasting plasma glucose, whereas both groups showed a decrease in HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol, an increase in high-density lipoprotein, and no change in triglyceride levels. None of the differences between the groups were statistically significant.In conclusion, mirtazapine increased the weight gain of diabetic patients; however, other diabetic and lipid markers generally did not worsen during the 6-month treatment period. These results suggest that, at least in the short term, mirtazapine is safe for diabetic patients in a stable state and are undergoing appropriate diabetic treatment.

  3. Effect of Socioeconomic Factors and Family History on the Incidence of Diabetes in an Adult Diabetic Population from Algeria

    PubMed Central

    FERDI, Nour El Houda; ABLA, Khalida; CHENCHOUNI, Haroun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is a serious public health problem worldwide and particularly in developing countries. In Algeria, this metabolic disorder occurs with a wide variety or atypical forms that linked to multiple risk factors including local habits and traditions. This study aimed to determine the impact of risk factors (metabolic syndrome, social, cultural, physical activity, family history and the treatment used) on the incidence of diabetes. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 on a random sample from a resident population in Tebessa, Northeast Algeria, which underwent a significant expanding of diabetes prevalence conditioned by profound socioeconomic changes. The survey included 200 subjects, randomly selected; with 100 controls and 100 diabetic patients, (26 diabetic subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus ‘T1DM’ and 74 subjects with type two diabetes mellitus ‘T2DM’). Results: Diabetic subjects were significantly affected by all these risk factors, including metabolic syndrome that was higher in women. The most common treatment among surveyed T1DM subjects was insulin, whereas T2DM patients used metformin. In addition, the duration from T1DM onset in the surveyed subjects is older than T2DM onset. The incidence of diabetes is significantly in close relationship between the majorities of these factors of risk. Conclusion: Subjects with a high socioeconomic status can afford a healthier way of life to avoid the risk of developing diabetes compared to subjects with lower social level. PMID:28053930

  4. Diabetes mellitus and severe mental illness: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Holt, Richard I G; Mitchell, Alex J

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is twofold to threefold higher in people with severe mental illness (SMI) than in the general population, with diabetes mellitus affecting ∼12% of people receiving antipsychotics. The consequences of diabetes mellitus are more severe and frequent in people with SMI than in those without these conditions, with increased rates of microvascular and macrovascular complications, acute metabolic dysregulation and deaths related to diabetes mellitus. Multiple complex mechanisms underlie the association between diabetes mellitus and SMI; these mechanisms include genetic, environmental and disease-specific factors, and treatment-specific factors. Although antipsychotics are the mainstay of treatment in SMI, a causative link, albeit of uncertain magnitude, seems to exist between antipsychotics and diabetes mellitus. The principles of managing diabetes mellitus in people with SMI are similar to those for the general population and should follow currently established treatment algorithms. Lifestyle interventions are needed to reduce incident diabetes mellitus. In addition, improved uptake of opportunities to screen for this disease will reduce the high prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Currently, people with SMI receive poorer treatment for diabetes mellitus than the general population. Thus, health-care professionals in primary care, diabetes mellitus services and mental health teams have a responsibility to ensure that patients with SMI are not disadvantaged.

  5. Epigenetics: deciphering its role in diabetes and its chronic complications.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Louisa M; Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2011-07-01

    1. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic factors might regulate the complex interplay between genes and the environment, and affect human diseases, such as diabetes and its complications. 2. Clinical trials have underscored the long lasting beneficial effects of strict glycaemic control for reducing the progression of diabetic complications. They have also shown that diabetic complications, such as diabetic nephropathy, a chronic kidney disorder, can continue even after blood glucose normalization, suggesting a metabolic memory of the prior glycaemic state. 3. Dysregulation of epigenetic post-transcriptional modifications of histones in chromatin, including histone lysine methylation, has been implicated in aberrant gene regulation associated with the pathology of diabetes and its complications. Genome-wide studies have shown cell-type specific changes in histone methylation patterns under diabetic conditions. In addition, studies in vascular cells have shown long lasting changes in epigenetic modifications at key inflammatory gene promoters after prior exposure to diabetic conditions, suggesting a possible mechanism for metabolic memory. 4. Recent studies have shown roles for histone methylation, DNA methylation, as well as microRNA in diabetic nephropathy. Whether these epigenetic factors play a role in metabolic memory of diabetic kidney disease is less well understood. 5. The incidence of diabetes is growing rapidly, as also the cost of treating the resulting complications. A better understanding of metabolic memory and the potential involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in this phenomenon could enable the development of new therapeutic targets for the treatment and/or prevention of sustained diabetic complications.

  6. Current status of managing diabetes mellitus in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasing global health problem. Guidelines for diabetic care recommend management of lifestyle and risk factors (glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol), as well as regular screening for complications associated with treatment of the conditions related to diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes increased from 8.6% to 11.0% from 2001 to 2013. According to the diabetes fact sheet 2015, the proportion of patients with diabetes treated with antihypertensive medications increased from 56.0% to 62.5% from 2006 to 2013, and 49.5% of those with diabetes were being treated with lipid-lowering medications in 2013, a 1.8-fold increase since 2006. According to the 2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, 45.6% of patients with diabetes achieved a hemoglobin A1c level of < 7.0%, 72.8% achieved a blood pressure of < 140/85 mmHg, and 58.0% achieved a low density lipoprotein cholesterol level of < 100 mg/dL. Only 19.7% of patients with diabetes had good control of all three of these parameters. Despite improvements in health promotion efforts, the rates of adherence to medication and risk-factor control are low. Therefore, a systematic approach to managing diabetes, including self-management education, is needed to prevent or delay complications. The government needs to establish a long-term policy to address the growing burden of diabetes. PMID:27604796

  7. Diabetes and bone health: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaghavan, Vikram; Mazur, Matthew M.; Evans, Brad; Liu, Jiayong; Ebraheim, Nabil A.

    2017-01-01

    As the prevalence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, research on some of the lesser-known effects, including impaired bone health, are gaining a lot of attention. The two most common forms of diabetes are type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). These two differ in their physiology, with T1DM stemming from an inability to produce insulin, and T2DM involving an insufficient response to the insulin that is produced. This review aims to highlight the most current information regarding diabetes as it relates to bone health. It looks at biochemical changes that characterize diabetic bone; notably increased adiposity, altered bone metabolism, and variations in bone mineral density (BMD). Then several hypotheses are analyzed, concerning how these changes may be detrimental to the highly orchestrated processes that are involved in bone formation and turnover, and ultimately result in the distinguishing features of diabetic bone. The review proceeds by explaining the effects of antidiabetes medications on bone health, then highlighting several ways that diabetes can play a part in other clinical treatment outcomes. With diabetes negatively affecting bone health and creating other clinical problems, and its treatment options potentiating these effects, physicians should consider the use of anti-osteoporotic drugs to supplement standard anti-diabetes medications in patients suffering with diabetic bone loss. PMID:28344668

  8. [Therapeutic approach in persistent diabetic macular edema].

    PubMed

    Brănişteanu, Daniel; Moraru, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema has been initially reserved to cases unresponsive to conventional laser photocoagulation according to ETDRS criteria. While knowledge about pathophysiology of macular edema evolved and new drugs became available, the terminology of persistent diabetic macular edema expanded to include resistance to most current therapies. The purpose of this paper is to review medical and surgical options in the treatment of such difficult cases according to literature data and personal experience.

  9. The Diabetic Foot

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The diabetic foot presents a complex interplay of neuropathic, macrovascular, and microvascular disease on an abnormal metabolic background, complicated by an increased susceptibility to mechanical, thermal, and chemical injury and decreased healing ability. The abnormalities of diabetes, once present, are not curable. But most severe foot abnormalities in the diabetic are due to neglect of injury and are mostly preventable. The physician must ensure that the diabetic patient learns the principles of good foot care. If time for teaching is limited, this task must be delegated to a podiatrist or a diabetes nurse educator in a diabetes day centre. It is the physician's responsibility to confirm foot care by personal inspection of the feet of all diabetic patients at every visit. PMID:21234002

  10. 78 FR 19275 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence..., National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, National Institute of Health, Building...

  11. 75 FR 14605 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence..., Director, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney...

  12. 77 FR 53208 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence..., National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institute of Health, Building...

  13. 76 FR 11499 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... Intramural Research, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive, and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, MD... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney... Kidney Diseases, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the...

  14. [Non-diabetic renal disease in type II diabetes mellitus patients in Mohammed V Military Hospital, Rabat, Morocco].

    PubMed

    Y, Zajjari; Benyahia, M; Ibrahim, D Montasser; Kassouati, J; Maoujoud, O; El Guendouz, F; Oualim, Z

    2012-06-01

    The distinction between diabetic nephropathy lesions and non-diabetic renal lesions is not always obvious and is often based on renal biopsy. This study evaluated the prevalence and predictors of nondiabetic renal disease in people with type 2 diabetes. The study was conducted between January 2008 and October 2010 in the nephrology department of the military hospital in Rabat. The study included 16 patients with type 2 diabetes in whom renal biopsy was indicated. Non-diabetic renal disease was found in 6 of the patients (37.5%); IgA nephropathy was the most frequent non-diabetic renal disease (half of non-diabetic renal diseases). Hypertension was significantly less frequent in the non-diabetic renal disease group than the diabetic nephropathy group (16.7% versus 80.0%, P = 0024), duration of diabetes was a shorter (4.5 versus 15.5 years, P = 0.022) and diabetic retinopathy was absent (100% versus 40%, P = 0.026). There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in relation to age, sex, creatinine level, 24-hour proteinuria, nephrotic syndrome and microscopic haematuria.

  15. Ultrasonic Measurement of Common Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Type 2 Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Ahmad; Roudbari, Ali; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Babaei Jandaghi, Ali; Bani Jamali, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a widespread disease. Its vascular complications can be characterized by arteriosclerosis formation in carotid arteries. Due to its delayed diagnosis resulting in more complications in Iran, it seems that screening diabetic patients is mandatory. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the intima-media thickness (IMT) of carotid artery in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Patients and Methods This is a cross-sectional study, which included 80 participants (40 diabetics and 40 non-diabetics). By using ultrasound, bilateral IMTs of the distal carotid were measured and the data were analyzed using ANOVA and multivariate regression tests in SPSS 14. Results The mean IMT was 0.97 in diabetic patients and 0.63 in non-diabetics (P < 0.001). Age and gender had significant positive effects on the increase of IMT (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005, respectively for age and gender). Past medical history of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular accident (CVA) in diabetes is associated significantly with an increase in IMT (P =0.019 and 0.027 respectively). Other confounding variables such as smoking, history of hypertension (HTN) and hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) in diabetic patients showed no significant relationship with the increase of IMT. Conclusions Although measuring the IMT of the carotid artery by sonography is a useful tool for screening diabetic patients, more studies are needed for determining how to use these measurements in promoting the patients outcomes. PMID:23329968

  16. Diabetes in Thailand: Status and Policy.

    PubMed

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Deerochanawong, Chaicharn

    2016-03-01

    Like other countries in the Western Pacific region, Thailand is facing increasing numbers of patients with diabetes due to unhealthy diets, high obesity rates, and an aging society. Diabetes is a considerable burden for developing countries as it reduces quality of life, increases mortality, and drives up healthcare costs. The disease detection rate in Thailand has improved in recent years, but glycemic control remains suboptimal and significant numbers of patients suffer from complications. Universal healthcare coverage has increased access to care, but inequality exists between different health plans and non-medication diabetes supplies are not yet widely covered. Diabetes self-management education has not yet been standardized and a multidisciplinary team approach is not widely utilized. The Thai government recognizes the burden of diabetes and has launched nationwide programs of health promotion and disease prevention. In addition, local initiatives have targeted reductions in specific complications, including retinopathy and diabetic foot problems, which has resulted in better disease prevention and treatment. Along with strategic public health planning, increased collaboration between private and public sectors, enhanced professional training, increased use of technology and data management, and equitable distribution of care are all needed to improve outcomes of patients with diabetes in Thailand.

  17. Management of diabetes mellitus in infants.

    PubMed

    Karges, Beate; Meissner, Thomas; Icks, Andrea; Kapellen, Thomas; Holl, Reinhard W

    2011-11-29

    Diabetes mellitus diagnosed during the first 2 years of life differs from the disease in older children regarding its causes, clinical characteristics, treatment options and needs in terms of education and psychosocial support. Over the past decade, new genetic causes of neonatal diabetes mellitus have been elucidated, including monogenic β-cell defects and chromosome 6q24 abnormalities. In patients with KCNJ11 or ABCC8 mutations and diabetes mellitus, oral sulfonylurea offers an easy and effective treatment option. Type 1 diabetes mellitus in infants is characterized by a more rapid disease onset, poorer residual β-cell function and lower rate of partial remission than in older children. Insulin therapy in infants with type 1 diabetes mellitus or other monogenic causes of diabetes mellitus is a challenge, and novel data highlight the value of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in this very young patient population. Infants are entirely dependent on caregivers for insulin therapy, nutrition and glucose monitoring, which emphasizes the need for appropriate education and psychosocial support of parents. To achieve optimal long-term metabolic control with low rates of acute and chronic complications, continuous and structured diabetes care should be provided by a multidisciplinary health-care team.

  18. Using Large Diabetes Databases for Research.

    PubMed

    Wild, Sarah; Fischbacher, Colin; McKnight, John

    2016-09-01

    There are an increasing number of clinical, administrative and trial databases that can be used for research. These are particularly valuable if there are opportunities for linkage to other databases. This paper describes examples of the use of large diabetes databases for research. It reviews the advantages and disadvantages of using large diabetes databases for research and suggests solutions for some challenges. Large, high-quality databases offer potential sources of information for research at relatively low cost. Fundamental issues for using databases for research are the completeness of capture of cases within the population and time period of interest and accuracy of the diagnosis of diabetes and outcomes of interest. The extent to which people included in the database are representative should be considered if the database is not population based and there is the intention to extrapolate findings to the wider diabetes population. Information on key variables such as date of diagnosis or duration of diabetes may not be available at all, may be inaccurate or may contain a large amount of missing data. Information on key confounding factors is rarely available for the nondiabetic or general population limiting comparisons with the population of people with diabetes. However comparisons that allow for differences in distribution of important demographic factors may be feasible using data for the whole population or a matched cohort study design. In summary, diabetes databases can be used to address important research questions. Understanding the strengths and limitations of this approach is crucial to interpret the findings appropriately.

  19. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  20. Succination of proteins in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frizzell, Norma; Lima, Maria; Baynes, John W

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is arguably the most reactive amino acid in protein. A wide range of cysteine derivatives is formed in vivo, resulting from oxidation, nitrosation, alkylation and acylation reactions. This review describes succination of proteins, an irreversible chemical modification of cysteine by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succinyl)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane and develop in concert with mitochondrial and oxidative stress in diabetes. Increased succination of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase explains the loss in specific activity of this enzyme in muscle of streptozotocin-diabetic rats and increased succination of adiponectin may explain the decreased secretion of adiponectin from adipose tissue in type 2 diabetes. In addition to GAPDH and adiponectin, other succinated proteins identified in adipocytes include cytoskeletal proteins (tubulin, actin) and chaperone proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Succination of adipocyte protein in vitro is inhibited by uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and by inhibitors of ER stress. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress and recent studies suggest that succination is the mechanistic link between mitochondrial and ER stress in diabetes.

  1. Psychology, technology, and diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Gonder-Frederick, Linda A; Shepard, Jaclyn A; Grabman, Jesse H; Ritterband, Lee M

    2016-10-01

    Use of technology in diabetes management is rapidly advancing and has the potential to help individuals with diabetes achieve optimal glycemic control. Over the past 40 years, several devices have been developed and refined, including the blood glucose meter, insulin pump, and continuous glucose monitor. When used in tandem, the insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor have prompted the Artificial Pancreas initiative, aimed at developing control system for fully automating glucose monitoring and insulin delivery. In addition to devices, modern technology, such as the Internet and mobile phone applications, have been used to promote patient education, support, and intervention to address the behavioral and emotional challenges of diabetes management. These state-of-the-art technologies not only have the potential to improve clinical outcomes, but there are possible psychological benefits, such as improved quality of life, as well. However, practical and psychosocial limitations related to advanced technology exist and, in the context of several technology-related theoretical frameworks, can influence patient adoption and continued use. It is essential for future diabetes technology research to address these barriers given that the clinical benefits appear to largely depend on patient engagement and consistence of technology use. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. [Prevention of diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Metelko, Zeljko; Brkljacić Crkvencić, Neva

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is the most common chronic complication, which depends mostly on the duration and successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. Based on epidemiological studies, it is estimated that 25% of persons with diabetes mellitus (PwDM) will develop the problems with DF during lifetime, while 5% do 15% will be treated for foot or leg amputation. The treatment is prolonged and expensive, while the results are uncertain. The changes in DF are influenced by different factors usually connected with the duration and regulation of diabetes mellitus. The first problems with DF are the result of misbalance between nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms on the one hand and the intensity of damaging factors against DF on the other hand. Diabetes mellitus is a state of chronic hyperglycemia, consisting of changes in carbohydrate, protein and fat metabolism. As a consequence of the long duration of diabetes mellitus, late complications can develop. Foot is in its structure very complex, combined with many large and small bones connected with ligaments, directed by many small and large muscles, interconnected with many small and large blood vessels and nerves. Every of these structures can be changed by nutritional, defensive and reparatory mechanisms with consequential DE Primary prevention of DF includes all measures involved in appropriate maintenance of nutrition, defense and reparatory mechanisms.First, it is necessary to identify the high-risk population for DF, in particular for macrovascular, microvascular and neural complications. The high-risk population of PwDM should be identified during regular examination and appropriate education should be performed. In this group, it is necessary to include more frequent and intensified empowerment for lifestyle changes, appropriate diet, regular exercise (including frequent breaks for short exercise during sedentary work), regular self control of body weight, quit smoking, and appropriate treatment of glycemia

  3. Correlates of Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes in US South Asians: Findings from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arti D.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Kandula, Namratha R.; Srivastava, Shweta; Kanaya, Alka M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we aim to elucidate the role of sociodemographic, lifestyle and cultural factors in pre-diabetes and diabetes in South Asian immigrants to the United States (US), a population at high risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of a community-based cohort of 899 South Asians without known cardiovascular disease from the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study. Glycemic status was determined by fasting glucose, 2-hour post-challenge glucose and use of diabetes medication. We used multinomial logistic regression models to estimate the independent associations of sociodemographic, lifestyle and cultural factors with pre-diabetes and diabetes, adjusting for confounders identified using directed acyclic graphs. Results Approximately 33% of participants had pre-diabetes and 25% had diabetes. In multivariate analyses, an independent correlate of pre-diabetes was low exercise. Additional covariates associated with diabetes included: lower family income, less education, high chronic psychological burden score, and greater time spent watching television, and fasting monthly or annually was inversely associated with diabetes prevalence. Conclusions We found several modifiable risk factors associated with pre-diabetes and diabetes that may help guide diabetes prevention interventions for South Asian immigrants to the US. PMID:25459085

  4. Diabetic foot syndrome: Immune-inflammatory features as possible cardiovascular markers in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Maida, Carlo; Pinto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcerations have been extensively reported as vascular complications of diabetes mellitus associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality. Diabetic foot syndrome (DFS), as defined by the World Health Organization, is an “ulceration of the foot (distally from the ankle and including the ankle) associated with neuropathy and different grades of ischemia and infection”. Pathogenic events able to cause diabetic foot ulcers are multifactorial. Among the commonest causes of this pathogenic pathway it’s possible to consider peripheral neuropathy, foot deformity, abnormal foot pressures, abnormal joint mobility, trauma, peripheral artery disease. Several studies reported how diabetic patients show a higher mortality rate compared to patients without diabetes and in particular these studies under filled how cardiovascular mortality and morbidity is 2-4 times higher among patients affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus. This higher degree of cardiovascular morbidity has been explained as due to the observed higher prevalence of major cardiovascular risk factor, of asymptomatic findings of cardiovascular diseases, and of prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in diabetic patients with foot complications. In diabetes a fundamental pathogenic pathway of most of vascular complications has been reported as linked to a complex interplay of inflammatory, metabolic and procoagulant variables. These pathogenetic aspects have a direct interplay with an insulin resistance, subsequent obesity, diabetes, hypertension, prothrombotic state and blood lipid disorder. Involvement of inflammatory markers such as IL-6 plasma levels and resistin in diabetic subjects as reported by Tuttolomondo et al confirmed the pathogenetic issue of the a “adipo-vascular” axis that may contribute to cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. This “adipo-vascular axis” in patients with type 2 diabetes has been reported as characterized

  5. Diabetic ketoacidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arterial blood gas Basic metabolic panel, (a group of blood tests that measure your sodium and potassium levels, kidney function, and other chemicals and functions) Blood glucose test Blood pressure measurement

  6. Measurement of health-related QOL in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Ken; Connell, Cathleen M

    2004-01-01

    A number of health-related QOL (HR-QOL) measures specifically designed for people with diabetes mellitus have appeared in the literature. This article provides a selective review of 12 measures that address this important construct. For each included study, a description of the measure and its development phase is provided, followed by discussion of sampling, reliability, validity and appropriateness for selected populations. Measures designed to investigate broad and specific conceptualisations of diabetes-specific QOL are included. For research in which a broad conceptualisation of diabetes-specific QOL is appropriate, the following measures are recommended: Diabetes-39, Diabetes Care Profile (DCP), Diabetes Impact Management Scales (DIMS), Diabetes Quality of Life (DQOL) and the Diabetes-Specific Quality of Life Scale (DSQOLS). For investigation of one or more specific aspects of diabetes-specific QOL, other measures may also be appropriate: single-scale questionnaires such as the Appraisal of Diabetes Scale (ADS) [stressful impact], Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life (ADDQoL) [life without diabetes] and the Problem Areas in Diabetes scale (PAID) [diabetes-related distress]; the Diabetes Health Profile (DHP) which focuses on diabetes-related distress, activity and eating behaviour; the Questionnaire on Stress in Patients with Diabetes-Revised (QSD-R) which has a primary focus on diabetes-related distress; and the Well-Being Enquiry for Diabetics (WED) which is primarily concerned with the perceptions of patients with diabetes in relation to mental health. Researchers selecting a diabetes-specific QOL measure should also carefully consider the conceptual underpinnings of the available instruments, as there is little uniformity in the definition and conceptualisation of HR-QOL. Based upon participants involved in questionnaire development and validation studies, those questionnaires that appear to be most appropriate for use with a variety of patient

  7. Economic analysis of a diabetes-specific nutritional meal replacement for patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Stephen; Mustad, Vikkie A; Lee, James; Sun, Jianqin

    2010-01-01

    This study extends nutritional intervention results reported by short-term clinical trials of a diabetes-specific nutritional meal replacement by assessing the ten-year impact of the interventions on patient outcomes and costs compared to usual care. We developed and validated a computer simulation of type 2 diabetes based on published data from major clinical trials. The model tracks patients through microvascular and macrovascular health states and reports cumulative costs and quality adjusted life years. We modeled different scenarios that include a diabetes-specific nutritional meal replacement as part of a structured lifestyle intervention, and also as the only difference between the intervention and usual care treatment groups, and compared them to usual care with diet and physical activity recommendations. We used sensitivity analysis to explore the robustness of results. When a diabetes-specific nutritional meal replacement is the only treatment difference and is considered an equal cost meal replacement, the diabetes-specific nutritional meal replacement interventions are less costly and more effective than usual care. As an added cost meal replacement, the diabetes-specific nutritional meal replacement has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio between $50,414 and $55,036 depending on improvement in percent glycated hemoglobin. A hypothetical lifestyle intervention using a diabetes-specific nutritional meal replacement has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $47,917. The diabetes-specific nutritional meal replacement was found to be cost-effective under the various conditions simulated.

  8. Prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients attending a diabetes center in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Börü, Ulkü Türk; Alp, Recep; Sargin, Haluk; Koçer, Abdulkadir; Sargin, Mehmet; Lüleci, Arda; Yayla, Ali

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for neuropathy in type 2 diabetic patients attending a major Turkish diabetes center. Eight hundred and sixty-six consecutive type 2 diabetic patients were included in the study. A single observer performed biothesiometry studies on these patients. The presence of diabetic neuropathy was investigated using neurological symptom scale (NSS) and neurological disability score (NDS) performed. Neuropathy was determined with standardized neurological examinations and defined as the presence of abnormal NSS and NDS together with abnormal sensory or motor signs and symptoms as well as decreased great toe vibration perception. Overall, 60% (n = 520) of the patients were diagnosed as having neuropathy. The prevalence of neuropathy increased with age (p < 0.001) and duration of diabetes (p < 0.001). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed the duration of diabetes (p < 0.001) and HbA1c levels (p < 0.001) as the risk factors for neuropathy. The overall prevalence of neuropathy in Turkish type 2 diabetic population was 60%. Age, duration of diabetes, and poor glycemic control were considered to be the risk factors for neuropathy.

  9. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-06-10

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations.

  10. Neuropathy and Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Volmer-Thole, Maren; Lobmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus worldwide and the most common cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients. The etiology of diabetic foot ulcerations is complex due to their multifactorial nature; in the pathophysiology of diabetic foot ulceration polyneuropathy is important. Proper adherence to standard treatment strategies and interdisciplinary cooperation can reduce the still high rates of major amputations. PMID:27294922

  11. Relations between Resiliency, Diabetes-Related Quality of Life, and Disease Markers to School-Related Outcomes in Adolescents with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Jaramillo, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the role that resiliency and diabetes quality of life play in school functioning and glucose control among adolescents with diabetes. Participants included 45 adolescents with diabetes who participated in a larger study evaluating the feasibility of a model of mental health screening, assessment, and referral/service…

  12. Evaluation of a school-based diabetes education intervention, an extension of Program ENERGY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, Matthew David

    Background: The prevalence of both obesity and type 2 diabetes in the United States has increased over the past two decades and rates remain high. The latest data from the National Center for Health Statistics estimates that 36% of adults and 17% of children and adolescents in the US are obese (CDC Adult Obesity, CDC Childhood Obesity). Being overweight or obese greatly increases one's risk of developing several chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 8% of adults in the US have diabetes, type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of these cases. Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents is still rare, however clinical reports suggest an increase in the frequency of diagnosis (CDC Diabetes Fact Sheet, 2011). Results from the Diabetes Prevention Program show that the incidence of type 2 diabetes can be reduced through the adoption of a healthier lifestyle among high-risk individuals (DPP, 2002). Objectives: This classroom-based intervention included scientific coverage of energy balance, diabetes, diabetes prevention strategies, and diabetes management. Coverage of diabetes management topics were included in lesson content to further the students' understanding of the disease. Measurable short-term goals of the intervention included increases in: general diabetes knowledge, diabetes management knowledge, and awareness of type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. Methods: A total of 66 sixth grade students at Tavelli Elementary School in Fort Collins, CO completed the intervention. The program consisted of nine classroom-based lessons; students participated in one lesson every two weeks. The lessons were delivered from November of 2005 to May of 2006. Each bi-weekly lesson included a presentation and interactive group activities. Participants completed two diabetes knowledge questionnaires at baseline and post intervention. A diabetes survey developed by Program ENERGY measured general diabetes knowledge and awareness of type 2 diabetes prevention strategies

  13. Hospital discharge records under-report the prevalence of diabetes in inpatients.

    PubMed

    Carral, Florentino; Olveira, Gabriel; Aguilar, Manuel; Ortego, José; Gavilán, Inmaculada; Doménech, Inmaculada; Escobar, Luis

    2003-02-01

    The objective of our study was to estimate the hospital inpatient prevalence of diabetes mellitus in a Spanish tertiary care teaching hospital. We analyzed a cohort of 1036 patients consecutively admitted over a 7-day period to our hospital. We classified this total of hospitalized patients based on information obtained from individual analysis of medical history and values of plasma glucose after fasting, into groups with the following conditions: recognized diabetes, unrecognized diabetes, other hyperglycaemic situations, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or non diabetes. One hundred and seventy-eight patients were estimated to have diabetes (total prevalence: 17.2%), including 158 patients with recognized diabetes and 20 patients with diabetes unrecognized before admission. Additionally, 25 patients were considered to have other hyperglycaemic situations and 20 patients were estimated to have IFG. The mean age of the diabetic patients was 65+/-13.7 years (50.5% men), and 94.4% had type 2 diabetes. Diabetes disproportionately affects the elderly inpatient, with a prevalence of 30.9% in people older than 64 years. Of the total number of patients with diabetes, only 144 (diabetes prevalence: 13.8%) were registered in hospital discharge records as having diabetes. We conclude that the extent of hospital diabetes prevalence considerably exceeds levels reported in the literature, suggesting that true diabetes prevalence in hospitals could be significantly under-reported, resulting in a serious underestimate of required expenditures.

  14. Conjunctival Flora in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Mehmet; Balcı, Mehmet; Bayhan, Hasan Ali; İnkaya, Ahmet Çağkan; Uyar, Mehmet; Gürdal, Canan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the conjunctival bacterial flora in diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three diabetic patients and 43 nondiabetic healthy individuals were included in the study. A specimen was taken from each participant for the study by rubbing a sterile cotton-tipped swab on the inferior palpebral conjunctiva of the right eye. Samples were incubated in blood agar, chocolate agar, eosin methylene-blue lactose sucrose agar and sabouraud 4% dextrose agar. Isolated microorganisms were identified using routine microbiological methods. Results: Rates for bacterial isolations were determined as 38.5% in diabetic patients and 34.9% in nondiabetic controls. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 30% of cases in the diabetic patient group, while 20% tested positive for Escherichia coli, 10% for coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 10% for Klebsiella pneumoniae and 30% for multiple bacteria. In the non-diabetic group, 53.3% of patients were positive for Staphylococcus aureus while coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was isolated in 26.7%, Klebsiella pneumoniae in 6.7% and multiple bacteria in 13.3% of patients. Although there was no statistically significant difference in the number of isolated bacteria between the diabetic and nondiabetic groups, gram-negative bacterial colonization was significantly higher in diabetic patients (χ2=0.129, p=0.719 and χ2=5.60, p=0.018, respectively). Conclusion: Gram-negative bacteria are more common in the conjunctival flora of diabetic patients. This should be considered by clinicians when treating ocular infections in diabetic patients. PMID:27800231

  15. Ocular complications in children with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Geloneck, Megan M.; Forbes, Brian J.; Shaffer, James; Ying, Gui-shuang; Binenbaum, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Objective The effectiveness of annual diabetic eye exams in children is unclear. We sought to determine the prevalence and onset of ocular pathology in children with diabetes mellitus (DM), identify risk factors for ocular disease, and recommend a screening regimen for asymptomatic children. Design Retrospective consecutive cohort study. Subjects Children less than age 18 years with type 1 or 2 DM examined over a 4 year period. Methods All children underwent a complete eye exam, including dilated fundoscopy and cycloplegic refraction. A literature review was performed, identifying the youngest reported age and shortest reported duration of DM prior to the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy. Main outcome measures Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, cataract, high refractive error, and strabismus. Results 370 children (mean age 11.2 years, range 1–17.5) had 693 examinations, with mean DM duration 5.2 years (range 0.1–16.2), mean HbA1c 8.6 (range 5 to ≥14). No children had diabetic retinopathy. 12 had cataract; 5 required extraction but were identified by decreased vision, not diabetic screening. 19 had strabismus; only one was microvascular paralytic strabismus. 41 had high refractive error. There were no associations between these conditions and duration or control of DM. In the literature, the youngest age at diagnosis of severe diabetic retinopathy was 15 years and the shortest duration of disease was 5 years. Conclusion Diabetic retinopathy is rare in children regardless of duration and control of DM. Based upon our study and literature review, screening examinations for type 1 diabetics could begin at age 15 years or at 5 years after the diagnosis of DM, whichever occurs later, unless the child is judged by the endocrinologist as being at unusally high risk. Other ocular complications are identifiable through existing amblyopia screening methods. PMID:26341461

  16. Anti-inflammatory Strategies to Prevent Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Jialal, I; Devaraj, S

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes is a proinflammatory state and inflammation is crucial in the genesis of vascular complications. While there are many anti-inflammatory strategies, most of which have been shown to reduce inflammation in diabetes, there is sparse data on reduction in cardiovascular events (CVEs). To date, the only anti-inflammatory strategies that have been shown to reduce CVE in diabetes include statins, angiotensin receptor blockers, metformin, and pioglitazone. We also discuss the role of novel emerging therapies.

  17. Diabetes in the Aged

    PubMed Central

    Grobin, Wulf

    1970-01-01

    In keeping with the already known high prevalence of diabetes among residents of the Jewish Home for the Aged, Toronto, annual screening disclosed an average incidence of 25.5% of abnormal glucose tolerance (two-hour post-glucose blood sugars above 140 mg./100 ml.) in residents not known to be diabetic. Forty-five (47%) of the 94 residents with abnormal screening values were considered subsequently to be diabetic according to our criteria. Long-term follow-up, particularly of 81 residents initially normoglycemic in 1964-5, confirmed that the natural course of glucose tolerance in this population was one of progressive deterioration. By contrast, improvement amounting to remission has been demonstrated in nine out of 20 residents several years after they had been declared diabetic, and is thought to have been induced by dietotherapy. Moderate hyperglycemia per se did not cause symptoms in these almost always keto-resistant and usually aglycosuric aged diabetics, who often claimed they felt better when hyperglycemic. Hypoglycemia was an ever present danger when anti-diabetic medication was used; it was the main reason for undertreatment. So far, data from our long-term study have not shown morbidity to be markedly increased in the diabetics, and mortality was found to be evenly distributed among diabetic and non-diabetic male residents. However, in the females there was a clear correlation between mortality rate and the diminished glucose tolerance. What may appear as overdiagnosis of diabetes in the aged is recommended in the hope that early institution of dietary treatment will delay the development of clinical diabetes and the need for anti-diabetic agents. This, in turn, would prevent iatrogenic hypoglycemia. It would also reduce the severity and frequency of spontaneous hypoglycemia which, we believe, occurs more commonly in the early phase of diabetes in the aged than is generally realized. PMID:5476778

  18. Gender Differences in Periodontal Status and Oral Hygiene of Non-Diabetic and Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Antina; Busse, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study investigated gender dependent differences by the comparison of periodontal status and oral hygiene between diabetic patients and non-diabetic subjects. Methods: 517 mostly obese subjects (171 non-diabetic, 205 type 2 diabetic with oral and 141 with insulin therapy; mean: 59 years) completed an oral hygiene questionnaire and had a clinical examination, including periodontal screening and recording (PSR), percentage of bleeding teeth (PBT), probing pocket depth (PD), gingivitis index (GI), and number of teeth (Tn). Main parameters were “periodontitis” and “oral hygiene behaviour”, each defined by 5 sub-parameters. For a comparison of all results, each sub-parameter was set 0.2. The “low performance index“ (LoP) was the sum of significantly worse sub-parameters in the compared groups (maximum of low performing = 1.0). Results: Gender comparison: In non-diabetic and diabetic patients with oral medication, males performed worse (LoP: periodontitis 0.6 - 0.8; oral hygiene 0.4 - 0.6). The male insulin group performed worse oral hygiene (LoP: 0.4) than females with insulin therapy, whereas the periodontal status showed no difference. Diabetic and non-diabetic groups: Females: Diabetic groups performed worse than non-diabetics (LoP: periodontitis 0.2 - 1.0; oral hygiene 0.4). Insulin patients had worse periodontal status and showed no difference in oral hygiene when compared to diabetic patients with oral medication (LoP: 0.2). Males: Diabetic group with oral medication had worse periodontal status than non-diabetics (LoP: 0.6). Conclusions: The periodontal status was mainly due to oral hygiene behaviour, which was worse in men. Apparently behaviour and not diabetes is the major determinant of periodontitis. Men apparently need much more advise than women. PMID:27347232

  19. Monitoring diabetic wound healing by NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Zubkov, Leonid; Zhu, Linda; Weingarten, Michael S; Tyagi, Som; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2005-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Lack of quantitative assessment of healing progress makes diabetic wound management a clinical challenge. We constructed an optical device based on near infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy and monitored the change in wound optical properties during healing. A single source, four detector frequency domain instrument with multiple wavelengths was employed in a streptozotocin induced diabetic rat animal model. Optical properties including absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were measured. Our results show that there is significant difference in the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient of the wounds between diabetic and controls rats, and such difference persists throughout the healing period. Our technique would be highly useful in monitoring and quantifying the wound healing process.

  20. Recent Advances in Nanotechnology for Diabetes Treatment

    PubMed Central

    DiSanto, Rocco Michael; Subramanian, Vinayak; Gu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology in diabetes research has facilitated the development of novel glucose measurement and insulin delivery modalities which hold the potential to dramatically improve quality of life for diabetics. Recent progress in the field of diabetes research at its interface with nanotechnology is our focus. In particular, we examine glucose sensors with nanoscale components including metal nanoparticles and carbon nanostructures. The addition of nanoscale components commonly increases glucose sensor sensitivity, temporal response, and can lead to sensors which facilitate continuous in vivo glucose monitoring. Additionally, we survey nanoscale approaches to “closed-loop” insulin delivery strategies which automatically release insulin in response to fluctuating blood glucose levels. “Closing the loop” between blood glucose level (BGL) measurements and insulin administration by removing the requirement of patient action holds the potential to dramatically improve the health and quality of life of diabetics. Advantages and limitations of current strategies, as well as future opportunities and challenges are also discussed. PMID:25641955

  1. Urinary tract infections in adults with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ronald, A; Ludwig, E

    2001-04-01

    Urinary tract (UTI) is a major disease burden for many patients with diabetes. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is several-fold more common among women and acute plyelonephritis is five to ten times more common in both sexes. The complications of pyelonephritis are also more common in patients with diabetes. These complications include acute papillary necrosis, emphysematous pyelonephritis, and bacteremia with metastatic localization to other sites. The management of urinary infection in patients with diabetes is essentially the same as patients without diabetes. Most infections should be managed as uncomplicated except when they occur in a milieu with obstruction or other factors that merit a diagnosis of complicated UTI. Strategies to prevent these infections and reduce morbidity should be a priority for research.

  2. Marine Organisms with Anti-Diabetes Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lauritano, Chiara; Ianora, Adrianna

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic degenerative metabolic disease with high morbidity and mortality rates caused by its complications. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in looking for new bioactive compounds to treat this disease, including metabolites of marine origin. Several aquatic organisms have been screened to evaluate their possible anti-diabetes activities, such as bacteria, microalgae, macroalgae, seagrasses, sponges, corals, sea anemones, fish, salmon skin, a shark fusion protein as well as fish and shellfish wastes. Both in vitro and in vivo screenings have been used to test anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic activities of marine organisms. This review summarizes recent discoveries in anti-diabetes properties of several marine organisms as well as marine wastes, existing patents and possible future research directions in this field. PMID:27916864

  3. Recent advances in nanotechnology for diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    DiSanto, Rocco Michael; Subramanian, Vinayak; Gu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology in diabetes research has facilitated the development of novel glucose measurement and insulin delivery modalities which hold the potential to dramatically improve quality of life for diabetics. Recent progress in the field of diabetes research at its interface with nanotechnology is our focus. In particular, we examine glucose sensors with nanoscale components including metal nanoparticles and carbon nanostructures. The addition of nanoscale components commonly increases glucose sensor sensitivity, temporal response, and can lead to sensors which facilitate continuous in vivo glucose monitoring. Additionally, we survey nanoscale approaches to 'closed-loop' insulin delivery strategies which automatically release insulin in response to fluctuating blood glucose levels (BGLs). 'Closing the loop' between BGL measurements and insulin administration by removing the requirement of patient action holds the potential to dramatically improve the health and quality of life of diabetics. Advantages and limitations of current strategies, as well as future opportunities and challenges are also discussed.

  4. [Role of zinc in type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Motoyuki; Fujitani, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic β cells contain the highest amount of zinc among cells within the human body, and hence, the relationship between zinc and diabetes has been of great interest. To date, many studies of zinc and diabetes have been reported, including studies demonstrating that diabetic patients and mice have a decreased amount of zinc in the pancreas. Zinc may counteract the deleterious effects of oxidative stress, which contributes to reduced insulin resistance, and may also protect pancreatic β cells from glucolipotoxicity. Recently, we have shown that SLC30A8/zinc transporter 8, which is a transporter expressed on the surface of insulin granules, plays a key role in zinc transport into insulin granules and in the regulation of hepatic insulin clearance. Here, we review the role of zinc in whole-body maintenance and the latest information on the relationship between zinc and diabetes.

  5. Diabetes and Frailty: Two Converging Conditions?

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Alan J; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a disabling, chronic cardiovascular and medical disease with a tremendous health, social and economic burden in our ageing communities. It has a prevalence of 10% to 30% in people older than 65 years of age, and more than half of all subjects with diabetes in the United States are older than 60 years of age. The main impact of diabetes in older adults stems from its effect on function, both physical and cognitive, that finally impairs their quality of life, although the impact on survival is modest. Frailty has emerged during the past 2 decades as the most powerful predictor of disability and other adverse outcomes, including mortality, disability and institutionalization in older adults. In this article we explore the relationship between diabetes and frailty, and we recognize that they are intimately related chronic medical conditions that result in huge societal and personal health burdens.

  6. APOE gene polymorphisms and diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Monastiriotis, Christodoulos; Papanas, Nikolaos; Veletza, Stavroula; Maltezos, Efstratios

    2012-09-08

    Genetic factors may influence the natural course of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and explain some of its variability. The aim of this review was to examine the association between apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene polymorphisms and diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Four relevant studies were identified. The two earlier works provided evidence that the ɛ4 allele is a risk factor for this complication, while the two more recent studies were negative. Important differences in the methodology used and in the populations included are obvious, rendering difficult the comparison between studies. In conclusion, the association between APOE gene polymorphisms and diabetic peripheral neuropathy is still unclear. Available evidence is rather limited and results have so far been contradictory. Future studies should employ more robust methodology, adjusting for potential confounders and for the prevalence of neuropathy in the general population with diabetes.

  7. AGE, RAGE, and ROS in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Adeline L Y; Forbes, Josephine M; Cooper, Mark E

    2007-03-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Two key mechanisms implicated in the development of diabetic nephropathy include advanced glycation and oxidative stress. Advanced glycation is the irreversible attachment of reducing sugars onto amino groups of proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGE modification of proteins may lead to alterations in normal function by inducing cross-linking of extracellular matrices. Intracellular formation of AGEs also can cause generalized cellular dysfunction. Furthermore, AGEs can mediate their effects via specific receptors, such as the receptor for AGE (RAGE), activating diverse signal transduction cascades and downstream pathways, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress occurs as a result of the imbalance between ROS production and antioxidant defenses. Sources of ROS include the mitochondria, auto-oxidation of glucose, and enzymatic pathways including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NAD[P]H) oxidase. Beyond the current treatments to treat diabetic complications such as the optimization of blood pressure and glycemic control, it is predicted that new therapies designed to target AGEs, including AGE formation inhibitors and cross-link breakers, as well as targeting ROS using novel highly specific antioxidants, will become part of the treatment regimen for diabetic renal disease.

  8. Gold nanostructure materials in diabetes management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Satyabrata; Pal, Arttatrana; Mohanta, Jagdeep; Sagar Satapathy, Smith

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia, and is now one of the most non-communicable diseases globally and can be lethal if not properly controlled. Prolonged exposure to chronic hyperglycemia, without proper management, can lead to various vascular complications and represents the main cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes patients. Studies have indicated that major long-term complications of diabetes arise from persistent oxidative-nitrosative stress and dysregulation in multiple metabolic pathways. Presently, the main focus for diabetes management is to optimize the available techniques to ensure adequate blood sugar level, blood pressure and lipid profile, thereby minimizing the diabetes complications. In this regard, nanomedicine utilizing gold nanostructures has great potential and seems to be a promising option. The present review highlights the basic concepts and up-to-date literature survey of gold nanostructure materials in management of diabetes in several ways, which include sensing, imaging, drug delivery and therapy. The work can be of interest to various researchers working on basic and applied sciences including nanosciences.

  9. Optimizing cardiovascular outcomes in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Burton E

    2007-09-01

    This article presents a series of take-home statements, compiled by a multidisciplinary steering committee, concerning significant aspects of macrovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus, including the extent of risk, pathogenetic mechanisms, and optimal management for risk reduction. The discussion focuses in particular on the impact of diabetes medications beyond blood glucose control. In summary, these statements are as follows: (1) Patients with diabetes have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease that contributes to decreased life expectancy; (2) prognosis after a cardiovascular event is poorer in patients with diabetes; (3) pathogenetic mechanisms include insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, dyslipidemia, chronic inflammation, procoagulability, and impaired fibrinolysis; (4) management of established cardiovascular risk factors, for example with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) and antihypertensive therapy, reduces cardiovascular event rates in diabetes; (5) correction of hyperglycemia can reduce macrovascular event rates, but the coupling to hyperglycemia is less tight for macrovascular events than it is for reduction of microvascular complications; (6) patients with diabetes should be screened for additional cardiovascular risk factors and appropriate interventions should be initiated; (7) results of observational and interventional studies have indicated that some insulin sensitizers appear to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events and improve survival; (8) thiazolidinediones have beneficial effects on metabolism that may improve cardiovascular risk, and a randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced atherosclerosis indicates that addition of pioglitazone to therapy for hyperglycemia may reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction and stroke.

  10. Genitourinary infection in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Julka, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is known to increase the risk of infection and the commonest amongst them are the ones involving the genitourinary tract. The infections in a diabetic patient are unique in that they are recurrent, more severe, requiring hospitalization, and also have higher mortality than nondiabetics. Some infections are exclusively found in diabetics like the emphysematous pyelonephritis while others have their natural history complicated due to hyperglycemia. Asymptomatic bacteriuria may lead to albuminuria and urinary tract infection and may need to be treated in diabetics. Not just this certain organisms have a predilection for the genitourinary tract of the diabetic patient. All of the above makes the diabetic patient vulnerable to infections and therefore early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is mandatory. PMID:24251228

  11. Living with Type 1 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... considered, plays a key role in diabetes care. Connecting with other people living with diabetes that understand ... affected by diabetes to find that support. Our Family Link program connects parents of children with type ...

  12. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetic type of cranial mononeuropathy III is a complication of diabetes . It causes double vision and eyelid drooping . ... Cooper ME, Vinik AI, Plutzky J, Boulton AJM. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  13. Snacking when you have diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy snacking - diabetes; Low blood sugar - snacking; Hypoglycemia - snacking ... When you have diabetes , you need to control your blood sugar. Insulin or diabetes medicines, as well as exercise in general, helps lower ...

  14. Neurodegeneration and neuroprotection in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ola, Mohammad Shamsul; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; Khan, Haseeb A; Alhomida, Abdullah S

    2013-01-28

    Diabetic retinopathy is widely considered to be a neurovascular disease. This is in contrast to its previous identity as solely a vascular disease. Early in the disease progression of diabetes, the major cells in the neuronal component of the retina consist of retinal ganglion cells and glial cells, both of which have been found to be compromised. A number of retinal function tests also indicated a functional deficit in diabetic retina, which further supports dysfunction of neuronal cells. As an endocrinological disorder, diabetes alters metabolism both systemically and locally in several body organs, including the retina. A growing body of evidences indicates increased levels of excitotoxic metabolites, including glutamate, branched chain amino acids and homocysteine in cases of diabetic retinopathy. Also present, early in the disease, are decreased levels of folic acid and vitamin-B12, which are potential metabolites capable of damaging neurons. These altered levels of metabolites are found to activate several metabolic pathways, leading to increases in oxidative stress and decreases in the level of neurotrophic factors. As a consequence, they may damage retinal neurons in diabetic patients. In this review, we have discussed those potential excitotoxic metabolites and their implications in neuronal damage. Possible therapeutic targets to protect neurons are also discussed. However, further research is needed to understand the exact molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration so that effective neuroprotection strategies can be developed. By protecting retinal neurons early in diabetic retinopathy cases, damage of retinal vessels can be protected, thereby helping to ameliorate the progression of diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness worldwide.

  15. Surgical Correction of the Achilles Tendon for Diabetic Foot Ulcerations and Charcot Neuroarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Achilles tendon pathologic conditions are implicated in contributing to the development of many diabetic foot complications including diabetic foot ulceration and Charcot neuroarthropathy. Surgical correction of the diabetic equinus deformity has been studied as an isolated or adjunctive treatment when dealing with difficult-to-close diabetic foot ulcerations or when surgically addressing the diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy foot or ankle. This article reviews the most common indications, complications, and surgical procedures for equinus correction by either a tendo-Achilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession for the management of diabetic foot conditions.

  16. Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Take Steps to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Browse Sections The Basics Overview Types of Diabetes ... 1 of 9 sections The Basics: Types of Diabetes What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease. People ...

  17. For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes For Men, Ignoring Diabetes Can Be Deadly Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table ... Man's Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. Simpler Diabetes Care: Estimated Average Glucose (eAG) The American Diabetes ...

  18. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  19. Diabetes and Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Goebel-Fabbri, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    The problem of insulin restriction is an important women's health issue in type 1 diabetes. This behavior is associated with increased rates of diabetes complications and decreased quality of life. Clinical and technological research is greatly needed to improve treatment tools and strategies for this problem. In this commentary, the author describes the scope of the problem of eating disorders and diabetes, as well as offers ideas about ways technology may be applied to help solve this complex problem. PMID:19885221

  20. History of Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Giovanna; Tamma, Grazia

    2016-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, fluid and electrolyte homoeostasis is maintained by the kidney adjusting urine volume and composition according to body needs. Diabetes Insipidus is a complex and heterogeneous clinical syndrome affecting water balance and characterized by constant diuresis, resulting in large volumes of dilute urine. With respect to the similarly named Diabetes Mellitus, a disease already known in ancient Egypt, Greece and Asia, Diabetes Insipidus has been described several thousand years later. In 1670s Thomas Willis, noted the difference in taste of urine from polyuric subjects compared with healthy individuals and started the differentiation of Diabetes Mellitus from the more rare entity of Diabetes Insipidus. In 1794, Johann Peter Frank described polyuric patients excreting nonsaccharine urine and introduced the term of Diabetes Insipidus. An hystorical milestone was the in 1913, when Farini successfully used posterior pituitary extracts to treat Diabetes Insipidus. Until 1920s the available evidence indicated Diabetes Insipidus as a disorder of the pituitary gland. In the early 1928, De Lange first observed that some patients with Diabetes Insipidus did not respond to posterior pituitary extracts and subsequently Forssman and Waring in 1945 established that the kidney had a critical role for these forms of Diabetes Insipidus resistant to this treatment. In 1947 Williams and Henry introduced the term Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus for the congenital syndrome characterized by polyuria and renal concentrating defect resistant to vasopressin. In 1955, du Vigneaud received the 1955 Nobel Prize in chemistry for the first synthesis of the hormone vasopressin representing a milestone for the treatment of Central Diabetes Insipidus.

  1. Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Syndrome Rather Than a Single Disease.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina B; Grassi, Giorgio; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Nazha, Marta; Roggero, Simona; Capizzi, Irene; De Pascale, Agostino; Priola, Adriano M; Di Vico, Cristina; Maxia, Stefania; Loi, Valentina; Asunis, Anna M; Pani, Antonello; Veltri, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The term "diabetic kidney" has recently been proposed to encompass the various lesions, involving all kidney structures that characterize protean kidney damage in patients with diabetes. While glomerular diseases may follow the stepwise progression that was described several decades ago, the tenet that proteinuria identifies diabetic nephropathy is disputed today and should be limited to glomerular lesions. Improvements in glycemic control may have contributed to a decrease in the prevalence of glomerular lesions, initially described as hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy, and revealed other types of renal damage, mainly related to vasculature and interstitium, and these types usually present with little or no proteinuria. Whilst glomerular damage is the hallmark of microvascular lesions, ischemic nephropathies, renal infarction, and cholesterol emboli syndrome are the result of macrovascular involvement, and the presence of underlying renal damage sets the stage for acute infections and drug-induced kidney injuries. Impairment of the phagocytic response can cause severe and unusual forms of acute and chronic pyelonephritis. It is thus concluded that screening for albuminuria, which is useful for detecting "glomerular diabetic nephropathy", does not identify all potential nephropathies in diabetes patients. As diabetes is a risk factor for all forms of kidney disease, diagnosis in diabetic patients should include the same combination of biochemical, clinical, and imaging tests as employed in non-diabetic subjects, but with the specific consideration that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may develop more rapidly and severely in diabetic patients.

  2. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Native Hawaiians

    PubMed Central

    Aluli, N. Emmett; Jones, Kristina L.; Reyes, Phillip W.; Brady, S. Kalani; Tsark, JoAnn U.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diabetes is an increasing health problem among Native Hawaiians. Diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death among Native Hawaiians. In this article, the prevalence of diabetes is reported and associations with CVD risk factors are examined. Design and Methods Cross-section of 862 Native Hawaiians, ages 19–88. Physical exam included anthropometric measures, blood pressure, glucose and lipid measures, and personal interview. Results Age-adjusted prevalences of diabetes (25.1% in men vs. 22.6% in women) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) (47.8% vs. 39.3%) increased with age and were higher in men. Fasting glucose was higher in diabetic men than women (209 mg/dL vs. 179, p = .0117). BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were higher in diabetic participants (all p < .01), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was lower (p < .005). Conclusions Diabetes prevalence in Native Hawaiians is high. The high proportion with IFG and the increase in CVD risk factors with diabetes suggest that community-based programs are needed to focus on diabetes and diabetes-related CVD. PMID:19653416

  3. Noninvasive Cardiovascular Risk Assessment of the Asymptomatic Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Budoff, Matthew J.; Raggi, Paolo; Beller, George A.; Berman, Daniel S.; Druz, Regina S.; Malik, Shaista; Rigolin, Vera H.; Weigold, Wm. Guy; Soman, Prem

    2017-01-01

    Increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes is well established; diabetes is associated with at least a 2-fold increased risk of coronary heart disease. Approximately two-thirds of deaths among persons with diabetes are related to cardiovascular disease. Previously, diabetes was regarded as a “coronary risk equivalent,” implying a high 10-year cardiovascular risk for every diabetes patient. Following the original study by Haffner et al., multiple studies from different cohorts provided varying conclusions on the validity of the concept of coronary risk equivalency in patients with diabetes. New guidelines have started to acknowledge the heterogeneity in risk and include different treatment recommendations for diabetic patients without other risk factors who are considered to be at lower risk. Furthermore, guidelines have suggested that further risk stratification in patients with diabetes is warranted before universal treatment. The Imaging Council of the American College of Cardiology systematically reviewed all modalities commonly used for risk stratification in persons with diabetes mellitus and summarized the data and recommendations. This document reviews the evidence regarding the use of noninvasive testing to stratify asymptomatic patients with diabetes with regard to coronary heart disease risk and develops an algorithm for screening based on available data. PMID:26846937

  4. Joint diabetes thalassaemia clinic: an effective new model of care.

    PubMed

    Tzoulis, Ploutarchos; Shah, Farrukh; Jones, Romilla; Prescott, Emma; Barnard, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a significant complication of β-thalassemia major (β-TM) and most patients receive fragmented diabetes care. In 2005, we developed a unique Joint Diabetes Thalassaemia Clinic, based at the Department of Diabetes, Whittington Health, London, UK, where patients were reviewed jointly by a multidisciplinary team, including Consultant Diabetologist and Hematologist. Study of the Joint Diabetes Thalassaemia Clinic (2005-2009) showed improvement in glycemic control with fructosamine reduction from 344 umol/L to 319 umol/L over a 1-year period as well as improvement in lipid profiles. The proportion of patients attending the Joint Clinic who achieved metabolic targets compared to the National Diabetes Audit for England was higher for glycemic control (73.0 Joint Diabetes Thalassaemia Clinic vs. 63.0% nationally), blood pressure control (58.0 Joint Diabetes Thalassaemia Clinic vs. 30.0% nationally) and cholesterol control (81.0 Joint Diabetes Thalassaemia Clinic vs. 78.0% nationally). Five patients (22.7%) had microvascular complications. A significant proportion of our patients had endocrinopathies (86.0% hypogonadism, 18.0% hypothyroidism, 23.0% hypoparathyroidism). The unique partnership of our Joint Diabetes Thalassaemia Clinic, allowed these very complex patients to be managed effectively.

  5. Podophyllum hexandrum as a potential botanical supplement for the medical management of nuclear and radiological emergencies (NREs) and free radical-mediated ailments: leads from in vitro/in vivo radioprotective efficacy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Arora, Rajesh; Chawla, Raman; Dhaker, Atlar Singh; Adhikari, Manish; Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Shikha; Gupta, Damodar; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh K; Tripathi, Rajender P

    2010-03-01

    Management of radiation-induced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species requires a holistic approach to mitigate the deleterious effects of free radicals. Flora of the Himalayas, which prevails under extreme climatic conditions, has been explored for its potential utility to develop radioprotective drugs. The Himalayan high altitude medicinal plant, Podophyllum hexandrum Royle, was selected on the basis of its unique properties, and a novel fractionated nonpolar extract (REC-2003) was prepared and evaluated for radioprotective efficacy, in vitro as well as in vivo. The free radical scavenging activity of REC-2003 was found to be > 75% (20 μg/ml) with maximum superoxide scavenging activity (57.56 ± 1.38%) recorded at 1 mg/ml concentration (tetrazolium-based estimation). More than 30% inhibition of nitric oxide radicals was observed at concentrations > 0.5 mg/ml, while hydroxyl radical scavenging activity (deoxy-D-ribose assay) exhibited a dose-dependent (100-600 μg/ml) increase. Significantly high (90%) protection to human erythrocytes was observed at 75 μg/ml, which was found to be the most optimized dose. Similarly, more than 90% inhibition was observed against lipid peroxidation (evaluated by estimating levels of malondialdehyde). The significant antihemolytic potential of REC-2003 could be attributed to its ability to scavenge free radicals, reduce peroxidative stress on lipid membranes, and render protection to DNA (evaluated using plasmid relaxation assay). All these activities holistically contributed toward the radioprotective ability. REC-2003 (8 mg/kg BW; intraperitoneal (i.p.), -30 min) rendered > 80% total-body protection in Swiss Albino Strain 'A' mice [against lethal radiation (10 Gy)] in a 30-day survival assay. Phytochemical characterization of the constituents of REC-2003 revealed the presence of polyphenolics (flavonoids). The characterized constituents also included the aryl-tetralin lignans like podophyllotoxin, its glycoside, 4'-demethyl derivative

  6. Association Between Diabetic Macular Edema and Cardiovascular Events in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leveziel, Nicolas; Ragot, Stéphanie; Gand, Elise; Lichtwitz, Olivier; Halimi, Jean Michel; Gozlan, Julien; Gourdy, Pierre; Robert, Marie-Françoise; Dardari, Dured; Boissonnot, Michèle; Roussel, Ronan; Piguel, Xavier; Dupuy, Olivier; Torremocha, Florence; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Maréchaud, Richard; Hadjadj, Samy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the main cause of visual loss associated with diabetes but any association between DME and cardiovascular events is unclear. This study aims to describe the possible association between DME and cardiovascular events in a multicenter cross-sectional study of patients with type 2 diabetes. Two thousand eight hundred seven patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from diabetes and nephrology clinical institutional centers participating in the DIAB 2 NEPHROGENE study focusing on diabetic complications. DME (presence/absence) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) classification were based on ophthalmological report and/or on 30° color retinal photographs. DR was defined as absent, nonproliferative (background, moderate, or severe) or proliferative. Cardiovascular events were stroke, myocardial infarction, and lower limb amputation. Details regarding associations between DME and cardiovascular events were evaluated. The study included 2807 patients with type 2 diabetes, of whom 355 (12.6%) had DME. DME was significantly and independently associated with patient age, known duration of diabetes, HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, and DR stage. Only the prior history of lower limb amputation was strongly associated with DME in univariate and multivariate analyses, whereas no association was found with regard to myocardial infarction or stroke. Moreover, both major (n = 32) and minor lower limb (n = 96) amputations were similarly associated with DME, with respective odds ratio of 3.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–7.74; P = 0.0012) and of 4.29 (95% CI, 2.79–6.61; P < 0.001). DME is strongly and independently associated with lower limb amputation in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:26287408

  7. Plasma proteome analysis of patients with type 1 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As part of a clinical proteomics program focused on diabetes and its complications we are looking for new and better protein biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. The search for new and better biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy has, with a few exceptions, previously focused on either hypothesis-driven studies or urinary based investigations. To date only two studies have investigated the proteome of blood in search for new biomarkers, and these studies were conducted in sera from patients with type 2 diabetes. This is the first reported in depth proteomic study where plasma from type 1 diabetic patients was investigated with the goal of finding improved candidate biomarkers to predict diabetic nephropathy. In order to reach lower concentration proteins in plasma a pre-fractionation step, either hexapeptide bead-based libraries or anion exchange chromatography, was performed prior to surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Results Proteomic analysis of plasma from a cross-sectional cohort of 123 type 1 diabetic patients previously diagnosed as normoalbuminuric, microalbuminuric or macroalbuminuric, gave rise to 290 peaks clusters of which 16 were selected as the most promising biomarker candidates based on statistical performance, including independent component analysis. Four of the peaks that were discovered have been identified as transthyretin, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein C1 and cystatin C. Several yet unidentified proteins discovered by this novel approach appear to have more potential as biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy. Conclusion These results demonstrate the capacity of proteomic analysis of plasma, by confirming the presence of known biomarkers as well as revealing new biomarkers for diabetic nephropathy in plasma in type 1 diabetic patients. PMID:20205888

  8. Prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults: findings from the Mexican Health and Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Wong, Rebeca; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to examine the prevalence and determinants of prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and diabetes among Mexican adults from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Methods We examined 2012 participants from a subsample of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Measures included sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, central obesity, medical conditions, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, and vitamin D. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes, and self-reported diabetes. Results Prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed, and self-reported diabetes in this cohort was 44.2%, 18.0%, and 21.4%, respectively. Participants with high waist-hip ratio (1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05–2.45) and high cholesterol (1.85, 95% CI = 1.36–2.51) had higher odds of prediabetes. Overweight (1.68, 95% CI = 1.07–2.64), obesity (2.38, 95% CI = 1.41–4.02), and high waist circumference (1.60, 95% CI = 1.06–2.40) were significantly associated with higher odds of having undiagnosed diabetes. Those residing in a Mexican state with high U.S. migration had lower odds of prediabetes (0.61, 95% CI = 0.45–0.82) and undiagnosed diabetes (0.53, 95% CI = 0.41–0.70). Those engaged in regular physical activity had lower odds of undiagnosed diabetes (0.74, 95% CI = 0.57–0.97). Conclusions There is a high prevalence of prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes among Mexican adults in this subsample. Findings suggest the need for resources to prevent, identify, and treat persons with prediabetes and undiagnosed diabetes. PMID:26872919

  9. Diabetes, Nutrition, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with body composition changes that lead to glucose intolerance and increased risk of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases with aging, and the prevalence has increased because of the increased life expectancy of the population. Lifestyle modifications through nutrition and exercise in combination with medications are the main components of diabetes management. The potential benefits of nutrition and exercise intervention in older people with diabetes are enormous. Nutrition and exercise training are feasible even in frail older people living in care homes and should take into consideration individual circumstances, cultural factors, and ethnic preferences.

  10. Nutrition in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Osama; Barakatun-Nisak, Mohd-Yusof

    2016-12-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) is a key component of diabetes management. The importance of balancing macronutrients, reducing carbohydrate load, lowering glycemic index, and implementing an overall healthy dietary pattern are emerging as better approaches for MNT in diabetes. Recent research points to improved glycemic control, reduction in body weight, and improvement in many cardiovascular risk factors when these approaches are provided by registered dietitians or health care providers. This review article discusses the current evidence about the role of sensible nutrition in diabetes management. Specific eating plans for weight reduction and for patients with type 1 diabetes are also discussed.

  11. Ayurvedic treatments for diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Kalpana; Mohan, Roshni; Ramaratnam, Sridharan; Panneerselvam, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes frequently use complimentary and alternative medications including Ayurvedic medications and hence it is important to determine their efficacy and safety. Objectives To assess the effects of Ayurvedic treatments for diabetes mellitus. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Library (issue 10, 2011), MEDLINE (until 31 August 2011), EMBASE (until 31 August 2011), AMED (until 14 October 2011), the database of randomised trials from South Asia (until 14 October 2011), the database of the grey literature (OpenSigle, until 14 October 2011) and databases of ongoing trials (until 14 October 2011). In addition we performed hand searches of several journals and reference lists of potentially relevant trials. Selection criteria We included randomized trials of at least two months duration of Ayurvedic interventions for diabetes mellitus. Participants of both genders, all ages and any type of diabetes were included irrespective of duration of diabetes, antidiabetic treatment, comorbidity or diabetes related complications. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data. Risk of bias of trials was evaluated as indicated in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Intervention. Main results Results of only a limited number of studies could be combined, in view of different types of interventions and variable quality of data. We found six trials of proprietary herbal mixtures and one of whole system Ayurvedic treatment. These studies enrolled 354 participants ( 172 on treatment, 158 on controls, 24 allocation unknown). The treatment duration ranged from 3 to 6 months. All these studies included adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. With regard to our primary outcomes, significant reductions in glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting blood sugar (FBS) or both were observed with Diabecon, Inolter and Cogent DB compared to placebo or no additional treatment, while no significant hypoglycaemic response was found

  12. [Composition of macronutrients in the diabetic diet].

    PubMed

    Rušavý, Zdeněk; Žourek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The diabetic diet is one of the pillars of diabetes treatment. The rapid development of knowledge relating to the treatment of diabetes also includes diet. The paper focuses on the importance of a diet in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and prevention of atherosclerosis. Its main goal is to assess the impact of a composition of macronutrients on individuals with type 2 diabetes. The paper is divided into several parts, each of which ends with a conclusion. The first part examines weight reduction. The diet aimed at a weight loss is effective, it can effectively prevent diabetes, it leads to improvements in glucose control and reduction of the risk factors for atherosclerosis, however it will not impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality until after more than 20 years. The second part deals with "healthy" foods. The studies exploring this area are not convincing. The only really rational component of food in relation to atherosclerosis is dietary fibres. Important is a balanced diet combined with regular physical activities. The third part focuses on the composition of macronutrients. It turns out that, considering a low-calorie diet, the effects of high- and low-carbohydrate diets on people with diabetes are similar with regard to weight loss and lowering of HbA1c, however the low-carbohydrate diet is associated with lower glycemic variability and a reduced need for anti-diabetic drugs. We do not know how the comparison of the two extreme diets would come out regarding individuals with a high energy diet. Currently it is useful to focus on the quality of individual macronutrients. Choose foods containing carbohydrates with a low glycemic index and high fibre foods, prefer fats that contain a low proportion of saturated fatty acids. The fourth part discusses the recent recommendation of the Czech Diabetes Society regarding the composition of macronutrients in the diabetic diet. As compared with the diet proposed earlier, lower intake of fibre

  13. Diabetic Retinopathy: Nature and Extent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, W. Ronald; Patz, Arnall

    1978-01-01

    The authors discuss the incidence and prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in juvenile and maturity onset diabetics, background and proliferative retinopathy, and current modalities of treatment. (Author)

  14. Fructose as a dietary sweetener in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, V A

    1978-01-01

    Human beings, including those with diabetes, have a desire for sweetness in the diet that cannot be ignored. The Food and Drug Administration ban of cyclamates and possible ban of saccharin have raised the question of alternative sweeteners for diabetic persons. Considerable interest has been focused on fructose, and both basic and clinical research has delineated its metabolic effects. This paper reviews the characteristics of fructose, as well as its physiology and metabolism in both normal and diabetic man. Findings seems to indicate that, in controlled diabetes, chronic or limited consumption of fructose at moderate doses has no adverse effects on the levels of blood glucose, cholesterol, or tryglycerides.

  15. [McCune-Albright syndrome associated with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Chihaoui, M; Hamza, N; Lamine, F; Jabeur, S; Yazidi, M; Ftouhi, B; Slimane, H

    2012-03-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) consists of the triad of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, cutaneous pigmentation, and multiple endocrine abnormalities. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is not included in MAS. We report the case of an 18-year-old girl who presented with McCune-Albright syndrome. The diagnosis was made by the presence of precocious puberty at the age of 6 years, cutaneous pigmentation, polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, and phosphate diabetes. Type 1 diabetes mellitus developed at the age of 16 years. We discuss this case, the relationship between type 1 diabetes mellitus and MAS, with a literature review.

  16. Diabetes in women: a life-course approach.

    PubMed

    Morling, Joanne R; Balkau, Beverley; Wild, Sarah H

    2013-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes in combination with an aging population and increasing female longevity means that it is important to understand the effects of diabetes on women's health. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes influence health outcomes throughout the life-course. This review article provides a summary of sex differences in diabetes epidemiology and covers specific aspects of the life-course in women including: the menarche, pregnancy and the menopause. It also discusses the associations with other conditions: cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and cancer.

  17. Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP-1) in Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Panee, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is the first discovered and most extensively studied CC chemokine, and the amount of studies on its role in the etiologies of obesity- and diabetes-related diseases have increased exponentially during the past 2 decades. This review attempted to provide a panoramic perspective of the history, regulatory mechanisms, functions, and therapeutic strategies of this chemokine. The highlights of this review include the roles of MCP-1 in the development of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, insulitis, diabetic nephropathy, and diabetic retinopathy. Therapies that specifically or non-specifically inhibit MCP-1 overproduction have been summarized. PMID:22766373

  18. Visual Acuity, Retinal Sensitivity, and Macular Thickness Changes in Diabetic Patients without Diabetic Retinopathy after Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Stunf Pukl, Spela; Vidović Valentinčič, Nataša; Urbančič, Mojca; Irman Grčar, Irena; Grčar, Rok; Pfeifer, Vladimir; Globočnik Petrovič, Mojca

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Functional and morphological macular study after cataract surgery in a group of diabetics without diabetic retinopathy compared to nondiabetics to evaluate the effect of surgical oxidative stress on diabetic retina. Methods. Prospective, comparative study. Preoperative eye exam, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measured by ETDRS letters, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were followed by standard cataract surgery. The follow-up visits at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively included BCVA, OCT, and microperimetry, to analyze changes within and between the groups. Results. The BCVA improved significantly in diabetics and controls: 64.2 to 81.0 and 61.9 to 82.1 ETDRS at 6 months, respectively. The central macula at OCT significantly thickened in both groups, while the central 5 fields, corresponding to the microperimetry area, subclinically thickened from 284.20 to 291.18 μm at 6 months only in diabetics (p = 0.026). A matching slight decrease in the microperimetry sensitivity from 1 to 6 months was found also only in diabetics, with mean average difference -0.75 dB (p = 0.04). Conclusion. Underlying diabetes does not influence the surgical outcome in diabetics without diabetic retinopathy. However, slight thickening of wider macula and corresponding decrease in retinal sensitivity observed in diabetics 6 months postoperatively might influence visual function on long term.

  19. Streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes in rodents as a model for studying mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic β cell glucotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinzi; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia and the corresponding glucotoxicity are the main pathogenic mechanisms of diabetes and its complications. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic animal models are useful platforms for the understanding of β cell glucotoxicity in diabetes. As diabetes induced by a single STZ injection is often referred to as type 1 diabetes that is caused by STZ’s partial destruction of pancreas, one question often being asked is whether the STZ type 1 diabetes animal model is a good model for studying the mitochondrial mechanisms of β cell glucotoxicity. In this mini review, we provide evidence garnered from the literature that the STZ type 1 diabetes is indeed a suitable model for studying mitochondrial mechanisms of diabetic β cell glucotoxicity. Evidence presented includes: 1) continued β cell derangement is due to chronic hyperglycemia after STZ is completely eliminated out of the body; 2) STZ diabetes can be reversed by insulin treatment, which indicates that β cell responds to treatment and shows ability to regenerate; and 3) STZ diabetes can be ameliorated or alleviated by administration of phytochemicals. In addition, mechanisms of STZ action and fundamental gaps in understanding mitochondrial mechanisms of β cell dysfunction are also discussed. PMID:25897251

  20. Visual Acuity, Retinal Sensitivity, and Macular Thickness Changes in Diabetic Patients without Diabetic Retinopathy after Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Irman Grčar, Irena; Grčar, Rok; Pfeifer, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Functional and morphological macular study after cataract surgery in a group of diabetics without diabetic retinopathy compared to nondiabetics to evaluate the effect of surgical oxidative stress on diabetic retina. Methods. Prospective, comparative study. Preoperative eye exam, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measured by ETDRS letters, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were followed by standard cataract surgery. The follow-up visits at 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively included BCVA, OCT, and microperimetry, to analyze changes within and between the groups. Results. The BCVA improved significantly in diabetics and controls: 64.2 to 81.0 and 61.9 to 82.1 ETDRS at 6 months, respectively. The central macula at OCT significantly thickened in both groups, while the central 5 fields, corresponding to the microperimetry area, subclinically thickened from 284.20 to 291.18 μm at 6 months only in diabetics (p = 0.026). A matching slight decrease in the microperimetry sensitivity from 1 to 6 months was found also only in diabetics, with mean average difference −0.75 dB (p = 0.04). Conclusion. Underlying diabetes does not influence the surgical outcome in diabetics without diabetic retinopathy. However, slight thickening of wider macula and corresponding decrease in retinal sensitivity observed in diabetics 6 months postoperatively might influence visual function on long term. PMID:28243608

  1. Decreased regional left ventricular myocardial strain in type 1 diabetic children: a first sign of diabetic cardiomyopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Hodzic, Amir; Ribault, Virginie; Maragnes, Pascale; Milliez, Paul; Saloux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Objectives Type 1 diabetes is a major cardiovascular risk factor associated with an excess of mortality in young adults due to premature cardiovascular events, which includes heart failure. The relation between type 1 diabetes and cardiac structure and function in children was poorly documented. Our study investigates (1) whether type 1 diabetic children have echocardiographic signs of subclinical cardiac dysfunction assessed by tissue Doppler strain and (2) whether state of metabolic control and diabetes duration have any influence on the cardiac event. Methods Standard echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging were prospectively performed in type 1 diabetic children. Left ventricular dimensions, standard indices of systolic and diastolic function, and septal longitudinal strain were investigated. Results Thirty consecutive asymptomatic diabetic children (age: 12.4 [5–17] years; males: 53%) were compared to 30 age and sex-matched healthy control subjects. Left ventricular mass index and diastolic septal thickness were significantly increased in diabetic children. There was no difference between two groups as regards the left ventricular ejection fraction and conventional mitral Doppler parameters (E, A, Ea). The global longitudinal systolic strain and strain rate were found to be decreased in children with diabetes. The global longitudinal early diastolic strain rate (Esr) was negatively correlated with metabolic control. Longitudinal strain was not correlated with diabetes duration. Conclusion Children with Type 1 diabetes had subclinical alterations in left ventricular size and longitudinal myocardial deformation. PMID:28191526

  2. Neurologic infections in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jay, Cheryl A; Solbrig, Marylou V

    2014-01-01

    Even at a time when HIV/AIDS and immunosuppressive therapy have increased the number of individuals living with significant immunocompromise, diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major comorbid disorder for several rare but potentially lethal infections, including rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis and malignant external otitis. DM is also a commonly associated condition in patients with nontropical pyomyositis, pyogenic spinal infections, Listeria meningitis, and blastomycosis. As West Nile virus spread to and across North America over a decade ago, DM appeared in many series as a risk factor for death or neuroinvasive disease. More recently, in several large international population-based studies, DM was identified as a risk factor for herpes zoster. The relationships among infection, DM, and the nervous system are multidirectional. Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 DM, while parasitic infections have been hypothesized to protect against autoimmune disorders, including type 1 DM. DM-related neurologic disease can predispose to systemic infection - polyneuropathy is the predominant risk factor for diabetic foot infection. Because prognosis for many neurologic infections depends on timely institution of antimicrobial and sometimes surgical therapy, neurologists caring for diabetic patients should be familiar with the clinical features of the neuroinfectious syndromes associated with DM.

  3. Regeneration therapy for diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Takashi

    2003-06-01

    Regeneration therapy can be classified into three categories. The first category, in vitro regeneration therapy, makes use of transplanted cultured cells, including embryonic stem (ES) cells, pancreatic precursor cells and beta-cell lines, in conjunction with immunosuppressive therapy or immunoisolation for the treatment of patients with Type 1 diabetes. In the second type of regeneration therapy, ex vivo regeneration therapy, a patient's own cells, such as bone marrow stem cells, are transiently removed and induced to differentiate into beta-cells in vitro. However, at the present time, insulin-producing cells cannot be generated from bone marrow stem cells. In vivo regeneration therapy, the third type of regeneration therapy, enables impaired tissue to regenerate from a patient's own cells in vivo. beta-Cell neogenesis from non-beta-cells, and beta-cell proliferation in vivo have been considered in particular as regeneration therapies for patients with Type 2 diabetes. Regeneration therapy for pancreatic beta-cells can be combined with various other therapeutic strategies, including islet transplantation, cell-based therapy, gene therapy and drug therapy, to promote beta-cell proliferation and neogenesis; it is hoped that these strategies will, in the future, provide a cure for diabetes.

  4. Prevention of Type 2 diabetes: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Chiasson, Jean-Louis

    2007-12-01

    The growing prevalence of Type 2 diabetes with its high morbidity and excess mortality is imposing a heavy burden on healthcare systems. Because of the magnitude of the problem, obviating diabetes has been a long-standing dream. In the last decade, a number of intervention strategies have been shown to be effective for the prevention of diabetes in high-risk populations with prediabetes. Seven studies have now confirmed that lifestyle modifications, including weight-reducing diets and exercise programs, are very effective in precluding or delaying Type 2 diabetes in high-risk populations with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Two major trials are the Diabetes Prevention Study (n = 522) from Finland and the Diabetes Prevention Program (n = 3234) from the US. Both studies have shown that intensive lifestyle intervention could reduce the progression of IGT to diabetes by 58%. Furthermore, four currently-available drugs have been established as being effective in preventing diabetes in subjects with prediabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program revealed that metformin 850 mg b.i.d. reduced the risk of diabetes by 31%. The STOP-NIDDM (Study To Prevent Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus) trial (n = 1429) showed that acarbose 100 mg t.i.d. with meals decreased the incidence of diabetes by 36% when the diagnosis was based on 2 oral glucose tolerance tests. The XENDOS (Xenical in the Prevention of Diabetes in Obese Subjects) study examined the use of orlistat, an antiobesity drug, as an adjunct to an intensive lifestyle modification program in obese non-diabetic subjects. Orlistat treatment resulted in a 37% decline in the development of diabetes. More recently, the DREAM (Diabetes Reduction Assessment with Ramipril and Rosiglitazone Medication) study (n = 5269) demonstrated that rosiglitazone at 8 mg once/day in subjects with prediabetes (IGT and/or impaired fasting glucose) was effective in reducing the risk of diabetes by 60%. It can be concluded that Type 2 diabetes

  5. Preventive Effect of Salicylate and Pyridoxamine on Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Abouzed, Tarek Kamal; Munesue, Seiichi; Harashima, Ai; Masuo, Yusuke; Kato, Yukio; Khailo, Khaled; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Diabetic nephropathy is a life-threatening complication in patients with long-standing diabetes. Hemodynamic, inflammatory, and metabolic factors are considered as developmental factors for diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we evaluated whether pharmacological interventions with salicylate, compared to pyridoxamine, could prevent diabetic nephropathy in mice. Methods. Male mice overexpressing inducible nitric oxide synthase in pancreatic β-cells were employed as a diabetic model. Salicylate (3 g/kg diet) or pyridoxamine (1 g/L drinking water; ~200 mg/kg/day) was given for 16 weeks to assess the development of diabetic nephropathy. Treatment with long-acting insulin (Levemir 2 units/kg twice a day) was used as a control. Results. Although higher blood glucose levels were not significantly affected by pyridoxamine, early to late stage indices of nephropathy were attenuated, including kidney enlargement, albuminuria, and increased serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and inflammatory and profibrotic gene expressions. Salicylate showed beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy similar to those of pyridoxamine, which include lowering blood glucose levels and inhibiting macrophage infiltration into the kidneys. Attenuation of macrophage infiltration into the kidneys and upregulation of antiglycating enzyme glyoxalase 1 gene expression were found only in the salicylate treatment group. Conclusions. Treatment with salicylate and pyridoxamine could prevent the development of diabetic nephropathy in mice and, therefore, would be a potentially useful therapeutic strategy against kidney problems in patients with diabetes. PMID:28042580

  6. Preventive Effect of Salicylate and Pyridoxamine on Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Abouzed, Tarek Kamal; Munesue, Seiichi; Harashima, Ai; Masuo, Yusuke; Kato, Yukio; Khailo, Khaled; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Diabetic nephropathy is a life-threatening complication in patients with long-standing diabetes. Hemodynamic, inflammatory, and metabolic factors are considered as developmental factors for diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we evaluated whether pharmacological interventions with salicylate, compared to pyridoxamine, could prevent diabetic nephropathy in mice. Methods. Male mice overexpressing inducible nitric oxide synthase in pancreatic β-cells were employed as a diabetic model. Salicylate (3 g/kg diet) or pyridoxamine (1 g/L drinking water; ~200 mg/kg/day) was given for 16 weeks to assess the development of diabetic nephropathy. Treatment with long-acting insulin (Levemir 2 units/kg twice a day) was used as a control. Results. Although higher blood glucose levels were not significantly affected by pyridoxamine, early to late stage indices of nephropathy were attenuated, including kidney enlargement, albuminuria, and increased serum creatinine, glomerulosclerosis, and inflammatory and profibrotic gene expressions. Salicylate showed beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy similar to those of pyridoxamine, which include lowering blood glucose levels and inhibiting macrophage infiltration into the kidneys. Attenuation of macrophage infiltration into the kidneys and upregulation of antiglycating enzyme glyoxalase 1 gene expression were found only in the salicylate treatment group. Conclusions. Treatment with salicylate and pyridoxamine could prevent the development of diabetic nephropathy in mice and, therefore, would be a potentially useful therapeutic strategy against kidney problems in patients with diabetes.

  7. Incorporating a Diabetes Certificate Program in a Pharmacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Sterrett, James; Croom, Meg; Phillips, Cynthia M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine student competency and confidence in the provision of diabetes care and satisfaction with incorporation of the American Pharmacist Association/American Association of Diabetes Educators (APhA/AADE) diabetes certificate program into the required doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curriculum. Design. Material from the diabetes certificate program was incorporated longitudinally into the third-year curriculum skills laboratory courses. Educational techniques used included self-study modules with case questions, lectures using the program’s slides and live seminar materials, and active-learning techniques including instructor-led modeling and role-playing exercises, small group activities, objective structured learning exercises (OSLE) using standardized patients, and a week-long diabetes simulation. Evaluation. Students achieved a 100% pass rate on a diabetes certificate program examination and earned a mean score of 71.8 out of 100 points on a medication therapy management (MTM) objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). A student survey demonstrated high student confidence in their ability to provide diabetes care (mean scores 4.2 to 4.8) and satisfaction with the program (mean scores 4.5 to 4.8). Conclusion. Longitudinal integration of a nationally recognized diabetes certificate program into the required PharmD curriculum produced satisfied students competent in providing diabetes pharmaceutical care. PMID:22761530

  8. "Governare il diabete" ("to steer diabetes"): a new proposal for diabetic camps.

    PubMed

    Salvatoni, Alessandro; Pompili, Valeria; Biasoli, Roberta; Cardani, Roberta; Arioli, Gianluigi; Nespoli, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    "Governare il diabete" (the Italian translation of "to steer diabetes") is a project which gives young diabetics the opportunity of sailing with non-diabetic companions in a protected and educational environment. The education technique, based on the parallelism between sailing and diabetes, encourage correct self-management of both diabetes related and unrelated problems. The impact of the experience on self-esteem, quality of life and metabolic control is currently under investigation.

  9. Managing Diabetes Mellitus: A Survey of Attitudes and Practices Among Family Physicians.

    PubMed

    Fogelman, Yacov; Goldfracht, Margalit; Karkabi, Khaled

    2015-10-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes and the shortage of endocrinologists, family physicians have an important role in diabetes management. The purpose of this study was to examine the sources of knowledge, attitudes and practices of family physicians regarding the management of type 2 diabetes. Attendees at continuous medical education (CME) programs in Israel were requested to respond anonymously to written questions about their sources of knowledge about diabetes, the methods of diabetes management they advise their patients, their knowledge of diabetes medication treatments, and their attitudes toward people with type 2 diabetes. Questionnaires were completed by 362 family physicians (79% response rate). Of them, 329 (91%) reported that they usually manage their patients' diabetes care, including that of patients with concomitant risk factors. Their most common recommendations for diabetes control were: to increase physical activity, decrease total calorie intake, consult with a dietitian and undergo weight loss counseling. Almost all physicians (97%) reported providing lifestyle change counseling. Sixty percent reported lacking knowledge about nutritional issues. Only 58% answered correctly regarding the effect of the anti-diabetic drug, GLP1 analog. Board certified family physicians and their residents exhibited more knowledge about diabetes practice than did non-board certified family physicians. The great majority of family physicians surveyed usually manage their patients' diabetes themselves, and do not refer them to diabetes specialists. The implementation of strategies that will enhance the competencies and confidence of family physicians in diabetes management are important for achieving successful treatment.

  10. Effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation in severe diabetic retinopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhov, Yuri S.; Shadrichev, Fedor Y.; Lisochkina, Alla B.

    1999-02-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the most severe complications of diabetes mellitus. In 1994, in St. Petersburg, a new system of ophthalmologic care for diabetic patients was set up. For Russia, this system represents an example of adequate care for subjects with DM, including screening strategies, documentation and education of patients and general ophthalmologists. According to our data, about one half of examined patients had DR, and about 20% of patients were in need of laser treatment. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) in cases of severe DR, including advanced nonproliferative DR (preproliferative DR) and proliferative DR. Data concerning 1073 diabetics are included in this study. PRP was performed in 736 cases (1163 eyes). DR stabilization was estimated after one year follow-up PRP enabled preventing severe visual loss in patients with preproliferative DR and proliferative DR. Our system of specialized ophthalmic care for diabetic patients proved to be effective.

  11. A new DAWN: Improving the psychosocial management of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Richard I. G.; Kalra, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN-2) study assessed psychosocial issues and health-care provision of people with diabetes, their family members and health-care professionals. Materials and Methods: Participants completed an online, telephone or in-person survey designed to assess health-related quality-of-life, self-management, attitudes/beliefs, social support and priorities for improving diabetes care as well as health-care provision and the impact of diabetes on family life. Results: A total of 8596 adults with diabetes, 2057 family members of people with diabetes and 4785 health-care professionals across 17 countries completed the survey. There were significant between country differences, but no one country's outcomes were consistently better or worse than others. A high proportion of people with diabetes reported likely depression (13.8%) and poor quality-of-life (12.2%). Diabetes had a negative impact on many aspects of life, including relationships with family/friends and physical health. A third of family members did not know how to help the person with diabetes, but wanted to be more involved in their care. Many health-care professionals indicated that major improvements were needed across a range of areas including health-care organization, resources for diabetes prevention, earlier diagnosis and treatment and psychological support. Conclusions: DAWN-2 is a multinational, multidisciplinary systematic study that compared unmet needs of people with diabetes and those who care for them in 17 countries across four continents. Its findings should facilitate innovative efforts to improve self-management and psychosocial support in diabetes, with the aim of reducing the burden of disease. The implications for India are discussed. PMID:24251231

  12. Recent Advances in Understanding Depression in Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lustman, Patrick J.; Penckofer, Sue M.; Clouse, Ray E.

    2013-01-01

    The authors review the science linking depression with diabetes. Some recent heuristic research is identified that highlights progress in the field and is directing future research. Issues in the management of depression in diabetes are outlined, including interactions of depression and insulin resistance. PMID:17425915

  13. Recent Advances in Understanding Depression in Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lustman, Patrick J.; Penckofer, Sue M.; Clouse, Ray E.

    2013-01-01

    The authors review the science linking depression with diabetes. Some recent heuristic research is identified that highlights progress in the field and is directing future research. Issues in the management of depression in diabetes are outlined, including interactions of depression and insulin resistance. PMID:18980733

  14. Diabetes-Related Goals, Practices, and Beliefs of Practicing Pediatricians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Rodney A.; Pichert, James W.

    1982-01-01

    Practicing pediatricians were surveyed to assess their need for diabetes education programs. Pediatricians generally have fewer than five diabetic patients, see them less than every four months, prescribe single daily insulin injections, and do not include diatetic services in the treatment program. No adequate rationale for continuing education…

  15. Diabetes and Orientation and Mobility Training: An Added Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozel, B.

    1995-01-01

    Issues related to promoting orientation and mobility training for individuals with visual impairments and diabetes are discussed, including effects of insulin, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, the timing of training, complications to the feet, and fluctuations in vision. Major lifestyle changes required by diabetes are stressed. (Author/SW)

  16. Managing Type 1 Diabetes at School: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolbert, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    This integrative literature review examines research studies that describe the care of the student with type 1 diabetes at school and interventions to improve care. Participants of the studies include school nurses, counselors, staff, administrators, parents, and students with diabetes. The studies reviewed use a descriptive approach in examining…

  17. Long-Term Complications of Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the kidney to confirm a diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. Treatment Treatments for kidney disease can include limiting the amount of protein in the diet to help prevent further kidney damage and taking ... with diabetic nephropathy is very important, as it can worsen kidney ...

  18. Employment Considerations for People Who Have Diabetes. Implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Mary B.

    One of a series of guides on implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), this guide focuses on employment considerations for people who have diabetes. First, the condition of diabetes mellitus, both Types I and II, is briefly explained. Next, the relationship of diabetes to the ADA is examined, including the definition of a disability…

  19. [Diabetic angiopathy: the role of microvascular exploration in routine practice. Consequences of a new algorithm for care of the diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Vayssairat, M; Le Dévéhat, C

    2001-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the chief medical cause of amputation. The risk of amputation is 15-fold higher in diabetic subjects and 5 out of 6 amputees are diabetic. There are three types of clinical presentation of diabetes-neurological, infectious and ischemic. In clinical practice, these three forms are often intertwined but the most frequent clinical sequence of events is neuropathy --> ulceration --> infection --> amputation. In this sequence, ischemia is not mentioned. The explanation is that the ischemic component of the diabetic foot is only recognized when ankle pulses are missing and when duplex scanning shows stenosis or occlusion of the main arterial trunks of the legs. This manner of diagnosing the ischemic component of diabetic foot is wrong as it fails to recognize the possibility of distal diabetic arteritis. Some experts in diabetology deny the existence of this arteritis which is obvious for those who measure systolic toe pressure. This distal arteritis is present in about 15% of all diabetic patients without trophic changes and in 35% of those with trophic changes. This foot arteritis is closely related to neuropathy. Toe pressure is not usually mentioned in text books or in consensus conferences concerning the diabetic foot. This is the main explanation for the calamitous number of amputations among diabetic patients. Nothing will change as long as physicians do not include toe pressure as a useful diagnostic tool in patients with diabetes. We present here a four-stage algorithm including toe pressure measurement for the management of the diabetic foot.

  20. Diabetes - what to ask your doctor - type 2

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries High blood cholesterol levels High blood pressure Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions ACE inhibitors Diabetes and exercise Diabetes - foot ulcers Diabetes - keeping active Diabetes - low ...

  1. Apoptosis of beta cells in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Rachakatla; Saraswati, Mudigonda; Kumar, Kishore G; Rani, Surekha H

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifactorial metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia. Apoptosis in beta cells has been observed in response to diverse stimuli, such as glucose, cytokines, free fatty acids, leptin, and sulfonylureas, leading to the activation of polyol, hexosamine, and diacylglycerol/protein kinase-C (DAG/PKC) pathways that mediate oxidative and nitrosative stress causing the release of different cytokines. Cytokines induce the expression of Fas and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) by activating the transcription factor, nuclear factor-κb, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) in the β cells in the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Cytokines produced in beta cells also induce proapoptotic members of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The genetic alterations in apoptosis signaling machinery and the pathogenesis of diabetes include Fas, FasL, Akt, caspases, calpain-10, and phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten). The other gene products that are involved in diabetes are nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2), small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO), apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), and Kruppel-like zinc finger protein Gli-similar 3 (GLIS3). The gene products having antiapoptotic nature are Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. Epigenetic mechanisms play an important role in type I and type II diabetes. Further studies on the apoptotic genes and gene products in diabetics may be helpful in pharmacogenomics and individualized treatment along with antioxidants targeting apoptosis in diabetes.

  2. Progenitor Cell Dysfunctions Underlie Some Diabetic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Melanie; Wong, Victor W.; Rennert, Robert C.; Davis, Christopher R.; Longaker, Michael T.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and progenitor cells are integral to tissue homeostasis and repair. They contribute to health through their ability to self-renew and commit to specialized effector cells. Recently, defects in a variety of progenitor cell populations have been described in both preclinical and human diabetes. These deficits affect multiple aspects of stem cell biology, including quiescence, renewal, and differentiation, as well as homing, cytokine production, and neovascularization, through mechanisms that are still unclear. More important, stem cell aberrations resulting from diabetes have direct implications on tissue function and seem to persist even after return to normoglycemia. Understanding how diabetes alters stem cell signaling and homeostasis is critical for understanding the complex pathophysiology of many diabetic complications. Moreover, the success of cell-based therapies will depend on a more comprehensive understanding of these deficiencies. This review has three goals: to analyze stem cell pathways dysregulated during diabetes, to highlight the effects of hyperglycemic memory on stem cells, and to define ways of using stem cell therapy to overcome diabetic complications. PMID:26079815

  3. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease. PMID:26512646

  4. Prevalence and factors associated with diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients at Arbaminch General Hospital, Ethiopia: Cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Chisha, Yilma; Terefe, Wondwossen; Assefa, Huruy; Lakew, Serawit

    2017-01-01

    Background Currently 93 million people are estimated as living with diabetic retinopathy worldwide. The prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy in developed countries have been well documented; but in Ethiopia, data on prevalence and associated factors of diabetic retinopathy is lacking. Objective To determine prevalence and factors associated with development of diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients at Arbaminch General Hospital, Ethiopia. Method Cross-sectional study design with record review of 400 diabetic patients was conducted at Arbaminch General Hospital from November to January 2015. Among 400 diabetic patients, 270 patients with baseline information and without history of hypertension at baseline were included in this study. But patients with gestational diabetes and with retinopathy at baseline were excluded from the study. Consecutive sampling technique was applied to select study participants. Data of cohorts was extracted from medical record using pre tested structured extraction check list. Data cleaning, coding, categorizing, merging and analysis carried out by STATA version 12. Descriptive statistics was done and presented accordingly. Bivariate binary logistic regression analysis was done to select potential candidates for the full model at P-value cutoff point ≤ 0.25 and multivariable binary logistic regression analysis was made to estimate the independent effect of predictors on the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. Model diagnostic tests were done, final model fitness was checked using Hosmer and Lemeshow chi square test. Finally, statistical significance was tested at P-value <0.05. Result Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among diabetic patients at Arbaminch General Hospital was 13%. Adjusted analysis showed that the odds of diabetic retinopathy were statistically and significantly associated with baseline age (AOR = 6.06: 95%CI; 2.42, 15.21), baseline systolic blood pressure level (AOR = 4.38: 95%CI; 1.64, 11

  5. Exocrine Pancreas in Cats With Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zini, E; Ferro, S; Lunardi, F; Zanetti, R; Heller, R S; Coppola, L M; Guscetti, F; Osto, M; Lutz, T A; Cavicchioli, L; Reusch, C E

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis has been described in cats with diabetes mellitus, although the number of studies currently available is very limited. In addition, ketoacidosis has been hypothesized to be associated with pancreatitis in diabetic cats. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether diabetic cats have pancreatitis and to determine if pancreatitis is more frequent with ketoacidosis. Samples of pancreas were collected postmortem from 37 diabetic cats, including 15 with ketoacidosis, and 20 control cats matched for age, sex, breed, and body weight. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, double-labeled for insulin/CD3, insulin/CD20, insulin/myeloperoxidase, insulin/PCNA, and glucagon/Ki67, and single-labeled for Iba1. A previously proposed semiquantitative score was used to characterize pancreatitis, along with counts of inflammatory cells. Scores of pancreatitis and the number of neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes in the exocrine pancreas did not differ between diabetic and control cats or between diabetic cats with and without ketoacidosis. Of note, PCNA-positive acinar cells were increased (P = .002) in diabetic cats, particularly near islets (P < .001). Ki67-positive acinar cells were increased only near islets (P = .038). Ketoacidosis was not linked to proliferation. The results suggest that histopathologic evidence of pancreatitis may not be more frequent in diabetic cats and that ketoacidosis may not be associated with it at the time of death. Augmented PCNA-positive acinar cells might indicate increased proliferation due to chronic pancreatitis. The reason behind the prevalent proliferation of acinar cells surrounding pancreatic islets deserves further investigation.

  6. [Diabetic nephropathy/diabetic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Boucek, P

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD), which belongs to the triad of diabetic microvascular complications, is currently the main cause of end-stage renal disease in developed countries. DKD usually simultaneously leads to a deteriorated long-term control of glucose metabolism and blood pressure, and to the development of diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy and atherosclerotic complications, which are the main causes of patients' mortality. Screening of the initial stages of DKD is to be based on the detection of increased albumin leak into the urine, microalbuminuria, and the reduction of renal function by means of estimates of glomerular filtration rate based on the serum creatinine level. The main objective of the prophylactic and treatment measures is to prevent the onset of DKD, or at least to stop its transition into an irreversible, progressive stage characterised by a permanent, often nephrotic proteinuria. The basic procedures in the prevention and treatment of DKD are maintaining the optimal metabolic control of diabetes and intensive hypertension treatment based on the inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system. Reaching the stage of progressive renal insufficiency (serum creatinine level approximately > or = 200 micromol/l) is an indication for further follow-up in the nephrology department, which will then take the necessary preparatory measures for dialysis treatment. The optimal method of kidney function replacement for patients with DKD is kidney transplantation, or combined kidney-pancreas transplantation in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  7. Genetic and environmental factors associated with type 2 diabetes and diabetic vascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Murea, Mariana; Ma, Lijun; Freedman, Barry I.

    2012-01-01

    Faced with a global epidemic of type 2 diabetes (T2D), it is critical that researchers improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of T2D and related vascular complications. These findings may ultimately lead to novel treatment options for disease prevention or delaying progression. Two major paradigms jointly underlie the development of T2D and related coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy, and diabetic retinopathy. These paradigms include the genetic risk variants and behavioral/environmental factors. This article systematically reviews the literature supporting genetic determinants in the pathogenesis of T2D and diabetic vasculopathy, and the functional implications of these gene variants on the regulation of beta-cell function and glucose homeostasis. We update the discovery of diabetes and diabetic vasculopathy risk variants, and describe the genetic technologies that have uncovered them. Also, genomic linkage between obesity and T2D is discussed. There is a complementary role for behavioral and environmental factors modulating the genetic susceptibility and diabetes risk. Epidemiological and clinical data demonstrating the effects of behavioral and novel environmental exposures on disease expression are reviewed. Finally, a succinct overview of recent landmark clinical trials addressing glycemic control and its impact on rates of vascular complications is presented. It is expected that novel strategies to exploit the gene- and exposure-related underpinnings of T2D will soon result. PMID:22972441

  8. Potential Effect of Opium Consumption on Controlling Diabetes and Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Najmeh; Gozashti, Mohamad Hossain; Najafipour, Hamid; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Marefati, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to this belief that opium may have beneficial effects on diabetes or cardiovascular risk factors, the present study aimed to assess the potential and possible effects of opium consumption on diabetes control and some cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients. Methods This study enrolled 374 diabetic subjects from diabetes care centers in Kerman, Iran, including opium user group (n = 179) and a non-opium user group (n = 195). The data were collected through a questionnaire completed by interviewing, physical examination and laboratory assessment. Findings Opium did not show any statistically significant effect on blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), fasting blood sugar (FBS), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and diastolic blood pressure. However, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and prevalence of high SBP were significantly higher in opium user group (P < 0.050). In addition, lower serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and frequency of lower HDL was significantly higher in opium user group (P < 0.001). Conclusion According to this study, opium does not seem to have beneficial effects on diabetes control or cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, it would not be advisable to consume opium as an anti-diabetes or cardioprotective agent. PMID:25140211

  9. Prevalence of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy among patients with diabetes mellitus in the Middle East region.

    PubMed

    Jambart, S; Ammache, Z; Haddad, F; Younes, A; Hassoun, A; Abdalla, K; Selwan, C Abou; Sunna, N; Wajsbrot, D; Youseif, E

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) was evaluated in type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (n = 4097) attending outpatient clinics across the Middle East. Overall, 53.7% of 3989 patients with DN4 data met the criteria for painful DPN (Douleur Neuropathique-4 [DN4] scores ≥ 4). Significant predictors of painful DPN included long history (≥ 10 years) of diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 2.43), age ≥ 65 years (OR 2.13), age 50 - 64 years (OR 1.75), presence of type 1 versus type 2 diabetes (OR 1.59), body mass index > 30 kg/m(2) (OR 1.35) and female gender (OR 1.27). Living in one of the Gulf States was associated with the lowest odds of having painful DPN (OR 0.44). The odds of painful DPN were highest among patients with peripheral vascular disease (OR 4.98), diabetic retinopathy (OR 3.90) and diabetic nephropathy (OR 3.23). Because of the high prevalence and associated suffering, disability and economic burden of painful DPN, it is important that diabetic patients are periodically screened, using a simple instrument such as the DN4, and receive appropriate treatment if symptoms develop.

  10. Novel and emerging diabetes mellitus drug therapies for the type 2 diabetes patient

    PubMed Central

    Rochester, Charmaine D; Akiyode, Oluwaranti

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder of deranged fat, protein and carbohydrate metabolism resulting in hyperglycemia as a result of insulin resistance and inadequate insulin secretion. Although a wide variety of diabetes therapies is available, yet limited efficacy, adverse effects, cost, contraindications, renal dosage adjustments, inflexible dosing schedules and weight gain significantly limit their use. In addition, many patients in the United States fail to meet the therapeutic HbA1c goal of < 7% set by the American Diabetes Association. As such new and emerging diabetes therapies with different mechanisms of action hope to address some of these drawbacks to improve the patient with type 2 diabetes. This article reviews new and emerging classes, including the sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors, 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibitors, glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitors, G Protein-Coupled receptor agonists and glucokinase activators. These emerging diabetes agents hold the promise of providing benefit of glucose lowering, weight reduction, low hypoglycemia risk, improve insulin sensitivity, pancreatic β cell preservation, and oral formulation availability. However, further studies are needed to evaluate their safety profile, cardiovascular effects, and efficacy durability in order to determine their role in type 2 diabetes management. PMID:24936252

  11. Vulvovaginitis and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Bharti; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Vulvovaginitis is a commonly encountered comorbid condition of diabetes, and is linked to poor glycaemic control. Proper, timely diagnosis and management is necessary to ensure optimal perineal/genital and metabolic health. Knowledge of current guidelines and recommendations helps in achieving this goal. This review describes the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, differential diagnosis, management and prevention of VV in diabetes.

  12. Diabetic neuralgic amyotrophy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Alan J.

    1981-01-01

    A rare neurological condition, neuralgic amyotrophy, in a diabetic is reported. Strong evidence for a causal relationship is suggested. Comment is made on striking similarities between the clinical presentation and course of both diabetic and neuralgic amyotrophy, inferring a similar end pathological process. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:7312743

  13. Medicines for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... body's cells where it can be used for energy. Without insulin around, glucose stays in the blood and blood sugar levels get too high. The types of insulin you use and how much you need to take each day will depend on your diabetes management plan. Some kids with diabetes need to take ...

  14. Idiopathic central diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Grace, Mary; Balachandran, Venu; Menon, Sooraj

    2011-10-01

    Idiopathic central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is a rare disorder characterized clinically by polyuria and polydipsia, and an abnormal urinary concentration without any identified etiology. We report a case of central diabetes insipidus in a 60-year-old lady in the absence of secondary causes like trauma, infection, and infiltrative disorders of brain.

  15. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grey, dean of the Yale University School of Nursing, developed and tested a program called Coping Skills Training (CST) as a part of routine diabetes ... is to improve diabetic teens' coping and communication skills, healthy ... sugar levels. "Nursing research is about helping people deal with the ...

  16. Diabetes Treatment Breakthrough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Shelly; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Eight experts in visual impairment respond briefly to reports that intensive monitoring of blood glucose levels by persons with diabetes can lead to a 70% reduction in the progression of detectable diabetic retinopathy. Comments are generally optimistic, though some cautions are raised. (DB)

  17. Remedies for common family ailments: 5. Sunscreen creams and lotions.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A

    1994-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to strong sunlight significantly increases the risk of skin cancer. Sunscreens provide useful protection from sunburn if correctly used. Some sunscreens contain chemical compounds which work by absorbing UVB wavelengths. Others contain chemicals which act as reflectants of UVA waves, eg titanium dioxide. Stars on the packet indicate how much UVA protection the product provides-the more stars, the more protection. Products are labelled with their sunscreen protection factor (SPF). The higher the factor, the greater the protection. Products used on children should have an SPF of at least 15. Fair-skinned and freckled people also need a high SPF as they burn easily. Use products according to the manufacturer's instructions and reapply at intervals and after swimming. Some products combine sunscreen properties with being water resistant perspiration-resistant or insect-repellent. Avoid folklore remedies like coconut oil. It is better to go or a scientifically formulated, branded product. A properly formulated after-sun lotion is advisable in order to counteract the drying effects of the sun on the skin.

  18. The Defense Industrial Base: Prescription for a Psychosomatic Ailment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    the Garrison State Threaten Civil Ri§hts, 1951) and George Orwell 1.984, 1948T. In 1947 Hanson Baldwin stated, "The military are getting the bit in...of peace that a nation can be made ready to fight. 3 The father of our nation George Washington also stressed the importance of adequate preparedness...industrial planning and mobilization fully effective. In a 1935 tour of government manufacturing facilities, Secretary of War George H. Dern witnessed

  19. Giant appendicolith: Rare finding in a common ailment

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sanjeev; Singhal, Anu; Mahajan, Harsh; Prakash, Brahm; Kapur, Sunil; Arora, Pankaj K.; Tiwari, Bishwanath; Sethi, Punit

    2016-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the commonest surgical emergencies worldwide. There is considerable variation in prevalence of appendicoliths with appendicitis. Most of the patients with appendicoliths are asymptomatic and they are not pathognomic for acute appendicitis. However, appendicoliths show increased association with perforation and abscess formation. Appendicolith are quite common, being present in 3% of general population and in nearly 10% cases of appendicitis. However, giant appendicoliths measuring over 2 centimeters (cms) are extremely rare. Computed Tomography (CT) has increased their pre-operative diagnosis considerably. Use of spectral analysis can give us the details of composition of the stone pre-operatively. We present a young male diagnosed pre-operatively on Non-Contrast Computed Tomography (NCCT) to have a giant calcium struvite appendicolith. On laparoscopy he had a 3 cm stone and an incidental Meckel's diverticulum and underwent appendectomy. The case is presented for the unique size of the appendicolith alongwith review of literature. PMID:27073312

  20. Orthoses: Not the Sole Solution for Running Ailments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Patrick

    1986-01-01

    Orthotic devices are an important element of treatment for biomechanically disadvantaged runners, but alignment problems are multifaceted and require multifaceted solutions. Appropriate uses of orthoses are discussed. (MT)

  1. The many ailments of Herman Melville (1819-91).

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2008-02-01

    Herman Melville developed debilitating physical and psychiatric disorders in middle age after writing, perhaps, the greatest of American novels, Moby Dick. This article critically examines claims that Melville had bipolar affective disorder and alcoholism, and suggests he may also have suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder. Melville was active and vigorous in youth but in middle age he developed recurrent attacks of eye pain, photophobia and disabling low back pain. Melville's contemporaries usually attributed his physical problems to 'neurasthenia' and his biographers have often dismissed them as psychosomatic. However, Melville's clinical course, abnormally rigid posture, loss of 1(3/8) inches in height between the ages of 30 and 37, and a family history of rheumatological disease, suggest a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis.

  2. Metformin and diabetic kidney disease: a mini-review on recent findings.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-10-01

    Metformin, an oral anti-diabetic agent in the biguanide class is a widely prescribed drug to treat high blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin has three different roles, including blood glucose regulatory effect, protection of kidney tubular cell by acting as an effective antioxidant and finally ameliorative effect on diabetic kidney disease through saving the podocytes. Therefore, diabetic patients may benefit from all of these three distinct ameliorative effects.

  3. Metformin and Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Mini-Review on Recent Findings

    PubMed Central

    Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Metformin, an oral anti-diabetic agent in the biguanide class is a widely prescribed drug to treat high blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin has three different roles, including blood glucose regulatory effect, protection of kidney tubular cell by acting as an effective antioxidant and finally ameliorative effect on diabetic kidney disease through saving the podocytes. Therefore, diabetic patients may benefit from all of these three distinct ameliorative effects. PMID:25793062

  4. Development of diabetes mellitus associated with quetiapine

    PubMed Central

    Nanasawa, Hideki; Sako, Akahito; Mitsutsuka, Tomohiko; Nonogaki, Kaori; Kondo, Tadayuki; Mishima, Shuichi; Uju, Yoriyasu; Ito, Toshihiko; Enomoto, Tetsuro; Hayakawa, Tatsuro; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to describe the characteristics and clinical course of patients who developed diabetes associated with the use of quetiapine. This study included patients who received quetiapine for over a month between April 2008 and November 2013, and were diagnosed as having new-onset diabetes after initiation of quetiapine. We excluded patients who developed diabetes more than 1 year after discontinuation of quetiapine. We identified new-onset diabetes by hemoglobin A1c or prescriptions of antidiabetic drugs. Among 1688 patients who received quetiapine, hemoglobin A1c had been measured in 595 (35.2%) patients at least once during the observation period, and 33 (2.0%) patients had received hypoglycemic drugs. Eighteen (1.1%) patients were considered to have developed new-onset diabetes associated with quetiapine after a median of 1.6 years following initiation of quetiapine. Median (interquartile range) age was 54.5 (29.8) years, 8 patients were male, and median (interquartile range) duration of mental illness was 15.3 (13.8) years. Median hemoglobin A1c and body mass index (BMI) were 7.1 (1.4) % and 28.4 (7.0) kg/m2, respectively. Seventeen patients had dyslipidemia when diabetes was discovered. All of these discontinued quetiapine within 3 months after the diagnosis of diabetes, and the diabetes in 4 patients had ameliorated without hypoglycemic drugs. Of 13 patients who had received either oral hypoglycemic drugs or insulin, 2 patients achieved well-controlled hemoglobin A1c without hypoglycemic drugs, and 10 patients had hemoglobin A1c 5.0% to 7.7% with the continued use of hypoglycemic drugs. We demonstrated that almost all patients who developed quetiapine-associated diabetes had dyslipidemia and increased BMI. There was no life-threatening hyperglycemia and diabetes was ameliorated just by discontinuation of quetiapine in several patients. The monitoring of metabolic parameters during antipsychotic treatment is important to diagnose and treat diabetes

  5. Diabetes insipidus in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Paulose, K P; Padmakumar, N

    2002-09-01

    The association of Diabetes Mellitus (DM) and Diabetes Insipidus (DI) without any congenital defects is very rare and we report here a case of type 2 diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) whose blood sugar was controlled by insulin, developing central diabetes insipidus 2 years later, which could be successively controlled by synthetic vasopressin.

  6. Diabetes Technologies and Their Role in Diabetes Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollipara, Sobha; Silverstein, Janet H.; Marschilok, Katie

    2009-01-01

    The 1993 Diabetes Complications and Control Trial (DCCT) showed that controlling blood glucose prevents and delays the progression of long term complications of diabetes. New diabetes technologies can make control of diabetes possible and safer. This paper reviews these technologies used to monitor blood glucose, administer insulin and evaluate…

  7. Living with diabetes: issues for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, D; Williams, A

    1994-07-01

    Discussion in this paper is based on findings drawn from research undertaken within a qualitative framework of analysis, and with the purpose of exploring people's perceptions of living with diabetes, including the nursing care they receive. A major theoretical concern is to demonstrate the importance of placing patients' and clients' experiences at the centre of nursing interest and practice. It is argued that understanding a disease process should of necessity include an understanding of the concerns of those who live with it. Findings related to the following research questions are discussed: first, what are the challenges of living with diabetes? and second, what are people's perceptions of the nursing care they receive?

  8. [Diabetes and travel].

    PubMed

    Bauduceau, B; Mayaudon, H; Ducorps, M; Belmejdoub, G; Thiolet, C; Pellan, M; Cosson, E

    1997-01-01

    With the continuing expansion in international air travel, increasing numbers of diabetic patients consult physicians for advice before going abroad. Careful planning is required taking into account climatic and medical conditions at the destination. Diabetic travelers should pack an appropriate treatment kit and contract special insurance coverage for medical evacuation. Precautions are necessary to limit the effects of motion sickness and time differences on diabetes control and especially the risk of hypoglycemia. Special attention is needed to avoid digestive problems and prevent foot injuries which can lead to serious complications in diabetic patients. Diabetic patients cannot forget their health problem during vacation and must be especially cautious when traveling. However with proper training, the risks of foreign travel can be reduced to acceptable levels.

  9. Diabetes mellitus and dementia.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Growing epidemiologic evidence has suggested that people with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk for the development of dementia. However, the results for the subtypes of dementia are inconsistent. This review examines the risk of dementia in people with diabetes mellitus, and discusses the possible mechanism underpinning this association. Diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.5-fold greater risk of dementia among community-dwelling elderly people. Notably, diabetes mellitus is a significant risk factor for not only vascular dementia, but also Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms underpinning the association are unclear, but it may be multifactorial in nature, involving factors such as cardiovascular risk factors, glucose toxicity, changes in insulin metabolism and inflammation. The optimal management of these risk factors in early life may be important to prevent late-life dementia. Furthermore, novel therapeutic strategies will be needed to prevent or reduce the development of dementia in people with diabetes mellitus.

  10. The impact of diabetes and diabetes medications on bone health.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Matthew P; Pratley, Richard E

    2015-04-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have an increased risk of fragility fractures despite increased body weight and normal or higher bone mineral density. The mechanisms by which T2DM increases skeletal fragility are unclear. It is likely that a combination of factors, including a greater risk of falling, regional osteopenia, and impaired bone quality, contributes to the increased fracture risk. Drugs for the treatment of T2DM may also impact on the risk for fractures. For example, thiazolidinediones accelerate bone loss and increase the risk of fractures, particularly in older women. In contrast, metformin and sulfonylureas do not appear to have a negative effect on bone health and may, in fact, protect against fragility fracture. Animal models indicate a potential role for incretin hormones in bone metabolism, but there are only limited data on the impact of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists on bone health in humans. Animal models also have demonstrated a role for amylin in bone metabolism, but clinical trials in patients with type 1 diabetes with an amylin analog (pramlintide) have not shown a significant impact on bone metabolism. The effects of insulin treatment on fracture risk are inconsistent with some studies showing an increased risk and others showing no effect. Finally, although there is limited information on the latest class of medications for the treatment of T2DM, the sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors, these drugs do not seem to increase fracture risk. Because diabetes is an increasingly common chronic condition that can affect patients for many decades, further research into the effects of agents for the treatment of T2DM on bone metabolism is warranted. In this review, the physiological mechanisms and clinical impact of diabetes treatments on bone health and fracture risk in patients with T2DM are described.

  11. [Diabetes and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-González, S A

    1998-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus during pregnancy could result in severe or fatal complications to mother or the unborn product, like polyhydramnios, preeclampsia, abortion, neonatal asphyxia, macrosomia, stillbirth, and others, therefore is very important the early detection and treatment of diabetes. Gestacional Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is the carbohydrate intolerance of variable severity first recognized during pregnancy. The screening test consist of 50 g of oral glucose and a plasma glucose measurement at one hour, regardless of the time of the last meal, and this may do in all pregnancies between 24 and 28 weeks of gestation. If plasma glucose level above 140 mg/dl results, a oral glucose tolerance test with 100 g must be done. This is the GDM diagnostic test. The risk factors for gestacional diabetes (older than 30 years of age, obesity, arterial hypertension, glucosury, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, family history of macrosomia) identify only 50% of pregnancies with gestacional diabetes, therefore, is necessary to screen all pregnancies who become pregnant, a strict control before pregnant is indispensable, with aim to slow congenital malformations probability and another complications. Gestacional diabetes prevalence in hispanic women in the U.S.A. is 12.3 percent. Diabetes mellitus prevalence in Mexico is about 2-6 percent. The goal of management of diabetes during pregnancy is the maintainance of fasting plasma glucose 105 mg/dl and 120 mg/dl two hours after meals. Treatment consist in diabetes education, diet with caloric needs calculation, exercise, and occasionally insulin. Is necessary the prenatal monitoring, the supervision of delivery or cesarean metabolic changes, and the postnatal monitoring of the mother and product.

  12. Erythropoietin and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-10-25

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a 30.4 kDa growth factor and cytokine that governs cell proliferation, immune modulation, metabolic homeostasis, vascular function, and cytoprotection. EPO is under investigation for the treatment of variety of diseases, but appears especially suited for the treatment of disorders of metabolism that include diabetes mellitus (DM). DM and the complications of this disease impact a significant portion of the global population leading to disability and death with currently limited therapeutic options. In addition to its utility for the treatment of anemia, EPO can improve cardiac function, reduce fatigue, and improve cognition in patients with DM as well as regulate cellular energy metabolism, obesity, tissue repair and regeneration, apoptosis, and autophagy in experimental models of DM. Yet, EPO can have adverse effects that involve the vasculature system and unchecked cellular proliferation. Critical to the cytoprotective capacity and the potential for a positive clinical outcome with EPO are the control of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B, the mechanistic target of rapamycin, Wnt signaling, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and AMP activated protein kinase. Therapeutic strategies that can specifically target and control EPO and its signaling pathways hold great promise for the development of new and effective clinical treatments for DM and the complications of this disorder.

  13. Erythropoietin and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a 30.4 kDa growth factor and cytokine that governs cell proliferation, immune modulation, metabolic homeostasis, vascular function, and cytoprotection. EPO is under investigation for the treatment of variety of diseases, but appears especially suited for the treatment of disorders of metabolism that include diabetes mellitus (DM). DM and the complications of this disease impact a significant portion of the global population leading to disability and death with currently limited therapeutic options. In addition to its utility for the treatment of anemia, EPO can improve cardiac function, reduce fatigue, and improve cognition in patients with DM as well as regulate cellular energy metabolism, obesity, tissue repair and regeneration, apoptosis, and autophagy in experimental models of DM. Yet, EPO can have adverse effects that involve the vasculature system and unchecked cellular proliferation. Critical to the cytoprotective capacity and the potential for a positive clinical outcome with EPO are the control of signal transduction pathways that include protein kinase B, the mechanistic target of rapamycin, Wnt signaling, mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class, silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and AMP activated protein kinase. Therapeutic strategies that can specifically target and control EPO and its signaling pathways hold great promise for the development of new and effective clinical treatments for DM and the complications of this disorder. PMID:26516410

  14. Materials for Diabetes Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; York, Roger L.; Invernale, Michael A.; Langer, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on the materials and methods used to fabricate closed-loop systems for type 1 diabetes therapy. Herein, we give a brief overview of current methods used for patient care and discuss two types of possible treatments and the materials used for these therapies–(i) artificial pancreases, comprised of insulin producing cells embedded in a polymeric biomaterial, and (ii) totally synthetic pancreases formulated by integrating continuous glucose monitors with controlled insulin release through degradable polymers and glucose-responsive polymer systems. Both the artificial and the completely synthetic pancreas have two major design requirements: the device must be both biocompatible and be permeable to small molecules and proteins, such as insulin. Several polymers and fabrication methods of artificial pancreases are discussed: microencapsulation, conformal coatings, and planar sheets. We also review the two components of a completely synthetic pancreas. Several types of glucose sensing systems (including materials used for electrochemical, optical, and chemical sensing platforms) are discussed, in addition to various polymer-based release systems (including ethylene-vinyl acetate, polyanhydrides, and phenylboronic acid containing hydrogels). PMID:23184741

  15. Exercise and spirulina control non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis and lipid profile in diabetic Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is associated with metabolic dysfunctions, including alterations in circulating lipid levels and fat tissue accumulation, which causes, among other pathologies, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Aim of the study The objective of this study was to analyse the effects of physical exercise and spirulina intake on the control of NAFLD in diabetic Wistar rats. Methods Diabetes was induced in the animals through intravenous administration of alloxan. The rats were divided into four groups: Diabetic Control (DC) - diabetic rats fed with a control diet and no physical exercise; Diabetic Spirulina (DS) - diabetic rats fed with a diet that included spirulina; Diabetic Spirulina and Exercise (DSE) - diabetic rats fed with a diet that included Spirulina and that exercised; and Diabetic Exercise (DE) - diabetic rats fed with a control diet and that exercised. Results The groups DS, DSE, and DE presented lower plasma concentrations of LDL cholesterol than DC, as well as lower levels of total liver lipids in groups DS, DSE, and DE in comparison to DC. Conclusion Thus, spirulina appears to be effective in reducing total circulating levels of LDL-cholesterol and hepatic lipids, alone or in conjunction with physical exercise in diabetic rats. PMID:21569626

  16. Depression and Advanced Complications of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Elizabeth H.B.; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Katon, Wayne; Heckbert, Susan R.; Ciechanowski, Paul; Oliver, Malia M.; Ludman, Evette J.; Young, Bessie A.; Williams, Lisa H.; McCulloch, David K.; Von Korff, Michael

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To prospectively examine the association of depression with risks for advanced macrovascular and microvascular complications among patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A longitudinal cohort of 4,623 primary care patients with type 2 diabetes was enrolled in 2000–2002 and followed through 2005–2007. Advanced microvascular complications included blindness, end-stage renal disease, amputations, and renal failure deaths. Advanced macrovascular complications included myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular procedures, and deaths. Medical record review, ICD-9 diagnostic and procedural codes, and death certificate data were used to ascertain outcomes in the 5-year follow-up. Proportional hazard models analyzed the association between baseline depression and risks of adverse outcomes. RESULTS After adjustment for prior complications and demographic, clinical, and diabetes self-care variables, major depression was associated with significantly higher risks of adverse microvascular outcomes (hazard ratio 1.36 [95% CI 1.05–1.75]) and adverse macrovascular outcomes (1.24 [1.0–1.54]). CONCLUSIONS Among people with type 2 diabetes, major depression is associated with an increased risk of clinically significant microvascular and macrovascular complications over the ensuing 5 years, even after adjusting for diabetes severity and self-care activities. Clinical and public health significance of these findings rises as the incidence of type 2 diabetes soars. Further research is needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms for this association and to test interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes complications among patients with comorbid depression. PMID:19933989

  17. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Honor Become a Member En Español Type 1 Type 2 About Us Online Community Meal Planning Sign In Search: Search More Sites Search ≡ Are You At Risk? Diabetes Basics Living with Diabetes Food & Fitness In My ... Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy ...

  18. Contraception and the Adolescent Diabetic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fennoy, Ilene

    1989-01-01

    Data from a study of 11 teenage diabetics suggests that pregnancy among adolescent diabetics is more frequent than among the general population, at a time when diabetic control is poor because of psychosocial factors associated with adolescence. Current recommendations regarding contraception for diabetic women, focusing on barrier methods, are…

  19. Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Progression to Diabetes in Patients at Risk for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pittas, Anastassios G.; Nelson, Jason; Mitri, Joanna; Hillmann, William; Garganta, Cheryl; Nathan, David M.; Hu, Frank B.; Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the association between vitamin D status, assessed by plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and risk of incident diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prospective observational study with a mean follow-up of 2.7 years in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a multicenter trial comparing different strategies for prevention of diabetes in patients with prediabetes. We assessed the association between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, measured repeatedly during follow-up, and incident diabetes in the combined placebo (n = 1,022) and intensive lifestyle (n = 1,017) randomized arms of the DPP. Variables measured at multiple study time points (25-hydroxyvitamin D, BMI, and physical activity) entered the analyses as time-varying “lagged” covariates, as the mean of the previous and current visits at which diabetes status was assessed. RESULTS After multivariate adjustment, including for the DPP intervention, participants in the highest tertile of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (median concentration, 30.1 ng/mL) had a hazard ratio of 0.72 (95% CI 0.56–0.90) for developing diabetes compared with participants in the lowest tertile (median concentration, 12.8 ng/mL). The association was in the same direction in placebo (0.70; 0.52–0.94) versus lifestyle arm (0.80; 0.54–1.17). CONCLUSIONS Higher plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, assessed repeatedly, was associated with lower risk of incident diabetes in high-risk patients, after adjusting for lifestyle interventions (dietary changes, increased physical activity, and weight loss) known to decrease diabetes risk. Because of the observational nature of the study, the potential association between vitamin D and diabetes needs to be confirmed in intervention studies. PMID:22323410

  20. Lipid mediators in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The implications of lipid lowering drugs in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy have been considered. At the same time, the clinical efficacy of lipid lowering drugs has resulted in improvement in the cardiovascular functions of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with or without diabetes, but no remarkable improvement has been observed in the kidney outcome. Earlier lipid mediators have been shown to cause accumulative effects in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Here, we attempt to analyze the involvement of lipid mediators in DN. The hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of diacyglycerol (DAG) is one of the causes for the activation of protein kinase C (PKCs), which is responsible for the activation of pathways, including the production of VEGF, TGFβ1, PAI-1, NADPH oxidases, and NFҟB signaling, accelerating the development of DN. Additionally, current studies on the role of ceramide are one of the major fields of study in DN. Researchers have reported excessive ceramide formation in the pathobiological conditions of DN. There is less report on the effect of lipid lowering drugs on the reduction of PKC activation and ceramide synthesis. Regulating PKC activation and ceramide biosynthesis could be a protective measure in the therapeutic potential of DN. Lipid lowering drugs also upregulate anti-fibrotic microRNAs, which could hint at the effects of lipid lowering drugs in DN. PMID:25206927

  1. Mechanisms of Diabetes-Induced Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jamaludin; Nazratun Nafizah, A. H.; Zariyantey, A. H.; Budin, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a non-communicable disease that occurs in both developed and developing countries. This metabolic disease affects all systems in the body, including the liver. Hyperglycaemia, mainly caused by insulin resistance, affects the metabolism of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and can lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can further progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and, finally, hepatocellular carcinomas. The underlying mechanism of diabetes that contributes to liver damage is the combination of increased oxidative stress and an aberrant inflammatory response; this activates the transcription of pro-apoptotic genes and damages hepatocytes. Significant involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α—exacerbates the accumulation of oxidative damage products in the liver, such as malondialdehyde, fluorescent pigments and conjugated dienes. This review summarises the biochemical, histological and macromolecular changes that contribute to oxidative liver damage among diabetic individuals. PMID:27226903

  2. Diabetes Causation Beliefs Among Spanish-Speaking Patients

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Jeannie Belinda; Mayer, Sallie D.; Mezuk, Briana R.; Avula, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore how the inquiry of cultural diabetes causation beliefs can improve Hispanic/Latino patient self-management. Methods Two semistructured focus groups were conducted with 13 Hispanic/Latinos adults diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Prior to taking part in the group discussion, participants completed a demographic survey and the Illness Perception Questionnaire–Revised. Results The top 5 diabetes causation items endorsed by participants per the questionnaire included stress or worry, behavior, hereditary, diet/eating habits, and family problems/worries. The qualitative analysis revealed stress as a recurring theme for a cause of diabetes. Work stress was specifically identified as a contributor to unhealthy eating and diabetes. Most participants were aware of and believed in susto and referred to it as coraje (anger). Participants believed that asking patients about their diabetes causation beliefs and emotional status can help health professionals (1) better understand the patient and (2) identify and prioritize diabetes treatments. Participants also indicated that the role of doctors is important and the encouragement that they give to patients is clinically and spiritually valued. Conclusions Stress was identified as a cause of diabetes in addition to unhealthy diets and heredity. Asking patients about diabetes causation beliefs and emotional status may help prioritize treatment and management goals. PMID:26568376

  3. Globalization of diabetes: the role of diet, lifestyle, and genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Frank B

    2011-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a global public health crisis that threatens the economies of all nations, particularly developing countries. Fueled by rapid urbanization, nutrition transition, and increasingly sedentary lifestyles, the epidemic has grown in parallel with the worldwide rise in obesity. Asia's large population and rapid economic development have made it an epicenter of the epidemic. Asian populations tend to develop diabetes at younger ages and lower BMI levels than Caucasians. Several factors contribute to accelerated diabetes epidemic in Asians, including the "normal-weight metabolically obese" phenotype; high prevalence of smoking and heavy alcohol use; high intake of refined carbohydrates (e.g., white rice); and dramatically decreased physical activity levels. Poor nutrition in utero and in early life combined with overnutrition in later life may also play a role in Asia's diabetes epidemic. Recent advances in genome-wide association studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of diabetes pathophysiology, but currently identified genetic loci are insufficient to explain ethnic differences in diabetes risk. Nonetheless, interactions between Westernized diet and lifestyle and genetic background may accelerate the growth of diabetes in the context of rapid nutrition transition. Epidemiologic studies and randomized clinical trials show that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable through diet and lifestyle modifications. Translating these findings into practice, however, requires fundamental changes in public policies, the food and built environments, and health systems. To curb the escalating diabetes epidemic, primary prevention through promotion of a healthy diet and lifestyle should be a global public policy priority.

  4. Assessing psychosocial variables: a tool for diabetes educators.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kelly L

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share an educational strategy or tool that is relevant for use in patient and professional diabetes education. The tool offers an opportunity for diabetes educators to screen for psychosocial variables such as depression or emotional distress. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify psychological variables that have an impact on individuals living with diabetes and their ability to self-manage their disease. The literature revealed that both depression and emotional distress related to diabetes was experienced by individuals with diabetes along with those individuals who were unable to self-management their disease. The Accu-Check Interview is a computer software program that may assist diabetes educators to provide diabetes education. Use of the Accu-Check Interview software program has been implemented at various sites including the Joslin Clinic (Boston, Mass), Baystate Medical Center (Springfield, Mass), and Emerson Hospital (Concord, Mass). The Diabetes Self Care Profile is a Web-based version of the Accu-Check Interview and can be accessed as a demonstration in English and Spanish. These tools allow diabetes educators to screen for psychosocial variables and address issues with individuals while using a motivational interviewing approach.

  5. Epidemiology of diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy in Africa: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, P I; MacCormick, I J C; Harding, S P; Bastawrous, A; Beare, N A V; Garner, P

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim To summarize findings from studies reporting the prevalence and incidence of diabetic retinopathy and diabetic maculopathy in African countries in light of the rising prevalence of diabetes mellitus. Methods Using a predefined search strategy, we systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation index and Conference Proceedings Citation index, African Index Medicus and the grey literature database ‘OpenSIGLE’ for studies published between January 1990 and February 2011. Included studies reported prevalence or incidence of diabetic retinopathy or diabetic maculopathy of subjects with diabetes resident in African countries. Results Sixty-two studies from 21 countries were included: three population-based surveys; two cohort studies; five case–control studies; 32 diabetes clinic-based, nine eye clinic-based and 11 other hospital-based surveys. Included studies varied considerably in terms of patient selection, method of assessing the eye and retinopathy classification. In population-based studies, the reported prevalence range in patients with diabetes for diabetic retinopathy was 30.2 to 31.6%, proliferative diabetic retinopathy 0.9 to 1.3%, and any maculopathy 1.2 to 4.5%. In diabetes clinic-based surveys, the reported prevalence range for diabetic retinopathy was 7.0 to 62.4%, proliferative diabetic retinopathy 0 to 6.9%, and any maculopathy 1.2 to 31.1%. No obvious association between prevalence and income level of the country was detected. Conclusions Large, community-based cross-sectional and cohort studies are needed to investigate rates and determinants of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, incidence and progression in Africa. Consensus is needed on the most appropriate methods of identification and classification of retinopathy for research and clinical practice. Estimates of prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, proliferative diabetic retinopathy and maculopathy are comparable with recent European and American studies. PMID:22817387

  6. Diabetic emergencies: new strategies for an old disease.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Gerald

    2014-06-01

    Diabetic emergencies are common presentations to the emergency department. It is estimated that diabetes affects 25.8 million people in the United States, at an annual total cost of over $174 billion. There are 2 general categories of diabetic emergencies: hyperglycemic and hypoglycemic. The hyperglycemic emergencies include diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. Management of these conditions requires a careful hydration strategy to restore volume and improve perfusion, intravenous insulin therapy, and electrolyte monitoring. Management of hypoglycemia includes identification of the underlying etiology, oral food and/or glucose, intravenous dextrose, and consideration of glucagon. This review evaluates the current strategies for management of diabetic emergencies and offers new information regarding effective diagnostic strategies, selection of fluids for rehydration, correction of potassium, the use of subcutaneous insulin for mild hyperglycemia, and management of metformin-induced lactic acidosis.

  7. A review of the mental health issues of diabetes conference.

    PubMed

    Ducat, Lee; Rubenstein, Arthur; Philipson, Louis H; Anderson, Barbara J

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk for depression, anxiety disorder, and eating disorder diagnoses. People with type 1 diabetes are also at risk for subclinical levels of diabetes distress and anxiety. These mental/behavioral health comorbidities of diabetes are associated with poor adherence to treatment and poor glycemic control, thus increasing the risk for serious short- and long-term physical complications, which can result in blindness, amputations, stroke, cognitive decline, decreased quality of life, as well as premature death. When mental health comorbidities of diabetes are not diagnosed and treated, the financial cost to society and health care systems is catastrophic, and the human suffering that results is profound. This review summarizes state-of-the-art presentations and working group scholarly reports from the Mental Health Issues of Diabetes Conference (7-8 October 2013, Philadelphia, PA), which included stakeholders from the National Institutes of Health, people living with type 1 diabetes and their families, diabetes consumer advocacy groups, the insurance industry, as well as psychologists, psychiatrists, endocrinologists, and nurse practitioners who are all nationally and internationally recognized experts in type 1 diabetes research and care. At this landmark conference current evidence for the incidence and the consequences of mental health problems in type 1 diabetes was presented, supporting the integration of mental health screening and mental health care into routine diabetes medical care. Future research directions were recommended to establish the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of paradigms of diabetes care in which physical and mental health care are both priorities.

  8. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting patient engagement in diabetes self-management: perspectives of a certified diabetes educator.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Kellie M

    2013-02-01

    Patients with diabetes are responsible for the vast majority of management requirements of their condition. However, their ability and motivation to engage in required self-management behaviors may be mitigated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic barriers include attitudes and health beliefs, limited diabetes knowledge and technical skill, reduced functional health literacy, and inadequate self-efficacy to promote positive behavior change. Extrinsic barriers include financial considerations, inadequate family and community support systems, ineffective clinical relationships, and limited access to effective diabetes health care delivery. Diabetes providers have opportunities for enhancing patient engagement with clinical recommendations and diabetes self-management through effective communication, including efforts to contextually assess patients' perceptions of diabetes and how the condition fits within the context of their changing lives. This article provides a conceptual framework for establishing and building an effective clinical alliance with patients with the goal of empowering them to take more control of their diabetes and reduce their risks for poor diabetes outcomes.

  9. The subtle signs of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome: not all juvenile diabetes is type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Claudia; Brosig, Burkhard; Zimmer, Klaus P; Wudy, Stefan A

    2011-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (also known as DIDMOAD = diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the association of childhood non-immune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DM) with progressive bilateral optic atrophy. Additional symptoms including signs of severe neurodegeneration and psychiatric illness are likely to evolve over time resulting in premature death. We report on two siblings of Turkish origin from our diabetes clinic who were diagnosed with Wolfram syndrome after 6 years and 2 years duration of DM, respectively. Subtle symptoms such as attitude changes, growing reading difficulties in the history of children or adolescents with antibody negative and ketone negative DM should alert the treating physician and lead to re-evaluation of the diagnosis, keeping in mind that not all juvenile DM is type 1 DM.

  10. Diabetes and Altered Glucose Metabolism with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Rita Rastogi; Egan, Josephine M.

    2013-01-01

    I. Synopsis Diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance affect a substantial proportion of older adults. While the aging process can be associated with alterations in glucose metabolism, including both relative insulin resistance and islet cell dysfunction, abnormal glucose metabolism is not a necessary component of aging. Instead, older adults with diabetes and altered glucose status likely represent a vulnerable subset of the population at high-risk for complications and adverse geriatric syndromes such as accelerated muscle loss, functional disability, frailty, and early mortality. Goals for treatment of diabetes in the elderly include control of hyperglycemia, prevention and treatment of diabetic complications, avoidance of hypoglycemia and preservation of quality of life. Given the heterogeneity of the elderly population with regards to the presence of comorbidities, life expectancy, and functional status, an individualized approach to diabetes management is often appropriate. A growing area of research seeks to explore associations of dysglycemia and insulin resistance with the development of adverse outcomes in the elderly and may ultimately inform guidelines on the use of future glucose-lowering therapies in this population. PMID:23702405

  11. Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Related Events in the Canagliflozin Type 2 Diabetes Clinical Program

    PubMed Central

    Erondu, Ngozi; Desai, Mehul; Ways, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study assessed the incidence of serious adverse events of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among patients with type 2 diabetes treated with canagliflozin. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS All serious adverse events of DKA and related events (ketoacidosis, metabolic acidosis, and acidosis) from 17,596 patients from randomized studies of canagliflozin through 11 May 2015 were analyzed. RESULTS Serious adverse events of DKA and related events were reported in 12 patients (0.07%), including 4 (0.07%), 6 (0.11%), and 2 (0.03%) treated with canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg and comparator, respectively; corresponding incidence rates were 0.522, 0.763, and 0.238 per 1,000 patient-years, respectively. Most patients with DKA and related events had a blood glucose >300 mg/dL (16.7 mmol/L) at presentation of DKA, were on insulin, and had DKA-precipitating factors, including some with type 1 diabetes/latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood. CONCLUSIONS DKA and related events occurred at a low frequency in the canagliflozin type 2 diabetes program, with an incidence consistent with limited existing observational data in the general population with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26203064

  12. [Diabetes and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Graf, U M; Vetter, K

    1999-10-01

    Preexisting type-I-diabetes (incidence 0.8%) and gestational diabetes (3-5%) are the two manifestations of disturbed carbohydrate metabolism in pregnancy. Maternal hyperglycemia and the resulting excessive glucose supply for the fetus leads to fetal hyperinsulinism which is responsible for the complications in the offspring. The most important clinical manifestations are the excessive growth of the fetus (macrosomia), the risk of intrauterine death and the neonatal morbidity caused by hypoglycemia and the delay of maturation of lungs and liver. Women with type-I-diabetes require preconception counseling and optimizing of glucose control to reduce the rate of abortion and of congenital anomalies of the offspring. Furthermore kidney function and retinopathia should be evaluated preconceptionally. The management of diabetic pregnancies requires a tight cooperation of obstetricians and diabetologists. Blood glucose levels have to be lower than outside pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed by a screening test with 50 g glucose for all women followed by a regular 75 g oGTT when the glucose value is > or = 140 mg%. In most of the women euglycemia can be achieved by diet and exercise. Women after pregnancies with gestational diabetes should be retested postnatally and counseled about their increased risk to develop diabetes in later life.

  13. Diabetes insipidus: historical aspects.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Jörgen

    2004-01-01

    The contributions to our present knowledge and understanding of diabetes insipidus are briefly surveyed. Though a disease presenting with polyuria and thirst had been recognized since Antiquity, it was not until the 17. Century the distinction was made between diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. At the beginning of the 20. Century almost nothing was known about the function of the pituitary. It was generally believed that diabetes insipidus was a renal disease. Two clinical observations in 1912 suggested an association between the hypophysis and diabetes insipidus. This view was supported by the recognition in 1913 that extract of the posterior lobe of the pituitary was effective in diabetes insipidus. Despite much evidence to the contrary, it was assumed that the antidiuretic hormone was produced in the intermediate lobe of the pituitary. Around 1950 it was finally established that 'the posterior lobe hormones' are in fact secreted in the hypothalamus. At the same time the antidiuretic hormone was isolated and synthesized. More recently, progress within genetics has made it possible to characterize in details other rare types of diabetes insipidus.

  14. [Type 2 diabetes complications].

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many complications, which are mainly due to complex and interconnected mechanisms such as hyperglycemia, insulino-resistance, low-grade inflammation and accelerated atherogenesis. Cardi-cerebrovascular disease are frequently associated to type 2 diabetes and may become life threatening, particularly coronaropathy, stroke and heart failure. Their clinical picture are sometimes atypical and silencious for a long time. Type 2 diabetes must be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Nephropathy is frequent in type 2 diabetes but has a mixed origin. Now it is the highest cause of end-stage renal disease. Better metabolic and blood pressure control and an improved management of microalbuminuria are able to slowdown the course of the disease. Retinopathy which is paradoxically slightly progressive must however be screened and treated in these rather old patients which are globally at high ophthalmologic risk. Diabetic foot is a severe complication secondary to microangiopathy, microangiopathy and neuropathy. It may be considered as a super-complication of several complications. Its screening must be done on a routine basis. Some cancer may be considered as an emerging complication of type 2 diabetes as well as cognitive decline, sleep apnea syndrome, mood disorders and bone metabolism impairments. Most of the type 2 diabetes complications may be prevented by a strategy combining a systematic screening and multi-interventional therapies.

  15. [Diabetes mellitus and dementia].

    PubMed

    Kopf, D

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus, particularly type 2 diabetes, is a risk factor for dementia and this holds true for incident vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Cerebrovascular complications of diabetes and chronic mild inflammation in insulin resistant states partly account for this increased risk. In addition, cellular resistance to the trophic effects of insulin on neurons and glial cells favor the accumulation of toxic metabolic products, such as amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau protein (pTau). Weight loss frequently precedes overt cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. This results in an increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes in stable diabetic patients who are on suitably adjusted doses of oral insulin or insulinotropic antidiabetic drugs. In turn, hypoglycemic episodes may induce further damage in the vulnerable brains of type 2 diabetes patients. Patients with unexplained weight loss, hypoglycemic episodes and subjective memory complaints must be screened for dementia. Once dementia has been diagnosed the goals of diabetes management must be reevaluated as prevention of hypoglycemia becomes more important than tight metabolic control. As weight loss accelerates the rate of cognitive decline, nutritional goals must aim at stabilizing body weight. There is no available evidence on whether drug treatment of diabetes in middle-aged persons can help to prevent dementia; however, physical exercise, mental activity and higher education have preventive effects on the risk of dementia in later life. In addition, nutritional recommendations that are effective in preventing cardiovascular events have also been shown to reduce the risk of dementia.

  16. Prevalence of Diabetic Foot Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus under Renal Replacement Therapy in Lleida, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Dòria, Montserrat; Rosado, Verónica; Pacheco, Linda Roxana; Betriu, Àngels; Valls, Joan; Mauricio, Dídac

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the prevalence of diabetic foot and other associated conditions in patients with diabetes mellitus under renal replacement in the region of Lleida, Spain. Methods. This was an observational, cross-sectional study of 92 dialysis-treated diabetic patients. Besides a podiatric examination, we explored the presence of cardiovascular risk factors, late diabetes complications, including peripheral neuropathy, atherosclerotic disease, and peripheral artery disease. We assessed risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation by logistic regression. Results. Prevalent diabetic foot was found in 17.4% of patients, foot deformities were found in 54.3%, previous ulcer was found in 19.6%, and amputations were found in 16.3%; and 87% of them had some risk of suffering diabetic foot in the future. We observed a high prevalence of patients with peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease (89.1% and 64.2%, resp.). Multivariable analysis identified diabetic retinopathy and advanced atherosclerotic disease (stenosing carotid plaques) as independent risk factors for foot ulceration (p = 0.004 and p = 0.023, resp.) and diabetic retinopathy also as an independent risk factor for lower-limb amputations (p = 0.013). Moreover, there was a temporal association between the initiation of dialysis and the incidence of amputations. Conclusion. Diabetic patients receiving dialysis therapy are at high risk of foot complications and should receive appropriate and intensive foot care. PMID:27190996

  17. Prevalence of Diabetic Foot Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus under Renal Replacement Therapy in Lleida, Spain.

    PubMed

    Dòria, Montserrat; Rosado, Verónica; Pacheco, Linda Roxana; Hernández, Marta; Betriu, Àngels; Valls, Joan; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Fernández, Elvira; Mauricio, Dídac

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the prevalence of diabetic foot and other associated conditions in patients with diabetes mellitus under renal replacement in the region of Lleida, Spain. Methods. This was an observational, cross-sectional study of 92 dialysis-treated diabetic patients. Besides a podiatric examination, we explored the presence of cardiovascular risk factors, late diabetes complications, including peripheral neuropathy, atherosclerotic disease, and peripheral artery disease. We assessed risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation by logistic regression. Results. Prevalent diabetic foot was found in 17.4% of patients, foot deformities were found in 54.3%, previous ulcer was found in 19.6%, and amputations were found in 16.3%; and 87% of them had some risk of suffering diabetic foot in the future. We observed a high prevalence of patients with peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease (89.1% and 64.2%, resp.). Multivariable analysis identified diabetic retinopathy and advanced atherosclerotic disease (stenosing carotid plaques) as independent risk factors for foot ulceration (p = 0.004 and p = 0.023, resp.) and diabetic retinopathy also as an independent risk factor for lower-limb amputations (p = 0.013). Moreover, there was a temporal association between the initiation of dialysis and the incidence of amputations. Conclusion. Diabetic patients receiving dialysis therapy are at high risk of foot complications and should receive appropriate and intensive foot care.

  18. The association of vitamin D with inflammatory cytokines in diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Bulent; Tulubas, Feti; Bilir, Betul Ekiz; Atile, Neslihan Soysal; Kara, Sonat Pinar; Yildirim, Tulay; Gumustas, Seyit Ali; Topcu, Birol; Kaymaz, Ozlem; Aydin, Murat

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The effects of vitamin D on the circulating levels of IL-17 and IL-13 were investigated in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 without neuropathy, and healthy controls. [Subjects and Methods] A single-blind controlled clinical study was performed, including70 type 2 diabetic patients with or without diabetic peripheral neuropathy and 33 healthy volunteer controls. The 25(OH)D levels were evaluated using ultra-performance liquid chromatography, and IL-17 and IL-13 levels were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. [Results] The 25(OH) vitamin D concentration was lower in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients than in diabetes mellitus patients without neuropathy and healthy controls. Similarly, 25(OH)D levels were lower in diabetes mellitus patients than healthy controls. IL-17 and IL-13 levels were higher in diabetes mellitus patients than in controls. Additionally, IL-13 levels were higher in diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients than in diabetes mellitus patients without neuropathy. These differences were statistically significant. There was a significant positive correlation between 25(OH)D and IL-13,and a negative correlation between 25(OH)D andIL-17 in the diabetic and diabetic neuropathy groups. [Conclusion] Vitamin D is a potential modifiable risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy and may regulate inflammatory mediators, e.g., IL-17 and IL-13.

  19. Advanced glycation end products and diabetic nephropathy: a comparative study using diabetic and normal rats with methylglyoxal-induced glycation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Lisa; Matafome, Paulo; Crisóstomo, Joana; Santos-Silva, Daniela; Sena, Cristina; Pereira, Paulo; Seiça, Raquel

    2014-03-01

    Hyperglycemia-related advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation is a key mechanism in diabetic nephropathy. Since methylglyoxal (MG) is a potent AGE precursor, we aimed to assess the role of MG-related AGE formation in the progression of renal damages. A comparative study between Wistar (W, normal) and Goto-Kakizaki (GK, nonobese type 2 diabetic) rats was performed at 6 and 14 months old and after 14 weeks of MG administration to 6-month-old rats. Diabetic rats showed progressive structural, biochemical, and functional alterations, including AGE, albuminuria, and tissue hypoxia, which were partially mimicked by MG administration to young GK rats. Aged Wistar rats had an impairment of some parameters, whereas MG administration caused a phenotype similar to young GK rats, including oxidative stress, impaired apoptotic and angiogenic markers, and structural lesions. MG accumulation specifically impaired several of the renal disease markers progressively observed in diabetic rats, and thus, it contributes to the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  20. Zinc and type 2 diabetes mellitus with periodontitis – a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pushparani, D S

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been increasing rapidly worldwide, making it a huge health pressure on society in both the developed and developing countries. During the last thirty years, diabetes mellitus, a chronic metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia is proving itself to be fatal. Periodontitis was considered as one of the main, oral health problems encountered in patients with diabetes mellitus. There exists a direct relation between the risk of complications of diabetes and periodontitis over time. The present review gives an outline of the features that govern the interrelationship between zinc and diabetes mellitus with periodontal disease, including the physiologic mechanisms and clinical studies, and presents scientific evidences. The disturbance in the zinc micronutrient and increased oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes may bring about insulin resistance and the creation of diabetic complications. The progression of diabetes mellitus may bring about perturbation in micronutrient metabolism and status.