Science.gov

Sample records for aip conf proc

  1. AIP Career Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchak, Amanda

    2012-02-01

    American Institute of Physics (AIP) Career Pathways is a new project funded by the National Science Foundation. One of the goals of AIP Career Pathways is to prepare students to compete for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers with a bachelor's degree in physics. In order to do so, I reviewed and compiled useful resources on finding a STEM career with a bachelor's degree in physics. These resources not only supply the job seeker with job postings in STEM careers but also provide them with information on resumes, interviewing skills, and networking. Recently at the 2011 Industrial Physics Forum, I interviewed companies in the private sector to obtain a unique perspective on what types of skills potential employers expect an applicant to posses with a bachelor's degree in physics. Ultimately, these components will be used as supplements at student career workshops held at annual Society of Physics Students Zone Meetings.

  2. AIP salary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    “1987 Salaries Society Membership Survey,” the fifth in a series of salary reports produced by the Education and Employment Statistics Division of the American Institute of Physics has recently been released. The data are based on a random sample survey of one-sixth of the U.S. and Canadian membership of the AIP Membership Societies, which include AGU, American Physical Society, Optical Society of America, Acoustical Society of America, Society of Rheology, American Association of Physics Teachers, American Crystallographic Association, American Astronomical Society, American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the American Vacuum Society.

  3. AIP's Career Pathways Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Jose

    2014-03-01

    The American Institute of Physics (AIP) Career Pathways Project, funded by the National Science Foundation, aims to increase the number of undergraduates going into STEM careers. The main purposes of this project are to show students the professional opportunities for a STEM career, understand what departments can do to better prepare physics bachelor's degree recipients to enter the workforce, understand what students can do to better prepare themselves, and develop resources based on these findings. I was chosen by the Society of Physics Students (SPS) to be the 2013 summer intern of the AIP's Career Pathways Project. In this talk I will discuss several resources I worked on with the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics and SPS. These resources include how to write a resume and cover letter, how to perform an informational interview, common job titles for physics bachelors, how to find career information in physics and STEM, how to search and use job postings, and how to network.

  4. Graedel named to AIP Board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    Thomas E. Graedel, an atmospheric scientist at AT&T Bell Laboratories (Murray Hill, N.J.), has been made an AGU representative to the Governing Board of the American Institute of Physics (AIP). The board oversees the operations of AIP, a nonprofit umbrella organization for 10 member societies, including AGU. Other AGU members currently on the governing board include Orson Anderson, a geophysicist at the University of California, Los Angeles; AGU General Secretary Peter M. Bell of the Norton Company, Worcester, Mass.; AGU Executive Director A. F. Spilhaus, Jr.; and Martin Walt, a geophysicist with the Lockheed Corporation in Palo Alto, Calif.All AGU members receive the benefits of membership in AIP, including the monthly magazine Physics Today. Other AIP services available to AGU members include access to an employment service, AIP's electronic network Pi-NET, and an insurance program. AGU members can also subscribe to journals published by the American Physical Society, another AIP member society, at discounted rates.—WWM

  5. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, Felix L.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a computer systems philosophy, a set of validated hardware building blocks, and a set of validated services as embodied in system software. The goal of AIPS is to provide the knowledgebase which will allow achievement of validated fault-tolerant distributed computer system architectures, suitable for a broad range of applications, having failure probability requirements of 10E-9 at 10 hours. A background and description is given followed by program accomplishments, the current focus, applications, technology transfer, FY92 accomplishments, and funding.

  6. 78 FR 16540 - AIP Series Trust and Morgan Stanley AIP GP LP; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... COMMISSION AIP Series Trust and Morgan Stanley AIP GP LP; Notice of Application March 11, 2013. AGENCY...: AIP Series Trust (the ``Trust'') and Morgan Stanley AIP GP LP (the ``Adviser''). DATES: Filing Dates...., Washington, DC 20549-1090. Applicants, c/ o Stefanie V. Chang Yu, Morgan Stanley Investment Management...

  7. Proc. Agent 2004 Conf. on Social Dynamics : Interaction, Reflexivity and Emergence

    SciTech Connect

    C. M. Macal, D. Sallach, M. J. North, eds.

    2004-01-01

    I'd like to welcome you to the Agent 2004 conference. As most of you are aware, this conference is the fifth in a series of meetings that began in 1999. A conference followed the next year in 2000. The 2001 conference was skipped because of some conflicts with other conferences, and the conferences have proceeded annually since then. We have the proceedings of the previous conferences available here on CDs. One CD has the proceedings from 1999, 2000, and 2002; the other contains last year's proceedings. The purpose of these conferences is to advance the state of the computational social sciences and to integrate the social sciences with the decision sciences and something that is traditionally known as the management sciences. Those of you in the operations/research area are familiar with the traditional school of modeling simulation that emerged from that scientific area. This conference will bring together a different group of people to talk about the topic of agent-based theories and simulations. This fifth agent conference is one of a group of conferences held annually around the country. Most of you are probably aware of the CASOS Conference held at Carnegie Mellon University, usually in July. UCLA holds the Arrowhead Conference, generally around May. The University of Michigan is now holding a conference as well. Of course everyone is aware of SwarmFest, which has been held annually for about a decade. The Swarm seems to 'swarm' in different locations each year. As you're well aware, this conference is organized into a three-day program. This is the first time we've used three days for the full conference setting. Last year, we held simultaneous sessions, and that didn't work well for most of those who attended. We had complaints from people who missed sessions and papers because of scheduling, so we decided to extend this year's conference by one day. As a result, we now have a program designed to present the papers in a serial sequence rather than in a parallel manner. Today, we'll focus on toolkits. Tomorrow we'll look at computational social theory, and Saturday is application day. We'll talk about how we're taking some of the theories and toolkits to look at real-world problems in order to understand how our very complex world works and maybe even to predict how it might work in the future. In addition to the content of the papers themselves, one of the more important things about this conference is the discussion that is inspired by these papers. I invite you to ask penetrating questions, offer insightful comments, share your experiences with toolkits or your ideas on theories, and help to create an atmosphere that will help this field move along and grow. It's a fairly new science--it is just emerging--but it seems to have been gaining momentum in the last couple of years. This is a conference to get your energy going and perhaps foster your creativity. With that, I welcome you to Agent 2004; have a great time at the conference.

  8. ProC: Process Coordinator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck software Team

    2016-01-01

    ProC (short for Process Coordinator) is a versatile workflow engine that allows the user to build, run and manage workflows with just a few clicks. It automatically documents every processing step, making every modification to data reproducible. ProC provides a graphical user interface for constructing complex data processing workflows out of a given set of computer programs. The user can, for example, specify that only data products which are affected by a change in the input data are updated selectively, avoiding unnecessary computations. The ProC suite is flexible and satisfies basic needs of data processing centers that have to be able to restructure their data processing along with the development of a project.

  9. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Spring 2014 ConfChem Virtual Poster Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belford, Robert E.; Stoltzfus, Matthew; Houseknecht, Justin B.

    2015-01-01

    This communication describes the virtual poster session of the Flipped Classroom online ConfChem conference that was hosted by the ACS CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE) from May 9 to June 12, 2014. During the conference's online discussions, it became evident that multiple participants who were not presenting papers had been…

  10. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) plays an important role in Italy. Numerous scientific international space programs are currently carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry), provided by ASI either as contribution to ESA programs either within a NASA/ASI joint venture framework, are now operating: MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation three Italian dedicated operational centers have been realized, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD ( Processing Altimetry Data). Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution. Although they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). PROC is conceived in order to include the three operational centers, namely SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD, either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view. The Planetary Radar Processing Center shall be conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs. Therefore, scalability, easy use and management shall be the design drivers. The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. Furthermore, in the frame of

  11. Validation environment for AIPS/ALS: Implementation and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, Zary; Siewiorek, Daniel; Caplan, Eddie; Chung, Alan; Czeck, Edward; Vrsalovic, Dalibor

    1990-01-01

    The work is presented which was performed in porting the Fault Injection-based Automated Testing (FIAT) and Programming and Instrumentation Environments (PIE) validation tools, to the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) in the context of the Ada Language System (ALS) application, as well as an initial fault free validation of the available AIPS system. The PIE components implemented on AIPS provide the monitoring mechanisms required for validation. These mechanisms represent a substantial portion of the FIAT system. Moreover, these are required for the implementation of the FIAT environment on AIPS. Using these components, an initial fault free validation of the AIPS system was performed. The implementation is described of the FIAT/PIE system, configured for fault free validation of the AIPS fault tolerant computer system. The PIE components were modified to support the Ada language. A special purpose AIPS/Ada runtime monitoring and data collection was implemented. A number of initial Ada programs running on the PIE/AIPS system were implemented. The instrumentation of the Ada programs was accomplished automatically inside the PIE programming environment. PIE's on-line graphical views show vividly and accurately the performance characteristics of Ada programs, AIPS kernel and the application's interaction with the AIPS kernel. The data collection mechanisms were written in a high level language, Ada, and provide a high degree of flexibility for implementation under various system conditions.

  12. Resources for History of Geophysics at AIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    The history programs of the American Institute of Physics -- the Center for History of Physics and the Niels Bohr Library & Archives -- maintain a wide variety of research resources for the history of physics generally, and for the history of geophysics in particular. AIP has over 20,000 photographs online, nearly 1000 oral history interview transcripts, and much more. The International Catalog of Sources provides an online union catalog of manuscript collections held worldwide. An important collection of IUGG records is available onsite, as also is the recently accessioned collection of AGU papers. As the 2019 centenary of AGU approaches, these resources will be of interest to both AGU members and historians of science.;

  13. Differences in ODS formatting for HTML with Proc Print and Proc Report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While proc print is a terrific tool for data checking and data summary, proc report is similar to, but more powerful because it can do some basic calculations or statistics and data can be broken more effectively into manageable fields. The ODS procedure can produce HTML files from either procedure...

  14. An enhanced Planetary Radar Operating Centre (PROC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.

    2010-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using GPRs is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are successfully operating: MARSIS on-board MEX, SHARAD on-board MRO and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft: the missions have been further extended . Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the missions beginning to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how the new PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation aiding scientists to increase their knowledge in the field of surface

  15. AIP1-mediated stress signaling in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiqin; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2016-01-01

    AIP1 (encoded by the DAB2IP gene), a signaling scaffolding protein, is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (EC). While it was initially discovered as an ASK1-interacting protein, AIP1 broadly suppresses inflammatory responses triggered by cytokines and stresses such as TNF, LPS, VEGF and ER stress in EC (therefore AIP1 is an Anti-Inflammatory Protein). Human genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified DAB2IP gene variants conferring susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. Consistently, a global or vascular EC-specific deletion of DAB2IP in mice strongly enhances inflammatory responses and exacerbates atherosclerosis and graft arteriosclerosis progression in mouse models. Mechanisms for AIP1 function and regulation associated with human cardiovascular diseases need further investigations. PMID:25732743

  16. AIP1-mediated stress signaling in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiqin; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2015-05-01

    AIP1 (ASK1-interacting protein-1; encoded by the DAB2IP gene), a signaling scaffolding protein, is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (EC). While it was initially discovered as an apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-interacting protein, AIP1 broadly suppresses inflammatory responses triggered by cytokines and stresses such as TNF, LPS, VEGF, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in EC (therefore, AIP1 is an anti-inflammatory protein). Human genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified DAB2IP gene variants conferring susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. Consistently, a global or vascular EC-specific deletion of DAB2IP in mice strongly enhances inflammatory responses and exacerbates atherosclerosis and graft arteriosclerosis progression in mouse models. Mechanisms for AIP1 function and regulation associated with human cardiovascular diseases need further investigations.

  17. PROC: a new Planetary Radars Operating Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Alberti, G.; Flamini, E.; Olivieri, A.; Orosei, R.

    2009-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) is an important role of Italy and numerous scientific international space programs are carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Actually three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry) provided by ASI within a NASA/ESA/ASI joint venture framework are operating in the frame of an extended missions : MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. Three dedicated operational centers, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD are operating from the starting of the missions in order In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution and even if they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). In order to harmonize operations either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view PROC is designed and developed for offering improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. PROC is, therefore, conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs, such as Europa-Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and

  18. Some Comments on Marketing AIP Information Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donald W.; Brown, A. M.

    This study was addressed to marketing considerations for the American Institute of Physics (AIP) information products and services. The general system and its operation in a marketing environment, including promotion, channels of distribution and pricing are covered. Particular emphasis is placed on the cost/demand/price relationship for four…

  19. Characterization of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Mutations in Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenoma Families

    PubMed Central

    Igreja, Susana; Chahal, Harvinder S; King, Peter; Bolger, Graeme B; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Guasti, Leonardo; Chapple, J Paul; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Gueorguiev, Maria; Guegan, Katie; Stals, Karen; Khoo, Bernard; Kumar, Ajith V; Ellard, Sian; Grossman, Ashley B; Korbonits, Márta

    2010-01-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) is an autosomal dominant condition with variable genetic background and incomplete penetrance. Germline mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene have been reported in 15–40% of FIPA patients. Limited data are available on the functional consequences of the mutations or regarding the regulation of the AIP gene. We describe a large cohort of FIPA families and characterize missense and silent mutations using minigene constructs, luciferase and β-galactosidase assays, as well as in silico predictions. Patients with AIP mutations had a lower mean age at diagnosis (23.6±11.2 years) than AIP mutation-negative patients (40.4±14.5 years). A promoter mutation showed reduced in vitro activity corresponding to lower mRNA expression in patient samples. Stimulation of the protein kinase A-pathway positively regulates the AIP promoter. Silent mutations led to abnormal splicing resulting in truncated protein or reduced AIP expression. A two-hybrid assay of protein–protein interaction of all missense variants showed variable disruption of AIP-phosphodiesterase-4A5 binding. In summary, exonic, promoter, splice-site, and large deletion mutations in AIP are implicated in 31% of families in our FIPA cohort. Functional characterization of AIP changes is important to identify the functional impact of gene sequence variants. Hum Mutat 31:1–11, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20506337

  20. Mild pituitary phenotype in 3- and 12-month-old Aip-deficient male mice.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Zizzari, Philippe; Hage, Mirella; Decourtye, Lyvianne; Adam, Clovis; Viengchareun, Say; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Geoffroy, Valérie; Lombès, Marc; Tolle, Virginie; Guillou, Anne; Karhu, Auli; Kappeler, Laurent; Chanson, Philippe; Kamenický, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene predispose humans to pituitary adenomas, particularly of the somatotroph lineage. Mice with global heterozygous inactivation of Aip (Aip(+/-)) also develop pituitary adenomas but differ from AIP-mutated patients by the high penetrance of pituitary disease. The endocrine phenotype of these mice is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the endocrine phenotype of Aip(+/-) mice by assessing the somatic growth, ultradian pattern of GH secretion and IGF1 concentrations of longitudinally followed male mice at 3 and 12 months of age. As the early stages of pituitary tumorigenesis are controversial, we also studied the pituitary histology and somatotroph cell proliferation in these mice. Aip(+/-) mice did not develop gigantism but exhibited a leaner phenotype than wild-type mice. Analysis of GH pulsatility by deconvolution in 12-month-old Aip(+/-) mice showed a mild increase in total GH secretion, a conserved GH pulsatility pattern, but a normal IGF1 concentration. No pituitary adenomas were detected up to 12 months of age. An increased ex vivo response to GHRH of pituitary explants from 3-month-old Aip(+/-) mice, together with areas of enlarged acini identified on reticulin staining in the pituitary of some Aip(+/-) mice, was suggestive of somatotroph hyperplasia. Global heterozygous Aip deficiency in mice is accompanied by subtle increase in GH secretion, which does not result in gigantism. The absence of pituitary adenomas in 12-month-old Aip(+/-) mice in our experimental conditions demonstrates the important phenotypic variability of this congenic mouse model.

  1. Mild pituitary phenotype in 3- and 12-month-old Aip-deficient male mice.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Anne-Lise; Zizzari, Philippe; Hage, Mirella; Decourtye, Lyvianne; Adam, Clovis; Viengchareun, Say; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Geoffroy, Valérie; Lombès, Marc; Tolle, Virginie; Guillou, Anne; Karhu, Auli; Kappeler, Laurent; Chanson, Philippe; Kamenický, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene predispose humans to pituitary adenomas, particularly of the somatotroph lineage. Mice with global heterozygous inactivation of Aip (Aip(+/-)) also develop pituitary adenomas but differ from AIP-mutated patients by the high penetrance of pituitary disease. The endocrine phenotype of these mice is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the endocrine phenotype of Aip(+/-) mice by assessing the somatic growth, ultradian pattern of GH secretion and IGF1 concentrations of longitudinally followed male mice at 3 and 12 months of age. As the early stages of pituitary tumorigenesis are controversial, we also studied the pituitary histology and somatotroph cell proliferation in these mice. Aip(+/-) mice did not develop gigantism but exhibited a leaner phenotype than wild-type mice. Analysis of GH pulsatility by deconvolution in 12-month-old Aip(+/-) mice showed a mild increase in total GH secretion, a conserved GH pulsatility pattern, but a normal IGF1 concentration. No pituitary adenomas were detected up to 12 months of age. An increased ex vivo response to GHRH of pituitary explants from 3-month-old Aip(+/-) mice, together with areas of enlarged acini identified on reticulin staining in the pituitary of some Aip(+/-) mice, was suggestive of somatotroph hyperplasia. Global heterozygous Aip deficiency in mice is accompanied by subtle increase in GH secretion, which does not result in gigantism. The absence of pituitary adenomas in 12-month-old Aip(+/-) mice in our experimental conditions demonstrates the important phenotypic variability of this congenic mouse model. PMID:27621108

  2. A clinically novel AIP mutation in a patient with a very large, apparently sporadic somatotrope adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Adrian F; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Thiry, Albert; Beckers, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene lead to pituitary adenomas that most frequently present in the setting of familial isolated pituitary adenoma syndrome, usually as somatotropinomas and prolactinomas. More recently, they have been found in a significant percentage of young patients presenting with pituitary macroadenoma without any apparent family history. We describe the case of a 19-year-old man who presented with a gigantic somatotropinoma. His family history was negative. His peripheral DNA showed a heterozygous AIP mutation (p.I13N), while tumor tissue only had the mutated allele, showing loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and suggesting that the mutation caused the disease. Learning points AIP mutations may be observed in sporadic somatotrope adenomas occurring in young patients.LOH is a strong indicator that an AIP variant is disease causing.Somatotrope adenomas in carriers of AIP mutations are generally larger and more difficult to cure. PMID:25136448

  3. Introduction to the Spring 2014 ConfChem on the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luker, Chris; Muzyka, Jennifer; Belford, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Students' active engagement is one of the most critical challenges to any successful learning environment. The blending of active engagement along with rich, meaningful content is necessary for chemical educators to re-examine the purpose of the chemistry classroom. The Spring 2014 ConfChem conference, Flipped Classroom, was held from May 9 to…

  4. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Using a Blog to Flip a Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haile, January D.

    2015-01-01

    This communication summarizes one of the invited papers to the Flipped Classroom ACS Division of Chemical Education Committee on Computers in Chemical Education online ConfChem held from May 18 to June 24, 2014. Just in Time Teaching is a technique in which students read the material before class and respond to a few questions. In a first-year…

  5. A Note on Multigroup Comparisons Using SAS PROC CALIS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones-Farmer, L. Allison; Pitts, Jennifer P.; Rainer, R. Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Although SAS PROC CALIS is not designed to perform multigroup comparisons, it is believed that SAS can be "tricked" into doing so for groups of equal size. At present, there are no comprehensive examples of the steps involved in performing a multigroup comparison in SAS. The purpose of this article is to illustrate these steps. We demonstrate…

  6. Using SAS PROC MCMC for Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Allison J.; Samonte, Kelli

    2015-01-01

    Interest in using Bayesian methods for estimating item response theory models has grown at a remarkable rate in recent years. This attentiveness to Bayesian estimation has also inspired a growth in available software such as WinBUGS, R packages, BMIRT, MPLUS, and SAS PROC MCMC. This article intends to provide an accessible overview of Bayesian…

  7. AIP1 expression in tumor niche suppresses tumor progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Weidong; Li, Yonghao; He, Yun; Yin, Mingzhu; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Boggon, Titus J.; Zhang, Haifeng; Min, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Studies from tumor cells suggest that tumor suppressor AIP1 inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the role of AIP1 in the tumor microenvironment has not been examined. We show that a global or vascular endothelial cell (EC)-specific deletion of the AIP1 gene in mice augments tumor growth and metastasis in melanoma and breast cancer models. AIP1-deficient vascular environment not only enhances tumor neovascularization and increases pre-metastatic niche formation, but also secrets tumor EMT-promoting factors. These effects from AIP1 loss are associated with increased VEGFR2 signaling in the vascular EC and could be abrogated by systemic administration of VEGFR2 kinase inhibitors. Mechanistically, AIP1 blocks VEGFR2-dependent signaling by directly binding to the phosphotyrosine residues within the activation loop of VEGFR2. Our data reveal that AIP1, by inhibiting VEGFR2-dependent signaling in tumor niche, suppresses tumor EMT switch, tumor angiogenesis and tumor pre-metastatic niche formation to limit tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26139244

  8. AIP1 acts with cofilin to control actin dynamics during epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Dandan; Pan, Hanshuang; Wan, Ping; Wu, Jing; Luo, Jun; Zhu, Hong; Chen, Jiong

    2012-10-01

    During epithelial morphogenesis, cells not only maintain tight adhesion for epithelial integrity but also allow dynamic intercellular movement to take place within cell sheets. How these seemingly opposing processes are coordinated is not well understood. Here, we report that the actin disassembly factors AIP1 and cofilin are required for remodeling of adherens junctions (AJs) during ommatidial precluster formation in Drosophila eye epithelium, a highly stereotyped cell rearrangement process which we describe in detail in our live imaging study. AIP1 is enriched together with F-actin in the apical region of preclusters, whereas cofilin displays a diffuse and uniform localization pattern. Cofilin overexpression completely rescues AJ remodeling defects caused by AIP1 loss of function, and cofilin physically interacts with AIP1. Pharmacological reduction of actin turnover results in similar AJ remodeling defects and decreased turnover of E-cadherin, which also results from AIP1 deficiency, whereas an F-actin-destabilizing drug affects AJ maintenance and epithelial integrity. Together with other data on actin polymerization, our results suggest that AIP1 enhances cofilin-mediated actin disassembly in the apical region of precluster cells to promote remodeling of AJs and thus intercellular movement, but also that robust actin polymerization promotes AJ general adhesion and integrity during the remodeling process.

  9. Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP): relationship to Hamman-Rich syndrome, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Parambil, Joseph G

    2012-10-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a term used for an idiopathic form of acute lung injury characterized clinically by acute respiratory failure with bilateral lung infiltrates and histologically by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), a combination of findings previously known as the Hamman-Rich syndrome. This review aims to clarify the diagnostic criteria of AIP, its relationship with DAD and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), key etiologies that need to be excluded before making the diagnosis, and the salient clinical features. Cases that meet clinical and pathologic criteria for AIP overlap substantially with those that fulfill clinical criteria for ARDS. The main differences between AIP and ARDS are that AIP requires a histologic diagnosis of DAD and exclusion of known etiologies. AIP should also be distinguished from "acute exacerbation of IPF," a condition in which acute lung injury (usually DAD) supervenes on underlying usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

  10. Sustainable Management of Seagrass Meadows: the GEOSS AIP-6 Pilot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Mattia; Pastres, Roberto; Zucchetta, Matteo; Venier, Chiara; Roncella, Roberto; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Mangin, Antoine; Amine Taji, Mohamed; Gonzalo Malvarez, Gonzalo; Nativi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Seagrass meadows (marine angiosperm plants) occupy less than 0.2% of the global ocean surface, annually store about 10-18% of the so-called "Blue Carbon", i.e. the Carbon stored in coastal vegetated areas. Recent literature estimates that the flux to the long-term carbon sink in seagrasses represents 10-20% of seagrasses global average production. Such figures can be translated into economic benefits, taking into account that a ton of carbon dioxide in Europe is paid at around 15 € in the carbon market. This means that the organic carbon retained in seagrass sediments in the Mediterranean is worth 138 - 1128 billion €, which represents 6-23 € per square meter. This is 9-35 times more than one square meter of tropical forest soil (0.66 € per square meter), or 5-17 times when considering both the above and the belowground compartments in tropical forests. According the most conservative estimations, about 10% of the Mediterranean meadows have been lost during the last century. To estimate seagrass meadows distribution, a Species Distribution Model (SDM) can be used. SDM is a tool that is used to evaluate the potential distribution of a given species (e.g. Posidonia oceanica for seagrass) on the basis of the features (bio-chemical-physical parameters) of the studied environment. In the framework of the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) initiative, the FP7 project MEDINA developed a showcase as part of the GEOSS Architecture Interoperability Pilot - phase 6 (AIP-6). The showcase aims at providing a tool for the sustainable management of seagrass meadows along the Mediterranean coastline by integrating the SDM with available GEOSS resources. This way, the required input data can be searched, accessed and ingested into the model leveraging the brokering framework of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI). This framework is comprised of a set of middle-ware components (Brokers) that are in charge of implementing the needed interoperability

  11. TOR1AIP1 as a cause of cardiac failure and recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ghaoui, Roula; Benavides, Tatiana; Lek, Monkol; Waddell, Leigh B; Kaur, Simranpreet; North, Kathryn N; MacArthur, Daniel G; Clarke, Nigel F; Cooper, Sandra T

    2016-08-01

    TorsinA-interacting protein 1 (TOR1AIP1) gene is a novel gene that has recently been described to cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with mild dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a family with mutations in TOR1AIP1 where the striking clinical feature is severe cardiac failure requiring cardiac transplant in two siblings, in addition to musculoskeletal weakness and muscular dystrophy. We demonstrate an absence of TOR1AIP1 protein expression in cardiac and skeletal muscles of affected siblings. We expand the phenotype of this gene to demonstrate the cardiac involvement and the importance of cardiac surveillance in patients with mutations in TOR1AIP1.

  12. Mutation analysis of aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene in colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Georgitsi, M; Karhu, A; Winqvist, R; Visakorpi, T; Waltering, K; Vahteristo, P; Launonen, V; Aaltonen, L A

    2007-01-29

    Germline mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene were recently identified in individuals with pituitary adenoma predisposition (PAP). These patients have prolactin (PRL) or growth hormone (GH) oversecreting pituitary adenomas, the latter exhibiting acromegaly or gigantism. Loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) analysis revealed that AIP is lost in PAP tumours, suggesting that it acts as a tumour-suppressor gene. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein is involved in several pathways, but it is best characterised as a cytoplasmic partner of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). To examine the possible role of AIP in the genesis of common cancers, we performed somatic mutation screening in a series of 373 colorectal cancers (CRCs), 82 breast cancers, and 44 prostate tumour samples. A missense R16H (47G>A) change was identified in two CRC samples, as well as in the respective normal tissues, but was absent in 209 healthy controls. The remaining findings were silent, previously unreported, changes of the coding, non-coding, or untranslated regions of AIP. These results suggest that somatic AIP mutations are not common in CRC, breast, and prostate cancers. PMID:17242703

  13. Intracellular Trafficking of AIP56, an NF-κB-Cleaving Toxin from Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Liliana M. G.; Pinto, Rute D.; Silva, Daniela S.; Moreira, Ana R.; Beitzinger, Christoph; Oliveira, Pedro; Sampaio, Paula; Benz, Roland; Azevedo, Jorge E.; dos Santos, Nuno M. S.

    2014-01-01

    AIP56 (apoptosis-inducing protein of 56 kDa) is a metalloprotease AB toxin secreted by Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida that acts by cleaving NF-κB. During infection, AIP56 spreads systemically and depletes phagocytes by postapoptotic secondary necrosis, impairing the host phagocytic defense and contributing to the genesis of infection-associated necrotic lesions. Here we show that mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (mBMDM) intoxicated by AIP56 undergo NF-κB p65 depletion and apoptosis. Similarly to what was reported for sea bass phagocytes, intoxication of mBMDM involves interaction of AIP56 C-terminal region with cell surface components, suggesting the existence of a conserved receptor. Biochemical approaches and confocal microscopy revealed that AIP56 undergoes clathrin-dependent endocytosis, reaches early endosomes, and follows the recycling pathway. Translocation of AIP56 into the cytosol requires endosome acidification, and an acidic pulse triggers translocation of cell surface-bound AIP56 into the cytosol. Accordingly, at acidic pH, AIP56 becomes more hydrophobic, interacting with artificial lipid bilayer membranes. Altogether, these data indicate that AIP56 is a short-trip toxin that reaches the cytosol using an acidic-pH-dependent mechanism, probably from early endosomes. Usually, for short-trip AB toxins, a minor pool reaches the cytosol by translocating from endosomes, whereas the rest is routed to lysosomes for degradation. Here we demonstrate that part of endocytosed AIP56 is recycled back and released extracellularly through a mechanism requiring phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity but independent of endosome acidification. So far, we have been unable to detect biological activity of recycled AIP56, thereby bringing into question its biological relevance as well as the importance of the recycling pathway. PMID:25287919

  14. 75 FR 3954 - Deadline for Notification of Intent To Use the Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Primary, Cargo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Improvement Plan (ACIP) process during the preceding year. If a sponsor does not declare their intention... AIP authorization and an extension of the FAA's spending authority from the Airport and Airway Trust... grant- making process. In the past when there has been full-year funding for AIP, the FAA...

  15. 76 FR 6178 - Deadline for Notification of Intent to Use the Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Primary, Cargo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Improvement Plan (ACIP) process during the preceding year. If a sponsor does not declare their intention... AIP authorization and an extension of the FAA's spending authority from the Airport and Airway Trust... grant- making process. In the past when there has been full-year funding for AIP, the FAA...

  16. Data processing and analysis with the autoPROC toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Vonrhein, Clemens Flensburg, Claus; Keller, Peter; Sharff, Andrew; Smart, Oliver; Paciorek, Wlodek; Womack, Thomas; Bricogne, Gérard

    2011-04-01

    Typical topics and problems encountered during data processing of diffraction experiments are discussed and the tools provided in the autoPROC software are described. A typical diffraction experiment will generate many images and data sets from different crystals in a very short time. This creates a challenge for the high-throughput operation of modern synchrotron beamlines as well as for the subsequent data processing. Novice users in particular may feel overwhelmed by the tables, plots and numbers that the different data-processing programs and software packages present to them. Here, some of the more common problems that a user has to deal with when processing a set of images that will finally make up a processed data set are shown, concentrating on difficulties that may often show up during the first steps along the path of turning the experiment (i.e. data collection) into a model (i.e. interpreted electron density). Difficulties such as unexpected crystal forms, issues in crystal handling and suboptimal choices of data-collection strategies can often be dealt with, or at least diagnosed, by analysing specific data characteristics during processing. In the end, one wants to distinguish problems over which one has no immediate control once the experiment is finished from problems that can be remedied a posteriori. A new software package, autoPROC, is also presented that combines third-party processing programs with new tools and an automated workflow script that is intended to provide users with both guidance and insight into the offline processing of data affected by the difficulties mentioned above, with particular emphasis on the automated treatment of multi-sweep data sets collected on multi-axis goniostats.

  17. Interactions between Nef and AIP1 proliferate multivesicular bodies and facilitate egress of HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luciana J; Chen, Nan; Lopes, Adriana; Aguiar, Renato S; Tanuri, Amilcar; Plemenitas, Ana; Peterlin, B Matija

    2006-01-01

    Background Nef is an accessory protein of primate lentiviruses, HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV. Besides removing CD4 and MHC class I from the surface and activating cellular signaling cascades, Nef also binds GagPol during late stages of the viral replicative cycle. In this report, we investigated further the ability of Nef to facilitate the replication of HIV-1. Results To this end, first the release of new viral particles was much lower in the absence of Nef in a T cell line. Since the same results were obtained in the absence of the viral envelope using pseudo-typed viruses, this phenomenon was independent of CD4 and enhanced infectivity. Next, we found that Nef not only possesses a consensus motif for but also binds AIP1 in vitro and in vivo. AIP1 is the critical intermediate in the formation of multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which play an important role in the budding and release of viruses from infected cells. Indeed, Nef proliferated MVBs in cells, but only when its AIP1-binding site was intact. Finally, these functions of Nef were reproduced in primary macrophages, where the wild type but not mutant Nef proteins led to increased release of new viral particles from infected cells. Conclusion We conclude that by binding GagPol and AIP1, Nef not only proliferates MVBs but also contributes to the egress of viral particles from infected cells. PMID:16764724

  18. 77 FR 30350 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Use of Mineral Revenue at Certain Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... modifications to this assurance at 77 FR 22376. Specifically, paragraph (a)(3) of Sponsor Assurance 25 permits... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Use of Mineral Revenue at Certain... (FAA) to declare certain revenue derived from or generated by mineral extraction, production, lease,...

  19. Arabidopsis AIP1-2 restricted by WER-mediated patterning modulates planar polarity.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Christian S; Claes, Andrea R; Nzayisenga, Jean-Claude; Pietra, Stefano; Stanislas, Thomas; Hüser, Anke; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Grebe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) is crucial for the development of diverse multicellular organisms. Small Rac/Rho-family GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton contribute to planar polarity formation at sites of polarity establishment in animals and plants. Yet, upstream pathways coordinating planar polarity differ strikingly between kingdoms. In the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, a concentration gradient of the phytohormone auxin coordinates polar recruitment of Rho-of-plant (ROP) to sites of polar epidermal hair initiation. However, little is known about cytoskeletal components and interactions that contribute to this planar polarity or about their relation to the patterning machinery. Here, we show that ACTIN7 (ACT7) represents a main actin isoform required for planar polarity of root hair positioning, interacting with the negative modulator ACTIN-INTERACTING PROTEIN1-2 (AIP1-2). ACT7, AIP1-2 and their genetic interaction are required for coordinated planar polarity of ROP downstream of ethylene signalling. Strikingly, AIP1-2 displays hair cell file-enriched expression, restricted by WEREWOLF (WER)-dependent patterning and modified by ethylene and auxin action. Hence, our findings reveal AIP1-2, expressed under control of the WER-dependent patterning machinery and the ethylene signalling pathway, as a modulator of actin-mediated planar polarity.

  20. Arabidopsis AIP1-2 restricted by WER-mediated patterning modulates planar polarity

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Christian S.; Claes, Andrea R.; Nzayisenga, Jean-Claude; Pietra, Stefano; Stanislas, Thomas; Hüser, Anke; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Grebe, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of cell polarity within the plane of the tissue layer (planar polarity) is crucial for the development of diverse multicellular organisms. Small Rac/Rho-family GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton contribute to planar polarity formation at sites of polarity establishment in animals and plants. Yet, upstream pathways coordinating planar polarity differ strikingly between kingdoms. In the root of Arabidopsis thaliana, a concentration gradient of the phytohormone auxin coordinates polar recruitment of Rho-of-plant (ROP) to sites of polar epidermal hair initiation. However, little is known about cytoskeletal components and interactions that contribute to this planar polarity or about their relation to the patterning machinery. Here, we show that ACTIN7 (ACT7) represents a main actin isoform required for planar polarity of root hair positioning, interacting with the negative modulator ACTIN-INTERACTING PROTEIN1-2 (AIP1-2). ACT7, AIP1-2 and their genetic interaction are required for coordinated planar polarity of ROP downstream of ethylene signalling. Strikingly, AIP1-2 displays hair cell file-enriched expression, restricted by WEREWOLF (WER)-dependent patterning and modified by ethylene and auxin action. Hence, our findings reveal AIP1-2, expressed under control of the WER-dependent patterning machinery and the ethylene signalling pathway, as a modulator of actin-mediated planar polarity. PMID:25428588

  1. Familial acromegaly due to aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene mutation in a Turkish cohort.

    PubMed

    Niyazoglu, Mutlu; Sayitoglu, Muge; Firtina, Sinem; Hatipoglu, Esra; Gazioglu, Nurperi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2014-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) is associated with 15-20% of familial isolated pituitary adenomas and 50-80% of cases with AIP mutation exhibit a somatotropinoma. Herein we report clinical characteristics of a large family where AIP R304X variants have been identified. AIP mutation analysis was performed on a large (n = 52) Turkish family across six generations. Sella MRIs of 30 family members were obtained. Basal pituitary hormone levels were evaluated in 13 family members harboring an AIP mutation. Thirteen of 52 family members (25%) were found to have a heterozygous nonsense germline R304X mutation in the AIP gene. Seven of the 13 mutation carriers (53.8%) had current or previous history of pituitary adenoma. Of these 7 mutation carriers, all but one had somatotropinoma/somatolactotropinoma (85.7% of the pituitary adenomas). Of the 6 acromegaly patients with AIP mutation (F/M: 3/3) the mean age at diagnosis of acromegaly was 32 ± 10.3 years while the mean age of symptom onset was 24.8 ± 9.9 years. Three of the six (50%) acromegaly cases with AIP mutation within the family presented with a macroadenoma and none presented with gigantism. Biochemical disease control was achieved in 66.6% (4/6) of the mutation carriers with acromegaly after a mean follow-up period of 18.6 ± 17.6 years. Common phenotypic characteristics of familial pituitary adenoma or somatotropinoma due to AIP mutation vary between families or even between individuals within a family. PMID:23743763

  2. AIP1 recruits phosphatase PP2A to ASK1 in tumor necrosis factor-induced ASK1-JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Min, Wang; Lin, Yan; Tang, Shibo; Yu, Luyang; Zhang, Haifeng; Wan, Ting; Luhn, Tricia; Fu, Haian; Chen, Hong

    2008-04-11

    Previously we have shown that AIP1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase [ASK]1-interacting protein 1), a novel member of the Ras-GAP protein family, facilitates dephosphorylation of ASK1 at pSer967 and subsequently 14-3-3 release from ASK1, leading to enhanced ASK1-JNK signaling. However, the phosphatase(s) responsible for ASK1 dephosphorylation at pSer967 has not been identified. In the present study, we identified protein phosphatase (PP)2A as a potential phosphatase in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced dephosphorylation of ASK1 pSer967 in ECs was blocked by PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid. Overexpression of PP2A catalytic subunit induced dephosphorylation of ASK1 pSer967 and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In contrast, a catalytic inactive form of PP2A or PP2A small interfering RNA blunted TNF-induced dephosphorylation of ASK1 pSer967 and activation of JNK without effects on NF-kappaB activation. Whereas AIP1, via its C2 domain, binds to ASK1, PP2A binds to the GAP domain of AIP1. Endogenous AIP1-PP2A complex can be detected in the resting state, and TNF induces a complex formation of AIP1-PP2A with ASK1. Furthermore, TNF-induced association of PP2A with ASK1 was diminished in AIP1-knockdown ECs, suggesting a critical role of AIP1 in recruiting PP2A to ASK1. TNF-signaling molecules TRAF2 and RIP1, known to be in complex with AIP1 and activate AIP1 by phosphorylating AIP1 at Ser604, are critical for TNF-induced ASK1 dephosphorylation. Finally, PP2A and AIP1 cooperatively induce activation of ASK1-JNK signaling and EC apoptosis, as demonstrated by both overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown approaches. Taken together, our data support a critical role of PP2A-AIP1 complex in TNF-induced activation of ASK1-JNK apoptotic signaling. PMID:18292600

  3. AIP mutations in young patients with acromegaly and the Tampico Giant: the Mexican experience.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Portocarrero-Ortiz, Lesly; Vargas, Guadalupe; Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Ana Laura; Sosa, Ernesto; González, Baldomero; Zúñiga, Sergio; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Stals, Karen; Bussell, Anne-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Dang, Mary; Iacovazzo, Donato; Kapur, Sonal; Gabrovska, Plamena; Radian, Serban; Roncaroli, Federico; Korbonits, Márta; Mercado, Moisés

    2016-08-01

    Although aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly, their prevalence among young patients is nonnegligible. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of AIP mutations in a cohort of Mexican patients with acromegaly with disease onset before the age of 30 and to search for molecular abnormalities in the AIP gene in teeth obtained from the "Tampico Giant". Peripheral blood DNA from 71 patients with acromegaly (51 females) with disease onset <30 years was analysed (median age of disease onset of 23 years) and correlated with clinical, biochemical and imaging characteristics. Sequencing was also carried out in DNA extracted from teeth of the Tampico Giant. Five patients (7 %) harboured heterozygous, germline mutations of the AIP gene. In two of them (a 9-year-old girl with gigantism and a young man with symptoms of GH excess since age 14) the c.910C>T (p.Arg304Ter), well-known truncating mutation was identified; in one of these two cases and her identical twin sister, the mutation proved to be a de novo event, since neither of their parents were found to be carriers. In the remaining three patients, new mutations were identified: a frameshift mutation (c.976_977insC, p.Gly326AfsTer), an in-frame deletion (c.872_877del, p.Val291_Leu292del) and a nonsense mutation (c.868A > T, p.Lys290Ter), which are predicted to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis. Patients with AIP mutations tended to have an earlier onset of acromegaly and harboured larger and more invasive tumours. A previously described genetic variant of unknown significance (c.869C > T, p.Ala299Val) was identified in DNA from the Tampico Giant. The prevalence of AIP mutations in young Mexican patients with acromegaly is similar to that of European cohorts. Our results support the need for genetic evaluation of patients with early onset acromegaly.

  4. AIP mutations in young patients with acromegaly and the Tampico Giant: the Mexican experience.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Rentería, Claudia; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Portocarrero-Ortiz, Lesly; Vargas, Guadalupe; Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Espinosa-de-Los-Monteros, Ana Laura; Sosa, Ernesto; González, Baldomero; Zúñiga, Sergio; Unterländer, Martina; Burger, Joachim; Stals, Karen; Bussell, Anne-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Dang, Mary; Iacovazzo, Donato; Kapur, Sonal; Gabrovska, Plamena; Radian, Serban; Roncaroli, Federico; Korbonits, Márta; Mercado, Moisés

    2016-08-01

    Although aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly, their prevalence among young patients is nonnegligible. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency of AIP mutations in a cohort of Mexican patients with acromegaly with disease onset before the age of 30 and to search for molecular abnormalities in the AIP gene in teeth obtained from the "Tampico Giant". Peripheral blood DNA from 71 patients with acromegaly (51 females) with disease onset <30 years was analysed (median age of disease onset of 23 years) and correlated with clinical, biochemical and imaging characteristics. Sequencing was also carried out in DNA extracted from teeth of the Tampico Giant. Five patients (7 %) harboured heterozygous, germline mutations of the AIP gene. In two of them (a 9-year-old girl with gigantism and a young man with symptoms of GH excess since age 14) the c.910C>T (p.Arg304Ter), well-known truncating mutation was identified; in one of these two cases and her identical twin sister, the mutation proved to be a de novo event, since neither of their parents were found to be carriers. In the remaining three patients, new mutations were identified: a frameshift mutation (c.976_977insC, p.Gly326AfsTer), an in-frame deletion (c.872_877del, p.Val291_Leu292del) and a nonsense mutation (c.868A > T, p.Lys290Ter), which are predicted to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis. Patients with AIP mutations tended to have an earlier onset of acromegaly and harboured larger and more invasive tumours. A previously described genetic variant of unknown significance (c.869C > T, p.Ala299Val) was identified in DNA from the Tampico Giant. The prevalence of AIP mutations in young Mexican patients with acromegaly is similar to that of European cohorts. Our results support the need for genetic evaluation of patients with early onset acromegaly. PMID:27033541

  5. AIP mutation identified in a patient with acromegaly caused by pituitary somatotroph adenoma with neuronal choristoma.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, H; Fukuoka, H; Iguchi, G; Inoshita, N; Yamada, S; Takahashi, Y

    2013-05-01

    Pituitary adenoma with neuronal choristoma (PANCH) is a rare condition that includes ganglion cells and GH-producing tumor that is characterized by sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type. However, the pathophysiology of this condition remains to be elucidated. We report a case of 46-year-old woman with acromegaly caused by PANCH. The patient had a large and invasive macroadenoma that was resistant to preoperative therapy with somatostatin analogue (SSA) and dopamine agonist. Histological examination showed typical diffuse, chromophobe-type adenoma containing ganglion cells, and sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type, which were consistent with PANCH. Genetic analysis showed heterozygous germline missense mutation in the AIP gene that results in Y261X amino acid substitution. The clinical characteristics of acromegaly associated with AIP mutations are reportedly macroadenomas with tumor extension and invasion, lower decreases in GH and IGF-I and less tumor shrinkage with SSA treatment, and sparsely granulated somatotroph cell type, which are comparable with those observed in PANCH. Taken together, the mutation in AIP gene may explain the clinical characteristics and pathogenesis of PANCH.

  6. 75 FR 69741 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-99 (RP-127367-07), 9100 Relief Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-99 (RP- 127367-07), 9100... comments concerning Rev. Proc. 2007-99 (RP-127367-07), 9100 Relief Under Sections 897 and 1445. DATES... Internet at Joel.P.Goldberger@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Rev. Proc. 2007-99...

  7. Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Mutant Proteins Is the Primary Mechanism Leading to Tumorigenesis in Patients With Missense AIP Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Martucci, Federico; Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Tilley, Daniel; Ramos-Guajardo, Nancy; Iacovazzo, Donato; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Context: The pathogenic effect of mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene (AIPmuts) in pituitary adenomas is incompletely understood. We have identified the primary mechanism of loss of function for missense AIPmuts. Objective: This study sought to analyze the mechanism/speed of protein turnover of wild-type and missense AIP variants, correlating protein half-life with clinical parameters. Design and Setting: Half-life and protein–protein interaction experiments and cross-sectional analysis of AIPmut positive patients' data were performed in a clinical academic research institution. Patients: Data were obtained from our cohort of pituitary adenoma patients and literature-reported cases. Interventions: Protein turnover of endogenous AIP in two cell lines and fifteen AIP variants overexpressed in HEK293 cells was analyzed via cycloheximide chase and proteasome inhibition. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down and quantitative mass spectrometry identified proteins involved in AIP degradation; results were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and gene knockdown. Relevant clinical data was collected. Main Outcome Measures: Half-life of wild-type and mutant AIP proteins and its correlation with clinical parameters. Results: Endogenous AIP half-life was similar in HEK293 and lymphoblastoid cells (43.5 and 32.7 h). AIP variants were divided into stable proteins (median, 77.7 h; interquartile range [IQR], 60.7–92.9 h), and those with short (median, 27 h; IQR, 21.6–28.7 h) or very short (median, 7.7 h; IQR, 5.6–10.5 h) half-life; proteasomal inhibition rescued the rapid degradation of mutant proteins. The experimental half-life significantly correlated with age at diagnosis of acromegaly/gigantism (r = 0.411; P = .002). The FBXO3-containing SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex was identified as the E3 ubiquitin-ligase recognizing AIP. Conclusions: AIP is a stable protein, driven to ubiquitination by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex

  8. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Rhodri M L; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Zhou, Lihong; Roe, S Mark; Korbonits, Márta; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h) mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation), R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE) of TOMM20.

  9. Structure of the TPR domain of AIP: lack of client protein interaction with the C-terminal α-7 helix of the TPR domain of AIP is sufficient for pituitary adenoma predisposition.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Rhodri M L; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Zhou, Lihong; Roe, S Mark; Korbonits, Márta; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h) mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation), R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE) of TOMM20. PMID:23300914

  10. Structure of the TPR Domain of AIP: Lack of Client Protein Interaction with the C-Terminal α-7 Helix of the TPR Domain of AIP Is Sufficient for Pituitary Adenoma Predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Zhou, Lihong; Roe, S. Mark; Korbonits, Márta; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) have been associated with familial isolated pituitary adenomas predisposing to young-onset acromegaly and gigantism. The precise tumorigenic mechanism is not well understood as AIP interacts with a large number of independent proteins as well as three chaperone systems, HSP90, HSP70 and TOMM20. We have determined the structure of the TPR domain of AIP at high resolution, which has allowed a detailed analysis of how disease-associated mutations impact on the structural integrity of the TPR domain. A subset of C-terminal α-7 helix (Cα-7h) mutations, R304* (nonsense mutation), R304Q, Q307* and R325Q, a known site for AhR and PDE4A5 client-protein interaction, occur beyond those that interact with the conserved MEEVD and EDDVE sequences of HSP90 and TOMM20. These C-terminal AIP mutations appear to only disrupt client-protein binding to the Cα-7h, while chaperone binding remains unaffected, suggesting that failure of client-protein interaction with the Cα-7h is sufficient to predispose to pituitary adenoma. We have also identified a molecular switch in the AIP TPR-domain that allows recognition of both the conserved HSP90 motif, MEEVD, and the equivalent sequence (EDDVE) of TOMM20. PMID:23300914

  11. Landscape of Familial Isolated and Young-Onset Pituitary Adenomas: Prospective Diagnosis in AIP Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Gabrovska, Plamena; Dénes, Judit; Stals, Karen; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Tilley, Daniel; Ferraù, Francesco; Evanson, Jane; Ellard, Sian; Grossman, Ashley B.; Roncaroli, Federico; Gadelha, Mônica R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) due to aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene mutations is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance. Clinical screening of apparently unaffected AIP mutation (AIPmut) carriers could identify previously unrecognized disease. Objective: To determine the AIP mutational status of FIPA and young pituitary adenoma patients, analyzing their clinical characteristics, and to perform clinical screening of apparently unaffected AIPmut carrier family members. Design: This was an observational, longitudinal study conducted over 7 years. Setting: International collaborative study conducted at referral centers for pituitary diseases. Participants: FIPA families (n = 216) and sporadic young-onset (≤30 y) pituitary adenoma patients (n = 404) participated in the study. Interventions: We performed genetic screening of patients for AIPmuts, clinical assessment of their family members, and genetic screening for somatic GNAS1 mutations and the germline FGFR4 p.G388R variant. Main Outcome Measure(s): We assessed clinical disease in mutation carriers, comparison of characteristics of AIPmut positive and negative patients, results of GNAS1, and FGFR4 analysis. Results: Thirty-seven FIPA families and 34 sporadic patients had AIPmuts. Patients with truncating AIPmuts had a younger age at disease onset and diagnosis, compared with patients with nontruncating AIPmuts. Somatic GNAS1 mutations were absent in tumors from AIPmut-positive patients, and the studied FGFR4 variant did not modify the disease behavior or penetrance in AIPmut-positive individuals. A total of 164 AIPmut-positive unaffected family members were identified; pituitary disease was detected in 18 of those who underwent clinical screening. Conclusions: A quarter of the AIPmut carriers screened were diagnosed with pituitary disease, justifying this screening and suggesting a variable clinical course for AIPmut-positive pituitary adenomas. PMID

  12. Spatial Representations in Local Field Potential Activity of Primate Anterior Intraparietal Cortex (AIP)

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Sebastian J.; Scherberger, Hansjörg

    2015-01-01

    The execution of reach-to-grasp movements in order to interact with our environment is an important subset of the human movement repertoire. To coordinate such goal-directed movements, information about the relative spatial position of target and effector (in this case the hand) has to be continuously integrated and processed. Recently, we reported the existence of spatial representations in spiking-activity of the cortical fronto-parietal grasp network (Lehmann & Scherberger 2013), and in particular in the anterior intraparietal cortex (AIP). To further investigate the nature of these spatial representations, we explored in two rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) how different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP) in AIP are modulated by grip type, target position, and gaze position, during the planning and execution of reach-to-grasp movements. We systematically varied grasp type, spatial target, and gaze position and found that both spatial and grasp information were encoded in a variety of frequency bands (1–13Hz, 13–30Hz, 30–60Hz, and 60–100Hz, respectively). Whereas the representation of grasp type strongly increased towards and during movement execution, spatial information was represented throughout the task. Both spatial and grasp type representations could be readily decoded from all frequency bands. The fact that grasp type and spatial (reach) information was found not only in spiking activity, but also in various LFP frequency bands of AIP, might significantly contribute to the development of LFP-based neural interfaces for the control of upper limb prostheses. PMID:26554592

  13. AIP mutation in pituitary adenomas in the 18th century and today.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Harvinder S; Stals, Karen; Unterländer, Martina; Balding, David J; Thomas, Mark G; Kumar, Ajith V; Besser, G Michael; Atkinson, A Brew; Morrison, Patrick J; Howlett, Trevor A; Levy, Miles J; Orme, Steve M; Akker, Scott A; Abel, Richard L; Grossman, Ashley B; Burger, Joachim; Ellard, Sian; Korbonits, Márta

    2011-01-01

    Gigantism results when a growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma is present before epiphyseal fusion. In 1909, when Harvey Cushing examined the skeleton of an Irish patient who lived from 1761 to 1783, he noted an enlarged pituitary fossa. We extracted DNA from the patient's teeth and identified a germline mutation in the aryl hydrocarbon-interacting protein gene (AIP). Four contemporary Northern Irish families who presented with gigantism, acromegaly, or prolactinoma have the same mutation and haplotype associated with the mutated gene. Using coalescent theory, we infer that these persons share a common ancestor who lived about 57 to 66 generations earlier. PMID:21208107

  14. GEOSS AIP-2 Climate Change and Biodiversity Use Scenarios: Interoperability Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, Stefano; Santoro, Mattia

    2010-05-01

    In the last years, scientific community is producing great efforts in order to study the effects of climate change on life on Earth. In this general framework, a key role is played by the impact of climate change on biodiversity. To assess this, several use scenarios require the modeling of climatological change impact on the regional distribution of biodiversity species. Designing and developing interoperability infrastructures which enable scientists to search, discover, access and use multi-disciplinary resources (i.e. datasets, services, models, etc.) is currently one of the main research fields for the Earth and Space Science Informatics. This presentation introduces and discusses an interoperability infrastructure which implements the discovery, access, and chaining of loosely-coupled resources in the climatology and biodiversity domains. This allows to set up and run forecast and processing models. The presented framework was successfully developed and experimented in the context of GEOSS AIP-2 (Global Earth Observation System of Systems, Architecture Implementation Pilot- Phase 2) Climate Change & Biodiversity thematic Working Group. This interoperability infrastructure is comprised of the following main components and services: a)GEO Portal: through this component end user is able to search, find and access the needed services for the scenario execution; b)Graphical User Interface (GUI): this component provides user interaction functionalities. It controls the workflow manager to perform the required operations for the scenario implementation; c)Use Scenario controller: this component acts as a workflow controller implementing the scenario business process -i.e. a typical climate change & biodiversity projection scenario; d)Service Broker implementing Mediation Services: this component realizes a distributed catalogue which federates several discovery and access components (exposing them through a unique CSW standard interface). Federated components

  15. GEOSS AIP-2 Climate Change and Biodiversity Use Scenarios: Interoperability Infrastructures (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nativi, S.; Santoro, M.

    2009-12-01

    Currently, one of the major challenges for scientific community is the study of climate change effects on life on Earth. To achieve this, it is crucial to understand how climate change will impact on biodiversity and, in this context, several application scenarios require modeling the impact of climate change on distribution of individual species. In the context of GEOSS AIP-2 (Global Earth Observation System of Systems, Architecture Implementation Pilot- Phase 2), the Climate Change & Biodiversity thematic Working Group developed three significant user scenarios. A couple of them make use of a GEOSS-based framework to study the impact of climate change factors on regional species distribution. The presentation introduces and discusses this framework which provides an interoperability infrastructures to loosely couple standard services and components to discover and access climate and biodiversity data, and run forecast and processing models. The framework is comprised of the following main components and services: a)GEO Portal: through this component end user is able to search, find and access the needed services for the scenario execution; b)Graphical User Interface (GUI): this component provides user interaction functionalities. It controls the workflow manager to perform the required operations for the scenario implementation; c)Use Scenario controller: this component acts as a workflow controller implementing the scenario business process -i.e. a typical climate change & biodiversity projection scenario; d)Service Broker implementing Mediation Services: this component realizes a distributed catalogue which federates several discovery and access components (exposing them through a unique CSW standard interface). Federated components publish climate, environmental and biodiversity datasets; e)Ecological Niche Model Server: this component is able to run one or more Ecological Niche Models (ENM) on selected biodiversity and climate datasets; f)Data Access

  16. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)-based fault tolerant avionics architecture for launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    1990-01-01

    An avionics architecture for the advanced launch system (ALS) that uses validated hardware and software building blocks developed under the advanced information processing system program is presented. The AIPS for ALS architecture defined is preliminary, and reliability requirements can be met by the AIPS hardware and software building blocks that are built using the state-of-the-art technology available in the 1992-93 time frame. The level of detail in the architecture definition reflects the level of detail available in the ALS requirements. As the avionics requirements are refined, the architecture can also be refined and defined in greater detail with the help of analysis and simulation tools. A useful methodology is demonstrated for investigating the impact of the avionics suite to the recurring cost of the ALS. It is shown that allowing the vehicle to launch with selected detected failures can potentially reduce the recurring launch costs. A comparative analysis shows that validated fault-tolerant avionics built out of Class B parts can result in lower life-cycle-cost in comparison to simplex avionics built out of Class S parts or other redundant architectures.

  17. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)-based fault tolerant avionics architecture for launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    An avionics architecture for the advanced launch system (ALS) that uses validated hardware and software building blocks developed under the advanced information processing system program is presented. The AIPS for ALS architecture defined is preliminary, and reliability requirements can be met by the AIPS hardware and software building blocks that are built using the state-of-the-art technology available in the 1992-93 time frame. The level of detail in the architecture definition reflects the level of detail available in the ALS requirements. As the avionics requirements are refined, the architecture can also be refined and defined in greater detail with the help of analysis and simulation tools. A useful methodology is demonstrated for investigating the impact of the avionics suite to the recurring cost of the ALS. It is shown that allowing the vehicle to launch with selected detected failures can potentially reduce the recurring launch costs. A comparative analysis shows that validated fault-tolerant avionics built out of Class B parts can result in lower life-cycle-cost in comparison to simplex avionics built out of Class S parts or other redundant architectures.

  18. EuroGEOSS/GENESIS ``e-Habitat'' AIP-3 Use Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzetti, P.; Dubois, G.; Santoro, M.; Peedell, S.; de Longueville, B.; Nativi, S.; Craglia, M.

    2010-12-01

    Natural ecosystems are in rapid decline. Major habitats are disappearing at a speed never observed before. The current rate of species extinction is several orders of magnitude higher than the background rate from the fossil record. Protected Areas (PAs) and Protected Area Systems are designed to conserve natural and cultural resources, to maintain biodiversity (ecosystems, species, genes) and ecosystem services. The scientific challenge of understanding how environmental and climatological factors impact on ecosystems and habitats requires the use of information from different scientific domains. Thus, multidisciplinary interoperability is a crucial requirement for a framework aiming to support scientists. The Group on Earth Observations (or GEO) is coordinating international efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). This emerging public infrastructure is interconnecting a diverse and growing array of instruments and systems for monitoring and forecasting changes in the global environment. This “system of systems” supports multidisciplinary and cross-disciplinary scientific researches. The presented GEOSS-based interoperability framework facilitates the discovery and exploitation of datasets and models from heterogeneous scientific domains and Information Technology services (data sources). The GEO Architecture and Data Committee (ADC) launched the Architecture Implementation Pilot (AIP) Initiative to develop and deploy new processes and infrastructure components for the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) and the broader GEOSS architecture. The current AIP Phase 3 (AIP-3) aims to increase GEOSS capacity to support several strategic Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) including: Disaster Management, Health/Air Quality, Biodiversity, Energy, Health/Disease and Water. As to Biodiversity, the EC-funded EuroGEOSS (http://www.eurogeoss.eu) and GENESIS (http://www.genesis-fp7.eu) projects have developed a use scenario called

  19. Acroangiodermatitis of Mali in protein C deficiency due to a novel PROC gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Wei-Min Tan, Aaron; Lee, Joyce Siong-See; Pramono, Zacharias A D; Chong, Wei-Sheng

    2012-04-01

    Acroangiodermatitis of Mali is a dermatologic condition of kaposiform skin lesions that has been associated with chronic venous insufficiency. Here we report a case of a 28-year-old Chinese man with acroangiodermatitis which co-existed with chronic lower limb deep vein thrombosis. Investigations revealed protein C deficiency and a frame shift mutation, c246_247dupCT, of the PROC gene. Our report lengthens the list of male acroangiodermatitis of Mali cases with a Chinese patient harboring a novel PROC mutation with manifest protein C deficiency.

  20. Documentation of the current fault detection, isolation and reconfiguration software of the AIPS fault-tolerant processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanning, David T.; Shepard, Allen W.; Johnson, Sally C.

    1987-01-01

    Documentation is presented of the December 1986 version of the ADA code for the fault detection, isolation, and reconfiguration (FDIR) functions of the Advanced Information processing System (AIPS) Fault-Tolerant Processor (FTP). Because the FTP is still under development and the software is constantly undergoing changes, this should not be considered final documentation of the FDIR software of the FTP.

  1. 75 FR 5846 - Deadline for Notification of Intent To Use the Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Primary, Cargo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... Administration (FAA) published a notice in the Federal Register. (75 FR 3954). This action corrects an error in... Doc. 2010-1291) published on January 25, 2010 (75 FR 3954) make the following correction: On page 3955... (AIP) Primary, Cargo, and Nonprimary Entitlement Funds for Fiscal Year 2010 AGENCY: Federal...

  2. Representation of continuous hand and arm movements in macaque areas M1, F5, and AIP: a comparative decoding study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menz, Veera Katharina; Schaffelhofer, Stefan; Scherberger, Hansjörg

    2015-10-01

    Objective. In the last decade, multiple brain areas have been investigated with respect to their decoding capability of continuous arm or hand movements. So far, these studies have mainly focused on motor or premotor areas like M1 and F5. However, there is accumulating evidence that anterior intraparietal area (AIP) in the parietal cortex also contains information about continuous movement. Approach. In this study, we decoded 27 degrees of freedom representing complete hand and arm kinematics during a delayed grasping task from simultaneously recorded activity in areas M1, F5, and AIP of two macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta). Main results. We found that all three areas provided decoding performances that lay significantly above chance. In particular, M1 yielded highest decoding accuracy followed by F5 and AIP. Furthermore, we provide support for the notion that AIP does not only code categorical visual features of objects to be grasped, but also contains a substantial amount of temporal kinematic information. Significance. This fact could be utilized in future developments of neural interfaces restoring hand and arm movements.

  3. 75 FR 53738 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-35

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-35 AGENCY: Internal... 2007-35, Statistical Sampling for purposes of Section 199. DATES: Written comments should be received... 199. OMB Number: 1545-2072. Revenue Procedure Number: RP-2007-35. Abstract: This revenue...

  4. Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenomas (FIPA) and the Pituitary Adenoma Predisposition due to Mutations in the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Daly, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors and occur with a prevalence of approximately 1:1000 in the developed world. Pituitary adenomas have a serious disease burden, and their management involves neurosurgery, biological therapies, and radiotherapy. Early diagnosis of pituitary tumors while they are smaller may help increase cure rates. Few genetic predictors of pituitary adenoma development exist. Recent years have seen two separate, complimentary advances in inherited pituitary tumor research. The clinical condition of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) has been described, which encompasses the familial occurrence of isolated pituitary adenomas outside of the setting of syndromic conditions like multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Carney complex. FIPA families comprise approximately 2% of pituitary adenomas and represent a clinical entity with homogeneous or heterogeneous pituitary adenoma types occurring within the same kindred. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene has been identified as causing a pituitary adenoma predisposition of variable penetrance that accounts for 20% of FIPA families. Germline AIP mutations have been shown to associate with the occurrence of large pituitary adenomas that occur at a young age, predominantly in children/adolescents and young adults. AIP mutations are usually associated with somatotropinomas, but prolactinomas, nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas, Cushing disease, and other infrequent clinical adenoma types can also occur. Gigantism is a particular feature of AIP mutations and occurs in more than one third of affected somatotropinoma patients. Study of pituitary adenoma patients with AIP mutations has demonstrated that these cases raise clinical challenges to successful treatment. Extensive research on the biology of AIP and new advances in mouse Aip knockout models demonstrate multiple pathways by which AIP may contribute to tumorigenesis. This review assesses

  5. Familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) and the pituitary adenoma predisposition due to mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Albert; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Daly, Adrian F; Karhu, Auli

    2013-04-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most frequent intracranial tumors and occur with a prevalence of approximately 1:1000 in the developed world. Pituitary adenomas have a serious disease burden, and their management involves neurosurgery, biological therapies, and radiotherapy. Early diagnosis of pituitary tumors while they are smaller may help increase cure rates. Few genetic predictors of pituitary adenoma development exist. Recent years have seen two separate, complimentary advances in inherited pituitary tumor research. The clinical condition of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) has been described, which encompasses the familial occurrence of isolated pituitary adenomas outside of the setting of syndromic conditions like multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Carney complex. FIPA families comprise approximately 2% of pituitary adenomas and represent a clinical entity with homogeneous or heterogeneous pituitary adenoma types occurring within the same kindred. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene has been identified as causing a pituitary adenoma predisposition of variable penetrance that accounts for 20% of FIPA families. Germline AIP mutations have been shown to associate with the occurrence of large pituitary adenomas that occur at a young age, predominantly in children/adolescents and young adults. AIP mutations are usually associated with somatotropinomas, but prolactinomas, nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas, Cushing disease, and other infrequent clinical adenoma types can also occur. Gigantism is a particular feature of AIP mutations and occurs in more than one third of affected somatotropinoma patients. Study of pituitary adenoma patients with AIP mutations has demonstrated that these cases raise clinical challenges to successful treatment. Extensive research on the biology of AIP and new advances in mouse Aip knockout models demonstrate multiple pathways by which AIP may contribute to tumorigenesis. This review assesses

  6. Using SAS PROC CALIS to fit Level-1 error covariance structures of latent growth models.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cherng G; Jane, Ten-Der

    2012-09-01

    In the present article, we demonstrates the use of SAS PROC CALIS to fit various types of Level-1 error covariance structures of latent growth models (LGM). Advantages of the SEM approach, on which PROC CALIS is based, include the capabilities of modeling the change over time for latent constructs, measured by multiple indicators; embedding LGM into a larger latent variable model; incorporating measurement models for latent predictors; and better assessing model fit and the flexibility in specifying error covariance structures. The strength of PROC CALIS is always accompanied with technical coding work, which needs to be specifically addressed. We provide a tutorial on the SAS syntax for modeling the growth of a manifest variable and the growth of a latent construct, focusing the documentation on the specification of Level-1 error covariance structures. Illustrations are conducted with the data generated from two given latent growth models. The coding provided is helpful when the growth model has been well determined and the Level-1 error covariance structure is to be identified.

  7. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Reclaiming Face Time--How an Organic Chemistry Flipped Classroom Provided Access to Increased Guided Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trogden, Bridget G.

    2015-01-01

    Students' active engagement is one of the most critical challenges to any successful learning environment. The blending of active engagement along with rich, meaningful content is necessary for chemical educators to re-examine the purpose of the chemistry classroom. The Spring 2014 ConfChem conference, Flipped Classroom, was held from May 9 to…

  8. Causative role of left aIPS in coding shared goals during human–avatar complementary joint actions

    PubMed Central

    Sacheli, Lucia M.; Candidi, Matteo; Era, Vanessa; Aglioti, Salvatore M.

    2015-01-01

    Successful motor interactions require agents to anticipate what a partner is doing in order to predictively adjust their own movements. Although the neural underpinnings of the ability to predict others' action goals have been well explored during passive action observation, no study has yet clarified any critical neural substrate supporting interpersonal coordination during active, non-imitative (complementary) interactions. Here, we combine non-invasive inhibitory brain stimulation (continuous Theta Burst Stimulation) with a novel human–avatar interaction task to investigate a causal role for higher-order motor cortical regions in supporting the ability to predict and adapt to others' actions. We demonstrate that inhibition of left anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS), but not ventral premotor cortex, selectively impaired individuals' performance during complementary interactions. Thus, in addition to coding observed and executed action goals, aIPS is crucial in coding ‘shared goals', that is, integrating predictions about one's and others' complementary actions. PMID:26154706

  9. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) proof-of-concept system functional design I/O network system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The function design of the Input/Output (I/O) services for the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) proof of concept system is described. The data flow diagrams, which show the functional processes in I/O services and the data that flows among them, are contained. A complete list of the data identified on the data flow diagrams and in the process descriptions are provided.

  10. Aβ42-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) neutralizes toxic amyloid-β42 species and protects synaptic structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Barucker, Christian; Bittner, Heiko J.; Chang, Philip K.-Y.; Cameron, Scott; Hancock, Mark A.; Liebsch, Filip; Hossain, Shireen; Harmeier, Anja; Shaw, Hunter; Charron, François M.; Gensler, Manuel; Dembny, Paul; Zhuang, Wei; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Rao, Yong; Lurz, Rudi; Hildebrand, Peter W.; McKinney, R. Anne; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) peptide is believed to be the main culprit in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), impairing synaptic function and initiating neuronal degeneration. Soluble Aβ42 oligomers are highly toxic and contribute to progressive neuronal dysfunction, loss of synaptic spine density, and affect long-term potentiation (LTP). We have characterized a short, L-amino acid Aβ-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) that targets a relatively well-defined population of low-n Aβ42 oligomers, rather than simply inhibiting the aggregation of Aβ monomers into oligomers. Our data show that AIP diminishes the loss of Aβ42-induced synaptic spine density and rescues LTP in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Notably, the AIP enantiomer (comprised of D-amino acids) attenuated the rough-eye phenotype in a transgenic Aβ42 fly model and significantly improved the function of photoreceptors of these flies in electroretinography tests. Overall, our results indicate that specifically “trapping” low-n oligomers provides a novel strategy for toxic Aβ42-oligomer recognition and removal. PMID:26510576

  11. Aβ42-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) neutralizes toxic amyloid-β42 species and protects synaptic structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucker, Christian; Bittner, Heiko J.; Chang, Philip K.-Y.; Cameron, Scott; Hancock, Mark A.; Liebsch, Filip; Hossain, Shireen; Harmeier, Anja; Shaw, Hunter; Charron, François M.; Gensler, Manuel; Dembny, Paul; Zhuang, Wei; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Rao, Yong; Lurz, Rudi; Hildebrand, Peter W.; McKinney, R. Anne; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    The amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) peptide is believed to be the main culprit in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), impairing synaptic function and initiating neuronal degeneration. Soluble Aβ42 oligomers are highly toxic and contribute to progressive neuronal dysfunction, loss of synaptic spine density, and affect long-term potentiation (LTP). We have characterized a short, L-amino acid Aβ-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) that targets a relatively well-defined population of low-n Aβ42 oligomers, rather than simply inhibiting the aggregation of Aβ monomers into oligomers. Our data show that AIP diminishes the loss of Aβ42-induced synaptic spine density and rescues LTP in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Notably, the AIP enantiomer (comprised of D-amino acids) attenuated the rough-eye phenotype in a transgenic Aβ42 fly model and significantly improved the function of photoreceptors of these flies in electroretinography tests. Overall, our results indicate that specifically “trapping” low-n oligomers provides a novel strategy for toxic Aβ42-oligomer recognition and removal.

  12. Aβ42-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) neutralizes toxic amyloid-β42 species and protects synaptic structure and function.

    PubMed

    Barucker, Christian; Bittner, Heiko J; Chang, Philip K-Y; Cameron, Scott; Hancock, Mark A; Liebsch, Filip; Hossain, Shireen; Harmeier, Anja; Shaw, Hunter; Charron, François M; Gensler, Manuel; Dembny, Paul; Zhuang, Wei; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rabe, Jürgen P; Rao, Yong; Lurz, Rudi; Hildebrand, Peter W; McKinney, R Anne; Multhaup, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) peptide is believed to be the main culprit in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), impairing synaptic function and initiating neuronal degeneration. Soluble Aβ42 oligomers are highly toxic and contribute to progressive neuronal dysfunction, loss of synaptic spine density, and affect long-term potentiation (LTP). We have characterized a short, L-amino acid Aβ-oligomer Interacting Peptide (AIP) that targets a relatively well-defined population of low-n Aβ42 oligomers, rather than simply inhibiting the aggregation of Aβ monomers into oligomers. Our data show that AIP diminishes the loss of Aβ42-induced synaptic spine density and rescues LTP in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Notably, the AIP enantiomer (comprised of D-amino acids) attenuated the rough-eye phenotype in a transgenic Aβ42 fly model and significantly improved the function of photoreceptors of these flies in electroretinography tests. Overall, our results indicate that specifically "trapping" low-n oligomers provides a novel strategy for toxic Aβ42-oligomer recognition and removal. PMID:26510576

  13. A fatal case of acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in a woman affected by glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Laura; Mancini, Chiara; Marvisi, Maurizio

    2014-03-01

    This report presents the case of a 67-year-old woman affected by glioblastoma. After a few days of adjuvant therapy with temozolomide and prophylaxis with trimetrophin-sulfamethoxazolo to prevent Pneumocystis Jiroveci, she had progressive and rapid worsening of symptoms with weakness, dyspnea and orthopnea. She had peripheral edema and proximal hyposthenia of the lower limbs. Chest CT showed bilateral ground-glass opacities and laboratory exams revealed hypoxemia and hypocapnia, an initial reduction in platelet and white blood cells, and an elevation of LDH, AST, ALT, and active urinary sediment. Blood cultures, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) data and transbronchial biopsy showed no infections, and in particular no evidence of Pneumocystis Jiroveci pneumonia. Histological examination revealed a typical pattern of AIP. She was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and high-dose steroids. The symptoms worsened and respiratory failure required mechanical ventilation. The pneumonia was not responsive to medical or invasive care. She died after ten days of hospitalization. At present very little can be found in the literature about lung toxicity caused by temozolomide. This case can be added as a new report describing this risk. The combination therapy with temozolamide and trimetophin-sulfamethoxazolo could have a synergistic action inducing various forms of pulmonary toxicity. ESTABLISHED FACTS: Acute interstitial pneumonia is a common manifestation of lung toxicity caused by drugs. The clinical course is favorable with a good response to corticosteroids. NOVEL INSIGHT: This is the first fatal case of lung toxicity caused by Temozolomide. Clinicians must be aware that a combination therapy including trimetophin-sulfamethoxazolo could have a synergistic action in inducing pulmonary toxicity.

  14. Time course of information representation of macaque AIP neurons in hand manipulation task revealed by information analysis.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Yutaka; Ishida, Fumihiko; Shimizu, Takashi; Murata, Akira

    2010-12-01

    We used mutual information analysis of neuronal activity in the macaque anterior intraparietal area (AIP) to examine information processing during a hand manipulation task. The task was to reach-to-grasp a three-dimensional (3D) object after presentation of a go signal. Mutual information was calculated between the spike counts of individual neurons in 50-ms-wide time bins and six unique shape classifications or 15 one-versus-one classifications of these shapes. The spatiotemporal distribution of mutual information was visualized as a two-dimensional image ("information map") to better observe global profiles of information representation. In addition, a nonnegative matrix factorization technique was applied for extracting its structure. Our major finding was that the time course of mutual information differed significantly according to different classes of task-related neurons. This strongly suggests that different classes of neurons were engaged in different information processing stages in executing the hand manipulation task. On the other hand, our analysis revealed the heterogeneous nature of information representation of AIP neurons. For example, "information latency" (or information onset) varied among individual neurons even in the same neuron class and the same shape classification. Further, some neurons changed "information preference" (i.e., shape classification with the largest amount of information) across different task periods. These suggest that neurons encode different information in the different task periods. Taking the present result together with previous findings, we used a Gantt chart to propose a hypothetical scheme of the dynamic interactions between different types of AIP neurons.

  15. Erwinia amylovora affects the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid pathway in mature leaves of Pyrus communis cv. Conférence.

    PubMed

    Vrancken, K; Holtappels, M; Schoofs, H; Deckers, T; Treutter, D; Valcke, R

    2013-11-01

    Flavonoids, which are synthesized by the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid pathway, not only contribute to fruit colour and photoprotection, they also may provide antimicrobial and structural components during interaction with micro-organisms. A possible response of this pathway was assessed in both mature and immature leaves of shoots of 2-year-old pear trees cv. Conférence, which were inoculated with the gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora strain SGB 225/12, were mock-inoculated or were left untreated. The phenylpropanoid-flavonoid pathway was analysed by histological studies, by gene expression using RT-qPCR and by HPLC analyses of the metabolites at different time intervals after infection. Transcription patterns of two key genes anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and chalcone synthase (CHS) related to the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid pathway showed differences between control, mock-inoculated and E. amylovora-inoculated mature leaves, with the strongest reaction 48 h after inoculation. The impact of E. amylovora was also visualised in histological sections, and confirmed by HPLC, as epicatechin -which is produced via ANR- augmented 72 h after inoculation in infected leaf tissue. Besides the effect of treatments, ontogenesis-related differences were found as well. The increase of certain key genes, the rise in epicatechin and the visualisation in several histological sections in this study suggest a non-negligible impact on the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid pathway in Pyrus communis due to inoculation with E. amylovora. In this study, we propose a potential role of this pathway in defence mechanisms, providing a detailed analysis of the response of this system attributable to inoculation with E. amylovora.

  16. The AIP Career Pathways Project: Learning the Effective Practices of Physics Departments Preparing Graduates with the Bachelor's Degree for STEM Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Thomas; Redmond, Kendra; Czujko, Roman

    2012-10-01

    Forty percent of students graduating with the bachelor's degree in physics seek employment immediately upon graduation. The AIP Career Pathways Project, funded by NSF, seeks to learn by site visits the effective practices of departments in preparing these students to successfully secure positions in STEM and to make these practices known by presentations, publications, and workshops. This talk will review AIP Statistical Resources data on the careers of physicists with the bachelor's degree, provide preliminary insights from the site visits, provide some advice for graduates seeking employment, and describe the upcoming workshops.

  17. 76 FR 13449 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Revenue Procedure 2009-41 (Rev. Proc. 2002-59 Is...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    .... 2002-59 Is Superseded) AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for... 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning.... Revenue Procedure Number: Revenue Procedure 2009-41. (Rev. Proc. 2002-59 is superseded.) Abstract:...

  18. Find the fish: using PROC SQL to build a relational database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fabrizio, Mary C.; Nelson, Scott N.

    1995-01-01

    Reliable estimates of abundance and survival, gained through mark-recapture studies, are necessary to better understand how to manage and restore lake trout populations in the Great Lakes. Working with a 24-year data set from a mark-recapture study conducted in Lake Superior, we attempted to disclose information on tag shedding by examining recaptures of double-tagged fish. The data set consisted of 64,288 observations on fish which had been marked with one or more tags; a subset of these fish had been marked with two tags at initial capture. Although DATA and PROC statements could be used to obtain some of the information we sought, these statements could not be used to extract a complete set of results from the double-tagging experiments. We therefore used SQL processing to create three tables representing the same information but in a fully normalized relational structure. In addition, we created indices to efficiently examine complex relationships among the individual capture records. This approach allowed us to obtain all the information necessary to estimate tag retention through subsequent modeling. We believe that our success with SQL was due in large part to its ability to simultaneosly scan the same table more than once and to permit consideration of other tables in sub-queries.

  19. Augmented Growth Hormone Secretion and Stat3 Phosphorylation in an Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP)-Disrupted Somatotroph Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Hamaguchi, Yuriko; Kawanami, Takako; Nomiyama, Takashi; Yanase, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) is thought to be a tumor suppressor gene, as indicated by a mutational analysis of pituitary somatotroph adenomas. However, the physiological significance of AIP inactivation in somatotroph cells remains unclear. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we identified a GH3 cell clone (termed GH3-FTY) in which Aip was genetically disrupted, and subsequently investigated its character with respect to growth hormone (Gh) synthesis and proliferation. Compared with GH3, GH3-FTY cells showed remarkably increased Gh production and a slight increase in cell proliferation. Gh-induced Stat3 phosphorylation is known to be a mechanism of Gh oversecretion in GH3. Interestingly, phosphorylated-Stat3 expression in GH3-FTY cells was increased more compared with GH3 cells, suggesting a stronger drive for this mechanism in GH3-FTY. The phenotypes of GH3-FTY concerning Gh overproduction, cell proliferation, and increased Stat3 phosphorylation were significantly reversed by the exogenous expression of Aip. GH3-FTY cells were less sensitive to somatostatin than GH3 cells in the suppression of cell proliferation, which might be associated with the reduced expression of somatostatin receptor type 2. GH3-FTY xenografts in BALB/c nude mice (GH3-FTY mice) formed more mitotic somatotroph tumors than GH3 xenografts (GH3 mice), as also evidenced by increased Ki67 scores. GH3-FTY mice were also much larger and had significantly higher plasma Gh levels than GH3 mice. Furthermore, GH3-FTY mice showed relative insulin resistance compared with GH3 mice. In conclusion, we established a somatotroph cell line, GH3-FTY, which possessed prominent Gh secretion and mitotic features associated with the disruption of Aip. PMID:27706259

  20. The νMSM and muon to electron conversion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canetti, Laurent; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2013-03-01

    We review briefly the different constraints on the three right-handed neutrinos of the νMSM, an extension of the Standard Model that can explain baryon asymmetry, dark matter and neutrino masses. We include in the discussion the proposed experiments on muon to electron conversion Mu2e (Carey et al., Mu2e Collaboration, 2012), COMET and PRISM (Hungerford, COMET Collaboration, AIP Conf Proc 1182:694, 2009; Cui et al., COMET Collaboration, 2012). We find that the expected sensitivity of these experiments is weaker by about two orders of magnitude than the constraints coming from successful baryogenesis.

  1. Alix/AIP1 antagonizes epidermal growth factor receptor downregulation by the Cbl-SETA/CIN85 complex.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mirko H H; Hoeller, Daniela; Yu, Jiuhong; Furnari, Frank B; Cavenee, Webster K; Dikic, Ivan; Bögler, Oliver

    2004-10-01

    The assembly of the Cbl-SETA/CIN85-endophilin complex at the C terminus of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) following ligand activation mediates its internalization and ubiquitination. We found that the SETA/CIN85-interacting protein Alix/AIP1, which also binds endophilins, modulates this complex. Alix was found to associate indirectly with EGFR, regardless of its activation state, and with DeltaEGFR, which signals at low intensity and does not bind Cbls or SETA/CIN85. In agreement with this, Alix interaction did not occur via SETA/CIN85. However, SETA/CIN85 and Alix were capable of mutually promoting their interaction with the EGFR. Increasing the level of Alix weakened the interaction between SETA/CIN85 and Cbl and reduced the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl and the level of ubiquitination of EGFR, SETA/CIN85, and Cbls. This antagonism of the Cbl-SETA/CIN85 complex by Alix was reflected in its diminution of EGFR internalization. In agreement with this, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Alix promoted EGFR internalization and downregulation. It has been suggested that SETA/CIN85 promotes receptor internalization by recruiting endophilins. However, Alix was also capable of increasing the level of endophilin associated with EGFR, implying that this is not sufficient to promote receptor internalization. We propose that Alix inhibits EGFR internalization by attenuating the interaction between Cbl and SETA/CIN85 and by inhibiting Cbl-mediated ubiquitination of the EGFR.

  2. Concomitant deletions of tumor suppressor genes MEN1 and AIP are essential for the pathogenesis of the brown fat tumor hibernoma

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Karolin H.; Magnusson, Linda; Isaksson, Margareth; Nilsson, Jenny; Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Domanski, Henryk A.; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Mandahl, Nils; Mertens, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Hibernomas are benign tumors with morphological features resembling brown fat. They consistently display cytogenetic rearrangements, typically translocations, involving chromosome band 11q13. Here we demonstrate that these aberrations are associated with concomitant deletions of AIP and MEN1, tumor suppressor genes that are located 3 Mb apart and that underlie the hereditary syndromes pituitary adenoma predisposition and multiple endocrine neoplasia type I. MEN1 and AIP displayed a low expression in hibernomas whereas the expression of genes up-regulated in brown fat—PPARA, PPARG, PPARGC1A, and UCP1—was high. Thus, loss of MEN1 and AIP is likely to be pathogenetically essential for hibernoma development. Simultaneous loss of two tumor suppressor genes has not previously been shown to result from a neoplasia-associated translocation. Furthermore, in contrast to the prevailing assumption that benign tumors harbor relatively few genetic aberrations, the present analyses demonstrate that a considerable number of chromosome breaks are involved in the pathogenesis of hibernoma. PMID:21078971

  3. UAS-NAS Live Virtual Constructive Distributed Environment (LVC): LVC Gateway, Gateway Toolbox, Gateway Data Logger (GDL), SaaProc Software Design Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovic, Srboljub

    2015-01-01

    This document provides the software design description for the two core software components, the LVC Gateway, the LVC Gateway Toolbox, and two participants, the LVC Gateway Data Logger and the SAA Processor (SaaProc).

  4. Nouveau procédé de synthèse du nitrure d'aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haussonne, J. M.; Lostec, J.; Bertot, J. P.; Lostec, L.; Sadou, S.

    1993-04-01

    Thermodynamic considerations show that, even at room temperature, pure aluminium can react with nitrogen to form the aluminium nitride AlN. However, pure aluminium does not exist: it is always surrounded by an alumina shell that protects the metal from further reactions. Furthermore, in the hypothesis where one has been able to make aluminium react with nitrogen, an aluminium nitride shell will protect as well the metal core from further oxidation. Prompted by the Lanxide process allowing to form Al/Al2O3 composites, we have mixed aluminium powders with lithium salts, and easily synthesized pure aluminium nitride by heating the mixed powders in nitrogen at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1200 °C. Starting from aluminium powders with a specific area ranging from 0.3 to 4 m^2/g, we have been able to produce aluminium nitride with specific are ranging from 1 to 20 m^2/g. Mixed with Y203-CaO and sintered at 1720 °C in N2, we obtained AIN ceramics owning 92% density and 160 W/m.K thermal conductivity. Les calculs thermodynamiques montrent que, même à température ambiante, l'aluminium pur peut réagir avec l'azote pour former le nitrure d'aluminium AlN. Cependant, la poudre d'aluminium pur n'existe pas : ses grains sont toujours entourés d'une couche d'alumine protectrice. De plus, dans l'hypothèse où l'on pourrait faire réagir de la poudre d'aluminium avec de l'azote, il se formerait de même une couche protectrice de nitrure d'aluminium qui empêcherait le centre des grains de réagir. S'inspirant du “procédé Lanxide” permettant de réaliser des composites Al/Al2O3, nous avons mélangé de la poudre d'aluminium avec des sels de lithium, et synthétisé du nitrure d'aluminium pur en portant ce mélange dans l'azote à une température pouvant être comprise entre 800 et 1 200 °C. Utilisant des poudres d'aluminium possédant une surface spécifique comprise entre 0,3 et 4 m^2/g, nous avons obtenu une poudre de nitrure d'aluminium avec une surface sp

  5. The AIP in 1975

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Today, 1976

    1976-01-01

    This Annual Report details the activities of the American Institute of Physics in 1975. The Institute placed major emphasis on the expansion of the institute's public-relations and manpower roles. Developments affecting journals and the activities of the Fiscal Branch and Marketing Division are also discussed. (BT)

  6. Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Panhematin ® is irritation of the vein used for infusion (phlebitis). This is avoided by slow infusion through a large caliber vein or central line. ... ensuring proper caloric intake, which can include intravenous infusion of sufficient nutrients (glucose and salt). Carbohydrate loading ...

  7. [Atypical interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in calves and young cattle in Schleswig-Holstein in conjunction with an infection by the bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV)].

    PubMed

    Appel, G; Heckert, H P

    1989-04-01

    It is reported on atypical interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in 16 mostly Holstein-Frisian calves and feeders from 13 different farms in Schleswig-Holstein in association with an infection by the respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). All animals were submitted with identical clinical histories. Macroscopically the lung lesions were characterized by alveolar and interstitial edema and emphysema. Microscopically there was a diffuse interstitial pneumonia with formation of hyaline membranes and multinucleated giant cells. From the investigation material of the 16 animals BRSV was confirmed by direct immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies in 4 animals from 4 different farms.

  8. Design of the Compact Auburn Torsatron Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwell, G. J.; Gandy, R. F.; Knowlton, S. F.; Watts, C.; Schneider, T. A.; Carnevali, A.

    1998-11-01

    As part of the National Stellarator Proof-of-Principle program, the Compact Auburn Torsatron is in the process of being upgraded operate with ohmic plasma current. The upgrade will be used to investigate MHD stability and plasma disruptions during the transition from pure stellarator plasmas to those in which the rotational transform is partially generated by the ohmic plasma current. The upgrade consists of three main parts: 1) the addition of a new power supply that will allow CAT-U to operate at magnetic fields Bo = 0.5T. This system consists of ten motor-generators capable of producing 8 MW of power for several seconds. 2) the addition of an air-core ohmic heating transformer to drive 25 kA of plasma current for 100 ms with a flux of 0.2-0.3 V-s. 3) Target plasmas for ohmic current stability studies in CAT-U will be generated by ICRF at ω=ω_ci using a Nagoya Type-III antenna as in CHS(T.Watari et al. in Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas (Proc. 12^th) Top. conf. Savannah, GA 1997) AIP Conf. Proc. 403, 57, AIP (1997). The expected RF power is P_RF = 200kW at f = 7.5 MHz. Each of the subsystems for the upgrade of CAT will be discussed.

  9. The Lunar dusty plasmas -levitation and transport.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atamaniuk, Barbara; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    Lunar dust can exhibit unusual behavior -due to electron photoemission via solar-UV radiation the lunar surface represents a complex plasma -"dusty plasma". The dust grains and lunar surface are electrostatically charged by the Moon's interaction with the local plasma environ-ment and the photoemission of electrons due to solar UV and X-rays. This effect causes the like-charged surface and dust particles to repel each other, and creates a near-surface electric field. Lunar dust must be treated as a dusty plasma. Using analytic (kinetic (Vlasov) and magnetohydrodynamic theory ) and numerical modeling we show physical processes related to levitation and transport dusty plasma on the Moon. These dust grains could affect the lunar environment for radio wave and plasma diagnostics and interfere with exploration activities. References: 1. Wilson T.L. (1992), in Analysis of Interplanetary Dust, M. Zolensky et al. AIP Conf.Proc. 310, 33-44 (AIP, NY), 2.Wilson T.L."LUNAR DUST AND DUSTY PLASMA PHYSICS".40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (2009), 3. Grün E., et al.(1993),Nature 363, 144. 4. Morfill G. and Grün E.(1979), Planet. Space Sci.. 27, 1269, 1283, 5. Manka R. and Michel F. (1971), Proc. 2nd Lun. Sci. Conf. 2, 1717 (MIT Press, Cambridge). 6. Manka R. et al.(1973), Lun. Sci.-III, 504. 7. Barbara Atamaniuk "Kinetic Description of Localized Plasma Structure in Dusty Plasmas". Czechoslovak Journal of Physics Vol.54 C 2004

  10. Optimisation de fonctionnements de pompe à chaleur chimique : synchronisation et commande du procédé

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassou, T.; Amouroux, M.; Labat, P.

    1995-04-01

    We present the mathematical modelling of a chemical heat pump and the associated simulator. This simulator is able to determine the influence of different parameters (which would be associated to the heat exchanges or to the chemical kinetics), but also to simulate the main operating modes. An optimal management of process represents the objective to reach; we materialize it by a continuous and steady production of the power delivered by the machine. Nous présentons le modèle mathématique d'un pilote de pompe à chaleur chimique et le simulateur numérique correspondant. Ce simulateur est capable de déterminer l'influence de divers paramètres (qu'ils soient liés aux échanges de chaleur ou à la cinétique chimique), mais aussi de simuler les principaux modes de fonctionnement. Une gestion optimale du procédé représente le but à atteindre: une conduite optimisée du système permet, par une gestion des différentes phases, une production continue et stable de la puissance délivrée par la machine.

  11. The role of germline AIP, MEN1, PRKAR1A, CDKN1B and CDKN2C mutations in causing pituitary adenomas in a large cohort of children, adolescents, and patients with genetic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Stratakis, C A; Tichomirowa, M A; Boikos, S; Azevedo, M F; Lodish, M; Martari, M; Verma, S; Daly, A F; Raygada, M; Keil, M F; Papademetriou, J; Drori-Herishanu, L; Horvath, A; Tsang, K M; Nesterova, M; Franklin, S; Vanbellinghen, J-F; Bours, V; Salvatori, R; Beckers, A

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence of germline mutations in MEN1, AIP, PRKAR1A, CDKN1B and CDKN2CI is unknown among pediatric patients with pituitary adenomas (PA). In this study, we screened children with PA for mutations in these genes; somatic GNAS mutations were also studied in a limited number of growth hormone (GH) or prolactin (PRL)-secreting PA. We studied 74 and 6 patients with either isolated Cushing disease (CD) or GH- or PRL-secreting PA, respectively. We also screened four pediatric patients with CD, and four with GH/PRL-secreting tumors who had some syndromic features. There was one AIP mutation (p.Lys103Arg) among 74 CD patients. Two MEN1 mutations that occurred in patients with recurrent or difficult-to-treat disease were found among patients with CD. There was one MEN1 and three AIP mutations (p.Gln307ProfsX104, p.Pro114fsX, p.Lys241X) among pediatric patients with isolated GH- or PRL-secreting PA and one additional MEN1 mutation in a patient with positive family history. There were no mutations in the PRKAR1A, CDKN1B, CDKN2C or GNAS genes. Thus, germline AIP or MEN1 gene mutations are frequent among pediatric patients with GH- or PRL-secreting PA but are significantly rarer in pediatric CD; PRKAR1A mutations are not present in PA outside of Carney complex. PMID:20507346

  12. Quatrième conférence consensuelle sur le diagnostic et le traitement de la démence

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Ainsley; Patterson, Christopher; Lee, Linda; Vedel, Isabelle; Bergman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    démence sont aussi présentées. Conclusion Plusieurs recommandations de la Quatrième conférence consensuelle sur le diagnostic et le traitement de la démence intéresseront les médecins de famille. Pour assurer l’utilité des lignes directrices, les médecins de famille devraient participer à toutes les étapes du processus de formulation continu, y compris à la sélection des sujets.

  13. Mutation in TOR1AIP1 encoding LAP1B in a form of muscular dystrophy: a novel gene related to nuclear envelopathies.

    PubMed

    Kayman-Kurekci, Gulsum; Talim, Beril; Korkusuz, Petek; Sayar, Nilufer; Sarioglu, Turkan; Oncel, Ibrahim; Sharafi, Parisa; Gundesli, Hulya; Balci-Hayta, Burcu; Purali, Nuhan; Serdaroglu-Oflazer, Piraye; Topaloglu, Haluk; Dincer, Pervin

    2014-07-01

    We performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping and mapped a novel myopathic phenotype to chromosomal region 1q25 in a consanguineous family with three affected individuals manifesting proximal and distal weakness and atrophy, rigid spine and contractures of the proximal and distal interphalangeal hand joints. Additionally, cardiomyopathy and respiratory involvement were noted. DNA sequencing of torsinA-interacting protein 1 (TOR1AIP1) gene encoding lamina-associated polypeptide 1B (LAP1B), showed a homozygous c.186delG mutation that causes a frameshift resulting in a premature stop codon (p.E62fsTer25). We observed that expression of LAP1B was absent in the patient skeletal muscle fibres. Ultrastructural examination showed intact sarcomeric organization but alterations of the nuclear envelope including nuclear fragmentation, chromatin bleb formation and naked chromatin. LAP1B is a type-2 integral membrane protein localized in the inner nuclear membrane that binds to both A- and B-type lamins, and is involved in the regulation of torsinA ATPase. Interestingly, luminal domain-like LAP1 (LULL1)-an endoplasmic reticulum-localized partner of torsinA-was overexpressed in the patient's muscle in the absence of LAP1B. Therefore, the findings suggest that LAP1 and LULL1 might have a compensatory effect on each other. This study expands the spectrum of genes associated with nuclear envelopathies and highlights the critical function for LAP1B in striated muscle.

  14. Mutation in TOR1AIP1 encoding LAP1B in a form of muscular dystrophy: a novel gene related to nuclear envelopathies.

    PubMed

    Kayman-Kurekci, Gulsum; Talim, Beril; Korkusuz, Petek; Sayar, Nilufer; Sarioglu, Turkan; Oncel, Ibrahim; Sharafi, Parisa; Gundesli, Hulya; Balci-Hayta, Burcu; Purali, Nuhan; Serdaroglu-Oflazer, Piraye; Topaloglu, Haluk; Dincer, Pervin

    2014-07-01

    We performed genome-wide homozygosity mapping and mapped a novel myopathic phenotype to chromosomal region 1q25 in a consanguineous family with three affected individuals manifesting proximal and distal weakness and atrophy, rigid spine and contractures of the proximal and distal interphalangeal hand joints. Additionally, cardiomyopathy and respiratory involvement were noted. DNA sequencing of torsinA-interacting protein 1 (TOR1AIP1) gene encoding lamina-associated polypeptide 1B (LAP1B), showed a homozygous c.186delG mutation that causes a frameshift resulting in a premature stop codon (p.E62fsTer25). We observed that expression of LAP1B was absent in the patient skeletal muscle fibres. Ultrastructural examination showed intact sarcomeric organization but alterations of the nuclear envelope including nuclear fragmentation, chromatin bleb formation and naked chromatin. LAP1B is a type-2 integral membrane protein localized in the inner nuclear membrane that binds to both A- and B-type lamins, and is involved in the regulation of torsinA ATPase. Interestingly, luminal domain-like LAP1 (LULL1)-an endoplasmic reticulum-localized partner of torsinA-was overexpressed in the patient's muscle in the absence of LAP1B. Therefore, the findings suggest that LAP1 and LULL1 might have a compensatory effect on each other. This study expands the spectrum of genes associated with nuclear envelopathies and highlights the critical function for LAP1B in striated muscle. PMID:24856141

  15. DdAlix, an Alix/AIP1 homolog in Dictyostelium discoideum, is required for multicellular development under low Ca2+ conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohkouchi, Susumu; El-Halawany, Medhat S; Aruga, Fumika; Shibata, Hideki; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Maki, Masatoshi

    2004-08-01

    Apoptosis-linked gene 2 (ALG-2) interacting protein X (Alix), also called AIP1, is a widely conserved protein in eukaryotes. Alix and its homologs are involved in various phenomena such as apoptosis, regulation of cell adhesion, protein sorting, adaptation to stress conditions, and budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To investigate the role of Alix in development, we identified an Alix homolog in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum and disrupted the gene by homologous recombination. The growth of DdAlix deletion mutant (alx-) cells was significantly impaired in the presence of 5 mM Li+. On an agar plate, alx- cells underwent normal development and formed fruiting bodies indistinguishable from those formed by wild-type cells. However, alx- cells could not form fruiting bodies in the presence of 5 mM Li+. Similar results were obtained when cells were developed in the presence of 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino)octyl ester (TMB-8), which is an antagonist of intracellular Ca2+ store. Furthermore, when the extracellular free Ca2+ was reduced to 10 nM, the ability of alx- cells, but not that of wild-type cells, to form fruiting bodies was impaired. The results indicate that DdAlix is essential for development under low Ca2+ conditions and suggest that DdAlix is involved in Ca2+ signaling during development. PMID:15276209

  16. PRO-C3-Levels in Patients with HIV/HCV-Co-Infection Reflect Fibrosis Stage and Degree of Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mandorfer, Mattias; Byrjalsen, Inger; Schierwagen, Robert; Schwabl, Philipp; Karsdal, Morten A.; Anadol, Evrim; Strassburg, Christian P.; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming; Krag, Aleksander; Reiberger, Thomas; Trebicka, Jonel

    2014-01-01

    Background Liver-related deaths represent the leading cause of mortality among patients with HIV/HCV-co-infection, and are mainly related to complications of fibrosis and portal hypertension. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the structural changes by the assessment of extracellular matrix (ECM) derived degradation fragments in peripheral blood as biomarkers for fibrosis and portal hypertension in patients with HIV/HCV co-infection. Methods Fifty-eight patients (67% male, mean age: 36.5 years) with HIV/HCV-co-infection were included in the study. Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) was measured in forty-three patients. The fibrosis stage was determined using FIB4 -Score. ECM degraded products in peripheral blood were measured using specific ELISAs (C4M, MMP-2/9 degraded type IV collagen; C5M, MMP-2/9 degraded type V collagen; PRO-C3, MMP degraded n-terminal propeptide of type III collagen). Results As expected, HVPG showed strong and significant correlations with FIB4-index (rs = 0.628; p = 7*10−7). Interestingly, PRO-C3 significantly correlated with HVPG (rs = 0.354; p = 0.02), alanine aminotransferase (rs = 0.30; p = 0.038), as well as with FIB4-index (rs = 0.3230; p = 0.035). C4M and C5M levels were higher in patients with portal hypertension (HVPG>5 mmHg). Conclusion PRO-C3 levels reflect liver injury, stage of liver fibrosis and degree of portal hypertension in HIV/HCV-co-infected patients. Furthermore, C4M and C5M were associated with increased portal pressure. Circulating markers of hepatic ECM remodeling might be helpful in the diagnosis and management of liver disease and portal hypertension in patients with HIV/HCV coinfection. PMID:25265505

  17. Employment Survey 1982. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susanne D.

    The employment status of 1981-1982 degree recipients in physics and astronomy was surveyed. Information is presented on changes in occupational status of physics and astronomy degree recipients which occurred between the summer of 1982 and the following winter. The characteristics of graduates of both fields who were employed full-time or…

  18. The AIP career pathways project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauncy, Toni; Redmond, Kendra; Czujko, Roman

    2015-12-01

    An average 40% of all physics baccalaureate degree recipients in the United States go directly into the work-force rather than entering graduate school. Departments aiming to build robust programs must prepare all students for a broad range of career paths, but the default focus is typically on preparing students for advanced physics degrees. Under-graduate physics programs, with effective recruitment, retention, and appropriate preparation of students, have the potential to add qualified individuals to the STEM workforce. We present results from an investigation to understand, compile, and disseminate effective practices for preparing undergraduate physics students to enter the STEM workforce upon graduation.

  19. Feasibility study for reduction of the screening current induced field in a 2G high temperature superconducting coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Y. J.; Jang, J. Y.; Ahn, M. C.; Park, Y. G.; Lee, S. G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports the effects of thermal energy on reducing the overshoot of the current sweep cycle method to reduce the screening current-induced field (SCF) in a 2G high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil. A disadvantage of the current sweep cycle method is the necessity for large overshoot in the coil current. For a 2G HTS coil, excessive overshooting of the coil current is undesirable (Yanagisawa et al 2012 AIP Conf. Proc. 1434 1373-8). In an effort to circumvent this overshooting problem, the thermal energy effect was investigated in combination with the current sweep cycle method based on experiments in this study. The experimental results show that greater SCF reduction in the HTS coil was obtained upon increasing thermal energy by heater current.

  20. Cyclic and ekpyrotic universes in modified Finsler osculating gravity on tangent Lorentz bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavrinos, Panayiotis C.; Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2013-03-01

    We consider models of an accelerating Universe elaborated for Finsler-like gravity theories constructed on tangent bundles to Lorentz manifolds. In the osculating approximation, certain locally anisotropic configurations are similar to those for f(R) gravity. This allows us to generalize a proposal by Nojiri et al (2011 AIP Conf. Proc. 1458 207-21) in order to reconstruct and compare two classes of Einstein-Finsler gravity (EFG) and f(R) gravity theories using modern cosmological data and realistic physical scenarios. We conclude that EFG provides inflation, acceleration and little rip evolution scenarios with realistic alternatives to standard ΛCDM cosmology. The approach is based on a proof that there is a general decoupling property of gravitational field equations in EFG and modified theories which allows us to generate off-diagonal cosmological solutions.

  1. A novel mutation c.1048A>T at codon 350(Lys>Stop) in PROC gene causing neonatal purpura fulminans.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakhi; T, Leenath; Chandran, Jolly; Jayandharan, Giridhara R; Palle, Arpana; Moses, Prabhakar D

    2013-12-01

    Purpura fulminans in the neonatal period due to severe congenital protein C deficiency (protein C activity <1 IU/dl) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. If untreated, it is fatal. Early identification of such patients may be lifesaving. Acquired deficiency of protein C caused by increased consumption as overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and severe infection creates a diagnostic dilemma. Mutation analysis plays a critical role in confirming the diagnosis of the disease and offering prenatal diagnosis. In this report, we describe a newborn who presented with purpura fulminans and DIC, molecular analysis showed a novel c.1048A>T transversion in a homozygous state at codon 350 (Lys>Stop) of protein C (PROC) gene. Prenatal diagnosis in subsequent pregnancy was done which revealed the affected fetus had the same mutation in homozygous form.

  2. Auxotrophic markers pyrF and proC can replace antibiotic markers on protein production plasmids in high-cell-density Pseudomonas fluorescens fermentation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jane C; Jenings, Annika F; Mun, Deborah M; McGovern, Patricia M; Chew, Lawrence C

    2005-01-01

    The use of antibiotic-resistance genes as selectable markers in transgenic organisms is coming under increased scrutiny, for fear that they may spread to human pathogens, thereby reducing the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A current Pseudomonas fluorescens protein expression system uses a tetracycline resistance gene (tetR/tetA) to maintain an expression plasmid under control of a repressible promoter and a kanamycin resistance gene (kanR) to maintain a plasmid carrying a repressor gene. We investigated using auxotrophic markers to replace these two antibiotic resistance genes: pyrF (encoding orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase) in place of tetR/tetA and proC (encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase) in place of kanR, complementing their respective precise chromosomal deletions created by allele exchange using a suicide vector carrying pyrF as a counterselectable marker. The resulting strains, devoid of antibiotic-resistance genes, were shown to achieve high productivity of nitrilase and thermostable alpha-amylase equal to that of the former antibiotic-resistant production host. The production plasmids were stable. The pyrF (uracil-dependent) background of the production host strain also allows us to sequentially alter the genome to incorporate other desired genomic changes, deletions, or insertions using 5'-fluoroorotic acid counterselection, restoring the selectable marker after each step.

  3. Growing Growth curves using PROC MIXED and PROC NLMIXED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Being able to describe growth appropriately and succinctly is important in many contexts, including biology, epidemiology, and statistics. Various approaches are used varying from differential equations, deterministic modeling, and statistical approaches like regression. Often, with epidemiologic da...

  4. Développement d'outils de mesure pour l'amélioration du procédé d'impression offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boumaïza, K.; Baudin, G.; Catusse, R.; Viallet, A.

    1999-03-01

    The offset printing process rests primarily on the balance between ink and damping solution. However, this balance remains difficult to realize. The corresponding wastes of time and into consumable (ink, paper and damping solution) are harmful for the industrialist, the consumer and the environment. The main feature of this work is to control and thus to optimize these flux. With this intention, two optical sensors functioning in reflection were developed. A laser with receiving photodiode for the control of damping solution film thickness, and an optical fiber related to a photoelectric sensor for control of ink film thickness. The current study aims at the calibration of these two sensors for respectively the control of water and ink flux in the offset press. Le procédé d'impression offset repose essentiellement sur l'équilibre entre la solution de mouillage et l'encre. Toutefois, cet équilibre reste une tâche difficile à réaliser. Les pertes en temps et en consommables (encre, papier, solution de mouillage) correspondantes sont nuisibles à la fois pour l'industriel, le consommateur et l'environnement. L'objectif de ce travail est de contrôler et donc d'optimiser ces flux pour un tirage donné. Pour ce faire, deux capteurs de type optique fonctionnant en réflexion ont été développés. Un laser avec photodiode réceptrice pour le contrôle du film de solution de mouillage, et une fibre optique liée à un capteur photoélectrique pour le contrôle du film d'encre. L'étude actuelle vise la mise en ouvre et l'étalonnage de ces deux capteurs pour la mesure et le contrôle des films respectifs d'eau et d'encre dans la presse offset.

  5. Distribution of Nanoflares as Spatially Resolved Current Sheets in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. S.; Lin, L.

    2014-05-01

    In a recent numerical study [Ng et al., Astrophys. J. 747, 109, 2012], based on a three-dimensional model of coronal heating using reduced magnetohydrodynamics, we have obtained scaling results of heating rate versus Lundquist number S based on a series of runs in which random photospheric motions are imposed for hundreds to thousands of Alfvén time in order to obtain converged statistical values. The heating rate found in these simulations saturates to a level that is independent of S in the high S limit and is consistent with the required level for coronal heating. In a previous study based on the total heating rate time series [Ng and Lin, AIP Conf. Proc. 1500, 38, 2012] in these simulations, we have also calculated heating events distributions, which are consistent with observations but do not support the nanoflares scenario [Parker, Astrophys. J. 330, 474, 1988]. This method has a limitation of not distinguishing individual heating events. We now extend this analysis to investigate the distribution of energy release events defined as spatially resolved current sheets [Lin et el., ASP Conf. Ser. 474, 159, 2013]. We report preliminary results and compare to results obtained using only time-series analysis.

  6. Electromagnetically driven, fast opening and closing gas jet valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan; Elliott, Kristi Wilson; Geddes, C. G. R.; van Mourik, R. A.; Leemans, W. P.; Murphy, H.; Clover, M.

    2011-03-01

    The design and performance are presented of an electromagnetically driven gas valve [M. Krishnan, J. Wright, and T. Ma, Proceedings of the 13th Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop, Santa Cruz, CA, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1086 (AIP, New York, 2008)] that opens in <100μs, closes in <500μs, and can operate at pressures of ˜1000psia to drive supersonic nozzles. Such a valve has applications to laser-plasma accelerators, where the fast opening and closing would allow sharper edges to the flow and also allow higher rep-rate operation without loading the vacuum chamber. The valve action is effected by a flyer plate accelerated by the electromagnetic impulse of a low inductance, spiral wound, strip-line coil driven by a capacitor. Gas flows out of the valve when the seal between this flyer plate and the valve seat is broken. The electromagnetic force greatly exceeds the restoring forces provided by a spring and the gas pressure against the valve seat. Piezoresistive sensor and laser interferometer measurements of flow show that the valve opens in ˜100μs for all pressures up to 800 psia. The closing time is 500μs, set by the spring constant and mass. The prototype valve has been operated with helium at 0.5 Hz and at 500 psia for ˜1 hour at a time with no cooling.

  7. Noninvasive Online Measurement of Genome Lengths of Mammalian Tissues in Bulk by 14 MeV Neutron Atometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maglich, Bogdan; Radovic, Anna; Druey, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Genome length, L=, no. of DNA nucleotide base pairs in cell of bovine (b) and porcine (p) tissues, closest to human genome, were hitherto measured by genomic sequencing Lb=3, Lp=2.7 Giga base pairs [1,2] (Gbp) errors not given. - We report measurements of Lb/Lp and Lb, Lp without sequencing by atometry [3,4]. No. of O and C atoms, N, in nucleotide molecules, was obtained from prompt γ rate, G, emitted in inel. scatt. 14 MeV neutrons, with nuclei of C, O, in nucleotide molecule. Since G prop. N, Lb/Lp=Gb/Gp. p and b meat was irradiated for 30'. From msd G we obtained Lb /Lp=1.28±0.02 16% greater than [1,2]. We got absolute Lb=1.65/f, Lp=1.28/f Gbp, 0.3AIP Conf. Proc. 796,431(2005); http://link.aip.org/link/?APCPCS/796/431/1

  8. Analysis and experiments in support of inertial confinement fusion reactor concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, G. A.; Peterson, R. R.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    1991-08-01

    Cost-effective and safe containment of high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) microexplosions in near-term laboratory microfusion facilities (LMF) and longer-term reactors requires an understanding of the interaction of target-generated x rays and ionic debris with surrounding buffer gases and the first solid surface that faces the target. The microfireball plasma created when a target explodes in a gas atmosphere of 1-10 Torr is not in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The plasma state must be determined by coupling the radiation field to the atomic level population calculation in order to correctly predict the surface emission of the plasma. Conditions similar to those predicted for ICF target chambers can be simulated using the SATURN x-ray simulator facility [Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Dense Z-Pinches, AIP Conf. Proc. 195 (AIP, New York, 1989), p. 3]. Aluminum and graphite samples that represent possible first wall materials were tested in SATURN. Coated aluminum samples and four-directional graphite weaves in a carbon matrix survived the tests.

  9. L’explosion intravésicale au cours des procédures de résection endoscopique: Un incident dangereux qui peut être évité

    PubMed Central

    Anzaoui, Jihad El; Abakka, Najib; El harrech, Younes; Ghoundale, Omar; Touiti, Driss; Lahkim, Mohammed; Fihri, Jawad Fassi; Bakzaza, Walid; Mejdane, Abdelhadi

    2013-01-01

    Résumé Les explosions survenant au cours des manœuvres endoscopiques urologiques sont rares et dangereuses. Elles sont dues à une production d’hydrogène par hydrolyse de l’eau lors des procédés de coagulation et de section. L’hydrogène devient très combustible une fois mélangé avec l’oxygène ambiant. Nous rapportons un cas d’explosion intravésicale au cours d’une résection transurethrale d’une tumeur de la vessie et nous exposons, par une revue de littérature, les différentes théories physiopathologiques et les moyens de prévention. PMID:23914274

  10. Physics Academic Workforce Report, 2000. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Stowe, Katie; Czujko, Roman

    This report discusses trends in the physics academic workforce and the implications of these trends for the future academic job market. In March 2000, a survey was sent to 766 U.S. physics departments that grant at least a bachelor's degree in physics, and 725 responses were received, a response rate of 95%. Degree-granting physics departments in…

  11. AIP Report, 1989 Salaries: Society Membership Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellman, Dawn; Scholz, Catherine

    This report examines the variations in salaries by degree level, employment sector, geographic location, and work activity among members of the scientific labor force and educational system. The data are based on a stratified random sample of one-sixth of the U.S. membership of the American Institute of Physics Member Societies; approximately…

  12. Study of Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering of Alizarin and Crystal Violet Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Ram; Swarnkar, Raj Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) plays a vital role in analytical chemistry to characterize ultra trace quantity of organic compounds and biological samples. Two mechanisms have been considered to explain the SERS effect. The main contribution arises from a huge enhancement of the local electromagnetic field close to surface roughness of the metal structures, due to the excitation of a localized surface plasmon, while a further enhancement can be observed for molecules adsorbed onto specific sites when resonant charge transfer occurs. SERS signals have been observed from adsorbates on many metallic surfaces like Ag, Au, Ni, Cu etc. Additionally, metal oxide nanoparticles also show SERS signals It has now been established that SERS of analyte material is highly dependent on the type of substrate involved. Many types of nanostructures like nanofilms, nanorods, nanospheres etc. show highly efficient SERS signals. In particular, there are two routes available for the synthesis of these nanomaterials: the chemical route and the physical route. Chemical route involves many types of reducing agents and capping agents which can interfere in origin and measurement of these signals. The physical route avoids these anomalies and therefore it is suitable for the study of SERS phenomenon. Pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium is an excellent top down technique to produce colloidal solution of nanoparticles with desired shape and size having surface free from chemical contamination, which is essential requirement for surface application of nanoparticles. The present work deals with the study of SERS of Crystal violet dye and Alizarin group dye on Cu@ Cu_2O and Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation. M. Fleishchmann, P. J. Hendra, and A. J. McQuillian Chem. Phys. Lett., 26, 163, 1974. U. Wenning, B. Pettinger, and H. Wetzel Chem. Phys. Lett., 70, 49, 1980. S. C. Singh, R. K. Swarnkar, P. Ankit, M. C. Chattopadhyaya, and R. Gopal AIP Conf. Proc

  13. Magnetism in EuBCO and YBCO vortex states near and below Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, R.; Browne, M. C.; Boekema, C.

    2012-02-01

    By means of MaxEnt-μSR [1] analysis, we investigate transverse field μSR data [2] of EuBa2Cu3O7-δgEuBCO; Tc = 93 K). Our focus is on a temperature interval near Tc to search for precursor effects, [3] and for predicted [4a] pseudogap loop currents above and below Tc, already observed [4b] above Tc for GdBCO. Further, we continue to study the field-direction dependence of the predicted [5a] and observed [5b] antiferromagnetism (AF) below 0.5Tc for the vortex states in c-axis-oriented YBCO. This AF in and near the vortex cores is likely three-dimensional. In sum, magnetic roots of cuprate superconductivity are well plausible. Research is supported by LANL-DOE, REU-NSF and AFC. [4pt] [1] C Boekema and MC Browne, AIP Conf Proc #1073 (2008) 260.[0pt] [2] DW Cooke et al, Phys Rev B 39 (1989) 2748.[0pt] [3] B Aguilar, C Boekema et al, Bull Am Phys Soc 37 (1992).[0pt] [4a] CM Varma, Phys Rev Lett 83 (1999) 3538.[0pt] [4b] T Songatikamas et al, J Supercond & Novel Magn 23 (2010) 793.[0pt] [5a] S-C Zhang, Science 275 (1997) 1089; H-D Chen et al, Phys Rev B70 (2004) 024516.[0pt] [5b] C. Boekema et al, J Phys Conf Series, 150 (2009) 052022. http://jpcs.iop.org/LT25

  14. Precision Spectroscopy in Helium and the Interface with Nuclear Physics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiner, David

    1996-05-01

    Atomic theory footnote G. Drake in Long-Range Casimir Forces: Theory and Recent Exp. on Atomic Systems, eds. Levin and Micha (Plenum, N. Y., 1993) footnote K. Pachucki and S. Karshenboim J. Phys. B 28, L221 (1995) and experiment footnote F. Marin, F. Minardi, F. Pavone, M. Inguscio, and G. Drake Z. Phys. D 32, 285 (1995) footnote D. Shiner, R. Dixson and V. Vedantham, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74 3553 (1995) in helium has begun to yield information on the nuclear sizes of helium-3 and helium-4 with a precision that can not be obtained by other techniques. In essence one attempts to use lasers and atomic physics to provide the most accurate "meter stick" or length scale for few-nucleon systems. Such efforts are particularly important since scattering techniques are no longer of sufficient accuracy to test the size predictions of few-body nuclear theory. footnote J. L. Friar, in Few-Body Problems in Physics, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 334, ed. F. Gross (AIP, New York, 1995) p.323 We will discuss the status of the relevant atomic theory and experiments along with current efforts at improvements. For instance we can improve our own measurements by, among other things, using improved laser frequency standards. footnote P. Jungner, M. Eickhoff, S. Swartz, J. Ye and J. Hall, SPIE 2378, 22 (1995) We will also discuss some aspects and issues of few-body nuclear theory that effect the nuclear size predictions. For example, recent work footnote S. Weinberg, Phys. Lett. B 295, 114 (1992) footnote C. Ordonez, L. Ray, and U. van Kolck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 1982 (1994) allows, through the use of chiral perturbation theory, a stronger connection between QCD and traditional approaches to nuclear forces and (2) support for and perhaps improvements in the methods employed in few-body nuclear theory.

  15. Sound speed and oscillation frequencies for a solar model evolved with Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann; Fontes, Christopher; Walczak, Przemyslaw; Wood, Suzannah R.; Mussack, Katie

    2015-08-01

    Los Alamos has calculated a new generation of radiative opacities for elements with atomic number Z=1-30 with improved physics input, updated atomic data, and finer temperature grid to replace the Los Alamos LEDCOP opacities released in the year 2000. We calculate the evolution of a standard solar model including these new opacities, and compare with a model evolved using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OPAL opacities released about 1996. We use the solar abundance mixture of Asplund, Grevesse, Sauval, and Scott (2009), including 2015 updates. The Los Alamos ATOMIC opacities (Colgan et al. 2013a,b) are somewhat higher than those of OPAL for temperatures and densities near the base of the solar convection zone. We compare the calculated nonadiabatic solar oscillation frequencies and solar interior sound speed to observed frequencies and helioseismic inferences. We discuss the potential for increased opacities to partially mitigate the ‘solar abundance problem’.References:J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr., G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, Eighth International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications: ICAMDATA, Gaithersburg, MD 2012, AIP Conf. Proc. No. 1545, (AIP, New York, 2013a), pp. 17-26.J. Colgan, D.P. Kilcrease, N.H. Magee, Jr, G.S.J. Armstrong, J. Abdallah, Jr., M.E. Sherrill, C.J. Fontes, H.L. Zhang and P. Hakel, High Energy Density Physics 9, 369 (2013b).

  16. Improvement of trace element analysis system using RIKEN electron cyclotron resonance ion source and linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kidera, M.; Nakagawa, T.; Takahashi, K.; Enomoto, S.; Igarashi, K.; Fujimaki, M.; Ikezawa, E.; Kamigaito, O.; Kase, M.; Goto, A.; Yano, Y.

    2006-03-15

    We have developed a new analytical system that consists of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (RIKEN 18 GHz ECRIS) and a RIKEN heavy ion linear accelerator (RILAC). This system is called trace element analysis using electron cyclotron resonance ion source and RILAC (ECRIS-RILAC-TEA). ECRIS-RILAC-TEA has several advantages as described in the work of Kidera et al. [AIP Conf. Proc. 749, 85 (2005)]. However, many experimental results during the last several years revealed a few problems: (1) large background contamination in the ECRIS, particularly at the surface of the plasma chamber wall, (2) high counting of the ionization chamber and the data taking system that is monitored by the direct beam from the accelerator, and (3) difficulty in the selection of the pilot sample and pilot beam production from the ECRIS for the purpose of normalization. In order to overcome these problems, we conducted several test experiments over the past year. In this article, we report the experimental results in detail and future plans for improving this system.

  17. Numerical studies of multipactor in dielectric-loaded accelerator structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Oleksandr; Nusinovich, Gregory; Antonsen, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Multipactor (MP) is known as the avalanche growth of the number of secondary electrons emitted from a solid surface exposed to an rf electric field under vacuum conditions. MP may occur in various microwave and rf systems such as microwave tubes, rf windows and launchers, accelerating structures, and rf satellite payloads. In this work we present results of MP analysis in dielectric-loaded accelerator (DLA) structures. The starting point of our work was experimental and theoretical studies of DLA structures jointly done by Argonne National Laboratory and Naval Research Laboratory (J. G. Power et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 164801 (2004); J. G. Power et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 877, 362 (2006)). In the theoretical model developed during those studies the space-charge field due to the total number of particles is taken into account as a parameter. We perform our studies using a self-consistent approach with the help of time-dependent two-dimensional code developed at the University of Maryland (O. V. Sinitsyn et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 073102 (2009)). Results include analysis of MP evolution at an early stage, detailed studies of individual electron trajectories, analysis of MP onset time under various conditions and comparison of some results with the experimental data.

  18. Proof-of-principle demonstration of a virtual flow meter-based transducer for gaseous helium monitoring in particle accelerator cryogenics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpaia, P.; Blanco, E.; Girone, M.; Inglese, V.; Pezzetti, M.; Piccinelli, F.; Serio, L.

    2015-07-01

    A transducer based on a virtual flow meter is proposed for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators. The virtual flow meter allows technical and economical constraints, preventing installation of physical instruments in all the needed measurement points, to be overcome. Virtual flow meter performance for the alternative models of Samson [http://www.samson.de (2015)] and Sereg-Schlumberger [http://www.slb.com/ (2015)] is compared with the standard IEC 60534-2-1 [Industrial-process control valves—Part 2-1: Flow capacity—sizing equations for fluid flow under installed conditions (2011), https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/2461], for a large temperature range, for both gaseous and liquid helium phases, and for different pressure drops. Then, the calibration function of the transducer is derived. Finally, the experimental validation for the helium gaseous state on the test station for superconducting magnets in the laboratory SM18 [Pirotte et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1573, 187 (2014)] at CERN is reported.

  19. Simulations of plasma confinement in an antihydrogen trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gomberoff, K.; Fajans, J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Vay, J.-L.; Wurtele, J.S.

    2007-10-15

    The three-dimensional particle-in-cell (3-D PIC) simulation code WARP is used to study positron confinement in antihydrogen traps. The magnetic geometry is close to that of a UC Berkeley experiment conducted, with electrons, as part of the ALPHA collaboration (W. Bertsche et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 796, 301 (2005)). In order to trap antihydrogen atoms, multipole magnetic fields are added to a conventional Malmberg-Penning trap. These multipole fields must be strong enough to confine the antihydrogen, leading to multipole field strengths at the trap wall comparable to those of the axial magnetic field. Numerical simulations reported here confirm recent experimental measurements of reduced particle confinement when a quadrupole field is added to a Malmberg-Penning trap. It is shown that, for parameters relevant to various antihydrogen experiments, the use of an octupole field significantly reducesthe positron losses seen with a quadrupole field. A unique method for obtaining a 3-D equilibrium of the positrons in the trap with a collisionless PIC code was developed especially for the study of the antihydrogen trap; however, it is of practical use for other traps as well.

  20. Simulations of plasma confinement in an antihydrogen trap

    SciTech Connect

    Gomberoff, K.; Fajans, J.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Vay, J.-L.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2007-10-15

    The three-dimensional particle-in-cell (3-D PIC) simulation code WARP is used to study positron confinement in antihydrogen traps. The magnetic geometry is close to that of a UC Berkeley experiment conducted, with electrons, as part of the ALPHA collaboration [W. Bertsche et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 796, 301 (2005)]. In order to trap antihydrogen atoms, multipole magnetic fields are added to a conventional Malmberg-Penning trap. These multipole fields must be strong enough to confine the antihydrogen, leading to multipole field strengths at the trap wall comparable to those of the axial magnetic field. Numerical simulations reported here confirm recent experimental measurements of reduced particle confinement when a quadrupole field is added to a Malmberg-Penning trap. It is shown that, for parameters relevant to various antihydrogen experiments, the use of an octupole field significantly reduces the positron losses seen with a quadrupole field. A unique method for obtaining a 3-D equilibrium of the positrons in the trap with a collisionless PIC code was developed especially for the study of the antihydrogen trap; however, it is of practical use for other traps as well.

  1. Gas Phase Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Dmso, Part II: Towards the Terahertz Observation of 4-FOLD Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Sadovskii, Dmitrii A.

    2013-06-01

    Benefiting of the exceptional properties of the AILES synchrotron beamline, the gas phase Far-IR spectrum of DMSO has been recorded and resolved. The rovibrational analysis allowed to discover a new rotational behaviour for a polyatomic molecule: the gyroscopic destabilization. In order to explain this phenomenon, we looked for four-fold energy clusters in the high resolution ground state THz spectrum of DMSO recorded with a sub-THz spectrometer based on a frequency multiplication chain. Pure rotational lines in the 5 lowest vibrationnally excited levels have been recorded below 700 GHz. With near 1000 rotational transitions assigned, high quantum numbers have been reached allowing to discover sequence of four-fold clusters in the out of plane bending mode of DMSO and to study the vibrational dependence of an unusual rotational dynamics. J. B. Brubach et al., AIP Conf. Proc., 1214, (81), 2010. A. Cuisset, L. Nanobashvili, I. Smirnova, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, D. Sadovskii,Chem. Phys. Lett., 492,(30),2010 A. Cuisset, O. Pirali, D. Sadovskii,Phys. Rev. Lett., 109,(094101), 2012. G. Mouret, M. Guinet, A. Cuisset, L. Croizet, S. Eliet, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, IEEE Sensors Journal, 13, 1, 2013.

  2. Extracting the Injection History of Solar Energetic Particles on Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.; Hill, M. E.

    2013-05-01

    Studies over the last Solar Cycle of nearly scatter-free solar energetic particle propagation during magnetically well-connected impulsive events established that the particle injection history could be extracted directly from the anisotropy histories of beam-like events (without requiring the solution of a full propagation equation). However, the limitation of observations at 1AU was that the particles back-scattered from beyond 1AU began to arrive before the maximum intensity of out-going particles, thus partially obscuring the remainder of the injection history (which usually extended well beyond the event maximum). Fortunately, as Solar Probe Plus moves inward towards its perihelion, the arrival of the back-scattered component (which still must travel inward from beyond 1 AU) will likely be delayed until well after the injection maximum, giving the ISIS/EPI-Lo & EPI-Hi instruments a much clearer diagnostic of the entire injection process. Examples of intensity histories for such events well inside 1 AU will be constructed (based on beam-like events observed at 1 AU by ACE/EPAM and SOHO/ERNE), using the functional equation directly relating the scatter-free and the back-scatter propagation (Roelof, AIP Conf. Proc., 1039, pp. 174-183, 2008).

  3. Gas Phase Rovibrational Spectroscopy of Dmso, PART.I: when a Synchrotron Source Reveals AN Unusual Rotational Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Sadovskii, Dmitrii A.; Pirali, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Many of us have enjoyed the spectacle of a spinning top influenced by friction: rotating rapidly about a stable stationary axis, the top loses slowly its angular momentum j (and energy), slows down gradually, and then, suddenly, its axis becomes unstable, the top wobbles, and an abrupt change of the top's position follows. In other words, the system undergoes a bifurcation. In the case of the tippe top, rotation about its lower point is stable at low values of angular momentum J and becomes unstable at large J. Something quite similar occurs in a freely rotating dimethylsulfoxyde (DMSO, (CH_3)_2SO) molecule. For the first time in such large polyatomic molecule a quantum bifurcation induced by a gyroscopic destabilization was observed. This unusual phenomenon in rotational dynamics was discovered in the rovibrational states of the bending fundamental ν_{23} band of DMSO whose high-resolution gas phase absorption spectrum was observed along with that of ν_{11} by Cuisset et al. using the exceptional properties of the AILES beamline in the Far-Infrared domain. A. Cuisset, O. Pirali, D. Sadovskii,Phys. Rev. Lett., 109,(094101), 2012. A. Cuisset, L. Nanobashvili, I. Smirnova, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, D. Sadovskii,Chem. Phys. Lett., 492,(30),2010 J. B. Brubach et al., AIP Conf. Proc., 1214, (81), 2010.

  4. Application of rank-ordered multifractal analysis (ROMA) to intermittent fluctuations in 3D turbulent flows, 2D MHD simulation and solar wind data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Chang, T.

    2010-12-01

    A new method in describing the multifractal characteristics of intermittent events was introduced by Cheng and Wu [Chang T. and Wu C.C., Physical Rev, E77, 045401(R), 2008]. The procedure provides a natural connection between the rank-ordered spectrum and the idea of one-parameter scaling for monofractals. This technique has been demonstrated using results obtained from a 2D MHD simulation. It has also been successfully applied to in-situ solar wind observations [Chang T., Wu, C.C. and Podesta, J., AIP Conf Proc. 1039, 75, 2008], and the broadband electric field oscillations from the auroral zone [Tam, S.W.Y. et al., Physical Rev, E81, 036414, 2010]. We take the next step in this procedure. By using the ROMA spectra and the scaled probability distribution functions (PDFs), raw PDFs can be calculated, which can be compared directly with PDFs from observations or simulation results. In addition to 2D MHD simulation results and in-situ solar wind observation, we show clearly using the ROMA analysis the multifractal character of the 3D fluid simulation data obtained from the JHU turbulence database cluster at http://turbulence.pha.jhu.edu. In particular, we show the scaling of the non-symmetrical PDF for the parallel-velocity fluctuations of this 3D fluid data.

  5. Particle acceleration and transport in a chaotic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Li, G.; Dasgupta, B.

    2012-12-01

    Time-dependent chaotic magnetic field can arise from a simple asymmetric current wire-loop system (CWLS). Such simple CWLSs exist, for example, in solar flares. Indeed one can use an ensemble of such systems to model solar active region magnetic field [1,2]. Here we use test particle simulation to investigate particle transport and energization in such a time-dependent chaotic magnetic field, and through induction, a chaotic electric field. We first construct an ensemble of simple systems based on the estimated size and field strength of solar active region. By following the trajectories of single charged particles, we will examine how particle energy is changed. Diffusion coefficients in both real space and momentum space can be calculated as well as the average trapped time of the particles within chaotic field region. Particle energy spectrum as a function of time will be examined. [1] Dasgupta, B. and Abhay K. Ram, (2007) Chaotic magnetic fields due to asymmetric current configurations -application to cross field diffusion of particles in cosmic rays, (Presented at the 49th Annual Meeting of the DPP, APS, Abstract # BP8.00102) [2] G. Li, B. Dasgupta, G. Webb, and A. K. Ram, (2009) Particle Motion and Energization in a Chaotic Magnetic Field, AIP Conf. Proc. 1183, pp. 201-211; doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3266777

  6. Optimal computation of guided wave propagation and scattering in pipeworks comprising elbows: Numerical and experimental validations and parametric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bakkali, M.; Lhémery, A.; Chapuis, B.; Berthelot, F.; Grondel, S.

    2015-03-01

    Simulation tools of guided wave (GW) examination are developed at CEA to help inspection design and results interpretation. In a previous paper [M. El Bakkali, A. Lhémery, V. Baronian and F. Berthelot, (AIP Conf. Proc. 1581), pp. 332-9 (2014)], a model was developed to deal with GW propagation in elbows, GW scattering at the junction of a straight and a curved guides and GW multiple-scattering by an elbow joined to two straight pipes. The method is computationally optimal: many results are obtained by fast post-processing. Modes in the straight and curved guides are computed once by the semi-analytic finite element method; this implies solving two systems of equations over their shared cross-section meshed by FE. Scattering at a junction of straight and curved pipes requires computing surface integrals over the same section for applying the mode-matching method. For varying elbow angle, computing scattering coefficients of the straight-curved-straight double junction requires multiplying scattering matrices local to one junction with analytic propagation matrices in the curved guide that are angle-dependent. The aim here is twofold. First, the model is validated by comparison of its predictions with results computed by the finite element method and with measurements. Second, the model is used for parametric studies made easy by its computing efficiency.

  7. Radiation-Hydromagnetic Models of a Z-Pinch Implosion with an Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. W.; Giuliani, J. L.; Terry, R.; Davis, J.; Velikovich, A. L.

    1997-11-01

    Experimental results on a 1MA pulser suggest that axial magnetic fields can stabilize z-pinch implosions and enhance the compression ratio(S. Sorokin and S. Chaikovsky, Dense Z-Pinches, AIP Conf. Proc. 299, p.83 (1993).). The present theoretical work calculates the effects of an axial magnetic field on the plasma and field profiles in an imploding z-pinch. The initial mass configuration is an annular shell of krypton. The 1-D simulation model includes: resistive diffusion (skin effect) for both the azimuthal and axial fields, ionization dynamics, and non-LTE radiation transport. Unlike the constant pulser current of self-similar models for the screw-pinch, a transmission line is used to model the circuit of a realistic ~10MA pulser. The implosion dynamics resulting from an axial field generated by a twisted return current cage will be compared with results due to an initial field from external Helmholtz coils. The dependence of the radiative performance on compression ratio, which in turn is a function of inital field strength or cage twist, will be discussed.

  8. Proof-of-principle demonstration of a virtual flow meter-based transducer for gaseous helium monitoring in particle accelerator cryogenics.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, P; Blanco, E; Girone, M; Inglese, V; Pezzetti, M; Piccinelli, F; Serio, L

    2015-07-01

    A transducer based on a virtual flow meter is proposed for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators. The virtual flow meter allows technical and economical constraints, preventing installation of physical instruments in all the needed measurement points, to be overcome. Virtual flow meter performance for the alternative models of Samson [ http://www.samson.de (2015)] and Sereg-Schlumberger [ http://www.slb.com/ (2015)] is compared with the standard IEC 60534-2-1 [Industrial-process control valves-Part 2-1: Flow capacity-sizing equations for fluid flow under installed conditions (2011), https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/2461], for a large temperature range, for both gaseous and liquid helium phases, and for different pressure drops. Then, the calibration function of the transducer is derived. Finally, the experimental validation for the helium gaseous state on the test station for superconducting magnets in the laboratory SM18 [Pirotte et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1573, 187 (2014)] at CERN is reported.

  9. Proof-of-principle demonstration of a virtual flow meter-based transducer for gaseous helium monitoring in particle accelerator cryogenics

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaia, P.; Blanco, E.; Inglese, V.; Pezzetti, M.; Serio, L.; Girone, M.; Piccinelli, F.

    2015-07-15

    A transducer based on a virtual flow meter is proposed for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators. The virtual flow meter allows technical and economical constraints, preventing installation of physical instruments in all the needed measurement points, to be overcome. Virtual flow meter performance for the alternative models of Samson [ http://www.samson.de (2015)] and Sereg-Schlumberger [ http://www.slb.com/ (2015)] is compared with the standard IEC 60534-2-1 [Industrial-process control valves—Part 2-1: Flow capacity—sizing equations for fluid flow under installed conditions (2011), https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/2461], for a large temperature range, for both gaseous and liquid helium phases, and for different pressure drops. Then, the calibration function of the transducer is derived. Finally, the experimental validation for the helium gaseous state on the test station for superconducting magnets in the laboratory SM18 [Pirotte et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1573, 187 (2014)] at CERN is reported.

  10. Proof-of-principle demonstration of a virtual flow meter-based transducer for gaseous helium monitoring in particle accelerator cryogenics.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, P; Blanco, E; Girone, M; Inglese, V; Pezzetti, M; Piccinelli, F; Serio, L

    2015-07-01

    A transducer based on a virtual flow meter is proposed for monitoring helium distribution and consumption in cryogenic systems for particle accelerators. The virtual flow meter allows technical and economical constraints, preventing installation of physical instruments in all the needed measurement points, to be overcome. Virtual flow meter performance for the alternative models of Samson [ http://www.samson.de (2015)] and Sereg-Schlumberger [ http://www.slb.com/ (2015)] is compared with the standard IEC 60534-2-1 [Industrial-process control valves-Part 2-1: Flow capacity-sizing equations for fluid flow under installed conditions (2011), https://webstore.iec.ch/publication/2461], for a large temperature range, for both gaseous and liquid helium phases, and for different pressure drops. Then, the calibration function of the transducer is derived. Finally, the experimental validation for the helium gaseous state on the test station for superconducting magnets in the laboratory SM18 [Pirotte et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 1573, 187 (2014)] at CERN is reported. PMID:26233405

  11. The fractional quantum Hall effect: The cases of 5/2 and 12/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Keshav

    2009-03-01

    We find that there is a state of zero energy because of a zero value in (1/2)g. When negative sign is used, L=0, S=1/2, g=(2J+1)/(2L+1)=[2(L-S)+1]/[2L+1]=0 so that [n+(1/2)][(1/2)g]=0. For positive sign, L+S, L=0, g=2 so that [n+(1/2)][(1/2)g]=5/2 for n=2. Hence 0 and 5/2 become particle-hole conjugates. In this definition, the sign of the spin for the particle is different from that for the hole as required by the helicity, p.s. For negative sign, L=2, (1/2)g=2/5 and (n-n')[(1/2)g]=12/5 with n-n'=6. For the positive sign, (1/2)g=3/5 for L=2 and for n-n"=4, we get 12/5. Thus 12/5 can arise for up spin as well as for down spin for different Landau levels[1]. On the basis of a product of [n+(1/2)][(1/2)g] we are able to understand all of the fractions given by Pan et al[2]. [1] K. N. Shrivastava, Phys. Lett. A 113,435(1986); A326,469(2004); Mod. Phys. Lett. 13,1087(1999); 14,1009(2000); AIP Conf. Proc. 909, 43-49(2007); 909.50-56(2007);1017, 422-428(2008);1017,326-330(2008); 1017, 47-56(2008), Proc. SPIE(USA)7155,71552F1-8[7155&_slash;86](2008). [2] Wei Pan et al, Phys. Rev. B 77, 075307(2008).

  12. Hadronic probes and nuclear interactions. AIP conference proceedings No. 133

    SciTech Connect

    Comfort, J.R.; Gibbs, W.R.; Ritchie, B.G.

    1985-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers in this conference proceedings. Topics include: complementary probes in nuclear physics, microscopic approaches to hadronic interactions, quark/gluon phenomena in nuclear physics, advocacy talks for approaches to quark/gluon phenomena, meson production in nuclei, future facilities for nuclear physics. (LEW)

  13. 77 FR 22376 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Grant Assurances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ...), preference shall be given to Vietnam era veterans, Persian Gulf veterans, Afghanistan-Iraq war veterans...), were published on February 3, 1988, at 53 FR 3104 and amended on September 6, 1988, at 53 FR 34361; on August 29, 1989, at 54 FR 35748; on June 10, 1994 at 59 FR 30076; on January 4, 1995, at 60 FR 521;...

  14. Society Membership Profile: Employment Mobility and Career Change. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Beverly Fearn; Kellman, Dawn

    Information on the influence of employment mobility and career change on the flexibility of the physics labor force is provided, noting the past several decades have brought a dramatic roller coaster of changes to the physics community. Five sections are as follows: membership composition (demographics, professional self-identification, and…

  15. Initial Employment Report: 1992 Physics Degree Recipients. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuschatz, Michael; Mulvey, Patrick

    Results of the 1991-92 annual survey for 1991-92 on initial employment rates for recipients of doctoral, masters, and bachelors degrees in physics and astronomy are reported. Overall, responses indicated that the job market for recent physics degree recipients remains tight. Other findings include the following: (1) among new bachelors degree…

  16. The Early Careers of Physics Bachelors. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Stowe, Katie

    This report focuses on graduates in physics who did not earn any degrees after their bachelor's degree and who are not primarily students. The report is based on data from a sample of physics bachelors between December 1998 and the summer of 1999. About 1,200 respondents, out of a potential 2,400, supplied the information. At 5 to 8 years after…

  17. Academic Workforce Report, 1997-98. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Stowe, Katie

    This report issued by the American Institute of Physics presents data on various aspects of the physics academic workforce. For the school year 1997-98, the institute measured the number of physics faculty, number of women faculty, turnover rates, retirement rates, new hires, frozen positions, and faculty recruitment efforts. Data suggest that the…

  18. 1977-78 Graduate Student Survey. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susanne D.

    The 1977-78 annual Graduate Student Survey analyzes information supplied by graduate physics students and also includes graduate astronomy students. Highlights of the findings are: a continuing decline in the number of graduate physics degree recipients; the reassurance of a steadily improving job market for new physicists with graduate degrees; a…

  19. Graduate Student Survey, 1984-85. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susanne D.

    Results of the 1984-1985 Graduate Student Survey of physics and astronomy graduates are presented, with attention to: educational background, current graduate student status, choice of subfield, and employment prospects. Highlights include: a major increase occurred in the proportion of foreign physics doctorate recipients; the number and…

  20. 1975-76 Graduate Student Survey. AIP Report, July 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Suzanne D.

    The characteristics of graduate physics and astronomy students are examined in this survey and their employment opportunities after graduate school are described. (The physics students have been surveyed annually for over 15 years, but this is only the second year that astronomy students have been included.) Highlights of this report are: (1) a…

  1. Women Physicists Speak Again. AIP Report, Number R-441

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Guo, Stacy

    2006-01-01

    Across the world, women in physics have much in common. In almost all countries, women are largely under represented in physics. In the majority of countries for which data was obtainable for this report from reliable statistical agencies, women earned no more than one-fifth of the PhDs in physics. Many women physicists across the world also…

  2. Graduate Student Survey, 1983-1984 AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susanne D.

    Results of the 1983-1984 Graduate Student Survey of physics and astronomy graduates are presented, with attention to: educational background, current graduate student status, choice of subfield, and employment prospects. Highlights include the following: the demand for doctoral physicists remains high, especially in industry; salary increases for…

  3. [Abolishment of the AiP. Transformation and further regulations].

    PubMed

    Haage, H

    2006-04-01

    Abolishment of the time as a physician in training (intern) in Germany on 1 October 2004 completed the reform of the education of doctors and the total time of education was reduced to 6 years. So the wages of young doctors could be raised and the aim is that these doctors will begin their jobs in hospitals in Germany and not abroad, so that this will be a measure to counteract the regional shortage of doctors. To finance the difference between the wages of the former trainees and now the young doctors in the hospitals, the German law about modernisation of the social health security system ("GKV-Modernisierungsgesetz") ensured that a budget of about 300 million euros would be provided to the hospitals by German health insurance companies. Implementation of this reform in general caused no problems. This can be ascribed to the fact that there are more than 3,000 open jobs for young doctors in German hospitals today. PMID:16523326

  4. Science on the Moon: The Wailing Wall of Space Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas

    conference. However, whatever the list the issue of cooperation and binding collaboration remains. As observers of Moon and other space enterprises, we all know that a room full of 60 scientists will not agree on much of anything and there will probably be 60! pleas for more funding. People have special interests and little common sense (e.g., conflict between NSF- and NASA-funding roadmaps). Scientists are no exception. Nevertheless, CERN has done it on Earth! Can we do the same on the Moon? Some of the present generation of proposals for science from and on the Moon, plus new ones, will witness a place in space exploration's future. It is clear, however, that the world has not thought this through adequately, except for talk about an international space federation - whatever that is. An outpost on the Moon with humans permanently living there much like Antarctica on Earth may be in our future. However, such planning is our collective international responsibility and not that of special-interest investigators from individual nations - unless they intend to pay for it. [1] Mendell W. W. (1985) Lunar Bases and Space Activities of the 21st Century, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston. [2] Potter A. E. and Wilson T. L. (1990) Physics and Astrophysics from a Lunar Base, AIP Conf. Proc. 202, American Institute of Physics, New York. [3] Mumma M. J. and Smith H. J. (1990) Astrophysics from the Moon, AIP Conf. Proc. 207, American Institute of Physics, New York.

  5. Hydrodynamic instability growth of three-dimensional, “native-roughness” modulations in x-ray driven, spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Weber, S. V.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Landen, O. L.; Robey, H. F.; Weber, C. R.; Hoover, D. E.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-07-15

    Hydrodynamic instability growth experiments with three-dimensional (3-D) surface-roughness modulations were performed on plastic (CH) shell spherical implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell, R. Cauble, and B. A. Remington, AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The initial capsule outer-surface roughness was similar to the standard specifications (“native roughness”) used in a majority of implosions on NIF. The experiments included instability growth measurements of the perturbations seeded by the thin membranes (or tents) used to hold the capsules inside the hohlraums. In addition, initial modulations included two divots used as spatial fiducials to determine the convergence in the experiments and to check the accuracy of 3D simulations in calculating growth of known initial perturbations. The instability growth measurements were performed using x-ray, through-foil radiography of one side of the imploding shell, based on time-resolved pinhole imaging. Averaging over 30 similar images significantly increases the signal-to-noise ratio, making possible a comparison with 3-D simulations. At a convergence ratio of ∼3, the measured tent and divot modulations were close to those predicted by 3-D simulations (within ∼15%–20%), while measured 3-D, broadband modulations were ∼3–4 times larger than those simulated based on the growth of the known imposed initial surface modulations. In addition, some of the measured 3-D features in x-ray radiographs did not resemble those characterized on the outer capsule surface before the experiments. One of the hypotheses to explain the results is based on the increased instability amplitudes due to modulations of the oxygen content in the bulk of the capsule. As the target assembly and handling procedures involve exposure to UV light, this can increase the uptake of the oxygen into the capsule, with irregularities in the oxygen seeding hydrodynamic instabilities. These new experimental results have

  6. Anomalous dimensionality dependence of diffusion in a rugged energy landscape: How pathological is one dimension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Bagchi, Kaushik; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-05-01

    Diffusion in one dimensional rugged energy landscape (REL) is predicted to be pathologically different (from any higher dimension) with a much larger chance of encountering broken ergodicity [D. L. Stein and C. M. Newman, AIP Conf. Proc. 1479, 620 (2012)]. However, no quantitative study of this difference has been reported, despite the prevalence of multidimensional physical models in the literature (like a high dimensional funnel guiding protein folding/unfolding). Paradoxically, some theoretical studies of these phenomena still employ a one dimensional diffusion description for analytical tractability. We explore the dimensionality dependent diffusion on REL by carrying out an effective medium approximation based analytical calculations and compare them with the available computer simulation results. We find that at an intermediate level of ruggedness (assumed to have a Gaussian distribution), where diffusion is well-defined, the value of the effective diffusion coefficient depends on dimensionality and changes (increases) by several factors (˜5-10) in going from 1d to 2d. In contrast, the changes in subsequent transitions (like 2d to 3d and 3d to 4d and so on) are far more modest, of the order of 10-20% only. When ruggedness is given by random traps with an exponential distribution of barrier heights, the mean square displacement (MSD) is sub-diffusive (a well-known result), but the growth of MSD is described by different exponents in one and higher dimensions. The reason for such strong ruggedness induced retardation in the case of one dimensional REL is discussed. We also discuss the special limiting case of infinite dimension (d = ∞) where the effective medium approximation becomes exact and where theoretical results become simple. We discuss, for the first time, the role of spatial correlation in the landscape on diffusion of a random walker.

  7. Substellar Companions to Seven Evolved Intermediate-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Bun'ei; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Kambe, Eiji; Takeda, Yoichi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Itoh, Yoichi; Ando, Hiroyasu; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Ida, Shigeru

    2012-12-01

    We report on the detections of substellar companions orbiting around seven evolved intermediate-mass stars from precise Doppler measurements at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory. o UMa (G4 II-III) is a giant with a mass of 3.1M', and hosts a planet with a minimum mass of m2 sini = 4.1MJ in an orbit with a period P = 1630 d and an eccentricity e = 0.13. The star also exhibits a linear velocity trend, suggesting the existence of an outer, more massive companion. 75 Cet (G3 III:) is a 2.5M⊙ giant hosting a planet of m2 sini = 3.0MJ in a 692 d orbit with e = 0.12. The star also shows a possible additional periodicity of about 200 d and 1880 d with a velocity amplitude of ˜7-10 m s-1, although these are not significant at this stage. ν Oph (K0 III) is a 3.0M⊙ giant, and has two brown-dwarf companions of m2 sini = 24MJ and 27MJ, in orbits with P = 530.3 d and 3190 d, and e = 0.126 and 0.17, respectively, which were independently announced by Quirrenbach, Reffert, and Bergmann (2011, AIP Conf. Proc. 1331, 102). The ratio of the periods is close to 1:6, suggesting that the companions are in mean motion resonance. We also independently confirmed planets around κ CrB (K0 III-IV) and HD 210702 (K1 IV), which were announced by Johnson et al. (2008, ApJ, 675, 784) and Johnson et al. (2007a, ApJ, 665, 785), respectively. All of the orbital parameters we obtained are consistent with the previous results.

  8. Non-gyrotropic pressure anisotropy induced by velocity shear.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenerani, A.; Del Sarto, D.; Pegoraro, F.; Califano, F.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how, in a collisionless magnetized plasma, a sheared velocity field may lead to the anisotropization of an initial Maxwellian state. By including the full pressure tensor dynamics in a fluid plasma model, we show, analytically and numerically, that a sheared velocity field makes an initial isotropic state anisotropic and non-gyrotropic [1], i.e., makes the plasma pressure tensor anisotropic also in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The propagation of transverse magneto-elastic waves in the anisotropic plasma affects the process of formation of a non-gyrotropic pressure and can lead to its spatial filamentation. This plasma dynamics implies in particular that isotropic MHD equilibria cease to be equilibria in presence of a stationary sheared flow. Similarly, in the case of turbulence, where small-scale spatial inhomogeneities are naturally developed during the direct cascade, we may expect that isotropic turbulent states are not likely to exist whenever a full pressure tensor evolution is accounted for. These results may be relevant to understanding the agyrotropic pressure configurations which are well documented in solar wind measurements and possibly correlated to plasma flows (see e.g. Refs.[2,3]), and which have also been measured in Vlasov simulations of Alfvenic turbulence [4]. [1] D. Del Sarto, F. Pegoraro, F. Califano, "Pressure anisotropy and small spatial scales induced by a velocity shear", http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.04895 [2] H.F. Astudillo, E. Marsch, S. Livi, H. Rosenbauer, "TAUS measurements of non-gyrotropic distribution functions of solar wind alpha particles", AIP Conf. Proc. 328, 289 (1996). [3] A. Posner, M.W. Liemhon, T.H. Zurbuchen, "Upstream magnetospheric ion flux tube within a magnetic cloud: Wind/STICS", Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, (2003). [4] S. Servidio, F. Valentini, F. Califano, P. Veltri, "Local kinetic effects in Two-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 045001 (2012).

  9. Low altitude cloud height and methane humidity retrievals on Titan in the near-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamkovics, M.; Hayes, A.; Mitchell, J.; De Pater, I.; Young, E.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of low altitude clouds on Titan, with cloud-top altitudes below ~10km, likely occurs by a fundamentally different mechanism than for the clouds commonly observed to have cloud-tops in the upper troposphere, above ~15km [1]. Near-infrared spectroscopy of clouds has been the method of choice for determining cloud altitudes [2], however, uncertainties in aerosols scattering properties and opacities, together with limitations in laboratory measurements of gas opacities (in particular for methane), lead to uncertainties in how accurately the altitude of low clouds can be retrieved [3]. Here we revisit near-IR spectra obtained with Keck and Cassini using new laboratory methane line data in the HITRAN 2012 database [4] to address the problem of measuring the altitudes of low clouds. We discuss the role of topography in relation to the formation of low clouds and other diagnostics of conditions near the surface, such as the tropospheric methane humidity. We reanalyze measurements the tropospheric humidity variation [5] and describe observational strategies for improved diagnostics of the tropospheric humidity on Titan . Acknowledgements: Funding for this work is provided by the NSF grant AST-1008788 and NASA OPR grant NNX12AM81G. References: [1] Brown, et al. (2009) ApJ, 706, L110-L113. [2] Ádámkovics et al. (2010) Icarus, 208, 868-877. [3] Griffith et al. (2012) Icarus, 218, 975-988. [4] Rothman et al. (2013) AIP Conf. Proc., 1545, 223-231. [5] Penteado & Griffith (2010) Icarus, 206, 345-351.

  10. Using spectral slopes to characterize the origin of ENAs in the IBEX sky maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; Dayeh, M. A.; Funsten, H. O.; Janzen, P. H.; McComas, D. J.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Schwadron, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    The solar wind exists in stationary states out of equilibrium and can be successfully described by kappa distributions [1]. The kappa index that governs these distributions lies between k~1.5 and infinity and characterizes how far the stationary state is from thermal equilibrium [2,3]. Equilibrium corresponds to kappa→infinity, while the specific index k→1.5 corresponds to the furthest stationary state from equilibrium. The special interval of kappa indices between k~1.5 and k~2.5, the far-equilibrium region, is found to be present in many space plasmas including solar wind [2]. Spontaneous processes that can increase entropy, drive the system away from that region and toward thermal equilibrium, while external factors that can decrease the entropy of the system, move it back into far-equilibrium stationary states. In the case of solar wind, newly formed pick-up ions can play just such a critical role because their motion is highly ordered, resulting that the inner heliosheath has to be characterized by stationary states with kappa indices in the far-equilibrium region [4]. Analysis of the IBEX-Hi Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) spectra show that the emissions are indeed characterized by kappa indices in the far-equilibrium region; these kappa indices directly indicate the source temperature and thus reveal the source locations of the ENAs. 1.Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D.J., 2009, JGR 114, A11105 (and reference therein). 2.Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D.J., 2010, ApJ 714, 971. 3.Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D.J., 2010, Phys. Scr. 82, 035003. 4.Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D.J., 2010, CSPAR 2010, AIP Conf. Proc. (In print).

  11. Anomalous dimensionality dependence of diffusion in a rugged energy landscape: How pathological is one dimension?

    PubMed

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Bagchi, Kaushik; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-05-21

    Diffusion in one dimensional rugged energy landscape (REL) is predicted to be pathologically different (from any higher dimension) with a much larger chance of encountering broken ergodicity [D. L. Stein and C. M. Newman, AIP Conf. Proc. 1479, 620 (2012)]. However, no quantitative study of this difference has been reported, despite the prevalence of multidimensional physical models in the literature (like a high dimensional funnel guiding protein folding/unfolding). Paradoxically, some theoretical studies of these phenomena still employ a one dimensional diffusion description for analytical tractability. We explore the dimensionality dependent diffusion on REL by carrying out an effective medium approximation based analytical calculations and compare them with the available computer simulation results. We find that at an intermediate level of ruggedness (assumed to have a Gaussian distribution), where diffusion is well-defined, the value of the effective diffusion coefficient depends on dimensionality and changes (increases) by several factors (∼5-10) in going from 1d to 2d. In contrast, the changes in subsequent transitions (like 2d to 3d and 3d to 4d and so on) are far more modest, of the order of 10-20% only. When ruggedness is given by random traps with an exponential distribution of barrier heights, the mean square displacement (MSD) is sub-diffusive (a well-known result), but the growth of MSD is described by different exponents in one and higher dimensions. The reason for such strong ruggedness induced retardation in the case of one dimensional REL is discussed. We also discuss the special limiting case of infinite dimension (d = ∞) where the effective medium approximation becomes exact and where theoretical results become simple. We discuss, for the first time, the role of spatial correlation in the landscape on diffusion of a random walker. PMID:27208935

  12. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  13. Non-Equilibrium Transitions of Heliospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in Space Physics theory have established the connection between non-extensive Statistical Mechanics and space plasmas by providing a theoretical basis for the empirically derived kappa distributions commonly used to describe the phase space distribution functions of these systems [1]. The non-equilibrium temperature and the kappa index that govern these distributions are the two independent controlling parameters of non-equilibrium systems [1-3]. The significance of the kappa index is primarily given by its role in identifying the non-equilibrium stationary states, and measuring their "thermodynamic distance" from thermal equilibrium [4], while its physical meaning is connected to the correlation between the system's particles [5]. For example, analysis of the IBEX high Energetic Neutral Atom spectra [6] showed that the vast majority of measured kappa indices are between ~1.5 and ~2.5, consistent with the far-equilibrium "cavity" of minimum entropy discovered by Livadiotis & McComas [2]. Spontaneous procedures that can increase the entropy, move the system gradually toward equilibrium, that is the state with the maximum (infinite) kappa index. Other external factors that may decrease the entropy, move the system back to states further from equilibrium where the kappa indices are smaller. Newly formed pick-up ions can play this critical role in the solar wind and other space plasmas. We have analytically shown that their highly ordered motion can reduce the average entropy in the plasma beyond the termination shock, inside the inner heliosheath [7]. Non-equilibrium transitions have a key role in understanding the governing thermodynamical processes of space plasmas. References 1. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2009, JGR, 114, 11105. 2. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2010a, ApJ, 714, 971. 3. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2010c, in AIP Conf. Proc. 9, Pickup Ions Throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond, ed. J. LeRoux, V. Florinski, G. P. Zank, & A

  14. Estimating relative risks for common outcome using PROC NLP.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binbing; Wang, Zhuoqiao

    2008-05-01

    In cross-sectional or cohort studies with binary outcomes, it is biologically interpretable and of interest to estimate the relative risk or prevalence ratio, especially when the response rates are not rare. Several methods have been used to estimate the relative risk, among which the log-binomial models yield the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of the parameters. Because of restrictions on the parameter space, the log-binomial models often run into convergence problems. Some remedies, e.g., the Poisson and Cox regressions, have been proposed. However, these methods may give out-of-bound predicted response probabilities. In this paper, a new computation method using the SAS Nonlinear Programming (NLP) procedure is proposed to find the MLEs. The proposed NLP method was compared to the COPY method, a modified method to fit the log-binomial model. Issues in the implementation are discussed. For illustration, both methods were applied to data on the prevalence of microalbuminuria (micro-protein leakage into urine) for kidney disease patients from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. The sample SAS macro for calculating relative risk is provided in the appendix.

  15. Evaluating local indirect addressing in SIMD proc essors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, David; Tomboulian, Sherryl

    1989-01-01

    In the design of parallel computers, there exists a tradeoff between the number and power of individual processors. The single instruction stream, multiple data stream (SIMD) model of parallel computers lies at one extreme of the resulting spectrum. The available hardware resources are devoted to creating the largest possible number of processors, and consequently each individual processor must use the fewest possible resources. Disagreement exists as to whether SIMD processors should be able to generate addresses individually into their local data memory, or all processors should access the same address. The tradeoff is examined between the increased capability and the reduced number of processors that occurs in this single instruction stream, multiple, locally addressed, data (SIMLAD) model. Factors are assembled that affect this design choice, and the SIMLAD model is compared with the bare SIMD and the MIMD models.

  16. Monitoring contamination due to materials outgassing by QCM-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    ), large operative temperature range (from -80°C to 130°C), temperature stability within 0.5°C and good frequency resolution of 0.1 Hz. The instruments concept and the performance evaluation, based on tests performed on the QCM based sensors (i.e. simulating an outgassing source in space conditions), are presented in this work. References : [1] Soares et al. 2003, Proc. SPIE, 09/2000; [2] Miller 1982, Report NASA TM- 82457; [3] Tighe et al. 2009, AIP Conf. Proc. 1087, 195; [4] Wood et al. 1997, AIAA 97-0841

  17. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Flipping at an Open-Enrollment College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butzler, Kelly B.

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom is a blended, constructivist learning environment that reverses where students gain and apply knowledge. Instructors from K-12 to the college level are interested in the prospect of flipping their classes, but are unsure how and with which students to implement this learning environment. There has been little discussion…

  18. Animal Investigation Program (AIP), A.I.P. summary report on and around the Nevada Test Site from 1982--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    This report describes the Animal Investigation Program conducted from 1982--1995 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory (R and IE), formerly Radiation Sciences Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site. The surveillance program was designed to measure levels and trends of radionuclides in animals on and around the Nevada Test Site to ascertain whether world-wide fallout, current radiation levels, and associated doses, to the general public were in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally had the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well-being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results indicated that no significant amounts of biological radionuclides had been detected in the near offsite areas or on the NTS, except in animals drinking water that drains from tunnels in Area 12.

  19. Feasibility and conceptual design of a C.W. positron source at CEBAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golge, Serkan

    A feasibility study of a CW positron source for the 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) is provided. The proposed ≥ 100 nA Continuous Wave (CW) positron source at JLAB has several unique and challenging characteristics: high current incident electron beam at 126 MeV with a high beam power (up to a MW); CW e- beam and CW e+ production. The multiple scattering is a dominant process when creating e+ in a target, which results a large phase space area of the emitted positrons. An admittance study was done at CEBAF to find the maximum phase space area, which is tolerated in the machine. The measured geometrical transverse admittance (A) were Ax =10 and Ay = 5 mm·mrad at the injector. Energy spread measurement was also done at the ARC1. The fractional spread limit in the ARC1 was measured as delta = 3 x 10-3 at 653 MeV. By using the optimized results and the CEBAF parameters, three positron injector configurations are proposed; Combined Function Magnet, Two-Dipole and Microtron Dipole configurations. With the assumptions made, by using 126 MeV⊗10 mA e- beam impinging on a 2 mm W target with a 100 mum spot size, we can get up to 3 muA useful e+ current at the North Linac connection. One of the biggest challenges is the target design, which the deposited power is about 60 kW. ILC designs project power deposition up to 13 kW, which would allow the creation of a e+ beam of up to 650 nA otherwise. The results of analytic and monte carlo simulations of the positron production, capture and acceleration are presented. For the target design, a review is presented of solutions for the high power production target. Portions of this dissertation work have been published in two conference proceedings. 1,2 1S. Golge et al., in Proceedings of PAC07, Albuquerque, New Mexico, June 2007 2S. Golge et al., AIP Conf. Proc., 1160, 109 (2009)

  20. Wave theories of non-laminar charged particle beams: from quantum to thermal regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Renato; Tanjia, Fatema; Jovanović, Dusan; de Nicola, Sergio; Ronsivalle, Concetta; Ronsivalle

    2014-04-01

    The standard classical description of non-laminar charged particle beams in paraxial approximation is extended to the context of two wave theories. The first theory that we discuss (Fedele R. and Shukla, P. K. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 4045. Tanjia, F. et al. 2011 Proceedings of the 38th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics, Vol. 35G. Strasbourg, France: European Physical Society) is based on the Thermal Wave Model (TWM) (Fedele, R. and Miele, G. 1991 Nuovo Cim. D 13, 1527.) that interprets the paraxial thermal spreading of beam particles as the analog of quantum diffraction. The other theory is based on a recently developed model (Fedele, R. et al. 2012a Phys. Plasmas 19, 102106; Fedele, R. et al. 2012b AIP Conf. Proc. 1421, 212), hereafter called Quantum Wave Model (QWM), that takes into account the individual quantum nature of single beam particle (uncertainty principle and spin) and provides collective description of beam transport in the presence of quantum paraxial diffraction. Both in quantum and quantum-like regimes, the beam transport is governed by a 2D non-local Schrödinger equation, with self-interaction coming from the nonlinear charge- and current-densities. An envelope equation of the Ermakov-Pinney type, which includes collective effects, is derived for both TWM and QWM regimes. In TWM, such description recovers the well-known Sacherer's equation (Sacherer, F. J. 1971 IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-18, 1105). Conversely, in the quantum regime and in Hartree's mean field approximation, one recovers the evolution equation for a single-particle spot size, i.e. for a single quantum ray spot in the transverse plane (Compton regime). We demonstrate that such quantum evolution equation contains the same information as the evolution equation for the beam spot size that describes the beam as a whole. This is done heuristically by defining the lowest QWM state accessible by a system of non-overlapping fermions. The latter are associated with temperature values that are

  1. In Situ Chemical Composition Measurements of Planetary Surfaces with a Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Riedo, Andreas; Meyer, Stefan; Mezger, Klaus; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The knowledge of the chemical composition of moons, comets, asteroids or other planetary bodies is of particular importance for the investigation of the origin and evolution of the Solar System. For cosmochemistry, the elemental and isotopic composition of the surface material is essential information to investigate origin, differentiation and evolution processes of the body and therefore the history of our Solar System [1]. We show that the use of laser-based mass spectrometers is essential in such research because of their high sensitivity in the ppm range and their capability for quantitative elemental and isotopic analysis. A miniaturised Laser Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS) was developed in our group to study the elemental composition of solid samples [2]. The instrument's small size and light weight make it suitable for an application on a space mission to determine the elemental composition of a planetary surface for example [3]. Meteorites offer the excellent possibility to study extraterrestrial material in the laboratory. To demonstrate the sensitivity and functionality of the LMS instrument, a sample of the Allende meteorite has been investigated with a high spatial resolution. The LMS measurements allowed investigations of the elemental abundances in the Allende meteorite and detailed studies of the mineralogy and volatility [4]. These approaches can be of considerable interest for in situ investigation of grains and inhomogeneous materials with high sensitivity on a planetary surface. [1] Wurz, P., Whitby, J., Managadze, G., 2009, Laser Mass Spectrometry in Planetary Science, AIP Conf. Proc. CP1144, 70-75. [2] Tulej, M., Riedo, A., Iakovleva, M., Wurz, P., 2012, Int. J. Spec., On Applicability of a Miniaturized Laser Ablation Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer for Trace Element Measurements, article ID 234949. [3] Riedo, A., Bieler, A., Neuland, M., Tulej, M., Wurz, P., 2012, Performance evaluation of a miniature laser ablation time

  2. Energetic Atomic Oxygen in the Region of the Terrestrial Exobase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, B.; Sospedra-Alfonso, R.

    2012-12-01

    nonthermal and thermal oxygen with distribution functions, f, and F, respectively. The Boltzmann equation for f includes the source term from dissociative recombination as well as self-collisions requiring the nonlinear Boltzmann collision operator [3]. We also include cross collisions between the two species and thus anticipate a departure from Maxwellian for F, quantified with a Boltzmann equation. With this model, we are able to investigate the influence that the nonthermal oxygen may have on the thermal population of atomic oxygen. This research is supported by the Canadian Space Agency. REFERENCES [1] V. I. Shematovich, V. V. Bisikalo and J. C. Gerard, textit{J. Geophys. Res.} textbf{99}, 217-228 (1994) [2] B. Shizgal, R. Sospedra-Alfonso and A. Yau, Geophys. Res. Abstracts 14 EGU2012-6128-2, (2012). [3] R. Sospedra-Alfonso and B. Shizgal, AIP Conf. Proc. (in press).

  3. Langmuir Turbulence in the Solar Wind : Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2014-12-01

    inhomogeneous plasma. AIP Conf. Proc. 1539, 78 (2013). C. Krafft, A. Volokitin, V. V. Krasnoselskikh, Interaction of energetic particles with waves in strongly inhomogeneous solar wind plasmas, Astrophys. J., 778, 111 (2013).

  4. Importance of the Compton-Getting Factor in Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Compton-Getting factor (CGF) enters into energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging as a consequence of the generation of ENAs by a population of singly-charged energetic ions having a non-zero bulk plasma velocity with respect to the imager. There is an additional effect if the cold neutral atoms that produce the charge exchange also have their own relative bulk motion, but that will not be discussed here. The CGF follows from the general invariance of the ion phase-space density under a Lorentz transformation (Gallilean at non-relativistic energies), and it takes its simplest form under the approximation that the energetic ion distribution is isotropic in the plasma frame. Then one can write approximately j(v)=CGF*j0(v), where j(v) is the intensity in the frame of the imager for an ion with velocity (v), while j0(v), is the (assumedly isotropic) intensity in the plasma frame (evaluated at the same velocity v) and (k) is the local power-law index of the intensity energy spectrum (also in the plasma frame). For ENA imaging of the heliosheath, to good approximation CGF=R-2(k+1), where R=1+Vr/v involves the radial component of the plasma velocity V. The extraction of k requires further analysis, because the ENA spectrum is affected by the CGF. Plasma velocities Vr~100 km/s are measured within the heliosheath by both the Voyager spacecraft, and approximate values 1.5AIP Conf. Proc., 1436, 239-244, 2012], wherein these formulas are derived, calculate that including the CGF in the comparison of INCA ENA intensities (530 keV) increases the estimate of the thickness of the heliosheath in the VGR2 pixel by 32%. Additional examples of how the CGF plays

  5. Experimental results of radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium implosions with adiabat-shaped drives at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D. T.; Clark, D. S.; Jones, O. S.; Milovich, J. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Bachmann, B.; Baker, K. L.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Chen, K.-C.; Goyon, C.; Grim, G.; Dixit, S. N.; Eckart, M. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Farrell, M.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Gharibyan, N.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J. P.; Kroll, J. J.; Kyrala, G.; Lafortune, K. N.; Landen, O. L.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Mauldin, M.; Merrill, F. E.; Moore, A. S.; Nagel, S.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Sayre, D. B.; Shaughnessy, D.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Turnbull, D. P.; Velikovich, A. L.; Volegov, P. L.; Weber, C. R.; Widmayer, C. C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-10-01

    Radiation-driven, layered deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions were carried out using 3-shock and 4-shock "adiabat-shaped" drives and plastic ablators on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 429, 3 (1998)]. The purpose of these shots was to gain further understanding on the relative performance of the low-foot implosions of the National Ignition Campaign [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] versus the subsequent high-foot implosions [T. Döppner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055001 (2015)]. The neutron yield performance in the experiment with the 4-shock adiabat-shaped drive was improved by factors ˜3 to ˜10, compared to five companion low-foot shots despite large low-mode asymmetries of DT fuel, while measured compression was similar to its low-foot companions. This indicated that the dominant degradation source for low-foot implosions was ablation-front instability growth, since adiabat shaping significantly stabilized this growth. For the experiment with the low-power 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive, the DT fuel compression was significantly increased, by ˜25% to ˜36%, compared to its companion high-foot implosions. The neutron yield increased by ˜20%, lower than the increase of ˜50% estimated from one-dimensional scaling, suggesting the importance of residual instabilities and asymmetries. For the experiment with the high-power, 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive, the DT fuel compression was slightly increased by ˜14% compared to its companion high-foot experiments. However, the compression was reduced compared to the lower-power 3-shock adiabat-shaped drive, correlated with the increase of hot electrons that hypothetically can be responsible for reduced compression in high-power adiabat-shaped experiments as well as in high-foot experiments. The total neutron yield in the high-power 3-shock adiabat-shaped shot N150416 was 8.5 × 1015 ± 0.2 × 1015, with the fuel areal density of 0.90 ± 0.07 g/cm2

  6. THz and Ft-Ir Study of 18-O Isotopologues of Sulfur Dioxide: 32S16O18O and 32S18O_2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulès, L.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Demaison, J.; Perrin, Agnes; Kwabia Tchana, F.; Manceron, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    Sulfur dioxide is a molecule that have a great interest in different domains: for atmospheric and planetology chemistry, it is also ubiquitous and abundant in interstellar medium. If the 16O species were extensively studied, this is not the case of the 18O isotopologues. The aim of this study is first to complete the rotational spectra of the ground state with these new measurements up to 1.5 THz, previous measurements are up to 1050 GHz for the 32S16O18O species, and 145 GHz concerning the 32S18O_2 species. The second part is making a global fit of the rotational and vibrational transitions for the excited vibrational states. For the v_2 band, we will complete the recent I.R. analysis. About the triad (v_1, 2v_2, v_3): 32S18O_2 species was studied, but not the 32S16O18O one. and 145 GHz concerning the 32S18O_2 species. The second part is making a global fit of the rotational and vibrational transitions for the excited vibrational states. For the v_2 band, we will complete the recent I.R. analysis. About the triad (v_1, 2v_2, v_3): 32S18O_2 species was studied, but not the 32S16O18O one. The FT-IR spectra were recorded on the AILES Beamline at Synchrotron SOLEIL using the Synchrotron light source, coupled to the Bruker IFS125HR Fourier transform spectrometer. The THz spectra were obtained from 150 to 1500 GHz using the Lille's solid state spectrometer. The analysis is in progress, the latest results will be presented. Support from the French Laboratoire d'Excellence CaPPA (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) through contract ANR-10-LABX-0005 of the Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir is acknowledged Belov, S. P.; et al., 1998, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 191, 17 Lindermayer, J.; et al., 1985, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 110, 357 Gueye, F.; et al. Mol. Phys. in press Ulenikov, O. N.; et al., 2015, JQSRT 166, 13 Brubach, J.; et al., 2010, AIP Conf. Proc. 1214, 81 Zakharenko, O.; et al., 2015, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 317, 41

  7. Noncommutative complex Grosse-Wulkenhaar model

    SciTech Connect

    Hounkonnou, Mahouton Norbert; Samary, Dine Ousmane

    2008-11-18

    This paper stands for an application of the noncommutative (NC) Noether theorem, given in our previous work [AIP Proc 956(2007) 55-60], for the NC complex Grosse-Wulkenhaar model. It provides with an extension of a recent work [Physics Letters B 653(2007) 343-345]. The local conservation of energy-momentum tensors (EMTs) is recovered using improvement procedures based on Moyal algebraic techniques. Broken dilatation symmetry is discussed. NC gauge currents are also explicitly computed.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Intranight optical variability of AGN (Goyal+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, A.; Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, P. J.; Stalin, C. S.; Sagar, R.

    2014-09-01

    Our sample of TeV blazars consists of two sets. Set 1 is derived from the list of TeV-detected extragalactic AGNs, published by Weekes (2008, AIP Conf. Ser. Vol. 1085, p. 3, table 2 of his paper). Our set 2 of TeV blazars was derived from table 1 of Abdo et al. (2010ApJ...715..429A, Cat. J/ApJ/715/429), consisting of 709 TeV-detected AGNs, which is based on 11 months of monitoring with Fermi LAT. (2 data files).

  9. Physics Students from Abroad: Monitoring the Continuing Impact of Visa Problems. AIP Report, Number R-440

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuschatz, Michael; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    2005-01-01

    Following the attacks of September 11, 2001, the US government set in motion a broad set of measures whose aim was to screen foreign applicants for entrance into the US, to try to identify those who it was felt might attempt to carry out further attacks. Since the 2001-02 academic year had already begun in most schools, and since it took time for…

  10. Advanced information processing system: Hosting of advanced guidance, navigation and control algorithms on AIPS using ASTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Richard; Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Nagle, Gail A.; Schor, Andrei; Turkovich, John

    1994-01-01

    This program demonstrated the integration of a number of technologies that can increase the availability and reliability of launch vehicles while lowering costs. Availability is increased with an advanced guidance algorithm that adapts trajectories in real-time. Reliability is increased with fault-tolerant computers and communication protocols. Costs are reduced by automatically generating code and documentation. This program was realized through the cooperative efforts of academia, industry, and government. The NASA-LaRC coordinated the effort, while Draper performed the integration. Georgia Institute of Technology supplied a weak Hamiltonian finite element method for optimal control problems. Martin Marietta used MATLAB to apply this method to a launch vehicle (FENOC). Draper supplied the fault-tolerant computing and software automation technology. The fault-tolerant technology includes sequential and parallel fault-tolerant processors (FTP & FTPP) and authentication protocols (AP) for communication. Fault-tolerant technology was incrementally incorporated. Development culminated with a heterogeneous network of workstations and fault-tolerant computers using AP. Draper's software automation system, ASTER, was used to specify a static guidance system based on FENOC, navigation, flight control (GN&C), models, and the interface to a user interface for mission control. ASTER generated Ada code for GN&C and C code for models. An algebraic transform engine (ATE) was developed to automatically translate MATLAB scripts into ASTER.

  11. AIP Conference Proceedings for the 19th Topical Conference on Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    J. W. Burby, G. J. Kramer, C. K. Phillips and E. J. Valeo

    2012-08-15

    An analytic model for single particle motion in the presence of a wave field and multiple cyclotron harmonics is developed and investigated. The model suggests that even in the absence of Doppler broadening, cyclotron harmonic layers have finite spatial extent. This allows for particles to interact with more than one harmonic layer simultaneously, provided the layers are tightly packed. The latter phenomenon is investigated in the context of the model using symplectic mapping techniques. Then the model behavior is compared with numerical simulations of neutral beam particle trajectories in NSTX using the full-orbit code SPIRAL

  12. Nuclear Physics at Storage Rings: Fourth International Conference: STORI99. AIP Conference Proceedings, No. 512 [APCPCS

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, H.-O; Schwandt, P.

    2000-12-31

    The aim of this conference was to bring together physicists from a diverse international research community connected by the common technology of storage rings and review the topics of current interest in nuclear physics research with stored, cooled ion beams and electron beams. Specifically, the scientific program focused on recent results from a wide variety of experimental programs at existing stored-beam facilities, on progress in associated theoretical issues, and on discussion of new facilities and experimental techniques. In addition to the traditional physics topics covered by the STORI conferences (nucleon physics and meson production, physics with stored heavy-ion beams, polarized beams and targets), new physics topics introduced at STORI99 included strangeness production with high-energy stored proton beams and physics with stored electron beams.

  13. Enrollments and Degrees Report, 2006. AIP Report Number R-151.43

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Nicholson, Starr

    2008-01-01

    This document reports on academic enrollments (including Fall 2006) and degrees conferred at the bachelor's, master's, and doctorate levels (including academic year 2005-2006) at colleges and universities with physics or astronomy degree-granting programs. The findings presented in this report are based on an annual survey of all the physics and…

  14. 76 FR 15028 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Interim Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... standards for control of airport operations and development and for self-sustaining and nondiscriminatory... include responsibilities to retain the rights and powers necessary to control and operate the airport; to... as self-sustaining as possible. A complete list of the current grant assurances can be viewed...

  15. 75 FR 54946 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... assurances if the airport sponsor meets certain standards for control of airport operations and development; self- sustaining and nondiscriminatory airport rates; and compatible land use. At present, there are 75... and powers necessary to control and operate the airport; to maintain the airport in a safe...

  16. 77 FR 51948 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... previously published interim policy (76 FR 15028; March 18, 2011) to commercial service airports that... 14, 2012. DATES: The comment period for the proposed policy document published July 30, 2012 (77 FR... Proposed Policy in the Federal Register at 77 FR 44515 proposing an FAA policy, based on Federal...

  17. 75 FR 57829 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... Register on September 9, 2010 (75 FR 54946). DATES: Effective September 22, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... Administration published a Notice of Proposed Policy in the Federal Register at 75 FR 54946 proposing to amend.... Correction In the Notice published on September 9, 2010 (75 FR 54946) FR Doc. 2010-22095, on page 54947...

  18. Untapped Talent: The African American Presence in Physics and the Geosciences. AIP Report. Number R-444

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czujko, Roman; Ivie, Rachel; Stith, James H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents data covering the representation of African Americans among physics and geoscience degree recipients at each stage of the educational system. The data were collected by several statistical agencies and are here provided in far more detail than has ever been available before. By placing all the data in one place, this paper…

  19. 78 FR 42419 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... (76 FR 15028; March 18, 2011) with regard to commercial service airports, and establishes how FAA will... adjacent or nearby property, when that property is used as a residence, is available at: 75 FR 54946; September 9, 2010; 76 FR 15028; March 18, 2011; and 77 FR 44515; July 30, 2012. On February 14, 2012,...

  20. 1999 Initial Employment Report: Follow-Up of 1998 Physics and Astronomy Degree Recipients. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Langer, Casey

    This report is based on an annual survey of physics degree recipients conducted approximately 6 months after the end of the academic year in which they received their degrees. During the 1997-1998 academic year, there were 1,323 physics Ph.D.s conferred at the 183 departments granting physics doctorates in the United States. Departments reported…

  1. Survey of Physics and Astronomy Bachelor's Degree Recipients, 1986-87. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susanne D.

    Results of the American Institute of Physics' 1986-87 annual survey of bachelor's degree recipients in physics and astronomy are reported. Data are presented in tables, with accompanying narrative analysis. The information on physics students includes: trends in postbaccalaureate plans of successive graduating classes of physicists from 1977-78…

  2. Survey of Physics and Astronomy Bachelor's Degree Recipients, 1985-86. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susanne D.

    Results of the American Institute of Physics' 1985-86 annual survey of bachelor's degree recipients in physics and astronomy are reported. Data are presented in tables, with accompanying narrative analysis. The information on physics students includes: trends in postbaccalaureate plans of successive graduating classes of physicists from 1977-78…

  3. 77 FR 44515 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... take. This included determining the role played by the airport in the National Plan of Integrated... limits application of the FAA's previously published interim policy (76 FR 15028; March 18, 2011) to... Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Availability of...

  4. Women in Physics and Astronomy, 2005. AIP Report, Number R-430.02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Ray, Kim Nies

    2005-01-01

    Despite years of continued growth, women's participation in physics remains among the lowest of any scientific field. The issue is of great concern to many in the scientific community, spawning talks at conferences, data collection efforts, and speculation about the causes of women's low participation in physics. Although women's participation in…

  5. Space Technology and Applications International Forum, Part Two. AIP Conference Proceedings, No. 504 [APCPCS

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.

    2000-12-31

    This volume contains the Conference on Thermophysics in Microgravity, Conference on Enabling Technology and Required Scientific Developments for Interstellar Missions, Conference on Commercial/Civil Next Generation Space Transportation, and the 17th Symposium on Space Nuclear Power and Propulsion, four of the five conferences comprising this forum.

  6. State of Georgia quarterly AIP Implementation Report: October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-19

    The objective of this report is to ensure the citizens of Georgia that health, safety and the environment are being protected through existing DOE programs at the Savannah River Site (SRS), through a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight by Georgia officials. SRS emergency plans will be annually reviewed and updated. Environmental monitoring will be conducted of surface water and related media, ground water, air, crops, milk, drinking water, soils and vegetation.

  7. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Improving Student Engagement in Organic Chemistry Using the Inverted Classroom Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Improving student engagement in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) courses generally, and organic chemistry specifically, has long been a goal for educators. Recently educators at all academic levels have been exploring the "inverted classroom" or "flipped classroom" pedagogical model for improving student…

  8. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Time-Saving Resources Aligned with Cognitive Science to Help Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, JudithAnn R.; Dahm, Donald J.; Nelson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies in cognitive science have verified that working memory (where the brain solves problems) can manipulate nearly all elements of knowledge that can be recalled automatically from long-term memory, but only a few elements that have not previously been well memorized. Research in reading comprehension has found that "lecture notes with…

  9. Presentations from the LARP Mini-Workshop on Beam-Beam Compensation 2007 (eConf C0707027)

    SciTech Connect

    Valine, J.

    2007-12-05

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) hosted a mini-workshop on beam-beam compensation at SLAC. The workshop reviewed the experience with beam-beam compensation tests, both long-range and head-on, in existing machines (DCI, SPS, Tevatron, DAFNE, KEKB, RHIC), and outlined milestones for the implementation of beam-beam compensation schemes in the LHC. It was also intended to be a platform for young scientists to present their work.

  10. ConfChem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Just-in-Time Teaching in Chemistry Courses with Moodle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muzyka, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    In the Just-in-Time Teaching approach, a faculty member assigns readings to students before every class. After the students have done the daily reading, they access a short reading quiz using a course management system (e.g., Moodle). The faculty member uses student responses to the quiz in the preparation of the day's class material and is able…

  11. Influence of various land uses on windbreak selection by nesting Mississippi kites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Diane; Grzybowski, Joseph A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1985-01-01

    Contemporary land-use practices have dramatically altered breeding habitats of birds of prey (Cramp, pp. 9-11 in World Conf. Birds of Prey, R. D. Chancellor, ed., ICPB, London, England, 1977). Some land uses appear to influence strongly both the nesting activity (White, Trans. North Am. Wild. Nat. Resour. Conf. 39:301-312, 1974) and abundance (Olendorff and Stoddart, pp. 44-48 in Management of Raptors, F. N. Jamerstrom, B. E. Harrel, and R. R. Olendorff, eds., Proc. Conf. Raptor Conserv. Tech., Raptor Rep. 2, Fort Collins, Colorado, 1974) of raptors. The Mississippi Kite (Ictinia mississippiensis) is a locally common raptor of the south-central plains of North America. In the prairie grasslands of western Oklahoma and south-western Kansas, kites commonly nest in tree plantings designed as windbreaks, irrespective of windbreak width, age, or tree species compositions (Parker, Ph.D. Diss., Univ. Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, 1974; Love and Knopf, Proc. Ann. Meet. For. Comm. Great Plains Agric. Counc. 30:69-77, 1978). Much of the potential nesting habitat within this region, however, is not used by kits (Parker and Ogden, Am. Birds 33:119-129, 1979). In this paper, we assess the potential influence of various land-use practices on windbreak selection by nesting Mississippi Kites.

  12. Population, Fossil Fuels and Armageddon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2001-03-01

    A well documented report of the somber findings of the specialists has established the growing world climate instability and related increases in weather related disasters since 1990 (Bette Hileman, Chem Eng News 16-28, Aug 9, '99). Their projections over the next century imply that ocean-atmosphere CO2 exchange involves deep mixing and long times. However, the Magnetic Coupling Model predicts a self-sustaining warming mode, based on net flux of CO2 from the top 100m of ocean surface to the atmosphere on decade time scales. Such a catastrophic greenhouse runaway to a new equilibrium climate is not precluded theoretically, could end the possibility of human intervention in global warming and sea level rise, and may have already started. It could initiate a melt of global ice inventory which can rapidly raise sea level 6 m. The recent decade's rate of pCO2 climb, over 1.5 ppmv/year, increasing exponentially, is more than twice the average rate from 1900 to 1950, but only half the 2.9 increase from 1997 to 1998. [Ely Proc. IEEE Conf. Oceans '89, 1: 277-284, 1989; NASA Conf. Pub. 2098, A, 25-26, 1979; Eos, Dec 98; Proc. Solar 1979 NW, DOE Conf. 79-0845, (Supplement 38-43), 1979].

  13. 78 FR 63568 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Rev. Proc. 2007-35

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ..., Statistical Sampling for purposes of Section 199. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before...: Statistical Sampling for purposes of Section 199. OMB Number: 1545-2072. Revenue Procedure Number: RP-2007-35. Abstract: This revenue procedure provides for determining when statistical sampling may be used in...

  14. Fitting correlated residual error structures in nonlinear mixed-effects models using SAS PROC NLMIXED.

    PubMed

    Harring, Jeffrey R; Blozis, Shelley A

    2014-06-01

    Nonlinear mixed-effects (NLME) models remain popular among practitioners for analyzing continuous repeated measures data taken on each of a number of individuals when interest centers on characterizing individual-specific change. Within this framework, variation and correlation among the repeated measurements may be partitioned into interindividual variation and intraindividual variation components. The covariance structure of the residuals are, in many applications, consigned to be independent with homogeneous variances, [Formula: see text], not because it is believed that intraindividual variation adheres to this structure, but because many software programs that estimate parameters of such models are not well-equipped to handle other, possibly more realistic, patterns. In this article, we describe how the programmatic environment within SAS may be utilized to model residual structures for serial correlation and variance heterogeneity. An empirical example is used to illustrate the capabilities of the module.

  15. Proc. of the workshop on pushing the limits of RF superconductivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K-J., Eyberger, C., editors

    2005-04-13

    For three days in late September last year, some sixty experts in RF superconductivity from around the world came together at Argonne to discuss how to push the limits of RF superconductivity for particle accelerators. It was an intense workshop with in-depth presentations and ample discussions. There was added excitement due to the fact that, a few days before the workshop, the International Technology Recommendation Panel had decided in favor of superconducting technology for the International Linear Collider (ILC), the next major high-energy physics accelerator project. Superconducting RF technology is also important for other large accelerator projects that are either imminent or under active discussion at this time, such as the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) for nuclear physics, energy recovery linacs (ERLs), and x-ray free-electron lasers. For these accelerators, the capability in maximum accelerating gradient and/or the Q value is essential to limit the length and/or operating cost of the accelerators. The technological progress of superconducting accelerators during the past two decades has been truly remarkable, both in low-frequency structures for acceleration of protons and ions as well as in high-frequency structures for electrons. The requirements of future accelerators demand an even higher level of performance. The topics of this workshop are therefore highly relevant and timely. The presentations given at the workshop contained authoritative reviews of the current state of the art as well as some original materials that previously had not been widely circulated. We therefore felt strongly that these materials should be put together in the form of a workshop proceeding. The outcome is this report, which consists of two parts: first, a collection of the scholarly papers prepared by some of the participants and second, copies of the viewgraphs of all presentations. The presentation viewgraphs, in full color, are also available from the Workshop Presentations link on the workshop's web page at http://www.aps.anl.gov/conferences/RFSCLimits/. I would like to thank all of the participants for their lively contributions to the workshop and to these proceedings, and Helen Edwards and Hasan Padamsee for their help in developing the workshop program. I also thank Cathy Eyberger, Kelly Jaje, and Renee Lanham for working very hard to take care of the administrative details, in particular Cathy for editing this report.

  16. PROcEED: Probabilistic reverse dosimetry approaches for estimating exposure distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    As increasing amounts of biomonitoring survey data become available, a new discipline focused on converting such data into estimates of chemical exposures has developed. Reverse dosimetry uses a pharmacokinetic model along with measured biomarker concentrations to determine the p...

  17. Proc. of the sixteenth symposium on energy engineering sciences, May 13-15, 1998, Argonne, IL.

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-13

    This Proceedings Volume includes the technical papers that were presented during the Sixteenth Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences on May 13--15, 1998, at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. The Symposium was structured into eight technical sessions, which included 30 individual presentations followed by discussion and interaction with the audience. A list of participants is appended to this volume. The DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of which Engineering Research is a component program, is responsible for the long-term, mission-oriented research in the Department. The Office has prime responsibility for establishing the basic scientific foundation upon which the Nation's future energy options will be identified, developed, and built. BES is committed to the generation of new knowledge necessary to solve present and future problems regarding energy exploration, production, conversion, and utilization, while maintaining respect for the environment. Consistent with the DOE/BES mission, the Engineering Research Program is charged with the identification, initiation, and management of fundamental research on broad, generic topics addressing energy-related engineering problems. Its stated goals are to improve and extend the body of knowledge underlying current engineering practice so as to create new options for enhancing energy savings and production, prolonging the useful life of energy-related structures and equipment, and developing advanced manufacturing technologies and materials processing. The program emphasis is on reducing costs through improved industrial production and performance and expanding the nation's store of fundamental knowledge for solving anticipated and unforeseen engineering problems in energy technologies. To achieve these goals, the Engineering Research Program supports approximately 130 research projects covering a broad spectrum of topics that cut across traditional engineering disciplines. The program focuses on three areas: (1) mechanical sciences, (2) control systems and instrumentation, and (3) engineering data and analysis. The Sixteenth Symposium involved approximately one-fourth of the research projects currently sponsored by the DOE/BES Engineering Research Program.

  18. Proc, Dr. Sam, Uncle Henry, and the "Little Green Book". Interview by Charles F. Wooley.

    PubMed

    Harvey, W Proctor

    2005-01-01

    During his house staff training before World War II, Dr. W. Proctor Harvey encountered Dr. Samuel A. Levine at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston. Following military service, Harvey returned to Boston and became Levine's first cardiology fellow. The book Clinical Auscultation of the Heart--the Little Green Book by Levine and Harvey in 1949 combined Levine's clinical wisdom with Harvey's objective phonocardiographic methods and brought an important objective dimension to the art of cardiac auscultation. Both Levine and Harvey shared experiences and friendship with Henry Christian, the first Physician-in-Chief when the new Brigham Hospital Opened in 1913. Christian, appointed Dean of the Harvard Medical School in 1908 at the age of 32, was referred to as the "Boy Dean." He held the Hersey Chair of Theory and Practice of Physic from 1908 until 1939, was one of the founding group of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and a major force in academic medicine. Levine served as intern to Christian and then joined the Brigham medical staff in 1915. Proctor Harvey followed Henry Christian's path from their mutual hometown of Lyunchburg, VA to the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. A series of illuminating and respectful professional interactions--initially between Christian and Levine, between Levine and Harvey in the early 1940s, and between Harvey and Christian in the 1950s--provide the background for the genesis of the Little Green Book and a remarkable example of academic heritage.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 100-Mpc-scale structures of radio galaxies (Brand+, 2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, K.; Rawlings, S.; Hill, G. J.; Lacy, M.; Mitchell, E.; Tufts, J.

    2003-09-01

    The TONS08 survey is in one of the areas covered by the 7CRS (Willott et al., 2002MNRAS.335.1120W) and the TexOx-1000 (TOOT) survey (Hill & Rawlings, 2002, ASP Conf. Proc., Leiden. Astron. Soc. Pac., San Francisco). It covers the region 08h 10m 20s <= RA <= 08h 29m 20s and 24{deg} 10' 00" <= DE<= 29{deg} 30' 00" (J2000). Unlike the low-frequency-selected 7CRS and TOOT, the TONS08 survey is selected at 1.4GHz from the NVSS. (1 data file).

  20. Origin of Tokamak Density Limit Scalings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, D. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.

    2012-04-01

    The onset criterion for radiation driven islands [P. H. Rebut and M. Hugon, Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1984: Proc. 10th Int. Conf. London, 1984, (IAEA, Vienna, 1985), Vol. 2] in combination with a simple cylindrical model of tokamak current channel behavior is consistent with the empirical scaling of the tokamak density limit [M. Greenwald, Nucl. Fusion 28, 2199 (1988)NUFUAU0029-551510.1088/0029-5515/28/12/009]. Many other unexplained phenomena at the density limit are consistent with this novel physics mechanism.

  1. Control of disruption-generated runaway plasmas in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, M. G.; Taylor, G.; Medley, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Many disruptions in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) (Meade and the TFTR Group 1991 Proc. Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion (Washington, DC, 1990) vol 1 (Vienna: IAEA) pp 9-24) produced populations of runaway electrons which carried a significant fraction of the original plasma current. In this paper, we describe experiments where, following a disruption of a low-beta, reversed-shear plasma, currents of up to 1 MA carried mainly by runaway electrons were controlled and then ramped down to near zero using the ohmic transformer. In the longer lasting runaway plasmas, events resembling Parail-Pogutse instabilities were observed.

  2. Understanding thermal equilibrium through activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-03-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education pp 169-72) we found that students in India have a rather unsatisfactory understanding of thermal equilibrium. We have designed and developed a module of five activities, which are presented in succession to the students. These activities address the students’ alternative conceptions that underlie their lack of understanding of thermal equilibrium and aim at enhancing their understanding of the concept.

  3. 77 FR 19408 - Deadline for Notification of Intent To Use the Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Primary, Cargo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... 2012 entitlement funds available under Section 47105(f) of Title 49, United States Code, to accomplish... available under Title 49 of the United States Code, section 47105(f). This notice must address all... Airports Capital Improvement Plan (ACIP) process during the preceding year. This notice must address...

  4. 78 FR 20167 - Deadline for Notification of Intent To Use the Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Primary, Cargo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... 2013 entitlement funds available under Section 47105(f) of Title 49, United States Code, to accomplish...-3831. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title 49 of the United States Code, section 47105(f), provides that..., to use their fiscal year 2013 entitlement funds available under Title 49 of the United States...

  5. Initial Employment Report: Physics and Astronomy Degree Recipients of 2003 & 2004. AIP Report. Number R-282.26

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesfaye, Casey Langer; Mulvey, Patrick J.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the initial employment and educational paths pursued by physics and astronomy degree recipients at the bachelor's, master's, and PhD levels for the classes of 2002-03 and 2003-04. The report includes starting salaries, primary work activities, ratings of professional challenge and other aspects of initial employment. The…

  6. MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR METHANE PRODUCTION FROM LANDFILL BIOREACTOR - A DISCUSSION PAPER HTTP://OIPS.AIP.ORG/EEO/

    EPA Science Inventory

    This discussion explains the experimental results of a landfill bioreactor (LFBR) from a microbiological perspective and provides a feasible strategy to evaluate methane production performance, since suitable models are complicated and not sufficiently reliable for anaerobic-syst...

  7. Characterization and evaluation of boron carbide for plate-impact conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmquist, T. J.; Johnson, G. R.

    2006-11-01

    This article addresses the response of boron carbide (B4C) to high-velocity impact. The authors previously characterized this material in 1999, using the Johnson-Holmquist [AIP Conf. Proc. 309, 981 (1994)] (JH-2) model. Since then, there have been additional experimental data presented in the literature that better describe the hydrostatic pressure (including a phase change). In addition, a series of plate-impact experiments (one-dimensional, uniaxial strain) that used configurations that produced either a shock, a shock release, or a shock reshock was performed. These experiments provide material behavior regarding the damage, failed strength, and hydrostat for which previously there has been little or no data. Constitutive model constants were obtained for the Johnson-Holmquist-Beissel [J. Appl. Phys. 94, 1639 (2003)] model using some of these plate-impact experiments. Computations of all the experiments were performed and analyzed to better understand the material response. The analysis provided the following findings: (1) The material fails and loses strength when the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) is exceeded. (2) The material has significant strength after failure and gradually increases as the pressure increases. (3) The shear modulus does not degrade when the material fails (as has been postulated), but rather increases. (4) When the material is reloaded from an initial shocked (failed) state, the loading appears to be elastic, indicating the material is not on the yield surface after failure. To provide more insight into the behavior of B4C, the strength versus pressure response was compared to that of silicon carbide (SiC). The strength of SiC increases as the pressure increases beyond the HEL, probably due to pressure hardening or strain hardening. It appears that B4C does not experience any hardening effects and fails at the HEL. Although the HEL for B4C is higher than that of SiC, the hardening ability of SiC produces a similar maximum strength with more

  8. Chemical and mineralogical analyses of planetary rocks using a laser ablation mass spectrometer for in situ space research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Mezger, Klaus; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    . With the current spatial resolution, grain-sized inclusions embedded in the surface (e.g. CAIs, dark inclusions, metal grains) could be identified. Detailed investigations, e.g. differentiation of chondrule components from rims of chondrules can be derived from LMS data. LMS has capabilities for highly sensitive chemical composition measurements of grain sized inclusions and sub-micrometre sized surface layers. The latter information is of considerable interest in the context of space weathering. References [1] P. Wurz, et al., 2009, AIP Conf.Proc. , CP1144:70-75. [2] P. Wurz et al.,2012, Sol. Sys. Res. 46 408-422. [3] U. Rohner, J. Whitby, and P. Wurz, 2003, Meas. Sci. Technol., 14 2159-2164. [4] A. Riedo et al.,2013, J.Anal.Atom.Spectrom. 28(8):1133-1356. [5] A. Riedo, et al., 2013, J. Mass Spectrom.48, 1-15. [6] M.B. Neuland et al.,2014, Planet. Space. Sci. 101, 196-209. [7] V. Grimaudoet al.,2014, Anal. Chem., submitted.

  9. Double-negative metamaterial research for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, S.; Spentzouris, L.; Gai, W.; Liu, W.; Power, J. G.

    2007-09-01

    Material properties are central to the design of particle accelerators. One area of advanced accelerator research is to investigate novel materials and structures and their potential use in extending capabilities of accelerator components. Within the past decade a new type of artificially constructed material having the unique property of simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability has been realized, and is under intense investigation, primarily by the optical physics and microwave engineering communities [C.M. Soukoulis, Science 315 (2007) 47; D.R. Smith, J.B. Pendry, M.C.K. Wiltshire, Science 305 (2004) 788; J.B. Pendry, A.J. Holden, W.J. Stewart, I. Youngs, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 4773]. Although they are typically constructed of arrays of discrete cells, as long as the condition that the wavelength of applied radiation is significantly greater than the cell dimensions is met, the material mimics a continuous medium and can be described with the bulk properties of permittivity, ɛ, and permeability, μ. When the permittivity and permeability are simultaneously negative in some frequency range, the metamaterial is called double negative (DNM) or left-handed (LHM) and has unusual properties, such as a negative index of refraction. An investigation of these materials in the context of accelerators is being carried out by IIT and the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Facility [S. Antipov, W. Liu, W. Gai, J. Power, L. Spentzouris, AIP Conf. Proc. 877 (2006); S. Antipov, W. Liu, J. Power, L. Spentzouris, Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Left-Handed Metamaterial, Wakefield Notes at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, ]. Waveguides loaded with metamaterials are of interest because the DNM can change the dispersion relation of the waveguide significantly. For example, slow backward waves can be produced in a DNM-loaded waveguide without having corrugations. This article begins with a brief introduction of known design

  10. A miniature laser ablation mass spectrometer for quantitative in situ chemical composition investigation of lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigitte Neuland, Maike; Grimaudo, Valentine; Mezger, Klaus; Moreno-García, Pavel; Riedo, Andreas; Tulej, Marek; Wurz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    surface processes on a planetary surface. Analyses of Pb isotopes show that the statistical uncertainty for the age determination by LMS is about ±100 Myrs, if abundance of 206Pb and 207Pb is 20ppm and 2ppm respectively [Riedo,2013]. These Pb isotopes have abundances of tens to hundreds of ppm in lunar KREEP [Nemchin,2008]. We demonstrate the measurement capabilities of LMS for petrographic and mineralogical analyses, for isotopic studies and dating analyses, which are key topics for future missions to the Moon. Having the LMS instrument installed on a lunar rover would allow measuring the chemical composition of many rock and soil samples, distributed over a certain area, inside the South Pole Aitken Basin for example. LMS measurements would yield valuable conclusions about age and mineralogy. References: [Wurz,2009]Wurz,P. et al. 2009, AIP Conf.Proc., CP1144:70-75. [Grimaudo,2015]Grimaudo, V. et al. 2015, Anal.Chem. 87: 2037-2041. [Neuland,2014]Neuland, M.B. et al. 2014, Planet.Space Sci.101:196-209. [Neuland,2016]Neuland M.B. et al. 2016, Meas. Sci. Technol.,submitted. [Riedo,2013]Riedo A. et al., 2013 Planet. Space Sci. 87: 1-13. [Nemchin,2008]Nemchin et al., 2008 Geochim. Cosmochim.Acta 72:668-689.

  11. Exploring Jupiter's icy moons with old techniques and big facilities - new insights on sulfuric acid hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard-Casely, H. E.; Avdeev, M.; Brand, H.; Wallwork, K.

    2013-12-01

    ., AIP Conf Proc, 2007. 879: p. 879-882. [5] Liss, K.D., et al., Phys B-Cond Mat, 2006. 385-86: p. 1010-1012. [6] Maynard-Casely, H.E., K.S. Wallwork, and M. Avdeev, (In review). [7] Maynard-Casely, H.E., H.E.A. Brand, and K.S. Wallwork, J.of App.Cryst, 2012. 45: p.1198-1207. [8] Maynard-Casely, H.E., K.S. Wallwork, and H.E.A. Brand, (In Preparation). Stages of the crystal structure determination of sulfruic acid octahydrate a) the oxygen and sulfur postions were determined from the synchrotron x-ray data b) Once neutron diffraction data was collected Fourier difference methods were used to locate hydrogen positions to determine c) the full structure of sulfuric acid octahydrate.

  12. Heliosheath Plasma Flow Slowdown Observed by Voyager 1: Explanation and Implications of the Transition Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    2011-12-01

    A striking feature in the approach of Voyager 1 to the heliopause was the nearly linear decrease during 2.5 years (2007.8-2010.3) in the inferred radial plasma flow velocity (Vr) from 60km/s to zero (Krimigis et al., Nature, 474, 359-361, 2011). However, the LECP energetic ion intensities (40keV < E < 4MeV) remained relatively constant during this time. Subsequently, after remaining near zero for 8 months (2010.3-2010.9), the radial flow went negative (-25km/s < Vr < 0) and has remained so for the past 6 months (2011.0-2011.5). The azimuthal flow has been small and positive (10 < Vphi < 25km/s) throughout these past 14 months in this heliosheath transition layer. A satisfactory explanation of this striking signature in the radial flow should quantitatively predict both the 2.5 yr linear decrease and the immediately following zero and then small negative radial flows. The signature does indeed naturally follow from the generalized transport equations for a composite thermal and non-thermal plasma (Roelof, AIP Conf. Proc., 1302, 133-141, 2010). The familiar gradP and JxB terms (along with weak pitch-angle scattering of particles along field lines) sustain the nearly constant non-thermal energetic ion intensities throughout the heliosheath in the presence of small temporal disturbances, while the much more slowly responding inertial term VgradV of the thermal plasma (that contains most of the mass) balances a frictional term produced by charge exchange of the non-thermal energetic population (that exerts most of the pressure) with the interstellar H-atoms. The relation between the latter two terms contains no free parameters or functions, involving only the observed VGR1 flow decay rate (dVr/dt=-18.8km/s/yr), the density of interstellar H-atoms, and the charge-exchange rate for 1-10keV non-thermal protons. The quantities agree within a factor of 2, i.e., within observational uncertainties. The zero velocity follows naturally from this frictional slowing-down process

  13. Characterization and evaluation of boron carbide for plate-impact conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Holmquist, T. J.; Johnson, G. R.

    2006-11-01

    This article addresses the response of boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) to high-velocity impact. The authors previously characterized this material in 1999, using the Johnson-Holmquist [AIP Conf. Proc. 309, 981 (1994)] (JH-2) model. Since then, there have been additional experimental data presented in the literature that better describe the hydrostatic pressure (including a phase change). In addition, a series of plate-impact experiments (one-dimensional, uniaxial strain) that used configurations that produced either a shock, a shock release, or a shock reshock was performed. These experiments provide material behavior regarding the damage, failed strength, and hydrostat for which previously there has been little or no data. Constitutive model constants were obtained for the Johnson-Holmquist-Beissel [J. Appl. Phys. 94, 1639 (2003)] model using some of these plate-impact experiments. Computations of all the experiments were performed and analyzed to better understand the material response. The analysis provided the following findings: (1) The material fails and loses strength when the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) is exceeded. (2) The material has significant strength after failure and gradually increases as the pressure increases. (3) The shear modulus does not degrade when the material fails (as has been postulated), but rather increases. (4) When the material is reloaded from an initial shocked (failed) state, the loading appears to be elastic, indicating the material is not on the yield surface after failure. To provide more insight into the behavior of B{sub 4}C, the strength versus pressure response was compared to that of silicon carbide (SiC). The strength of SiC increases as the pressure increases beyond the HEL, probably due to pressure hardening or strain hardening. It appears that B{sub 4}C does not experience any hardening effects and fails at the HEL. Although the HEL for B{sub 4}C is higher than that of SiC, the hardening ability of SiC produces a similar

  14. Enhanced life ion source for germanium and carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tseh-Jen; Colvin, Neil; Kondratenko, Serguei

    2012-11-06

    Germanium and carbon ions represent a significant portion of total ion implantation steps in the process flow. Very often ion source materials that used to produce ions are chemically aggressive, especially at higher temperatures, and result in fast ion source performance degradation and a very limited lifetime [B.S. Freer, et. al., 2002 14th Intl. Conf. on Ion Implantation Technology Proc, IEEE Conf. Proc., p. 420 (2003)]. GeF{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} are commonly used to generate germanium and carbon beams. In the case of GeF{sub 4} controlling the tungsten deposition due to the de-composition of WF{sub 6} (halogen cycle) is critical to ion source life. With CO{sub 2}, the materials oxidation and carbon deposition must be controlled as both will affect cathode thermionic emission and anti-cathode (repeller) efficiencies due to the formation of volatile metal oxides. The improved ion source design Extended Life Source 3 (Eterna ELS3) together with its proprietary co-gas material implementation has demonstrated >300 hours of stable continuous operation when using carbon and germanium ion beams. Optimizing cogas chemistries retard the cathode erosion rate for germanium and carbon minimizes the adverse effects of oxygen when reducing gas is introduced for carbon. The proprietary combination of hardware and co-gas has improved source stability and the results of the hardware and co-gas development are discussed.

  15. Physics and Society: A sub-discipline of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafemeister, David

    2012-03-01

    The Forum on Physics and Society was born in the tumultuous 1960's and 70's and has a long record of accomplishments over the past 40 years. *303 APS session in 40 years, an average of 7.7/year. *10 Books (3 Forum Studies, 7 AIP Conf. Proceedings, 4 booklets). *Physics and Society has published results that have been widely referenced. *2 Forum Board Members became U.S. Congressmen [V. Ehlers (R-MI), R. Holt (D-NJ)], others have had notable public service careers. *Szilard and Burton-Forum Awards recognize positive contributions of physicists in society. *The Forum helped establish the Congressional Science Fellowships. This talk will update the 1999 Forum History (http://www.aps.org/units/fps/history.cfm) and provide anecdotal humor. Lastly, back-of-the-envelope calculations from my text, Physics of Society Issues: Calculations on National Security, Environment and Energy (Springer, 2007), will be provided.

  16. Analysis of Chemical Bioactivity through In Vitro Profiling using ToxCast and Tox21 High-Throughput Screening (China tox. conf. TATT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Safety assessment of drugs and environmental chemicals relies extensively on animal testing. However, the quantity of chemicals needing assessment and challenges of species extrapolation drive the development of alternative approaches. The EPA’s ToxCast and the multiagency Tox21 ...

  17. Low energy weak interactions and decays. [Partial summary of presentations at XXth International Conf. on High Energy Physics, Madison, Wisc. , July 17-23, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Trilling, G.H.

    1980-09-01

    Results presented during sessions B5 to 7 at the XXth International Conference on High Energy Physics (University of Wisconsin, Madison, July 17 to 23, 1980) are discussed. Essentially all the material presented is summarized. The sessions covered various aspects of low-energy weak interactions. The following topics are addressed: CP-invariance violation, high-statistics study of ..lambda.. beta decay, parity violation in proton-nucleus scattering at 6 GeV/c, new results on the tau, charm particle decays (direct lifetime determinations, semileptonic branching ratios, comparison of semileptonic rate with theoretical expectations, further study of charm meson decays, F decays), and neutrino oscillations. 6 figures, 9 tables. (RWR)

  18. Proceedings of the 34th International Conference in High Energy Physics (ICHEP08), Philadelphia, PA, 2008, eConf C080730, [hep-ph/0809.xxx

    SciTech Connect

    Lockyer, Nigel S.; Smith, AJ Stewart,; et. al.

    2008-09-01

    In 2004 a team from the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University, and the Institute for Advanced Study proposed to host the 2008 International Conference on High Energy Physics (ICHEP) on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The proposal was approved later that year by the C-11 committee of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics. The Co-Chairs were Nigel S. Lockyer (U. Penn/TRIUMF) and A.J. Stewart Smith (Princeton); Joe Kroll of U. Penn served as Deputy Chair from 2007 on. Highlights of the proposal included 1. greatly increased participation of young scientists, women scientists, and graduate students 2. new emphasis on formal theory 3. increased focus on astrophysics and cosmology 4. large informal poster session (170 posters) in prime time 5. convenient, contiguous venues for all sessions and lodging 6. landmark locations for the reception and banquet. The conference program consisted of three days of parallel sessions and three days of plenary talks.

  19. Using PROC GLIMMIX to Analyze the Animal Watch, a Web-Based Tutoring System for Algebra Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbu, Otilia C.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, I investigated how proficiently seventh-grade students enrolled in two Southwestern schools solve algebra word problems. I analyzed various factors that could affect this proficiency and explored the differences between English Learners (ELs) and native English Primary students (EPs). I collected the data as part of the Animal Watch…

  20. Resonance Ionization of Heavy Noble Gases: The Potential of KR and Xe Measurements from Single Pre-Solar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonnard, N.

    1995-09-01

    routine noble gas measurements from terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples. The present system, data illustrating current capabilities, and improvements that should reduce the detection limit significantly below 100 atoms for both Kr and Xe will be described. An early application will be simultaneous Kr and Xe isotopic measurements from single microscopic interstellar SiC grains. References: [1]Reynolds J. H. (1960) Phys. Rev. Lett., 4, 351-354. [2] Reynolds J. H. and Turner G. (1964) J. Geo. Phys. Res., 69, 3263-3281. [3] Lee T. (1988) (J. F. Kerridge and M. S. Matthews, eds.), 1063-1089, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson. [4] Anders A. and Zinner E. (1993) Meteoritics, 28, 490-514. [5] Burbidge E. M. et al. (1957) Rev. Mod. Phys., 29, 547-650. [6] Lewis R. S. et al. (1994) GCA, 58, 471-494. [7] Zinner E. et al. (1989) GCA, 53, 730-732. [8] Amari S. et al. (1992) Astrophys. J. Lett., 394, L43-L46. [9] Hohenberg C. M. et al. (1990) GCA, 54, 2133-2140. [10] Nichols R. H. Jr. et al. (1991) Meteoritics, 26. [11] Nichols R. H. Jr. et al. (1993) Meteoritics, 28, 410-411. [12] Nittler L. et al. (1995) LPS XXVI, 1057-1058. [13]Hohenberg C. M. (1994) personal communication. [14]Payne M. G. et al. (1994) Rev. Sci. Instrum., 65, 2433-2459. [15] Thonnard N. et al. (1992) Inst. Phys. Conf. Ser. 128, 27-30. [16] Gilmour J. D. et al. (1994) Rev. Sci. Instrum., 65, 617-625. [17] Thonnard N. and Lehmann B. L. (1995) AIP Conf. Proc., 329, 335-338.

  1. PBFA Z: A 50 TW/5 MJ Electrical Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielman, R. B.

    1997-05-01

    PBFA Z is a new 50 TW/5 MJ short electrical driver located at Sandia National Laboratories. We use PBFA Z to magnetically-implode solid or plasma shells. These configurations are historically known as z pinches. The pulsed power design of PBFA Z(R. B. Spielman, et al., Proc. of the Ninth IEEE Pulsed Power Conf., Albuquerque, NM 1995) is based on conventional single-pulse Marx generator, water-line pulse-forming technology used on the earlier Saturn (D. D. Bloomquist, et al., Proc. of the Sixth IEEE Pulsed Power Conf., Arlington, VA edited by P. J. Turchi and B. H. Bernstein (IEEE, New York, 1987), p. 310) and PBFA II(B. N. Turman, et al., Proc. of the Fifth IEEE Pulsed Power Conf., Arlington, VA 1985, pp. 155) accelerators. PBFA Z stores 11.4 MJ in its 36 Marx generators, couples 5 MJ in a 50 TW/100 ns pulse to the output water transmission lines, and delivers 3.4 MJ and 40 TW of electrical energy to the z-pinch load. Depending on the initial load inductance and the implosion time, we attain a peak current of 16-20 MA with a rise time of 105 ns. Current is fed to the z-pinch load through self magnetically-insulated transmission lines (MITLs). Peak electric fields in the MITLs exceed 2 MV /cm. The current from the four independent conical disk MITLs is combined together in a double post-hole vacuum convolute with an efficiency greater than 95%. The measured system performance of the water transmission lines, the vacuum insulator stack, the MITLs, and the double post-hole vacuum convolute differed from preshot predictions by ~ 5%. Using a 2-cm radius and a 2-cm length tungsten wire array with 240, 7.5-=B5m diameter wires (4.1-mg mass) as the z-pinch load, we achieved x-ray powers of 160 TW and x-ray energies of 1.85 MJ as measured by x-ray diodes and resistive bolometry.

  2. Overview of the SSPX Experimental Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. H.; Sspx Team

    1999-11-01

    The Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) is now operating, with the goal of measuring and optimizing energy confinement in spheromak plasmas sustained by DC helicity injection (Hooper, E.B., et al, in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research), Proc. 17th Inter. Conf., Yokohama, Japan, 1998. The spheromak plasmas are formed inside a tungsten-coated copper "flux conserver" that defines the toroidal plasma volume (a=0.23m, R=0.5m). Diagnostics include magnetic probes, a CO2 interferometer, Thomson scattering, and impurity spectroscopy. A set of bias coils is being installed, which will allow a wide range of possible configurations, including a "flux-core" spheromak. Major near term objectives include plasma cleanup, diagnostic commissioning, and maximizing the ratio of toroidal plasma current to injector current. The scaling of SSPX to potential reactor concepts will be discussed.

  3. Nonlinear {omega}*-stabilization of the m = 1 mode in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, B.; Zakharov, L.

    1995-08-01

    Earlier studies of sawtooth oscillations in Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor supershots (Levinton et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2895 (1994); Zakharov, et al, Plasma Phys. and Contr. Nucl. Fus. Res., Proc. 15th Int. Conf., Seville 1994, Vienna) have found an apparent contradiction between conventional linear theory and experiment: even in sawtooth-free discharges, the theory typically predicts instability due to a nearly ideal m = 1 mode. Here, the nonlinear evolution of such mode is analyzed using numerical simulations of a two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. We find the mode saturates nonlinearly at a small amplitude provided the ion and electron drift-frequencies {omega}*{sub i,e} are somewhat above the linear stability threshold of the collisionless m = 1 reconnecting mode. The comparison of the simulation results to m = 1 mode activity in TFTR suggests additional, stabilizing effects outside the present model are also important.

  4. An exploration of advanced X-divertor scenarios on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covele, B.; Valanju, P.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Mahajan, S.

    2014-07-01

    It is found that the X-divertor (XD) configuration (Kotschenreuther et al 2004 Proc. 20th Int. Conf. on Fusion Energy (Vilamoura, Portugal, 2004) (Vienna: IAEA) CD-ROM file [IC/P6-43] www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/physics/fec/fec2004/datasets/index.html, Kotschenreuther et al 2006 Proc. 21st Int. Conf. on Fusion Energy 2006 (Chengdu, China, 2006) (Vienna: IAEA), CD-ROM file [IC/P7-12] www-naweb.iaea.org/napc/physics/FEC/FEC2006/html/index.htm, Kotschenreuther et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 072502) can be made with the conventional poloidal field (PF) coil set on ITER (Tomabechi et al and Team 1991 Nucl. Fusion 31 1135), where all PF coils are outside the TF coils. Starting from the standard divertor, a sequence of desirable XD configurations are possible where the PF currents are below the present maximum design limits on ITER, and where the baseline divertor cassette is used. This opens the possibility that the XD could be tested and used to assist in high-power operation on ITER, but some further issues need examination. Note that the increased major radius of the super-X-divertor (Kotschenreuther et al 2007 Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 53 11, Valanju et al 2009 Phys. Plasmas 16 5, Kotschenreuther et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 035003, Valanju et al 2010 Fusion Eng. Des. 85 46) is not a feature of the XD geometry. In addition, we present an XD configuration for K-DEMO (Kim et al 2013 Fusion Eng. Des. 88 123) to demonstrate that it is also possible to attain the XD configuration in advanced tokamak reactors with all PF coils outside the TF coils. The results given here for the XD are far more encouraging than recent calculations by Lackner and Zohm (2012 Fusion Sci. Technol. 63 43) for the Snowflake (Ryutov 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 064502, Ryutov et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 092501), where the required high PF currents represent a major technological challenge. The magnetic field structure in the outboard divertor SOL (Kotschenreuther 2013 Phys. Plasmas 20 102507) in the recently created

  5. Comparison of Moderate to High Ion Cyclotron Absorption on Energetic Ions in NSTX and DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burby, J.; Pinsker, R. I.; Choi, M.

    2009-11-01

    Strong absorption of fast waves (FWs) on injected deuterons at ion cyclotron harmonic numbers in the 4-10 range is observed on both DIII-D and NSTX. The results from fast ion Dα spectroscopic measurements from the two devices differ significantly: deposition on fast ions peaks near the cyclotron harmonic layer closest to the magnetic axis in the conventional-aspect-ratio DIII-D, while results from the low-aspect-ratio NSTX show a broader deposition profile [1]. One root of the difference stems from the absorbing fast ions sampling more harmonic layers in NSTX than in DIII-D. We investigate cyclotron absorption in cases with multiple harmonic layers within a single ion gyroradius and related phenomena numerically and analytically by examining the response of individual charged particles to rf fields in various field configurations. 8pt [1] M. Podesta et al., RF Power in Plasmas (Proc.18th Top. Conf., Gent, Belgium, 2009), to be published.

  6. Investigations on inertial confinement fusion at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center—VNIIEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, S.; Kirillov, G. A.; Kochemasov, G. G.; Mkhitaryan, L. S.; Murugov, V. M.; Sukharev, S. A.; Zhidkov, N. V.

    2003-12-01

    Since 30 years already, the All-Russia Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) is engaged in investigations on the problem of inertial confinement fusion. The high-power laser facilities 'Iskra 5' (Kirillov G A et al 1990 Laser Particle Beams 8 827 31) and 'Luch' (Sukharev S A 3rd Int. Conf. on Solid State Lasers for Application to Inertial Confinement Fusion ed W H Lowdermilk Proc. SPIE 3492 12 24) were created and are operating now in the framework of this programme. The main lines of the work at these facilities are the investigation of the physics of thermonuclear targets and the development of laser technologies. This work resulted in the development of a project of the new generation facility 'Iskra-6'. This report presents the main results of these works carried out at Russian Federal Nuclear Center—VNIIEF in the period 1991 2002.

  7. Interplay between low-energy optical phonon modes and structural transition in PrT2Zn20 (T=Ru and Ir)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakiya, K.; Onimaru, T.; Tsutsui, S.; Matsumoto, K. T.; Nagasawa, N.; Baron, A. Q. R.; Hasegawa, T.; Ogita, N.; Udagawa, M.; Takabatake, T.

    2015-03-01

    Atomic dynamics of PrT2Zn20 for T=Ru with a structural transition at Ts=138 K and T=Ir without such a transition have been studied by inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) measurements. The IXS spectra for T=Ru reveal an optical phonon excitation at 3 meV. We assign it to low-energy vibration of the Zn atom at the 16c site by taking account of the first principles calculation [Hasegawa et al. 2012 J. Phys.: Conf. Proc. 391 012016]. For T=Ir, on the other hand, the optical excitation at 3 meV was not observed. The contrasting results indicate that the low-energy optical phonon mode has a role in the structural transition in PrRu2Zn20 and isostructural La counterparts.

  8. TIMP-1 expression in human colorectal cancer is associated with TGF-B1, LOXL2, INHBA1, TNF-AIP6 and TIMP-2 transcript profiles.

    PubMed

    Offenberg, Hanne; Brünner, Nils; Mansilla, Francisco; Orntoft Torben, F; Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin

    2008-10-01

    The balance of activity between the endogenous enzyme inhibitors known as tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases and their targets, the matrix metalloproteinases, in the extracellular matrix is thought to play an important role in tumour cell invasion. Supporting this notion, we have shown that colorectal cancer patients have increased plasma levels of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), and that high plasma TIMP-1 levels are associated with short colorectal cancer patient survival. However, although TIMP-1 has been extensively studied in cancer, very little is known about how it is regulated. To further elucidate potential mechanisms of regulation of this protein, we did a number of experiments to look at associations between the transcript profile of TIMP-1 with known matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as well as with expression profiles of other genes differentially regulated in human colorectal cancer (CRC) and the other TIMPs 2-4, which have also been associated with the progression of colorectal cancer. Genome-wide expression profiling of 172 CRC and normal mucosa samples was used to identify transcript changes for the genes under investigation. We found that TIMP-1 was up-regulated in CRC samples compared with normal tissue, while TIMP-2 was down-regulated. Eight MMPs were up-regulated in CRC compared with normal tissue. Correlating up-regulated genes with the TIMP-1 transcript, we identified 13 that were also up-regulated in cancerous tissue. Among these were genes associated with the synthesis of extracellullar matrix, genes involved in the TGF-beta signalling pathway, and genes that are likely transcribed by the tumour cells. These insights add to the complex picture emerging about the regulation of TIMPs in colorectal cancer.

  9. Rebuttal to the comment by Malhotra and Strom on "Constraints on the source of lunar cataclysm impactors"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćuk, Matija; Gladman, Brett J.; Stewart, Sarah T.

    2011-11-01

    Ćuk et al. (Ćuk, M. Gladman, B.J., Stewart, S.T. [2010]. Icarus 207 590-594) concluded that the the lunar cataclysm (late heavy bombardment) was recorded in lunar Imbrian era craters, and that their size distribution is different from that of main belt asteroids (which may have been the dominant pre-Imbrian impactors). This result would likely preclude the asteroid belt as the direct source of lunar cataclysm impactors. Malhotra and Strom (Malhotra, R., Strom, R.G. [2011]. Icarus) maintain that the lunar impactor population in the Imbrian era was the same as in Nectarian and pre-Nectarian periods, and this population had a size distribution identical to that of main belt asteroids. In support of this claim, they present an Imbrian size distribution made from two data sets published by Wilhelms et al. (Wilhelms, D.E., Oberbeck, V.R., Aggarwal, H.R. [1978]. Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 9, 3735-3762). However, these two data sets cannot be simply combined as they represent areas of different ages and therefore crater densities. Malhotra and Strom (Malhotra, R., Strom, R.G. [2011]. Icarus) differ with the main conclusion of Wilhelms et al. (Wilhelms, D.E., Oberbeck, V.R., Aggarwal, H.R. [1978]. Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 9, 3735-3762) that the Nectarian and Imbrian crater size distributions were different. We conclude that the available data indicate that the lunar Imbrian-era impactors had a different size distribution from the older ones, with the Imbrian impactor distribution being significantly richer in small impactors than that of older lunar impactors or current main-belt asteroids.

  10. Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX): First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Gagnard, Sam; Gathright, David; Gruen, Eberhard; James, David; Kempf, Sascha; Lankton, Mark; Srama, Ralf; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Szalay, Jamey

    2014-05-01

    The lunar dust environment is expected to be dominated by submicron-sized dust particles released from the Moon due to the continual bombardment by micrometeoroids, and possibly due to UV radiation and plasma-induced near-surface intense electric fields. The Lunar Dust EXperiment (LDEX) instrument is designed to map the spatial and temporal variability of the dust size and density distributions in the lunar environment onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission [1, 2] orbiting the Moon since 10/6/2013. LDEX is an impact detector, capable of reliably detecting and measuring the mass of submicron and micron sized dust grains. LDEX also measures the collective currents from low-energy ions and from the impacts of dust grains that are below the detection threshold for single dust impacts; hence it can search for the putative population of grains with radii ~ 0.1 μm lofted over the terminator regions by plasma effects. This talk will summarize the preliminary analysis of the observations to date: 1) LDEX identified the dust ejecta cloud that is maintained by micrometeoroid bombardment. As predicted, the density of the dust ejecta cloud rapidly increases toward the surface, and it also shows strong temporal variability, most likely related to the stochastic nature of the meteoroid impacts. 2) LDEX, as of yet, has not confirmed the existence of levitated dust clouds. This puts strict new upper limits on the density of small lofted grains, especially during periods of low ion fluxes entering the instrument. [1] Elphic et al., Proc. Lunar. Sci. Conf. 44th, 1719 (2013) [2] Horanyi et al., Proc. Lunar. Sci. Conf. 43th, 1659 (2012).

  11. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing experimental efforts to detect cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos are guided by the expectation that astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray protons would also generate neutrinos through interactions with ambient matter and/or photons. However, there will be a reduction in the predicted neutrino flux if cosmic ray sources accelerate not only protons but also significant numbers of heavier nuclei, as is indicated by recent air shower data. We consider plausible extragalactic sources such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and starburst galaxies and demand consistency with the observed cosmic ray composition and energy spectrum at Earth after allowing for propagation through intergalactic radiation fields. This allows us to calculate the expected neutrino fluxes from the sources, normalized to the observed cosmic ray spectrum. We find that the likely signals are still within reach of next generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube.PACS95.85.Ry98.70.Rz98.54.Cm98.54.EpReferencesFor a review, see:F.HalzenD.HooperRep. Prog. Phys.6520021025A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.972006221101A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationAstropart. Phys.262006282arXiv:astro-ph/0611063arXiv:astro-ph/0702265V.NiessANTARES CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8672006217I.KravchenkoPhys. Rev. D732006082002S.W.BarwickANITA CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.962006171101V.Van ElewyckPierre Auger CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8092006187For a survey of possible sources and event rates in km3 detectors see e.g.,W.BednarekG.F.BurgioT.MontaruliNew Astron. Rev.4920051M.D.KistlerJ.F.BeacomPhys. Rev. D742006063007A. Kappes, J. Hinton, C. Stegmann, F.A. Aharonian, arXiv:astro-ph/0607286.A.LevinsonE.WaxmanPhys. Rev. Lett.872001171101C.DistefanoD.GuettaE.WaxmanA.LevinsonAstrophys. J.5752002378F.A.AharonianL.A.AnchordoquiD.KhangulyanT.MontaruliJ. Phys. Conf. Ser.392006408J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenAstrophys. J.5762002L33F.VissaniAstropart. Phys.262006310F.W

  12. The E864 lead-scintillating fiber hadronic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T. A.; Barish, K.; Bennett, S. J.; Cormier, T. M.; Cernej, R.; Chikanian, A.; Coe, S. D.; Davies, R.; Dee, P. R.; Diebold, G. E.; Fachini, P.; Finch, E.; George, N. K.; Greene, S. V.; Haridas, P.; Hill, J. C.; Hirsch, A.; Huang, H. Z.; Hoversten, R. A.; Kim, B.; Kumar, B. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Libby, B.; Maguire, C. F.; Majka, R. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murgatroyd, J. T.; Nagle, J. L.; Petridis, A. N.; Pless, I. A.; Pope, J. K.; Pruneau, C. A.; Riso, J.; Rabin, M. S. Z.; Reid, J. D.; Rotondo, F. S.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sandweiss, J.; Scharenberg, R.; Sheen, J.; Tincknell, M.; Rimai, A.; Van Buren, G.; Wilson, W. K.; Wohn, F. K.; Zhao, K.

    1998-02-01

    A large hadronic lead scintillating fiber calorimeter has been built and integrated into the AGS experiment E864 [C. Pruneau et al., E864 Collaboration, Proc. 6th Internal. Conf. on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics, 1996, Frascati, Italy; F. Rotondo et al., E864 Collaboration, Proc. Quark Matter'96, Heidelberg, Germany, 20 May 1996] spectrometer to provide an independent measurement of the mass of particles produced in heavy ion collisions. The "spaghetti-type" calorimeter design and construction techniques are described in detail. Results from a prototype and the full implementation of the calorimeter are reported. The hadronic energy resolution of the calorimeter is found to be 6E/E = 0.035(± 0.005) + 0.344(± 0.008)/trE/GeV, in very good agreement with a FLUKA calculation. The hadronic time resolution is measured to be better than 400 ps. The combined calorimeter energy and time signals provide for a mass determination with good resolution. The mass resolution scales as δm/m = 0.026 + 0.347/√E(GeV) for velocities v/c < 0.98.

  13. Enhanced affordable methods for assessing material characteristics and consolidation effects on stone and mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdácký, Miloš; Slížková, Zuzana

    2013-12-01

    It is rather difficult to set up non-destructive or considerate in situ tests for assessing material characteristics and consolidation effects on historic stone and mortar. However, some simple methods have proved to be helpful when applied appropriately and this paper provides brief information about two such methods: peeling tests, also known as the ‘Scotch tape’ method, and surface water uptake measurements using a digitized microtube. Both methods have some history of development and use Mora and Torraca (1965 Bollettino Istituto Centrale del Restauro (Rome) pp 109-32), Giorgi et al (2000 Stud. Conserv. 45 154-61), Tiano et al (2006 J. Cult. Heritage 7 49-55), Lehmann (2004 Thesis, Hochschule für Bildende Künste, Dresden pp 33-34), Drdácký et al (2011 Proc. European Workshop on Cultural Heritage Preservation pp 126-30) and Zíma (2011 Proc. 49th Int. Scientific Conf. on Experimental Stress Analysis pp 441-8) without any standardized support. This lack of a validated procedure can lead to some deficiencies and misinterpretations for applying the peeling test. Also, in the case of the digitized micro-tube, there can be some difficulties when the device is applied, which could prevent its wider adoption or even lead to rejection of the micro-tube technique. The paper summarizes basic principles for the application of both methods and reports illustrative results for laboratory and historic building investigations.

  14. Rôle de l'hydrogène dans le procédé de purification du silicium par plasma thermique inductif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erin, J.; Morvan, D.; Amouroux, J.

    1993-03-01

    The use of the thermal process for purification of silicon led to a material with the chemical purity required for phototovoltaic applications. In this paper, the various properties of ArH2 plasma mixtures are briefly reviewed and the effect of hydrogen percentage in an argon plasma used for melting and purifying silicon is pointed out. Physico-chemical analysis of the purified silicon showed that hydrogen diffused in the material and could passivate crystal defects by formation of stable chemical bonds such as Si-H. La technique de purification du silicium sous plasma thermique permet d'aboutir à un matériau de pureté chimique requise pour l'industrie photovoltaïque. Dans ce travail, nous soulignerons le rôle de l'hydrogène intervenant dans les propriétés du plasma en rappelant les caractéristiques des plasmas Ar-H2 utilisés pour fondre et purifier le silicium. Les caractéristiques physico-chimiques du silicium purifié montrent que l'hydrogène diffuse dans le matériau et est en mesure de cicatriser les défauts cristallins par formation de liaisons chimiques stables de type Si-H.

  15. Baryon-Baryon Interactions ---Nijmegen Extended-Soft-Core Models---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijken, T. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    options for the ESC-model. In particularly in ESC08 with single-sets of parameters excellent fits were obtained for the NN- and YN-data. For example, in the case of ESC08a'' we have: (i) For the selected 4233 NN-data with energies 0 ≤ T_{lab} ≤ 350 MeV, excellent results were obtained having chi(2/N_{data}) = 1.094. (ii) For the usual set of 35 YN-data and 3 Sigma(+p) cross-sections from a recent KEK-experiment E289 [H. Kanda et al., AIP Conf. Proc. 842 (2006), 501; H. Kanda, Measurement of the cross sections of Sigma(=p) elastic scattering, Ph. D. thesis, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University, March 2007] the fit has chi(2}/YN_{data) ≈ 0.83. (iii) For YY there is a weak LambdaLambda-interaction, which successfully matches with t he Nagara-event [H. Takahashi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001), 212502]. (iv) The nuclear Sigma and Xi well-dephts satisfy U_Sigma > 0 and U_Xi < 0. The predictions for the S = -2 (LambdaLambda, Xi N, LambdaSigma, SigmaSigma)-channels are the occurrences of an S = -2 bound states in the Xi N((3S_1-^3D_1,) I = 0,1)-channels.

  16. ME-μSR study in YBCO vortex states.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. H.; Boekema, C.

    2007-03-01

    We are analyzing μSR vortex data of YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Tc = 91 K). The average superconducting grain size is ˜20 μm. The μSR data are recorded in a transverse 1 kOe field and at temperatures below 10 K. The μSR technique is used to probe the magnetic fields in the cuprate vortex state. The μSR signals show an oscillatory time dependence. To determine the frequency-dependent signals, we use the Maximum Entropy (ME) transform technique. [2] The ME-Burg algorithm removes noise, and does not suffer from Fourier-like truncation effects. The frequency signals are better fit with Lorentzians than static Gaussians. This Lorentzian behavior indicates the existence of dynamic magnetism in and around the vortex cores. This is consistent with earlier YBCO vortex ME-μSR results [3] and the SO(5) modeling [4] of cuprate superconductivity, predicting the existence of antiferromagnetism in the vortex states. Research is supported by NSF-REU and WiSE at SJSU. [1] C. Boekema et al, Physica C282-287 (1997) 2069. [2] J Lee et al, J Appl Phys 95 (2004) 6906 and ref therein; AIP www: Virtual J Appl of Superconductivity 2004 V6 Iss11. [3] C. Boekema et al, 8th Int M2S-HTSC Conf, Physica C in press. [4] H-D Chen et al, Phys Rev B70 (2004) 024516; SC Zhang, Science 275 (1997) 1089.

  17. MONTE-CARLO Simulations ``QUANTUM''-``NOISE'' POWER-SPECTRUM 0 =(F =ma) =0 Uniform-Velocity Pareto/Red/Beethoven-Law VS 0 ≠(F =ma) ≠0 Uniform-Acceleration/Deceleration/Bremsstrahlung Archimedes-(Euclid-Descartes)-Zipf/Pink/Flicker/Bach-Law UNIVERSALITY INEVITABILITY!!!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, T. T. L.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig; Young, Frederic; Smith, Adolph

    2013-03-01

    Dynamics vs usual by-rote kinematics treatment/lack of understanding, via Siegel[AIP Shock-Physics Confs. Chicago(2011); Seattle(2013)] simple classical-mechanics/dynamics simple-insights]-Panofsky-Phillips[E&M (1960s)],of Monte Carlo[Kaplan et.al.[PRL 107, 201601 (11)]:'''Noise', Sign-Problems & Statistics'']-simulations' {Hamersley-Handscombe, Monte Carlo Methods, Methuen(64-75)}``noises'' power-spectra{SEMINAL Montroll [(60s-80s)}-Boccara[ ``Modeling'' ``Complex''-Sys.(02)-ch.-8/p.-311]-West et.al.[Physics of Fractal-Operators, Springer(00)]-Shlesinger-Lindenberg-Handel-van Vliet-Jonscher-Ngai-...-Siegel[Schrodinger Symp., Imperial-College (1987);Copenhagen-Onterp. 50-Yrs. After Como-Lect.,Symp.Fdns.Mod.Phys., Joensu(87)]}, in the light of Siegel[MRS Fall-Mtgs. Boston: Symp. Fractals(89)-5-papers!!!; Symp. Scaling(90); Symp.Transport in Geometric-Constraints(90)] power-law decay algebraicity vs. white/flat/functionless [analogous to Fokker-Planck-eqn. two-terms Dichotomy, relatively: static/non-diffusive vs diffusive!!!] but dimensionality-dependence: first-odd-integer Z vs. first-even-integer Z: 2-D bulk-region -area - dominated constant

  18. Acute intermittent porphyria: Diagnostic dilemma and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Mohan Deep; Hazarika, Nita; Saraswat, Namita; Sood, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) presents with diverse group of symptoms making its early diagnosis difficult. Delaying diagnosis and treatment of AIP can be fatal or can cause long term or permanent neurological damage. We present here a case report of AIP where the diagnosis was missed. The diversity of symptoms and details concerning the treatment options for AIP are discussed. PMID:26330726

  19. Clinical Features and Expressions of Foxp3 and IL-17 in Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Na; Han, Wen-Ya; Lu, Lu; Yu, Tao; Li, Jie-Yao; Min, Xiao-Hui; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Yuan, Yu-Hong; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2014-01-01

    Background Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct type of pancreatitis associated with a presumed autoimmune mechanism. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical features and expressions of forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) in type 1 AIP in China and to identify factors for differentiation of AIP from non-AIP chronic pancreatitis (CP). Material/Methods We retrospectively reviewed pancreatic specimens with diagnosis of type 1 AIP and non-AIP CP at Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital in China from January 2000 to December 2013. The clinical symptoms, serological data, imaging findings, histopathology, and immunohistochemical findings of Foxp3 and IL-17 in the 2 groups were analyzed. Results Twenty-nine patients with type 1 AIP and 20 patients with non-AIP CP were enrolled. Obstructive jaundice was more common in type 1 AIP than in non-AIP CP (62.1% vs. 30.0%, P=0.042). The diffuse or segmental enlargement of the pancreas was more frequent in type 1 AIP than in non-AIP CP (72.4% vs. 40.0%, P=0.038). Histopathology of type 1 AIP presented dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, “snowstorm-like” fibrosis and abundant immunoglobulin (Ig) G4+ cells. Foxp3+ cells were more frequently observed in type 1 AIP than in non-AIP CP. IL-17+ cell infiltration was similar between the 2 groups. Furthermore, a positive correlation was found between Foxp3+ and IgG4+ cell counts in the pancreas of patients with type 1 AIP. Conclusions Type 1 AIP has distinctive symptoms, image, and pathological characteristics, which could be used for differentiation from non-AIP CP. Foxp3+ cells might be helpful to distinguish type 1 AIP from non-AIP CP. PMID:25553723

  20. Searching for Indigenous Noble Gases in the Moon: Vacuum Crushing of Vesicular Basalt 15016 and Stepwise Heating of Anorthosites 60025, 60215 and 65315 Aliquots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekaert, D. V.; Avice, G.; Marty, B.; Gudipati, M. S.; Henderson, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    theses samples and primordial U-Xe [4], inferred on theoretical ground to be the precursor of atmospheric Xe but never clearly identified. [1] Lightner and Marti (1974) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 5th, [2] Niemeyer and Leich (1976) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 7th, [3] Niedermann and Eugster (1992) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, [4] Pepin (2000) Space Sci. Rev.

  1. Two-stage approach for detection and reduction of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic data.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rajet; Natarajan, Balasubramaniam Bala; Warren, Steve

    2010-08-01

    Corruption of photopleythysmograms (PPGs) by motion artifacts has been a serious obstacle to the reliable use of pulse oximeters for real-time, continuous state-of-health monitoring. In this paper, we propose an automated, two-stage PPG data processing method to minimize the effects of motion artifacts. The technique is based on our prior work related to motion artifact detection (stage 1) [R. Krishnan, B. Natarajan, and S. Warren, "Analysis and detection of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic data using higher order statistics,'' in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Acoust., Speech, Signal Process. (ICASSP 2008), Las Vegas, Nevada, Apr. 2008, pp. 613-616] and motion artifact reduction (stage 2) [R. Krishnan, B. Natarajan, and S. Warren, "Motion artifact reduction in photoplethysmography using magnitude-based frequency domain independent component analysis,'' in Proc. 17th Int. Conf. Comput. Commun. Network, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, Aug. 2008, pp. 1-5]. Regarding stage 1, we present novel and consistent techniques to detect the presence of motion artifact in PPGs given higher order statistical information present in the data. We analyze these data in the time and frequency domains (FDs) and identify metrics to distinguish between clean and motion-corrupted data. A Neyman-Pearson detection rule is formulated for each of the metrics. Furthermore, by treating each of the metrics as observations from independent sensors, we employ hard fusion and soft fusion techniques presented in [Z. Chair and P. Varshney, "Optimal data fusion in multiple sensor detection systems,'' IEEE Trans. Aerosp. Electron. Syst., AES, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 98-101, Jan. 1986] and [C. C. Lee and J. J. Chao, "Optimum local decision space partitioning for distributed detection,'' IEEE Trans. Aerosp. Electron. Syst., AES, vol. 25, no. 7, pp. 536-544, Jul. 1989], respectively, in order to fuse individual decisions into a global system decision. For stage two, we propose a motion artifact reduction method

  2. Two-stage approach for detection and reduction of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic data.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rajet; Natarajan, Balasubramaniam Bala; Warren, Steve

    2010-08-01

    Corruption of photopleythysmograms (PPGs) by motion artifacts has been a serious obstacle to the reliable use of pulse oximeters for real-time, continuous state-of-health monitoring. In this paper, we propose an automated, two-stage PPG data processing method to minimize the effects of motion artifacts. The technique is based on our prior work related to motion artifact detection (stage 1) [R. Krishnan, B. Natarajan, and S. Warren, "Analysis and detection of motion artifacts in photoplethysmographic data using higher order statistics,'' in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Acoust., Speech, Signal Process. (ICASSP 2008), Las Vegas, Nevada, Apr. 2008, pp. 613-616] and motion artifact reduction (stage 2) [R. Krishnan, B. Natarajan, and S. Warren, "Motion artifact reduction in photoplethysmography using magnitude-based frequency domain independent component analysis,'' in Proc. 17th Int. Conf. Comput. Commun. Network, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, Aug. 2008, pp. 1-5]. Regarding stage 1, we present novel and consistent techniques to detect the presence of motion artifact in PPGs given higher order statistical information present in the data. We analyze these data in the time and frequency domains (FDs) and identify metrics to distinguish between clean and motion-corrupted data. A Neyman-Pearson detection rule is formulated for each of the metrics. Furthermore, by treating each of the metrics as observations from independent sensors, we employ hard fusion and soft fusion techniques presented in [Z. Chair and P. Varshney, "Optimal data fusion in multiple sensor detection systems,'' IEEE Trans. Aerosp. Electron. Syst., AES, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 98-101, Jan. 1986] and [C. C. Lee and J. J. Chao, "Optimum local decision space partitioning for distributed detection,'' IEEE Trans. Aerosp. Electron. Syst., AES, vol. 25, no. 7, pp. 536-544, Jul. 1989], respectively, in order to fuse individual decisions into a global system decision. For stage two, we propose a motion artifact reduction method

  3. Physics of Spherical Torus Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2000-01-01

    Broad and important progress in plasma tests, theory, new experiments, and future visions of the spherical torus (ST, or very low aspect ratio tokamaks) have recently emerged. These have substantially improved our understanding of the potential properties of the ST plasmas, since the preliminary calculation of the ST magnetohydrodynamic equilibria more than a decade ago. Exciting data have been obtained from concept exploration level ST experiments of modest capabilities (with major radii up to 35 cm), making important scientific contributions to toroidal confinement in general. The results have helped approval and construction of new and/or more powerful ST experiments, and stimulated an increasing number of theoretical calculations of interest to magnetic fusion energy. Utilizing the broad knowledge base from the successful tokamak and advanced tokamak research, a wide range of new ST physics features has been suggested. These properties of the ST plasma will be tested at the 1 MA level with major radius up to similar to 80 cm in the new proof of principle devices National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX, U.S.) [M. Peng , European Conf. Abst. 22C, 451 (1998); S. M. Kaye , Fusion Technol. 36, 16 (1999); M. Ono , "Exploration of Spherical Torus Physics in the NSTX Device," 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conf., paper IAEA-CN-69/ICP/01 (R), Yokohama, Japan (1998)], Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST, U.K.) [A. C. Darke , Fusion Technol. 1, 799 (1995); Q. W. Morris , Proc. Int. Workshop on ST (Ioffe Inst., St. Petersburg, 1997), Vol. 1, p. 290], and Globus-M (R.F.) [V. K. Gusev , European Conf. Abst. 22C, 576 (1998)], which have just started full experimental operation. New concept exploration experiments, such as Pegasus (University of Wisconsin) [R. Fonck and the PEGASUS Team, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 267 (1999)], Helicity Injected Tokamak-II (HIT-II, University of Washington) [T. R. Jarboe , Phys. Plasmas 5, 1807 (1998)], and Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX

  4. The physics of spherical torus plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.-K. M.

    2000-05-01

    Broad and important progress in plasma tests, theory, new experiments, and future visions of the spherical torus (ST, or very low aspect ratio tokamaks) have recently emerged. These have substantially improved our understanding of the potential properties of the ST plasmas, since the preliminary calculation of the ST magnetohydrodynamic equilibria more than a decade ago. Exciting data have been obtained from concept exploration level ST experiments of modest capabilities (with major radii up to 35 cm), making important scientific contributions to toroidal confinement in general. The results have helped approval and construction of new and/or more powerful ST experiments, and stimulated an increasing number of theoretical calculations of interest to magnetic fusion energy. Utilizing the broad knowledge base from the successful tokamak and advanced tokamak research, a wide range of new ST physics features has been suggested. These properties of the ST plasma will be tested at the 1 MA level with major radius up to ˜80 cm in the new proof of principle devices National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX, U.S.) [M. Peng et al., European Conf. Abst. 22C, 451 (1998); S. M. Kaye et al., Fusion Technol. 36, 16 (1999); M. Ono et al., "Exploration of Spherical Torus Physics in the NSTX Device," 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conf., paper IAEA-CN-69/ICP/01 (R), Yokohama, Japan (1998)], Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST, U.K.) [A. C. Darke et al., Fusion Technol. 1, 799 (1995); Q. W. Morris et al., Proc. Int. Workshop on ST (Ioffe Inst., St. Petersburg, 1997), Vol. 1, p. 290], and Globus-M (R.F.) [V. K. Gusev et al., European Conf. Abst. 22C, 576 (1998)], which have just started full experimental operation. New concept exploration experiments, such as Pegasus (University of Wisconsin) [R. Fonck and the PEGASUS Team, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 267 (1999)], Helicity Injected Tokamak-II (HIT-II, University of Washington) [T. R. Jarboe et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1807 (1998)], and Current

  5. Erratum: “Effect of hydrothermal condition on the formation of multi-component oxides of Ni-based metallic glass under high temperature water near the critical point” [AIP Advances 5, 077132 (2015)

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, J. S.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, D. H.; Ott, R. T.; Kim, H. G.; Lee, M. H.

    2015-12-30

    In the original manuscript, M. H. Lee’s affiliation number was incorrectly listed as 1. M. H. Lee’s correct affiliation number is 2 (Rare Metals R&D Group, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840, South Korea). Furthermore, this change affects no other part of the paper.

  6. A decision support system for AIDS intervention and prevention.

    PubMed

    Xu, L D

    1994-08-01

    In recent years, the importance of information systems has been identified as a vital issue to continuing success in AIDS intervention and prevention (AIP). The advances in information technology have resulted in integrative information systems including decision support systems (DSS). The concept of DSS for AIP was created at the intersection of two trends. The first trend was a growing belief that AIP information systems are successful in automating operations in AIP programs. The second was a continuing improvement in modeling and software development in the AIP area. This paper presents an integrated DSS for AIP. The system is integrated with a database and achieves its efficiency by incorporating various algorithms and models to support AIP decision processes. The application examples include screening AIDS-risky behaviors, evaluating educational interventions, and scheduling AIP sessions. The implementation results present evidence of the usefulness of the system in AIP.

  7. Amyloid inspired self-assembled peptide nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Goksu; Ceylan, Hakan; Urel, Mustafa; Erkal, Turan S; Deniz Tekin, E; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dâna, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-10-01

    Amyloid peptides are important components in many degenerative diseases as well as in maintaining cellular metabolism. Their unique stable structure provides new insights in developing new materials. Designing bioinspired self-assembling peptides is essential to generate new forms of hierarchical nanostructures. Here we present oppositely charged amyloid inspired peptides (AIPs), which rapidly self-assemble into nanofibers at pH 7 upon mixing in water caused by noncovalent interactions. Mechanical properties of the gels formed by self-assembled AIP nanofibers were analyzed with oscillatory rheology. AIP gels exhibited strong mechanical characteristics superior to gels formed by self-assembly of previously reported synthetic short peptides. Rheological studies of gels composed of oppositely charged mixed AIP molecules (AIP-1 + 2) revealed superior mechanical stability compared to individual peptide networks (AIP-1 and AIP-2) formed by neutralization of net charges through pH change. Adhesion and elasticity properties of AIP mixed nanofibers and charge neutralized AIP-1, AIP-2 nanofibers were analyzed by high resolution force-distance mapping using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nanomechanical characterization of self-assembled AIP-1 + 2, AIP-1, and AIP-2 nanofibers also confirmed macroscopic rheology results, and mechanical stability of AIP mixed nanofibers was higher compared to individual AIP-1 and AIP-2 nanofibers self-assembled at acidic and basic pH, respectively. Experimental results were supported with molecular dynamics simulations by considering potential noncovalent interactions between the amino acid residues and possible aggregate forms. In addition, HUVEC cells were cultured on AIP mixed nanofibers at pH 7 and biocompatibility and collagen mimetic scaffold properties of the nanofibrous system were observed. Encapsulation of a zwitterionic dye (rhodamine B) within AIP nanofiber network was accomplished at physiological conditions to demonstrate that this

  8. Advanced information processing system for advanced launch system: Hardware technology survey and projections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The major goals of this effort are as follows: (1) to examine technology insertion options to optimize Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) performance in the Advanced Launch System (ALS) environment; (2) to examine the AIPS concepts to ensure that valuable new technologies are not excluded from the AIPS/ALS implementations; (3) to examine advanced microprocessors applicable to AIPS/ALS, (4) to examine radiation hardening technologies applicable to AIPS/ALS; (5) to reach conclusions on AIPS hardware building blocks implementation technologies; and (6) reach conclusions on appropriate architectural improvements. The hardware building blocks are the Fault-Tolerant Processor, the Input/Output Sequencers (IOS), and the Intercomputer Interface Sequencers (ICIS).

  9. Faraday current sensing employing chromatic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. R.; Li, G.; Spencer, J. W.; Aspey, R. A.; Kong, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    Faraday current sensors using a variety of sensing elements have been investigated extensively for their high sensitivity as well as other advantages [G.L. Lewis et al., Proc. IEE Conf. on The Reliability of Transmission and Distribution Equipment, 1995; Y.N. Ning et al., Optics Lett. 16 (1991); C.M.M. van den Tempel, Appl. Optics 32 (1993)]. Concurrently chromatic modulation techniques have been investigated at the University of Liverpool for use with optical fibre sensors of different types [N.A. Pilling, Ph.D. Thesis, 1992; M.M. Murphy, Ph.D. Thesis, 1991] including Faraday current sensing, for overcoming difficulties with non-referenced intensity modulation systems. In this contribution a brief discussion of the scope of chromatically based Faraday current sensing with particular regard to electric power transmission and distribution industries is given. A novel sensor based upon a Faraday glass block in combination with a BSO crystal in the sensing element is described. The sensor takes advantage of the natural gyrotropy of the BSO which conversely has been previously regarded as a disadvantage. The experimental results obtained indicate that this method offers a novel approach to improving system sensitivity. The extension of the approach from a simple bench top demonstrator to real power systems deployment is also discussed.

  10. Early deterioration of coarse woody debris.

    SciTech Connect

    Tainter, Frank, H.; McMinn, James, W.

    1999-02-16

    Tainter, F.H., and J.W. McMinn. 1999. Early deterioration of coarse woody debris. In: Proc. Tenth Bien. South. Silv. Res. Conf. Shreveport, LA, February 16-18, 1999. Pp. 232-237 Abstract - Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important structural component of southern forest ecosystems. CWD loading may be affected by different decomposition rates on sites of varying quality. Bolts of red oak and loblolly pine were placed on plots at each of three (hydric, mesic. and xerlc) sites at the Savannah River Site and sampled over a I6-week period. Major changes were in moisture content and nonstructural carbohydrate content (total carbohydrates, reducing sugars, and starch) of sapwood. Early changes in nonstructural carbohydrate levels following placement of the bolts were likely due to reallocation of these materials by sapwood parenchyma cells. These carbohydrates later formed pools increasingly metabolized by bacteria and invading fungi. Most prevalent fungi in sapwood were Ceratocysfis spp. in pine and Hypoxy/on spp. in oak. Although pine sapwood became blue stained and oak sapwood exhibited yellow soft decay with black zone lines, estimators of decay (specific gravity, sodium hydroxide solubility, and holocellulose content) were unchanged during the 16-week study period. A small effect of site was detected for starch content of sapwood of both species. Fungal biomass in sapwood of both species, as measured by ergosterol content, was detectable at week zero, increased somewhat by week three and increased significantly by week 16.

  11. Study on the Feasibility of Direct Fusion Energy Conversion for Deep-Space Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, Alfonso G.; Miley, George H.; Scott, John H.

    2012-10-01

    A significant change in the current space mission capabilities can be achieved with a highly efficient integration of a fusion energy source with an advanced space propulsion thruster, both with low specific mass. With aneutronic nuclear fusion as the high-density primary energy source, this study considers first electric energy extraction from the fusion reaction products via direct energy conversion to recirculate power as required for the operation of the fusion core. Then the beam of remaining reaction products is conditioned to achieve the optimal thrust and specific impulse for the mission. The research is specifically focused on two key issues: (i) Efficiency improvement of a Traveling Wave Direct Energy Converter (TWDEC, [1]) by achieving a higher ion beam density and optimization of the electrode coupling and of the neutralizing electron flow. (ii) A fast-particle kinetic energy-to-thrust conversion process based on collective interaction between ion bunches well separated in space [2]. Computer simulation results and a design for a basic physics experiment currently under development are reported. [4pt] [1] H. Momota et al., Fus. Tech., 35, 60(1999)[0pt] [2] A. G. Tarditi et al. Proc. NETS 2012 Conf., Woodlands, TX (2012)

  12. Power deposition in the JET divertor during ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, S.; Chankin, A.; Ciric, D.; Coad, J. P.; Falter, J.; Gauthier, E.; Lingertat, J.; Puppin, S.

    The power deposited in the JET divertor during ELMs has been evaluated using an infrared camera specifically designed for fast measurements. The first results [E. Gauthier, A. Charkin, S. Clement et al., Proc. 24th Euro. conf. on contr. Fusion and Plasma Phys., Berchtesgaden, 1997 (European Physical Society, 1998), vol. 21A, p. 61.] indicated that during type I ELMs, surface temperatures in excess of 2000°C were measured, leading to peak power fluxes in the order of 4 GW/m 2. The time integrated power flux exceeded the measured plasma energy loss per ELM by a factor of four. The reasons for this discrepancy are studied in this paper. Redeposited carbon layers of up to 40 μm have been found on the divertor surface in the places where the highest temperatures are measured. The impact of such layers on the power flux evaluation has been studied with numerical calculations, and a controlled simulation of ELM heating has been performed in the JET neutral beam test facility. It is found that neglecting the existence of layers on the surface in a 2D calculation can lead to overestimating the power by a factor of 3, whereas the error in the calculation of the energy is much smaller. An energy based calculation reduces the peak power during type I ELMs to values around 1.2 GW/m 2.

  13. Capillary micro-switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, Paul; Matalanis, Claude; Hirsa, Amir; Cox, Christhopher

    2002-11-01

    A capillary surface is a liquid/liquid or liquid/gas interface whose shape is determined by surface tension. Capillary surfaces occur when the capillary length is large compared to the container scale, as happens for typical liquids against gas on the sub-millimeter scale on Earth and on the meter scale in the micro-gravity environment of space vehicles. Manipulating capillary surfaces has emerged as a leading strategy for moving liquids on the micro-scale [1]. Practitioners have yet to take advantage of capillary instability in their design of devices, though. We illustrate how the response diagram of a single switch (bi-stable device) can be constructed from that of two capillary elements, how that of a system of switches (a pair) can be built from that of a single switch and finally how understanding the response of the system guides us to observations of new behavior in the laboratory. Experiments on capillary surfaces use either a soap-film analog (10 centimeter scale) or a liquid/gas (millimeter scale) apparatus. Progress is reported on the application of an array of micro-switches to make a controllable adhesion device, with the aim of effecting droplet transport. 1. Cho, Fan, Moon and Kim, "Towards digital microfluidic circuits: creating, transporting, cutting and merging liquid droplets by electrowetting-based actuation." Proc. 15th IEEE Int'l Conf. on MEMS, January 2002.

  14. d-Wave Signatures and Vortex Anomalies: A Maximum-Entropy μSR Study of RBCO Vortex States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fanyun; Ruiz, E. J.; Punjabi, S. R.; Boekema, C.; Cooke, D. W.

    1998-03-01

    A maximum-entropy (ME) technique has been applied to transverse-field muon- spin-relaxation (μSR) vortex data of several polycrystalline cuprate superconductors (RBCO with R = Er, Gd, Ho, Eu, Y). This ME method produces spectra representing estimates for the magnetic-field distributions in the vortex state. The main vortex signals for R = Er, Gd, and Ho reveal signs of a twin peak in the field distributions below the applied field (1 kOe), as predicted for d-wave superconductivity [1]. For comparison, we have also applied the ME method to simulated μSR data using the predicted shapes. For RBCO vortex states below 10 K, low-field tails in the field distribution have been confirmed. This low-field tail may be caused by magnetic frustration in the vortex state [2] or possible CuO-chain superconductivity below 25 K [3]. Tentative results on the grain-orientation dependence of the YBCO vortex states are presented and discussed. [1] M. Franz et al., Phys Rev B53 (1996) 5795; I. Affleck et al., Phys Rev B55 (1997) R704. [2] S.Alves et al., Phys Rev B49 (1994) 12396; C. Boekema et al., Physica C235-240 (1994) 2633; J Phys Chem Solids 56 (1995) 1905. [3] C.H. Pennington et al., M2S-HTSC-V Conf Proc, Physica C282-287 (1997).

  15. Optimal eavesdropping on quantum key distribution without quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, Aurélien; Alléaume, Romain; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    We consider the security of the BB84 (Bennett and Brassard 1984 Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. on Computers, Systems, and Signal Processing pp 175-9), six-state (Bruß 1998 Phys. Rev. Lett. http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.81.3018) and SARG04 (Scarani et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.057901) quantum key distribution protocols when the eavesdropper does not have access to a quantum memory. In this case, Eve’s most general strategy is to measure her ancilla with an appropriate positive operator-valued measure designed to take advantage of the post-measurement information that will be released during the sifting phase of the protocol. After an optimization on all the parameters accessible to Eve, our method provides us with new bounds for the security of six-state and SARG04 against a memoryless adversary. In particular, for the six-state protocol we show that the maximum quantum bit error ratio for which a secure key can be extracted is increased from 12.6% (for collective attacks) to 20.4% with the memoryless assumption.

  16. On three explicit difference schemes for fractional diffusion and diffusion-wave equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana Murillo, Joaquín; Bravo Yuste, Santos

    2009-10-01

    Three explicit difference schemes for solving fractional diffusion and fractional diffusion-wave equations are studied. We consider these equations in both the Riemann-Liouville and the Caputo forms. We find that the Gorenflo et al (2000 J. Comput. Appl. Math. 118 175) and the Yuste-Acedo (2005 SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 42 1862) methods when applied to fractional diffusion equations are equivalent when BDF1 coefficients are used to discretize the fractional derivative operators, but that this is not the case for fractional diffusion-wave equations. The accuracy and stability of the three methods are studied. Surprisingly, the third method, that of Ciesielski-Leszczynski (2003 Proc. 15th Conf. on Computer Methods in Mechanics), although closely related to the Gorenflo et al method, is the least accurate, especially for short times. The stability analysis is carried out by means of a procedure close to the standard von Neumann method. We find that the stability bounds of the three methods are the same.

  17. Prospects and Needs of Micro-arcsecond Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifahrt, Andreas; Röll, Tristan; Neuhäuser, Ralph

    Dedicated instruments for the VLTI, such as PRIMA [F. Delplancke, S.A. Leveque, P. Kervella, A. Glindemann, L. D'Arcio in Proceedings of the SPIE Conference: Astronomical Telescope and Instrumentation. Munich, Germany, 25-31 March 2000. Proc. SPIE, vol. 4006, p. 365; R. Launhardt et al. in Astrometry in the Age of the Next Generation of Large Telescopes. ASP Conf. Ser., vol. 338 (2005), p. 167] or the proposed second generation VLTI instrument GRAVITY [F. Eisenhauer, G. Perrin, S. Rabien, A. Eckart, P. Lena, R. Genzel, R. Abuter, T. Paumard in Astron. Nachr. 326, 561 (2005)], are designed for phase referenced imaging and aim in providing an astrometric accuracy of about 10 μas for two targets within the isoplanatic angle (PRIMA) or within the 2 arcsec FOV of the VLTI (GRAVITY). While interferometric measurements provide highly accurate astrometry, they are also time consuming and technically challenging. In the niche where precise but not necessarily accurate astrometry is needed, such as for measuring the reflex motion of stars orbited by extrasolar planets, single aperture measurements using AO imagers could provide an alternative. Providing astrometric precisions in the order of 100-200 μas, such measurements are feasible with current AO imagers and are a much easier and cheaper way to confirm and detect extrasolar planets. This article focuses on the possibilities and limitations of this technique, outlines the difference to interferometric measurements and shows its possible impact on current and future VLT instrumentation.

  18. Multi-rogue waves solutions: from the NLS to the KP-I equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubard, P.; Matveev, V. B.

    2013-12-01

    Our discovery of multi-rogue wave (MRW) solutions in 2010 completely changed the viewpoint on the links between the theory of rogue waves and integrable systems, and helped explain many phenomena which were never understood before. It is enough to mention the famous Three Sister waves observed in oceans, the creation of a regular approach to studying higher Peregrine breathers, and the new understanding of 2 + 1 dimensional rogue waves via the NLS-KP correspondence. This article continues the study of the MRW solutions of the NLS equation and their links with the KP-I equation started in a previous series of articles (Dubard et al 2010 Eur. Phys. J. 185 247-58, Dubard and Matveev 2011 Natural Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. 11 667-72, Matveev and Dubard 2010 Proc. Int. Conf. FNP-2010 (Novgorod, St Petersburg) pp 100-101, Dubard 2010 PhD Thesis). In particular, it contains a discussion of the large parametric asymptotics of these solutions, which has never been studied before.

  19. MHD Simulation of Plasma Flow through the VASIMR Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, A. G.; Shebalin, J. V.

    2003-10-01

    The VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket, [1]) concept is currently in the experimental development phase at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center. The current experimental effort is mainly focused on the demonstration of the efficient plasma production (light ion helicon source, [2]) and energy boosting (ion cyclotron resonance heating section). Two other critical issues, the plasma detachment process and the collimation of the plasma plume in the magnetic nozzle, are essential for the near term experimental development and are being addressed through an MHD simulation modeling effort with the NIMROD code [3,4]. The model follows the plasma flow up to few meters from the nozzle throat: at that distance the plasma exhaust parameters reach values comparable with the ionospheric plasma background [5]. Results from two-dimensional simulation runs (cylindrical geometry, assuming azimuthal symmetry) aimed in particular at testing the effectiveness of different open-end boundary condition schemes are presented. [1] F. R. Chang-Diaz, Scientific American, p. 90, Nov. 2000 [2] M. D. Carter, et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 5097-5110, 2002 [3] http://www.nimrodteam.org [4] A. Tarditi et al., 28th Int. Electric Propulsion Conf., IEPC 2003, Toulouse, France, March 2003 [5] A. V. Ilin et al., Proc. 40th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, NV, Jan. 2002

  20. Cosmic Rays, the Black Pole and Extreme Climate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, J.

    2001-04-01

    The Magnetic Coupling Model predicts many climate anomalies due to solar oscillations (from gravitational torque impulses), galactic cosmic ray modulations, etc, back thru the Pleistocene. A major process in this era is Hale cycle reconnection of solar and galactic B, causing strong recurring "Cirrus Holes." These: shift pressure centers, making drought cycles, record floods, etc; disguised global warming (causing disunity on its reality) by high contrast (deglaciating) climate in the northern hemisphere in alternate sunspot cycles. Fossil fuel CO2 ended major ice ages and risks imminent rapid (decade) CO2 runaway via sea surface exchange (see refs: Ely, Session A8, APS Mtg March 2001; Bette Hileman, Chem Eng News 9, Apr 24, 2000; Ely, Proc. IEEE Conf. Oceans '91, 3: 1658-1665, 1991) Polar regions warm much more in summer than the global averages and now, having lost snow cover, in the Arctic radiate as a black body in winter becoming extremely cold. Hence, altho the record highest average first quarter year US temperature was in April 2000, the most severe US winter ever recorded began in Nov, due to polar breakthrough. Using fossil fuel to survive the winter, hastens the 6m sea level rise.

  1. Wire Array Z-pinch Insights for Intense X-ray Power Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, T. W. L.

    1998-11-01

    The discovery [1] that the use of very large numbers of wires enables high x- ray power to be generated from wire-array z-pinches represents a breakthrough in load design for large pulsed power generators, and has permitted high temperatures to be generated in radiation cavities [2] on Saturn [3] and Z [4]. In this paper, changes in x-ray emission characteristics as a function of wire number, array mass, and load radius, for 20-mm-long aluminum arrays on Saturn that led to these breakthrough hohlraum results, are discussed and compared with a few related emission characteristics of high-wire-number aluminum and tungsten arrays on Z. In this discussion, the detailed measurements made with bolometers, filtered XRDs and PCDs, time resolved filtered x-ray pinhole cameras and crystal spectrometers are given meaning by comparison with one, two, and three dimensional radiation-magnetohydrodynamic code simulations. [1] T. W. L. Sanford, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 5063 (1996). [2] M. K. Matzen, Phys. Plasmas 4, 1519 (1997). [3] D. D. Bloomquist, et al., Proc. 6th Int. IEEE Pulsed Power Conf., (1987), p. 310. [4] R. B. Spielman, et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998).

  2. Multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging of wire array and gas puff Z pinches on the Z and Saturn pulsed power generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Nielsen, D. S.; Jones, M. C.; Deeney, C.; Serrano, J. D.; Nielsen-Weber, L. B.; Meyer, C. J.; Apruzese, J. P.; Clark, R. W.; Coleman, P. L.

    2008-10-01

    A multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging instrument is fielded as part of the core diagnostic set on the 25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage et al., in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. 979] for studying intense wire array and gas puff Z-pinch soft x-ray sources. Pinhole images are reflected from a planar multilayer mirror, passing 277 eV photons with <10 eV bandwidth. An adjacent pinhole camera uses filtration alone to view 1-10 keV photons simultaneously. Overlaying these data provides composite images that contain both spectral as well as spatial information, allowing for the study of radiation production in dense Z-pinch plasmas. Cu wire arrays at 20 MA on Z show the implosion of a colder cloud of material onto a hot dense core where K-shell photons are excited. A 528 eV imaging configuration has been developed on the 8 MA Saturn generator [R. B. Spielman et al., and A. I. P. Conf, Proc. 195, 3 (1989)] for imaging a bright Li-like Ar L-shell line. Ar gas puff Z pinches show an intense K-shell emission from a zippering stagnation front with L-shell emission dominating as the plasma cools.

  3. Measuring glottal activity during voiced speech using a tuned electromagnetic resonating collar sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. R., III; Keenaghan, K.; Desimini, S.

    2005-11-01

    Non-acoustic speech sensors can be employed to obtain measurements of one or more aspects of the speech production process, such as glottal activity, even in the presence of background noise. These sensors have a long history of clinical applications and have also recently been applied to the problem of denoising speech signals recorded in acoustically noisy environments (Ng et al 2000 Proc. Int. Conf. on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP) (Istanbul, Turkey) vol 1, pp 229-32). Recently, researchers developed a new non-acoustic speech sensor based primarily on a tuned electromagnetic resonator collar (TERC) (Brown et al 2004 Meas. Sci. Technol. 15 1291). The TERC sensor measures glottal activity by sensing small changes in the dielectric properties of the glottis that result from voiced speech. This paper builds on the seminal work in Brown et al (2004). The primary contributions of this paper are (i) a description of a new single-mode TERC sensor design addressing the comfort and complexity issues of the original sensor, (ii) a complete description of new external interface systems used to obtain long-duration recordings from the TERC sensor and (iii) more extensive experimental results and analysis for the single-mode TERC sensor including spectrograms of speech containing both voiced and unvoiced speech segments in quiet and acoustically noisy environments. The experimental results demonstrate that the single-mode TERC sensor is able to detect glottal activity up to the fourth harmonic and is also insensitive to acoustic background noise.

  4. Material Modeling and Springback Prediction of Ultra Thin Austenitic Stainless Steel Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Rahul K.; Murakoso, Satoko; Chung, Kwansoo; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2010-06-01

    The constitutive model with combined isotropic-kinematic hardening along with hardening stagnation (or permanent softening) [Verma, Kuwabara, Chung, Haldar: Int. J. Plasticity (submitted)] was used here for modeling the tension-compression behaviors of a 0.1 mm thick austenitic stainless steel sheet (SUS304), which was observed in a recent work [Kuwabara and Murakoso: Proc. CIRP 2010 Conf. (submitted)]. Springback was also experimentally measured for a shallow drawn rectangular cup here and it was verified using the above model. It was found that this model can successfully predict the Bauschinger effect and hardening stagnation. As for springback, it was found that in this particular case it depends on, other than the material model, factors like boundary conditions, in the finite element analysis (FEA), during unloading. It was also observed that incorporation of the Bauschinger effect and permanent softening is a key for accurate springback prediction and, therefore, the present model performs better than the one which is based only on isotropic hardening without any hardening stagnation.

  5. Physics of radiation-driven islands near the tokamak density limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, D. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; White, R. B.

    2013-06-01

    In previous work (Gates and Delgado-Aparicio 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 165004), the onset criterion for radiation-driven islands (Rebut et al 1985 Proc. 10th Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1984 (London, UK, 1984) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) p 197) in combination with a simple cylindrical model of tokamak current channel behaviour was shown to be consistent with the empirical scaling of the tokamak density limit (Greenwald et al 1988 Nucl. Fusion 28 2199). A number of the unexplained phenomena at the density limit are consistent with this novel physics mechanism. In this work, a more formal theoretical underpinning, consistent with cylindrical tearing mode theory, is developed for the onset criteria of these modes. The appropriate derivation of the radiation-driven addition to the modified Rutherford equation (MRE) is discussed. Additionally, the ordering of the terms in the MRE is examined in a regime near the density limit. It is hoped that, given the apparent success of this simple model in explaining the observed global scalings, it will lead to a more comprehensive analysis of the possibility that radiation-driven islands are the physics mechanism responsible for the density limit. In particular, with modern diagnostic capabilities detailed measurements of current densities, electron densities and impurity concentrations at rational surfaces should be possible, enabling verification of the concepts described above.

  6. Transverse quantum Stern-Gerlach magnets for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, Scot; Bach, Roger; Batelaan, Herman

    2011-06-01

    In the Stern-Gerlach experiment, silver atoms were separated according to their spin state (Gerlach and Stern 1922 Z. Phys. 9 353-355). This experiment demonstrates the quantization of spin and relies on the classical description of motion. However, so far, no design has led to a functional Stern-Gerlach magnet for free electrons. Bohr and Pauli showed in the 1930 Solvay conference that Stern-Gerlach magnets for electrons cannot work, at least if the design is based on classical trajectories (Pauli W 1932 Proc. of the 6th Solvay Conf. 2 (1930) (Brussels: Gauthier-Villars) pp 183-86, 217-20, 275-80 Pauli W 1964 Collected Scientific Papers ed R Kronig and V F Weiskopf, vol 2 (New York: Wiley)). Here, we present ideas for the realization of a Stern-Gerlach magnet for electrons in which spin and motion are treated fully quantum mechanically. We show that a magnetic phase grating composed of a regular array of microscopic current loops can separate electron diffraction peaks according to their spin states. The experimental feasibility of a diffractive approach is compared to that of an interferometric approach. We show that an interferometric arrangement with magnetic phase control is the functional equivalent of an electron Stern-Gerlach magnet.

  7. Search for cosmogenic Ar-42 in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Cane, D.; Taricco, C.; Bhandari, N.

    2003-04-01

    We have evidence for decreasing galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux in the past 3 centuries by a factor about two [1]. The measurements of the activity of cosmogenic 44Ti (T1/2 = 59.2 y) produced by GCR in stony meteorites that fell during the last two centuries are in good agreement with the calculated values and validate the decreasing trend of GCR flux. The measurements were obtained by an hyperpure (372 cm3) Ge-NaI(Tl) spectrometer operating in the Monte dei Cappuccini laboratory in Torino[2]. To further improve upon statistical precision of 44Ti data and also to be able to measure the 42Ar (T1/2 = 33 y) which is produced in even smaller amounts by GCR in meteorites, we have set up in the same laboratory a larger (581 cm3) hyperpure Ge detector operating in coincidence with a 100 kg NaI(Tl) crystal assembly. This should enable us to confirm the above results about GCR variations. We wish to acknowledge our deep gratitude to professor Bonino, deceased on September 29, 2002, to whom the assemblage of the new equipment is due. [1] G. Bonino, G. Cini Castagnoli, D. Cane, C. Taricco and N. Bhandari,Proc. XXVII Intern. Cosmic Ray Conf. (Hamburg, 2001) 3769-3772. [2] Bonino G., Cini Castagnoli G., Cane D., Taricco C., Bhandari N, textit {34th COSPAR Sci. Ass. Houston 2002 (Adv. Space Res.)}, in press

  8. EFFECT OF SITE ON BACTERIAL POPULATIONS IN THE SAPWOOD OF COARSE WOODY DEBRIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Emma, G.,; Waldrop, Thomas, A.; McElreath, Susan, D.; Tainter, Frank, H.

    1998-01-01

    Porter, Emma G., T.A. Waldrop, Susan D. McElreath, and Frank H. Tainter. 1998. Effect of site on bacterial populations in the sapwood of coarse woody debris. Pp. 480-484. In: Proc. 9th Bienn. South. Silv. Res. Conf. T.A. Waldrop (ed). USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-20. Abstract: Coarse woody debris (CWD) is an important structural component of southeastern forest ecosystems, yet little is known about its dynamics in these systems. This project identified bacterial populations associated with CWD and their dynamics across landscape ecosystem classification (LEC) units. Bolts of red oak and loblolly pine were placed on plots at each of three hydric, mesic, and xeric sites at the Savannah River Station. After the controls were processed, samples were taken at four intervals over a 16-week period. Samples were ground within an anaerobe chamber using nonselective media. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria were identified using the Biolog system and the anaerobes were identified using the API 20A system. Major genera isolated were: Bacillus, Buttiauxella, Cedecea, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Escherichia, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Serratia, and Xanthomonas. The mean total isolates were determined by LEC units and sample intervals. Differences occurred between the sample intervals with total isolates of 6.67, 13.33, 10.17, and 9.50 at 3, 6, 10, and 16 weeks, respectively. No significant differences in the numbers of bacteria isolated were found between LEC units.

  9. Multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging of wire array and gas puff Z pinches on the Z and Saturn pulsed power generators

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Coverdale, C. A.; Nielsen, D. S.; Jones, M. C.; Deeney, C.; Serrano, J. D.; Nielsen-Weber, L. B.; Meyer, C. J.; Apruzese, J. P.; Clark, R. W.; Coleman, P. L.

    2008-10-15

    A multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging instrument is fielded as part of the core diagnostic set on the 25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage et al., in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. 979] for studying intense wire array and gas puff Z-pinch soft x-ray sources. Pinhole images are reflected from a planar multilayer mirror, passing 277 eV photons with <10 eV bandwidth. An adjacent pinhole camera uses filtration alone to view 1-10 keV photons simultaneously. Overlaying these data provides composite images that contain both spectral as well as spatial information, allowing for the study of radiation production in dense Z-pinch plasmas. Cu wire arrays at 20 MA on Z show the implosion of a colder cloud of material onto a hot dense core where K-shell photons are excited. A 528 eV imaging configuration has been developed on the 8 MA Saturn generator [R. B. Spielman et al., and A. I. P. Conf, Proc. 195, 3 (1989)] for imaging a bright Li-like Ar L-shell line. Ar gas puff Z pinches show an intense K-shell emission from a zippering stagnation front with L-shell emission dominating as the plasma cools.

  10. Multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging of wire array and gas puff Z pinches on the Z and Saturn pulsed power generators.

    PubMed

    Jones, B; Coverdale, C A; Nielsen, D S; Jones, M C; Deeney, C; Serrano, J D; Nielsen-Weber, L B; Meyer, C J; Apruzese, J P; Clark, R W; Coleman, P L

    2008-10-01

    A multicolor, time-gated, soft x-ray pinhole imaging instrument is fielded as part of the core diagnostic set on the 25 MA Z machine [M. E. Savage et al., in Proceedings of the Pulsed Power Plasma Sciences Conference (IEEE, New York, 2007), p. 979] for studying intense wire array and gas puff Z-pinch soft x-ray sources. Pinhole images are reflected from a planar multilayer mirror, passing 277 eV photons with <10 eV bandwidth. An adjacent pinhole camera uses filtration alone to view 1-10 keV photons simultaneously. Overlaying these data provides composite images that contain both spectral as well as spatial information, allowing for the study of radiation production in dense Z-pinch plasmas. Cu wire arrays at 20 MA on Z show the implosion of a colder cloud of material onto a hot dense core where K-shell photons are excited. A 528 eV imaging configuration has been developed on the 8 MA Saturn generator [R. B. Spielman et al., and A. I. P. Conf, Proc. 195, 3 (1989)] for imaging a bright Li-like Ar L-shell line. Ar gas puff Z pinches show an intense K-shell emission from a zippering stagnation front with L-shell emission dominating as the plasma cools.

  11. Color-rendering indices in global illumination methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geisler-Moroder, David; Dür, Arne

    2009-10-01

    Human perception of material colors depends heavily on the nature of the light sources that are used for illumination. One and the same object can cause highly different color impressions when lit by a vapor lamp or by daylight, respectively. On the basis of state-of-the-art colorimetric methods, we present a modern approach for the calculation of color-rendering indices (CRI), which were defined by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) to characterize color reproduction properties of illuminants. We update the standard CIE method in three main points: first, we use the CIELAB color space; second, we apply a linearized Bradford transformation for chromatic adaptation; and finally, we evaluate color differences using the CIEDE2000 total color difference formula. Moreover, within a real-world scene, light incident on a measurement surface is composed of a direct and an indirect part. Neumann and Schanda [Proc. CGIV'06 Conf., Leeds, UK, pp. 283-286 (2006)] have shown for the cube model that diffuse interreflections can influence the CRI of a light source. We analyze how color-rendering indices vary in a real-world scene with mixed direct and indirect illumination and recommend the usage of a spectral rendering engine instead of an RGB-based renderer for reasons of accuracy of CRI calculations.

  12. Adaptation of TRIPND Field Line Tracing Code to a Shaped, Poloidal Divertor Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, P.; Moyer, R. A.; Evans, T. E.

    2001-10-01

    The magnetic field line tracing code TRIPND(T.E. Evans, Proc. 18th Conf. on Control. Fusion and Plasma Phys., Berlin, Germany, Vol. 15C, Part II (European Physical Society, 1991) p. 65.) has been modified to use the axisymmetric equilibrium magnetic fields from an EFIT reconstruction in place of circular equilibria with multi-filament current profile expansions. This adaptation provides realistic plasma current profiles in shaped geometries. A major advantage of this modification is that it allows investigation of magnetic field line trajectories in any device for which an EFIT reconstruction is available. The TRIPND code has been used to study the structure of the magnetic field line topology in circular, limiter tokamaks, including Tore Supra and TFTR and has been benchmarked against the GOURDON code used in Europe for magnetic field line tracing. The new version of the code, called TRIP3D, is used to investigate the sensitivity of various shaped equilibria to non-axisymmetric perturbations such as a shifted F coil or error field correction coils.

  13. Unifying Paschen Curve Conditions across Pressure and Gap Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Amanda; Garner, Allen; Valfells, Agust

    2015-11-01

    The Paschen curve (PC) predicts the breakdown voltage of a gas by relating it to the product of pressure and gap distance (pd). Recent experiments deviate from the PC for microscale gaps at low pd. A scaling law incorporating field emission-driven breakdown and field enhancement to the macroscale Paschen law yields more accurate predictions for microscale gaps (A. Venkattraman and A. A. Alexeenko, Phys. Plasmas 19, 123515 (2012).). While many studies consider low pd, deviations from the PC also arise at high pd, as demonstrated for gap distances between 0.0508 and 0.254 cm and pressures between 96.5 and 6900 kPa (W. J. Carey, A. J. Wiebe, R. D. Nord, and L. L. Altgilbers, in Proc. IEEE Pulsed Power Conf., 2011, pp. 741-744). High pd values are relevant for ongoing high voltage plasma experiments for food treatment and combustion. We attempt to elucidate the impact of large gap distances (~ 5 cm) and higher pressures (~ 200-300 kPa) on these deviations by connecting recent work at low pd to high pd by assessing scaling laws, analyzing field emission models, and using particle-in-cell codes. Implications on experimental design will be discussed, and the development of a universal Paschen curve will be explored.

  14. Carbon flows in attached divertor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Isler, R.C.; Brooks, N.H.; West, W.P.; Porter, G.D. |; The DIII-D Divertor Team

    1999-05-01

    Parallel flow velocities of carbon ions in the DIII-D divertor [J. Luxon {ital et al.}, {ital Plasma Physics Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research}, 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159; S. L. Allen {ital et al.}, {ital Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics}, 1987 (Proc. 24th European Conf. Berchtesgaden, 1997), Vol. 21 A, Part III, p. 1129] have been studied under various operating conditions: L-mode (low-confinement mode), H-mode (high-confinement mode) with low-frequency ELMs (edge-localized modes), and H-mode with high-frequency ELMs. Both normal and reversed flows (toward the target plate and away from the target plate, respectively) are observed under all conditions, with the reversed speeds being as much as a factor of four greater than normal speeds. Magnitudes are approximately the same for L-mode and H-mode operation with high-frequency ELMs. In H-mode conditions with low-frequency ELMs, normal velocities are frequently observed to decline while reversed velocities increase in comparison to the other two conditions. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Transport modeling of the ORNL high intensity linear RF plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, L. W.; Peng, Y. K. M.; Canik, J. M.; Goulding, R. H.; Bonnin, X.

    2010-11-01

    Recent progress in the electrode-less helicon hydrogenic plasma sourceootnotetextR.H. Goulding, et al., Proc. 18th Conf on RF Power in Plasmas, Gent, Belgium, June, 2009. have motivated the development at ORNL of an RF-plasma source that magnetically links a helicon to a mirror cell in which the plasma is heated by EBW, ICH and whistler waves. The <4m long plasma column further includes a parallel transport region connected to a pumped target plate. Such a source is modeled at three levels using: a two-point model, a 1D-parallel Braginski's fluid model in which the plasma sources/sinks are computed using the kinetic Monte Carlo neutrals code DEGAS, and the 2D SOLPS code. The required source plasma parameters to achieve certain target plasma parameters, particularly at high plasma heat and particle fluxes, are found to be sensitive to the plasma and neutrals parameters in the helicon and RF mirror cells, the effective heating via various RF techniques, the plasma and neutrals boundary conditions at the target plates and around the RF-plasma heating zones, and the pumped reservoirs with partial backflow of thermal molecules. New results of this investigation will be reported.

  16. The Microhollow Cathode Discharge as ion source for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Kerstin; Miclea, Manuela; Franzke, Joachim; Niemax, Kay

    2003-10-01

    Microhollow Cathode Discharges (MHCD) are atmospheric pressure, non-equilibrium discharges and well studied for the generation of excimer radiation. The investigated discharge consists of two platinum electrodes with a hole diameter of 100 μm separated by a 200 μm thick Al_2O3 insulator. Diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy reveals a gas temperature of 2000 K and 1000 K and electron density of 6x10^15/cm^3 and 2x10^14/cm^3 for Ar and He, respectively [1]. The ionization degree of 10-3 to 10-5 at atmospheric pressure makes the plasma suitable as a mass selective detector for analytical purposes. Hereby the discharge expands from atmospheric pressure on anode side to a low-pressure regime on cathode side. The MHCD does not only act as an ion source, but the small aperture serves also as sampler for the quadrupole mass spectrometer. Halogenated hydrocarbons in gas mixtures as well as liquid samples, preseparated by a gas chromatograph, could be detected by the halogen mass in the low ppb range. [1] M. Miclea et al., Proc. XVI-th ESCAMPIG Conf., 14-18 July, Grenoble - France (2002)

  17. Proton, Helium and Minor Ion Interactions with Circularly Polarized Alfven and Ion-cyclotron waves in the Expanding Solar Wind: Hybrid Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velli, M.; Liewer, P. C.; Goldstein, B. E.

    2000-05-01

    We present simulations of parallel propagating Alfvén waves in the accelerating solar wind and their interactions with protons, alpha particles, and minor ions using an expanding box hybrid code (Liewer et al., 1999). In this model, the average solar wind flow speed is a given external function, and the simulation domain follows a plasma parcel as it expands both in the radial and transverse directions accordingly: the decrease of Alfvén speed and density with distance from the Sun are taken into account self-consistently. It is therefore possible to carry out a detailed study of frequency drifting and the coming into resonance with the waves at different radial locations of particles with differing charge to mass ratios. Simulations of monochromatic waves as well as waves with well-developed spectra are presented for plasmas with one, two and three ion species. We observe preferential heating and acceleration of protons and minor ions. Under some conditions, we obtain the scaling observed in coronal hole solar wind: the heavy ion temperature is proportional to its mass (Liewer et al., 2000). A comparison with predictions from models based on such quasi-linear or linear analyses will also be presented. P. C. Liewer, M. Velli and B. E. Goldstein, in Solar Wind Nine, S. Habbal, R. Esser, J. V. Hollweg, P. A. Isenberg, eds., (AIP Conference Proceedings 471, 1999) 449. P. C. Liewer, M. Velli, and B. E. Goldstein, in Proc. ACE 2000 Conference (2000) to be published.

  18. Amélioration des performances du procédé de soudage TIG sur un acier au carbone et un alliage d'aluminium par dépôt de silice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sire, Stéphane; Marya, Surendar

    This Note presents ways to improve the weld penetration potential of TIG process by optimising silica application around the joints in a plain carbon steel and an aluminium alloy 5086. Whereas for plain carbon steels, full coverage of joint improves penetration, the presence of a blank zone around the joint in the flux coating on aluminium 5086 using AC-TIG seems to be the best solution for cosmetic and deep welds. To cite this article: S. Sire, S. Marya, C. R. Mecanique 330 (2002) 83-89.

  19. Creating and Sustaining University-Community Partnerships in Science Education (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, N.

    2009-12-01

    Despite years of research and investment, we have yet to see the widespread implementation of a myriad research-proven instructional strategies in STEM education[1]. To address this challenge, we present and analyze one such strategy, a theoretically-grounded model of university-community partnership [2] that engages university students and children in a collective enterprise that has the potential to improve the participation and education of all. We document the impact of this effort on: university participants who learn about education, the community and science; children in the community who learn about science, the nature of science and develop their identities and attitudes towards science; and, shifts in institutional structures which may allow these programs to be part of standard practice. This project is designed to be sustained and scaled, and is analyzed through the application of a new framework [3] which brings together theories of STEM change that come from studies in higher education, faculty development and disciplinary-based education research in STEM. [1] National Research Council. (2003). Improving Undergraduate Instruction in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: Report of A Workshop. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press. [2] Finkelstein, N. and Mayhew, L. (2008). Acting in Our Own Self-Interest: Blending University and Community. Proceedings of the 2008 Physics Education Research Conf, AIP Press. Melville NY, 1064, 19-22. [3] Henderson, C., Finkelstein, N. & Beach A. (to appear). Beyond Dissemination in College science teaching: An Introduction to Four Core Change Strategies. Accepted May 2009 in Journal of College Science Teaching.

  20. Porphyrins and Porphyria Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us About Porphyria AIP VP HCP ADP PCT EPP CEP HEP Diet and Nutrition History of ... Alliance Healthcare Professionals AIP, HCP, VP & ADP EPP PCT Drug Safety in Acute Porphyrias Emergency Room Guidelines ...

  1. The Internal Temperature Profiles of Large Micrometeorites During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szydlik, P. P.; Flynn, G. J.

    1992-07-01

    thermal diffusivity of 1x10^-9 m^2/sec the peak central temperature is within 100 K of the surface temperature. When the thermal diffusivity is reduced to 1x10^-10 m^2/sec, significant temperature gradients result. The peak central temperature is 700 K lower than the peak surface temperature, and the duration of the heating pulse is much longer at the center than at the surface. Thermal diffusivities as low as 1x10^-10 m^2/sec do not seem appropriate for large Antarctic micrometeorites. The irregular, "unmelted" large micrometeorites are compact, with textures similar to chondritic meteorites. Thermal data for chondritic meteorites indicate thermal diffusivities from 6 to 18x10^-7 m^2/sec (Wasson, 1974), several orders of magnitude larger than that required to produce substantial temperature gradients. Thus, if the textural differences seen in the partially melted large micrometeorites are from differential heating, it is likely that another mechanism, such as local phase transformation of phyllosilicates, is responsible. REFERENCES: Cremers C.J. and Hsia H.S. (1974) Proc. 5th Lunar Sci. Conf., 2703-2708. Flynn G.J. (1990) Meteoritics, 25, 365. Flynn G.J. (1989) Proc. 19th Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf., 673-682. Love S.G. and Brownlee D.E. (1991) Icarus, 89, 26-43. Sutton S. R. et al. (1992) Lunar Planet. Sci. XXIII (abstract), 1391-1392. Szydlik P. P. and Flynn G. J. (1992) Lunar Planet. Sci. XXIII (abstract), 1399-1400. Wasson J. T. (1974) Meteorites, Springer-Verlag, 177-178. Whipple F. L. (1950) Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 35, 687-695. Figure 1, which in the hard copy appears here, shows temperature versus time and position [surface, center, and midway between (R/2)] for a 100-micrometer-diameter micrometeorite entering the Earth's atmosphere at 15 km/sec at normal incidence.

  2. Recent advances in autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Tabata, Taku; Hara, Seiichi; Kuruma, Sawako; Chiba, Kazuro; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-01-01

    It is now clear that are two histological types (Type-1 and Type-2) of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The histological pattern of Type-1 AIP, or traditional AIP, is called lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The histological pattern of Type-2 AIP is characterized by neutrophilic infiltration in the epithelium of the pancreatic duct. In general, Type-2 AIP patients are younger, may not have a male preponderance, and rarely show elevation of serum IgG4 compared with Type-1 AIP patients. Unlike Type-1 AIP patients, Type-2 AIP patients rarely have associated sclerosing diseases, but they are more likely to have acute pancreatitis and ulcerative colitis. Although Type-2 AIP is sometimes observed in the USA and Europe, most AIP cases in Japan and Korea are Type-1. The international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP comprise 5 cardinal features, and combinations of one or more of these features provide the basis for diagnoses of both Type-1 and Type-2 AIP. Due to the fact that steroid therapy is clinically, morphologically, and serologically effective in AIP patients, it is the standard therapy for AIP. The indications for steroid therapy in AIP include symptoms such as obstructive jaundice and the presence of symptomatic extrapancreatic lesions. Oral prednisolone (0.6 mg/kg/day) is administered for 2–4 weeks and gradually tapered to a maintenance dose of 2.5–5 mg/day over a period of 2–3 months. Maintenance therapy by low-dose prednisolone is usually performed for 1–3 years to prevent relapse of AIP. PMID:23060806

  3. Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Autoimmune Pancreatitis: Similarities and Differences in Japan and Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Myung Hwan; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Chung, Jae Bock

    2013-01-01

    Two subtypes (types 1 and 2) of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) are currently recognized. Type 1 AIP is related to immunoglobulin G4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis), and type 2 AIP is characterized by neutrophilic infiltration into the epithelium of the pancreatic duct (idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis). Although type 2 AIP is sometimes observed in the United States and Europe, most cases of AIP in Japan and Korea are type 1. The international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP were created to be applicable worldwide and to distinguish between the two types of AIP. AIP is diagnosed based on the presence of at least one of the five cardinal features (i.e., imaging, serology, other organ involvement, histology, and response to steroid therapy). Oral steroids are the standard therapy for AIP, but immunomodulatory drugs or rituximab have been successfully used for patients with relapsed AIP in the United States and Europe. Generally, the clinical manifestations and demography of AIP are similar between Japan and Korea. However, there are differences in some aspects of the disease, including the proportion of other organ involvement, the prevalence of type 2 AIP, diagnostic criteria and maintenance therapy between the two countries. PMID:23898377

  4. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP. PMID:25770706

  5. Dielectronic Satellite Lines of Fe XVII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Laska, Alexander; Lepson, Jaan K.

    2015-08-01

    . C. Johns-Krull, M. K. Browning, and A. A. West (San Francisco:Astronomical Society of the Pacific), 787 (2011)[3] P. Beiersdorfer et al., ApJ., 793, 99 (2014)[4] P. Beiersdorfer et al., J. Phys. Conf. Proc. 583, 012022 (2015)

  6. Autoimmune pancreatitis with histologically proven lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis with granulocytic epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Takaoka, Makoto; Uchida, Kazushige; Shimatani, Masaaki; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Kusuda, Takeo; Kurishima, Akiko; Fukui, Yuri; Sumimoto, Kimi; Satoi, Sohei; Ohe, Chisato; Uemura, Yoshiko; Kwon, A-Hon; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2012-01-01

    Recent histological and clinical studies have suggested the existence of 2 distinct types of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP): type 1 AIP related to IgG4, exhibiting lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP), and type 2 AIP related to granulocyte epithelial lesions (GELs), exhibiting idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP). We herein present a case of type 1 AIP with histologically proven LPSP with GELs. This patient had neither serum IgG4 elevation nor MPD narrowing. In this case, the clinically and histologically atypical findings for type 1 AIP are intriguing. PMID:22466829

  7. Azacitidine-associated acute interstitial pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Junya; Shimura, Yuji; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Kiyota, Miki; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Maegawa, Saori; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Horiike, Shigeo; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Azacitidine is the first-line therapeutic option for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This report describes a case of MDS in a patient who developed fatal acute interstitial pneumonitis (AIP) after the first seven-day course of intravenous azacitidine (75 mg/m(2)/day) treatment. A review of previous and present studies of azacitidine-associated AIP suggests that azacitidine may cause life-threatening AIP during or after the first seven-day course of treatment, with pyrexia commonly preceding AIP. Although the non-hematologic adverse events associated with azacitidine are generally relatively mild, further accumulation of evidence may help to make an earlier diagnosis of azacitidine-associated AIP.

  8. [Two cases of localized autoimmune pancreatitis that relapsed after surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Jun; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Saito, Masaya; Onoyama, Mitsuko; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Toyama, Hirochika; Shinzeki, Ryo; Matsumoto, Ippei; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Makino, Tetsuya; Tada, Hidetoshi; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Ku, Yonson; Azuma, Takeshi

    2011-04-01

    Since the revision of Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Autoimmune Pancreatitis (AIP) 2006, many cases of localized AIP have been reported. Localized AIP is often difficult to preoperatively differentiate from pancreatic carcinoma. We present two cases of localized AIP that developing relapse after surgical treatment. Swollen hilar lymph nodes of lung was detected on CT in both two cases. Recently, AIP is thought to be the pancreatic manifestation of an IgG4 related systemic disease, which has been associated with many extrapancreatic lesions. Response to steroid treatment and the detection of extrapancreatic lesions may contribute to provide adequate diagnosis thereby avoiding unnecessary surgery.

  9. Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia in a pediatric patient with acute intermittent porphyria: literature review and case report.

    PubMed

    Olutunmbi, Yetunde; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Galvez, Jorge A; Simpao, Allan F

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia techniques placed under general anesthesia have not been reported in pediatric patients with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). A 9-year-old male with AIP presented for right inguinal herniorraphy. Family history included one relative's death after anesthesia. Preoperative preparation included reviewing medications safe for AIP patients, minimizing known AIP triggers (fasting, stress) and ensuring access to rescue medications. Intraoperative management included a propofol induction with the patient's mother present in the operating room. We performed an ultrasound-guided ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric nerve block under general anesthesia. The surgery proceeded without complications and the patient did not demonstrate signs of an AIP crisis. PMID:25137868

  10. Acute interstitial pneumonia in siblings: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seung Yeon; Kim, Jong Min; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Myung Joon; Cho, Sang-Ho

    2008-06-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) is a rapidly progressive condition of unknown cause that occurs in a previously healthy individual and produces the histologic findings of diffuse alveolar damage. Since the term AIP was first introduced in 1986, there have been very few case reports of AIP in children. Here we present a case of AIP in a 3-yr-old girl whose other two siblings showed similar radiologic findings. The patient was confirmed to have AIP from autopsy showing histological findings of diffuse alveolar damage and proliferation of fibroblasts. Her 3-yr-old brother was also clinically and radiologically highly suspected as having AIP, and the other asymptomatic 8-yr-old sister was radiologically suspected as having AIP.

  11. Progress of astrometric research in Nikolaev Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantsov, Anatoliy; Maigurova, Nadia; Martynov, Maxim; Pinigin, Gennadiy

    2012-08-01

    A catalog of astrometric positions and proper motions of 140237 stars in fields of ecliptical zone and high proper motion stars was derived from CCD - observations made at AMC telescope (Nikolaev) in 2008 - 2009. The UCAC2 catalog was used as a reference one for astrometric reductions. The standard error for a single position is 20 - 65 mas in right ascension and 30 - 70 mas in declination. Cross - identification of the obtained data with modern astrometric catalogs such as TYCHO2, 2MASS, CMC14, PPMX, XPM, USNO - A2.0 and XPM - 1.0 was made for investigation systematical errors and calculation of the proper motions [1]. The final catalog contains star positions, proper motions as well as photometric data (B, V, r ´, J, H, K) taken from other catalogs. For analysis of perturbed motion of selected asteroids, there was made astrometric reduction for three thousands of positions of 68 selected asteroids observed at the Russian - Turkish telescope RTT150 in 2008 - 2011 [2]. The research is conducted within the International Joint Project between IMCCE (France), NAO (Ukraine), KFU (Russia), and TUG (Turkey). The reduction was made with the UCAC2 and UCAC3 catalogs. The standard error of a single position is 0.15 arcsec in right ascension and 0.13 arcsec in declination. Also, the first results of astrometric reduction are presented for the observations of selected asteroids made at the AZT8 (Evpatoriya ) and Mobitel (Nikolaev) telescopes. The obtained positions are expected to be used for derivation masses of asteroids by dynamical method. This work is supported by State Agency on Science, Innovation and Information of Ukraine, Russian Foundation for Basic Research. 1. Jin, W., Pinigin, G., Tang, Zh., Shulga, A. (2011). The collaboration between ShAO and NAO: Celebration of the 1 90th anniversary of NAO. Proc. Int. Conf. “Astronomical Research: from near - Earth Space to the Galaxy”, Nikolaev (pp. 92 - 104). 2 . Ivantsov, A., Gumerov, R., Khamitov, I., Aslan, Z

  12. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  13. Thermoluminescence and Compositional Zoning in the Mesostasis of a Semarkona Group A1 Chondrule and New Insights into the Chondrule-Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunami, S.; Ninagawa, K.; Yamamoto, I.; Kohata, M.; Wada, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Lu, J.; Sears, D. W. G.; Nishimura, H.

    1992-07-01

    anorthite then crystallized in the mesostasis. The Mn zoning caused the difference of Mn-contents in anorthite crystallized in the mesostasis, finally leading to the formation of TL and CL zoning. Jones R.H. and Scott E.R.D. (1989) Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 19th, B523-B536. Ninagawa K. et al. (1990) Proc. NIPR Symp. Antarct. Meteorites 15th, 244-253. Sears D.W.G. et al. (1992) Nature, in press.

  14. How Old is Cone Crater at the Apollo 14 Landing Site?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Simon, Ina; van der Bogert, Carolyn H.; Robinson, Mark S.; Plescia, Jeff B.

    2015-04-01

    and 23 Ma older than the exposure ages [e.g., 10]. We find that CSFD measurements performed on the ejecta blanket of Cone crater yield AMAs that agree well with the exposure ages, considering the relatively small count areas and the hummocky nature of the ejecta blanket. However, the AMAs are generally older than the exposure ages, which may be due to the small count area sizes [16], a possibly higher recent impact rate [17], some unidentified secondary craters [13], poor calibration of the production function, or inaccurate exposure ages. [1] Hiesinger et al. (2012) J. Geophys. Res. 117. [2] Stöffler and Ryder (2001) Chronology and Evolution of Mars. [3] Neukum (1983) Habil. thesis, U. of Munich. [4] Neukum et al. (2001) Space Sci. Rev. 96. [5] Swann et al. (1971) Apollo 14 Prelim. Sci. Rep. [6] Carlson (1978) NASA STI/Recon Technical Report. [7] Swann (1977) Washington US Govt. Print. Off. [8] Bhandari et al. (1972) Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 3. [9] Crozaz et al. (1972) Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 3. [10] Arvidson et al. (1975) Moon 13. [11] Stadermann et al. (1991) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 55. [12] Moore et al. (1980) Moon and Planets 23. [13] Plescia and Robinson (2011) LPSC 42. [14] Williams et al. (2014) Icarus 235. [15] Robbins (2014) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 403. [16] van der Bogert et al. (2015) LPSC 46. [17] McEwen et al. (2015) LPSC 46.

  15. Areal Crater Density Analysis of Volcanic Smooth Plains: A New Approach to Distinguishing Age Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrach, L. R.; Robinson, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    and composition) are not observed on Mercury [e.g., 13-15], so the ACD method can be used to test hypotheses concerning timing of smooth plains emplacement [15]. [1] Hartmann W.K. et al. (1981) In: BVTP, 1049-1127. [2] Stöffler D. et al. (2006) Rev. Mineral. Geochem, 60, 519-596. [3] Hiesinger H. et al. (2011) Spec. Pap. - Geol. Soc. Am, 477, 1-51. [4] Pieters C.M. (1978) Proc. Lunar Plan. Sci. Conf, 9th, 2825-2849. [5] Hiesinger H. et al. (2000) J. Geophys. Res, 105, 29239-29275. [6] Staid M.I. and C.M. Pieters (2001) J. Geophys. Res, 106, 27887-27900. [7] Staid M.I. et al. (2011) J. Geophys. Res, 116, E00G10. [8] Lucey P.G. et al. (2000) J. Geophys. Res, 105, 20297-20306. [9] Schaber G.G. (1973) In: Apollo 17 PSR, NASA SP-330, 30-17 to 30-25. [10] Schaber G.G. et al. (1975) The Moon, 13, 395-423. [11] Boyce J.M. and A.L. Dial Jr. (1975) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf, 6th, 2585-2595. [12] Bugiolacchi R. and J.E. Guest (2008) Icarus, 197, 1-18. [13] Robinson M.S. et al. (2008) Science, 321, 66-69. [14] Denevi B.W. et al. (2009) Science, 324, 613-618. [15] Denevi B.W. et al. (2013) J. Geophys. Res, 118, 1-17.

  16. Re-analysis of previous laboratory phase curves: 1. Variations of the opposition effect morphology with the textural properties, and an application to planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Déau, Estelle; Flandes, Alberto; Spilker, Linda J.; Petazzoni, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    Typical variations in the opposition effect morphology of laboratory samples at optical wavelengths are investigated to probe the role of the textural properties of the surface (roughness, porosity and grain size). A previously published dataset of 34 laboratory phase curves is re-analyzed and fit with several morphological models. The retrieved morphological parameters that characterize the opposition surge, amplitude, width and slope (A, HWHM and S respectively) are correlated to the single scattering albedo, the roughness, the porosity and the grain size of the samples. To test the universality of the laboratory samples’ trends, we use previously published phase curves of planetary surfaces, including the Moon, satellites and rings of the giant planets. The morphological parameters of the surge (A and HWHM) for planetary surfaces are found to have a non-monotonic variation with the single scattering albedo, similar to that observed in asteroids (Belskaya, I.N., Shevchenko, V.G. [2000]. Icarus 147, 94-105), which is unexplained so far. The morphological parameters of the surge (A and HWHM) for laboratory samples seem to exhibit the same non-monotonic variation with single scattering albedo. While the non-monotonic variation with albedo was already observed by Nelson et al. (Nelson, R.M., Hapke, B.W., Smythe, W.D., Hale, A.S., Piatek, J.L. [2004]. Planetary regolith microstructure: An unexpected opposition effect result. In: Mackwell, S., Stansbery, E. (Eds.), Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 35, p. 1089), we report here the same variation for the angular width.

  17. Fish and chips: implementation of a neural network model into computer chips to maximize swimming efficiency in autonomous underwater vehicles.

    PubMed

    Blake, R W; Ng, H; Chan, K H S; Li, J

    2008-09-01

    Recent developments in the design and propulsion of biomimetic autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) have focused on boxfish as models (e.g. Deng and Avadhanula 2005 Biomimetic micro underwater vehicle with oscillating fin propulsion: system design and force measurement Proc. 2005 IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Auto. (Barcelona, Spain) pp 3312-7). Whilst such vehicles have many potential advantages in operating in complex environments (e.g. high manoeuvrability and stability), limited battery life and payload capacity are likely functional disadvantages. Boxfish employ undulatory median and paired fins during routine swimming which are characterized by high hydromechanical Froude efficiencies (approximately 0.9) at low forward speeds. Current boxfish-inspired vehicles are propelled by a low aspect ratio, 'plate-like' caudal fin (ostraciiform tail) which can be shown to operate at a relatively low maximum Froude efficiency (approximately 0.5) and is mainly employed as a rudder for steering and in rapid swimming bouts (e.g. escape responses). Given this and the fact that bioinspired engineering designs are not obligated to wholly duplicate a biological model, computer chips were developed using a multilayer perception neural network model of undulatory fin propulsion in the knifefish Xenomystus nigri that would potentially allow an AUV to achieve high optimum values of propulsive efficiency at any given forward velocity, giving a minimum energy drain on the battery. We envisage that externally monitored information on flow velocity (sensory system) would be conveyed to the chips residing in the vehicle's control unit, which in turn would signal the locomotor unit to adopt kinematics (e.g. fin frequency, amplitude) associated with optimal propulsion efficiency. Power savings could protract vehicle operational life and/or provide more power to other functions (e.g. communications).

  18. Temperature gradients in the Cepheus B molecular cloud - a multi-line analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiss, B. M.; Beuther, H.; Kramer, C.

    The Cepheus B molecular cloud is a prime candidate to study the effect of sequential star formation on molecular clouds: it is located at the edge of an H ii region (S155) and an OB association (Cepheus OB3), and it comprises a hot-core region with an embedded compact H ii region and NIR cluster suggesting on-going star formation. The bulk of the cloud, however, appears to be in a 'calm' state where star formation has not (yet) started. We conducted on-the-fly maps of the (2-1) and (3-2) low-J transitions of the CO isotopomers 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (Beuther et al. 1999, to appear in A&A); the observations were carried out with the 3 m KOSMA submillimeter telescope at Gornergrat, Switzerland (Kramer et al. 1998, SPIE, Conf.Proc., Kona, Vol 3350). We present line ratio maps as well as spectra at selected positions, where the latter sample regions of Cepheus B each having different physical conditions. The line ratio distribution is a measure for the variation of the excitation conditions. Adopting an escape probability integration scheme the data can be fitted reasonably treating each of the CO isotopomers seperately. From that we derive differing kinetic temperatures at each of the projected positions. This strongly indicates a temperature gradient along the line-of-sight since different isotopomers trace different layers of the cloud due to their differing optical depths. The temperature difference between the cooler inner parts of the cloud and the cloud's 'surface' amounts up to 40 K. We also found a lateral west-to-east 'surface' temperature decrease from 70 K at the hot-core region down to 40 K.

  19. A portable electronic system for radiation dosimetry using electrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruvinel, P. E.; Mascarenhas, S.; Cameron, J.

    1990-02-01

    An electret dosimeter with a cylindrical active volume has been introduced by Mascarenhas and collaborators [Proc. 10th Anniversary Conf. 1969-1979, Associacâo Brasileira de Fisicos em Medicina, p. 488; Topics Appl. Phys. 33 (1987) 321] for possible use in personnel and area monitoring. The full energy response curve as well as the degree of reproducibility and accuracy of the dosimeter are reported in a previous report [O. Guerrini, Master Science Thesis, São Carlos, USP-IFQSC (1982)]. For dimensions similar to those of the common pen dosimeter, the electret has a total surface charge of the order of 10 -9 C and it has a readout sensitivity of the order of 10 -5 Gy with a useful range of 5 × 10 -2 Gy. In this paper we describe a portable electronic system to measure X and γ-rays using a cylindrical electret ionization chamber. It uses commercially available operational amplifiers, and charge measurements can also be made by connecting a suitable capacitor in the feedback loop. With this system it is possible to measure equivalent surface charges up to (19.99±0.01) on the dosimeter. The readout doses are shown on a 3 {1}/{2} digit liquid crystal display (LCD). We have used complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and bipolar metal oxide semiconductor (BiMOS) operatonal amplifier devices in the system's design. This choice provides small power consumption and is ideal for battery powered instruments. Furthermore the instrument is ideally suited for in situ measurements of X and γ radiation using a cylindrical electret ionization chamber.

  20. Laboratory Experiments of Rip Current Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, R.; Coco, G.; Lomonaco, P.; Dalrymple, R. A.; Alvarez, A.; Gonzalez, M.; Medina, R.

    2014-12-01

    The hypothesis of rip current generation from purely hydrodynamic processes is here investigated through laboratory experiments. The experiments have been performed at the Cantabria Coastal and Ocean Basin (CCOB) with a segmented wavemaker consisting of 64 waveboards. The basin measures 25m in the cross-shore and 32m in the alongshore direction and the water depth at the wavemaker is 1m. A concrete plane sloping (1:5) beach has been built in the opposite side of the wave machine, its toe is 15m from the waveboards. Reflective lateral walls covered the full length of the basin. The set of instruments consists of 33 wave gauges deployed along two longshore and two cross-shore transects, 7 acoustic Doppler velocimeters and 15 run-up wires. Furthermore a set of two cameras has been synchronized with the data acquisition system. Two types of experiments have been performed to specifically study the generation of rip currents under wave group forcing. First, similarly to the experiments of Fowler and Dalrymple (Proc. 22nd Int. Conf. Coast. Eng.,1990), two intersecting wave trains with opposite directions have been imposed. They give rise to the formation of a non-migrating rip current system with a wavelength that depends on wave frequency and direction. Second, single wave trains with alongshore periodic amplitude attenuation have been imposed. Although the attenuation has been set such that the incident wave field has the same envelope as in the first type of experiments, the rip current system differs due to diffraction and interference processes. The results for different wave conditions (maximum incident wave height from 0.2m to 0.4m, wave period from 1.4s to 2s) will be presented and the intensity of the rip currents will be compared to the alongshore variation in wave set-up. This research is part of the ANIMO project funded by the Spanish Government under contract BIA2012-36822.

  1. The Moon and Phobos: specific responses of two satellites moving off and nearer their respective planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, Gennady Gregory

    2016-10-01

    Two enigmatic structural and petrologic features of two satellites are widely discussed: origin and global spreading of high-Ti lunar basalts and intercrossing ripples of Phobos. The rippling covers the whole surface of this small satellite constantly moving towards Mars, thus narrowing its orbit and increasing its orbital frequency and speed of rotation. The increasing speed of rotation means increasing angular momentum of Phobos and this must be compensated by diminishing radius. Very "fresh" overall rippling cutting majority of structural forms of Phobos is a trace of this global contracting process. Another trend is in the moving off Moon. Loosing its angular momentum due to slowing rotation a necessary compensation is fulfilled by sending dense basaltic lava into the crust. Varying density basalt flows (high, low, very low-Ti) reflect various stages of the slowing rotation process. Various contents of dense mineral component – ilmenite in basalts means various densities of the rock. Iron in basalts can be in less dense dark minerals and denser ilmenite thus influencing overall basalt densities corresponding to requirements of "healing" diminishing angular momentum. Spectral mapping of basalt types [3] indicate that for large parts of Oceanus Procellarum younger basalts are more titanium rich than the older basalts, thus somewhat reversing the trend found in the returned samples [2]. In some smaller basins spectral mapping also shows titanium richer basalts being older than titanium pure ones [1]. Thus, one may conclude that decreasing rotation rate of the Moon was not smooth but rather uneven. References: [1] H. Hiesinger, R. Jaumann, G.Neukum, J,W. Head, III. Ages of mare basalts on the lunar nearside // J.Geoph.Res., 2000, v.185, #E12, 29239-275. [2] H.Hiesinger and J.W. Head III. Ages of Oceanus Procellarum basalts and other nearside mare basalts //Workshop on New Views of the Moon II, 2016, abs.8030.[3] Pieters C.M.// Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf., 9th

  2. Failure Wave in DEDF and Soda-Lime Glass During Rod Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orphal, Dennis; Behner, Thilo; Anderson, Charles; Templeton, Douglas

    2005-07-01

    Investigations of glass by planar, and classical and symmetric Taylor impact experiments reveal that failure wave velocity U/F depends on impact velocity, geometry, and the type of glass. U/F typically increases with impact velocity to between ˜ 1.4 C/S and C/L (shear and longitudinal wave velocities, respectively). This paper reports the results of direct high-speed photographic measurements of the failure wave for gold rod impact from 1.2 and 2.0 km/s on DEDF glass (C/S = 2.0, C/L =3.5 km/s). The average rod penetration velocity, u, was measured using flash X-rays. Gold rods eliminated penetrator strength effects. U/F for gold rod impact on DEDF is ˜ 1.0-1.2 km/s, which is considerably less than C/S. The increase of u with impact velocity is greater than that of U/F. These results are confirmed by soda-lime glass impact on a gold rod at an impact velocity of 1300 m/s. Similar results are found in``edge-on-impact'' tests; U/F values of 1.4 km/s and 2.4-2.6 km/s in soda-lime glass are reported for W-alloy rod impact, considerably less than C/S (3.2 km/s) [1,2]. [1] Bless, et. al.(1990) AIP Proc. Shock Comp. Cond. Matter---1989, pp. 939-942 (1990) [2] E. L. Zilberbrand, et. al. (1999) Int. J. Impact Engng., 23, 995-1001 (1999).

  3. GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilot Phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percivall, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is conducting a second phase of the Architecture Implementation Pilot (AIP-2) to integrate services into the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). The first phase of AIP contributed to the initial operating capability of GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) established in early 2008. AIP-2 will augment the GCI with services contributed by GEO Members and Participating Organizations. The activities of AIP-2 are conducted in working groups. Five working groups are developing the transverse technology that supports the multiple user communities. Four Community working groups are applying the transverse technologies to support the following communties of practice: Energy, Biodiversity and Climate Change, Disasters and Air Quality. The Air Quality Working Group is led by the ESIP AQ Cluster. AIP-2 testing and integration will integrate the use cases in to demonstration scenarios. Persistent exemplar services will be nominated to augment the GCI. This presentation will describe the AIP-2 process, progress and planned deliverables.

  4. [An IgG4-related pancreatitis mimicking an adenocarcinoma: A case report].

    PubMed

    Courcet, Emilie; Beltjens, Françoise; Charon-Barra, Céline; Guy, France; Orry, David; Ghiringhelli, François; Arnould, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 auto-immune pancreatitis (type 1 AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of IgG4-related systemic disease (IgG4-RD). This disease has recently been individualized and is characterized by elevated serum IgG4 levels and extrapancreatic lesions with common histologic characteristic: dense infiltration of lymphocytes, IgG4-positive plasma cells and storiforme fibrosis. Obliterative phlebitis is frequently detected. The pancreas is frequently involved in this disease. As approach to the pancreas for histological examination is generally difficult, AIP is diagnosed using a combination of clinical, serological, morphological and histopathological features. In pseudotumoral cases, AIP can be misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer. Since AIP responds dramatically to steroid therapy, accurate diagnosis of AIP can avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection. We report here a case of a patient who underwent surgery for presumed pancreatic cancer. The final diagnosis was type 1 AIP.

  5. Bevalac operations update: Pub. 496, No. 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This report contains information on the following experiments: Beam 30-1 (Dilepton Spectrometer); Beam 30-2 (Janus Spectrometer); Beam 39 I Low Energy Program; Beam 39 II Irradiation Station; Beam 39 III Irradiation Station; Beam 40 I RTE; Beam 40 II NASA; Beam 42 I EOS; Beam 42 II Radioactive Beams-Nuclear Radii; Beam 42 III Fragmentation; Beam 42 IV TPC; Beam 42 V Time of Flight Wall; Beam 44 I Low Energy Program; Beam 44 II Radioactive Beams-Magnetic Moments; Beam 44 III Antiprotons; AIP 86-Uranium Intensity; AIP 87-SHILAC Drift Tubes; AIP 88-Computer Control Upgrade I; AIP 89-Computer Control Upgrade II; AIP 90-External Particle Beam Lines Control; AIP 91-Power Supplies; BEVAX Developments; Spiller Control; and, New Pulsed Switching Magnet. 20 figs.

  6. GPR surveying of transport infrastructures and buildings; underground utility and void sensing - ongoing activities in Working Group 2 of COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajewski, Lara; Plati, Christina; Derobert, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    European test sites and laboratories for the testing of GPR equipment, methodology and procedures, that is being coordinated by France and Italy. The catalogue will represent a useful tool for the GPR community and it will contribute to identifying new cooperation possibilities among research groups, to clarifying which are the missing testing facilities in the various European regions, and to addressing current or future research needs. Acknowledgement The Authors thank COST, for funding the COST Action TU1208 'Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar.' References [1] Proc. First Action's General Meeting (Rome, Italy, 22-24 July 2013), 1st edition, COST Action TU1208, L. Pajewski, A. Benedetto, Eds., ISBN 978-88-548-6191-6 (Aracne, 2013). [2] Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar, A. Benedetto, L. Pajewski, Eds., ISBN 978-3-319-04812-3 (Springer, 2015). [3] A. Benedetto, 'State of the Art of GPR Applications and New Trends in Transportation Infrastructures,' Future Trends in Civil Engineering, A. Ceric, S. Lakusic, Eds., ISBN 978-953-6272-65-5 (2014). [4] Proc. 2013 Working Group Progress Meeting (Nantes, France, 24-25 February 2014), COST Action TU1208, L. Pajewski, X. Derobert, Eds., ISBN 978-88-548-7223-3 (Aracne, 2014). [5] Proc. 15th International Conference on Ground Penetrating Radar - GPR2014, S. Lambot, A. Giannopoulos, L. Pajewski, F. De André, E. Slob, C. Craeye, Eds., IEEE Conf. Number 35163 (IEEE, 2014). [6] Proc. Second Action's General Meeting (Vienna, Austria, 30 April-2 May 2014), COST Action TU1208, L. Pajewski, A. Benedetto, Eds., ISBN 978-88-548-7224-0 (Aracne, 2014). [7] S. Fontul, F. De Chiara, E. Fortunato, A. Lopes, 'Evaluation of ballast condition using Ground Penetrating Radar,' The Ninth Intl. Conf. on Engineering Computational Technology (2014).

  7. A Case Report of Childhood Recurrent Autoimmune Pancreatitis: A Rare Emerging Entity

    PubMed Central

    Masawa, Lojain; Jan, Ajwan; Alsaleem, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare entity in the paediatric population and its aetiology is unknown. Here, we report a 10-year-old girl with recurrent abdominal pain. A diagnosis of AIP was made based on elevated pancreatic enzymes, elevated IgG 4 and image findings. She responded to corticosteroid treatment. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent pancreatitis. Correct diagnosis can help avert the consequences of progressive disease and unnecessary surgery. PMID:27504369

  8. A Case Report of Childhood Recurrent Autoimmune Pancreatitis: A Rare Emerging Entity.

    PubMed

    Hasosah, Mohammed Y; Masawa, Lojain; Jan, Ajwan; Alsaleem, Khalid

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare entity in the paediatric population and its aetiology is unknown. Here, we report a 10-year-old girl with recurrent abdominal pain. A diagnosis of AIP was made based on elevated pancreatic enzymes, elevated IgG 4 and image findings. She responded to corticosteroid treatment. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent pancreatitis. Correct diagnosis can help avert the consequences of progressive disease and unnecessary surgery. PMID:27504369

  9. Incidence and outcome of lung involvement in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Takaaki; Kido, Takashi; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Oda, Keishi; Nishida, Chinatsu; Yamasaki, Kei; Orihashi, Takeshi; Kawanami, Yukiko; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Masashi; Harada, Masaru; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated the incidence and outcome of lung involvement in 35 patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Our results indicate that lung involvement is commonly observed in AIP (40%). In addition, corticosteroid treatment improved the lung lesions and appeared to reduce the probability of relapse compared with pancreatic lesions (0% vs 36%). This is the first report to assess the long-term outcome of lung involvement in AIP (52 ± 33 months).

  10. A case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, which presented an acute interstitial pneumonia-like image on chest CT scan.

    PubMed

    Kameda, Tomohiro; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Susaki, Kentaro; Danjo, Junichi; Nakashima, Shusaku; Shimada, Hiromi; Izumikawa, Miharu; Takeuchi, Yohei; Mitsunaka, Hiroki; Bandoh, Shuji; Imataki, Osamu; Nose, Masato; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) complicated with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). A female patient was diagnosed with acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) with MCTD by chest CT scan. Corticosteroid therapy was refractory for lung involvement, and she died due to acute respiratory failure. The autopsy revealed that AIP was compatible with lung involvement of CAPS. We therefore suggest that chest CT might reveal AIP-like findings in CAPS patients whose condition is complicated with pulmonary manifestations.

  11. SPAM: Source Peeling and Atmospheric Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intema, Huib T.

    2014-08-01

    SPAM is a extension to AIPS for reducing high-resolution, low-frequency radio interferometric observations. Direction-dependent ionospheric calibration and image-plane ripple suppression are among the features that help to make high-quality sub-GHz images. Data reductions are captured in well-tested Python scripts that execute AIPS tasks directly (mostly during initial data reduction steps), call high-level functions that make multiple AIPS or ParselTongue calls, and require few manual operations.

  12. Data analysis systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Donald C.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * WHY SYSTEMS? * PROJECT MANAGEMENT REASONS * TECHNICAL REASONS * THE TIME-SCALE PROBLEM * WHAT END-USERS WANT * DATA INTERCHANGE FORMATS * PROJECT MANAGEMENT ISSUES * THE EXPORT POLICY * GROUP PROGRAMMING PSYCHOLOGY * THE CASE FOR SYSTEM PORTABILITY * HOW TO BUILD PORTABLE DATA ANALYSIS SYSTEMS * ON THE DESIGN OF COMMAND LANGUAGES * LAYERED VIRTUAL INTERFACES IN AIPS * STATUS REPORT ON NRAO'S AIPS PROJECT * AIPS DEVELOPMENT PLANS * CONCLUSION * DISCUSSION * REFERENCES * BIBLIOGRAPHY—FOR FURTHER READING

  13. Advanced information processing system: Input/output network management software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagle, Gail; Alger, Linda; Kemp, Alexander

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide the software requirements and specifications for the Input/Output Network Management Services for the Advanced Information Processing System. This introduction and overview section is provided to briefly outline the overall architecture and software requirements of the AIPS system before discussing the details of the design requirements and specifications of the AIPS I/O Network Management software. A brief overview of the AIPS architecture followed by a more detailed description of the network architecture.

  14. Ulcerative Colitis and Immunoglobulin G4

    PubMed Central

    Kuwata, Go; Koizumi, Koichi; Tabata, Taku; Hara, Seiichi; Kuruma, Sawako; Fujiwara, Takashi; Chiba, Kazuro; Egashira, Hideto; Fujiwara, Junko; Arakawa, Takeo; Momma, Kumiko; Horiguchi, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Ulcerative colitis (UC) is sometimes associated with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Infiltration of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-positive plasma cells is sometimes detected in the colonic mucosa of AIP or UC patients. This study aimed to clarify the relation between UC and IgG4. Methods Associations with UC were reviewed in 85 AIP patients. IgG4 immunostaining was performed on biopsy specimens from the colonic mucosa of 14 AIP and 32 UC patients. Results UC was confirmed in two cases (type 1 AIP, n=1; suspected type 2 AIP, n=1). Abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the colonic mucosa was detected in the case of suspected type 2 AIP with UC and two cases of type 1 AIP without colitis. Abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells was detected in 10 UC cases (IgG4-present, 31%). Although 72% of IgG4-absent UC patients showed mild disease activity, 70% of IgG4-present patients showed moderate to severe disease activity (p<0.05). Conclusions UC is sometimes associated with AIP, but it seems that UC is not a manifestation of IgG4-related disease. Infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells is sometimes detectable in the colonic mucosa of UC patients and is associated with disease activity. PMID:24516698

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis: an illustrated guide to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R D; Rofe, C J; Bryant, T J C; Hacking, C N; Stedman, B

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) remains one of the rarer forms of pancreatitis but has become increasingly well recognized and widely diagnosed as it is an important differential, particularly due to the dramatic response to appropriate therapy. It is now best considered as part of a multisystem disease and the notion of "IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease" has become widely recognized as the number of extra-pancreatic associations of AIP grows. More recently AIP has been classified into two subtypes: lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with distinct geographical, age and sex distributions for the two subtypes, in addition to different pathological characteristics. The role of imaging is crucial in AIP and should be considered in conjunction with clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to make the diagnosis. Radiologists are uniquely placed to raise the possibility of AIP and aid the exclusion of significant differentials to allow the initiation of appropriate management and avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Radiological investigation may reveal a number of characteristic imaging findings in AIP but appearances can vary considerably and the focal form of AIP may appear as a pancreatic mass, imitating pancreatic carcinoma. This review will illustrate typical and atypical appearances of AIP on all imaging modes. Emphasis will be placed on the imaging features that are likely to prove useful in discriminating AIP from other causes prior to histopathological confirmation. In addition, examples of relevant differential diagnoses are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23177083

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  17. Characterization of acute interstitial pneumonia in cattle in southern Alberta feedyards.

    PubMed Central

    Ayroud, M; Popp, J D; VanderKop, M A; Yost, G S; Haines, D M; Majak, W; Karren, D; Yanke, L J; McAllister, T A

    2000-01-01

    Field data were collected over 2 consecutive years to characterize acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in feedyard cattle. Thirty-eight cattle with clinical symptoms of AIP were examined following emergency slaughter; 31 (all heifers) were confirmed to have AIP on the basis of gross and histological lung pathology. The 7 without AIP, plus 17 asymptomatic penmates, were used as contemporary controls. Plasma concentrations of 3-methylindole (3MI) metabolites were higher (P < 0.001) in heifers afflicted with AIP than in the control animals, and concentrations of 3MI mercapturates in the urine were lower (P < 0.007) in affected heifers. Concentrations of 3MI adducts in lung tissue and in microsomal protein did not differ (P > 0.05) between the 2 groups, and 3MI was not detected in ruminal fluid from either group. Total ruminal bacterial numbers and populations of lactobacilli and protozoa were similar (P > 0.05) between the AIP-positive and unafflicted groups, but fewer (P < 0.05) cellulolytic bacteria were present in the positive group. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus antigen was not found in lung tissue from any of the heifers confirmed to have AIP. To our knowledge, this study is the first to implicate 3MI metabolites as having a role in feedyard AIP. Further research is required to determine the factors responsible for the elevation in 3MI adducts in plasma and urine of feedyard cattle afflicted with AIP. Images Figure 1. PMID:10907577

  18. Characterization of acute interstitial pneumonia in cattle in southern Alberta feedyards.

    PubMed

    Ayroud, M; Popp, J D; VanderKop, M A; Yost, G S; Haines, D M; Majak, W; Karren, D; Yanke, L J; McAllister, T A

    2000-07-01

    Field data were collected over 2 consecutive years to characterize acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in feedyard cattle. Thirty-eight cattle with clinical symptoms of AIP were examined following emergency slaughter; 31 (all heifers) were confirmed to have AIP on the basis of gross and histological lung pathology. The 7 without AIP, plus 17 asymptomatic penmates, were used as contemporary controls. Plasma concentrations of 3-methylindole (3MI) metabolites were higher (P < 0.001) in heifers afflicted with AIP than in the control animals, and concentrations of 3MI mercapturates in the urine were lower (P < 0.007) in affected heifers. Concentrations of 3MI adducts in lung tissue and in microsomal protein did not differ (P > 0.05) between the 2 groups, and 3MI was not detected in ruminal fluid from either group. Total ruminal bacterial numbers and populations of lactobacilli and protozoa were similar (P > 0.05) between the AIP-positive and unafflicted groups, but fewer (P < 0.05) cellulolytic bacteria were present in the positive group. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus antigen was not found in lung tissue from any of the heifers confirmed to have AIP. To our knowledge, this study is the first to implicate 3MI metabolites as having a role in feedyard AIP. Further research is required to determine the factors responsible for the elevation in 3MI adducts in plasma and urine of feedyard cattle afflicted with AIP.

  19. High atherogenic index of plasma in subclinical hypothyroidism: Implications in assessment of cardiovascular disease risk

    PubMed Central

    James, Stephen R.; Ray, Lopamudra; Ravichandran, Kandasamy; Nanda, Sunil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: A controversy exists regarding the association between subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) and dyslipidemia. Moreover, studies on lipid ratios and atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) in SH are rare, particularly in the Indian scenario. Aim: This study aimed to investigate abnormalities in conventional lipid profile, lipid ratios, and AIP in SH and attempted to correlate thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and AIP in SH. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analysis of patient records of SH subjects and euthyroid subjects, age, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, TSH, total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, lipid ratios, and AIP were compared between the two groups. The correlation of TSH and AIP in SH was studied. Spearman's correlation, Mann–Whitney U-test and logistic regression analysis were performed. Results: Triglyceride, triglyceride/HDL-C, and AIP were significantly higher in SH as compared to euthyroid group, but there was no correlation between TSH and AIP in SH. AIP emerged as the significant single factor associated with SH in multiple logistic regressions. Conclusion: The positive association of dyslipidemia and SH indicates a need for regular screening of these patients to enable early diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia. Even in patients who have a normal conventional lipid profile, lipid ratios, and AIP have to be calculated for better assessment of atherogenic risk. PMID:27730076

  20. The Association of Ideal Cardiovascular Health and Atherogenic Index of Plasma in Rural Population: A Cross-Sectional Study from Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ye; Li, Yuan; Guo, Xiaofan; Dai, Dongxue; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, the American Heart Association has proposed a new concept “ideal cardiovascular health” (CVH) based on seven CVH metrics: smoking, body mass index, physical activity, diet score, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting plasma glucose. We aimed to determine the association of CVH with atherogenic index of plasma (AIP), a strong marker for atherosclerosis (AS). This cross-sectional study was conducted in the rural areas of northeast China and 11,113 middle-aged subjects were enrolled. Seven CVH metrics were classified into ideal, intermediate, and poor groups. AIP was calculated as log (TG/HDL) (triglycerides/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol). AIP > 0.21 was classified into the high AIP group and served as dependent variable. All seven CVH metrics were correlated with AIP. A gradient relationship between the number of poor CVH metrics and the prevalence of high AIP existed. Log binomial regression analysis showed that compared to those with five to seven ideal CVH metrics, individuals with four, three, two, one, and no ideal CVH metrics had 1.67, 2.66, 4.00, 5.30 and 6.50 times higher prevalence for high AIP. The subjects with poor CVH status had 2.73 times higher prevalence for high AIP. We found an inversely gradient relationship between the number of ideal CVH metrics and lower prevalence of high AIP. PMID:27775583

  1. Wind-blown sand on beaches: an evaluation of models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Douglas J.; Jackson, Derek W. T.; Namikas, Steven L.; Wang, Jinkang

    1998-03-01

    Five models for predicting rates of aeolian sand transport were evaluated using empirical data obtained from field experiments conducted in April, 1994 at a beach on Inch Spit, Co. Kerry, Republic of Ireland. Measurements were made of vertical wind profiles (to derive shear velocity estimates), beach slope, and rates of sand transport. Sediment samples were taken to assess characteristics of grain size and surface moisture content. Estimates of threshold shear velocity were derived using grain size data. After parsing the field data on the basis of the quality of shear velocity estimation and the occurrence of blowing sand, 51 data sets describing rates of sand transport and environmental conditions were retained. Mean grain diameter was 0.17 mm. Surface slopes ranged from 0.02 on the foreshore to about 0.11 near the dune toe. Mean shear velocities ranged from 0.23 m s -1 (just above the observed transport threshold) to 0.65 m s -1. Rates of transport ranged from 0.02 kg m -1 h -1 to more than 80 kg m -1 h -1. These data were used as input to the models of Bagnold [Bagnold, R.A., 1936. The Movement of Desert Sand. Proc. R. Soc. London, A157, 594-620], Kawamura [Kawamura, R., 1951. Study of Sand Movement by Wind. Translated (1965) as University of California Hydraulics Engineering Laboratory Report HEL 2-8, Berkeley], Zingg [Zingg, A.W., 1953. Wind tunnel studies of the movement of sedimentary material. Proc. 5th Hydraulics Conf. Bull. 34, Iowa City, Inst. of Hydraulics, pp. 111-135], Kadib [Kadib, A.A., 1965. A function for sand movement by wind. University of California Hydraulics Engineering Laboratory Report HEL 2-8, Berkeley], and Lettau and Lettau [Lettau, K. and Lettau, H., 1977. Experimental and Micrometeorological Field Studies of Dune Migration. In: K. Lettau and H. Lettau (Eds.), Exploring the World's Driest Climate. University of Wisconsin-Madison, IES Report 101, pp. 110-147]. Correction factors to adjust predictions of the rate of transport to account

  2. Association of uric acid, atherogenic index of plasma and albuminuria in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Akbas, Emin Murat; Timuroglu, Aysu; Ozcicek, Adalet; Ozcicek, Fatih; Demirtas, Levent; Gungor, Adem; Akbas, Nergis

    2014-01-01

    Background: The associations of serum uric acid (UA), atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and albuminuria with cardiovascular disease have been shown. Several studies focused on association of serum UA and dyslipidemia, serum UA and renal impairment, dyslipidemia and renal impairment. However, to date, in literature, there have been no studies demonstrating the relationship between these parameters in diabetic patients together. Aims: We aimed to investigate the association between serum UA, albuminuria and AIP in diabetic patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving data of 645 diabetic patients. The patients were separated into groups according to their serum uric acid and AIP levels. The quantitative urine albumin/creatinine ratio in morning spot urine samples were used for standard albuminuria determination. Serum uric acid levels under 6 mg/dL were considered as normal. AIP was calculated as the logarithmically transformed ratio of triglyceride to high density lipoprotein cholesterol. Results: AIP and albuminuria levels were high in high serum UA group compared to normal UA group. Uric acid and albuminuria tended to increase with increasing AIP. Correlation analysis showed that albuminuria, AIP and UA were significantly correlated with each other. Additionally, in binary logistic regression analysis, AIP was found to be independently associated with high UA levels. Conclusions: Present study reveals that serum UA, AIP and albuminuria are closely related. Physicians should be aware that patients with concomitant hyperuricemia, albuminuria and high AIP are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Our study confirms that there is a need for larger prospective studies to determine the mechanisms underlying the association of serum UA, AIP and albuminuria. PMID:25664100

  3. Conformal Geometry of the Supercotangent and Spinor Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, J.-P.

    2012-06-01

    We study the actions of local conformal vector fields {X \\in conf(M,g)} on the spinor bundle of ( M, g) and on its classical counterpart: the supercotangent bundle {{M}} of ( M, g). We first deal with the classical framework and determine the Hamiltonian lift of conf ( M, g) to {{M}} . We then perform the geometric quantization of the supercotangent bundle of ( M, g), which constructs the spinor bundle as the quantum representation space. The Kosmann Lie derivative of spinors is obtained by quantization of the comoment map. The quantum and classical actions of conf ( M, g) turn, respectively, the space of differential operators acting on spinor densities and the space of their symbols into conf ( M, g)-modules. They are filtered and admit a common associated graded module. In the conformally flat case, the latter helps us determine the conformal invariants of both conf ( M, g)-modules, in particular the conformally odd powers of the Dirac operator.

  4. 75 FR 78798 - Airport Improvement Program: Proposed Changes to Benefit Cost Analysis (BCA) Threshold

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ... Decisions on Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Discretionary Grants and Letters of Intent (LOI), 64 FR 70107... requiring benefit cost analyses (BCA) for capacity projects when applying for Airport Improvement Program (AIP) grants for capacity projects at the discretion of the Secretary of Transportation....

  5. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP). PMID:25469024

  6. Autoimmune pancreatitis: the clinicopathological characteristics of the subtype with granulocytic epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, Günter; Detlefsen, Sönke; Chari, Suresh T; Longnecker, Daniel S; Zamboni, Giuseppe

    2010-08-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been established as a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is distinguishable from other types such as alcoholic, hereditary or obstructive chronic pancreatitis. AIP seems to be a global disease, since it has been reported in many different countries, especially from Japan, USA and Europe (Germany, Italy, United Kingdom). Typical histopathological findings in the pancreas in AIP include a periductal lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with fibrosis, causing narrowing of the involved ducts. The typical clinical features include presentation with obstructive jaundice/pancreatic mass and a dramatic response to steroids. However, while the reports from Japan describe uniform changes called lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) in the pancreas from AIP patients, the reports from Europe and USA distinguish two histopathologic patterns in AIP patients: one with the characteristics of LPSP and another with slightly different histological features, called idiopathic duct centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesions (GELs). This article reviews the evidence that GEL-positive AIP or IDCP is a second type of AIP, distinct from LPSP, in regard to pancreatic pathology, immunology and epidemiology. PMID:20549251

  7. Autoantibodies against the exocrine pancreas in autoimmune pancreatitis: gene and protein expression profiling and immunoassays identify pancreatic enzymes as a major target of the inflammatory process

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, J.-Matthias; Faissner, Ralf; Koczan, Dirk; Bewerunge, Peter; Bassi, Claudio; Brors, Benedikt; Eils, Roland; Frulloni, Luca; Funk, Anette; Halangk, Walter; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Kaderali, Lars; Kleeff, Jörg; Krüger, Burkhard; Lerch, Markus M.; Lösel, Ralf; Magnani, Mauro; Neumaier, Michael; Nittka, Stephanie; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Sänger, Julian; Serafini, Sonja; Schnölzer, Martina; Thierse, Hermann-Josef; Wandschneider, Silke; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Klöppel, Günter

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is thought to be an immune-mediated inflammatory process, directed against the epithelial components of the pancreas. Methods In order to explore key targets of the inflammatory process we analysed the expression of proteins at the RNA and protein level using genomics and proteomics, immunohistochemistry, Western blot and immunoassay. An animal model of AIP with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus infected mice was studied in parallel. RNA microarrays of pancreatic tissue from 12 patients with AIP were compared to those of 8 patients with non-AIP chronic pancreatitis (CP). Results Expression profiling revealed 272 upregulated genes, including those encoding for immunoglobulins, chemokines and their receptors, and 86 downregulated genes, including those for pancreatic proteases such as three trypsinogen isoforms. Protein profiling showed that the expression of trypsinogens and other pancreatic enzymes was greatly reduced. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a near-loss of trypsin positive acinar cells, which was also confirmed by Western blotting. The serum of AIP patients contained high titres of autoantibodies against the trypsinogens PRSS1, and PRSS2 but not against PRSS3. In addition, there were autoantibodies against the trypsin inhibitor PSTI (the product of the SPINK1 gene). In the pancreas of AIP animals we found similar protein patterns and a reduction in trypsinogen. Conclusion These data indicate that the immune-mediated process characterizing AIP involves pancreatic acinar cells and their secretory enzymes such as trypsin isoforms. Demonstration of trypsinogen autoantibodies may be helpful for the diagnosis of AIP. PMID:20407433

  8. Treatment of Autoimmune Pancreatitis with the Anecdotes of the First Report

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takeuchi, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    The first case that led researchers to put forward a new concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was treated with steroids by gastroenterologists in Tokyo Women's Medical University. It is important to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer before treatment with steroids is started. Today, steroids are standard therapy for AIP worldwide. In the Japanese consensus guidelines, steroid therapy is indicated for symptomatic AIP. After management of glucose levels and obstructive jaundice, oral prednisolone is initiated at 0.6 mg/kg/day for 2–4 weeks and is gradually tapered to a maintenance dose of 2.5–5 mg/day over 2-3 months. To prevent relapse, maintenance therapy with low-dose prednisolone is used. For relapsed AIP, readministration or increased doses of steroids are effective. The presence of proximal bile duct stenosis and elevated serum IgG4 levels may be predictive of relapse of AIP. It is necessary to verify the validity of the Japanese regimen of steroid therapy for AIP. The necessity, drugs, and duration of maintenance therapy for AIP need to be clarified by prospective studies. PMID:22548071

  9. The therapeutic strategy for autoimmune pancreatitis is subject to the endoscopic features of the duodenal papilla

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kensuke; Nakajima, Atushi

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) often presents with a swollen duodenal papilla, however, the clinical significance of the duodenal papilla in AIP has not been fully elucidated. Data have shown swollen duodenal papillae shaped like a pear and/or with a submucosal tumor having IgG4-bearing plasma cells. Immunohistopathology has potentially verified duodenal papillitis associated with AIP. FOXP3-positive lymphocytes are also recognized in AIP. AIP has shown spontaneous remission and relapse irrelevance to corticosteroid therapy. The results of a multivariate analysis revealed the absence of a swollen duodenal papilla as the only significant independent factor predictive of spontaneous remission in AIP cases. In addition, the results of another multivariate analysis revealed the presence of a swollen duodenal papilla and the presence of extrapancreatic lesions as the significant independent factors predictive of relapse in these cases. Results suggest that the lack of a swollen duodenal papilla is a predictive factor for spontaneous remission, and thus negates the need to administer corticosteroids in those AIP patients. In contrast, a swollen duodenal papilla and the presence of extrapancreatic lesions are risk factors for relapse, and those AIP patients are candidates for maintenance corticosteroid therapy to reduce relapse. Therefore, the therapeutic strategy such as the indication for corticosteroid administration is subject to the endoscopic features of the duodenal papilla. PMID:21180617

  10. Regulatory T Cells in Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Kazushige; Kusuda, Takeo; Koyabu, Masanori; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Fukata, Norimasa; Sumimoto, Kimi; Fukui, Yuri; Sakaguchi, Yutaku; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Shimatani, Masaaki; Fukui, Toshiro; Matsushita, Mitsunobu; Takaoka, Makoto; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly recognized pancreatic disorder. Recently, International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria for AIP (ICDC) was published. In this ICDC, AIP was classified into Type 1 and Type 2. Patients with Type 1 AIP have several immunologic and histologic abnormalities specific to the disease, including increased levels of serum IgG4 and storiform fibrosis with infiltration of lymphocytes and IgG4-positive plasmacytes in the involved organs. Among the involved organs showing extrapancreatic lesions, the bile duct is the most common, exhibiting sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC). However, the role of IgG4 is unclear. Recently, it has been reported that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in both the development of various autoimmune diseases and the shift of B cells toward IgG4, producing plasmacytes. Our study showed that Tregs were increased in the pancreas with Type 1 AIP and IgG4-SC compared with control. In the patients with Type 1 AIP and IgG4-SC, the numbers of infiltrated Tregs were significantly positively correlated with IgG4-positive plasma cells. In Type 1 AIP, inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS)+ and IL-10+ Tregs significantly increased compared with control groups. Our data suggest that increased quantities of ICOS+ Tregs may influence IgG4 production via IL-10 in Type 1 AIP. PMID:22536257

  11. SNPs in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein gene associated with sporadic non-functioning pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    HU, YESHUAI; YANG, JUN; CHANG, YONGKAI; MA, SHUNCHANG; QI, JIANFA

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene have previously been associated with a predisposition to pituitary adenomas. However, to the best of our knowledge, mutations in AIP that relate specifically to sporadic non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) have yet to be reported. Therefore, the present study aimed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the AIP gene that may be associated with NFPAs. Peripheral blood samples and the entire coding sequence of the AIP gene from 56 patients with NFPAs and 56 controls were analyzed in triplicate. Of the 56 patients with NFPAs, 9 patients (16.1%) were identified as harboring five different SNPs, although no germline mutations in the AIP gene were detected in any of the patients. Three different SNPs (7051C>T, 8012G>C and 8020G>C) were identified in exons 4 and 6 in 3 different patients (each in 1 patient). Two different SNPs (7318C>A and 7886A>G) were identified in exons 5 and 6, respectively, in 6 different patients (each in 3 patients). No SNPs or germline mutations in the AIP gene were identified in the controls. The results of the present study suggested that mutations in the AIP gene might not have an important role in the tumorigenesis of NFPAs. However, further studies are required in order to investigate potential molecular and genetic mechanisms that may underlie the involvement of AIP in NFPA. PMID:26998050

  12. Challenges in the successful management of a case of acute intermittent porphyria in India.

    PubMed

    Patell, Rushad; Dosi, Rupal; Joshi, Harsh; Shah, Purav; Tripathi, Rishi

    2016-07-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare metabolic disease involving a defect in haem biosynthesis resulting in the accumulation and excessive secretion of porphyrins and its precursors. Acute attacks present with episodes of severe abdominal pain, nausea, confusion and severe life-threatening seizures. A high index of suspicion is required for the initial diagnosis of AIP.

  13. Society Membership Survey: 1986 Salaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelton, W. Keith; And Others

    The fourth in a series of reports produced by the Education and Employment Statistics division of the American Insititute of Physics (AIP) is presented. Data are based on a stratified random sample survey of one-sixth of the U.S. and Canadian membership of the AIP member societies. In the spring of 1986, every individual in the sample received a…

  14. Abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion as clinical presentation of acute intermittent porphyria.

    PubMed

    Valle Feijóo, M L; Bermúdez Sanjurjo, J R; González Vázquez, L; Rey Martínez, M; de la Fuente Aguado, J

    2015-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is a rare condition characterized by abdominal pain and a wide range of nonspecific symptoms. We report the case of a woman with abdominal pain and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) as clinical presentation of AIP. The diagnosis was achieved through the etiologic study of the SIADH.

  15. Astrophysical Institute, Potsdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Built upon a tradition of almost 300 years, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam (AIP) is in an historical sense the successor of one of the oldest astronomical observatories in Germany. It is the first institute in the world which incorporated the term `astrophysical' in its name, and is connected with distinguished scientists such as Karl Schwarzschild and Albert Einstein. The AIP constitutes on...

  16. 77 FR 14583 - Notice to Manufacturers of Alternative Fuel Vans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... American Preferences. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is considering issuing waivers to foreign... (VALE) to determine whether a waiver to the Buy American Preferences should be issued. FOR FURTHER... Program (AIP). AIP grant recipients must follow 49 U.S.C. 50101, Buy American Preferences. Under 49...

  17. Effect of dietary melengestrol acetate on the incidence of acute interstitial pneumonia in feedlot heifers.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A; Ayroud, Mejid; Bray, Tammy M; Yost, Garold S

    2006-07-01

    Over a 3-y period, 906,000 cattle were monitored in 23 feedlots in southern Alberta for symptoms of acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). Plasma, urine, and lung tissue were collected at slaughter from 299 animals clinically diagnosed with AIP and from 156 healthy penmates and analyzed for 3-methylindole (3MI) derivatives and reduced glutathione concentration. From each animal, the left lung was subsampled for histologic examination. Concentrations of glutathione in lung tissue were reduced (P < 0.001) in animals showing clinical symptoms of AIP as compared with their asymptomatic penmates. Animals histologically confirmed as having AIP had higher levels of 3MI protein adducts in blood and lung tissue (P < 0.05) than did emergency-slaughtered animals without AIP. Within feedlots, where pens of heifers were fed either a standard dosage of melengestrol acetate (MGA) or none, the rate of death attributable to AIP was similar between treatment groups, but emergency slaughter after clinical diagnosis of AIP was done 3.2 times more often (P < 0.001) in the MGA-fed heifers than in the group not fed MGA. Use of MGA did not influence glutathione concentration. As growth performance of heifers given steroidal implants may not be improved by feeding MGA, the most cost-effective method of reducing the incidence of AIP-related emergency slaughter in feedlot heifers may be to eliminate MGA from the diet.

  18. Effect of dietary melengestrol acetate on the incidence of acute interstitial pneumonia in feedlot heifers

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Tim A.; Ayroud, Mejid; Bray, Tammy M.; Yost, Garold S.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Over a 3-y period, 906 000 cattle were monitored in 23 feedlots in southern Alberta for symptoms of acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). Plasma, urine, and lung tissue were collected at slaughter from 299 animals clinically diagnosed with AIP and from 156 healthy penmates and analyzed for 3-methylindole (3MI) derivatives and reduced glutathione concentration. From each animal, the left lung was subsampled for histologic examination. Concentrations of glutathione in lung tissue were reduced (P < 0.001) in animals showing clinical symptoms of AIP as compared with their asymptomatic penmates. Animals histologically confirmed as having AIP had higher levels of 3MI protein adducts in blood and lung tissue (P < 0.05) than did emergency-slaughtered animals without AIP. Within feedlots, where pens of heifers were fed either a standard dosage of melengestrol acetate (MGA) or none, the rate of death attributable to AIP was similar between treatment groups, but emergency slaughter after clinical diagnosis of AIP was done 3.2 times more often (P < 0.001) in the MGA-fed heifers than in the group not fed MGA. Use of MGA did not influence glutathione concentration. As growth performance of heifers given steroidal implants may not be improved by feeding MGA, the most cost-effective method of reducing the incidence of AIP-related emergency slaughter in feedlot heifers may be to eliminate MGA from the diet. PMID:16850945

  19. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein Targets IRF7 to Suppress Antiviral Signaling and the Induction of Type I Interferon*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qinjie; Lavorgna, Alfonso; Bowman, Melissa; Hiscott, John; Harhaj, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor IRF7 (interferon regulatory factor 7) is a key regulator of type I interferon and plays essential roles in restricting virus infection and spread. IRF7 activation is tightly regulated to prevent excessive inflammation and autoimmunity; however, how IRF7 is suppressed by negative regulators remains poorly understood. Here, we have identified AIP (aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein) as a new binding partner of IRF7. The interaction between AIP and IRF7 is enhanced upon virus infection, and AIP potently inhibits IRF7-induced type I IFN (IFNα/β) production. Overexpression of AIP blocks virus-induced activation of IFN, whereas knockdown of AIP by siRNA potentiates virally activated IFN production. Consistently, AIP-deficient murine embryonic fibroblasts are highly resistant to virus infection because of increased production of IFNα/β. AIP inhibits IRF7 function by antagonizing the nuclear localization of IRF7. Together, our study identifies AIP as a novel inhibitor of IRF7 and a negative regulator of innate antiviral signaling. PMID:25911105

  20. The Assessment Interaction Plan--A Tool for Driving Performance Improvement through Analysis to Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Brett; Barr, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The assessment interaction plan (AIP) is a performance support tool developed by members of the Canadian Defence Academy's Directorate of Learning Innovation. This article provides a brief overview of the performance gap that led to the creation of the AIP, its function within the overall courseware design process, a description of its components,…

  1. Sleep and wake phase of heart beat dynamics by artificial insymmetrised patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowska, A.; Makowiec, D.

    2004-05-01

    In order to determine differences between healthy patients and patients with congestive heart failure we apply the artificial insymmetrised pattern (AIP) method. The AIP method by exploring a human eye ability to extract regularities and read symmetries in a dot pattern, serves a tool for qualitative discrimination of heart rate states.

  2. A Bold Move: Reframing Composition through Assessment Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condran, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the decision of the Art Institute of Pittsburgh (AiP) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to implement a rigorous writing program assessment in order to obtain the Middle States accreditation, and it describes the process of determining which assessment model would be the most appropriate for AiP's needs. The use of a quantitative…

  3. Image-Processing Educator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Apple Image-Processing Educator (AIPE) explores ability of microcomputers to provide personalized computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in digital image processing of remotely sensed images. AIPE is "proof-of-concept" system, not polished production system. User-friendly prompts provide access to explanations of common features of digital image processing and of sample programs that implement these features.

  4. A career in theoretical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, P. W.

    in Proc. of 12th Int. Conf. on Low Temperature Physics -- 29. Anomalous low-temperature thermal properties of glasses and spin glasses -- 30. Comments on the maximum superconducting transition temperature (with M. L. Cohen). Comment on "Model for an exciton mechanism of superconductivity" (with J. C. Inkson) -- 31. Resonating valence bonds: a new kind of insulator? -- 32. Anisotropic superfluidity in [symbol]He: a possible interpretation of its stability as a spin-fluctuation effect (with W. F. Brinkman) -- 33. Conference summary in Collective Properties of Physical Systems -- 34. Asymptotically exact methods in the Kondo problem (with G. Yuval) -- 35. Many-body effects at surfaces in Elementary Excitations in Solids, Molecules and Atoms -- 36. Conductivity from charge or spin density waves (with P. A. Lee and T. M. Rice) -- 37. Uses of solid state analogies in Elementary Particle Theory in Proc. of Conf. on Gauge Theories and Modern Field Theory -- 38. Possible consequences of negative U centers in amorphous materials -- 39. Theory of spin glasses (with S. F. Edwards) -- 40. Solution of "Solvable model of a spin glass" (with D. J. Thouless and R. G. Palmer) -- 41. Phase slippage without vortex cores: vortex textures in superfluid [symbol]He (with G. Toulouse) -- 42. Scaling theory of localization: absence of quantum diffusion in two dimensions (with E. Abrahams, D. C. Licciardello and T. V. Ramakrishnan) -- 43. Some general thoughts about broken symmetry in Symmetries and Broken Symmetries in Condensed Matter Physics -- 44. The rheology of neutron stars: vortex line pinning in the crust superfluid (with M. A. Alpar, D. Pines and J. Shaham) -- 45. Localization redux -- 46. New method for scaling theory of localization. II: multi-channel theory of a "wire" and possible extension to higher dimensionality -- 47. Definition and measurement of the electrical and thermal resistances (with H.-L. Engquist) -- 48. Suggested model for prebiotic evolution: the use of chaos

  5. Differential recognition of Staphylococcus aureus quorum-sensing signals depends on both extracellular loops 1 and 2 of the transmembrane sensor AgrC.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Rasmus O; Winzer, Klaus; Clarke, Simon R; Chan, Weng C; Williams, Paul

    2008-08-29

    Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus is regulated via agr-dependent quorum sensing in which an autoinducing peptide (AIP) activates AgrC, a histidine protein kinase. AIPs are usually thiolactones containing seven to nine amino acid residues in which the thiol of the central cysteine is linked to the alpha-carboxyl of the C-terminal amino acid residue. The staphylococcal agr locus has diverged such that the AIPs of the four different S. aureus agr groups self-activate but cross-inhibit. Consequently, although the agr system is conserved among the staphylococci, it has undergone significant evolutionary divergence whereby to retain functionality, any changes in the AIP-encoding gene (agrD) that modifies AIP structure must be accompanied by corresponding changes in the AgrC receptor. Since AIP-1 and AIP-4 only differ by a single amino acid, we compared the transmembrane topology of AgrC1 and AgrC4 to identify amino acid residues involved in AIP recognition. As only two of the three predicted extracellular loops exhibited amino acid differences, site-specific mutagenesis was used to exchange the key AgrC1 and AgrC4 amino acid residues in each loop either singly or in combination. A novel lux-based agrP3 reporter gene fusion was constructed to evaluate the response of the mutated AgrC receptors. The data obtained revealed that while differential recognition of AIP-1 and AIP-4 depends primarily on three amino acid residues in loop 2, loop 1 is essential for receptor activation by the cognate AIP. Furthermore, a single mutation in the AgrC1 loop 2 resulted in conversion of (Ala5)AIP-1 from a potent antagonist to an activator, essentially resulting in the forced evolution of a new AIP group. Taken together, our data indicate that loop 2 constitutes the predicted hydrophobic pocket that binds the AIP thiolactone ring while the exocyclic amino acid tail interacts with loop 1 to facilitate receptor activation.

  6. Light Nitrogen in Lahrauli Ureilite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murty, S. V. S.; Bhandari, N.

    1992-07-01

    carbonaceous chondrites (which have delta^15N>=40o/oo), are the main precursor material for ureilites. Preservation of isotopically distinct N-components, will be consistant with the heterogenous accretion of the ureilite parent body, as suggested by oxygen isotopes (Clayton and Mayeda, 1988). N isotopic studies in separated phases, aimed at identifying the carriers of different N-components are in progress. References: Bhandari, N., Shah V.G., and Graham A. (1981) Meteoritics 16, 185; Clayton, R.N. and Mayeda, T.K. (1988) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 52, 1313; Goodrich, C.A., Jones, J.J., and Berkley, J.L. (1987) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 51, 2255; Grady, M.M., Wright, I.P., Swart, P.K., and Pillinger, C.T. (1985) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 49, 903; Grady, M.M. and Pillinger, C.T. (1986) Meteoritics 21, 375; Grady, M.M. and Pillinger, C.T. (1988) Nature 331, 321; Murty, S.V.S. and Goswami, J.N. (1991) 22nd Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. (Abstract) 947; Sturgeon, G. and Marti, K. (1991) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 21, 523.

  7. Unusual Multiorgan Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) Inflammation: Autoimmune Pancreatitis, Mikulicz Syndrome, and IgG4 Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Trna, Jan; Kinkor, Zdeněk; Novotný, Ivo; Lata, Jan; Kianička, Bohuslav; Hermanová, Markéta

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) type 1 is commonly associated with simultaneous involvement of extrapancreatic organs. Sclerosing cholangitis, sialadenitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis, Sjögren syndrome, and other extrapancreatic lesions are often observed concurrently with AIP. High levels of immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) in the blood serum and affected tissues are typical of this diagnostic entity. We describe a case report of a 58-year-old female with findings of AIP (according to Asian criteria), IgG4-positive mastitis, and histologically verified Mikulicz syndrome. The effect of corticoid therapy supported the diagnosis of AIP and simultaneously led to the eradication of recurrent mastitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of concurrent findings of AIP and IgG4 mastitis. Our case report supports the concept of systemic IgG4 syndrome with multisystem involvement. Timely diagnosis and appropriate therapy can be effective in a high percentage of patients. PMID:24073323

  8. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimatani, Masaaki; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-09-14

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been considered a favorable-prognosis disease; however, currently, there is limited information on natural course of AIP during long-term follow-up. Recently published studies regarding the long-term outcomes of AIP has demonstrated the developments of pancreatic stone formation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency are observed in 5%-41%, 34%-82%, and 38%-57% of patients having the disease. Furthermore, the incidence rate of developing pancreatic cancer ranges from 0% to 4.8% during the long-term follow-up. The event of death from AIP-related complications other than accompanying cancer is likely to be rare. During follow-up of AIP patients, careful surveillance for not only relapse of the disease but also development of complications at regular intervals is needed. PMID:27678359

  9. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimatani, Masaaki; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been considered a favorable-prognosis disease; however, currently, there is limited information on natural course of AIP during long-term follow-up. Recently published studies regarding the long-term outcomes of AIP has demonstrated the developments of pancreatic stone formation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency are observed in 5%-41%, 34%-82%, and 38%-57% of patients having the disease. Furthermore, the incidence rate of developing pancreatic cancer ranges from 0% to 4.8% during the long-term follow-up. The event of death from AIP-related complications other than accompanying cancer is likely to be rare. During follow-up of AIP patients, careful surveillance for not only relapse of the disease but also development of complications at regular intervals is needed. PMID:27678359

  10. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Shimatani, Masaaki; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been considered a favorable-prognosis disease; however, currently, there is limited information on natural course of AIP during long-term follow-up. Recently published studies regarding the long-term outcomes of AIP has demonstrated the developments of pancreatic stone formation, exocrine insufficiency, and endocrine insufficiency are observed in 5%-41%, 34%-82%, and 38%-57% of patients having the disease. Furthermore, the incidence rate of developing pancreatic cancer ranges from 0% to 4.8% during the long-term follow-up. The event of death from AIP-related complications other than accompanying cancer is likely to be rare. During follow-up of AIP patients, careful surveillance for not only relapse of the disease but also development of complications at regular intervals is needed.

  11. Theoretical and Experimental SHG Angular Intensity Patterns from Healthy and Proteolysed Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Rouède, Denis; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Schaub, Emmanuel; Recher, Gaëlle; Tiaho, François

    2013-01-01

    SHG angular intensity pattern (SHG-AIP) of healthy and proteolysed muscle tissues are simulated and imaged here for the first time to our knowledge. The role of the spatial distribution of second-order nonlinear emitters on SHG-AIP is highlighted. SHG-AIP with two symmetrical spots is found to be a signature of healthy muscle whereas SHG-AIP with one centered spot in pathological mdx muscle is found to be a signature of myofibrillar disorder. We also show that SHG-AIP provides information on the three-dimensional structural organization of myofibrils in physiological and proteolysed muscle. Our results open an avenue for future studies aimed at unraveling more complex physiological and pathological fibrillar tissues organization. PMID:23663839

  12. Advanced information processing system: Input/output system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masotto, Tom; Alger, Linda

    1989-01-01

    The functional requirements and detailed specifications for the Input/Output (I/O) Systems Services of the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) are discussed. The introductory section is provided to outline the overall architecture and functional requirements of the AIPS system. Section 1.1 gives a brief overview of the AIPS architecture as well as a detailed description of the AIPS fault tolerant network architecture, while section 1.2 provides an introduction to the AIPS systems software. Sections 2 and 3 describe the functional requirements and design and detailed specifications of the I/O User Interface and Communications Management modules of the I/O System Services, respectively. Section 4 illustrates the use of the I/O System Services, while Section 5 concludes with a summary of results and suggestions for future work in this area.

  13. Strategy to differentiate autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takuma, Kensuke; Kamisawa, Terumi; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Egawa, Naoto; Igarashi, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly described entity of pancreatitis in which the pathogenesis appears to involve autoimmune mechanisms. Based on histological and immunohistochemical examinations of various organs of AIP patients, AIP appears to be a pancreatic lesion reflecting a systemic “IgG4-related sclerosing disease”. Clinically, AIP patients and patients with pancreatic cancer share many features, such as preponderance of elderly males, frequent initial symptom of painless jaundice, development of new-onset diabetes mellitus, and elevated levels of serum tumor markers. It is of uppermost importance not to misdiagnose AIP as pancreatic cancer. Since there is currently no diagnostic serological marker for AIP, and approach to the pancreas for histological examination is generally difficult, AIP is diagnosed using a combination of clinical, serological, morphological, and histopathological features. Findings suggesting AIP rather than pancreatic cancer include: fluctuating obstructive jaundice; elevated serum IgG4 levels; diffuse enlargement of the pancreas; delayed enhancement of the enlarged pancreas and presence of a capsule-like rim on dynamic computed tomography; low apparent diffusion coefficient values on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance image; irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; less upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, presence of other organ involvement such as bilateral salivary gland swelling, retroperitoneal fibrosis and hilar or intrahepatic sclerosing cholangitis; negative work-up for malignancy including endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration; and steroid responsiveness. Since AIP responds dramatically to steroid therapy, accurate diagnosis of AIP can avoid unnecessary laparotomy or pancreatic resection. PMID:22416175

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan: overview and perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kanno, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Since the rediscovery and definition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) by Yoshida et al. in 1995, the disease has been attracting attention because of its unique clinical features and practical issues. This disease shows very impressive imaging findings, serological changes, and characteristic histopathology. It occurs most commonly in elderly males with painless jaundice or mild abdominal pain; resemblance in imaging findings between AIP and pancreatobiliary cancers poses an important practical issue of differentiation. With increasing recognition of AIP and accumulation of cases, another important feature of this disease has been revealed, i.e., association of extrapancreatic organ involvements. Initially misunderstood because it can be accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, such as Sjögren's syndrome or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), AIP is now known to be associated with unique types of sialadenitis and cholangitis distinct from Sjögren's syndrome or PSC. Now the concept of "IgG4-related sclerosing disease" has become widely accepted and the list of organs involved continues to increase. With worldwide recognition, an emerging issue is the clinical definition of other possible types of autoimmune-related pancreatitis called "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP)" and "AIP with granulocyte epithelial lesion (GEL)" and their relation to AIP with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The time has arrived to establish clinical diagnostic criteria of AIP based on international consensus and to discuss regional and racial differences in the clinicopathological features of AIP. Consensus guidelines are also required for the ideal use of steroids in the treatment of AIP to suppress recurrence efficiently with minimal side effects. There are many issues to be settled in AIP; international collaboration of experts in the pancreas field is necessary to clarify the entire picture of this unique and important disease. PMID:19377842

  15. Studies in Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Sassa, Shigeru; Zalar, Gregory L.; Kappas, Attallah

    1978-01-01

    A 50% reduction in the activity of uroporphyrinogen-I (URO) synthase in liver, erythrocytes, and cultured skin fibroblasts characterizes all patients with clinically active acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). The same enzyme defect has also been demonstrated in the erythrocytes and skin fibroblasts of completely latent gene carriers of this disorder and presumably exists in the liver as well. In this study, we examined whether or not the formation of URO-synthase is impaired in AIP cells using lymphocytes treated with mitogens or infected with Epstein-Barr virus. Both mitogens (phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen) and Epstein-Barr virus induced the synthesis of URO-synthase in lymphocytes, but the induction of URO-synthase in AIP lymphocytes was only 50% as compared with that in normal lymphocytes. The impaired induction of URO-synthase in AIP lymphocytes reflects a specific gene defect because AIP lymphocytes showed normal [3H] thymidine uptake into DNA, [3H] uridine uptake into RNA, and normal δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthase, ALA-dehydratase, catalase activities, and heme content. Utilizing the same methodology, the ferrochelatase deficiency of hereditary erythropoietic protoporphyria could also be identified. The Km of the induced URO-synthase in AIP cells was identical to that of the enzyme in normal cells. The induced URO-synthase of mitogen-treated AIP lymphocytes was not accompanied by a concurrent enhanced level of ALA-synthase. Moreover, the URO-synthase deficiency in lymphocytes from actively ill AIP patients was not different from the level of enzyme activity when they were in clinical remission, or when compared with the enzyme activity of cells from completely latent AIP gene carriers. The results of this study indicate that the URO-synthase deficiency in AIP may be the result of a gene mutation regulating the rate of synthesis of a normal enzyme rather than a mutation causing a structural abnormality of this enzyme protein. PMID:621286

  16. Hypermethylation of MST1 in IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuhara, Takataro; Tomiyama, Takashi; Yasuda, Kaneki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Yoshio; Son, Yonsu; Nomura, Shosaku; Uchida, Kazushige; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2015-08-07

    The serine/threonine kinase Mst1 plays important roles in the control of immune cell trafficking, proliferation, and differentiation. Previously, we reported that Mst1 was required for thymocyte selection and regulatory T-cell functions, thereby the prevention of autoimmunity in mice. In humans, MST1 null mutations cause T-cell immunodeficiency and hypergammaglobulinemia with autoantibody production. RASSF5C(RAPL) is an activator of MST1 and it is frequently methylated in some tumors. Herein, we investigated methylation of the promoter regions of MST1 and RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from patients with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Increased number of CpG methylation in the 5′ region of MST1 was detected in AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions, whereas AIP patients without extrapancreatic lesions were similar to controls. In RA patients, we detected a slight increased CpG methylation in MST1, although the overall number of methylation sites was lower than that of AIP patients with extrapancreatic lesions. There were no significant changes of the methylation levels of the CpG islands in the 5′ region of RASSF5C(RAPL) in leukocytes from AIP and RA patients. Consistently, we found a significantly down-regulated expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells of AIP patients. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of MST1 in regulatory T cells due to hypermethylation of the promoter contributes to the pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP. - Highlights: • Mst1 controls immune cells trafficking, cell proliferation and differentiation. • Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an idiopathic pancreatitis affecting multiple organs. • Decreased MST1 expression and increased CpG methylation of promoter of MST1 in AIP. • Slight increased CpG methylation of MST1 in rheumatoid arthritis patients. • MST1 contributes pathogenesis of IgG4-related AIP.

  17. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As ...

  18. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying the data. They can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). ...

  19. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As w...

  20. Re-analysis of previous laboratory phase curves: 2. Connections between opposition effect morphology and spectral features of stony meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Déau, Estelle; Spilker, Linda J.; Flandes, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We investigate connections between the opposition phase curves and the spectra from ultraviolet to near infrared wavelengths of stony meteorites. We use two datasets: the reflectance dataset of Capaccioni et al. ([1990] Icarus, 83, 325), which consists of optical phase curves (from 2° to 45°) of 17 stony meteorites (three carbonaceous chondrites, 11 ordinary chondrites, and three achondrites), and the spectral dataset from the RELAB database consisting of near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectra of the same meteorites. We re-analyzed the first dataset and fit it with two morphological models to derive the amplitude A, the angular width HWHM of the surge and the slope S of the linear part. Our re-analysis confirms that stony meteorites have a non-monotonic behavior of the surge amplitude with albedo, which is also observed in planetary surfaces (Déau et al. [2013] Icarus, 226, 1465), laboratory samples (Nelson et al. [2004] Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf., 35, p. 1089) and asteroids (Belskaya and Shevchenko [2000] Icarus, 147, 94). We find a very strong correlation between the opposition effect morphological parameters and the slope of the spectra between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm. In particular, we found that meteorites with a positive amplitude-albedo correlation have a positive spectral slope between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm, while meteorites with a negative amplitude-albedo correlation have a negative spectral slope between 0.75 μm and 0.95 μm. We have ruled out the role of the meteorite samples' macro-properties (grain size, porosity and macroscopic roughness) in the correlations found because these properties were constant during the preparation of the samples. If this hypothesis is correct, this implies that other properties like the composition or the micro-properties (grain inclusions, grain shape or microscopic roughness) could have a preponderant role in the non-monotonic behavior of the surge morphology with albedo at small and moderate phase angles. Further

  1. Beach protection by a system of permeable groins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boczar-Karakiewicz, B.; Romanczyk, W.; Roy, N.

    2002-12-01

    available, and the cost is low (waste material of the local forest industry); (5) the construction is simple and can be carried out by low-skilled labor force. Boczar-Karakiewicz, B., W. Romanczyk, N. Roy, N. Pelletier, L. Maltec and J.-P. Savard. 2001. New method of beach protection adapted to coastal zones of the estuary of the Saint Lawrence river, Quebec, Canada. Proc. Can. Coast. Conf., Quebec, QC, Canada: 201-214 (in French).

  2. Comparing the topographic long profiles of gullies on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Susan; Balme, Matthew; Murray, John; Towner, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Liquid water is not stable under the present atmospheric conditions on the martian surface. Hence, the discovery of widespread recently active kilometre-scale gullies that resemble those carved by water on Earth [1,2], was extremely surprising. Some authors suggest that either carbon dioxide driven processes or dry mass wasting could explain these features [3-6]. However, recent work has shown that some aspects of gully-morphology, such as braiding and streamlined features, are hard to explain with these mechanisms [e.g., 7,8]. In this study we have used topographic long profiles to investigate the formation mechanism of martian gullies. On Earth it is recognised that certain forms of long-profiles can be linked to a particular process, for example, at equilibrium fluvial systems have a profile curve of exponential decay [9]. However, these shapes have not been generalised for kilometre-scale landforms, such as gullies. We used differential GPS data and airborne laser altimeter data on Earth (LiDAR) from NSA-funded NCALM and UK's NERC ARSF to generate profile-data for gullies with a fluvial and debris flow origin. On Mars we used stereo-images from the HiRISE camera (25 cm/pix) and generated the gully-profiles using the manual point-matching method of Kreslavsky [10]. We found that the shape of gully long profiles on Mars is similar to that of both fluvial and debris flow gullies on Earth. However, more of the martian gullies we have studied are similar to fluvial gullies than to debris flow gullies. The slopes of the gully long profiles on Mars tend to be shallower than fluvial gullies on Earth, but this can be accounted for by the difference in gravity between Earth and Mars. References cited: [1] M.C. Malin and K.S. Edgett, Science, (2000), 288,2330-2335.[2] M.C. Malin et al., Science, (2006), 314,1573-1577. [3] T. Shinbrot et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U A, (2004), 101,8542-8546. [4] S. Diniega et al., Icarus, (2013), 225,526-537. [5] T. Ishii and S. Sasaki, Lunar

  3. D'une olivine naturelle à un catalyseur industriel au nickel pour la production d'hydrogène à partir de biomasse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świerczyński, D.; Courson, C.; Guille, J.; Kiennemann, A.

    2004-11-01

    L'olivine naturelle ((Mg,Fe){2}SiO{4}) présente un double intérêt comme catalyseur de gazéification de la biomasse en lit fluidisé circulant : son activité catalytique supérieure à la silice et sa grande dureté lui conférant une résistance à l'attrition. L'addition de nickel à l'olivine naturelle permet d'obtenir un catalyseur de reformage du méthane et des goudrons répondant aux exigences liées au procédé, à savoir une utilisation en lit fluidisé circulant alternativement en phase réductrice et oxydante et une association forte nickel-olivine. Le rôle des différentes phases présentes dans l'olivine est mis en évidence par DRX, TPR, MEB et spectroscopie Mössbauer. Cette étude permet d'identifier les interactions nickel-support du catalyseur créées à différentes températures de calcination et d'expliquer les mécanismes de formation du catalyseur actif. Un rejet de fer sous forme d'oxyde est observé. Il peut être expliqué soit par à un échange avec le nickel, sans modification de la structure olivine initiale, conduisant à la formulation ((Mg,Ni){2}SiO{4}), soit par la précipitation d'une phase MgO avec formation d'une solution solide NiO-MgO. La deuxième hypothèse est privilégiée car la présence de cette phase est cohérente avec l'existence d'interactions fortes nickel-olivine et avec les rapports Ni/Mg {=} 1 à la surface des grains sur l'échantillon Ni/olivine calciné à 1100circC. Elle explique la grande activité catalytique de cet échantillon en reformage du méthane.

  4. Comparison of a beach parametric morphodynamic model results with in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Caroline; Silva, Paulo A.; Baptista, Paulo; Abreu, Tiago

    2014-05-01

    unsaturated surf zones, Coastal Engineering, Vol. 34, 173-196. Baptista P, Cunha TR, Matias A, Gama C, Bernardes C, Ferreira O., 2011a. New land-based method for surveying sandy shores and extracting DEMs: the INSHORE system, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 182, 243-257. Baptista PRB, Bernardes C, Cunha TR, 2011b. The validation analysis of the INSHORE system-a precise and efficient coastal survey system, Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 179, 589-604. Battjes, JA, Janssen, JPFM, 1978. Energy Loss and Set-up due to Breaking of Random Waves Proc. 16th Int. Conf. Coastal Engineering, ASCE, Hamburg, Vol. 1, 569-587.

  5. The Importance of In Situ Measurements and Sample Return in the Search for Chemical Biosignatures on Mars or other Solar System Bodies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Conrad, P. G.; Dworkin, J. P.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Getty, S.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    ) In The Chemistry of Life's Origin, pp. 209-258. [2] Summons et al. (2008) Space Sci. Rev. 135, 133. [3] Mahaffy, P. R. et al. (2012) Space Sci. Rev. 170, 401. [4] Getty, S. A. et al. (2013) IEEE Aerospace Conf. Proc. 10.1109/AERO.2013.6497391.

  6. Compressive Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles within Coronal Mass Ejections: Observations and Theory Relevant to the Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of solar energetic particles (SEPs) over Solar Cycles 22-24 included the measurement of their pitch-angle distributions (PADs). When only magnetically "well-connected" SEP events were selected, i.e., with the spacecraft on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines whose coronal foot-points were within about 30 deg of the associated flare site, the PADs were usually "beam-like" during the rise-to-maximum phase (RTM) of the events. This nearly "scatter-free" propagation (due to magnetic focusing of the IMF) revealed that the injection times of the SEPs were delayed up to 10s of minutes after the onset of electromagnetic emissions from the flare. Direct comparison with the flare-associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from the western hemisphere indicated that the SEP acceleration/injection was occurring at least 1 Rs into the corona (and often continuing well above that radial distance). Moreover, the RTM profiles exhibited a continuum of shapes, from "spikes" to "pulses" to "ramps", and these shape characterizations ordered the properties of the associated CMEs. Most importantly, when compared at nearly the same near-relativistic velocities, electrons and protons exhibited similar PADs and RTM profiles. Clearly, such orderly patterns in the data call for a single dominant acceleration process that treats all particles of similar velocities the same, regardless of mass and charge. A simple theory that meets all of these requirements, based on nearly scatter-free propagation and energy change within particle "reservoirs" (such as the closed magnetic structure of a CME), has recently been proposed [Roelof, Proc. 14th Ann. Int'l. Astrophys. Conf., IOP, in press, 2015]. The acceleration results from compression (-divV) of the driver plasma, well sunward of the CME shock. Acceleration (e-folding) times of only a few minutes can be obtained from representative parameters of 1000 km/s CMEs. A companion paper [Roelof and Vourlidas, op. cit.], proposed a new

  7. Infrared spectra of interstellar deuteronated PAHs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buragohain, Mridusmita; Pathak, Amit; Sarre, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have emerged as a potential constituent of the ISM that emit strong features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.2 and 12.7 μm with weaker and blended features in the 3-20μm region. These features are proposed to arise from the vibrational relaxation of PAH molecules on absorption of background UV photons (Tielens 2008). These IR features have been observed towards almost all types of astronomical objects; say H II regions, photodissociation regions, reflection nebulae, planetary nebulae, young star forming regions, external galaxies, etc. A recent observation has proposed that interstellar PAHs are major reservoir for interstellar deuterium (D) (Peeters et al. 2004). According to the `deuterium depletion model' as suggested by Draine (2006), some of the Ds formed in the big bang are depleted in PAHs, which can account for the present value of D/H in the ISM. Hence, study of deuterated PAHs (PADs) is essential in order to measure D/H in the ISM.In this work, we consider another probable category of the large PAH family, i.e. Deuteronated PAHs (DPAH+). Onaka et al. have proposed a D/H ratio which is an order of magnitude smaller than the proposed value of D/H by Draine suggesting that if Ds are depleted in PAHs, they might be accommodated in large PAHs (Onaka et al. 2014). This work reports a `Density Functional Theory' calculation of large deuteronated PAHs (coronene, ovalene, circumcoronene and circumcircumcoronene) to determine the expected region of emission features and to find a D/H ratio that is comparable to the observational results. We present a detailed analysis of the IR spectra of these molecules and discuss the possible astrophysical implications.ReferencesDraine B. T. 2006, in ASP Conf. Ser. 348, Proc. Astrophysics in the Far Ultraviolet: Five Years of Discovery with FUSE, ed. G. Sonneborn, H. Moos, B-G Andersson (San Francisco, CA:ASP) 58Onaka T., Mori T. I., Sakon I., Ohsawa R., Kaneda H., Okada Y., Tanaka M

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of tungsten redeposition at the divertor target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chankin, A. V.; Coster, D. P.; Dux, R.

    2014-02-01

    Recent modeling of controlled edge-localized modes (ELMs) in ITER with tungsten (W) divertor target plates by the SOLPS code package predicted high electron temperatures (>100 eV) and densities (>1 × 1021 m-3) at the outer target. Under certain scenarios W sputtered during ELMs can penetrate into the core in quantities large enough to cause deterioration of the discharge performance, as was shown by coupled SOLPS5.0/STRAHL/ASTRA runs. The net sputtering yield, however, was expected to be dramatically reduced by the ‘prompt redeposition’ during the first Larmor gyration of W1+ (Fussman et al 1995 Proc. 15th Int. Conf. on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (Vienna: IAEA) vol 2, p 143). Under high ne/Te conditions at the target during ITER ELMs, prompt redeposition would reduce W sputtering by factor p-2 ˜ 104 (with p ≡ τionωgyro ˜ 0.01). However, this relation does not include the effects of multiple ionizations of sputtered W atoms and the electric field in the magnetic pre-sheath (MPS, or ‘Chodura sheath’) and Debye sheath (DS). Monte Carlo simulations of W redeposition with the inclusion of these effects are described in the paper. It is shown that for p ≪ 1, the inclusion of multiple W ionizations and the electric field in the MPS and DS changes the physics of W redeposition from geometrical effects of circular gyro-orbits hitting the target surface, to mainly energy considerations; the key effect is the electric potential barrier for ions trying to escape into the main plasma. The overwhelming majority of ions are drawn back to the target by a strong attracting electric field. It is also shown that the possibility of a W self-sputtering avalanche by ions circulating in the MPS can be ruled out due to the smallness of the sputtered W neutral energies, which means that they do not penetrate very far into the MPS before ionizing; thus the W ions do not gain a large kinetic energy as they are accelerated back to the surface by the

  9. Has Martian History Been Dominated by Explosive Rather than Effusive Volcanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandfield, J. L.; Edwards, C. S.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    appears that Mars has a unique style of crustal formation that is distinct from that of the Moon and the other terrestrial planets. References: McEwen, A. S., and 14 colleagues (2007) Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). J. Geophys. Res., 112, 10.1029/2005JE002605. Pike, R.J. (1980) Control of crater morphology by gravity and target type - Mars, earth, moon. Proc. Lun. Planet. Sci. Conf., 11, 2159-2189. Schultz, R. A. (2002) Stability of rock slopes in Valles Marineris, Mars. Geophys. Res. Let., 29, 10.1029/2002GL015728. Stewart, S. T. and G. J. Valiant (2006) Martian subsurface properties and crater formation processes inferred from fresh impact crater geometries. Meteor. Planet. Sci., 41, 1509-1537.

  10. Quantifying Slope Effects and Variations in Crater Density across a Single Geologic Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Heather; Mahanti, Prasun; Robinson, Mark; Povilaitis, Reinhold

    2016-10-01

    Steep underlying slopes (>~5°) significantly increase the rate of degradation of craters [1-3]. As a result, the density of craters is less on steeper slopes for terrains of the same age [2, 4]. Thus, when age-dating a planetary surface, an area encompassing one geologic unit of constant low slope is chosen. However, many key geologic units, such as ejecta blankets, lack sufficient area of constant slope to derive robust age estimates. Therefore, accurate age-dating of such units requires an accurate understanding of the effects of slope on age estimates. This work seeks to determine if the observed trend of decreasing crater density with increasing slopes [2] holds for craters >1 km and to quantify the effect of slope for craters of this size, focusing on the effect of slopes over the kilometer scale. Our study focuses on the continuous ejecta of Orientale basin, where we measure craters >1 km excluding secondaries that occur as chains or clusters. Age-dating via crater density measurements relies on uniform cratering across a single geologic unit. In the case of ejecta blankets and other impact related surfaces, this assumption may not hold due to the formation of auto- secondary craters. As such, we use LRO WAC mosaics [5], crater size-frequency distributions, absolute age estimates, a 3 km slope map derived from the WAC GLD100 [6], and density maps for various crater size ranges to look for evidence of non-uniform cratering across the continuous ejecta of Orientale and to determine the effect of slope on crater density. Preliminary results suggest that crater density does decrease with increasing slope for craters >1 km in diameter though at a slower rate than for smaller craters.References: [1] Trask N. J. and Rowan L. C. (1967) Science 158, 1529–1535. [2] Basilevsky (1976) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 7th, p. 1005-1020. [3] Pohn and Offield (1970) USGS Prof. Pap., 153-162. [4] Xiao et al. (2013) Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 376, pgs. 1-11. doi:10.1016/j

  11. Earth and Moon Observations by Thermal Infrared Imager TIR on Hayabusa2 and Applications to Asteroid 162173 Ryugu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tatsuaki

    2016-04-01

    The Earth and the Moon were imaged by the thermal infrared imager TIR on Hayabusa2 during the Earth swing-by operation to change the trajectory of the spacecraft with a gravity assist of the Earth's mass. Hayabusa2 is the second sample-return from a near-Earth asteroid organized by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and will visit and explore C-type small asteroid 162173 Ryugu, collect samples from the surface of the asteroid, and return them to the Earth [1-3]. TIR is a thermal infrared imager based on uncooled micro-bolometer array. It covers the temperature range from 150 to 460 K, and resolves the surface by 16° x 12° with 328 x 248 pixels with 0.05° per pixel [4, 5]. After the launch on 3 December 2014, TIR has been proven to work well by function tests, and its operation temperature has been adjusted by using the in-flight deep sky images. On 14 October 2015, TIR has detected the Earth and the Moon simultaneously from the distance of 2 x 107 km, and the alignment of -Z axis between TIR and the spacecraft attitude control system was checked. Afterwards, the Earth-Moon system were imaged many times and we could determine the alignment more precisely. Just after the Earth swing-by, TIR observed the Earth on 4 December 2015 and the Moon on the next day. We compared those thermal images with the calculated temperatures on the Earth and the Moon. It was a good opportunity to check the performance of thermal radiometry of this instrument, because there is no known calibration target before arrival at Ryugu. We found the temperature pattern on the Earth and the Moon are almost equal to the theoretical estimates [6]. The point spread feature shows that a point is imaged as a point, just the same as taken during the pre-flight tests. More detailed results will be presented. References: [1] Tsuda Y. et al. (2013) Acta. Astronautica, 91, 356-362. [2] Tachibana S. et al. (2014) Geochemical Journal, 48, 571-587. [3] Okada T. (2014) Proc. Intl. CJMT-1 workshop on

  12. Magnetic Properties of Lunar Samples: an Exhaustive Survey of the Apollo Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattacceca, J.; Andrade Lima, E.; Rochette, P.; Weiss, B. P.; Uehara, M.; Quesnel, Y.; Baratchart, L.; Leblond, J.; Chevillard, S.

    2014-12-01

    é 1970. Proc. Apollo 11 Lunar Sci. Conf. 3:2093-96 [9] Rochette et al. 2010. EPSL 292:383-391.

  13. Pulsars at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P.

    1994-04-01

    The atmospheric Cerenkov technique is used to search for emission at energies above several hundred GeV from a variety of objects, including pulsars (see, e.g., reviews by Weekes, 1988, Phys. Rep., 160, 1; Weekes, 1992, Sp. Sci. Rev., 59, 315). Claims for TeV emission (from any source) should be of high significance, show gamma-ray-like properties, and be independently confirmed. By these criteria the Crab nebula is currently the only established pulsar-driven system to be observed at TeV energies (Weekes et al., 1989, Astrophys. J., 342, 379; Vacanti et al., 1991, Astrophys. J., 377, 467; Goret et al., 1993, Astron. Astrophys., 270, 401). The gamma-ray signal is not pulsed at TeV energies, leading to models of synchrotron self-Compton emission from the Crab nebula (e.g., De Jager and Harding, 1992, Astrophys. J., 396, 161), although other models have also been proposed (Kwok et al., 1991, Astrophys. J., 379, 653). While claims exist for TeV emission from, amongst others, the Vela pulsar (e.g., Bhat et al., 1987, Astron. Astrophys., 178, 242, Geminga (Vishwanath et al., 1993, Astron. Astrophys., 267, L5; Bowden et al., 1993, J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys., 19, L29), and PSR 1509-58 (Nel et al., 1992, Astrophys. Proc. 23rd Int. Cosmic Ray Conf., 1, 392), is of great interest but has yet to be confirmed. Several recently discovered millisecond pulsars have high values of E-dot/d2 (due to their proximity) and are thus potentially observable TeV sources. *The detection of TeV gamma-rays from millisecond pulsars has been considered recently by Smith (1993, Astrophys. -J., 408, 468).

  14. Assessment the Synoptic Variability of Vertical Thermal Structure in Baltic Sea Waters on the Base of in-situ Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, A.; Klevantsov, J.; Rozhkov, V.

    2004-12-01

    layer is not significant. References 1. Terziev, F.S., Rozhkov, V.A., Smirnova, A.I.// Hydrometeorology and Hydro-chemistry of USSR seas, Vol. III. The Baltic Sea, Issue 2. Hydro-chemical Conditions and Oceanographic Basis for Biological Productivity, pp. 149-197, 1994 2. Davidan, I.N., Gusev, A.K., Savchuk, O.P., Chernyshova, E.S., Shadrin, P.S.// Representativity of seasonal surveys in the Baltic sea/ Proc. of III BASYS Annual Science Conf., Warnemünde, Germany, 20 - 22.09.1999. Paper SP 8 - 7, p. 83

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a systemic immune complex mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Vikram; Chicano, Sonia; Chiocca, Sonia; Finkelberg, Dmitry; Selig, Martin K; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Brugge, William R; Colvin, Robert B; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2006-12-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a mass forming inflammatory pancreatobiliary-centric disease. Recent reports of multiorgan inflammatory mass forming lesions with increased numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells suggest that AIP may have a systemic component. In this study, we explore the systemic nature of AIP, investigate the relevance of subtyping AIP, perform a systematic study of tissue IgG4 immunoperoxidase, and ultrastructurally evaluate the presence of immune complexes. Our study group consisted of 36 patients with AIP, 21 of whom underwent a Whipple procedure. On the basis of the pattern of inflammation, pancreatic involvement was subtyped as ductocentric (AIP-D) or lobulocentric (AIP-L). Extrapancreatic lesions included bile duct (n=3), salivary glands (n=3), lung (n=2), gallbladder (n=11), and kidney (n=4). Clinical and radiologic data was recorded. Immunohistochemistry for IgG4 was performed on both pancreatic and extrapancreatic tissues and the numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells were semiquantitatively scored. A control cohort composed of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n=19) and chronic pancreatitis-not otherwise specified (NOS) (n=14) was also evaluated. Eleven pancreatic specimens, including 2 cases of chronic pancreatitis-NOS and 4 kidneys were evaluated ultrastructurally. The pancreas, bile duct, gall bladder, salivary gland, kidney, and lung lesions were characterized by dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates with reactive fibroblasts and venulitis. IgG4 positive plasma cells were identified in all pancreatic and extrapancreatic lesions. The AIP cases showed significantly more pancreatic IgG4 positive plasma cells than chronic pancreatitis-NOS or adenocarcinoma (P=0.001). However, IgG4 positive cells were identified in 57.1% of chronic pancreatitis-NOS and 47.4% of ductal adenocarcinoma. Fifteen of 21 resected cases were classified as AIP-D, and 6 as AIP-L, the latter notably showing significantly more IgG4 positive plasma cells than the former (P=0

  16. Pavlovian conditioning in the rabbit during inactivation of the interpositus nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, J P; Harvey, J A

    1991-01-01

    1. We have examined the role of the anterior interpositus nucleus (AIP) of the cerebellum in Pavlovian conditioning of the nictitating membrane response (NMR) of the rabbit with the use of reversible brain lesions produced by the local anaesthetic lidocaine. Previous experiments have demonstrated that destructive lesions of the AIP prevent the performance of conditioned NMRs (CRs). Microinjections of lidocaine into the AIP were used in the present experiment to determine whether the deficit in the performance of CRs resulted from a deficit in learning or memory. 2. A 3-phase procedure was employed to determine whether associative learning required the function of the AIP. In phase 1, rabbits were trained to make CRs to a flashing-light conditioned stimulus (CS) that was paired with an air-puff unconditioned stimulus (UCS) directed at the cornea. In phase 2, the AIP was anaesthetized during a session of conditioning in which a tone CS was paired with the UCS. Presentations of the light CS were interpolated throughout the tone conditioning in order to monitor the degree to which CRs were impaired by lidocaine. Phase 3 occurred after the effects of the lidocaine had dissipated and consisted of a test of retention to determine whether learning occurred during phase 2 but could not be expressed because of a performance deficit resulting from the inactivation of the AIP. 3. Infusion of lidocaine into the AIP abolished CRs to the light CS and prevented the performance of CRs to the tone CS in phase 2. The effect of the infusion was specifically due to a conduction block of neurons and/or fibres in the lateral aspect of the AIP. The infusion of lidocaine into regions surrounding the AIP did not affect CRs elicited by the light CS or prevent acquisition of CRs to the tone. Infusions of saline directly into the AIP did not impair the performance of CRs to either the tone or light CS. Quantitative analysis of diffusion revealed that the abolition of CRs was accompanied by

  17. Potential for in situ carbonation of peridotite for geological CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Matter, J.; Streit, L.; Rudge, J.; Spiegelman, M.

    2008-12-01

    , then armoring of unreacted peridotite minerals with carbonate reaction products will lead to decreasing rates. In Oman, there is a marked difference between (a) mildly carbonated peridotite, in which partially serpentinized, olivine-rich rocks host carbonate veins, and reaction products lack talc and quartz, and (b) rarer, completely carbonated peridotite composed of carbonate + talc and/or quartz with no remaining olivine. This suggests that the natural system has accessed both self-limiting and self-catalyzing conditions over time [2]. It is vital to use observations and models to predict conditions that cause reaction driven cracking and exothermic heating, and test predictions in field studies. We are just beginning this work. [1] Kelemen & Matter, Proc Nat Acad Sci 2008, in press [2] Kelemen, Matter & Streit, Proc Conf Accelerated Carbonation for Environmental & Materials Eng., 2008, in press

  18. Study of Gas and Plasma Conditions in the High Isp VASIMR Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishchev, O.; Molvig, K.

    2002-01-01

    Internal electrode-free VASIMR thruster [1-3] consists of three major sections: plasma production, plasma heating, and plasma exhaust. In our previous works [6-10] we have performed an extensive study of plasma dynamics in the plasma source. We have developed several models of helicon plasma discharge utilizing hydrogen (deuterium) gas, and analyzed its performance in the experimental set-up [4-5]. In the present work we are trying to expand and apply existing models to the helium gas propellant case. Though the specific impulse is somewhat lower with heavier helium atoms, but unlike hydrogenic species helium doesn't form molecules, and therefore shows less radiative losses. We extend 0-D plasma-chemistry, 1-D mixed-collisional and kinetic gas flow models [11] to characterize gas/plasma composition and condition in the helium helicon discharge. Recent experiments suggest that there is a strong dependence of both VASIMR 1st and 2nd stage performance on the magnetic field mirror ratio in the VX-10 experimental configuration. We study effects of the plasma particles trapping in a strong magnetic field and their acceleration by the combination of the mirror force and ambipolar potential for the typical VASIMR experiment conditions. We also discuss possibility for plasma instabilities and comment on the micro-scale plasma transport in the VASIMR thruster. [1] Chang Díaz F.R., "Research Status of The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket", Proc. 39th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics (Pittsburgh, PA, 1997), Bulletin of APS, 42 (1997) 2057. [2] Chang Díaz, F. R., Squire, J. P., Carter, M., et al., `'Recent Progress on the VASIMR'', Proc. 41th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics (Seattle, WA, 1999), Bulletin of APS, 44 (1999) 99. [3] Chang Díaz, F. R., Squire, J. P., Ilin, A. V., et al. "The Development of the VASIMR Engine", Proceedings of International Conference on Electromagnetics in Advanced Applications (ICEAA99), Sept. 13

  19. Parentless Fission and Radiogenic Xe in Lunar Breccia 14301 Studied by Closed-System Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieler, R.; Baur, H.; Signer, P.

    1993-07-01

    radiogenic 129Xe, including those that are devoid of fission Xe. This corroborates that at least part of the 129Xe(sub)rad is sited in places more resistant to etching than the fission Xe [2]. The noble gas data reveal the existence of several phases of different etchability, as expected for a bulk sample. It is conceivable that the 129Xe(sub)rad resides more deeply in the grains than the fission Xe or that the more acid resistant phases (e.g., mineral grains?) may contain 129Xe(sub)rad but no fission Xe. CSSE analyses of mineral separates may help to decide between the alternatives. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation. References: [1] Drozd R. et al. (1972) EPSL, 15, 338-346. [2] Bernatowicz T. J. et al. (1979) Proc. LPSC 10th, 1587-1616. [3] Hohenberg C. M. et al. (1980) Proc. Conf. Lunar Highlands Crust, 419-439. [4] Wieler R. et al. GCA, 50, 1997-2017. [5] Wieler R. et al. (1992) LPSC XXIII, 1525-1526.

  20. Scheduling lessons learned from the Autonomous Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringer, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) project at NASA LeRC is designed to demonstrate the applications of integrated intelligent diagnosis, control, and scheduling techniques to space power distribution systems. The project consists of three elements: the Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) for Fault Diagnosis, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR); the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler (AIPS) to efficiently assign activities start times and resources; and power hardware (Brassboard) to emulate a space-based power system. The AIPS scheduler was tested within the APS system. This scheduler is able to efficiently assign available power to the requesting activities and share this information with other software agents within the APS system in order to implement the generated schedule. The AIPS scheduler is also able to cooperatively recover from fault situations by rescheduling the affected loads on the Brassboard in conjunction with the APEX FDIR system. AIPS served as a learning tool and an initial scheduling testbed for the integration of FDIR and automated scheduling systems. Many lessons were learned from the AIPS scheduler and are now being integrated into a new scheduler called SCRAP (Scheduler for Continuous Resource Allocation and Planning). This paper will service three purposes: an overview of the AIPS implementation, lessons learned from the AIPS scheduler, and a brief section on how these lessons are being applied to the new SCRAP scheduler.

  1. Hybrid kappa\\lambda antibody is a new serological marker to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis and differentiate it from pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Mingju; Li, Wenli; Yi, Lang; Yu, Songlin; Fan, Gaowei; Lu, Tian; Yang, Xin; Wang, Guojing; Zhang, Dong; Ding, Jiansheng; Zhang, Kuo; Zhang, Rui; Lin, Guigao; Han, Yanxi; Wang, Lunan; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    The only generally accepted serological marker currently used for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is IgG4. Our aim was mainly to determine whether hybrid κ\\λ antibody can help to diagnose AIP and to differentiate it from pancreatic cancer. We established an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system to measure the levels of hybrid κ\\λ antibodies in human sera. Sera were obtained from 338 patients, including 61 with AIP, 74 with pancreatic cancer, 50 with acute pancreatitis, 40 with ordinary chronic pancreatitis, 15 with miscellaneous pancreatic diseases, and 98 with normal pancreas. Our study showed levels of hybrid κ\\λ antibodies in the AIP group were significantly higher than in the non-AIP group (P < 0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the diagnosis of AIP were 80.3%, 91%, 66.2% and 95.5% respectively. Furthermore, the combined measurement of serum hybrid κ\\λ antibody and IgG4 tended to increase the sensitivity although the difference was not statistically significant (90.2% vs. 78.7%, P = 0.08), compared to measurement of IgG4 alone. Our findings suggest that hybrid κ\\λ antibody could be a new serological marker to diagnose AIP and differentiate it from pancreatic cancer. PMID:27271825

  2. Diagnostic criteria for autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a particular type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Currently, AIP should be diagnosed based on combination of clinical, serological, morphological, and histopathological features. When diagnosing AIP, it is most important to differentiate it from pancreatic cancer. Diagnostic criteria for AIP, proposed by the Japan Pancreas Society in 2002 first in the world, were revised in 2006. The criteria are based on the minimum consensus of AIP and aim to avoid misdiagnosing pancreatic cancer as far as possible, but not for screening AIP. The criteria consist of the following radiological, serological, and histopathological items: (1) radiological imaging showing narrowing of the main pancreatic duct and enlargement of the pancreas, which are characteristic of the disease; (2) laboratory data showing abnormally elevated levels of serum γ-globulin, IgG or IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies; (3) histopathological examination of the pancreas demonstrating marked fibrosis and prominent infiltration of lymphocytes and plasma cells, which is called lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). For a diagnosis of AIP, criterion 1 must be present, together with criterion 2 and/or criterion 3. However, it is necessary to exclude malignant diseases such as pancreatic or biliary cancer. PMID:18763279

  3. Atherogenic Index of Plasma Predicts Hyperuricemia in Rural Population: A Cross-Sectional Study from Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ye; Li, Yuan; Guo, Xiaofan; Guo, Liang; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the association of atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) with hyperuricemia (HUA) in the rural population of northeast China. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the rural areas of northeast China from January 2012 to August 2013, and the final analysis included data obtained form 5253 men and 6092 women. 1104 participants (9.7%) suffered from HUA. Spearman rank test showed that AIP was positively correlated with uric acid in both sexes (r = 0.310 for men and r = 0.347 for women, both p < 0.001). AIP was classified into three groups: the low (<0.11), the intermediate (0.11–0.21) and the increased (>0.21) risk. The prevalence of HUA increased with AIP. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, compared to the low AIP group, participants in increased AIP group had a 2.536-fold risk for HUA (2.164-fold in male and 2.960-fold in female) after adjustment for covariates. Results of receiver operating characteristic curves showed that the area under the curve (95% confidence intervals) was 0.686 (0.665–0.707) for male and 0.730 (0.706–0.755) for female. We indicated that increased AIP was associated with higher serum uric acid levels and could be identified as an independent risk factor of HUA in the rural population of northeast China. PMID:27598187

  4. Atherogenic Index of Plasma Predicts Hyperuricemia in Rural Population: A Cross-Sectional Study from Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ye; Li, Yuan; Guo, Xiaofan; Guo, Liang; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the association of atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) with hyperuricemia (HUA) in the rural population of northeast China. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the rural areas of northeast China from January 2012 to August 2013, and the final analysis included data obtained form 5253 men and 6092 women. 1104 participants (9.7%) suffered from HUA. Spearman rank test showed that AIP was positively correlated with uric acid in both sexes (r = 0.310 for men and r = 0.347 for women, both p < 0.001). AIP was classified into three groups: the low (<0.11), the intermediate (0.11-0.21) and the increased (>0.21) risk. The prevalence of HUA increased with AIP. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, compared to the low AIP group, participants in increased AIP group had a 2.536-fold risk for HUA (2.164-fold in male and 2.960-fold in female) after adjustment for covariates. Results of receiver operating characteristic curves showed that the area under the curve (95% confidence intervals) was 0.686 (0.665-0.707) for male and 0.730 (0.706-0.755) for female. We indicated that increased AIP was associated with higher serum uric acid levels and could be identified as an independent risk factor of HUA in the rural population of northeast China. PMID:27598187

  5. Association of metabolic and genetic factors with cholesterol esterification rate in HDL plasma and atherogenic index of plasma in a 40 years old Slovak population.

    PubMed

    Rašlová, K; Dobiášová, M; Hubáček, J A; Bencová, D; Siváková, D; Danková, Z; Franeková, J; Jabor, A; Gašparovič, J; Vohnout, B

    2011-01-01

    We assessed association between novel biomarkers of cardiovascular disease and conventional factors in 40 years old subjects (208 men and 266 women) from the general population of Slovakia. FER(HDL) (cholesterol esterification rate in HDL plasma), AIP--Atherogenic Index of Plasma [Log(TG/HDL-C)] as markers of lipoprotein particle size, and CILP2, FTO and MLXIPL polymorphisms, were examined in relation to biomarkers and conventional risk factors. Univariate analyses confirmed correlation between AIP, FER(HDL) and the most of measured parameters. Relations between AIP and CILP2, FTO and MLXIPL were not significant. However, CILP2 was significantly related to FER(HDL) in both genders. In multivariate analysis BMI was the strongest correlate of AIP levels. In multivariate model variability of FER(HDL) was best explained by AIP (R(2) = 0.55) in both genders with still significant effect of CILP2 SNP in men. In a model where AIP was omitted, TG levels explained 43 % of the FER(HDL) variability in men, while in women HDL-C was the major determinant (42 %). In conclusions, FER(HDL) and AIP related to the known markers of cardiovascular risk provide means to express their subtle interactions by one number. Our novel finding of association between CILP2 polymorphism and FER(HDL) supports its role in lipid metabolism.

  6. Alterations in theophylline protein binding in acutely ill patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Zarowitz, B; Shlom, J; Eichenhorn, M S; Popovich, J

    1985-06-01

    We investigated the role of decreased theophylline protein binding as a possible explanation for observed decreases in total theophylline concentrations (TC) in acutely-ill patients (AIP). Multiple blood samples were obtained from nine AIP with underlying chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and from 13 stable COPD patients. The mean albumin concentration +/- SD was 2.7 +/- .61 mg/dl in the AIP vs 4.0 +/- 0.52 mg/dl in the stable COPD patients (p less than 0.005). Total (TC) and unbound theophylline concentrations (UTC) were determined. Theophylline protein binding was assessed at room temperature by centrifugal ultrafiltration of the patients' sera. The TC was 13.7 +/- 4.8 micrograms/ml in the stable COPD patients vs 11.8 +/- 4.1 micrograms/ml in the AIP although the mean dose was larger (17.21 +/- 5.41 vs 10.7 +/- 4.09 mg/kg/day of theophylline) in the AIP (p less than 0.005). There was no difference in UTC between the two groups (7.4 +/- 2.5 micrograms/ml and 8.1 +/- 2.6 micrograms/ml); however, the unbound fraction was higher in the AIP (p less than 0.005). We conclude that theophylline protein binding appears altered in AIP and that the altered binding relates predominantly to the severity of the clinical illness.

  7. Hyperplasia-adenoma sequence in pituitary tumorigenesis related to aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Villa, Chiara; Lagonigro, Maria Stefania; Magri, Flavia; Koziak, Maria; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Brauner, Raja; Bouligand, Jerome; Junier, Marie Pierre; Di Rocco, Federico; Sainte-Rose, Christian; Beckers, Albert; Roux, François Xavier; Daly, Adrian F; Chiovato, Luca

    2011-06-01

    Mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene are associated with pituitary adenomas that usually occur as familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA). Detailed pathological and tumor genetic data on AIP mutation-related pituitary adenomas are not sufficient. Non-identical twin females presented as adolescents to the emergency department with severe progressive headache caused by large pituitary macroadenomas require emergency neurosurgery; one patient had incipient pituitary apoplexy. Post-surgically, the patients were found to have silent somatotrope adenomas on pathological examination. Furthermore, the light microscopic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic studies demonstrated tumors of virtually identical characteristics. The adenomas were accompanied by multiple areas of pituitary hyperplasia, which stained positively for GH, indicating somatotrope hyperplasia. Genetic analyses of the FIPA kindred revealed a novel E216X mutation of the AIP gene, which was present in both the affected patients and the unaffected father. Molecular analysis of surgical specimens revealed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the adenoma but showed that LOH was not present in the hyperplastic pituitary tissue from either patient. AIP immunostaining confirmed normal staining in the hyperplastic tissue and decreased staining in the adenoma in the tumors from both patients. These results demonstrate that patients with AIP germline mutation can present with silent somatotrope pituitary adenomas. The finding of somatotrope hyperplasia unaccompanied by AIP LOH suggests that LOH at the AIP locus might be a late event in a potential progression from hyperplastic to adenomatous tissue. PMID:21450940

  8. Review of the diagnosis, classification and management of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Derek A; Malde, Deep J; Duncan, Trish; Rao, Madhu; Filobbos, Rafik

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis, with as yet undetermined incidence and prevalence in the general population. Our understanding of it continues to evolve. In the last few years, 2 separate subtypes have been identified: type 1 AIP has been recognised as the pancreatic manifestation of a multiorgan disease, named immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease while type 2 AIP is a pancreas specific disorder not associated with IgG4. International criteria for the diagnosis of AIP have been defined: the HISORt criteria from the Mayo clinic, the Japan consensus criteria and, most recently, the international association of pancreatology “International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria”. Despite this, in clinical practice it can still be very difficult to confirm the diagnosis and differentiate AIP from a pancreatic cancer. There are no large studies into the long-term prognosis and management of relapses of AIP, and there is even less information at present regarding the Type 2 AIP subtype. Further studies are necessary to clarify the pathogenesis, treatment and long-term outcomes of this disease. Critically for clinicians, making the correct diagnosis and differentiating the disease from pancreatic cancer is of the utmost importance and the greatest challenge. PMID:24891978

  9. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver. PMID:26908609

  10. Pathophysiology of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Pagano, Nico

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a recently discovered form of pancreatitis and represents one of the diseases of the pancreas which can be cured and healed medically. International consensus diagnostic criteria have been developed, and the clinical phenotypes associated with the histopathologic patterns of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis should be referred to as type 1 and type 2 AIP, respectively. Most importantly, in type 1 AIP, the pancreatic manifestations are associated with other extrapancreatic disorders, resembling an immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease. In addition, the pancreas of a patient with AIP is often infiltrated by various types of immune cells; the cluster of differentiation (CD) 4 or CD8 T lymphocytes and IgG4-bearing plasma cells have been found in the pancreatic parenchyma and other involved organs in AIP and factors regulating T-cell function may influence the development of AIP. From a genetic point of view, it has also been reported that DRB1*0405 and DQB1*0401 mutations are significantly more frequent in patients with AIP when compared to those with chronic calcifying pancreatitis, and that only DQB1*0302 had a significant association with the relapse of AIP. Finally, it has been found that the polymorphic genes encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, a key negative regulator of the T-cell immune response, are associated with AIP in a Chinese population. Even if these data are not concordant, it is possible that physiological IgG4 responses are induced by prolonged antigen exposure and controlled by type 2 helper T cells. We reviewed the current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of this intriguing disease, focusing on the importance of the humoral and cellular immune responses. PMID:24891971

  11. Studies in porphyria. IV. Expression of the gene defect of acute intermittent porphyria in cultured human skin fibroblasts and amniotic cells: prenatal diagnosis of the porphyric trait

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The gene lesion of the porphyrin-heme synthetic pathway in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is reflected in a deficient level of activity of the cytosol enzyme uroporphyrinogen I synthetase (URO-S). A marked URO-S deficiency has been demonstrated in the liver and in circulating erythrocytes of individuals with both active and latent AIP. This enzymic abnormality accounts for the excessive production and excretion into urine of the porphyrin precursors, lamda-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) in AIP subjects. In this study, utilizing cell culture techniques, a marked URO-S deficiency has also been demonstrated in skin fibroblasts from AIP patients and in cells derived through aminocentesis from an approximately 17-wk old fetus. The prenatal diagnosis of the AIP trait in this fetus was confirmed postnatally by the demonstration in the child of a deficient level of erythrocyte URO-S activity which was comparable to those found in her AIP mother and affected sibling and which was approximately one-half the levels characterizing her normal father and aunt and a second unaffected sibling. The identification of the URO-S deficiency in cultured human fibroblasts from AIP patients was facilitated by a newly developed, sensitive assay for the enzyme activity. In this assay, the ability of such cells to convert ALA to protoporphyrin was quantitated; in the sequence of reactions involved in this transformation, URO-S is limiting so that the gene defect of AIP could be simply and precisely determined by appropriate spectrofluorometry of cell extracts. The technique described has distinct advantages over the direct enzymatic assay for URO-S activity in cultured human skin fibroblasts and permits clear differentiation of AIP carrier from normal individuals. PMID:1165472

  12. Studies in porphyria. IV. Expression of the gene defect of acute intermittent porphyria in cultured human skin fibroblasts and amniotic cells: prenatal diagnosis of the porphyric trait.

    PubMed

    Sassa, S; Solish, G; Levere, R D; Kappas, A

    1975-09-01

    The gene lesion of the porphyrin-heme synthetic pathway in acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is reflected in a deficient level of activity of the cytosol enzyme uroporphyrinogen I synthetase (URO-S). A marked URO-S deficiency has been demonstrated in the liver and in circulating erythrocytes of individuals with both active and latent AIP. This enzymic abnormality accounts for the excessive production and excretion into urine of the porphyrin precursors, lamda-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) in AIP subjects. In this study, utilizing cell culture techniques, a marked URO-S deficiency has also been demonstrated in skin fibroblasts from AIP patients and in cells derived through aminocentesis from an approximately 17-wk old fetus. The prenatal diagnosis of the AIP trait in this fetus was confirmed postnatally by the demonstration in the child of a deficient level of erythrocyte URO-S activity which was comparable to those found in her AIP mother and affected sibling and which was approximately one-half the levels characterizing her normal father and aunt and a second unaffected sibling. The identification of the URO-S deficiency in cultured human fibroblasts from AIP patients was facilitated by a newly developed, sensitive assay for the enzyme activity. In this assay, the ability of such cells to convert ALA to protoporphyrin was quantitated; in the sequence of reactions involved in this transformation, URO-S is limiting so that the gene defect of AIP could be simply and precisely determined by appropriate spectrofluorometry of cell extracts. The technique described has distinct advantages over the direct enzymatic assay for URO-S activity in cultured human skin fibroblasts and permits clear differentiation of AIP carrier from normal individuals.

  13. Circadian Rhythms in Acute Intermittent Porphyria—a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Larion, Sebastian; Caballes, F. Ryan; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Jin-Gyun; Rossman, Whitney Ellefson; Parsons, Judy; Steuerwald, Nury; Li, Ting; Maddukuri, Vinaya; Groseclose, Gale; Finkielstein, Carla V.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2013-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited disorder of heme synthesis wherein a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen [PBG] deaminase [PBGD], with other factors may give rise to biochemical and clinical manifestations of disease. The biochemical hallmarks of active AIP are relative hepatic heme deficiency and uncontrolled up-regulation of hepatic 5-aminolevulinic acid [ALA] synthase-1 [ALAS1] with overproduction of ALA and PBG. The treatment of choice is intravenous heme, which restores the deficient regulatory heme pool of the liver and represses ALAS1. Recently, heme has been shown to influence circadian rhythms by controlling their negative feedback loops. We evaluated whether subjects with AIP exhibited an altered circadian profile. Over a 21 h period, we measured levels of serum cortisol, melatonin, ALA, PBG, and mRNA levels [in peripheral blood mononuclear cells] of selected clock-controlled genes and genes involved in heme synthesis in 10 Caucasian [European-American] women who were either post-menopausal or had been receiving female hormone therapy, 6 of whom have AIP and 4 do not and are considered controls. Four AIP subjects with biochemical activity exhibited higher levels of PBG and lower levels and dampened oscillation of serum cortisol, and a trend for lower levels of serum melatonin, than controls or AIP subjects without biochemical activity. Levels of clock-controlled gene mRNAs showed significant increases over baseline in all subjects at 5 am and 11 pm, whereas mRNA levels of ALAS1, ALAS2, and PBGD were increased only at 11 pm in subjects with active AIP. This pilot study provides evidence for disturbances of circadian markers in women with active AIP that may trigger or sustain some common clinical features of AIP. PMID:23650938

  14. Long-term outcomes of autoimmune pancreatitis: a multicentre, international analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Phil A; Kamisawa, Terumi; Brugge, William R; Chung, Jae Bock; Culver, Emma L; Czakó, László; Frulloni, Luca; Go, Vay Liang W; Gress, Thomas M; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Lee, Kyu Taek; Lerch, Markus M; Liao, Wei-Chih; Löhr, Matthias; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Ryu, Ji Kon; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Shimizu, Kyoko; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Soetikno, Roy; Webster, George; Yadav, Dhiraj; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2013-01-01

    Objective Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a treatable form of chronic pancreatitis that has been increasingly recognised over the last decade. We set out to better understand the current burden of AIP at several academic institutions diagnosed using the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria, and to describe long-term outcomes, including organs involved, treatments, relapse frequency and long-term sequelae. Design 23 institutions from 10 different countries participated in this multinational analysis. A total of 1064 patients meeting the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria for type 1 (n=978) or type 2 (n=86) AIP were included. Data regarding treatments, relapses and sequelae were obtained. Results The majority of patients with type 1 (99%) and type 2 (92%) AIP who were treated with steroids went into clinical remission. Most patients with jaundice required biliary stent placement (71% of type 1 and 77% of type 2 AIP). Relapses were more common in patients with type 1 (31%) versus type 2 AIP (9%, p<0.001), especially those with IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (56% vs 26%, p<0.001). Relapses typically occurred in the pancreas or biliary tree. Retreatment with steroids remained effective at inducing remission with or without alternative treatment, such as azathioprine. Pancreatic duct stones and cancer were uncommon sequelae in type 1 AIP and did not occur in type 2 AIP during the study period. Conclusions AIP is a global disease which uniformly displays a high response to steroid treatment and tendency to relapse in the pancreas and biliary tree. Potential long-term sequelae include pancreatic duct stones and malignancy, however they were uncommon during the study period and require additional follow-up. Additional studies investigating prevention and treatment of disease relapses are needed. PMID:23232048

  15. Structural Basis for Ligand Recognition and Discrimination of a Quorum-quenching Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Garner, Amanda L.; Flack, Caralyn E.; Mee, Jenny M.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Janda, Kim D.; Kaufmann, Gunnar F.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2011-09-16

    In the postantibiotic era, available treatment options for severe bacterial infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have become limited. Therefore, new and innovative approaches are needed to combat such life-threatening infections. Virulence factor expression in S. aureus is regulated in a cell density-dependent manner using 'quorum sensing,' which involves generation and secretion of autoinducing peptides (AIPs) into the surrounding environment to activate a bacterial sensor kinase at a particular threshold concentration. Mouse monoclonal antibody AP4-24H11 was shown previously to blunt quorum sensing-mediated changes in gene expression in vitro and protect mice from a lethal dose of S. aureus by sequestering the AIP signal. We have elucidated the crystal structure of the AP4-24H11 Fab in complex with AIP-4 at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution to determine its mechanism of ligand recognition. A key GluH95 provides much of the binding specificity through formation of hydrogen bonds with each of the four amide nitrogens in the AIP-4 macrocyclic ring. Importantly, these structural data give clues as to the interactions between the cognate staphylococcal AIP receptors AgrC and the AIPs, as AP4-24H11 {center_dot} AIP-4 binding recapitulates features that have been proposed for AgrC-AIP recognition. Additionally, these structural insights may enable the engineering of AIP cross-reactive antibodies or quorum quenching vaccines for use in active or passive immunotherapy for prevention or treatment of S. aureus infections.

  16. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (−) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS. PMID:27630716

  17. Modeling the shape hierarchy for visually guided grasping.

    PubMed

    Rezai, Omid; Kleinhans, Ashley; Matallanas, Eduardo; Selby, Ben; Tripp, Bryan P

    2014-01-01

    The monkey anterior intraparietal area (AIP) encodes visual information about three-dimensional object shape that is used to shape the hand for grasping. We modeled shape tuning in visual AIP neurons and its relationship with curvature and gradient information from the caudal intraparietal area (CIP). The main goal was to gain insight into the kinds of shape parameterizations that can account for AIP tuning and that are consistent with both the inputs to AIP and the role of AIP in grasping. We first experimented with superquadric shape parameters. We considered superquadrics because they occupy a role in robotics that is similar to AIP, in that superquadric fits are derived from visual input and used for grasp planning. We also experimented with an alternative shape parameterization that was based on an Isomap dimension reduction of spatial derivatives of depth (i.e., distance from the observer to the object surface). We considered an Isomap-based model because its parameters lacked discontinuities between similar shapes. When we matched the dimension of the Isomap to the number of superquadric parameters, the superquadric model fit the AIP data somewhat more closely. However, higher-dimensional Isomaps provided excellent fits. Also, we found that the Isomap parameters could be approximated much more accurately than superquadric parameters by feedforward neural networks with CIP-like inputs. We conclude that Isomaps, or perhaps alternative dimension reductions of visual inputs to AIP, provide a promising model of AIP electrophysiology data. Further work is needed to test whether such shape parameterizations actually provide an effective basis for grasp control. PMID:25386134

  18. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hironori; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke; Matsubara, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (-) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS. PMID:27630716

  19. SU-E-T-174: Evaluation of the Optimal Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans Done On the Maximum and Average Intensity Projection CTs

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkovic, I; Stathakis, S; Li, Y; Patel, A; Vincent, J; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the difference in coverage between plans done on average intensity projection and maximum intensity projection CT data sets for lung patients and to establish correlations between different factors influencing the coverage. Methods: For six lung cancer patients, 10 phases of equal duration through the respiratory cycle, the maximum and average intensity projections (MIP and AIP) from their 4DCT datasets were obtained. MIP and AIP datasets had three GTVs delineated (GTVaip — delineated on AIP, GTVmip — delineated on MIP and GTVfus — delineated on each of the 10 phases and summed up). From the each GTV, planning target volumes (PTV) were then created by adding additional margins. For each of the PTVs an IMRT plan was developed on the AIP dataset. The plans were then copied to the MIP data set and were recalculated. Results: The effective depths in AIP cases were significantly smaller than in MIP (p < 0.001). The Pearson correlation coefficient of r = 0.839 indicates strong degree of positive linear relationship between the average percentage difference in effective depths and average PTV coverage on the MIP data set. The V2 0 Gy of involved lung depends on the PTV coverage. The relationship between PTVaip mean CT number difference and PTVaip coverage on MIP data set gives r = 0.830. When the plans are produced on MIP and copied to AIP, r equals −0.756. Conclusion: The correlation between the AIP and MIP data sets indicates that the selection of the data set for developing the treatment plan affects the final outcome (cases with high average percentage difference in effective depths between AIP and MIP should be calculated on AIP). The percentage of the lung volume receiving higher dose depends on how well PTV is covered, regardless of on which set plan is done.

  20. Modeling the shape hierarchy for visually guided grasping

    PubMed Central

    Rezai, Omid; Kleinhans, Ashley; Matallanas, Eduardo; Selby, Ben; Tripp, Bryan P.

    2014-01-01

    The monkey anterior intraparietal area (AIP) encodes visual information about three-dimensional object shape that is used to shape the hand for grasping. We modeled shape tuning in visual AIP neurons and its relationship with curvature and gradient information from the caudal intraparietal area (CIP). The main goal was to gain insight into the kinds of shape parameterizations that can account for AIP tuning and that are consistent with both the inputs to AIP and the role of AIP in grasping. We first experimented with superquadric shape parameters. We considered superquadrics because they occupy a role in robotics that is similar to AIP, in that superquadric fits are derived from visual input and used for grasp planning. We also experimented with an alternative shape parameterization that was based on an Isomap dimension reduction of spatial derivatives of depth (i.e., distance from the observer to the object surface). We considered an Isomap-based model because its parameters lacked discontinuities between similar shapes. When we matched the dimension of the Isomap to the number of superquadric parameters, the superquadric model fit the AIP data somewhat more closely. However, higher-dimensional Isomaps provided excellent fits. Also, we found that the Isomap parameters could be approximated much more accurately than superquadric parameters by feedforward neural networks with CIP-like inputs. We conclude that Isomaps, or perhaps alternative dimension reductions of visual inputs to AIP, provide a promising model of AIP electrophysiology data. Further work is needed to test whether such shape parameterizations actually provide an effective basis for grasp control. PMID:25386134

  1. Factors Contributing to Massive Blood Loss on Peripartum Hysterectomy for Abnormally Invasive Placenta: Who Bleeds More?

    PubMed Central

    Usui, Rie; Suzuki, Hirotada; Baba, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To identify factors that determine blood loss during peripartum hysterectomy for abnormally invasive placenta (AIP-hysterectomy). Methods. We reviewed all of the medical charts of 11,919 deliveries in a single tertiary perinatal center. We examined characteristics of AIP-hysterectomy patients, with a single experienced obstetrician attending all AIP-hysterectomies and using the same technique. Results. AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 18 patients (0.15%: 18/11,919). Of the 18, 14 (78%) had a prior cesarean section (CS) history and the other 4 (22%) were primiparous women. Planned AIP-hysterectomy was performed in 12/18 (67%), with the remaining 6 (33%) undergoing emergent AIP-hysterectomy. Of the 6, 4 (4/6: 67%) patients were primiparous women. An intra-arterial balloon was inserted in 9/18 (50%). Women with the following three factors significantly bled less in AIP-hysterectomy than its counterpart: the employment of an intra-arterial balloon (4,448 ± 1,948 versus 8,861 ± 3,988 mL), planned hysterectomy (5,003 ± 2,057 versus 9,957 ± 4,485 mL), and prior CS (5,706 ± 2,727 versus 9,975 ± 5,532 mL). Patients with prior CS (−) bled more: this may be because these patients tended to undergo emergent surgery or attempted placental separation. Conclusion. Patients with intra-arterial balloon catheter insertion bled less on AIP-hysterectomy. Massive bleeding occurred in emergent AIP-hysterectomy without prior CS.

  2. Final Report 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    2013-11-03

    The 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics was held in LaJolla, California on May 26 to May 31, 2009. The Conference Proceedings are published by the American Institute of Physics in Volume 1182 of the AIP Conference Proceedings (ISBN: 978-0-7354-0723-7). The Proceedings include papers from each of the Conference Presenters and a detailed schedule of talks at the Conference. The Table of Contents of the Conference Proceedings is available at http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/proceeding/aipcp/1182. Support by the U.S. Department of Energy and by DOE Laboratories was essential to the success of the Conference.

  3. Anesthetic implication of tricuspid valve replacement in a patient with acute intermittent porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Kianoush; Salehi, Mehrdad; Rahmanian, Mehrzad; Bakhshandeh, Ali Reza; Mahlabani, Mohammad Amin Gorji

    2016-01-01

    Facing a patient with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), there is narrow safety margin which circumscribe all the therapeutic actions including choice of drugs. This would become even more complicated when it comes to a stressful and drug-dependent process like a cardiopulmonary bypass. According to author's researches, no specific AIP case of tricuspid valve (TV) replacement is reported recently. Furthermore, fast-track anesthesia was safely used in this 37-year-old male known the case of AIP, who was a candidate for TV replacement and removing the port catheter. The patient was extubated subsequently, only 3 h after entering the Intensive Care Unit. PMID:27052088

  4. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP.

  5. Advanced information processing system for advanced launch system: Avionics architecture synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a fault-tolerant distributed computer system architecture that was developed to meet the real time computational needs of advanced aerospace vehicles. One such vehicle is the Advanced Launch System (ALS) being developed jointly by NASA and the Department of Defense to launch heavy payloads into low earth orbit at one tenth the cost (per pound of payload) of the current launch vehicles. An avionics architecture that utilizes the AIPS hardware and software building blocks was synthesized for ALS. The AIPS for ALS architecture synthesis process starting with the ALS mission requirements and ending with an analysis of the candidate ALS avionics architecture is described.

  6. Future directions in studies of nuclei far from stability. [Nashville, Tennessee, Sept. 10-13, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.H.; Spejewski, E.H.; Bingham, C.R.; Zganjar, E.F.

    1980-01-01

    Individual abstracts were prepared for 27 of the papers in this volume. The remaining ten have already been cited in ERA; these papers can be located by reference to the entry CONF-790976-- in the report number index. (RWR)

  7. Science and Society

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Dans une période d'un mois, 2me conférence sur le contrôle d'armes. Le conférencier Drell, américain, parle comme son collègue Worden (AUDIO-1985-005) des problèmes de défense stratégique.

  8. 32 CFR Attachment D to Subpart B... - Decision Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... date NACLC or SSBI Conf, Sec; “L” Top Secret, SCI; “Q” None None SSBI B None; Conf, Sec; “L” Current or... NACLC Secret; “L” 0 to 9 yrs 11 mos None (note 1) 10 yrs. or more NACLC Top Secret, SCI; “Q” 0 to 4 yrs... indicates the person may no longer satisfy the standards of Executive Order 12968....

  9. 32 CFR Attachment D to Subpart B... - Decision Tables

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... date NACLC or SSBI Conf, Sec; “L” Top Secret, SCI; “Q” None None SSBI B None; Conf, Sec; “L” Current or... NACLC Secret; “L” 0 to 9 yrs 11 mos None (note 1) 10 yrs. or more NACLC Top Secret, SCI; “Q” 0 to 4 yrs... indicates the person may no longer satisfy the standards of Executive Order 12968....

  10. 77 FR 35104 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property at Merrill Field Airport, Anchorage, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ... purchased for inclusion into MRI utilizing FAA Airport Improvement (AIP) Funds. Said lands, described as a... impacts to the airport by allowing the disposal of the property. A categorical exclusion for this...

  11. Breeder reactors: A renewable energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Bernard L.

    1983-01-01

    Based on a cost analysis of uranium extracted from seawater, it is concluded that the world's energy requirements for the next 5 billion years can be met by breeder reactors with no price increase due to fuel costs.(AIP)

  12. High-Speed Photography

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.; Schelev, M.Y.

    1998-08-01

    The applications of high-speed photography to a diverse set of subjects including inertial confinement fusion, laser surgical procedures, communications, automotive airbags, lightning etc. are briefly discussed. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}

  13. Porphyria Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... only. For treatment options for Porphyria Cutanea Tarda (PCT) , Congenital Erythropoietic Protoporphyria (CEP) and Hepatoerythropoietic Porphyria (HEP) ... Contact Us About Porphyria AIP VP HCP ADP PCT EPP CEP HEP Diet and Nutrition History of ...

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a surgical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Perez, David; Vaquero, Eva C; Ayuso, Juan R; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is defined as a particular form of pancreatitis that often manifests as obstructive jaundice associated with a pancreatic mass or an obstructive bile duct lesion, and that has an excellent response to corticosteroid treatment. The prevalence of AIP worldwide is unknown, and it is considered as a rare entity. The clinical and radiological presentation of AIP can mimic bilio-pancreatic cancer, presenting difficulties for diagnosis and obliging the surgeon to balance decision-making between the potential risk presented by the misdiagnosis of a deadly disease against the desire to avoid unnecessary major surgery for a disease that responds effectively to corticosteroid treatment. In this review we detail the current and critical points for the diagnosis, classification and treatment for AIP, with a special emphasis on surgical series and the methods to differentiate between this pathology and bilio-pancreatic cancer.

  15. With new funding, antimatter research to continue at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, T.

    1997-05-01

    This article describes the planned upgrading of CERN LEAR to produce antihydrogen and to measure its spectra for comparison to energy levels of hydrogen. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Salinity determination using NIRA

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschfeld, T.

    1985-07-01

    The determination of salinity of water by near infrared spectroscopic techniques is discussed. The concept of 'spectral shift reagents' is used and sufficiently rapid computer calculations yield the concentrations of Naci from measured absorbances at selected wavelengths. (AIP)

  17. 77 FR 73511 - Clarification of Wildlife Hazard Management Requirements for Non-Certificated Federally Obligated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... ``Airport Improvement Program (AIP) Grant Assurances,'' 77 FR 22376). The FAA uses a standard set of...), turkey vultures (2.6 percent), American white pelicans (8.4 percent), double-crested cormorants...

  18. 78 FR 69927 - Notice to Manufacturers of Continuous Friction Measurement Equipment (CFME)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice to Manufacturers of Continuous Friction Measurement Equipment (CFME... foreign manufacturers of Continuous Friction Measurement Equipment (CFME) that meet the requirements of....faa.gov/airports/aip/buy_american/ at the tab entitled, Continuous Friction Measurement...

  19. Longitudinal diffusion coefficients and test of the generalized Einstein relation for Tl + ions in Kr and Xe, Li + in Kr and Xe, and Cl - in N2 a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackston, M. G.; Byers, M. S.; Holleman, F. B.; Chelf, R. D.; Twist, J. R.; McDaniel, E. W.

    1983-04-01

    Longitudinal diffusion coefficients are measured for Tl+ in Kr and Xe, Li+ in Kr and Xe and cl- in N2. These diffusion coefficients are compared with the calculated ones from a previous measurement of ion mobility values.3 (AIP)

  20. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, Keith Z.; Ho, Meng-Chaio; Cassera, Maria B.; Clinch, Keith; Crump, Douglas R.; Rosario Jr., Irving; Merino, Emilio F.; Almo, Steve C.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  1. Advanced information processing system: Inter-computer communication services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhardt, Laura; Masotto, Tom; Sims, J. Terry; Whittredge, Roy; Alger, Linda S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to document the functional requirements and detailed specifications for the Inter-Computer Communications Services (ICCS) of the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS). An introductory section is provided to outline the overall architecture and functional requirements of the AIPS and to present an overview of the ICCS. An overview of the AIPS architecture as well as a brief description of the AIPS software is given. The guarantees of the ICCS are provided, and the ICCS is described as a seven-layered International Standards Organization (ISO) Model. The ICCS functional requirements, functional design, and detailed specifications as well as each layer of the ICCS are also described. A summary of results and suggestions for future work are presented.

  2. Taking the Next Step: Building an Arabidopsis Information Portal[OA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (AIP), a resource expected to provide access to all community data and combine outputs into a single user-friendly interface, has emerged from community discussions over the last 23 months. These discussions began during two closely linked workshops in early 2010 that established the International Arabidopsis Informatics Consortium (IAIC). The design of the AIP will provide core functionality while remaining flexible to encourage multiple contributors and constant innovation. An IAIC-hosted Design Workshop in December 2011 proposed a structure for the AIP to provide a framework for the minimal components of a functional community portal while retaining flexibility to rapidly extend the resource to other species. We now invite broader participation in the AIP development process so that the resource can be implemented in a timely manner. PMID:22751211

  3. Baranowski et al. reply

    SciTech Connect

    Baranowski, J.M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Yau, W.; Weber, E.R. Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 )

    1992-01-27

    A reply to the Comment on Evidence for superconductivity in low-temperature--grown GaAs is given. It is argued that the authors findings are clearly distinguished from the scope of the previous work.(AIP)

  4. Injection locking of wide-aperture TEA CO/sub 2/ lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tratt, D.M.; Kar, A.K.; Mathew, J.G.H.; Harrison, R.G.

    1983-01-15

    The performance and operation of a TEA CO/sub 2/ laser is described and the single longitudinal mode (SLM) TEM/sub 00/ pulses are analyzed. The wide-aperture SLM output was reproducible 98% of the time. (AIP)

  5. Summary of conventional RF power sources at X-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, H.

    1995-07-01

    A description of the probable RF power sources for the next generation of TeV linear colliders is presented. Parameters discussed are efficiencies, power capability, pulse compression, etc. for modulators and klystrons. (AIP)

  6. Evaluation methodologies for an advanced information processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schabowsky, R. S., Jr.; Gai, E.; Walker, B. K.; Lala, J. H.; Motyka, P.

    1984-01-01

    The system concept and requirements for an Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) are briefly described, but the emphasis of this paper is on the evaluation methodologies being developed and utilized in the AIPS program. The evaluation tasks include hardware reliability, maintainability and availability, software reliability, performance, and performability. Hardware RMA and software reliability are addressed with Markov modeling techniques. The performance analysis for AIPS is based on queueing theory. Performability is a measure of merit which combines system reliability and performance measures. The probability laws of the performance measures are obtained from the Markov reliability models. Scalar functions of this law such as the mean and variance provide measures of merit in the AIPS performability evaluations.

  7. Effect of carbon and hydrogen isotopic substitutions on the thermal diffusion of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal diffusion factor of the benzene/carbon 13 substituted benzene pair and of the benzene/deuterated benzene pair are reported. The results show some interesting effects of mass distribution. (AIP)

  8. Association between ideal cardiovascular health and the atherogenic index of plasma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shiwei; Lu, Yun; Qi, Huajin; Li, Feng; Shen, Zhenhai; Wu, Liuxin; Yang, Chengjian; Wang, Ling; Shui, Kedong; Wang, Yaping; Qiang, Dongchang; Yun, Jingting; Weng, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The American Heart Association aims to improve cardiovascular health by encouraging the general population to meet 7 cardiovascular health behaviors and factors. The atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) is an important index. Our aim is to evaluate the relationship between ideal cardiovascular health and the atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) in middle-aged Chinese men. A cross-sectional study was performed. A total of 27,824 middle-aged Chinese men were enrolled. The association between ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors and AIP was determined. The 7 cardiovascular health metrics were scored as follows: 0, poor; 1, general; and 2, ideal. The cardiovascular health status was classified according to the total score, as follows: 0 to 4, inadequate; 5 to 9, average; and 10 to 14, optimum. Analyses assessed the prevalence of 7 cardiovascular health metrics, its association with AIP. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs), adjusting for age. All 7 cardiovascular health metrics were shown to correlate with AIP (all P values < 0.05), and the strongest correlation existed between body mass and AIP, followed by total cholesterol and AIP. The mean AIP level increased with the decrease in the score of each of the 7 cardiovascular health metrics (all P values < 0.05). The subjects with poor cardiovascular health status had a 4.982-fold increase in the high risk of developing atherosclerosis, whereas a 1-point increase in the cardiovascular health score resulted a 0.046 reduction in AIP and a 22.3% reduction in the high-risk of developing atherosclerosis (OR = 0.777, 95% CI: 0.768–0.787). The ideal cardiovascular health score correlated significantly with AIP, and a 1-point increase in the cardiovascular health score led to a 0.046 reduction in AIP and a 22.3% reduction in the high risk of developing atherosclerosis. These validated the value of ideal cardiovascular health behaviors and factors in the prediction of high

  9. Clinical and pathological differences between serum immunoglobulin G4-positive and -negative type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Woo Hyun; Ryu, Ji Kon; Park, Jin Myung; Song, Byeong Jun; Park, Joo Kyung; Kim, Yong-Tae; Lee, Kyoungbun

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To identify clinical and pathological differences between serum immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-positive (SIP) and IgG4-negative (SIN) type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in South Korea. METHODS: AIP was diagnosed by the international consensus diagnostic criteria. The medical records and pathology were retrospectively reviewed and IgG4-positive cells were counted in a high power field (HPF). Type I AIP was defined as a high serum level of IgG4 or histological finding. SIN type 1 AIP was defined as a histological evidence of type 1 AIP and a normal serum IgG4 level. The clinical and pathological findings were compared between the two groups. The analysis was performed using Student’s t test, Fischer’s exact test and Mann-Whitney’s U test. A P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. As repeated comparison was made, P values of less than 5% (P < 0.05) were considered significant. RESULTS: Twenty five patients with definite type 1 AIP (19 histologically and six serologically diagnosed cases) were enrolled. The mean tissue IgG4 concentrations were significantly higher in SIP than SIN group (40 cells per HPF vs 18 cells per HPF, P = 0.02). Among eight SIN patients, the tissue IgG4 concentrations were less than 15 cells per HPF in most of cases, except one. The sensitivity of serum IgG4 was 68% (17 SIP and eight SIN AIP). Other organ involvement was more frequently associated with SIP than SIN AIP (59% vs 26%, P = 0.016). However, the relapse rate and diffuse swelling of the pancreas were not associated with serum IgG4 level. The concentrations of IgG4-positive cells per HPF were higher in SIP than SIN AIP (40 vs 18, P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: The sensitivity of serum IgG4 was 68% in type 1 AIP. High serum IgG4 level was associated with other organ involvement and tissue IgG4 concentration but did not affect the relapse rate in type 1 AIP. PMID:23840149

  10. Multiple gene mutations in patients with type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis and its clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Feng; Chen, Qing-quan; Zhuang, Ze-hao; He, Qing-liang; Wang, Feng-qing; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background It is now clear that there are two histological types (type 1 and type 2) of autoimmune pancreatitis (AI P). The histological substance of type 1 AI P is known as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) or traditional AIP, and type 2 AIP is characterized by distinct histology called idiopathic duct centric pancreatitis (IDCP). Serum IgG4 increase is considered as a marker for type 1 AI P. Far less is known about type 2 and it lacks predicting markers, so it easily leads to missed diagnosis and misdiagnosis. The aim of this study The aim of this study was to describe multi-gene mutations in patients with type 2 AI P and its clinical features. Material and methods Three unrelated patients with type 2 AI P, 10 cases with type 1 AIP, 15 cases with other chronic pancreatitis and 120 healthy individuals were studied. The mutations and polymorphisms of 6 genes involved in chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer — PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, MEN1, PKHD1, and mitochondrial DNA – were sequenced. Information of clinical data was collected by personal interview using a structured questionnaire. Results Novel mutations were found in the genes encoding for MEN1 (p.546 Ala > The) and PKHD1 (c. 233586 A > G and c. 316713 C > T) from patients with type 2 AIP. What is more, the serum TCR (T cell receptor) level is relatively higher in patients with type 2 AIP than in patients with type 1 AIP and other chronic pancreatitis or normal controls. Weight loss was the major manifestation and no patients had extrapancreatic involvement in type 2 AIP. Conclusions Type 2 AIP may occur with multi-gene mutations. For screening purposes, it is more reasonable to evaluate TCR levels in serum. PMID:26155104

  11. Are Dysregulated Inflammatory Responses to Commensal Bacteria Involved in the Pathogenesis of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Autoimmune Disease? An Analysis Using Mice Models of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, Naoko; Haruta, Ikuko; Kikuchi, Ken; Shibata, Noriyuki; Yagi, Junji

    2011-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of many autoimmune disorders has not been identified. The aim of this paper is to focus on the involvement of bacterial exposure in the pathogenesis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), both of which are broadly categorized as autoimmune disorders involving hepatobiliary-pancreatic lesions. Avirulent and/or commensal bacteria, which may have important role(s) as initiating factors in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as PBC and AIP, will be emphasized. PMID:21991516

  12. Commensal Flora, is it an Unwelcomed Companion as a Triggering Factor of Autoimmune Pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Haruta, Ikuko; Shimizu, Kyoko; Yanagisawa, Naoko; Shiratori, Keiko; Yagi, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The etiopathogenesis of many autoimmune disorders has not been identified. The aim of this paper is to focus on the involvement of bacterial exposure, as an environmental factor, in the pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), which is broadly categorized as autoimmune disorders involving pancreatic lesions. Avirulent and/or commensal bacteria, which may have an important role(s) as initiating/progressing factors in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorder AIP, will be emphasized. PMID:22485093

  13. A case of acute interstitial pneumonia indistinguishable from bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia/cryptogenic organizing pneumonia: high-resolution CT findings and pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Ichikado, K; Johkoh, T; Ikezoe, J; Yoshida, S; Honda, O; Mihara, N; Nakamura, H; Tsujimura, T; Suga, M; Ando, M

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of histologically proved acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) with subacute onset whose high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings were indistinguishable from those of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP)/cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). The HRCT findings were air-space consolidation with air-bronchiologram associated with little ground-glass attenuation, and nodules. Some cases of AIP present HRCT findings indistinguishable from those of BOOP/COP.

  14. Successful combination therapy with corticosteroids, biweekly intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide and cyclosporin A for acute interstitial pneumonia in patients with dermatomyositis : report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akitake; Shoji, Norikazu; Kikuchi, Eigo; Uekubo, Kazuaki; Aoki, Naoko; Sonoda, Yui; Torigai, Hideyuki; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Kentaro; Okai, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    We report three patients with dermatomyositis (DM) complicated with acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). All of them complained of fever and acutely worsening dyspnea and were treated immediately by combination therapies with pulse therapy with methylprednisone (mPSL) followed by corticosteroids, biweekly intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide (IVCY) and cyclosporine A (CSA). They recovered rapidly soon after an initiation of this combination regimen. Early intervention with aggressive combination therapy is life-saving for the treatment of AIP in patients with DM.

  15. FINAL REPORT OF THE RESEARCH PROJECT FOR THE EVALUATION OF THE UDC AS THE INDEXING LANGUAGE FOR A MECHANIZED REFERENCE RETRIEVAL SYSTEM. APPENDIX 5--THE UDC ENGLISH LANGUGAE MASTER FILES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FREEMAN, ROBERT R.; ATHERTON, PAULINE

    THIS APPENDIX TO THE FINAL REPORT OF THE AIP/UDC PROJECT (LI 000 583) INCLUDES THE COMPLETE, MERGED SET OF UDC SCHEDULES ACCUMULATED BY THE AIP/UDC PROJECT FROM 1965-1967. PART 1 OF THE FILE CONTAINS 110,759 RECORDS. EACH RECORD INCLUDES THE UDC NUMBER, A CODE WHICH REPRESENTS THE SOURCE OF THE RECORD, AND THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE EQUIVALENT OF THE…

  16. Quantitative perfusion analysis in pancreatic contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US): a promising tool for the differentiation between autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Vitali, F; Pfeifer, L; Janson, C; Goertz, R S; Neurath, M F; Strobel, D; Wildner, D

    2015-10-01

    In the work-up of focal pancreatic lesions autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare differential diagnosis to pancreatic cancer (PC) with similar clinical constellations. The aim of our study was to compare differences between proven AIP and PC using transabdominal dynamic contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US). Therefore we recorded 3-minute-clips of CEUS examinations and analyzed perfusion parameters with VueBox®-quantification software. To obtain DCE-US Parameters, Regions-of-Interest were selected within the lesions and the surrounding pancreas parenchyma, serving as reference tissue. We compared 3 patients with AIP (mean age: 58 years; lesion mean size: 40 mm) to 17 patients with PC (mean age: 68 years; lesion mean size: 35.9 mm). Significant differences between PC and parenchyma could be found in the following parameters: Peak-Enhancement (PE), Wash-in-and-Wash-out-AUC, Wash-in Perfusion-Index. PE of AIP was comparable to normal parenchyma. The relation of PE between parenchyma and lesion (ΔPE) AIP and PC was significantly different [AIP: 0.21 (±0.06); PC: 0.81 (±0.1); p<0.01]. PE of neoplastic lesions was significantly lower as AIP and normal parenchyma (p<0.01). Therefore perfusion analysis in DCE-US can help to differentiate hypovascular PC from AIP presenting nearly isovascular time intensity curves. Diagnostic accuracy of DCE-US in this setting has to be validated in future prospective studies in comparison to CT and MRI. PMID:26480053

  17. Haem Biosynthesis and Antioxidant Enzymes in Circulating Cells of Acute Intermittent Porphyria Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Miguel D.; Mestre-Alfaro, Antonia; Martínez-Tomé, Magdalena; Carrera-Quintanar, Lucrecia; Capó, Xavier; Jiménez-Monreal, Antonia M.; García-Diz, Luis; Roche, Enrique; Murcia, María A.; Tur, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the expression pattern of haem biosynthesis enzymes in circulating cells of patients affected by two types of porphyria (acute intermittent, AIP, and variegate porphyria, VP), together with the antioxidant enzyme pattern in AIP in order to identify a possible situation of oxidative stress. Sixteen and twelve patients affected by AIP and VP, respectively, were analysed with the same numbers of healthy matched controls. Erythrocytes, neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were purified from blood, and RNA and proteins were extracted for quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western-blot analysis, respectively. Porhobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) gene and protein expression was analysed. Antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression were additionally determined in blood cells, together with protein carbonyl content in plasma. PBMCs isolated from AIP patients presented low mRNA levels of PBGD when compared to controls, while PBMCs isolated from VP patients presented a decrease in PPOX mRNA. PPOX protein content was higher in AIP patients and lower in VP patients, compared to healthy controls. Regarding antioxidant enzymes, PBMCs and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) presented statistically significant higher activity in AIP patients compared to controls, while catalase activity tended to be lower in these patients. No differences were observed regarding antioxidant gene expression in white blood cells. Circulating cells in AIP and VP patients present altered expression of haem biosynthetic enzymes, which could be useful for the differential diagnosis of these two types of porphyria in certain difficult cases. AIP patients present a condition of potential oxidative stress similar to VP patients, evidenced by the post-transcriptional activation of SOD and possible catalase impairment. PMID:27788171

  18. The Alcohol Improvement Programme: Evaluation of an Initiative to Address Alcohol-Related Health Harm in England

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Betsy; MacGregor, Susanne; Godfrey, Christine; Herring, Rachel; Lloyd, Charlie; Tchilingirian, Jordan; Toner, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The evaluation aimed to assess the impact of The Alcohol Improvement Programme (AIP). This was a UK Department of Health initiative (April 2008–March 2011) aiming to contribute to the reduction of alcohol-related harm as measured by a reduction in the rate of increase in alcohol-related hospital admissions (ARHAs). Methods: The evaluation (March 2010–September 2011) used a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods to assess the impact of the AIP on ARHAs, to describe and assess the process of implementation, and to identify elements of the programme which might serve as a ‘legacy’ for the future. Results: There was no evidence that the AIP had an impact on reducing the rise in the rate of ARHAs. The AIP was successfully delivered, increased the priority given to alcohol-related harm on local policy agendas and strengthened the infrastructure for the delivery of interventions. Conclusion: Although there was no measurable short-term impact on the rise in the rate of ARHAs, the AIP helped to set up a strategic response and a delivery infrastructure as a first, necessary step in working towards that goal. There are a number of valuable elements in the AIP which should be retained and repackaged to fit into new policy contexts. PMID:23729674

  19. Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis Can Transform into Chronic Pancreatitis: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study of 73 Japanese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Arakura, Norikazu; Ozaki, Yayoi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tetsuya; Yoneda, Suguru; Maruyama, Masafumi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Some patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) form pancreatic stones suggestive of transformation into chronic pancreatitis (CP). The present study examined the underlying risk factors and mechanism of AIP progression to confirmed CP. We compared the clinical and laboratory parameters of subjects who progressed to confirmed CP with those of the subjucts who did not in a cohort of 73 type 1 AIP patients. A total of 16 (22%) AIP patients progressed to CP. Univariate analysis revealed that relapse was significantly more frequent in the progression group, and multivariate analysis indicated that pancreatic head swelling (OR 12.7, P = 0.023) and nonnarrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic body (OR 12.6, P = 0.001) were significant independent risk factors for progression to CP. Kaplan-Meier testing showed that the progression rate to CP was approximately 10% at 3 years and 30% at 10 years in total AIP patients and 30% at 3 years and 60% at 10 years in subjects with both risk factors. AIP with pancreatic head swelling and a history of relapse may cause pancreatic juice stagnation and nonnarrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic body, which can progress to advanced stage chronic pancreatitis. PMID:23762066

  20. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  1. Localized 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake at the pancreatic head during remission phase of autoimmune pancreatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yonenaga, Yoshikuni; Kushihata, Fumiki; Watanabe, Jota; Tohyama, Taiji; Inoue, Hitoshi; Sugita, Atsuro; Takada, Yasutsugu

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a unique form of pancreatitis, histopathologically characterized by dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis of the pancreas with obliterative phlebitis. AIP is associated with a good response to steroid therapy. Differentiation between AIP and pancreatic cancer to determine a preoperative diagnosis is often challenging, despite the use of various diagnostic modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. It has been reported that 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT may be a useful tool for distinguishing between the two diseases. In the present case report, a 71-year-old male patient presented with a well-circumscribed, solitary, nodular and homogenous 18F-FDG uptake at the pancreatic head, while receiving maintenance steroid therapy in the remission phase of AIP; preoperatively, the patient had been strongly suspected of having pancreatic cancer. Pathological examination revealed post-treatment relapse of AIP. The present case highlights the diagnostic and management difficulties with AIP in the remission phase. In certain cases, it remains challenging to differentiate the two diseases, even using the latest modalities. PMID:27602112

  2. Urinary metabolic fingerprint of acute intermittent porphyria analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carichon, Mickael; Pallet, Nicolas; Schmitt, Caroline; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Gouya, Laurent; Talbi, Neila; Deybach, Jean Charles; Beaune, Philippe; Vasos, Paul; Puy, Hervé; Bertho, Gildas

    2014-02-18

    (1)H NMR is a nonbiased technique for the quantification of small molecules that could result in the identification and characterization of potential biomarkers with prognostic value and contribute to better understand pathophysiology of diseases. In this study, we used (1)H NMR spectroscopy to analyze the urinary metabolome of patients with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an inherited metabolic disorder of heme biosynthesis in which an accumulation of the heme precursors 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) promotes sudden neurovisceral attacks, which can be life-threatening. Our objectives were (1) to demonstrate the usefulness of (1)H NMR to identify and quantify ALA and PBG in urines from AIP patients and (2) to identify metabolites that would predict the response to AIP crisis treatment and reflect differential metabolic reprogramming. Our results indicate that (1)H NMR can help to diagnose AIP attacks based on the identification of ALA and PBG. We also show that glycin concentration increases in urines from patients with frequent recurrences at the end of the treatment, after an initial decrease, whereas PBG concentration remains low. Although the reasons for this altered are elusive, these findings indicate that a glycin metabolic reprogramming occurs in AIPr patients and is associated with recurrence. Our results validate the proof of concept of the usefulness of (1)H NMR spectroscopy in clinical chemistry for the diagnosis of acute attack of AIP and identify urinary glycin as a potential marker of recurrence of AIP acute attacks. PMID:24437734

  3. Localized 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake at the pancreatic head during remission phase of autoimmune pancreatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yonenaga, Yoshikuni; Kushihata, Fumiki; Watanabe, Jota; Tohyama, Taiji; Inoue, Hitoshi; Sugita, Atsuro; Takada, Yasutsugu

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a unique form of pancreatitis, histopathologically characterized by dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis of the pancreas with obliterative phlebitis. AIP is associated with a good response to steroid therapy. Differentiation between AIP and pancreatic cancer to determine a preoperative diagnosis is often challenging, despite the use of various diagnostic modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. It has been reported that 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT may be a useful tool for distinguishing between the two diseases. In the present case report, a 71-year-old male patient presented with a well-circumscribed, solitary, nodular and homogenous 18F-FDG uptake at the pancreatic head, while receiving maintenance steroid therapy in the remission phase of AIP; preoperatively, the patient had been strongly suspected of having pancreatic cancer. Pathological examination revealed post-treatment relapse of AIP. The present case highlights the diagnostic and management difficulties with AIP in the remission phase. In certain cases, it remains challenging to differentiate the two diseases, even using the latest modalities.

  4. An immunohistochemical study in a fatal case of acute interstitial pneumonitis (Hamman-Rich syndrome) in a 15-year-old boy presenting as sudden death.

    PubMed

    Turillazzi, Emanuela; Di Donato, Sabina; Neri, Margherita; Riezzo, Irene; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2007-11-15

    Acute interstitial pneumonitis (AIP), also known as Hamman-Rich syndrome, is a distinct type of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia affecting patients of both genders without pre-existing lung diseases. We describe the case of a fulminant form of AIP and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms of AIP with reference to the histological pattern. A 15-year-previously-healthy male boy presented to the Hospital with a 6-day history of malaise, fever and cough. The clinical prodromes were followed by the acute onset of increasing shortness of breath rapidly progressing in acute respiratory failure. Chest X-ray demonstrated bilateral diffuse airspace opacification; the high resolution CT confirmed the presence of bilateral, symmetric diffuse ground-glass attenuation. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit, but died after few hours. An autopsy was performed within 24h. The histological examination of lung specimens showed a pattern of diffuse alveolar damage. immunohistochemical, microbiological and toxicological tests were also carried out. The clinical presentation, the histological findings and the exclusion of infective, traumatic, toxic and metabolic causes of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) allowed us to conclude that the boy was affected by AIP. In conclusion, AIP is a diagnosis of exclusion. It has a mortality rate ranging about 50%, despite mechanical ventilation. In fatal cases of AIP diagnosis can be based on clinical presentation, radiological, histological and microbiological findings and can be further confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis.

  5. Clinical predictors of injuries not identified by focused abdominal sonogram for trauma (FAST) examinations.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Lance; Pierce, Daniel; Puumala, Susan

    2009-04-01

    This study's objective was to identify clinical characteristics of patients with a blunt traumatic injury that increased the risk of peritoneal or pericardial fluid collections and abdominal organ injuries not identified by a bedside focused abdominal sonogram for trauma (FAST) examination. This observational study used a retrospective chart review of a cohort of patients identified through a query of the University of Nebraska Medical Center's trauma registry, a tertiary referral center for portions of Nebraska, Iowa, and Missouri. Adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) for an evaluation of blunt traumatic injury from September 1996 to December 2002 were eligible if their ED course included admission to the trauma service after completion of a bedside FAST examination (US) and a confirmatory study (Conf) such as an abdominopelvic computed tomography scan or exploratory laparotomy within 12 h of completion of the ED FAST examination. The medical records of those patients with a US+/Conf+ or US-/Conf+ examination were reviewed. Clinical characteristics were recorded on a standard data collection form. Statistically significant predictors of a US-/Conf+ examination were found using a stepwise logistic regression procedure. A query of the trauma registry for the study period revealed 1453 adult individuals with blunt abdominal trauma, with 458 patients meeting the inclusion criteria. The clinical characteristics of the 79 US+/Conf+ examinations were compared to those of the 53 US-/Conf+ examinations. The presence of a radiographically proven pelvic fracture (odds ratio 3.459; 95% confidence interval of 1.308-9.157) and a radiographically or operatively proven renal injury (odds ratio 3.667; 95% confidence interval of 1.013-13.275) were found to be significant predictors. The presence of a pelvic fracture or renal injury in adult victims of blunt abdominal trauma increases the likelihood of a US-/Conf+ examination. Patients with a negative FAST

  6. 78 FR 79460 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Infectious Diseases, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chonqing, China, engaged in... virus in Chinese patients with seronegative hepatitis discovered by deep sequencing.'' Proc. Natl....

  7. [The new atherogenic plasma index reflects the triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol ratio, the lipoprotein particle size and the cholesterol esterification rate: changes during lipanor therapy].

    PubMed

    Dobiásová, M; Frohlich, J

    2000-03-01

    The new atherogenic plasma index (AIP) is a logarithmic transformation of the ratio of the molar triglyceride (TG) concentration and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). AIP correlates closely with the size of LDL particles (r = 0.8) and esterification rate of plasma cholesterol devoid of apo B lipoproteins (FERHDL), r = 0.9 which are considered at present the most sensitive indicators of the atherogenic plasma profile. AIP was recommended by the authors, based on analysis of results of 11 previous studies (1156 subjects) where FERHDL and plasma lipid parameters were investigated in different groups of people who differed as to the atherogenic risk. The AIP index was moreover used for evaluation of a clinical study comprising 609 patients with hyperlipidaemia, who were treated for three months with ciprofibrate (Lipanor). The mean AIP values of non-risk groups (plasma from umbilical blood, children, healthy women etc.) equalled zero or were lower, while with an increasing atherogenic risk (men, women after the menopause) AIP reached positive values, incl. high positive values in risk groups (plasma of diabetic subjects, patients with HLP, patients with positive angiography, myocardial infarction etc.). In all groups women had lower AIP values as compared with males. In patients after Lipanor therapy the AIP declined (from 0.58 +/- 0.17 to 0.33_0.18 in men, from 0.50 +/- 0.18 to 0.21 +/- 0.19 in women). If we consider AIP values from negative ones to 0.15 as "safe" from the aspect of atherogenicity, before Lipanor treatment these "safe" levels were recorded in 1.5% men and in 5.2% women and after treatment in 32% men and 48% women. The results indicate, that AIP which reflects the plasma lipoprotein profile quantifies the relations between TG and HDL-C and thus can be an objective indicator of the atherogenic risk and effectiveness of treatment and it is useful because it can be assessed in any surgery. PMID:11048517

  8. Characterization of the Porphobilinogen Deaminase Deficiency in Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Peter M.; Reddy, Raman M.; Anderson, Karl E.; Desnick, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    The molecular pathology of the porphobilinogen (PBG)-deaminase deficiency in heterozygotes for acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) was investigated by means of biochemical and immunologic techniques. The stable enzyme-substrate intermediates (A, B, C, D, and E) of PBG-deaminase were separated by anion-exchange chromatography of erythrocyte lysates from heterozygotes for AIP and normal individuals. In normal lysates, the intermediates eluted in a characteristic pattern with decreasing amounts of activity (A > B > C > D > E), the combined A and B intermediates representing >75% of total recovered activity. In contrast, two different profiles were observed in lysates from heterozygotes for AIP. In most heterozygotes, the elution profile was similar to that of normal individuals, but each intermediate was reduced ∼50%. A second profile in which the C intermediate had disproportionately higher activity than the A or B intermediates was observed in asymptomatic heterozygotes with high urinary levels of PBG (>5 μg/ml) as well as in heterozygotes during acute attacks. These findings suggested that the C intermediate (the dipyrrole-enzyme intermediate) may be rate limiting in the stepwise conversion of the monopyrrole, PBG, to the linear tetrapyrrole, hydroxymethylbilane. To investigate further the nature of the enzymatic defect in AIP, sensitive immunotitration and immunoelectrophoretic assays were developed with the aid of a rabbit anti-human PBG-deaminase IgG preparation produced against the homogeneous enzyme. Equal amounts of erythrocyte lysate activity from 32 heterozygotes for AIP from 22 unrelated families and 35 normal individuals were immunoelectrophoresed. There were no detectable differences in the amounts of cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM) in lysates from the normal individuals and 25 heterozygotes from 21 of the 22 unrelated families with AIP. In contrast, when equal enzymatic activities were coimmunoelectrophoresed, all seven heterozygotes from

  9. Nox2 Modification of LDL Is Essential for Optimal Apolipoprotein B-mediated Control of agr Type III Staphylococcus aureus Quorum-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Pamela R.; Elmore, Bradley O.; Spang, Cynthia H.; Alexander, Susan M.; Manifold-Wheeler, Brett C.; Castleman, Moriah J.; Daly, Seth M.; Peterson, M. Michal; Sully, Erin K.; Femling, Jon K.; Otto, Michael; Horswill, Alexander R.; Timmins, Graham S.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus contains an autoinducing quorum-sensing system encoded within the agr operon that coordinates expression of virulence genes required for invasive infection. Allelic variation within agr has generated four agr specific groups, agr I–IV, each of which secretes a distinct autoinducing peptide pheromone (AIP1-4) that drives agr signaling. Because agr signaling mediates a phenotypic change in this pathogen from an adherent colonizing phenotype to one associated with considerable tissue injury and invasiveness, we postulated that a significant contribution to host defense against tissue damaging and invasive infections could be provided by innate immune mechanisms that antagonize agr signaling. We determined whether two host defense factors that inhibit AIP1-induced agrI signaling, Nox2 and apolipoprotein B (apoB), also contribute to innate control of AIP3-induced agrIII signaling. We hypothesized that apoB and Nox2 would function differently against AIP3, which differs from AIP1 in amino acid sequence and length. Here we show that unlike AIP1, AIP3 is resistant to direct oxidant inactivation by Nox2 characteristic ROS. Rather, the contribution of Nox2 to defense against agrIII signaling is through oxidation of LDL. ApoB in the context of oxLDL, and not LDL, provides optimal host defense against S. aureus agrIII infection by binding the secreted signaling peptide, AIP3, and preventing expression of the agr-driven virulence factors which mediate invasive infection. ApoB within the context of oxLDL also binds AIP 1-4 and oxLDL antagonizes agr signaling by all four agr alleles. Our results suggest that Nox2-mediated oxidation of LDL facilitates a conformational change in apoB to one sufficient for binding and sequestration of all four AIPs, demonstrating the interdependence of apoB and Nox2 in host defense against agr signaling. These data reveal a novel role for oxLDL in host defense against S. aureus quorum-sensing signaling. PMID:23459693

  10. Effects of Microstimulation in the Anterior Intraparietal Area during Three-Dimensional Shape Categorization

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Vogels, Rufin; Janssen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The anterior intraparietal area (AIP) of rhesus monkeys is part of the dorsal visual stream and contains neurons whose visual response properties are commensurate with a role in three-dimensional (3D) shape perception. Neuronal responses in AIP signal the depth structure of disparity-defined 3D shapes, reflect the choices of monkeys while they categorize 3D shapes, and mirror the behavioral variability across different stimulus conditions during 3D-shape categorization. However, direct evidence for a role of AIP in 3D-shape perception has been lacking. We trained rhesus monkeys to categorize disparity-defined 3D shapes and examined AIP's contribution to 3D-shape categorization by microstimulating in clusters of 3D-shape selective AIP neurons during task performance. We find that microstimulation effects on choices (monkey M1) and reaction times (monkey M1 and M2) depend on the 3D-shape preference of the stimulated site. Moreover, electrical stimulation of the same cells, during either the 3D-shape-categorization task or a saccade task, could affect behavior differently. Interestingly, in one monkey we observed a strong correlation between the strength of choice-related AIP activity (choice probabilities) and the influence of microstimulation on 3D-shape-categorization behavior (choices and reaction time). These findings propose AIP as part of the network responsible for 3D-shape perception. The results also show that the anterior intraparietal cortex contains cells with different tuning properties, i.e. 3D-shape- or saccade-related, that can be dynamically read out depending on the requirements of the task at hand. PMID:26295941

  11. Diffuse alveolar damage and acute interstitial pneumonitis: histochemical evaluation with lectins and monoclonal antibodies against surfactant apoprotein and collagen type IV.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, K; Kawai, T

    1993-05-01

    Diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) and acute interstitial pneumonitis (AIP) often present clinically as the adult respiratory distress syndrome. To evaluate the usefulness of histochemical techniques and to better understand the histopathologic changes of these diffuse lung injuries, postmortem lung sections of 14 and 33 patients who had been diagnosed as having DAD in organizing stage and AIP, respectively, were studied with the use of lectins and monoclonal antibodies against surfactant apoprotein (PE-10) and collagen type IV. On hematoxylin-eosin stained sections, type II pneumocyte hyperplasia and hyaline membrane formation were the major histopathologic findings in both DAD and AIP. The binding rates of type II pneumocytes to Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I) in both DAD (64%) and AIP (45%) cases were significantly higher than those of type I pneumocytes or alveolar macrophages (both P < 0.001). Reactions of type II pneumocytes to PE-10 varied from 40 to 44% in DAD and 0 to 100% in AIP cases depending on the use of respirator and steroid medication. Therefore, it may be said that UEA-I and PE-10 are useful methods for outlining hyperplastic type II pneumocytes in both DAD and AIP. Hyaline membrane coating alveolar septal surfaces and exudate in alveolar air spaces were also stainable with PE-10. Surfactant apoprotein remained demonstrable histochemically within type II pneumocytes and hyaline membrane despite severe inflammatory injuries of the lungs. The immunohistochemical stain using anti-collagen type IV antibody revealed discontinuous alveolar basement membrane in 50% of DAD patients with respirator use and 80% of AIP patients with steroid medication.

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis--recent advances.

    PubMed

    Novotný, I; Díte, P; Lata, J; Nechutová, H; Kianicka, B

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is recognized as a distinct clinical entity, identified as a chronic inflammatory process of the pancreas in which the autoimmune mechanism is involved. Clinically and histologically, AIP has two subsets: type 1--lymphoplasmatic sclerosing pancreatitis with abundant infiltration of the pancreas and other affected organs with immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cells, and type 2--duct centric fibrosis, characterized by granulocyte epithelial lesions in the pancreas without systemic involvement. In the diagnosis of AIP, two diagnostic criterions are used--the HISORt criteria and Asian Diagnostic Criteria. In the differential diagnosis, the pancreatic cancer must be excluded by endosonographically guided pancreatic biopsy. Typical signs of AIP are concomitant disorders in other organs (kidney, liver, biliary tract, salivary glands, colon, retroperitoneum, prostate). Novel clinicopathological entity was proposed as an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' (IgG4-RSC). Extensive IgG4-positive plasma cells and T lymphocyte infiltration is a common characteristics of this disease. Recently, IgG4-RSC syndrome was extended to a new entity, characterized by IgG4 hypergammaglobulinemia and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration, this being considered an expression of a lymphoproliferative disease, 'IgG4-positive multiorgan lymphoproliferative syndrome'. This syndrome includes Mikulicz's disease, mediastinal fibrosis, autoimmune hypophysitis, and inflammatory pseudotumor--lung, liver, breast. In the therapy of AIP, steroids constitute first-choice treatment. High response to the corticosteroid therapy is an important diagnostic criterion. In the literature, there are no case-control studies that determine if AIP predisposes to pancreatic cancer. Undoubtedly, AIP is currently a hot topic in pancreatology.

  13. Distinct Spatiotemporal Activation Patterns of the Perirhinal-Entorhinal Network in Response to Cortical and Amygdala Input

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Janske G. P.; Wadman, Wytse J.; Cappaert, Natalie L. M.

    2016-01-01

    The perirhinal (PER) and entorhinal cortex (EC) receive input from the agranular insular cortex (AiP) and the subcortical lateral amygdala (LA) and the main output area is the hippocampus. Information transfer through the PER/EC network however, is not always guaranteed. It is hypothesized that this network actively regulates the (sub)cortical activity transfer to the hippocampal network and that the inhibitory system is involved in this function. This study determined the recruitment by the AiP and LA afferents in PER/EC network with the use of voltage sensitive dye (VSD) imaging in horizontal mouse brain slices. Electrical stimulation (500 μA) of the AiP induced activity that gradually propagated predominantly in the rostro-caudal direction: from the PER to the lateral EC (LEC). In the presence of 1 μM of the competitive γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor antagonist bicuculline, AiP stimulation recruited the medial EC (MEC) as well. In contrast, LA stimulation (500 μA) only induced activity in the deep layers of the PER. In the presence of bicuculline, the initial population activity in the PER propagated further towards the superficial layers and the EC after a delay. The latency of evoked responses decreased with increasing stimulus intensities (50–500 μA) for both the AiP and LA stimuli. The stimulation threshold for evoking responses in the PER/EC network was higher for the LA than for the AiP. This study showed that the extent of the PER/EC network activation depends on release of inhibition. When GABAA dependent inhibition is reduced, both the AiP and the LA activate spatially overlapping regions, although in a distinct spatiotemporal fashion. It is therefore hypothesized that the inhibitory network regulates excitatory activity from both cortical and subcortical areas that has to be transmitted through the PER/EC network. PMID:27378860

  14. Detection and Extent of Ancient, Buried Mare Deposits in South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA):Implications for Robotic Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, N. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Gaddis, L. R.; Pieters, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    possible cryptomare units. We will assess the distribution of the gabbroic region using these above datasets to determine what relation, if any, this unit has to surrounding cryptomare and plains units. The definitive identification of cryptomare units has important implications for the selection of appropriate landing sites to sample SPA-derived impact-melt [10]. [1] Head, J. W., et al., (1993) JGR, 98, 17,149-117,181. [2] Yingst, R. A. and J. W. Head, (1999) JGR, 104, 18957-18979. [3] Pieters, C. M., et al., (2001) JGR, 106, 28001-28022. [4] Stuart-Alexander, D. E., (1978) Geologic map of the central far side of the Moon, I-1047. [5] Wilhelms, D. E., et al., (1979) Geologic map of the South side of the Moon, I-1162. [6] Petro, N., et al., (2010) GSA SP: Recent Advances in Lunar Stratigraphy, In Press. [7] Head, J. W., III and L. Wilson, (1992) GCA, 56, 2155-2175. [8] Schultz, P. H. and P. D. Spudis, (1979) Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf., 10, 2899-2918. [9] Haruyama, J., et al., (2009) Science, 323, 905-908. [10] Jolliff, B., et al., (2010) These proceedings.

  15. Modelling of the effect of a sea-level rise and land subsidence on the evolution of the groundwater density in the subsoil of the northern part of the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meij, J. L.; Minnema, B.

    1999-12-01

    The Province of Friesland is conducting a study on possible future changes in the surface water and groundwater systems of Friesland. The aim of the study is to assess what changes might be caused by land subsidence and a rise in sea level—focusing in particular on the salinization of the surface water—by modelling the flow of groundwater in the coastal zone of the Province of Friesland. A three-dimensional density distribution of groundwater (based on the chloride distribution in the groundwater) can be projected by using the density dependent version of the MLAEM software: MVAEM (Strack, O.D.L., 1989. Multi-layer aquifer modeling using the analytical element method. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. on the use of models to findworking solutions to groundwater problems, National Water Well Association, Dublin, Ohio, USA, 1995). Construction of a fully three-dimensional density distribution is based on irregularly spaced chloride concentration data points. These are interpolated using a three-dimensional multi-quadric interpolator (in MVAEM). For some parts of the model area, chloride data were not available (e.g. the Wadden Sea); for these regions chloride concentrations were estimated (based on geo-electric and other information) and assigned to artificial data points, which were added to the data set. The techniques used for this process were developed during the construction of the coastal elements in NAGROM—the NAtional GROundwater Model for The Netherlands (De Lange, W.J., van der Meij, J.L., 1995. NAGROM (National GROundwater Model). RIZA, Lelystad, TNO-GG, Delft, The Netherlands; De Lange, W.J., 1996. Groundwater modeling of large domains with analytic elements. Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands). The influences of a sea-level rise and land subsidence on the groundwater system were simulated by computational modelling of density-driven groundwater flow. The groundwater model that was used is a refined version of the regional model contained in

  16. The Ecological Monitoring Of Atmosphere Pollution In A City With Microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, I. B.; Zemlyanukhina, O. M.; Ivanova, E. V.

    2007-05-01

    The ecological problem is a problem of mutual relation of a society and nature preservation of an environment. The development of industry results in increasing of the atmosphere pollution. This paper presents the measurements of degree of pollution zone on several links with length di each. The amount of links depends on city dimension and on presence of enterprises with emission into atmosphere of harmful substances. It is known, that by the emissions in an atmosphere of harmful substances (CO, CO2 , NO etc) the environment refraction coefficient nAV (average value) is changed. So, the phase progression of microwave kd identifies the properties of an environment, where k - microwave propagation constant. In a paper (I. B. Shirokov, M. V. Ivashina, Amplitude and Phase Progression Measurements on Microwave Line-of- Sight Links, IEEE Conf. Proc. IGARSS'01, Sydney, Australia) it was shown the possibility of phase progression measurement on microwave. In this paper it is suggested to abandon the synchronization of the microwave oscillations by low frequency oscillations and to use the origin microwave oscillations as heterodyne ones with the same initial phase and a frequency shift. The length of measurement link can reach several kilometers, so the phase stability of link in low frequency band was enough for phase measurement on microwave band with high accuracy, because of length of testing link is much less than low frequency wavelength. So, presented method let us measure phase difference, which is proportional to phase progression of microwave on line-of-sight link. Taking into account that phase progression of microwave depends on refraction coefficient of medium n, we have possibility to carry out the ecological monitoring of region, where the testing link is placed. However, the phase measurements are uncertain principally. In a paper it is presented the possibility of elimination of these disadvantages by the changing of the frequency f of microwave

  17. Trace Elements in Chondritic Cosmic Dust: Volatile Correlation with CA Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Sutton, S. R.

    1992-07-01

    depleted from CI in the smooth group. We separated the particles into normal-Ca and low-Ca (Ca<1/3xCI) groups using SXRF Ca abundance or JSC Catalog EDX spectra. Although this does not provide a perfect separation into hydrated and anhydrous particles, the average compositions of the low-Ca and normal-Ca groups show distinct differences. The normal-Ca group is enriched in Mn, Cu, Ga, Ge, and Se by ~2x over the low-Ca group. Br and Zn are each enriched by approximately the same factor in both groups, but the average Zn content is dominated by one Zn-rich particle (probably containing a large ZnS) in each group. If Ca abundance is a general indicator of mineralogy, the anhydrous particles are more volatile rich than the hydrated particles. This is opposite the trend in meteorites, with hydrated CI meteorites being the most volatile rich. REFERENCES: Flynn G.J. and Sutton S.R. (1991) Meteoritics, 26, 334. Flynn G.J. and Sutton S.R. (1992a) Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf., Vol. 22, 171-184. Flynn G.J. and Sutton S.R. (1992b) Lunar Planet. Sci. XXIII, 373-374. Flynn G.J. et al. (1992) Lunar Planet. Sci. XXIII, 375-376. Jessberger E.K. et al. (1991) Meteoritics, 26, 352. Schramm L.S. et al. (1989) Meteoritics, 24, 99-112. Figure 1, which in the hard copy appears here, shows the average trace element contents of chondritic cosmic dust.

  18. Spatial Distribution and Characteristics of Graben on the Lunar Nearside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahm, Amanda

    2016-04-01

    mare margins. In some places within and on the margins of the maria, graben are observed to cut 'highland islands,' that is, graben cut older highland terrain but not mare. This observation indicates that graben in these locations are younger than the highland material but older than the maria, providing a means with which to constrain the timing of faulting, critical for understanding the temporal distribution and evolution of stresses on the lunar nearside. In addition, these observations will help determine the source(s) of stress responsible for the formation of graben on the lunar nearside. References: [1] Lucchitta and Watkins (1978), Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 9, 3459-3472. [2] Watters and Johnson (2010), in Planetary Tectonics, pp. 121-182, Cambridge University Press. [3] Nahm and Schultz (2013), Geol. Soc. Sp. Pub. 401, 377-394.

  19. Coupling of WRF meteorological model to WAM spectral wave model through sea surface roughness at the Balearic Sea: impact on wind and wave forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolosana-Delgado, R.; Soret, A.; Jorba, O.; Baldasano, J. M.; Sánchez-Arcilla, A.

    2012-04-01

    scope of the 7th EU FP Project FIELD_AC, assesses the impact of coupling WAM and WRF on wind and wave forecasts on the Balearic Sea, and compares it with other possible improvements, like using available high-resolution circulation information from MyOcean GMES core services, or assimilating altimeter data on the Western Mediterranean. This is done in an ordered fashion following statistical design rules, which allows to extract main effects of each of the factors considered (coupling, better circulation information, data assimilation following Lionello et al., 1992) as well as two-factor interactions. Moreover, the statistical significance of these improvements can be tested in the future, though this requires maximum likelihood ratio tests with correlated data. Charnock, H. (1955) Wind stress on a water surface. Quart.J. Row. Met. Soc. 81: 639-640 Donelan, M. (1982) The dependence of aerodynamic drag coefficient on wave parameters. Proc. 1st Int. Conf. on Meteorology and Air-Sea Interactions of teh Coastal Zone. The Hague (Netherlands). AMS. 381-387 Janssen, P.A.E.M., Doyle, J., Bidlot, J., Hansen, B., Isaksen, L. and Viterbo, P. (1990) The impact of oean waves on the atmosphere. Seminars of the ECMWF. Lionello, P., Günther, H., and Janssen P.A.E.M. (1992) Assimilation of altimeter data in a global third-generation wave model. Journal of Geophysical Research 97 (C9): 453-474. Warner, J., Armstrong, B., He, R. and Zambon, J.B. (2010) Development of a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System. Ocean Modelling 35: 230-244.

  20. Two-way WKB Approximation Applied to GPR - COST Action TU1208

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopovich, Igor; Popov, Alexei; Marciniak, Marian; Pajewski, Lara

    2016-04-01

    account. In this work we study bistatic EM pulse probing of a horizontally layered medium in a 2D case. Coupled WKB equations set describing both forward and backward waves are derived and solved analytically. The comparison of our semi-analytical solutions with numerical calculations by gprMax software [4] demonstrates a good agreement, being hundreds of times faster than the letter. Our numerical results explain the protracted return pulses in the low-frequency GPR data. As an example, we discuss the experimental data obtained during the GPR mission in search of a big fragment of Chelyabinsk meteorite under a thick silt layer at the bottom of Chebarcul' Lake [5]. Acknowledgement The Authors are grateful to the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (www.cost.eu) facilitating this work by a Short-Term Scientific Missions (STSM) within the framework of the Action TU1208 "Civil engineering applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" (www.GPRadar.eu). References 1. H. Bremmer "Propagation of electromagnetic waves", in Handbuch der Physik, S. Flugge, Ed. Berlin-Goettingen-Heidelberg: Springer, 1958, pp. 423-639 2. L.M. Brekhovskikh, Waves in Stratified Media (in Russian). Moscow: USSR Academy of Sciences, 1957. 3. V.A.Vinogradov, V.V. Kopeikin, A.V. Popov, "An Approximate Solution of 1D Inverse Problem", in Proc. 10th Internat. Conf. on GPR, 21-24 June, 2004, Delft, The Netherlands 4. A. Giannopoulos, "Modelling ground penetrating radar by GprMax", Construction and Building Materials, vol. 19, no. 10, pp. 755-762, 2005, doi: 10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2005.06.007 5. V. V. Kopeikin , V. D. Kuznetsov, P. A. Morozov, A. V. Popov et al., "Ground penetrating radar investigation of the supposed fall site of a fragment of the Chelyabinsk meteorite in Lake Chebarkul'", Geochemistry International, vol. 51, no. 7, pp. 575-582, 2013, doi: 10.1134/S0016702913070112

  1. Solar Noble Gases from ACFER 111 Metal Etched in Vacuo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroni, A.; Begemann, F.

    1992-07-01

    /^20Ne)solar ratio is initially 585 (as in the Solar Wind), increases smoothly as etching proceeds, and, after reaching a maximum around 680, decreases to approximately 230 (Fig. 1, upper panel). These variations, especially in the last two steps of the experiment, where the solar gases are depleted in He, are most probably due to different depth distributions for He and Ne, with the implantation range of the lighter nuclide being shorter than that of the heavier one (5). Ignoring the implantation range effect, the variations imply that the ^4He/^20Ne ratio of the SW and the SEP do not differ by more than 20%. Although we do not recognize significant variations in the (^20Ne/^36Ar)solar ratio (Fig. 1 lower panel), possibly because of larger experimental errors, the data imply again that SW and the SEP do not differ by more than 20% in the ^20Ne/^36Ar ratio also. References (1) Wieler et al. (1986) GCA 50, 1997-2017. (2) Benkert et al. (1988) LPSC IXX. (3) Wieler et al. (1992) LPSC XXIII (4) Anders and Grevesse GCA 53, 197-214 (5) Kiko et al. (1978) Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 9th, 1655-1665.

  2. Inhomogeneities Between and Within Moldavites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, J.-M.; Meisel, T.

    1995-09-01

    ratios, the Bohemian subfield contains the tektites of unusual composition and covers a large range in element abundances and ratios. Moldavites from the Lusatian population contain glasses of mainly normal Bohemian and Moravian composition and also cover a large range in composition. So far no tektites of unusual composition have been discovered in the Lusatian subfield. References: [1] Bouska V. I. and Konta J. (1986) Acta Univ. Carolinae, Geol. 1, 1-126. [2] Delano J. W. and Lindsley D. H. (1982) GCA, 46, 2447-2452. [3] Rost R. (1966) Acta Univ. Carolinae, Geol. 4, 235-242. [4] Delano J. W. et al. (1988) Proc. 2nd Intl. Conf. Nat. Glasses, 221-230. [5] Bouska V. I. and Cilek V. (1992) Vestn. Cesk. Geol. Ust., 67, 225-234. [6] Meisel T. et al. (1993) Meteoritics, 28, 397-398.

  3. Development of Natural Alkalinity in Appalachian Deep Coal Mine Discharges, Irwin Syncline, Pennsylvania, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, E. M.; Winters, W. R.; Winters, W. R.; Capo, R. C.

    2001-12-01

    dissolution. The discharges in the southwestern sub-basins, however, exhibit a significant excess of sodium relative to chloride that correlates with increasing alkalinity. Modeling results are consistent with the development of net alkaline waters as a result of limestone dissolution enhanced by subsurface cation exchange reactions with coal overburden clay minerals such as illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite. The data suggest these processes occur in deeper sub-basins (overburden thickness greater than 100 m), dominated by groundwaters derived from neighboring mine pools with minimum infiltration of surface waters; this is corroborated by calculated infiltration rates for these sub-basins. [1]Weaver, T. J., Capo, R.C., Hedin, R. S., 1997, Geol. Soc. Am. Abstr. Prog., v. 29, A-321. [2]Winters, W.R., Capo, R.C., Wolinsky, M.W., Weaver, T.J., Hedin, R.S., 1999, Proc. 16th Ann. Int. Pittsburgh Coal Conf., sect. 6-5, p. 1-36. [3]Parkhurst, D.L. and Appelo, C.A.J., 1999, USGS Water Res. Invest. Rept. 99-4259, 326 p.

  4. Mineral inclusions and geochemical characteristics of microdiamonds from the DO27, A154, A21, A418, DO18, DD17 and Ranch Lake kimberlites at Lac de Gras, Slave Craton, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rondi M.; Griffin, William L.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Doyle, Buddy J.

    2004-09-01

    A mineral inclusion, carbon isotope, nitrogen content, nitrogen aggregation state and morphological study of 576 microdiamonds from the DO27, A154, A21, A418, DO18, DD17 and Ranch Lake kimberlites at Lac de Gras, Slave Craton, was conducted. Mineral inclusion data show the diamonds are largely eclogitic (64%), followed by peridotitic (25%) and ultradeep (11%). The paragenetic abundances are similar to macrodiamonds from the DO27 kimberlite (Davies, R.M., Griffin, W.L., O'Reilly, S.Y., 1999. Diamonds from the deep: pipe DO27, Slave craton, Canada. In: Gurney, J.J., Gurney, J.L., Pascoe, M.D., Richardson, S.H. (Eds.), The J. B. Dawson Vol., Proc. 7th Internat. Kimberlite Conf., Red Roof Designs, Cape Town, pp. 148-155) but differ to diamonds from nearby kimberlites at Ekati (e.g., Lithos (2004); Tappert, R., Stachel, T., Harris, J.W., Brey, G.P., 2004. Mineral Inclusions in Diamonds from the Panda Kimberlite, S. P., Canada. 8th International Kimberlite Conference, extended abstracts) and Snap Lake to the south (Dokl. Earth Sci. 380 (7) (2001) 806), that are dominated by peridotitic stones. Eclogitic diamonds with variable inclusion compositions and temperatures of formation (1040-1300 °C) crystallised at variable lithospheric depths sometimes in changing chemical environments. A large range to very 13C-depleted C-isotope compositions ( δ13C=-35.8‰ to -2.2‰) and an NMORB bulk composition, calculated from trace elements in garnet and clinopyroxene inclusions, are consistent with an origin from subducted oceanic crust and sediments. Carbon isotopes in the peridotitic diamonds have mantle compositions ( δ13C mode -4.0‰). Mineral inclusion compositions are largely harzburgitic. Variable temperatures of formation (garnet TNi=800-1300 °C) suggest the peridotitic diamonds originate from the shallow ultra-depleted and deeper less depleted layers of the central Slave lithosphere. Carbon isotopes ( δ13C av.=-5.1‰) and mineral inclusions in the ultradeep diamonds

  5. Do Lunar Soils Tell us When the Geomagnetic Field First Appeared?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.; Miura, Y. N.; Podosek, F. A.; Seki, K.

    2003-12-01

    directly hit the lunar surface. Isotopic inventory considerations suggest that the implantation of about 1E4cm-2s-1 of N of terrestrial origin would suffice to explain the hypothesized non-solar N in ancient lunar soils. This amount of non-solar N could be attributed to terrestrial N that was transported to the Moon if the Earth did not have a geomagnetic field. It is known that the dynamical coupling between the Earth and the Moon is so stable that the near side of the Moon has remained facing the Earth for nearly the whole history of the Earth-Moon system [7]. Therefore, we predict that a considerable amount of terrestrial N would be observable in near side lunar soils whose exposure times predate the commencement of the geomagnetic field, whereas soils from the far side should not show terrestrial components. We propose that comparison of N isotopic components in ancient lunar soils from the far side with those from the near side could help resolve the time of the appearance of the geomagnetic field. [1] Hale C.J. Nature, 399, 249, 1987. [2] Seki et al., Science, 291, 1847, 2001. [3] Kasprzak et al. JGR, 11, 175, 1991. [4] Grebowsky et al. JGR, 9055, 1993. [5] Abe Y., Lithos, 30, 223, 1993. [6] Abe M. et al., Proc. 30th Int. Geological Conf., 26, 1, 1997. [7] Murray C.D. and Dermott, S.F., Solar System Dynamics, Cambridge Univ. Press,1999.

  6. Hydrate pingoes at Nyegga - natural small-scale carbon capture laboratories?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M. T.; Rueslaatten, H.

    2009-12-01

    methane clathrates into CO2 hydrates by segregation. A ‘Chinese hat’ (steel cone) could for example be put over one of the most accessible pingoes, to collect fluids emitting from it. After a year or so of fluid type and flux monitoring, the next research step could for example be to inject a known volume of CO2 into the base of the pingo and monitor what happens to the flux and fluid type emitting from it. Such pioneering experiments will call for a high degree of international cooperation and probably also the involvement of industry partners, especially with respect to offshore multi-purpose vessel support. References Hovland, M., Svensen, H., 2006. Marine Geology 228, 15-23 Ivanov et al., 2007. EOS 88 (19), 209, 212 Westbrook et al., 2008. ICGH Conf. Proc., Vancouver, July 6-10

  7. Improving Short Wave Breaking Behavior In Surfbeat Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelvink, J.; Daly, C.; Vandongeren, A. R.; van Thiel de Vries, J.; McCall, R.

    2009-12-01

    C. Obviously this has important consequences for the forcing of both long waves and mean currents. In our presentation we will show results of comparisons of both formulations. References. Arcilla, A.S., Roelvink, J.A., O'Connor, B.A. Reniers, A., and Jimenez. J.A. The Delta Flume '93 Experiment. Coastal Dynamics '94. Arcilla, Stive and Kraus (eds), ASCE, New York, pp. 488-502. Battjes, J.A. and J.P.F.M. Janssen, (1978), Energy loss and set-up due to breaking in random waves, Proc. 16th Int. Coastal Eng. Conf., Hamburg, vol. 1: 569-587. Dally, W.R. (1992) Random breaking waves: Field verification of a wave-by-wave algorithm for engineering application. Coastal Engineering, Volume 16, Issue 4, March 1992, Pages 369-397. Roelvink, Dano, Ad Reniers, Ap van Dongeren, Jaap van Thiel de Vries, Robert McCall, Jamie Lescinski. Modelling storm impacts on beaches, dunes and barrier islands, Coast. Eng. (2009), doi:10.1016/j.coastaleng.2009.08.006 Roelvink, J.A. Dissipation in random wave groups incident on a beach. Coastal Eng., 19 (1993) pp. 127-150.

  8. Morphodynamics structures induced by variations of the channel width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duro, Gonzalo; Crosato, Alessandra; Tassi, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    alluvial rivers. References Crosato A. and Mosselman E., 2009. Simple physics-based predictor for the number of river bars and the transition between meandering and braiding. Water Resources Research, 45, W03424, doi: 10.1029/2008WR007242. Crosato A., Mosselman E., Desta F.B. and Uijttewaal W.S.J., 2011. Experimental and numerical evidence for intrinsic nonmigrating bars in alluvial channels. Water Resources Research, AGU, 47(3), W03511, doi 10.1029/2010WR009714. Frascati A. and Lanzoni S., 2013. A mathematical model for meandering rivers with varying width. J. Geophys. Res.Earth Surf., 118, doi:10.1002/jgrf.20084. Olesen K.W., 1984. Alternate bars in and meandering of alluvial rivers. In: River Meandering, Proc. of the Conf. Rivers '83, 24-26 Oct. 1983, New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.A., ed. Elliott C.M., pp. 873-884, ASCE, New York. ISBN 0-87262-393-9. Repetto R., Tubino, M. and Paola C., 2002. Planimetric instability of channels with variable width. J. Fluid Mech., 457, 79-109. Struiksma N., Olesen K.W., Flokstra C. and De Vriend H.J., 1985. Bed deformation in curved alluvial channels. J. Hydraul. Res., 23(1), 57- 79. Wu F.-C. and Yeh T.-H., 2005. Forced bars induced by variations of channel width: Implications for incipient bifurcation. J. Geophys. Res., 110, F02009, doi:10.1029/2004JF000160. Zolezzi, G., R. Luchi, and M. Tubino (2012), Modeling morphodynamic processes in meandering rivers with spatial width variations, Rev. Geophys., 50, RG4005, doi:10.1029/2012RG000392.

  9. Ejecta velocity distribution of impact craters formed on quartz sand: Effect of projectile density on crater scaling law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujido, Sayaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Suzuki, Ayako I.; Yasui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    . Pergamon, NY, pp. 1003-1008). Therefore, we used the extended Z-model by Croft (Croft, S.K. [1980]. Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 11, 2347-2378), which could be applied to the crater excavation process when the point source was buried at the depth of d under the target surface, and then all the experimental results of μ and θ were reasonably explained by suitable Z and d values of the extended Z-model.

  10. Insolation and Resulting Surface Temperatures of the Kuiper-Rudaki Study Region on Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Karin E.; Hiesinger, Harald; D'Amore, Mario; Helbert, Jörn; Weinauer, Julia

    2016-04-01

    cold poles along the equator. The region shows smooth plains surrounding crater Rudaki (˜120km), as well as cratered terrain around the prominent crater Kuiper (˜60km) and has been extensively covered by measurements during the MESSENGER mission. Temperatures range from about 100K during the night to 570K (cold pole) and 700K (hot pole) at local noon. The floor of Kuiper crater reaches temperatures of ˜660K at local noon, while those at Rudaki crater are 625K (+/-5K). Due to their higher albedo, the rays of Kuiper crater are about 5K colder than the surrounding regions. These temperature estimates will aid the accurate interpretation of future MERTIS spectra of the region obtained during the BepiColombo mission [10]. References: [1] Hiesinger, H. et al. (2010), PSS 58, 144-165. [2] Helbert, J. et al. (2005), LPSC XXXVI, #1753. [3] Keihm, S.J. and Langseth, M.G. (1973), Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 4th, 2503-2513. [4] Lawson, S.L. et al. (2000), JGR 105, E5, 4273-4290. [5] Pieters, C.M. et al. (2009), Science 326, 568-572. [6] Paige, D.A. et al. (2010), Space Sci. Rev 150, 125-160. [7] Bauch, K.E. et al. (2014), PSS 101, 27-36. [8] Vasavada, A. et al. (1999), Icarus 141, 179-193. [9] Solomon, S.C. et al. (2008), Science 321, 59-62. [10] D'Amore et al. (2013), AGU, #P13A-1735.

  11. Insolation and Resulting Surface Temperatures of Study Regions on the Moon and Implications for Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Karin E.; Hiesinger, Harald

    2010-05-01

    simulation, we use topography data from the Moon and transfer them as model regions to the surface of Mercury. When calculated with lunar parameters, this allows us to compare the results to lunar temperature measurements of the Apollo, Clementine and Chandrayaan missions (e.g. Keihm and Langseth (1973), Lawson et al. (2000), Pieters et al. (2009)). It also allows a direct comparison of the insolation and thermal variation between craters on the lunar and mercurian surface. Hiesinger, H. et al. (2010), PSS 58, 144-165; Helbert, J. et al. (2005), LPSC XXXVI, Abstract #1753; Clark, R.N. (2009), Science 326, 562-564; Pieters, C.M. et al. (2009), Science 326, 568-572; Sunshine, J.M. et al. (2009), Science 326, 565-568; Bauch, K.E. et al. (2009) LPSC XL, Abstract #1789; Keihm, S.J. and Langseth, M.G. (1973), Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 4th, 2503-2513; Lawson, S.L. et al. (2000), JGR 105, E5, 4273-4290

  12. The Early Shape of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.; Perera, V.; Nimmo, F.; Zuber, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    that the values of C2,0/C2,2 are approximately equal to the values expected for each unique process: -1.3 and -1.0, for compensated (tidal-heating) and uncompensated (fossil bulge) topography components, respectively. However, if we had not removed the effects of large basins, the ratios would not be in agreement. In conclusion, a combination of early tidal heating in the crust and a frozen fossil bulge can help explain the global, pre-basin shape of the Moon. References [1] W.F. Sedgwick, On the figure of the Moon, Messenger Math. 27 (1898) 171. [2] H. Jeffreys, On the figures of the Earth and Moon, Geophys. J. Int. 4 (1937) 1-13. [3] H.C. Urey, et al., Note on the internal structure of the Moon, Ap. J. 129 (1959) 842. [4] K. Lambeck, S. Pullan, The lunar fossil bulge hypothesis revisited, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 22 (1980) 29-35. [5] D.J. Stevenson, Origin and implications of the degree two lunar gravity field, Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf. 32nd (2001) 1175. [6] I. Garrick-Bethell, et al., Structure and formation of the lunar farside highlands, Science 330 (2010) 949-951.

  13. Ceres composition as inferred by the VIR-Dawn imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longobardo, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    been formed in the outer Solar System before to migrate in its actual location [9]. References [1] Russell, C.T. et al., Science, 336, 684, 2012 [2] De Sanctis M.C. et al., Space Sci. Rev., 163, 329-336, 2011 [3] Longobardo, A. et al., LPSC abstract, #2239, 2016 [4] De Sanctis, M.C. et al., LPSC abstract, #1832, 2016 [5] De Sanctis, M.C. et al., Nature, 528, 241-244, 2015 [6] Palomba, E. et al., LPSC abstract, #2166, 2016 [7] Ammannito, E. et al., LPSC abstract, #3020, 2016 [8] Johansen, A. et al., Sci. Adv. 1, 1500109, 2015 [9] McKinnon, W.B. et al., Proc. Conf. Asteroids, Comets, Meteors, # 6475, 2012

  14. The Influence of Relative Submergence on the Near-bed Flow Field: Implications for Bed-load Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, J.; Tait, S.; Marion, A.

    2005-12-01

    the above tests. The overlap between this distribution and the measured velocities are used to estimate entrainment rates. Predicted entrainment rates increase with relative submergence, even for similar bed shear stress. Assuming bed-load rate is the product of entrainment rate and hop length, and that hop lengths are sensibly stable, suggests that transport rate has a dependence on relative submergence. This demonstrates that transport rate is not a direct function of average bed shear stress. The results describe a mechanism that will cause river channels with contrasting morphologies (and different relative submergence) but similar levels of average bed stress to experience different levels of sediment mobility. Chegini A. Tait S. Heald J. McEwan I. 2002 The development of an automated system for the measurement of near bed turbulence and grain motion. Proc. ASCE Conf. on Hydraulic Measurements and Experimental Methods, ISBN 0-7844-0655-3. Drake T.G. Shreve R.L. Dietrich W.E. Whiting P.J. Leopold L.B. 1988 Bedload transport of fine gravel observed by motion-picture photography, J. Fluid Mech., 192, 193-217. Heald J. McEwan I. Tait, S. 2004 Sediment transport over a flat bed in a unidirectional flow: simulations and validation, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. of London A, 362, 1973-1986. Nelson J.M. Shreve R.L. McLean S.R. Drake T.G. 1995 Role of near-bed turbulence structure in bed-load transport and bed form mechanics, Water. Res. Res., 31, 8, 2071-2086.

  15. A comparison of dynamical and statistical downscaling methods for regional wave climate projections along French coastlines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laugel, Amélie; Menendez, Melisa; Benoit, Michel; Mattarolo, Giovanni; Mendez, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    110 coastal locations along the French coast. The model, based on the BAJ parameterization of the source terms (Bidlot et al, 2007) was calibrated against ten years of GlobWave altimeter observations (2000-2009) and validated through deep and shallow water buoy observations. The dynamical downscaling method has been performed with the same numerical wave model TOMAWAC used for building ANEMOC-2. Forecast simulations are forced by the 10m wind fields of ARPEGE-CLIMAT (A1B, A2, B1) from 2010 to 2100. The model covers the Atlantic Ocean and uses a spatial resolution along the French and European coast of 10 and 20 km respectively. The results of the model are stored with a time resolution of one hour. References: Benoit M., Marcos F., and F. Becq, (1996). Development of a third generation shallow-water wave model with unstructured spatial meshing. Proc. 25th Int. Conf. on Coastal Eng., (ICCE'1996), Orlando (Florida, USA), pp 465-478. Bidlot J-R, Janssen P. and Adballa S., (2007). A revised formulation of ocean wave dissipation and its model impact, technical memorandum ECMWF n°509. Menendez, M., Mendez, F.J., Izaguirre,C., Camus, P., Espejo, A., Canovas, V., Minguez, R., Losada, I.J., Medina, R. (2011). Statistical Downscaling of Multivariate Wave Climate Using a Weather Type Approach, 12th International Workshop on Wave Hindcasting and Forecasting and 3rd Coastal Hazard Symposium, Kona (Hawaii).

  16. Comparison between different approaches of modeling shallow landslide susceptibility: a case history in the area of Oltrepo Pavese, Northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zizioli, D.; Meisina, C.; Valentino, R.; Montrasio, L.

    2012-04-01

    , slope position index). In order to apply the different methods, a test area, with an extension of 17.5 km2, was selected in the sector of Oltrepo Pavese with the highest density of the April 2009 landslides. The main peculiarities distinguishing the different models are outlined and their predictive capabilities for the forecasting of the potential source areas are evaluated using a quantitative method (the ROC plot). TRIGRS is characterized by different levels of complexity and its results strongly depend on the quality and detail of input data. The SLIP model allows a "dynamic" (i.e. time-varying) stability analysis on territory scale. ANN and logistic regression are very promising and have the advantage to take into account some important predisposing factors in the study area, that are not considered by the other models. Finally, both the main limits and the most important advantages of the different methods are discussed, and comparisons between the results obtained are highlighted. Baum R L, Savage WZ, Godt JW (2008) TRIGRS - A FORTRAN program for transient rainfall infiltration and grid-based regional slope stability analysis, version 2.0. U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008-1159, 75 p. Montrasio L (2000) Stability analysis of soil slip. In: Brebbia, C.A.(Ed.), Proc. of International Conf. "Risk 2000", Wit Press, Southampton. Montrasio L, Valentino R (2008) A model for triggering mechanisms of shallow landslides. Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences 8: 1149-1159.

  17. Lunar cryptomare: Analysis of mineralogy and distribution of ancient volcanic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitten, J.; Head, J. W.; Pieters, C. M.; Kreslavsky, M. A.; Hiesinger, H.

    2012-12-01

    (LOLA) data are being used to understand the geologic context and surface roughness of these ancient volcanic deposits and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) image data are used to identify the exposure of lower albedo material or small dark-halo craters and also to help narrow down the boundary of the cryptomare deposits. In addition to topographic and image data, mineralogy data from the Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) instrument are being used to identify cryptomare deposits and to measure the compositional variability of the exposed mafic regions in these deposits. The measured mineral compositions of cryptomare deposits from dark-halo craters are compared with spectra collected from exposed mare deposits to determine if there are observable compositional differences. Our analyses support previous interpretations in the Schiller-Schickard region that suggest that the composition of volcanic deposits did not changed significantly during the ≥100 Ma of volcanic activity and that at least some of the cryptomare deposits in the region were emplaced in the Schiller-Zucchius basin. References Head, J.W. and L. Wilson, (1992) GCA, 55, 2155-2175. Schultz, P.H. and P.D. Spudis, (1079) Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf., 10th, 2899-2918. Whitten, J.L., J.W. Head, C.M. Pieters and H. Hiesinger, (2012) Lunar Sci. Forum, Abstract #592.

  18. Collaborative Catchment-Scale Water Quality Management using Integrated Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zia, Huma; Harris, Nick; Merrett, Geoff

    2013-04-01

    collaborative information sharing can have a direct influence on agricultural practice. We apply a nutrient management scheme to a model of an example catchment with several individual networks. The networks are able to correlate catchment events to events within their zone of influence, allowing them to adapt their monitoring and control strategy in light of wider changes across the catchment. Results indicate that this can lead to significant reductions in nutrient losses (up to 50%) and better reutilization of nutrients amongst farms, having a positive impact on catchment scale water quality and fertilizer costs. 1. EC, E.C., Directive 2000/60/EC establishing a framework for Community action in the field of water policy, 2000. 2. Rivers, M., K. Smettem, and P. Davies. Estimating future scenarios for farm-watershed nutrient fluxes using dynamic simulation modelling-Can on-farm BMPs really do the job at the watershed scale? in Proc.29th Int.Conf System Dynamics Society, 2011. 2010. Washington 3. Liu, C., et al., On-farm evaluation of winter wheat yield response to residual soil nitrate-N in North China Plain. Agronomy Journal, 2008. 100(6): p. 1527-1534. 4. Kotamäki, N., et al., Wireless in-situ sensor network for agriculture and water monitoring on a river basin scale in Southern Finland: Evaluation from a data user's perspective. Sensors, 2009. 9(4): p. 2862-2883.

  19. Distinct kimberlite pipe classes with contrasting eruption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, E. M. W.; Marsh, J. S.

    2004-09-01

    Field and Scott Smith [Field, M., Scott Smith, B.H., 1999. Contrasting geology and near-surface emplacement of kimberlite pipes in southern Africa and Canada. Proc. 7th Int. Kimb. Conf. (Eds. Gurney et al.) 1, 214-237.] propose that kimberlite pipes can be grouped into three types or classes. Classical or Class 1 pipes are the only class with characteristic low temperature, diatreme-facies kimberlite in addition to hypabyssal- and crater-facies kimberlite. Class 2 and 3 pipes are characterized only by hypabyssal-and crater-facies kimberlite. In an increasing number of Class 1 pipes a new kimberlite facies, transitional-facies kimberlite, is being found. In most cases this facies forms a zone several metres wide at the interface between the hypabyssal- and diatreme-facies. The transitional-facies exhibits textural and mineralogical features, which are continuously gradational between the hypabyssal and the diatreme types. The textural gradations are from a coherent magmatic texture to one where the rock becomes increasingly magmaclastic and this is accompanied by concomitant mineralogical gradations involving the decline and eventual elimination of primary calcite at the expense of microlitic diopside. Both transitional- and diatreme-facies kimberlites are considered to have formed in situ from intruding hypabyssal kimberlite magma as a consequence of exsolution of initially CO 2-rich volatiles from the volatile-rich kimberlite magma. The transitional-facies is initiated by volatile exsolution at depths of about 3 km below the original surface. With subsequent cracking through to the surface and resultant rapid decompression, the further catastrophic exsolution of volatiles and their expansion leads to the formation of the diatreme facies. Thus diatreme-facies kimberlite and Class 1 pipes are emplaced by essentially magmatic processes rather than by phreatomagmatism. Distinctly different petrographic features characterize crater-facies kimberlite in each of the

  20. Excavation of buried hydrated minerals on Mars by impact cratering? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.; Poulet, F.; Loizeau, D.; Bibring, J.

    2010-12-01

    buried, pre-existing phyllosilicates is thought to be the driving process. Other hydrated mineral formation pathways linked with impact cratering include impact-induced hydrothermal alteration [10-12], shock-induced and post-impact changes to mineral composition. [1]Poulet et al., Nature 438, 623 (2005). [2]Murchie et al., J. Geophys. Res. 114, E00D06 (2009). [3]Bibring et al., Science 312, 5772 (2006). [4]Baratoux et al., J. Geophys. Res. 112, E08S05 (2007). [5]Tanaka et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108, (E4), 8043 (2003). [6]Carter et al., Science 328, 1682 (2010). [7]Bibring et al., Eur. Space Agency Spec. Pub. 1240, 37 (2004). [8]Murchie et al., J. Geophys. Res. 114, E00D07 (2009). [9]Carter et al., Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 40, abstr. 2028 (2009). [10]Abramov and Kring, J. Geophys. Res. 110, (E12), E12S09 (2005). [11]Schwenzer and Kring, Geology 37, 1091 (2009). [12]Marzo et al., Icarus 208, 667-683 (2010).

  1. Numerical Results of Earth's Core Accumulation 3-D Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Yurie; Anfilogov, Vsevolod

    2013-04-01

    velocity-pressure variables is constructed on the base of the splitting method. The velocity field and pressure field we obtain using the checkerboard grid. The occurring and evolution of the initial heterogeneities in the growing planets is caused by heterogeneous distribution of falling accumulated bodies. 1.V.N. Anfilogov and Yu.V.Khachai A Possible Scenario of Material Differentiation at the Ini-tial Stage of the Earth's Formation // Doklady Earth Sciences. V. 403 A.N 6. 2005. 954-957 Transl. from Doklady Akademii Nauk.v.403.N 6.2005.803-806. 2.Khachay Yu., Anfilogov V. VARIANTS OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE EARTH ON ITS ACCUMULATION // Proc. of the 6th Orlov Conf. "The study of the Earth as a planet by methods of geophysics, geodesy and astronomy" K.: Akad. 2010.197-202. 3.V.N. Anfilogov and Yu.V.Khachay Differentiation of the mantle matter during the process of the Earth's accumulation and early crust formation // Litosphere, 2012, N6, 3-15.

  2. Real World Data and Service Integration: Demonstrations and Lessons Learnt from the GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilot Phase Four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonis, I.; Alameh, N.; Percivall, G.

    2012-04-01

    The GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilots (AIP) develop and pilot new process and infrastructure components for the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) and the broader GEOSS architecture through an evolutionary development process consisting of a set of phases. Each phase addresses a set of Societal Benefit Areas (SBA) and geoinformatic topics. The first three phases consisted of architecture refinements based on interactions with users; component interoperability testing; and SBA-driven demonstrations. The fourth phase (AIP-4) documented here focused on fostering interoperability arrangements and common practices for GEOSS by facilitating access to priority earth observation data sources and by developing and testing specific clients and mediation components to enable such access. Additionally, AIP-4 supported the development of a thesaurus for earth observation parameters and tutorials to guide data providers to make their data available through GEOSS. The results of AIP-4 are documented in two engineering reports and captured in a series of videos posted online. Led by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), AIP-4 built on contributions from over 60 organizations. This wide portfolio helped testing interoperability arrangements in a highly heterogeneous environment. AIP-4 participants cooperated closely to test available data sets, access services, and client applications in multiple workflows and set ups. Eventually, AIP-4 improved the accessibility of GEOSS datasets identified as supporting Critical Earth Observation Priorities by the GEO User Interface Committee (UIC), and increased the use of the data through promoting availability of new data services, clients, and applications. During AIP-4, A number of key earth observation data sources have been made available online at standard service interfaces, discovered using brokered search approaches, and processed and visualized in generalized client applications. AIP-4 demonstrated the level of interoperability

  3. A new, mainly dynamical, two-stage scenario for forming the Sun's planetary system and its relation to exoplanet findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmaston, M. F.

    2009-04-01

    leaving their second cloud and now deprived of the shielding by its dust. Contrasting with the solar system, the exoplanet database shows both that substantial eccentricity is widespread, and that it seems to grow with orbit radius. In our scenario this could arise from an infall column that was far from polar, making the (near-equatorial) PDW much stronger on one side of the star, which would 'puff' protoplanets additionally as they passed, building up their eccentricity. The scenario may have potential for building brown dwarfs and even disparate binaries. [1] Jeans, J. H., 1919, Problems of cosmogony and stellar dynamics, Adams Prize Essay, Univ. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 293 p. [2] Osmaston, M.F. (2000). J.Conf. Abstr. 5 (2) 762. [3] Osmaston, M.F. (2002) GCA 66 (S1)A571. [4] Osmaston, M. F. (2006) GCA 70 (18S) A465. [5] Osmaston, M.F. (in press) Continuum Theory: what can CT do that GR cannot? Fundamental illumination of the dynamical construction and evolution of well-observed spiral galaxies and planetary systems. In: Proc. 11th Int. Conf. on Physical Interpretations of Relativity Theory (PIRT XI), Imperial College, London, Sept. 2008, PD Publications, Liverpool.

  4. Model slope infiltration experiments for shallow landslides early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiano, E.; Greco, R.; Guida, A.; Olivares, L.; Picarelli, L.

    2009-04-01

    soil water content at the occurrence of slope failure is of key importance, since high soil moisture, in such loose granular soils, may lead the landslide to develop in a fast flowslide, either by modifying the rehological properties of the mud, or by affecting slope equilibrium. However, actual water content is not predictable from suction measurements alone, because soil water retention curve is modified by shear stress and by soil bulk volume change under wet conditions. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The research was co-financed by the Italian Ministry of University, by means of the PRIN 2006 PRIN program, within the research project entitled ‘Definition of critical rainfall thresholds for destructive landslides for civil protection purposes'. REFERENCES Damiano, E., 2004, Meccanismi d'innesco di colate di fango in terreni piroclastici, Ph.D. Thesis, Seconda Università degli studi di Napoli, Italy. Eckersely, J. 1990. Instrumented laboratory flowslides. Géotechnique, 40(3): 489-502 Greco, R., 2006, Soil water content inverse profiling from single TDR waveforms, Journal Hydrol., Vol. 317, pp. 325-339. Olivares, L. and Picarelli, L., 2001, Susceptibility of loose pyroclastic soils to static liquefaction - Some preliminary data, Int. Conf. Landslides - Causes, countermeasures and impacts. Davos Olivares, L., Damiano, E. and Picarelli, L., 2003, Wetting and flume tests on a volcanic ash, International Conference on Fast Slope Movements - Prediction and Prevention for Risk Mitigation, Naples, Italy, pp. 399-404. Olivares, L. and Picarelli, L., 2006, Modelling of flowslides behaviour for risk mitigation, General Report, Int. Conf. on Physical Modelling in Geotechnics, Hong Kong, Vol. 1, pp. 99-113. Olivares, L., Damiano, E., Greco, R., Zeni, L., Picarelli, L., Minardo, A., Guida, A. and Bernini, R., 2007, An instrumented flume for investigation of the mechanics of rainfall-induced landslides in unsaturated granular soils. Subbmitted for publication in ASTM Geotechnical Testing

  5. EDITORIAL: Terahertz nanotechnology Terahertz nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Reno, John L.

    2013-05-01

    an InGaAs heterostructure Nanotechnology 24 214007 [4] Chen H-T, Padilla W J, Zide J M O, Gossard A C, Taylor A J and Averitt R D 2006 Active terahertz metamaterial devices Nature 444 597-600 [5] Hans H 1991 Microwave technology in the terahertz region Brand Conf. Proc.—European Microwave Conf. vol 1, pp 16-35 [6]Joyce H J, Docherty C J, Gao Q, Tan H H, Jagadish C, Lloyd-Hughes J, Herz L M and Johnston M B 2013 Electronic properties of GaAs, InAs and InP nanowires studied by terahertz spectroscopy Nanotechnology 24 214006 [7] Knap W, Rumyantsev S, Vitiello M S, Coquillat D, Blin S, Dyakonova N, Shur M, Teppe F, Tredicucci A and Nagatsuma T 2013 Nanometer size field effect transistors for terahertz detectors Nanotechnology 24 214002 [8] Kawano Y 2013 Wide-band frequency-tunable terahertz and infrared detection with graphene Nanotechnology 24 214004 [9]Romeo L, Coquillat D, Pea M, Ercolani D, Beltram F, Sorba L, Knap W, Tredicucci A and Vitiello M S 2013 Nanowire-based field effect transistors for terahertz detection and imaging systems Nanotechnology 24 214005 [10] Son J-H 2013 Principle and applications of terahertz molecular imaging Nanotechnology 24 214001 [11] Zhu Z, Yang X, Gu J, Jiang J, Yue W, Tian Z, Tonouchi M, Han J and Zhang W 2013 Broadband plasmon induced transparency in terahertz metamaterials Nanotechnology 24 214003 [12] Tonouchi M 2007 Cutting-edge terahertz technology Nature Photon. 1 97-105

  6. Thickness Estimate of Ice-Rich Mantle Deposits on Malea Planum and the Southern Hellas Basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, M.; Hiesinger, H.; Reiss, D.

    2009-04-01

    map. The thickest areas of deposited material are found on the southern slope of the Hellas Basin, where craters are often completely mantled and no rim is seen. These were identified by concentric fractures in the mantle which mark the approximate outline of the buried rim. Mantle in these regions is typically smooth and continuously seen draped over the topography. Our results indicate distinct thickening of ice-rich deposited material north of ~58°S on the southern wall of the Hellas Basin, compared to the plains of Malea Planum. The mantle on the plains is probably thinner than what is indicated due to the overestimation of values caused by partially buried craters. Similarly, the mantle on the slope of the basin is probably thicker than represented due underestimation caused by complete burial of many craters. [1] Zanetti et al., 2009, Icarus, in review. [2] DeHon, R.A., 1974 Proc. Lunar Sci. Conf., 5th, 53. [3] Bleacher, J.E., et al., 2003, JGR, JE001535. [4] Garvin et al., 2003, 6th Intl. Conf. on Mars, Abs. #3277. [5] Head, J.W., (1982), Moon and Planets, 26, 61-88.

  7. 75 FR 21253 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... States Government property. In/Out Processing (In/Out Proc): Soldiers' personal cell phone number, home... Information System (EDMIS): Soldiers' personal cell phone number, home telephone number, personal e-mail.../Out Proc): Soldiers' personal cell phone number, home telephone number, personal e-mail...

  8. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  9. Analysis of VH gene rearrangement and somatic hypermutation in type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Fumihiro; Sakuma, Hidenori; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Hayashi, Kazuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; Yoshida, Michihiro; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Ohara, Hirotaka; Inagaki, Hiroshi; Joh, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is the pancreatic manifestation of systemic fibroinflammatory disease called immunoglobulin G4-associated systemic disease. Although this inflammatory process is considered to be a disease with an autoimmune mechanism, its pathogenesis still remains unclear. To clarify the characteristics of B cells infiltrating the lesion, we analyzed the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (VH) gene rearrangement and somatic hypermutation of invasive lymphoid cells in type 1 AIP (n= 3), in comparison with obstructive pancreatitis (n= 3) as a control. DNA was extracted from the affected inflammatory lesions. After PCR amplification of the rearranged VH gene, the clones were subcloned, and recombinant clones were randomly selected and sequenced. More than 60 clones per case were analyzed. Monoclonal VH rearrangement was not detected in any of the cases examined. There was no VH family or VH fragment specific to type 1 AIP and obstructive pancreatitis. However, the rate of unmutated VH fragments in type 1 AIP (17%) was higher than that in obstructive pancreatitis (5.1%) (P= 0.010). Our study suggests that an increased rate of unmutated or less mutated VH genes may be characteristic of type 1 AIP and might play a role in the development of this disease.

  10. Efficacy of three surface disinfectants for dental radiographic films and gloves.

    PubMed

    Coogan, M M; Patel, M; Mladenova, D

    2004-07-01

    Contaminated radiographic films and gloves may transmit infectious diseases. Objective. To determine whether Pre Sept (NaDC), a sodium dichloroisocyanurate based disinfectant; Bronocide SP (AIP) an alcohol-phenol-iodine disinfectant and polyvinyl pyrrolidine iodine (PVPI) can be used to disinfect radiographic films and gloves. Study design. Radiographic films were contaminated with Candida albicans, Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli or saliva and placed in either 0.1, 0.25 or 0.5 NaDC for 1, 2 or 5 min; PVPI for 5 min or sprayed with AIP. Gloves contaminated with C. albicans, S. mutans or Lactobacilli were sprayed with AIP. After treatment the films and gloves were tested for viable microorganisms. Results. A 0.5% solution of NaDC killed all microorganisms after one-minute exposure. PVPI killed 99.8% and AIP spray between 95.8 and 99% of microorganisms. Conclusions. NaDC was the most successful disinfectant in the laboratory and clinical setting followed by PVPI and AIP. PMID:15193787

  11. Acute Intermittent Porphyria in Argentina: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Cerbino, Gabriela Nora; Gerez, Esther Noemí; Varela, Laura Sabina; Melito, Viviana Alicia; Parera, Victoria Estela; Rossetti, María Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases that arise from deficiencies in the heme biosynthetic pathway. A partial deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) produces a hepatic disorder named Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP); the acute porphyria is more frequent in Argentina. In this paper we review the results obtained for 101 Argentinean AIP families and 6 AIP families from foreign neighbour countries studied at molecular level at Centro de Investigaciones sobre Porfirinas y Porfirias (CIPYP). Thirty-five different mutations were found, of which 14 were described for the first time in our population. The most prevalent type of mutations was the missense mutations (43%) followed by splice defects (26%) and small deletions (20%). An odd case of a double heterozygous presentation of AIP in a foreign family from Paraguay is discussed. Moreover, it can be noted that 38 new families were found carrying the most frequent mutation in Argentina (p.G111R), increasing to 55.66% the prevalence of this genetic change in our population and adding further support to our previous hypothesis of a founder effect for this mutation in Argentina. Identification of patients with an overt AIP is important because treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis, but more critical is the identification of asymptomatic relatives to avoid acute attacks which may progress to death. PMID:26075277

  12. Acute intermittent porphyria in Argentina: an update.

    PubMed

    Cerbino, Gabriela Nora; Gerez, Esther Noemí; Varela, Laura Sabina; Melito, Viviana Alicia; Parera, Victoria Estela; Batlle, Alcira; Rossetti, María Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases that arise from deficiencies in the heme biosynthetic pathway. A partial deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) produces a hepatic disorder named Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP); the acute porphyria is more frequent in Argentina. In this paper we review the results obtained for 101 Argentinean AIP families and 6 AIP families from foreign neighbour countries studied at molecular level at Centro de Investigaciones sobre Porfirinas y Porfirias (CIPYP). Thirty-five different mutations were found, of which 14 were described for the first time in our population. The most prevalent type of mutations was the missense mutations (43%) followed by splice defects (26%) and small deletions (20%). An odd case of a double heterozygous presentation of AIP in a foreign family from Paraguay is discussed. Moreover, it can be noted that 38 new families were found carrying the most frequent mutation in Argentina (p.G111R), increasing to 55.66% the prevalence of this genetic change in our population and adding further support to our previous hypothesis of a founder effect for this mutation in Argentina. Identification of patients with an overt AIP is important because treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis, but more critical is the identification of asymptomatic relatives to avoid acute attacks which may progress to death.

  13. NOVIDAS and UVPROC II---Data Archive and Reduction System for Nobeyama Millimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, T.; Morita, K.-I.; Umeyama, S.

    A workstation-based data archive and reduction software system is developed for the Nobeyama Millimeter Array (NMA). NOVIDAS is used for archiving the output data from the interferometer onto 8mm tapes. It also provides a search utility for the archived database. The calibration and reduction of the data are handled by UVPROC II\\@. It uses the AIPS file system via a set of interface modules called vif library developed by us in order to make an easier transition from the calibration processing to further imaging and analysis using AIPS. Basic functions of the UVPROC II are: correcting bandpass characteristics and time variations of complex gains, correction of variations in system temperature due to atmosphere, subtraction of continuum from spectral data, data flagging, and flux scaling. A key concept for designing the software is that the system should be user-friendly. We adopted a GUI based on X-windows system with a menu-button feature for execution of commands and PGPLOT for graphical display. This allows users to examine the data quality visually and edit the data interactively. The vif library consists of simple fortran programs to open/close and read/write the AIPS files. Therefore it can also be used by users to develop their own codes for manipulating the AIPS data without calling the AIPS routines directly. The system currently runs on SUN-Solaris and will be ported to SGI-Irix with a disk array.

  14. A Patient with Autoimmune Pancreatitis Type 1 with Previously Known Lymphadenopathy, Both in the Context of IgG4-related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alidjan, Fazil M.; Karim, Faiz; Verdijk, Rob M.; van Esser, Joost W.; van Heerde, Marianne J.

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Auto-immune pancreatitis Symptoms: Jaundice • lymfadenopathy Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laboratory • imaging Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an important clinical pathologic concept of IgG-4-related disease. AIP is a rare cause of chronic pancreatitis, characterized by a fibroinflammatory process by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, and increased IgG4+ plasma cells, leading to dysfunction of the pancreas. Affected patients with AIP frequently have disease affecting other organs or sites with similar histologic changes, elevated IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrate, and good response to corticosteroid therapy. These diseases often are not limited to the pancreas and the pancreas may not be involved at all. Case Report: We report a 62-year-old man with obstructive jaundice with pre-existent submandibular lymphadenopathy. Diagnosis of AIP was based on diagnostic criteria by the HISORT-criteria in combination with elevated IgG-4 serum levels. CT revealed a focal enlargement of the head of the pancreas, as well as mesenteric peripancreatic and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. He was treated with high-dose steroid in combination with azathioprine and showed good clinical response. Conclusions: We report a case with pre-existent submandibular lymphadenopathy and obstructive jaundice based on AIP type 1, both in the context of IgG4-related disease. PMID:26537530

  15. State Water Resources Control Board, California Agreement in Principle 1995 summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Laudon, L.

    1996-03-01

    The Agreement in Principle (AIP) was established as part of the Secretary of Energy`s Ten-Point Initiative which was announced in 1989. One of the Secretary`s goals was to integrate the Department of Energy`s (DOE) national security mission with their environmental restoration and compliance responsibilities. In an effort to accomplish this goal, DOE increased the role of the states in the oversight of DOE`s monitoring programs through AIPs. The State of California and DOE negotiated the California AIP beginning in 1989 and signed the Agreement in September 1990. The AIP identified six DOE facilities to be evaluated under the program. The six facilities evaluated by the AIP program were: (1) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) including LLNL`s Site 300; (2) Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA); (3) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL); (4) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC); (5) Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC); and (6) Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR).

  16. Activation and Inhibition of the Receptor Histidine Kinase AgrC Occurs Through Opposite Helical Transduction Motions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Boyuan; Zhao, Aishan; Novick, Richard; Muir, Tom W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Staphylococcus aureus virulence is regulated when secreted autoinducing peptides (AIPs) are recognized by a membrane-bound receptor histidine kinase (RHK), AgrC. Some AIPs are agonists of virulence gene expression, while others are antagonists. It is unclear how AIP binding regulates AgrC activity. Here, we reconstitute an AgrC family member, AgrC-I, using nanometer-scale lipid bilayer discs. We show that AgrC-I requires membranes rich in anionic lipids to function. The agonist, AIP-I, binds AgrC-I non-cooperatively in a 2:2 stoichiometry, while an antagonist ligand, AIP-II, functions as an inverse agonist of the kinase activity. We also demonstrate the kinase and sensor domains in AgrC are connected by a helical linker whose conformational state exercises rheostat-like control over the kinase activity. Binding of agonist or inverse-agonist peptides results in twisting of the linker in different directions. These two observations provide a view of the molecular motions triggered by ligand binding in an intact membrane-bound RHK. PMID:24656130

  17. [Acute interstitial pneumonia: diagnostic approach and management].

    PubMed

    Feuillet, S; Tazi, A

    2011-06-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) encompasses a spectrum of pulmonary disorders characterized by involvement of the lung interstitium and distal airways (bronchioles and alveoli). The onset of respiratory symptoms is acute, most often within two weeks. Most AIP take place de novo, but sometimes represent an acute exacerbation of chronic lung disease. The clinical presentation of AIP comprises rapidly progressive dyspnoea, associated sometimes with cough, fever, myalgia and asthenia. Chest radiography shows diffuse pulmonary opacities. The associated hypoxemia may be severe enough to cause acute respiratory failure. Underlying aetiologies are numerous and variable, particularly in relation to the underlying immune status of the host. Various histopathological entities may be responsible for AIP although diffuse alveolar damage is the predominant pattern. The diagnostic approach to a patient presenting with AIP is to try to determine the most likely underlying histopathological pattern and to search for a precise aetiology. It relies mainly on a meticulous clinical evaluation and accurate biological investigation, essentially guided by the results of bronchoalveolar lavage performed in an area identified by abnormalities on high resolution computed tomography of the lungs. Initial therapeutic management includes symptomatic measures, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment adapted to the clinical context, frequently combined with systemic corticosteroid therapy.

  18. Acute interstitial pneumonia in feedlot cattle: effects of feeding feather meal or vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A; Ayroud, Mejid; Bray, Tammy M; Yost, Garold S

    2007-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of feeding 1.5% cysteine-rich feather meal or 550 IU of vitamin E for 40 d before slaughter on the rates of death and emergency slaughter due to acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in commercial feedlots. Blood and lung tissue were collected at slaughter from 83 animals clinically diagnosed with AIP, 40 asymptomatic penmates, and 40 heifers receiving either feather meal (20) or vitamin E (20); the left lung was subsampled for histologic examination. Blood and lung tissue were analyzed for thiol adducts of 3-methyleneindolenine (3ME) and reduced glutathione. Supplementation with feather meal or vitamin E had no effect on the rates of death and emergency slaughter attributable to AIP and did not influence the levels of 3ME or reduced glutathione in blood or lung tissue. Although supplementation with greater amounts of feather meal or vitamin E may have been necessary to significantly affect factors related to feedlot AIP, increased supplementation would be uneconomical for commercial feedlots, given the relatively low incidence of AIP.

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis: an underdiagnosed autoimmune disease with clinical, imaging and serological features.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castañón, María; de las Heras-Castaño, Gonzalo; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    2010-02-01

    Since Sarles et al. [Sarles H, Sarles JC, Muratore R, Guien C. Chronic inflammatory sclerosis of the pancreas-an autonomous pancreatic disease? Am J Dig Dis 1961; 6: 688-698.] reported a case of pancreatitis associated with hypergammaglobulinemia, many cases have been described, which led to the current concept of "autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP)". Lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis on histology together with elevated IgG levels or the presence of autoantibodies on laboratory examinations supported the concept of AIP. In recent years, based on histological and immunohistochemical examination of various organs of patients with AIP, a novel clinicopathological entity, IgG4-related slerosing disease, has been proposed. AIP is a systemic disease that is characterized by dense infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and T lymphocytes in various organs. Clinical manifestations are related with pancreas dysfunction but other organs may be affected such as bile duct, gallbladder, salivary gland, retroperitoneum, kidney, lung and prostate. Increased serum IgG4 levels, the presence of several autoantibodies such as anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies (ACA-II), immunostaining IgG4 positive in pancreas tissue and a very good response to steroid therapy are useful for the diagnosis of AIP that can mimic pancreatic cancer.

  20. An autopsy case of autoimmune pancreatitis after a 6-year history of steroid therapy accompanied by malignant dissemination of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hideaki; Kitamura, Shigehiro; Yamada, Haruki

    2008-09-01

    Little is known about the long-term outcome of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), and whether AIP possesses malignant potential. We report herein a 68-year-old Japanese AIP patient who rapidly developed systemic malignant dissemination of unknown origin, resulting in death. The patient was diagnosed histopathologically as having AIP in 1999. After a 6-year history of 5 mg/day of prednisolone therapy, a sudden onset of abdominal pain and convulsive seizure occurred, and the patient died on the tenth hospital day owing to diffuse peritoneal disseminations and metastases in the bilateral lungs and brain. Autopsy disclosed that the primary site was renal cell carcinoma, detectable only by autopsy, originating in the left kidney. On microscopy, metastatic cells obtained from the brain, lung, and peritoneum were composed of pleomorphic malignant cells identical to those from the renal cell carcinoma. Unexpectedly, abundant IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration, suggesting high activity of AIP in pancreatic parenchyma and around dilated bile ducts, was still observed.