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Sample records for aipl1 effective rescue

  1. Gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis caused by defects in AIPL1: effective rescue of mouse models of partial and complete Aipl1 deficiency using AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mei Hong; Smith, Alexander J.; Pawlyk, Basil; Xu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Bainbridge, James B.; Basche, Mark; McIntosh, Jenny; Tran, Hoai Viet; Nathwani, Amit; Li, Tiansen; Ali, Robin R.

    2009-01-01

    Defects in the photoreceptor-specific gene encoding aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1) are clinically heterogeneous and present as Leber Congenital Amaurosis, the severest form of early-onset retinal dystrophy and milder forms of retinal dystrophies such as juvenile retinitis pigmentosa and dominant cone-rod dystrophy. [Perrault, I., Rozet, J.M., Gerber, S., Ghazi, I., Leowski, C., Ducroq, D., Souied, E., Dufier, J.L., Munnich, A. and Kaplan, J. (1999) Leber congenital amaurosis. Mol. Genet. Metab., 68, 200–208.] Although not yet fully elucidated, AIPL1 is likely to function as a specialized chaperone for rod phosphodiesterase (PDE). We evaluate whether AAV-mediated gene replacement therapy is able to improve photoreceptor function and survival in retinal degeneration associated with AIPL1 defects. We used two mouse models of AIPL1 deficiency simulating three different rates of photoreceptor degeneration. The Aipl1 hypomorphic (h/h) mouse has reduced Aipl1 levels and a relatively slow degeneration. Under light acceleration, the rate of degeneration in the Aipl1 h/h mouse is increased by 2–3-fold. The Aipl1−/− mouse has no functional Aipl1 and has a very rapid retinal degeneration. To treat the different rates of degeneration, two pseudotypes of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibiting different transduction kinetics are used for gene transfer. We demonstrate restoration of cellular function and preservation of photoreceptor cells and retinal function in Aipl1 h/h mice following gene replacement therapy using an AAV2/2 vector and in the light accelerated Aipl1 h/h model and Aipl1−/− mice using an AAV2/8 vector. We have thus established the potential of gene replacement therapy in varying rates of degeneration that reflect the clinical spectrum of disease. This is the first gene replacement study to report long-term rescue of a photoreceptor-specific defect and to demonstrate effective rescue of a rapid photoreceptor

  2. Viral-mediated vision rescue of a novel AIPL1 cone-rod dystrophy model

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Cristy A.; Chiodo, Vince A.; Boye, Sanford L.; Hayes, Abigail; Goldberg, Andrew F.X.; Hauswirth, William W.; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan

    2015-01-01

    Defects in aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like1 (AIPL1) are associated with blinding diseases with a wide range of severity in humans. We examined the mechanism behind autosomal dominant cone-rod dystrophy (adCORD) caused by 12 base pair (bp) deletion at proline 351 of hAIPL1 (P351Δ12) mutation in the primate-specific region of human AIPL1. Mutant P351Δ12 human isoform, aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (hAIPL1) mice demonstrated a CORD phenotype with early defects in cone-mediated vision and subsequent photoreceptor degeneration. A dominant CORD phenotype was observed in double transgenic animals expressing both mutant P351Δ12 and normal hAIPL1, but not with co-expression of P351Δ12 hAIPL1 and the mouse isoform, aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (mAipl1). Despite a dominant effect of the mutation, we successfully rescued cone-mediated vision in P351Δ12 hAIPL1 mice following high over-expression of WT hAIPL1 by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery, which was stable up to 6 months after treatment. Our transgenic P351Δ12 hAIPL1 mouse offers a novel model of AIPL1-CORD, with distinct defects from both the Aipl1-null mouse mimicking LCA and the Aipl1-hypomorphic mice mimicking a slow progressing RP. PMID:25274777

  3. The Leber congenital amaurosis protein, AIPL1, is needed for the viability and functioning of cone photoreceptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kirschman, Lindsay T; Kolandaivelu, Saravanan; Frederick, Jeanne M; Dang, Loan; Goldberg, Andrew F X; Baehr, Wolfgang; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan

    2010-03-15

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) caused by mutations in Aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein like-1 (Aipl1) is a severe form of childhood blindness. At 4 weeks of age, a mouse model of LCA lacking AIPL1 exhibits complete degeneration of both rod and cone photoreceptors. Rod cell death occurs due to rapid destabilization of rod phosphodiesterase, an enzyme essential for rod survival and function. However, little is understood regarding the role of AIPL1 in cone photoreceptors. Cone degeneration observed in the absence of AIPL1 could be due to an indirect 'bystander effect' caused by rod photoreceptor death or a direct role for AIPL1 in cones. To understand the importance of AIPL1 in cone photoreceptor cells, we transgenically expressed hAIPL1 exclusively in the rod photoreceptors of the Aipl1(-/-) mouse. Transgenic expression of hAIPL1 restored rod morphology and the rod-derived electroretinogram response, but cone photoreceptors were non-functional in the absence of AIPL1. In addition, the cone photoreceptors degenerate, but at a slower rate compared with Aipl1(-/-) mice. This degeneration is linked to the highly reduced levels of cone PDE6 observed in the hAIPL1 transgenic mice. Our studies demonstrate that AIPL1 is needed for the proper functioning and survival of cone photoreceptors. However, rod photoreceptors also provide support that partially preserves cone photoreceptors from rapid death in the absence of AIPL1.

  4. Residual Electroretinograms in Young Leber Congenital Amaurosis Patients with Mutations of AIPL1

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Niamh B.; Stone, Edwin M.; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Weleber, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To describe in detail the clinical phenotype and electrophysiological features of three patients with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by mutations of AIPL1. Methods. Ophthalmologic examination, color fundus photography, detailed electrophysiological assessment, and screening of AIPL1 were undertaken in three subjects. One patient also underwent visual field testing and spectral domain-optical coherence tomography. Results. All three patients, two of whom were siblings, had histories consistent with Leber congenital amaurosis (severely reduced vision, poorly responsive pupils, and nystagmus presenting within the first year of life). However, each patient had recordable and similar electroretinograms (ERGs), which demonstrated absent cone-driven responses and slow insensitive scotopic responses. The first patient was found to have a homozygous Trp278 stop mutation in AIPL1, whereas the siblings were each found to have novel heterozygous mutations in AIPL1 (Leu17Pro and Lys214Asn). Conclusions. Patients with mutations in AIPL1 may present with Leber congenital amaurosis and residual ERGs characterized by slow insensitive scotopic responses. Such responses are likely seen only in very young patients and may not be seen with the typical filter settings recommended by the ISCEV standards because of low-pass filtering. Progressive loss of residual ERG activity in young LCA patients with AIPL1 mutations suggests that gene replacement therapy will likely have to be performed early. PMID:21900377

  5. Residual electroretinograms in young Leber congenital amaurosis patients with mutations of AIPL1.

    PubMed

    Pennesi, Mark E; Stover, Niamh B; Stone, Edwin M; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Weleber, Richard G

    2011-10-17

    To describe in detail the clinical phenotype and electrophysiological features of three patients with Leber congenital amaurosis caused by mutations of AIPL1. Ophthalmologic examination, color fundus photography, detailed electrophysiological assessment, and screening of AIPL1 were undertaken in three subjects. One patient also underwent visual field testing and spectral domain-optical coherence tomography. All three patients, two of whom were siblings, had histories consistent with Leber congenital amaurosis (severely reduced vision, poorly responsive pupils, and nystagmus presenting within the first year of life). However, each patient had recordable and similar electroretinograms (ERGs), which demonstrated absent cone-driven responses and slow insensitive scotopic responses. The first patient was found to have a homozygous Trp278 stop mutation in AIPL1, whereas the siblings were each found to have novel heterozygous mutations in AIPL1 (Leu17Pro and Lys214Asn). Patients with mutations in AIPL1 may present with Leber congenital amaurosis and residual ERGs characterized by slow insensitive scotopic responses. Such responses are likely seen only in very young patients and may not be seen with the typical filter settings recommended by the ISCEV standards because of low-pass filtering. Progressive loss of residual ERG activity in young LCA patients with AIPL1 mutations suggests that gene replacement therapy will likely have to be performed early.

  6. AIPL1, a protein implicated in Leber's congenital amaurosis, interacts with and aids in processing of farnesylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Visvanathan; Roberts, Melanie; van den Akker, Focco; Niemi, Gregory; Reh, T A; Hurley, James B

    2003-10-28

    The most common form of blindness at birth, Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), is inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. Mutations in six different retina-specific genes, including a recently discovered gene, AIPL1, have been linked to LCA in humans. To understand the molecular basis of LCA caused by aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1) mutations, and to elucidate the normal function of AIPL1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using AIPL1 as bait. The screen demonstrated that AIPL1 interacts specifically with farnesylated proteins. Mutations in AIPL1 linked to LCA compromise this activity. These findings suggest that the essential function of AIPL1 within photoreceptors requires interactions with farnesylated proteins. Analysis of isoprenylation in cultured human cells shows that AIPL1 enhances the processing of farnesylated proteins. Based on these findings, we propose that AIPL1 interacts with farnesylated proteins and plays an essential role in processing of farnesylated proteins in retina.

  7. Role of AIP and its homologue the blindness-associated protein AIPL1 in regulating client protein nuclear translocation.

    PubMed

    van der Spuy, J; Cheetham, M E

    2004-08-01

    Mutations in the AIPL1 (aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1) cause the blinding disease Leber's congenital amaurosis. AIPL1 is a homologue of the AIP. AIP functions as part of a chaperone heterocomplex to facilitate signalling by the AhR and plays an important role in regulating the nuclear translocation of the receptor. We review the evidence for the role of AIP in protein translocation and compare the potential functions of AIPL1 in the translocation of its interacting partner the NEDD8 ultimate buster protein 1.

  8. Aipl1 is required for cone photoreceptor function and survival through the stability of Pde6c and Gc3 in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Iribarne, Maria; Nishiwaki, Yuko; Nakamura, Shohei; Araragi, Masato; Oguri, Eri; Masai, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Genetic mutations in aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1) cause photoreceptor degeneration associated with Leber congenital amaurosis 4 (LCA4) in human patients. Here we report retinal phenotypes of a zebrafish aipl1 mutant, gold rush (gosh). In zebrafish, there are two aipl1 genes, aipl1a and aipl1b, which are expressed mainly in rods and cones, respectively. The gosh mutant gene encodes cone-specific aipl1, aipl1b. Cone photoreceptors undergo progressive degeneration in the gosh mutant, indicating that aipl1b is required for cone survival. Furthermore, the cone-specific subunit of cGMP phosphodiesterase 6 (Pde6c) is markedly decreased in the gosh mutant, and the gosh mutation genetically interacts with zebrafish pde6c mutation eclipse (els). These data suggest that Aipl1 is required for Pde6c stability and function. In addition to Pde6c, we found that zebrafish cone-specific guanylate cyclase, zGc3, is also decreased in the gosh and els mutants. Furthermore, zGc3 knockdown embryos showed a marked reduction in Pde6c. These observations illustrate the interdependence of cGMP metabolism regulators between Aipl1, Pde6c, and Gc3 in photoreceptors. PMID:28378769

  9. AIPL1, A protein linked to blindness, is essential for the stability of enzymes mediating cGMP metabolism in cone photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolandaivelu, Saravanan; Singh, Ratnesh K.; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan

    2014-01-01

    Defects in the photoreceptor-specific gene encoding aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein like-1 (AIPL1) are linked to blinding diseases, including Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and cone dystrophy. While it is apparent that AIPL1 is needed for rod and cone function, the role of AIPL1 in cones is not clear. In this study, using an all-cone animal model lacking Aipl1, we show a light-independent degeneration of M- and S-opsin containing cones that proceeds in a ventral-to-dorsal gradient. Aipl1 is needed for stability, assembly and membrane association of cone PDE6, an enzyme crucial for photoreceptor function and survival. Furthermore, RetGC1, a protein linked to LCA that is needed for cGMP synthesis, was dramatically reduced in cones lacking Aipl1. A defect in RetGC1 is supported by our finding that cones lacking Aipl1 exhibited reduced levels of cGMP. These findings are in contrast to the role of Aipl1 in rods, where destabilization of rod PDE6 results in an increase in cGMP levels, which drives rapid rod degeneration. Our results illustrate mechanistic differences behind the death of rods and cones in retinal degenerative disease caused by deficiencies in AIPL1. PMID:24108108

  10. Differential Macular Morphology in Patients with RPE65-, CEP290-, GUCY2D-, and AIPL1-Related Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasadhika, Sirichai; Stone, Edwin M.; Lindeman, Martin; Zelkha, Ruth; Lopez, Irma; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate genotypic and macular morphologic correlations in patients with RPE65-, CEP290-, GUCY2D-, or AIPL1-related Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. SD-OCT macular scans were performed in 21 patients, including 10 with RPE65, 7 with CEP290, 3 with GUCY2D, and 1 with AIPL1 mutations. An image processing software was used to manually draw segmentation lines by three observers. Lamellar structure was evaluated based on the number of retinal layers on segmented images. Total retinal thickness was measured at the central macular and perifoveal areas by using an automated algorithm. Results. All three patients with GUCY2D mutations (age range, 20–53 years) retained six retinal layers with visible photoreceptor inner/outer segment juncture (PSJ). However, the preservation of lamellar structures did not parallel better visual acuity. Patients with other mutations had poorly defined PSJ and disorganized retinal lamellar structures, where only one to three retinal layers could be observed. Patients with CEP290 mutations trended to have retention of the outer nuclear layer at the fovea and macular thickening, especially at younger ages. In patients with RPE65 (age range, 20–71 years) and AIPL1 mutations (age, 22 years), macular thickness was markedly decreased. Disorganization of retinal lamellar structures in the RPE65 group trended toward a worsening with increasing age. Conclusions. Variations of macular microstructures were observed among LCA patients with different genotypes. Disorganization of retinal lamellar structure was generally age related. Preservation of retinal microanatomic structures may not be associated with better visual acuity. PMID:19959640

  11. Rescue Effects: Irradiated Cells Helped by Unirradiated Bystander Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, R. K. K.; Fung, Y. K.; Han, W.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    The rescue effect describes the phenomenon where irradiated cells or organisms derive benefits from the feedback signals sent from the bystander unirradiated cells or organisms. An example of the benefit is the mitigation of radiation-induced DNA damages in the irradiated cells. The rescue effect can compromise the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) (and actually all radiotherapy). In this paper, the discovery and subsequent confirmation studies on the rescue effect were reviewed. The mechanisms and the chemical messengers responsible for the rescue effect studied to date were summarized. The rescue effect between irradiated and bystander unirradiated zebrafish embryos in vivo sharing the same medium was also described. In the discussion section, the mechanism proposed for the rescue effect involving activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway was scrutinized. This mechanism could explain the promotion of cellular survival and correct repair of DNA damage, dependence on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and modulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in irradiated cells. Exploitation of the NF-κB pathway to improve the effectiveness of RIT was proposed. Finally, the possibility of using zebrafish embryos as the model to study the efficacy of RIT in treating solid tumors was also discussed. PMID:25625514

  12. Effects of streptokinase on reflow in rescue percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sanatkar, Masoud; Shemirani, Hassan; Sanei, Hamid; Pourmoghaddas, Masoud; Rabiei, Katayoun

    2013-01-01

    disease, smoking, platelets number, myocardial infarction level, the extent of stenosis, and the involved artery. CONCLUSION According to the present study, although SK is more effective than eptifibatide in resolution of thrombosis and clots, rescue PCI did not differ from PPCI in terms of the incidence of no-reflow phenomenon or short-term complications. PMID:23696756

  13. The effects of Operation Rescue on pro-life support.

    PubMed

    Ansuini, C G; Fiddler-woite, J; Woitaszek, R S

    1994-12-01

    Operation Rescue is a militant anti-abortion group. The organization conveys its position against abortion by targeting a city in which it will mount speeches, rallies, pickets, and media barrages. Operation Rescue held activities in Greater Buffalo, New York, in 1992. The authors investigated the effect of the anti-abortion campaign upon a sample of non-activist university undergraduate students and the anti-abortion cause in general. 114 male and 195 female students of the State University of New York College at Buffalo participated. 60% were younger than age 22 years and 17% were 46 years of age or older. 87% were sexually active, but only 18% were married. 11% reported having an abortion themselves or dating someone who had. 150 subjects were surveyed each spring for three years with regard to their abortion-related attitudes and behaviors. 18% of the participants identified themselves as pro-life in 1991, 22% in 1992, and 12% in 1993, the year after the Operation Rescue campaign. 70% identified themselves as pro-choice in 1991, 60% in 1992, and 57% in 1993. The percentage of respondents reporting that they would not have an abortion themselves, but support a woman's right to free choice with regard to abortion steadily increased from 11% in 1991 to 19% in 1992 and 30% in 1993. In general, support for the anti-abortion camp increased during protest activities, but decreased overall over the long term. The campaign had a particularly negative effect upon males.

  14. Zebrafish fetal alcohol syndrome model: effects of ethanol are rescued by retinoic acid supplement.

    PubMed

    Marrs, James A; Clendenon, Sherry G; Ratcliffe, Don R; Fielding, Stephen M; Liu, Qin; Bosron, William F

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to develop a zebrafish experimental model to examine defects in retinoic acid (RA) signaling caused by embryonic ethanol exposure. RA deficiency may be a causative factor leading to a spectrum of birth defects classified as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Experimental support for this hypothesis using Xenopus showed that effects of treatment with ethanol could be partially rescued by adding retinoids during ethanol treatment. Previous studies show that treating zebrafish embryos during gastrulation and somitogenesis stages with a pathophysiological concentration of ethanol (100mM) produces effects that are characteristic features of FASD. We found that treating zebrafish embryos with RA at a low concentration (10(-9)M) and 100mM ethanol during gastrulation and somitogenesis stages significantly rescued a spectrum of defects produced by treating embryos with 100mM ethanol alone. The rescued phenotype that we observed was quantitatively more similar to embryos treated with 10(-9)M RA alone (RA toxicity) than to untreated or 100mM ethanol-treated embryos. RA rescued defects caused by 100mM ethanol treatment during gastrulation and somitogenesis stages that include early gastrulation cell movements (anterior-posterior axis), craniofacial cartilage formation, and ear development. Morphological evidence also suggests that other characteristic features of FASD (e.g., neural axis patterning) are rescued by RA supplement.

  15. Effect of simulation on nursing knowledge and critical thinking in failure to rescue events.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Carolyn R

    2012-10-01

    Failure to rescue events are hospital deaths that result from human error and unsafe patient conditions. A failure to rescue event implies that the last and best chance to avoid tragedy is not acted on in time to avoid a disaster. Patient safety is often compromised by nurses who do not perform accurate assessments (vigilance), do not detect clinical changes (surveillance), or do not display critical thinking (recognition that something is wrong). This project used simulation as a teaching strategy to enhance nursing performance. Medical-surgical nurses took part in a simulated failure to rescue event in which the patient's clinical condition deteriorated rapidly. Nursing knowledge and critical thinking improved after the simulation and showed the effectiveness of simulation as a teaching strategy to address nursing knowledge and critical thinking skills.

  16. Rescuing Israeli travellers: effects of substance abuse, mental health, geographic region of rescue, gender and age of rescuees.

    PubMed

    Bonny-Noach, Hagit; Sagiv-Alayoff, Moran

    2017-09-01

    Research conducted on young Israeli travellers has pointed to high substance usage rates. For some drug-using backpackers, actual extraction and rescue from their trip abroad is necessary. This study represents a first attempt to explore the influence of geographic region in which rescue occurs, cause for rescue and gender and age differences among Israeli rescuees. Sub-analysis of all logs of individual rescuees during a 5-year period from 2011 to 2016 ( N  = 86) included 66 men and 20 women, with an average age of 27.83 (SD = 7.86). The findings demonstrate that Israelis are most frequently rescued from South and Southeast Asia (57%) followed by Europe (22%), South America (17%), North America (2.3%) and Africa (1.2%). India was the country with the highest rate of rescue incidents ( N  = 36) followed by Thailand ( N  = 8) and the Netherlands ( N  = 5). The most common cause for rescue was substance abuse (87%). However, significant regional differences were found based on the variable of age ( F  = 3.21, df = 3,50, P  < 0.05). The youngest rescuees were evacuated from South America ( M  = 24.20 years, SD  =   3.8), while the oldest were from Europe ( M  = 32.86 years, SD  =   10.9). The most frequent mental diagnosis for rescuees was acute psychosis due to substance use disorder (81%) and bipolar disorder, manic subtype due to substance abuse (7%). Significant gender differences were found among rescuees diagnosed with bipolar disorder, manic type: 25% were female, while men only accounted for 1.5% ( χ 2 = 61.70, df = 24, P  < 0.0001). Region, age and gender of young travellers should be taken into consideration when thinking about induced acute psychosis caused by substance use. Policymakers need to consider prevention and harm reduction interventions relevant to this risk group.

  17. Rescuing the duty to rescue.

    PubMed

    Rulli, Tina; Millum, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Clinicians and health researchers frequently encounter opportunities to rescue people. Rescue cases can generate a moral duty to aid those in peril. As such, bioethicists have leveraged a duty to rescue for a variety of purposes. Yet, despite its broad application, the duty to rescue is underanalysed. In this paper, we assess the state of theorising about the duty to rescue. There are large gaps in bioethicists' understanding of the force, scope and justification of the two most cited duties to rescue--the individual duty of easy rescue and the institutional rule of rescue. We argue that the duty of easy rescue faces unresolved challenges regarding its force and scope, and the rule of rescue is indefensible. If the duty to rescue is to help solve ethical problems, these theoretical gaps must be addressed. We identify two further conceptions of the duty to rescue that have received less attention--an institutional duty of easy rescue and the professional duty to rescue. Both provide guidance in addressing force and scope concerns and, thereby, traction in answering the outstanding problems with the duty to rescue. We conclude by proposing research priorities for developing accounts of duties to rescue in bioethics. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Thio Effects and an Unconventional Metal Ion Rescue in the Genomic HDV Ribozyme§

    PubMed Central

    Thaplyal, Pallavi; Ganguly, Abir; Golden, Barbara L.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    Metal ion and nucleobase catalysis are important for ribozyme mechanism, but the extent to which they cooperate is unclear. A crystal structure of the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme suggested that the pro-RP oxygen at the scissile phosphate directly coordinates a catalytic Mg2+ ion and is within hydrogen bonding distance of the amine of the general acid C75. Prior studies on the genomic HDV ribozyme, however, showed neither a thio effect nor metal ion rescue using Mn2+. Here, we combine experiment and theory to explore phosphorothioate substitutions at the scissile phosphate. We report significant thio effects at the scissile phosphate and metal ion rescue with Cd2+. Reaction profiles with an SP-phosphorothioate substitution are indistinguishable from those of the unmodified substrate in the presence of Mg2+ or Cd2+, supporting that the pro-SP oxygen does not coordinate metal ions. The RP-phosphorothioate substitution, however, exhibits biphasic kinetics, with the fast-reacting phase displaying a thio effect of up to 5-fold effect and the slow-reacting phase displaying a thio effect of ~1,000-fold. Moreover, the fast- and slow-reacting phases give metal ion rescues in Cd2+ of up to 10- and 330-fold, respectively. The metal ion rescues are unconventional in that they arise from Cd2+ inhibiting the oxo substrate but not the RP substrate. This metal ion rescue suggests a direct interaction of the catalytic metal ion with the pro-RP oxygen, in line with experiments on the antigenomic HDV ribozyme. Experiments without divalent ions, with mutants that interfere with Mg2+ binding, or with C75 deleted suggest that the pro-RP oxygen plays at most a redundant role in positioning C75. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) studies indicate that the metal ion contributes to catalysis by interacting with both the pro-RP oxygen and the nucleophilic 2’- hydroxyl, supporting the experimental findings. PMID:24001219

  19. Demographic costs of inbreeding revealed by sex-specific genetic rescue effects

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Inbreeding can slow population growth and elevate extinction risk. A small number of unrelated immigrants to an inbred population can substantially reduce inbreeding and improve fitness, but little attention has been paid to the sex-specific effects of immigrants on such "genetic rescue". We conducted two subsequent experiments to investigate demographic consequences of inbreeding and genetic rescue in guppies. Results Populations established from pairs of full siblings that were descended either from two generations of full-sibling inbreeding or unrelated outbred guppies did not grow at different rates initially, but when the first generation offspring started breeding, outbred-founded populations grew more slowly than inbred-founded populations. In a second experiment, adding two outbred males to the inbred populations resulted in significantly faster population growth than in control populations where no immigrants were added. Adding females resulted in growth at a rate intermediate to the control and male-immigrant treatments. Conclusion The slower growth of the outbred-founded than inbred-founded populations is the opposite of what would be expected under inbreeding depression unless many deleterious recessive alleles had already been selectively purged in the inbreeding that preceded the start of the experiment, and that significant inbreeding depression occurred when the first generation offspring in outbred-founded populations started to inbreed. The second experiment revealed strong inbreeding depression in the inbred founded populations, despite the apparent lack thereof in these populations earlier on. Moreover, the fact that the addition of male immigrants resulted in the highest levels of population growth suggests that sex-specific genetic rescue may occur in promiscuous species, with male rescue resulting in higher levels of outbreeding than female rescue. PMID:20003302

  20. Significant damage-rescuing effects of wood vinegar extract in living Caenorhabditis elegans under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kezhou; Jiang, Shaotong; Ren, Chong; He, Yujie

    2012-01-15

    Wood vinegar (WV), a byproduct from the charcoal production process, has been reported to have excellent antioxidant capability by chemical examination. However, the biological effect of WV in living animals is still unknown. In this study, a simple model organism, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, was used as an in vivo system to assess the biological effects of wood vinegar through the development, lifespan, brood size, germline cell apoptosis and superoxide dismutase (SOD) level. Wood vinegar extract (WVE) promoted the development, prolonged the lifespan and increased the brood size in reactive oxidative species (ROS)-sensitive mutant worms. WVE treatment rescued the effects of damage in germline cell apoptosis and SOD upregulation induced by paraquat, an ROS generator, to the control level. Additionally, WVE showed comparative ability in rescuing damage as compared with L-ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol. WVE treatment exhibits a remedial/beneficial effect on ROS-sensitive mutant under normal cultural conditions and on wild-type worms under oxidative stress. ROS scavenging is involved in the damage-rescuing mechanism. This study will provide a basal biological and nutritional exploration for the use of WV as a functional food, and for the substitution of chemical antioxidants with side effects in food. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. The emergence of the rescue effect from explicit within- and between-patch dynamics in a metapopulation

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Anders; Elías-Wolff, Federico; Mehlig, Bernhard; Manica, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Immigration can rescue local populations from extinction, helping to stabilize a metapopulation. Local population dynamics is important for determining the strength of this rescue effect, but the mechanistic link between local demographic parameters and the rescue effect at the metapopulation level has received very little attention by modellers. We develop an analytical framework that allows us to describe the emergence of the rescue effect from interacting local stochastic dynamics. We show this framework to be applicable to a wide range of spatial scales, providing a powerful and convenient alternative to individual-based models for making predictions concerning the fate of metapopulations. We show that the rescue effect plays an important role in minimizing the increase in local extinction probability associated with high demographic stochasticity, but its role is more limited in the case of high local environmental stochasticity of recruitment or survival. While most models postulate the rescue effect, our framework provides an explicit mechanistic link between local dynamics and the emergence of the rescue effect, and more generally the stability of the whole metapopulation. PMID:24523274

  2. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  3. Effective and Safe Use of Glucocorticosteroids for Rescue of Late ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Diana, Paolo; Money, Dustin T.; Gelvin, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a case of severe refractory hypoxemia requiring prolonged extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support in a case of postpartum acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The clinical course was marked by persistently poor lung compliance and several complications of ECMO, that is, significant hemolysis, hemothorax, and intracranial bleeding. We report marked improvement of lung mechanics and respiratory function, leading to accelerated separation from ECMO, following rescue administration of low dose methylprednisolone 24 days after the onset of ARDS. Corticosteroid treatment was safe and well tolerated. In contrast with the conclusions of the 2006 ARDS Network trial, our report establishes a case in support of the use of low dose methylprednisolone as a safe and effective rescue treatment option in selected subsets of patients with nonresolving ARDS. PMID:28337348

  4. Space Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muratore, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Space Rescue has been a topic of speculation for a wide community of people for decades. Astronauts, aerospace engineers, diplomats, medical and rescue professionals, inventors and science fiction writers have all speculated on this problem. Martin Caidin's 1964 novel Marooned dealt with the problems of rescuing a crew stranded in low earth orbit. Legend at the Johnson Space Center says that Caidin's portrayal of a Russian attempt to save the American crew played a pivotal role in convincing the Russians to join the real joint Apollo-Soyuz mission. Space Rescue has been a staple in science fiction television and movies portrayed in programs such as Star Trek, Stargate-SG1 and Space 1999 and movies such as Mission To Mars and Red Planet. As dramatic and as difficult as rescue appears in fictional accounts, in the real world it has even greater drama and greater difficulty. Space rescue is still in its infancy as a discipline and the purpose of this chapter is to describe the issues associated with space rescue and the work done so far in this field. For the purposes of this chapter, the term space rescue will refer to any system which allows for rescue or escape of personnel from situations which endanger human life in a spaceflight operation. This will span the period from crew ingress prior to flight through crew egress postlanding. For the purposes of this chapter, the term primary system will refer to the spacecraft system that a crew is either attempting to escape from or from which an attempt is being made to rescue the crew.

  5. Propranolol Effects on Decompression Sickness in a Simulated DISSUB Rescue in Swine.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Angela S; Regis, David P; Hall, Aaron A; Mahon, Richard T; Cronin, William A

    2017-04-01

    Disabled submarine (DISSUB) survivors may face elevated CO2 levels and inert gas saturation, putting them at risk for CO2 toxicity and decompression sickness (DCS). Propranolol was shown to reduce CO2 production in an experimental DISSUB model in humans but its effects on DCS in a DISSUB rescue scenario are unknown. A 100% oxygen prebreathe (OPB) reduces DCS incidence and severity and is incorporated into some DISSUB rescue protocols. We used a swine model of DISSUB rescue to study the effect of propranolol on DCS incidence and mortality with and without an OPB. In Experiment 1, male Yorkshire Swine (70 kg) were pressurized to 2.8 ATA for 22 h. Propranolol 1.0 mg · kg-1 (IV) was administered at 21.25 h. At 22 h, the animal was rapidly decompressed and observed for DCS type, onset time, and mortality. Experimental animals (N = 21; 69 ± 4.1 kg), PROP1.0, were compared to PROP1.0-OPB45 (N = 8; 69 ± 2.8 kg) with the same dive profile, except for a 45 min OPB prior to decompression. In Experiment 2, the same methodology was used with the following changes: swine pressurized to 2.8 ATA for 28 h; experimental group (N = 25; 67 ± 3.3 kg), PROP0.5 bis, propranolol 0.5 mg · kg-1 bis (twice) (IV) was administered at 22 h and 26 h. Control animals (N = 25; 67 ± 3.9 kg) received normal saline. OPB reduced mortality in PROP1.0-OBP45 compared to PROP1.0 (0% vs. 71%). PROP0.5 bis had increased mortality compared to CONTROL (60-% vs. 4%). Administration of beta blockers prior to saturation decompression appears to increase DCS and worsen mortality in a swine model; however, their effects in bounce diving remain unknown.Forbes AS, Regis DP, HallAA, Mahon RT, Cronin WA. Propranolol effects on decompression sickness in a simulated DISSUB rescue in swine. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(4):385-391.

  6. Nonintravenous rescue medications for pediatric status epilepticus: A cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Fernández, Iván; Gaínza-Lein, Marina; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2017-08-01

    To quantify the cost-effectiveness of rescue medications for pediatric status epilepticus: rectal diazepam, nasal midazolam, buccal midazolam, intramuscular midazolam, and nasal lorazepam. Decision analysis model populated with effectiveness data from the literature and cost data from publicly available market prices. The primary outcome was cost per seizure stopped ($/SS). One-way sensitivity analyses and second-order Monte Carlo simulations evaluated the robustness of the results across wide variations of the input parameters. The most cost-effective rescue medication was buccal midazolam (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio ([ICER]: $13.16/SS) followed by nasal midazolam (ICER: $38.19/SS). Nasal lorazepam (ICER: -$3.8/SS), intramuscular midazolam (ICER: -$64/SS), and rectal diazepam (ICER: -$2,246.21/SS) are never more cost-effective than the other options at any willingness to pay. One-way sensitivity analysis showed the following: (1) at its current effectiveness, rectal diazepam would become the most cost-effective option only if its cost was $6 or less, and (2) at its current cost, rectal diazepam would become the most cost-effective option only if effectiveness was higher than 0.89 (and only with very high willingness to pay of $2,859/SS to $31,447/SS). Second-order Monte Carlo simulations showed the following: (1) nasal midazolam and intramuscular midazolam were the more effective options; (2) the more cost-effective option was buccal midazolam for a willingness to pay from $14/SS to $41/SS and nasal midazolam for a willingness to pay above $41/SS; (3) cost-effectiveness overlapped for buccal midazolam, nasal lorazepam, intramuscular midazolam, and nasal midazolam; and (4) rectal diazepam was not cost-effective at any willingness to pay, and this conclusion remained extremely robust to wide variations of the input parameters. For pediatric status epilepticus, buccal midazolam and nasal midazolam are the most cost-effective nonintravenous rescue

  7. A Comparative Effectiveness Study of Rescue Strategies in 1,000 Subjects With Severe Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Moreno Franco, Pablo; Enders, Felicity; Wilson, Gregory; Gajic, Ognjen; Pannu, Sonal R

    2016-02-01

    Subjects with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure have shown a high mortality in previous studies. All adult ICU patients requiring mechanical ventilation from 2005 to 2010 at Mayo Clinic were screened for severe hypoxemia (Murray lung injury score of ≥ 3). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, prone positioning, high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), and inhaled vasodilators were considered as rescue strategies. A propensity-based scoring was created for the indication or predilection to use each strategy. A model was created to evaluate the association of each rescue strategy with hospital mortality. Among 1,032 subjects with severe hypoxemia, 239 subjects received some form of rescue strategy (59 received a combination of therapies, and 180 received individual therapies). Inhaled vasodilators were the most common, followed by HFOV. Rescue strategies were used in younger subjects with severe oxygenation deficits. Subjects receiving rescue strategies had higher mortality and longer ICU stays. None of the strategies individually or in combination showed a significant association with hospital mortality after adjusting covariates by propensity scoring. Adjusted Odds ratios and respective 95% CI were as follows: HFOV 0.67 (0.35-1.27), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation 0.63 (0.18-1.92), prone position 1.07 (0.49-2.28), and inhaled vasodilators 1.17 (0.78-1.77). In this retrospective comparative effectiveness study, there was no association of rescue strategies with hospital mortality in subjects with severe hypoxemia. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. Effects of chemical protective equipment on team process performance in small unit rescue operations.

    PubMed

    Grugle, Nancy L; Kleiner, Brian M

    2007-09-01

    In the event of a nuclear, biological, or chemical terrorist attack against civilians, both military and civilian emergency response teams must be able to respond and operate efficiently while wearing protective equipment. Chemical protective equipment protects the user by providing a barrier between the individual and hazardous environment. Unfortunately, the same equipment that is designed to support the user can potentially cause heat stress, reduced task efficiency, and reduced range-of-motion. Targeted Acceptable Responses to Generated Events of Tasks (TARGETS), an event-based team performance measurement methodology was used to investigate the effects of Mission Oriented Protective Posture (MOPP) on the behavioral processes underlying team performance during simulated rescue tasks. In addition, this study determined which team processes were related to team performance outcomes. Results of six primary analyses indicated that team process performance was not degraded by MOPP 4 on any rescue task and that the team processes critical for successful task performance are task-dependent. This article discusses the implications of these results with respect to the study design and the limitations of using an event-based team performance measurement methodology.

  9. Risk of large-scale evacuation based on the effectiveness of rescue strategies under different crowd densities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghong; Lo, Siuming; Wang, Qingsong; Sun, Jinhua; Mu, Honglin

    2013-08-01

    Crowd density is a key factor that influences the moving characteristics of a large group of people during a large-scale evacuation. In this article, the macro features of crowd flow and subsequent rescue strategies were considered, and a series of characteristic crowd densities that affect large-scale people movement, as well as the maximum bearing density when the crowd is extremely congested, were analyzed. On the basis of characteristic crowd densities, the queuing theory was applied to simulate crowd movement. Accordingly, the moving characteristics of the crowd and the effects of typical crowd density-which is viewed as the representation of the crowd's arrival intensity in front of the evacuation passageways-on rescue strategies was studied. Furthermore, a "risk axle of crowd density" is proposed to determine the efficiency of rescue strategies in a large-scale evacuation, i.e., whether the rescue strategies are able to effectively maintain or improve evacuation efficiency. Finally, through some rational hypotheses for the value of evacuation risk, a three-dimensional distribution of the evacuation risk is established to illustrate the risk axle of crowd density. This work aims to make some macro, but original, analysis on the risk of large-scale crowd evacuation from the perspective of the efficiency of rescue strategies.

  10. Inbreeding avoidance in spiders: evidence for rescue effect in fecundity of female spiders with outbreeding opportunity.

    PubMed

    Bilde, T; Maklakov, A A; Schilling, N

    2007-05-01

    Selection by inbreeding depression should favour mating biases that reduce the risk of fertilization by related mates. However, equivocal evidence for inbreeding avoidance questions the strength of inbreeding depression as a selective force in the evolution of mating biases. Lack of inbreeding avoidance can be because of low risk of inbreeding, variation in tolerance to inbreeding or high costs of outbreeding. We examined the relationship between inbreeding depression and inbreeding avoidance adaptations under two levels of inbreeding in the spider Oedothorax apicatus, asking whether preference for unrelated sperm via pre- and/or post-copulatory mechanisms could restore female fitness when inbreeding depression increases. Using inbred isofemale lines we provided female spiders with one or two male spiders of different relatedness in five combinations: one male sib; one male nonsib; two male sibs; two male nonsibs; one male sib and one male nonsib. We assessed the effect of mating treatment on fecundity and hatching success of eggs after one and three generations of inbreeding. Inbreeding depression in F1 was not sufficient to detect inbreeding avoidance. In F3, inbreeding depression caused a major decline in fecundity and hatching rates of eggs. This effect was mitigated by complete recovery in fecundity in the sib-nonsib treatment, whereas no rescue effect was detected in the hatching success of eggs. The rescue effect is best explained by post-mating discrimination against kin via differential allocation of resources. The natural history of O. apicatus suggests that the costs of outbreeding may be low which combined with high costs of inbreeding should select for avoidance mechanisms. Direct benefits of post-mating inbreeding avoidance and possibly low costs of female multiple mating can favour polyandry as an inbreeding avoidance mechanism.

  11. Development of a Search and Rescue Simulation to Study the Effects of Prolonged Isolation on Team Decision Making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entin, Elliot E.; Kerrigan, Caroline; Serfaty, Daniel; Young, Philip

    1998-01-01

    The goals of this project were to identify and investigate aspects of team and individual decision-making and risk-taking behaviors hypothesized to be most affected by prolonged isolation. A key premise driving our research approach is that effects of stressors that impact individual and team cognitive processes in an isolated, confined, and hazardous environment will be projected onto the performance of a simulation task. To elicit and investigate these team behaviors we developed a search and rescue task concept as a scenario domain that would be relevant for isolated crews. We modified the Distributed Dynamic Decision-making (DDD) simulator, a platform that has been extensively used for empirical research in team processes and taskwork performance, to portray the features of a search and rescue scenario and present the task components incorporated into that scenario. The resulting software is called DD-Search and Rescue (Version 1.0). To support the use of the DDD-Search and Rescue simulator in isolated experiment settings, we wrote a player's manual for teaching team members to operate the simulator and play the scenario. We then developed a research design and experiment plan that would allow quantitative measures of individual and team decision making skills using the DDD-Search and Rescue simulator as the experiment platform. A description of these activities and the associated materials that were produced under this contract are contained in this report.

  12. Multiple growth factors, cytokines, and neurotrophins rescue photoreceptors from the damaging effects of constant light.

    PubMed Central

    LaVail, M M; Unoki, K; Yasumura, D; Matthes, M T; Yancopoulos, G D; Steinberg, R H

    1992-01-01

    Recent demonstrations of survival-promoting activity by neurotrophic agents in diverse neuronal systems have raised the possibility of pharmacological therapy for inherited and degenerative disorders of the central nervous system. We have shown previously that, in the retina, basic fibroblast growth factor delays photoreceptor degeneration in Royal College of Surgeons rats with inherited retinal dystrophy and that the growth factor reduces or prevents the rapid photoreceptor degeneration produced by constant light in the rat. This light-damage model now provides an efficient way to assess quantitatively the survival-promoting activity in vivo of a number of growth factors and other molecules. We report here that photoreceptors can be significantly protected from the damaging effects of light by intravitreal injection of eight different growth factors, cytokines, and neurotrophins that typically act through several distinct receptor families. In addition to basic fibroblast growth factor, those factors providing a high degree of photoreceptor rescue include brain-derived neurotrophic factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, interleukin 1 beta, and acidic fibroblast growth factor; those with less activity include neurotrophin 3, insulin-like growth factor II, and tumor necrosis factor alpha; those showing little or no protective effect are nerve growth factor, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, insulin, insulin-like growth factor I, heparin, and laminin. Although we used at least one relatively high concentration of each agent (the highest available), it is still possible that other concentrations or factor combinations might be more protective. Injecting heparin along with acidic fibroblast growth factor or basic fibroblast growth factor further enhanced the degree of photoreceptor survival and also suppressed the increased incidence of macrophages produced by either factor, especially basic fibroblast growth factor. These results now provide the

  13. Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring

    PubMed Central

    Gribble, Kristin E; Jarvis, George; Bock, Martha; Mark Welch, David B

    2014-01-01

    While many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of advanced maternal age and harmful prenatal environments on progeny, little is known about the role of beneficial non-Mendelian maternal inheritance on aging. Here, we report the effects of maternal age and maternal caloric restriction (CR) on the life span and health span of offspring for a clonal culture of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Mothers on regimens of chronic CR (CCR) or intermittent fasting (IF) had increased life span compared with mothers fed ad libitum (AL). With increasing maternal age, life span and fecundity of female offspring of AL-fed mothers decreased significantly and life span of male offspring was unchanged, whereas body size of both male and female offspring increased. Maternal CR partially rescued these effects, increasing the mean life span of AL-fed female offspring but not male offspring and increasing the fecundity of AL-fed female offspring compared with offspring of mothers of the same age. Both maternal CR regimens decreased male offspring body size, but only maternal IF decreased body size of female offspring, whereas maternal CCR caused a slight increase. Understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of these different maternal effects on aging may guide effective interventions to improve health span and life span. PMID:24661622

  14. Quantifying Search Dog Effectiveness in a Terrestrial Search and Rescue Environment.

    PubMed

    Greatbatch, Ian; Gosling, Rebecca J; Allen, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    There is widespread and longstanding use of dogs in land search and rescue (SAR) operations, and their effectiveness is well accepted within the SAR community. However, very little published research exists that quantifies that effectiveness within a realistic SAR environment. This study included 25 experiments, conducted between October 2013 and February 2014 with 10 dog/handler pairs, using randomized target placement to calculate the ratio of hits, misses, and false positives per dog. Each dog was fitted with a GPS receiver to record their paths and ambient temperature. Wind strength and humidity were recorded throughout each run. There was no identifiable correlation between humidity, temperature, or wind speed and effectiveness, but the age of the dog has a small positive correlation. Using a standard effectiveness formula, basic descriptive statistics were generated, which showed that the dogs tested were 76.4% successful overall, with an effectiveness of 62.9%. Dogs covered a mean distance 2.4 times greater than their human handlers but travelled at roughly average human walking speed. This work represents a first attempt to quantify and understand levels of performance in lowland search dogs, and these results need to be understood within that context. A repeatable experimental framework has been demonstrated and provides a foundation for further work in this area. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Kristin E; Jarvis, George; Bock, Martha; Mark Welch, David B

    2014-08-01

    While many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of advanced maternal age and harmful prenatal environments on progeny, little is known about the role of beneficial non-Mendelian maternal inheritance on aging. Here, we report the effects of maternal age and maternal caloric restriction (CR) on the life span and health span of offspring for a clonal culture of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Mothers on regimens of chronic CR (CCR) or intermittent fasting (IF) had increased life span compared with mothers fed ad libitum (AL). With increasing maternal age, life span and fecundity of female offspring of AL-fed mothers decreased significantly and life span of male offspring was unchanged, whereas body size of both male and female offspring increased. Maternal CR partially rescued these effects, increasing the mean life span of AL-fed female offspring but not male offspring and increasing the fecundity of AL-fed female offspring compared with offspring of mothers of the same age. Both maternal CR regimens decreased male offspring body size, but only maternal IF decreased body size of female offspring, whereas maternal CCR caused a slight increase. Understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of these different maternal effects on aging may guide effective interventions to improve health span and life span. © 2014 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Vasoprotective effect of PDGF-CC mediated by HMOX1 rescues retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    He, Chang; Zhao, Chen; Kumar, Anil; Lee, Chunsik; Chen, Mingquan; Huang, Lijuan; Wang, Jing; Ren, Xiangrong; Jiang, Yida; Chen, Wei; Wang, Bin; Gao, Zhiqin; Zhong, Zheng; Huang, Zijing; Zhang, Fan; Huang, Bing; Ding, Hao; Ju, Rong; Tang, Zhongshu; Liu, Yizhi; Cao, Yihai; Li, Xuri; Liu, Xialin

    2014-10-14

    Blood vessel degeneration is critically involved in nearly all types of degenerative diseases. Therefore strategies to enhance blood vessel protection and survival are highly needed. In this study, using different animal models and cultured cells, we show that PDGF-CC is a potent vascular protective and survival factor. PDGF-CC deficiency by genetic deletion exacerbated blood vessel regression/degeneration in various animal models. Importantly, treatment with PDGF-CC protein not only increased the survival of retinal blood vessels in a model of oxygen-induced blood vessel regression but also markedly rescued retinal and blood vessel degeneration in a disease model of retinitis pigmentosa. Mechanistically, we revealed that heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) activity is critically required for the vascular protective/survival effect of PDGF-CC, because blockade of HMOX1 completely abolished the protective effect of PDGF-CC in vitro and in vivo. We further found that both PDGF receptors, PDGFR-β and PDGFR-α, are required for the vasoprotective effect of PDGF-CC. Thus our data show that PDGF-CC plays a pivotal role in maintaining blood vessel survival and may be of therapeutic value in treating various types of degenerative diseases.

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis of different rescue therapies in patients with lamivudine-resistant chronic hepatitis B in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Shen, Jinfang; Cheng, Huafeng

    2012-11-08

    Several rescue therapies have been used in patients with lamivudine (LAM)-resistant chronic hepatitis B (CHB); however, the economic outcome of these therapies is unclear. The object of the current analysis was to evaluate the lifetime cost-effectiveness of rescue therapies among patients with LAM-resistant CHB. A Markov model was developed to simulate the clinical course of patients with LAM-resistant CHB. From the perspective of Chinese health care, a lifetime cost-utility analysis was performedfor 4 rescue strategies: adefovir (ADV), entecavir (ETV) or tenofovir (TDF) monotherapy and combination therapy using LAM and ADV. A hypothetical cohort of 45-year-old patients with genotypic or clinical LAM-resistant CHB entered the model, and the beginning health state was LAM-resistant CHB without other complications. The transition probabilities, efficacy and resistance data for each rescue therapy as well as the costs and utility data were estimated from the literature. The discount rate (3%) utilized for costs and benefits. Sensitivity analyses were used to explore the impact of uncertainty on the results. In LAM-resistant HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative CHB cohorts, TDF monotherapy and combination therapy were on the efficiency frontier for both positive and negative populations. Compared with no treatment, the use of combination therapy cost an additional $6,531.7 to gain 1 additional quality-adjusted life year (QALY) for HBeAg-positive patients and $4,571.7 to gain 1 additional QALY for HBeAg-negative patients. TDF monotherapy for HBeAg-positive patients, shows greater increase in QALYs but higher incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) in comparison with combination therapy. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, combination therapy was the preferred option for health care systems with limited health resources, such as Chinese health care system. In Chinese patients with LAM-resistant CHB, combination therapy is a more cost-effective option than the

  18. Heavy Rescue - Course Outline.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    used during heavy rescue operations . Methods and procedures for utilizing heavy rescue equipment. 4 Methods of developing improvised rescue equipment...utilizing available materials. A simulated exercise utilizing various rescue operations and techniques. Methods and procedures for the maintenance and...HEAVY RESCUE CONSIDERATIONS LEVEL I PERFORMANCE GOALS: 1 Hour GIVEN: 1. Summary of blocked access considerations during heavy rescue operations 2

  19. Pharmacological Selectivity Within Class I Histone Deacetylases Predicts Effects on Synaptic Function and Memory Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Rumbaugh, Gavin; Sillivan, Stephanie E; Ozkan, Emin D; Rojas, Camilo S; Hubbs, Christopher R; Aceti, Massimiliano; Kilgore, Mark; Kudugunti, Shashi; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V; Sweatt, J David; Rusche, James; Miller, Courtney A

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are promising therapeutic targets for neurological and psychiatric disorders that impact cognitive ability, but the relationship between various HDAC isoforms and cognitive improvement is poorly understood, particularly in mouse models of memory impairment. A goal shared by many is to develop HDAC inhibitors with increased isoform selectivity in order to reduce unwanted side effects, while retaining procognitive effects. However, studies addressing this tack at the molecular, cellular and behavioral level are limited. Therefore, we interrogated the biological effects of class I HDAC inhibitors with varying selectivity and assessed a subset of these compounds for their ability to regulate transcriptional activity, synaptic function and memory. The HDAC-1, -2, and -3 inhibitors, RGFP963 and RGFP968, were most effective at stimulating synaptogenesis, while the selective HDAC3 inhibitor, RGFP966, with known memory enhancing abilities, had minimal impact. Furthermore, RGFP963 increased hippocampal spine density, while HDAC3 inhibition was ineffective. Genome-wide gene expression analysis by RNA sequencing indicated that RGFP963 and RGFP966 induce largely distinct transcriptional profiles in the dorsal hippocampus of mature mice. The results of bioinformatic analyses were consistent with RGFP963 inducing a transcriptional program that enhances synaptic efficacy. Finally, RGFP963, but not RGFP966, rescued memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's Disease. Together, these studies suggest that the specific memory promoting properties of class I HDAC inhibitors may depend on isoform selectivity and that certain pathological brain states may be more receptive to HDAC inhibitors that improve network function by enhancing synapse efficacy. PMID:25837283

  20. Rescue Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Lifeshear cutter, a rescue tool for freeing accident victims from wreckage, was developed under the Clinton Administration's Technology Reinvestment Program. Prior cutting equipment was cumbersome and expensive; the new cutter is 50 percent lighter and 70 percent cheaper. The cutter is pyrotechnically-actuated, using a miniature version of the power cartridges used for separation devices on the Space Shuttle and other NASA spacecraft. Hi-Shear Technology Corporation developed the cutter with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and input from the City of Torrance (California) Fire Department.

  1. Manganese rescues adverse effects on lifespan and development in Podospora anserina challenged by excess hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Carolin; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2015-03-01

    For biological systems, balancing cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is of great importance because ROS are both, essential for cellular signaling and dangerous in causing molecular damage. Cellular ROS abundance is controlled by a delicate network of molecular pathways. Within this network, superoxide dismutases (SODs) are active in disproportion of the superoxide anion leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The fungal aging model Podospora anserina encodes at least three SODs. One of these is the mitochondrial PaSOD3 isoform containing manganese as a cofactor. Previous work resulted in the selection of strains in which PaSod3 is strongly overexpressed. These strains display impairments in growth and lifespan. A computational model suggests a series of events to occur in Sod3 overexpressing strains leading to adverse effects due to elevated hydrogen peroxide levels. In an attempt to validate this model and to obtain more detailed information about the cellular responses involved in ROS balancing, we further investigated the PaSod3 overexpressing strains. Here we show that hydrogen peroxide levels are indeed strongly increased in the mutant strain. Surprisingly, this phenotype can be rescued by the addition of manganese to the growth medium. Strikingly, while we obtained no evidence for an antioxidant effect of manganese, we found that the metal is required for induction of components of the ROS scavenging network and lowers the hydrogen peroxide level of the mutant. A similar effect of manganese on lifespan reversion was obtained in wild-type strains challenged with exogenous hydrogen peroxide. It appears that manganese is limited under high hydrogen peroxide and suggests that a manganese-dependent activity leads to the induction of ROS scavenging components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rescue Manual. Module 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The ninth of 10 modules contains 7 chapters: (1) ice characteristics; (2) river characteristics and tactics for rescue; (3) water rescue techniques; (4) water rescue/recovery operations; (5) dive operations; (6) water rescue equipment; and…

  3. Rescue Manual. Module 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The eighth of 10 modules contains 6 chapters: (1) trench rescue; (2) shoring and tunneling techniques; (3) farm accident rescue; (4) wilderness search and rescue; (5) aircraft rescue; and (6) helicopter information. Key points, an…

  4. Photoreceptor rescue.

    PubMed

    Luthert, P J; Chong, N H

    1998-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the final, irreversible event in many blinding diseases including retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular disease and retinal detachment. This paper examines the potential strategies for preventing photoreceptor cell death in the context of current understanding of the mechanisms of cell death. There is evidence to suggest that photoreceptor cells are inherently vulnerable, apoptosis is the final common pathway of photoreceptor cell loss, and other retinal cells play an important role in the survival of rods and cones. Furthermore, the rationale of using neurotrophic factors as therapeutic agents in retinal degeneration is discussed in detail. Photoreceptor rescue by manipulation of genes involved in apoptosis and some pharmacological agents is also described.

  5. How competition affects evolutionary rescue

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, Matthew Miles; de Mazancourt, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Populations facing novel environments can persist by adapting. In nature, the ability to adapt and persist will depend on interactions between coexisting individuals. Here we use an adaptive dynamic model to assess how the potential for evolutionary rescue is affected by intra- and interspecific competition. Intraspecific competition (negative density-dependence) lowers abundance, which decreases the supply rate of beneficial mutations, hindering evolutionary rescue. On the other hand, interspecific competition can aid evolutionary rescue when it speeds adaptation by increasing the strength of selection. Our results clarify this point and give an additional requirement: competition must increase selection pressure enough to overcome the negative effect of reduced abundance. We therefore expect evolutionary rescue to be most likely in communities which facilitate rapid niche displacement. Our model, which aligns to previous quantitative and population genetic models in the absence of competition, provides a first analysis of when competitors should help or hinder evolutionary rescue. PMID:23209167

  6. Dose-dependent effects of D-methionine for rescuing noise-induced permanent threshold shift in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Lo, W-C; Liao, L-J; Wang, C-T; Young, Y-H; Chang, Y-L; Cheng, P-W

    2013-12-19

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dose-response effectiveness of d-methionine (d-met) in rescuing a noise-induced permanent threshold shift (PTS) and cochlear biochemistry following noise exposure. One hour after being exposed to continuous broadband white noise at 105dB sound pressure level (SPL) for 6h, guinea-pigs were treated five times at 12-h intervals with 200, 400, or 600mg/kg d-met or sterile 0.9% saline (each group, N=6) by intraperitoneal injection. Six guinea-pigs with normal hearing that were not exposed to noise served as control animals. Although administration of d-met 200mg/kg did not significantly reduce the mean PTS, treatment with d-met 600mg/kg achieved a complete rescue response. The level of rescue from noise-induced PTS following treatment with 200, 400, or 600mg/kg d-met was dose dependent. The attenuation of the noise-induced decreases in the activities of the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase following treatment with 200, 400, or 600mg/kg d-met was also dose dependent. Likewise, d-met-dose-dependent decreases in mean lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide levels were observed in the d-met treated groups. Significant attenuation of increased oxidative stress and decreased ATPase activities was concurrent with the d-met-mediated improvements in noise-induced auditory dysfunction.

  7. Reliability of Search and Rescue Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burciu, Zbigniew

    2012-06-01

    Determination of the reliability of Search and Rescue action system allows the SAR Mission Coordinator to increase the effectiveness of the action through the proper selection of operational characteristics of the system elements, in particular the selection of the rescue units and auxiliary units. The paper presents the example of the influence of water temperature and time of the action on the reliability of search and rescue action in the case of rescuing a survivor in the water.

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of different rescue therapies in patients with lamivudine-resistant chronic hepatitis B in China

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several rescue therapies have been used in patients with lamivudine (LAM)-resistant chronic hepatitis B (CHB); however, the economic outcome of these therapies is unclear. The object of the current analysis was to evaluate the lifetime cost-effectiveness of rescue therapies among patients with LAM-resistant CHB. Methods A Markov model was developed to simulate the clinical course of patients with LAM-resistant CHB. From the perspective of Chinese health care, a lifetime cost-utility analysis was performedfor 4 rescue strategies: adefovir (ADV), entecavir (ETV) or tenofovir (TDF) monotherapy and combination therapy using LAM and ADV. A hypothetical cohort of 45-year-old patients with genotypic or clinical LAM-resistant CHB entered the model, and the beginning health state was LAM-resistant CHB without other complications. The transition probabilities, efficacy and resistance data for each rescue therapy as well as the costs and utility data were estimated from the literature. The discount rate (3%) utilized for costs and benefits. Sensitivity analyses were used to explore the impact of uncertainty on the results. Results In LAM-resistant HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative CHB cohorts, TDF monotherapy and combination therapy were on the efficiency frontier for both positive and negative populations. Compared with no treatment, the use of combination therapy cost an additional $6,531.7 to gain 1 additional quality-adjusted life year (QALY) for HBeAg-positive patients and $4,571.7 to gain 1 additional QALY for HBeAg-negative patients. TDF monotherapy for HBeAg-positive patients, shows greater increase in QALYs but higher incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) in comparison with combination therapy. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, combination therapy was the preferred option for health care systems with limited health resources, such as Chinese health care system. Conclusion In Chinese patients with LAM-resistant CHB, combination therapy is a more

  9. Effect of rescue breathing by lay rescuers for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by respiratory disease: a nationwide, population-based, propensity score-matched study.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Kondo, Yutaka; Sera, Toshiki; Yahagi, Naoki

    2016-05-30

    The importance of respiratory care in cardiopulmonary resuscitation may vary depending on the cause of cardiac arrest. No previous study has investigated the effects of rescue breathing performed by a lay rescuer on the outcomes of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) caused by intrinsic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate whether rescue breathing performed by a lay rescuer is associated with outcomes after respiratory disease-related OHCA. In a nationwide, population-based, propensity score-matched study in Japan, among adult patients with OHCA caused by respiratory disease who received bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2010, we compared patients with rescue breathing to those without rescue breathing. The primary outcome was neurologically favorable survival 1 month after OHCA. Of the eligible 14,781 patients, 4970 received rescue breathing from a lay rescuer and 9811 did not receive rescue breathing. In a propensity score-matched cohort (4897 vs. 4897 patients), the neurologically favorable survival rate was similar between patients with and without rescue breathing from a lay rescuer [0.9 vs. 0.7 %; OR 1.23 (95 % CI 0.79-1.93)]. Additionally, in subgroup analyses, rescue breathing was not associated with neurological outcome regardless of the type of rescuer [family member: adjusted OR 0.83 (95 % CI 0.39-1.70); or non-family member: adjusted OR 1.91 (95 % CI 0.79-5.35)]. Even among patients with OHCA caused by respiratory disease, rescue breathing performed by a lay rescuer was not associated with neurological outcomes, regardless of the type of lay rescuer.

  10. Lunar mission safety and rescue: Escape/rescue analysis and plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results are presented of the technical analysis of escape/rescue/survival situations, crew survival techniques, alternate escape/rescue approaches and vehicles, and the advantages and disadvantages of each for advanced lunar exploration. Candidate escape/rescue guidelines are proposed and elements of a rescue plan developed. The areas of discussions include the following: lunar arrival/departure operations, lunar orbiter operations, lunar surface operations, lunar surface base escape/rescue analysis, lander tug location operations, portable airlock, emergency pressure suit, and the effects of no orbiting lunar station, no lunar surface base, and no foreign lunar orbit/surface operations on the escape/rescue plan.

  11. Electronic search and rescue aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    There are two elements to the basic electronic search and rescue problem: a means for immediately alerting potential rescuers and an effective method to guide the rescue forces to the scene of the emergency. An Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) used by aircraft or an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) used by maritime vessels has the capability of providing for both an immediate alert and a homing signal to assist rescue forces in locating the site of the distress. This paper describes the development of ELT/EPIRB systems. Emphasis is placed on the SARSAT project, the COSPAS/SARSAT project, and an experimental 406 MHz ELT/EPIRB system.

  12. Electronic search and rescue aids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, B. J.

    1980-01-01

    There are two elements to the basic electronic search and rescue problem: a means for immediately alerting potential rescuers and an effective method to guide the rescue forces to the scene of the emergency. An Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) used by aircraft or an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) used by maritime vessels has the capability of providing for both an immediate alert and a homing signal to assist rescue forces in locating the site of the distress. This paper describes the development of ELT/EPIRB systems. Emphasis is placed on the SARSAT project, the COSPAS/SARSAT project, and an experimental 406 MHz ELT/EPIRB system.

  13. Rescue Manual. Module 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The sixth of 10 modules contains 4 chapters: (1) industrial rescue; (2) rescue from a confined space; (3) extrication from heavy equipment; and (4) rescue operations involving elevators. Key points, an introduction, and conclusion accompany…

  14. A Screen for F1 Hybrid Male Rescue Reveals No Major-Effect Hybrid Lethality Loci in the Drosophila melanogaster Autosomal Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cuykendall, Tawny N.; Satyaki, P.; Ji, Shuqing; Clay, Derek M.; Edelman, Nathaniel B.; Kimchy, Alexandra; Li, Ling-Hei; Nuzzo, Erin A.; Parekh, Neil; Park, Suna; Barbash, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid sons between Drosophila melanogaster females and D. simulans males die as 3rd instar larvae. Two genes, D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) on the X chromosome, and D. simulans Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr) on chromosome II, interact to cause this lethality. Loss-of-function mutations in either gene suppress lethality, but several pieces of evidence suggest that additional factors are required for hybrid lethality. Here we screen the D. melanogaster autosomal genome by using the Bloomington Stock Center Deficiency kit to search for additional regions that can rescue hybrid male lethality. Our screen is designed to identify putative hybrid incompatibility (HI) genes similar to Hmr and Lhr which, when removed, are dominant suppressors of lethality. After screening 89% of the autosomal genome, we found no regions that rescue males to the adult stage. We did, however, identify several regions that rescue up to 13% of males to the pharate adult stage. This weak rescue suggests the presence of multiple minor-effect HI loci, but we were unable to map these loci to high resolution, presumably because weak rescue can be masked by genetic background effects. We attempted to test one candidate, the dosage compensation gene male specific lethal-3 (msl-3), by using RNA interference with short hairpin microRNA constructs targeted specifically against D. simulans msl-3 but failed to achieve knockdown, in part due to off-target effects. We conclude that the D. melanogaster autosomal genome likely does not contain additional major-effect HI loci. We also show that Hmr is insufficient to fully account for the lethality associated with the D. melanogaster X chromosome, suggesting that additional X-linked genes contribute to hybrid lethality. PMID:25352540

  15. A screen for F1 hybrid male rescue reveals no major-effect hybrid lethality loci in the Drosophila melanogaster autosomal genome.

    PubMed

    Cuykendall, Tawny N; Satyaki, P; Ji, Shuqing; Clay, Derek M; Edelman, Nathaniel B; Kimchy, Alexandra; Li, Ling-Hei; Nuzzo, Erin A; Parekh, Neil; Park, Suna; Barbash, Daniel A

    2014-10-27

    Hybrid sons between Drosophila melanogaster females and D. simulans males die as 3rd instar larvae. Two genes, D. melanogaster Hybrid male rescue (Hmr) on the X chromosome, and D. simulans Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr) on chromosome II, interact to cause this lethality. Loss-of-function mutations in either gene suppress lethality, but several pieces of evidence suggest that additional factors are required for hybrid lethality. Here we screen the D. melanogaster autosomal genome by using the Bloomington Stock Center Deficiency kit to search for additional regions that can rescue hybrid male lethality. Our screen is designed to identify putative hybrid incompatibility (HI) genes similar to Hmr and Lhr which, when removed, are dominant suppressors of lethality. After screening 89% of the autosomal genome, we found no regions that rescue males to the adult stage. We did, however, identify several regions that rescue up to 13% of males to the pharate adult stage. This weak rescue suggests the presence of multiple minor-effect HI loci, but we were unable to map these loci to high resolution, presumably because weak rescue can be masked by genetic background effects. We attempted to test one candidate, the dosage compensation gene male specific lethal-3 (msl-3), by using RNA interference with short hairpin microRNA constructs targeted specifically against D. simulans msl-3 but failed to achieve knockdown, in part due to off-target effects. We conclude that the D. melanogaster autosomal genome likely does not contain additional major-effect HI loci. We also show that Hmr is insufficient to fully account for the lethality associated with the D. melanogaster X chromosome, suggesting that additional X-linked genes contribute to hybrid lethality. Copyright © 2014 Cuykendall et al.

  16. [Accidents and their health effects in firemen of rescue and firefighting teams].

    PubMed

    Szubert, Z; Sobala, W

    2000-01-01

    Accidents, traumas and poisoning are the most frequent causes of health impairments among firemen, determined by the nature of their occupation. Their work is directly related with the exposure to various harmful chemical and physical factors, involving at the same time mental stress during rescue and firefighting actions. The aim of the analysis performed was to determine the accident rate, range and causes of accident-related absenteeism among firemen of the rescue and firefighting brigades, as well as to indicate major traumas resulting from accidents at work. The study was carried out in a group of 1503 firemen (7% of the total number of firemen in Poland) employed in the rescue and firefighting brigades, selected at random throughout the country. Workers' personal data, as well as the data on the number of accidents and the number of days of work disability during the years 1994-97 were analysed. Accidents and accident-related absenteeism by age, certified causes and sites (body parts) of traumas were also analysed using the following parameters: the accident rate (the number of accidents per 1000 workers), accident severity rate (the number of work disability days per one accident), and absenteeism rate (the number of accident-related work disability days per 100 employed). In the period under study (1994-97) 352 accidents, involving 301 persons were registered. Thus, the accident rate was 70.3. These accidents were responsible for the period of work disability three times higher (293.5 days/100 workers) than that observed in the male population employed in the national economy, and eight times higher (770.2 days/100 workers) in the 50-59 age group. Dislocations and distortions were the most frequent causes of accident-related absenteeism--48, whereas fractures occupied the second place--25%. Burns were classified among the most severe injuries, resulting in more than 90 days of absenteeism annually, but they made only 7% of absenteeism with frequency rate of

  17. Altered Transcription and Neofunctionalization of Duplicated Genes Rescue the Harmful Effects of a Chimeric Gene in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shengqian; Wang, Zhixin; Zhang, Haiyan; Hu, Kaining; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Qin, Maomao; Dun, Xiaoling; Yi, Bin; Wen, Jing; Ma, Chaozhi; Shen, Jinxiong; Fu, Tingdong

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric genes contribute to the evolution of diverse functions in plants and animals. However, new chimeric genes also increase the risk of developmental defects. Here, we show that the chimeric gene Brassica napus male sterile 4 (Bnams4b) is responsible for genic male sterility in the widely used canola line 7365A (Bnams3 ms3ms4bms4b). Bnams4b originated via exon shuffling ∼4.6 million years ago. It causes defects in the normal functions of plastids and induces aborted anther formation and/or albino leaves and buds. Evidence of the age of the mutation, its tissue expression pattern, and its sublocalization indicated that it coevolved with BnaC9.Tic40 (BnaMs3). In Arabidopsis thaliana, Bnams4b results in complete male sterility that can be rescued by BnaC9.Tic40, suggesting that BnaC9.Tic40 might restore fertility through effects on protein level. Another suppressor gene, Bnams4a, rescues sterility by reducing the level of transcription of Bnams4b. Our results suggest that Brassica plants have coevolved altered transcription patterns and neofunctionalization of duplicated genes that can block developmental defects resulting from detrimental chimeric genes. PMID:27559024

  18. Snyder-Robinson Syndrome: Rescuing the Disease-Causing Effect of G56S mutant by Small Molecule Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Martiny, Virginie; Lagorce, David; Alexov, Emil; Miteva, Maria; Clemson University Team; Université Paris Diderot Team

    2013-03-01

    Snyder-Robinson Syndrome (SRS) is an X-linked mental retardation disorder, which is caused by defects in a particular gene coding for the spermine synthase (SMS) protein. Among the missense mutations known to be disease-causing is the G56S, which is positioned at the interface of the SMS homo-dimer. Previous computational and experimental investigations have shown that G56S mutation destabilizes the homo-dimer and thus greatly reduces the SMS enzymatic activity. In this study, we explore the possibility of mitigating the effect of G56S mutation by binding small molecules to suitable pockets around the mutation site. It is done by combined efforts of molecular dynamics simulations and in silico screening. The binding of selected molecules was calculated to fully compensate the effect of the mutation and rescue the wild type dimer affinity. This work was supported by NIH, NLM grant. No. 1R03LM009748

  19. Effect of advanced location methods on search and rescue duration for general aviation aircraft accidents in the contiguous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Ryan J.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of advanced search and rescue devices and techniques on search duration for general aviation aircraft crashes. The study assessed three categories of emergency locator transmitters, including 121.5 MHz, 406 MHz, and GPS-Assisted 406 MHz devices. The impact of the COSPAS-SARSAT organization ceasing satellite monitoring for 121.5 MHz ELTs in 2009 was factored into the study. Additionally, the effect of using radar forensic analysis and cellular phone forensic search methods were also assessed. The study's data was derived from an Air Force Rescue Coordination Center database and included 365 historical general aviation search and rescue missions conducted between 2006 and 2011. Highly skewed data was transformed to meet normality requirements for parametric testing. The significance of each ELT model was assessed using a combination of Brown-Forsythe Means Testing or Orthogonal Contrast Testing. ANOVA and Brown-Forsythe Means testing was used to evaluate cellular phone and radar forensic search methods. A Spearman's Rho test was used to determine if the use of multiple search methods produced an additive effect in search efficiency. Aircraft which utilized an Emergency Locator Transmitter resulted in a shorter search duration than those which did not use such devices. Aircraft utilizing GPS-Aided 406 MHz ELTs appeared to require less time to locate than if equipped with other ELT models, however, this assessment requires further study due to limited data. Aircraft equipped with 406 MHz ELTs required slightly less time to locate than aircraft equipped with older 121.5 MHz ELTs. The study found no substantial difference in the search durations for 121.5 MHz ELTs monitored by COSPAS-SARSAT verses those which were not. Significance testing revealed that the use of cellular phone forensic data and radar forensic data both resulted in substantially higher mission search durations. Some possible explanations for this

  20. Rescue Manual. Module 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The first of 10 modules contains 9 chapters: (1) introduction; (2) occupational stresses in rescue operations; (3) size-up; (4) critique; (5) reports and recordkeeping; (6) tools and equipment for rescue operations; (7) planning for…

  1. Rescue Manual. Module 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The fourth of 10 modules contains 8 chapters: (1) construction and characteristics of rescue rope; (2) knots, bends, and hitches; (3) critical angles; (4) raising systems; (5) rigging; (6) using the brake-bar rack for rope rescue; (7) rope…

  2. Rescue Manual. Module 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The third of 10 modules contains 4 chapters: (1) forcible entry; (2) structure search and rescue; (3) rescue operations involving electricity; and (4) cutting torches. Key points, an introduction, and conclusion accompany substantive…

  3. Rescue Skills and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    The guide has been prepared for use as a textbook in rescue training courses at DCPA (Defense Civil Preparedness Agency) approved training schools and is to be used in rescue training programs of State and local governments. The document explains the various types of rescue missions, command structure, the personnel of the operating unit,…

  4. Sex, mitochondria, and genetic rescue

    PubMed Central

    Havird, Justin C.; Fitzpatrick, Sarah W.; Kronenberger, John; Funk, W. Chris; Angeloni, Lisa M.; Sloan, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic rescue is a potentially effective management tool to offset the effects of reduced genetic diversity in imperiled populations. However, implementation requires complex choices. Here, we address the consequences of introducing males vs. females, highlighting the possibility that introduced females might lead to maladapted mitonuclear genomes and reduced offspring fitness. PMID:26712562

  5. A graft-based chemotherapy method for screening effective molecules and rescuing huanglongbing-affected citrus plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Muqing; Powell, Charles A; Guo, Ying; Doud, Melissa S; Duan, Yongping

    2012-06-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is the most devastating disease of citrus. The global citrus industry is in urgent need of effective chemical treatments for HLB control because of its rapid spreading worldwide. Due to the fastidious nature of the pathogens, and the poor permissibility of citrus leaf surfaces, effective screening of chemicals for the HLB control can be challenging. In this study, we developed a graft-based chemotherapy method to rapidly screen potential HLB-controlling chemical compounds. In addition, we improved transmission efficiency by using the best HLB-affected scion-rootstock combination, and demonstrated the HLB bacterial titer was the critical factor in transmission. The HLB-affected lemon scions had a high titer of HLB bacterium, survival rate (83.3%), and pathogen transmission rate (59.9%). Trifoliate, a widely used commercial rootstock, had the highest survival rate (>70.0%) compared with grapefruit (52.6%) and sour orange (50.4%). Using this method, we confirmed a mixture of penicillin and streptomycin was the most effective compounds in eliminating the HLB bacterium from the HLB-affected scions, and in successfully rescuing severely HLB-affected citrus germplasms. These findings are useful not only for chemical treatments but also for graft-based transmission studies in HLB and other Liberibacter diseases.

  6. Rescue of heavy metal effects on cell physiology of the algal model system Micrasterias by divalent ions

    PubMed Central

    Volland, Stefanie; Bayer, Elisabeth; Baumgartner, Verena; Andosch, Ancuela; Lütz, Cornelius; Sima, Evelyn; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that metals such as copper, zinc, aluminum, cadmium, chromium, iron and lead cause severe dose-dependent disturbances in growth, morphogenesis, photosynthetic and respiratory activity as well as on ultrastructure and function of organelles in the algal model system Micrasterias denticulata (Volland et al., 2011, 2012; Andosch et al., 2012). In the present investigation we focus on amelioration of these adverse effects of cadmium, chromium and lead by supplying the cells with different antioxidants and essential micronutrients to obtain insight into metal uptake mechanisms and subcellular metal targets. This seems particularly interesting as Micrasterias is adapted to extremely low-concentrated, oligotrophic conditions in its natural bog environment. The divalent ions of iron, zinc and calcium were able to diminish the effects of the metals cadmium, chromium and lead on Micrasterias. Iron showed most ameliorating effects on cadmium and chromium in short- and long-term treatments and improved cell morphogenesis, ultrastructure, cell division rates and photosynthesis. Analytical transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods (electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI)) revealed that chromium uptake was decreased when Micrasterias cells were pre-treated with iron, which resulted in no longer detectable intracellular chromium accumulations. Zinc rescued the detrimental effects of chromium on net-photosynthesis, respiration rates and electron transport in PS II. Calcium and gadolinium were able to almost completely compensate the inhibiting effects of lead and cadmium on cell morphogenesis after mitosis, respectively. These results indicate that cadmium is taken up by calcium and iron transporters, whereas chromium appears to enter the algae cells via iron and zinc carriers. It was shown that lead is not taken up into Micrasterias at all but exerts its adverse effects on cell growth by substituting cell

  7. [The compilation, contents and spread of Qing li Shan jiu Fang (Formulary for Effective Rescuing in the Qingli Reign].

    PubMed

    Han, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Qing li shan jiu fang (Formulary for Effective Rescuing in the Qingli Reign), compiled by Hanlin Academy of Medical Official in 1048 under the decree of the Emperor, is a medical formulary exclusively used to prevent and control poisonous parasite disease. It is composed of formulae provided by a medical scholar of Fuzhou, Lin Shiyuan, together with other formulae collected by the imperial physicians and so on. Unfortunately, it was lost about after the demise of the Southern Song Dynasty. However, in the Southern Song Dynasty, two books, Liang Kejia's Chun xi san shan zhi and Hong Mai's Yi jian zhi bu, do record the progress of its compilation, parts of its contents and the condition of its spread and application. Moreover, they also describe the kinds, the feature, the epidemic, prevention and cure of parasite poison. It is especially good that this book preserves three famous formulae, including Zhi gu du zheng fang (Orthodox Formula for Treating Parasitic Poisons) (called A Cathartic Formula with 8 Ingredients in the Yuan Dynasty), Jie du wan (Antidote Pills) and He qi tang san (Powder of Decoction for Harmonious Qi), which are of medical significance for the understanding of the property of Qing li shan jiu fang. The Song emperors, the central government and local officials all paid high attention to the spread and application of this book. They not only enacted it to the counties, and provinces, but also carved it on stone steles for popularizing the knowledge of preventing parasitic poisons to medical workers and common people.

  8. Rescue Manual. Module 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The 10th of 10 modules contains a 16-page glossary of rescue terms and 3 appendices: (1) 4 computer programs and 32 other technical assistance materials available for hazardous materials; (2) hazardous materials resources--60 phone numbers,…

  9. Rescue Manual. Module 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The second of 10 modules contains 5 chapters: (1) patient care and handling techniques; (2) rescue carries and drags; (3) emergency vehicle operations; (4) self-contained breathing apparatus; and (5) protective clothing. Key points, an…

  10. Relieved residual damage in the hematopoietic system of mice rescued by radiation-induced adaptive response (Yonezawa Effect)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Maruyama, Kouichi; VarèS, Guillaume; Eguchi-Kasai, Kiyomi; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2013-01-01

    Existence of adaptive response (AR) was previously demonstrated in C57BL/6J mice. Irradiations were performed by delivering a priming low dose of X-rays (0.50 Gy) in combination with a challenge high dose of accelerated carbon or neon ion particles. AR was characterized by significantly decreased mortality in the 30-day survival test. This mouse AR model (‘Yonezawa Effect’) was originally established by using X-rays as both the priming and challenge irradiations. The underlying mechanism was due to radio-resistance occurring in blood-forming tissues. In this study, we verified the existence of AR and further investigated residual damage in the hematopoietic system in surviving animals. Results showed that the priming low dose of X-rays could relieve the detrimental effects on the hematopoietic system. We observed both an improvement in the blood platelet count and the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) to the sum of PCEs and normochromatic erythrocytes (NCEs) and a marked reduction of the incidences of micronucleated PCEs and micronucleated NCEs. These findings suggest that the priming low dose of low linear energy transfer (LET) X-rays induced a protective effect on the hematopoietic system, which may play an important role in both rescue from acute lethal damage (mouse killing) and prevention of late detrimental consequences (residual anhematopoiesis and delayed genotoxic effects) caused by exposure to a high challenge dose from low-LET (X-ray) or high-LET (carbon and neon ion) irradiations. These findings provide new knowledge of the characterization of the Yonezawa Effect by providing new insight into the mechanistic study of AR in vivo. PMID:22923746

  11. Aflatoxin B1 Induced Systemic Toxicity in Poultry and Rescue Effects of Selenium and Zinc.

    PubMed

    Mughal, Muhammad Jameel; Peng, Xi; Kamboh, Asghar Ali; Zhou, Yi; Fang, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Among many challenges, exposure to aflatoxins, particularly aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), is one of the major concerns in poultry industry. AFB1 intoxication results in decreased meat/egg production, hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, disturbance in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and reproduction, immune suppression, and increased disease susceptibility. Selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn), in dietary supplementation, offer easy, cost-effective, and efficient ways to neutralize the toxic effect of AFB1. In the current review, we discussed the impact of AFB1 on poultry industry, its biotransformation, and organ-specific noxious effects, along with the action mechanism of AFB1-induced toxicity. Moreover, we explained the biological and detoxifying roles of Se and Zn in avian species as well as the protection mechanism of these two trace elements. Ultimately, we discussed the use of Se and Zn supplementation against AFB1-induced toxicity in poultry birds.

  12. Magnesium sulfate and nimesulide have synergistic effects on rescuing brain damage after transient focal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang-Chao; Huang, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Hao-Kuang; Wu, Ming-Hsiu; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2012-05-01

    Magnesium sulfate and nimesulide are commonly used drugs with reported neuroprotective effects. Their combination as stroke treatment has the potential benefits of decreasing individual drug dosage and fewer adverse effects. This study evaluated their synergistic effects and compared a low-dose combination with individual drug alone and placebo. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 90 min of focal ischemia with intraluminal suture occlusion of the middle cerebral artery followed by reperfusion. The rats were randomly assigned to receive one of the following treatments: placebo, magnesium sulfate (MgSO₄; 45 mg/kg) intravenously immediately after the induction of middle cerebral artery occlusion, nimesulide (6 mg/kg) intraperitoneally before reperfusion, and combined therapy. Three days after the ischemia-reperfusion insult, therapeutic outcome was assessed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and a 28-point neurological severity scoring system. Cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E₂, myeloperoxidase, and caspase-3 expression after treatment were evaluated using Western blot analyses and immunohistochemical staining, followed by immunoreactive cell analysis using tissue cytometry. Only the combination treatment group showed a significant decrease in infarction volume (10.93±6.54% versus 26.43±7.08%, p<0.01), and neurological severity score (p<0.05). Low-dose MgSO₄ or nimesulide showed no significant neuroprotection. There was also significant suppression of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E₂, myeloperoxidase, and caspase-3 expression in the combination treatment group, suggesting that the combination of the two drugs improved the neuroprotective effects of each individual drug. MgSO₄ and nimesulide have synergistic effects on ischemia-reperfusion insults. Their combination helps decrease drug dosage and adverse effects. Combined treatment strategies may help to combat stroke-induced brain damage in the future.

  13. Effectiveness of ecological rescue for altered soil microbial communities and functions.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Kadiya; Spor, Aymé; Breuil, Marie-Christine; Bru, David; Bizouard, Florian; Violle, Cyrille; Barnard, Romain L; Philippot, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Soil ecosystems worldwide are subjected to marked modifications caused by anthropogenic disturbances and global climate change, resulting in microbial diversity loss and alteration of ecosystem functions. Despite the paucity of studies, restoration ecology provides an appropriate framework for testing the potential of manipulating soil microbial communities for the recovery of ecosystem functioning. We used a reciprocal transplant design in experimentally altered microbial communities to investigate the effectiveness of introducing microbial communities in degraded soil ecosystems to restore N-cycle functioning. Microbial diversity loss resulted in alternative compositional states associated with impaired N-cycle functioning. Here, the addition of complex microbial communities to these altered communities revealed a pivotal role of deterministic community assembly processes. The diversity of some alternative compositional states was successfully increased but without significant restoration of soil N-cycle functioning. However, in the most degraded alternative state, the introduction of new microbial communities caused an overall decrease in phylogenetic diversity and richness. The successful soil colonization by newly introduced species for some compositional states indicates that priority effects could be overridden when attempting to manipulate microbial communities for soil restoration. Altogether, our result showed consistent patterns within restoration treatments with minor idiosyncratic effects. This suggests the predominance of deterministic processes and the predictability of restoration trajectories, which could be used to guide the effective management of microbial community assemblages for ecological restoration of soils.

  14. Interleukin 35 Rescues Regulatory B Cell Function, but the Effect Is Dysregulated in Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoxuan; Qin, Chengyong

    2017-05-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a long-time inflammatory condition arising from aberrant immune activation in the colon and the rectum. Interleukin (IL)-35 plays critical roles in autoimmune disorders. In this study, we explored the pathways of IL-35 in affecting UC. First, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from UC patients were obtained. Pretreating PBMCs with IL-35 resulted in significantly elevated IL-10 production from whole PBMCs as well as B cells, whereas pretreating PBMCs with IL-12 or IL-27 did not demonstrate a similar effect. IL-35 suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T cells, CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, and CD8(+) T cells, but did not inhibit the proliferation of B cells. IL-35-mediated IL-10 secretion in B cells did not require the presence of Treg cells. After treatment with IL-35, B cells from UC patients presented significantly enhanced regulatory function, characterized by inhibiting cell proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion from autologous CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells and CD8(+) T cells, which was dependent on IL-10 signaling. However, IL-35-treatment did not demonstrate an effect on regulating IL-5 and IL-13 responses. These discoveries identified a Th1, Th17, and CD8(+) T cell-targeting role of IL-35 in UC patients. Next, we examined the IL-35 expression in the intestinal mucosal in UC patients. Data showed that both noninflamed and inflamed tissues from UC patients presented significantly lower IL-35 secretion compared to healthy control tissues, which was associated with suppressed p35 transcription. UC patients with higher IL-35 also presented higher IL-10 secretion in gut mucosa. Together, our study identified that IL-35 could mediate anti-inflammatory function through promoting regulatory B cell functions, but this effect was suppressed in UC patients.

  15. Physiologic effects of a self-contained self-rescue apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Petsonk, E.L.; Hancock, J.; Boyles, C.

    1983-05-01

    Recently promulgated federal regulations mandate the provision of an emergency, self-contained, oxygen-supplying breathing device (self-contained self-rescuer, SCSR) to all underground coalminers. In order to assist in defining the potential limitations of this new device, we measured the responses of ten healthy coal mine inspectors to submaximal steady-state treadmill exercise with and without the SCSR. During the last minute of exercise, blood oxygen saturation averaged 98.3% and mouth pressure swing 15.6 cm H/sub 2/O with the device, compared to 94.8% and 10.4 cm H/sub 2/O without it. Mean respiratory rates were decreased to 25/min with the SCSR from 28/min without it. Blood pressure, core temperature and heart rate were unaffected. We conclude that in healthy individuals on submaximal exercise there is little evidence of a significant adverse effect of the new device.

  16. Rationing of medical care: Rules of rescue, cost-effectiveness, and the Oregon plan.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Emmet J

    2004-06-01

    Doctors who deal with individual patients fail to avoid interventions with minimal expected benefits. This is one reason that the United States spends more on health care services than any of 28 other industrialized nations. Yet, our money has not bought us health; our infant mortality rate ranks 23rd, and our overall life expectancy rate ranks 20th among the 29 nations. Ours is the only nation without a national health system. Our job-based health insurance system has allowed the number of uninsured persons to reach 44 million, which is 18% of the nonelderly population. This article examines the role of such ethical concepts as beneficence, utilitarianism, and justice in the allocation of health care resources. It also examines the innovative Oregon Health Plan and its use of cost-effectiveness analysis for health care allocation that is based on league tables.

  17. Rescue of heavy metal effects on cell physiology of the algal model system Micrasterias by divalent ions.

    PubMed

    Volland, Stefanie; Bayer, Elisabeth; Baumgartner, Verena; Andosch, Ancuela; Lütz, Cornelius; Sima, Evelyn; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2014-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that metals such as copper, zinc, aluminum, cadmium, chromium, iron and lead cause severe dose-dependent disturbances in growth, morphogenesis, photosynthetic and respiratory activity as well as on ultrastructure and function of organelles in the algal model system Micrasterias denticulata (Volland et al., 2011, 2012; Andosch et al., 2012). In the present investigation we focus on amelioration of these adverse effects of cadmium, chromium and lead by supplying the cells with different antioxidants and essential micronutrients to obtain insight into metal uptake mechanisms and subcellular metal targets. This seems particularly interesting as Micrasterias is adapted to extremely low-concentrated, oligotrophic conditions in its natural bog environment. The divalent ions of iron, zinc and calcium were able to diminish the effects of the metals cadmium, chromium and lead on Micrasterias. Iron showed most ameliorating effects on cadmium and chromium in short- and long-term treatments and improved cell morphogenesis, ultrastructure, cell division rates and photosynthesis. Analytical transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods (electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI)) revealed that chromium uptake was decreased when Micrasterias cells were pre-treated with iron, which resulted in no longer detectable intracellular chromium accumulations. Zinc rescued the detrimental effects of chromium on net-photosynthesis, respiration rates and electron transport in PS II. Calcium and gadolinium were able to almost completely compensate the inhibiting effects of lead and cadmium on cell morphogenesis after mitosis, respectively. These results indicate that cadmium is taken up by calcium and iron transporters, whereas chromium appears to enter the algae cells via iron and zinc carriers. It was shown that lead is not taken up into Micrasterias at all but exerts its adverse effects on cell growth by substituting cell

  18. Nrf2 the Rescue: Effects of the Antioxidative/Electrophilic Response on the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, Curtis D.; Reisman, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that positively regulates the basal and inducible expression of a large battery of cytoprotective genes. These gene products include proteins that catalyze reduction reactions (NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, Nqo1), conjugation reactions (glutathione-S-transferases, Gsts and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, Ugts), as well as the efflux of potentially toxic xenobiotics and xenobiotic conjugates (multidrug resistance-associated proteins, Mrps). The significance of Nrf2 in the liver has been established, as livers of Nrf2-null mice are more susceptible to various oxidative/electrophilic stress-induced pathologies than wild-type mice. In contrast, both pharmacological and genetic models of hepatic Nrf2 activation are protective against oxidative/electrophilic stress. Furthermore, because certain Nrf2-target genes in the liver could affect the distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics, the effects of Nrf2 on the kinetics of drugs and other xenobiotics should also be considered, with a special emphasis on metabolism and excretion. Therefore, this review highlights the research that has contributed to the understanding of the importance of Nrf2 in toxicodynamics and toxicokinetics, especially that which pertains to the liver. PMID:20122946

  19. Nrf2 the rescue: Effects of the antioxidative/electrophilic response on the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Klaassen, Curtis D.; Reisman, Scott A.

    2010-04-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that positively regulates the basal and inducible expression of a large battery of cytoprotective genes. These gene products include proteins that catalyze reduction reactions (NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, Nqo1), conjugation reactions (glutathione-S-transferases, Gsts and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases, Ugts), as well as the efflux of potentially toxic xenobiotics and xenobiotic conjugates (multidrug resistance-associated proteins, Mrps). The significance of Nrf2 in the liver has been established, as livers of Nrf2-null mice are more susceptible to various oxidative/electrophilic stress-induced pathologies than wild-type mice. In contrast, both pharmacological and genetic models of hepatic Nrf2 activation are protective against oxidative/electrophilic stress. Furthermore, because certain Nrf2-target genes in the liver could affect the distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics, the effects of Nrf2 on the kinetics of drugs and other xenobiotics should also be considered, with a special emphasis on metabolism and excretion. Therefore, this review highlights the research that has contributed to the understanding of the importance of Nrf2 in toxicodynamics and toxicokinetics, especially that which pertains to the liver.

  20. An oncolytic adenovirus enhances antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding endostatin by rescuing its selective replication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ran-yi; Zhou, Ling; Zhang, Yan-ling; Huang, Bi-jun; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-min; Li, Li-xia; Fu, Xiang; Wu, Jiang-xue; Huang, Wenlin

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •H101 promotes endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication. •H101 rescued Ad-Endo replication by supplying E1A and E1B19k proteins. •Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 in NPC cells. •Ad-Endo and oncolytic Ad H101 have synergistic antitumor effects on NPC. -- Abstract: A replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding secreted human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to have promising antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects. The E1B55k-deleted Ad H101 can selectively lyse cancer cells. In this study, we explored the antitumor effects and cross-interactions of Ad-Endo and H101 on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The results showed that H101 dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication in NPC cells, and the expressed endostatin proteins significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. E1A and E1B19k products are required for the rescuing of H101 to Ad-Endo replication in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells, but not in C666-1 cells. On the other hand, Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 by enhancing Ad replication in NPC cells. The combination of H101 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited CNE-2 xenografts growth through the increased endostatin expression and Ad replication. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-Endo gene therapy and oncolytic Ad therapeutics could be promising in comprehensive treatment of NPC.

  1. Constitutive MEK1 activation rescues anthrax lethal toxin-induced vascular effects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bolcome, Robert E; Chan, Joanne

    2010-12-01

    Anthrax lethal toxin (LT) increases vascular leakage in a number of mammalian models and in human anthrax disease. Using a zebrafish model, we determined that vascular delivery of LT increased permeability, which was phenocopied by treatment with a selective chemical inhibitor of MEK1 and MEK2 (also known as mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK] kinase, MEK, or MKK). Here we investigate further the role of MEK1/phospho-ERK (pERK) in the action of LT. Overexpression of wild-type zebrafish MEK1 at high levels did not induce detrimental effects. However, a constitutively activated version, MEK1(S219D,S223D) (MEK1DD), induced early defects in embryonic development that correlated with increased ERK/MAPK phosphorylation. To bypass these early developmental defects and to provide a genetic tool for examining the action of lethal factor (LF), we generated inducible transgenic zebrafish lines expressing either wild-type or activated MEK1 under the control of a heat shock promoter. Remarkably, induction of MEK1DD transgene expression prior to LT delivery prevented vascular damage, while the wild-type MEK1 line did not. In the presence of both LT and MEK1DD transgene expression, cardiovascular development and function proceeded normally in most embryos. The resistance to microsphere leakage in transgenic animals demonstrated a protective role against LT-induced vascular permeability. A consistent increase in ERK phosphorylation among LT-resistant MEK1DD transgenic animals provided additional confirmation of transgene activation. These findings provide a novel genetic approach to examine mechanism of action of LT in vivo through one of its known targets. This approach may be generally applied to investigate additional pathogen-host interactions and to provide mechanistic insights into host signaling pathways affected by pathogen entry.

  2. Effect of Advanced Location Methods on Search and Rescue Duration for General Aviation Aircraft Accidents in the Contiguous United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of advanced search and rescue devices and techniques on search duration for general aviation aircraft crashes. The study assessed three categories of emergency locator transmitters, including 121.5 MHz, 406 MHz, and GPS-Assisted 406 MHz devices. The impact of the COSPAS-SARSAT organization…

  3. Effect of Advanced Location Methods on Search and Rescue Duration for General Aviation Aircraft Accidents in the Contiguous United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Ryan J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of advanced search and rescue devices and techniques on search duration for general aviation aircraft crashes. The study assessed three categories of emergency locator transmitters, including 121.5 MHz, 406 MHz, and GPS-Assisted 406 MHz devices. The impact of the COSPAS-SARSAT organization…

  4. Endoscopic multiple metal stenting for the treatment of enteral leaks near the biliary orifice: A novel effective rescue procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mutignani, Massimiliano; Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Dokas, Stefanos; Aseni, Paolo; Carnevali, Pietro; Forti, Edoardo; Manta, Raffaele; Sica, Mariano; Tringali, Alberto; Pugliese, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Between April 2013 and October 2015, 6 patients developed periampullary duodenal or jejunal/biliary leaks after major abdominal surgery. In all patients, percutaneous drainage of the collection or re-operation with primary surgical repair was attempted at first but failed. A fully covered enteral metal stent was placed in all patients to seal the leak. Subsequently, we cannulated the common bile duct and, in some cases, and the main pancreatic duct inserting hydrophilic guidewires through the stent after dilating the stent mesh with a dilatation balloon or breaking the meshes with Argon Plasma Beam. Finally, we inserted a fully covered biliary metal stent to drain the bile into the lumen of the enteral stent. In cases of normal proximal upper gastrointestinal anatomy, a pancreatic plastic stent was also inserted. Oral food intake was initiated when the abdominal drain outflow stopped completely. Stent removal was scheduled four to eight weeks later after a CT scan to confirm the complete healing of the fistula and the absence of any perilesional residual fluid collection. The leak resolved in five patients. One patient died two days after the procedure due to severe, pre-existing, sepsis. The stents were removed endoscopically in four weeks in four patients. In one patient we experienced stent migration causing small bowel obstruction. In this case, the stents were removed surgically. Four patients are still alive today. They are still under follow-up and doing well. Bilio-enteral fully covered metal stenting with or without pancreatic stenting was feasible, safe and effective in treating postoperative enteral leaks near the biliopancreatic orifice in our small series. This minimally invasive procedure can be implemented in selected patients as a rescue procedure to repair these challenging leaks. PMID:27606045

  5. Countries renew rescue agreement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan M.

    To insure long-term continuity for the international satellite search and rescue system, COSPAS/SARSAT, an intergovernmental agreement binding the four sponsoring nations to cooperate was signed July 1 in Paris. According to Russell Vollmers of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the agreement is binding for 15 years, with an automatic extension.The system marked the fifth anniversary of its first rescue last year, when on September 10, 1982, three persons were rescued. Begun in the 1970s by NASA as an experiment, COSPAS/SARSAT (a Russian-English acronym) is now a cooperative project among the United States, Canada, France, and the Soviet Union. Its goal is to reduce the time required to rescue air and maritime distress victims and also to locate victims who otherwise may not be found, thus using the satellite system as a life-saving device.

  6. Developing a new perspective to study the health of survivors of Sichuan earthquakes in China: a study on the effect of post-earthquake rescue policies on survivors' health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ying; Wang, Xiukun

    2013-10-29

    Sichuan is a province in China with an extensive history of earthquakes. Recent earthquakes, including the Lushan earthquake in 2013, have resulted in thousands of people losing their homes and their families. However, there is a research gap on the efficiency of government support policies. Therefore, this study develops a new perspective to study the health of earthquake survivors, based on the effect of post-earthquake rescue policies on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of survivors of the Sichuan earthquake. This study uses data from a survey conducted in five hard-hit counties (Wenchuan, Qingchuan, Mianzhu, Lushan, and Dujiangyan) in Sichuan in 2013. A total of 2,000 questionnaires were distributed, and 1,672 were returned; the response rate was 83.6%. Results of the rescue policies scale and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) scale passed the reliability test. The confirmatory factor analysis model showed that the physical component summary (PCS) directly affected the mental component summary (MCS). The results of structural equation model regarding the effects of rescue policies on HRQOL showed that the path coefficients of six policies (education, orphans, employment, poverty, legal, and social rescue policies) to the PCS of survivors were all positive and passed the test of significance. Finally, although only the path coefficient of the educational rescue policy to the MCS of survivors was positive and passed the test of significance, the other five policies affected the MCS indirectly through the PCS. The general HRQOL of survivors is not ideal; the survivors showed a low satisfaction with the post-earthquake rescue policies. Further, the six post-earthquake rescue policies significantly improved the HRQOL of survivors and directly affected the promotion of the PCS of survivors. Aside from the educational rescue policy, all other policies affected the MCS indirectly through the PCS. This finding indicates relatively large differences in

  7. A new approach to road accident rescue.

    PubMed

    Morales, Alejandro; González-Aguilera, Diego; López, Alfonso I; Gutiérrez, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    This article develops and validates a new methodology and tool for rescue assistance in traffic accidents, with the aim of improving its efficiency and safety in the evacuation of people, reducing the number of victims in road accidents. Different tests supported by professionals and experts have been designed under different circumstances and with different categories of damaged vehicles coming from real accidents and simulated trapped victims in order to calibrate and refine the proposed methodology and tool. To validate this new approach, a tool called App_Rescue has been developed. This tool is based on the use of a computer system that allows an efficient access to the technical information of the vehicle and sanitary information of the common passengers. The time spent during rescue using the standard protocol and the proposed method was compared. This rescue assistance system allows us to make vital information accessible in posttrauma care services, improving the effectiveness of interventions by the emergency services, reducing the rescue time and therefore minimizing the consequences involved and the number of victims. This could often mean saving lives. In the different simulated rescue operations, the rescue time has been reduced an average of 14%.

  8. Airborne rescue system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haslim, Leonard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The airborne rescue system includes a boom with telescoping members for extending a line and collar to a rescue victim. The boom extends beyond the tip of the helicopter rotor so that the victim may avoid the rotor downwash. The rescue line is played out and reeled in by winch. The line is temporarily retained under the boom. When the boom is extended, the rescue line passes through clips. When the victim dons the collar and the tension in the line reaches a predetermined level, the clips open and release the line from the boom. Then the rescue line can form a straight line between the victim and the winch, and the victim can be lifted to the helicopter. A translator is utilized to push out or pull in the telescoping members. The translator comprises a tape and a rope. Inside the telescoping members the tape is curled around the rope and the tape has a tube-like configuration. The tape and rope are provided from supply spools.

  9. Self-repair promotes microtubule rescue

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Jérémie; John, Karin; Blanchoin, Laurent; Théry, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Summary The dynamic instability of microtubules is characterised by slow growth phases stochastically interrupted by rapid depolymerisations called catastrophes. Rescue events can arrest the depolymerisation and restore microtubule elongation. However the origin of these rescue events remain unexplained. Here we show that microtubule lattice self-repair, in structurally damaged sites, is responsible for the rescue of microtubule growth. Tubulin photo-conversion in cells revealed that free tubulin dimers can incorporate along the shafts of microtubules, especially in regions where microtubules cross each other, form bundles or become bent due to mechanical constraints. These incorporation sites appeared to act as effective rescue sites ensuring microtubule rejuvenation. By securing damaged microtubule growth, the self-repair process supports a mechanosensitive growth by specifically promoting microtubule assembly in regions where they are subjected to physical constraints. PMID:27617929

  10. Fire Rescue Exercise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Special Rescue Operations firefighters with NASA Fire Rescue Services in the Protective Services Office at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida participate in a training exercise at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Firefighters, wearing protective gear, use hoses to put out a fire burning close to a mock-up of a small plane. Kennedy’s firefighters recently achieved Pro Board Certification in aerial fire truck operations and completed vehicle extrication training using the Jaws of Life. The Protective Services Office is one step closer to achieving certification in vehicle machinery extrication and other rescue skills. Kennedy’s firefighters are with G4S Government Solutions Inc., on the Kennedy Protective Services Contract. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  11. Fire Rescue Exercise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Special Rescue Operations firefighters with NASA Fire Rescue Services in the Protective Services Office at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida participate in a training exercise at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Firefighters, wearing protective gear, use hoses to put out a fire burning near the mock-up of a small plane. Kennedy’s firefighters recently achieved Pro Board Certification in aerial fire truck operations and completed vehicle extrication training using the Jaws of Life. The Protective Services Office is one step closer to achieving certification in vehicle machinery extrication and other rescue skills. Kennedy’s firefighters are with G4S Government Solutions Inc., on the Kennedy Protective Services Contract. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  12. Fire Rescue Exercise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Special Rescue Operations firefighters with NASA Fire Rescue Services in the Protective Services Office at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida participate in a training exercise at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Firefighters use a fire truck to put out a fire burning close to a mock-up of a small plane and a truck. Kennedy’s firefighters recently achieved Pro Board Certification in aerial fire truck operations and completed vehicle extrication training using the Jaws of Life. The Protective Services Office is one step closer to achieving certification in vehicle machinery extrication and other rescue skills. Kennedy’s firefighters are with G4S Government Solutions Inc., on the Kennedy Protective Services Contract. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  13. Fire Rescue Exercise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Special Rescue Operations firefighters with NASA Fire Rescue Services in the Protective Services Office at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida participate in a training exercise at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Firefighters, wearing protective gear, use hoses to put out a fire burning on a mock-up of a small plane. Kennedy’s firefighters recently achieved Pro Board Certification in aerial fire truck operations and completed vehicle extrication training using the Jaws of Life. The Protective Services Office is one step closer to achieving certification in vehicle machinery extrication and other rescue skills. Kennedy’s firefighters are with G4S Government Solutions Inc., on the Kennedy Protective Services Contract. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  14. Fire Rescue Exercise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - During a training exercise, Special Rescue Operations firefighters with NASA Fire Rescue Services in the Protective Services Office at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida use hoses to put out a fire burning on a mock-up of a small plane at the Shuttle Landing Facility. They are wearing protective gear for the training exercise. Kennedy’s firefighters recently achieved Pro Board Certification in aerial fire truck operations and completed vehicle extrication training using the Jaws of Life. The Protective Services Office is one step closer to achieving certification in vehicle machinery extrication and other rescue skills. Kennedy’s firefighters are with G4S Government Solutions Inc., on the Kennedy Protective Services Contract. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  15. Fire Rescue Exercise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Special Rescue Operations firefighters with NASA Fire Rescue Services in the Protective Services Office at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida participate in a training exercise at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Firefighters use fire trucks and hoses to extinguish flames burning on and around a mock-up of a small plane. Kennedy’s firefighters recently achieved Pro Board Certification in aerial fire truck operations and completed vehicle extrication training using the Jaws of Life. The Protective Services Office is one step closer to achieving certification in vehicle machinery extrication and other rescue skills. Kennedy’s firefighters are with G4S Government Solutions Inc., on the Kennedy Protective Services Contract. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  16. Fire Rescue Exercise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Special Rescue Operations firefighters with NASA Fire Rescue Services in the Protective Services Office at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida participate in a training exercise at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Firefighters, wearing protective gear, use hoses to put out a fire burning near the mock-up of a small plane as another firefighter checks inside the plane. Kennedy’s firefighters recently achieved Pro Board Certification in aerial fire truck operations and completed vehicle extrication training using the Jaws of Life. The Protective Services Office is one step closer to achieving certification in vehicle machinery extrication and other rescue skills. Kennedy’s firefighters are with G4S Government Solutions Inc., on the Kennedy Protective Services Contract. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  17. Fire Rescue Exercise

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-06

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Special Rescue Operations firefighters with NASA Fire Rescue Services in the Protective Services Office at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida prepare to participate in a training exercise at the Shuttle Landing Facility. A small fire is burning near a mock-up of a plane during the training exercise. Kennedy’s firefighters recently achieved Pro Board Certification in aerial fire truck operations and completed vehicle extrication training using the Jaws of Life. The Protective Services Office is one step closer to achieving certification in vehicle machinery extrication and other rescue skills. Kennedy’s firefighters are with G4S Government Solutions Inc., on the Kennedy Protective Services Contract. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  18. In vitro effect of amifostine on haematopoietic progenitors exposed to carboplatin and non-alkylating antineoplastic drugs: haematoprotection acts as a drug-specific progenitor rescue.

    PubMed Central

    Pierelli, L.; Scambia, G.; Fattorossi, A.; Bonanno, G.; Battaglia, A.; Perillo, A.; Menichella, G.; Panici, P. B.; Leone, G.; Mancuso, S.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the protective ability of amifostine on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived colony-forming unit (CFU) and PB CD34+ cells which were previously exposed in vitro to etoposide, carboplatin, doxorubicin and taxotere. Amifostine pretreatment protected PBMC-derived CFU from the toxic effect of etoposide, carboplatin and taxotere. A significant detrimental effect was exerted by amifostine on the growth of doxorubicin-treated PBMC-derived CFU. Liquid cultures of PB CD34+ cells reproduced faithfully the effects observed on growth of PBMC-derived CFU and confirmed amifostine chemoprotection against etoposide and carboplatin with its detrimental effect on doxorubicin-treated progenitors. Combining the data of viable cell count, cytometric estimation of apoptosis, cell cycle and viable cell replication rate, we found that amifostine protects from etoposide and carboplatin toxicity mainly through a mechanism of cell rescue. Conversely, the detrimental effect of amifostine on the growth of doxorubicin-treated PB CD34+ cells is apparently due to an increased G2/M arrest. In conclusion, amifostine protects haematopoietic progenitors from etoposide, carboplatin and taxotere. Progenitor rescue is the mechanism through which amifostine reduced etoposide and carboplatin toxicity. PMID:9792145

  19. [Removal due to cut-out effect in pertrochanteric femoral fractures: what is the rescue treatment of choice?].

    PubMed

    Cuervas-Mons, M; Mora, F; López Fernández, J; Chana, F; Vaquero, J

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to compare functional results in different treament options in cutting-out, and analize factors associated to failure. Retrospective cohort study in 56 patients diagnosed with cutting-out between 2000-2010. Groups were based on rescue treatment: arthroplasty versus alternative treatment. Demographics, fracture characteristics, osteosynthesis, tip to apex distance (TAD), follow-up, complications, and final functional capacity were analyzed. Rescue treatment: 36 (64.28%) hip replacement (arthroplasty group), and 20 (35.72%) alternative treatment preserving femoral head (alternative group). Groups comparable on demographic parameters, fracture pattern and osteosynthesis characteristics. Radiography analysis: low inter-observer variability (k=0.83, 95% CI 0.78-0.88), mean TAD 28.66mm (arthroplasty group 32.9mm, 21.5mm control group; p=0.01), insufficient fracture reduction 39.3% (p=0.001). Cutting-out diagnosis median 60 days (arthroplasty group 90 days, 18 days alternative group; p=0.001). Follow up at least 12 months from rescue treatment. Similar complications rate in both groups (p=0.16). Re-operation rate 3.57% (11.7% arthroplasty group, alternative group 0%; p=0.01). Better final functional capacity in arthroplasty group (p=0.004). Hip arthroplasty offers better results, being considered the gold standard in geriatric patients, although re-operation rate is higher. We recommend new nailing before arthroplasty in early failure (4 weeks) in patients with femoral head integrity. An insufficient fracture reduction is the main short term factor predicting failure; and TAD higher than 20mm is a middle-long term one. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Factors influencing mine rescue team behaviors.

    PubMed

    Jansky, Jacqueline H; Kowalski-Trakofler, K M; Brnich, M J; Vaught, C

    2016-01-01

    A focus group study of the first moments in an underground mine emergency response was conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Office for Mine Safety and Health Research. Participants in the study included mine rescue team members, team trainers, mine officials, state mining personnel, and individual mine managers. A subset of the data consists of responses from participants with mine rescue backgrounds. These responses were noticeably different from those given by on-site emergency personnel who were at the mine and involved with decisions made during the first moments of an event. As a result, mine rescue team behavior data were separated in the analysis and are reported in this article. By considering the responses from mine rescue team members and trainers, it was possible to sort the data and identify seven key areas of importance to them. On the basis of the responses from the focus group participants with a mine rescue background, the authors concluded that accurate and complete information and a unity of purpose among all command center personnel are two of the key conditions needed for an effective mine rescue operation.

  1. Close Call: Unwanted Rescue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Leadership, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Describes incident where group engaged in training exercise was almost "rescued" by Coast Guard, although Coast Guard had been alerted that training exercise would be taking place. On another occasion Coast Guard did not react to actual report, thinking it was training group. Group was studying grey seal breeding colonies in…

  2. Rescue Manual. Module 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The fifth of 10 modules contains information on hazardous materials. Key points, an introduction, and conclusion accompany substantive material in this module. In addition, the module contains a Department of Transportation guide chart on…

  3. Rescue Manual. Module 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This learner manual for rescuers covers the current techniques or practices required in the rescue service. The seventh of 10 modules contains information on extrication from vehicles. Key points, an introduction, and conclusion accompany substantive material in this module. In addition, suggested tools and equipment for extrication procedures are…

  4. Close Call: Unwanted Rescue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Leadership, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Describes incident where group engaged in training exercise was almost "rescued" by Coast Guard, although Coast Guard had been alerted that training exercise would be taking place. On another occasion Coast Guard did not react to actual report, thinking it was training group. Group was studying grey seal breeding colonies in…

  5. Operation Rescue. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Neena; Crawford, Georgette

    The Operation Rescue project was designed to develop a classroom setting for the delivery of comprehensive educational services to "at risk" young adolescents. The classroom was established as part of the pre-existing Jonesboro Alternative School, and it utilized the basic academic and social program developed by this entity over 12…

  6. Combat Rescue Helicopter (CRH)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-479 Combat Rescue Helicopter (CRH) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense Acquisition...Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined TY - Then Year UCR

  7. An oncolytic adenovirus enhances antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects of a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding endostatin by rescuing its selective replication in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran-Yi; Zhou, Ling; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Huang, Bi-Jun; Ke, Miao-la; Chen, Jie-Min; Li, Li-Xia; Fu, Xiang; Wu, Jiang-Xue; Huang, Wenlin

    2013-12-13

    A replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) encoding secreted human endostatin (Ad-Endo) has been demonstrated to have promising antiangiogenic and antitumoral effects. The E1B55k-deleted Ad H101 can selectively lyse cancer cells. In this study, we explored the antitumor effects and cross-interactions of Ad-Endo and H101 on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The results showed that H101 dramatically promoted endostatin expression by Ad-Endo via rescuing Ad-Endo replication in NPC cells, and the expressed endostatin proteins significantly inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. E1A and E1B19k products are required for the rescuing of H101 to Ad-Endo replication in CNE-1 and CNE-2 cells, but not in C666-1 cells. On the other hand, Ad-Endo enhanced the cytotoxicity of H101 by enhancing Ad replication in NPC cells. The combination of H101 and Ad-Endo significantly inhibited CNE-2 xenografts growth through the increased endostatin expression and Ad replication. These findings indicate that the combination of Ad-Endo gene therapy and oncolytic Ad therapeutics could be promising in comprehensive treatment of NPC.

  8. Effects of hospital safety-net burden and hospital volume on failure to rescue after open abdominal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Eric B; Joshi, Girish P; Minhajuddin, Abu; Timaran, Carlos H; Modrall, J Gregory

    2017-08-01

    Failure to rescue (FTR) is defined as the inability to rescue a patient from major perioperative complications, resulting in operative mortality. FTR is a known contributor to operative mortality after open abdominal aortic surgery. Understanding the causes of FTR is essential to designing interventions to improve perioperative outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine the relative contributions of hospital volume and safety-net burden (the proportion of uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients) to FTR. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2001-2011) was analyzed to investigate variables associated with FTR after elective open abdominal aortic operations in the United States. FTR was defined as in-hospital death following postoperative complications. Mixed multivariate regression models were used to assess independent predictors of FTR, taking into account the clustered structure of the data (patients nested into hospitals). A total of 47,233 elective open abdominal aortic operations were performed in 1777 hospitals during the study period. The overall incidences of postoperative complications, in-hospital mortality, and FTR in the whole cohort were 32.7%, 3.2%, and 8.6%, respectively. After adjusting for demographics, comorbidities, and hospital characteristics, safety-net burden was significantly associated with increased likelihood of FTR (highest vs lowest quartile of safety-net burden, odds ratio, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-1.91; P < .0001). In contrast, after adjusting for safety-net burden, procedure-specific hospital volume was not significantly associated with FTR (P = .897). After adjusting for patient- and hospital-level variables, including hospital volume, safety-net burden was an independent predictor of FTR after open aortic surgery. Future investigations should be aimed at better understanding the relationship between safety-net hospital burden and FTR to design interventions to improve outcomes after open abdominal aortic surgery

  9. Microtubule catastrophe and rescue.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Melissa K; Zanic, Marija; Howard, Jonathon

    2013-02-01

    Microtubules are long cylindrical polymers composed of tubulin subunits. In cells, microtubules play an essential role in architecture and motility. For example, microtubules give shape to cells, serve as intracellular transport tracks, and act as key elements in important cellular structures such as axonemes and mitotic spindles. To accomplish these varied functions, networks of microtubules in cells are very dynamic, continuously remodeling through stochastic length fluctuations at the ends of individual microtubules. The dynamic behavior at the end of an individual microtubule is termed 'dynamic instability'. This behavior manifests itself by periods of persistent microtubule growth interrupted by occasional switching to rapid shrinkage (called microtubule 'catastrophe'), and then by switching back from shrinkage to growth (called microtubule 'rescue'). In this review, we summarize recent findings which provide new insights into the mechanisms of microtubule catastrophe and rescue, and discuss the impact of these findings in regards to the role of microtubule dynamics inside of cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Microtubule Catastrophe and Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Melissa K.; Zanic, Marija; Howard, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    Microtubules are long cylindrical polymers composed of tubulin subunits. In cells, microtubules play an essential role in architecture and motility. For example, microtubules give shape to cells, serve as intracellular transport tracks, and act as key elements in important cellular structures such as axonemes and mitotic spindles. To accomplish these varied functions, networks of microtubules in cells are very dynamic, continuously remodeling through stochastic length fluctuations at the ends of individual microtubules. The dynamic behavior at the end of an individual microtubule is termed “dynamic instability”. This behavior manifests itself by periods of persistent microtubule growth interrupted by occasional switching to rapid shrinkage (called microtubule `catastrophe'), and then by switching back from shrinkage to growth (called microtubule `rescue'). In this review, we summarize recent findings which provide new insights into the mechanisms of microtubule catastrophe and rescue, and discuss the impact of these findings in regards to the role of microtubule dynamics inside of cells. PMID:23092753

  11. Collectivizing rescue obligations in bioethics.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Jeremy R

    2015-01-01

    Bioethicists invoke a duty to rescue in a wide range of cases. Indeed, arguably, there exists an entire medical paradigm whereby vast numbers of medical encounters are treated as rescue cases. The intuitive power of the rescue paradigm is considerable, but much of this power stems from the problematic way that rescue cases are conceptualized-namely, as random, unanticipated, unavoidable, interpersonal events for which context is irrelevant and beneficence is the paramount value. In this article, I critique the basic assumptions of the rescue paradigm, reframe the ethical landscape in which rescue obligations are understood, and defend the necessity and value of a wider social and institutional view. Along the way, I move back and forth between ethical theory and a concrete case where the duty to rescue has been problematically applied: the purported duty to regularly return incidental findings and individual research results in genomic and genetic research.

  12. Developing a new perspective to study the health of survivors of Sichuan earthquakes in China: a study on the effect of post-earthquake rescue policies on survivors’ health-related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sichuan is a province in China with an extensive history of earthquakes. Recent earthquakes, including the Lushan earthquake in 2013, have resulted in thousands of people losing their homes and their families. However, there is a research gap on the efficiency of government support policies. Therefore, this study develops a new perspective to study the health of earthquake survivors, based on the effect of post-earthquake rescue policies on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of survivors of the Sichuan earthquake. Methods This study uses data from a survey conducted in five hard-hit counties (Wenchuan, Qingchuan, Mianzhu, Lushan, and Dujiangyan) in Sichuan in 2013. A total of 2,000 questionnaires were distributed, and 1,672 were returned; the response rate was 83.6%. Results Results of the rescue policies scale and Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) scale passed the reliability test. The confirmatory factor analysis model showed that the physical component summary (PCS) directly affected the mental component summary (MCS). The results of structural equation model regarding the effects of rescue policies on HRQOL showed that the path coefficients of six policies (education, orphans, employment, poverty, legal, and social rescue policies) to the PCS of survivors were all positive and passed the test of significance. Finally, although only the path coefficient of the educational rescue policy to the MCS of survivors was positive and passed the test of significance, the other five policies affected the MCS indirectly through the PCS. Conclusions The general HRQOL of survivors is not ideal; the survivors showed a low satisfaction with the post-earthquake rescue policies. Further, the six post-earthquake rescue policies significantly improved the HRQOL of survivors and directly affected the promotion of the PCS of survivors. Aside from the educational rescue policy, all other policies affected the MCS indirectly through the PCS. This finding

  13. [Potential and effectiveness of a telemedical rescue assistance system. Prospective observational study on implementation in emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Brokmann, J C; Rossaint, R; Bergrath, S; Valentin, B; Beckers, S K; Hirsch, F; Jeschke, S; Czaplik, M

    2015-06-01

    The demographic change and an increasing multimorbidity of patients represent increasing challenges for the adequate prehospital treatment of emergency patients. The incorporation of supplementary telemedical concepts and systems can lead to an improved guideline-conform treatment. Beneficial evidence of telemedical procedures is only known for isolated disease patterns; however, no mobile telemedical concept exists which is suitable for use in the wide variety of different clinical situations. This article presents a newly developed and evaluated total telemedical concept (TemRas) that encompasses organizational, medical and technical components. The use of intelligent and robust communication technology and the implementation of this add-on system allows the telemedical support of the rescue service for all emergencies. After development of the telemedical rescue assistance system, which includes organizational, medical and technical components, a telemedical centre and six ambulances in five different districts in North-Rhine Westphalia were equipped with this new tool. During the evaluation phase of 1 year in the routine emergency medical service the rate of complications as well as differences between urban and rural areas were analyzed with respect to different target parameters. Between August 2012 and July 2013 a total of 401 teleconsultations were performed during emergency missions and 24 during secondary interhospital transfers. No complications due to teleconsultation were observed. The mean duration (±SD) of teleconsultations was longer in rural areas than in urban areas with 28.6±12.0 min vs. 25.5±11.1 min (p < 0.0001). In 63.2% of these missions administration of medications was delegated to the ambulance personnel (52.0% urban vs. 73.6% rural, p < 0.0001). The severity of ailments corresponded to scores of III and VI in the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) classification. Emergency medical care of patients with

  14. Wrapping Effects within a Proposed Function-Rescue Strategy for the Y220C Oncogenic Mutation of Protein p53

    PubMed Central

    Accordino, Sebastián R.; Rodríguez Fris, J. Ariel; Appignanesi, Gustavo A.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble proteins must protect their structural integrity from water attack by wrapping interactions which imply the clustering of nonpolar residues around the backbone hydrogen bonds. Thus, poorly wrapped hydrogen bonds constitute defects which have been identified as promoters of protein associations since they favor the removal of hydrating molecules. More specifically, a recent study of our group has shown that wrapping interactions allow the successful identification of protein binding hot spots. Additionally, we have also shown that drugs disruptive of protein-protein interfaces tend to mimic the wrapping behavior of the protein they replace. Within this context, in this work we study wrapping three body interactions related to the oncogenic Y220C mutation of the tumor suppressor protein p53. Our computational results rationalize the oncogenic nature of the Y220C mutation, explain the binding of a drug-like molecule already designed to restore the function of p53 and provide clues to help improve this function-rescue strategy and to apply in other drug design or re-engineering techniques. PMID:23365691

  15. Stereoselective Blockage of Quinidine and Quinine in the hERG Channel and the Effect of Their Rescue Potency on Drug-Induced hERG Trafficking Defect

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Meng; Fan, Pan; Shi, Yanhui; Feng, Lifang; Wang, Junnan; Zhan, Ge; Li, Baoxin

    2016-01-01

    Diastereoisomers of quinidine and quinine are used to treat arrhythmia and malaria, respectively. It has been reported that both drugs block the hERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) potassium channel which is essential for myocardium repolarization. Abnormality of repolarization increases risk of arrhythmia. The aim of our research is to study and compare the impacts of quinidine and quinine on hERG. Results show that both drugs block the hERG channel, with quinine 14-fold less potent than quinidine. In addition, they presented distinct impacts on channel dynamics. The results imply their stereospecific block effect on the hERG channel. However, F656C-hERG reversed this stereoselectivity. The mutation decreases affinity of the two drugs with hERG, and quinine was more potent than quinidine in F656C-hERG blockage. These data suggest that F656 residue contributes to the stereoselective pocket for quinidine and quinine. Further study demonstrates that both drugs do not change hERG protein levels. In rescue experiments, we found that they exert no reverse effect on pentamidine- or desipramine-induced hERG trafficking defect, although quinidine has been reported to rescue trafficking-deficient pore mutation hERG G601S based on the interaction with F656. Our research demonstrated stereoselective effects of quinidine and quinine on the hERG channel, and this is the first study to explore their reversal potency on drug-induced hERG deficiency. PMID:27690007

  16. Stereoselective Blockage of Quinidine and Quinine in the hERG Channel and the Effect of Their Rescue Potency on Drug-Induced hERG Trafficking Defect.

    PubMed

    Yan, Meng; Fan, Pan; Shi, Yanhui; Feng, Lifang; Wang, Junnan; Zhan, Ge; Li, Baoxin

    2016-09-28

    Diastereoisomers of quinidine and quinine are used to treat arrhythmia and malaria, respectively. It has been reported that both drugs block the hERG (human ether-a-go-go-related gene) potassium channel which is essential for myocardium repolarization. Abnormality of repolarization increases risk of arrhythmia. The aim of our research is to study and compare the impacts of quinidine and quinine on hERG. Results show that both drugs block the hERG channel, with quinine 14-fold less potent than quinidine. In addition, they presented distinct impacts on channel dynamics. The results imply their stereospecific block effect on the hERG channel. However, F656C-hERG reversed this stereoselectivity. The mutation decreases affinity of the two drugs with hERG, and quinine was more potent than quinidine in F656C-hERG blockage. These data suggest that F656 residue contributes to the stereoselective pocket for quinidine and quinine. Further study demonstrates that both drugs do not change hERG protein levels. In rescue experiments, we found that they exert no reverse effect on pentamidine- or desipramine-induced hERG trafficking defect, although quinidine has been reported to rescue trafficking-deficient pore mutation hERG G601S based on the interaction with F656. Our research demonstrated stereoselective effects of quinidine and quinine on the hERG channel, and this is the first study to explore their reversal potency on drug-induced hERG deficiency.

  17. Inflatable rescue device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swan, Scott A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention discloses, in one aspect, a personal rescue device for use in outer space which has an inflatable flexible tube with a shaper apparatus herein. Gas under pressure flows through the shaper apparatus and into the flexible tube. The flexible tube is mounted to the shaper so that as it inflates it expands and deploys lengthwise away from the shaper. In one embodiment a housing contains the shaper and the flexible tube and the housing is designed to facilitate movement of the expanding tube from the housing so the expanding tube does not bunch up in the housing.

  18. Effects of environmental conditions on point-of-care cardiac biomarker test performance during a simulated rescue: implications for emergency and disaster response.

    PubMed

    Louie, Richard F; Ferguson, William J; Curtis, Corbin M; Vy, John H; Tang, Chloe S; Kost, Gerald J

    2013-01-01

    To characterize the effects of environmental stress on point-of-care (POC) cardiac biomarker testing during a simulated rescue. Multiplex test cassettes for cardiac troponin I (cTnI), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), CK-MB, myoglobin, and D-dimer were exposed to environmental stresses simulating a 24-hour rescue from Hawaii to the Marshall Islands and back. We used Tenney environmental chambers (T2RC and BTRC) to simulate flight conditions (20°C, 10 percent relative humidity) and ground conditions (22.3-33.9°C, 73-77 percent). We obtained paired measurements using stressed versus control (room temperature) cassettes at seven time points (T1-7 with T1,2,6,7 during flight and T3-5 on ground). We analyzed paired differences (stressed minus control) with Wilcoxon signed rank test. We assessed the impact on decision-making at clinical thresholds. cTnI results from stressed test cassettes (n = 10) at T4 (p < 0.05), T5 (p < 0.01), and T7 (p < 0.05) differed significantly from control, when testing samples with median cTnI concentration of 90 ng/L. During the ground rescue, 36.7 percent (11/30) of cTnI measurements from stressed cassettes generated significantly lowered results. At T5, 20 percent (2/10) of cTnI results were highly discrepant-stressed cassettes reported normal results, when control results were >100 ng/L. With sample median concentration of 108 pg/mL, BNP results from stressed test cassettes differed significantly from controls (p < 0.05). Despite modest, short-term temperature elevation, environmental stresses led to erroneous results. False negative cTnI and BNP results potentially could miss acute myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure, confounded treatment, and increased mortality and morbidity. Therefore, rescuers should protect POC reagents from temperature extremes.

  19. Appropriate suction device in rescue medicine.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, B E; Nilsson, H; Bjorn, P; Skedevik, C

    1987-12-01

    In rescue medicine, a suction apparatus must function in a variety of environmental conditions. To find an appropriate device for the Swedish Air Force air rescue service the Laerdal suction device 790,000 was selected for further testing according to international standards for aviation safety. Tests showed that vibrations had deleterious effects on the internal construction of the suction device. In addition, an electromagnetic field was generated affecting the navigation, autopilot, and communication systems. We conclude that the suction apparatus and probably other devices as well must be tested for their functioning in adverse environments and their ability to meet international aviation safety regulations.

  20. [Medical rescue of China National Earthquake Disaster Emergency Search and Rescue Team in Lushan earthquake].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-hua; Yang, Hui-ning; Liu, Hui-liang; Wang, Fan; Hu, Li-bin; Zheng, Jing-chen

    2013-05-01

    To summarize and analyze the medical mission of China National Earthquake Disaster Emergency Search and Rescue Team (CNESAR) in Lushan earthquake, to promote the medical rescue effectiveness incorporated with search and rescue. Retrospective analysis of medical work data by CNESAR from April 21th, 2013 to April 27th during Lushan earthquake rescue, including the medical staff dispatch and the wounded case been treated. The reasonable medical corps was composed by 22 members, including 2 administrators, 11 doctors [covering emergency medicine, orthopedics (joints and limbs, spinal), obstetrics and gynecology, gastroenterology, cardiology, ophthalmology, anesthesiology, medical rescue, health epidemic prevention, clinical laboratory of 11 specialties], 1 ultrasound technician, 5 nurses, 1 pharmacist, 1 medical instrument engineer and 1 office worker for propaganda. There were two members having psychological consultants qualifications. The medical work were carried out in seven aspects, including medical care assurance for the CNESAR members, first aid cooperation with search and rescue on site, clinical work in refugees' camp, medical round service for scattered village people, evacuation for the wounded, mental intervention, and the sanitary and anti-epidemic work. The medical work covered 24 small towns, and medical staff established 3 medical clinics at Taiping Town, Shuangshi Town of Lushan County and Baoxing County. Medical rescue, mental intervention for the old and kids, and sanitary and anti-epidemic were performed at the above sites. The medical corps had successful evacuated 2 severe wounded patients and treated the wounded over thousands. Most of the wounded were soft tissue injuries, external injury, respiratory tract infections, diarrhea, and heat stroke. Compared with the rescue action in 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, the aggregation and departure of rescue team in Lushan earthquake, the traffic control order in disaster area, the self-aid and buddy aid

  1. [Implementation of modern rescue medicine].

    PubMed

    Hou, S K; Fan, H J; Ding, H; Dong, W L

    2016-01-01

    Catastrophic disasters occur frequently in recent years, resulting in a large number of casualties. Thus, more and more scholars begin to focus on a newly emerged displine-rescue medicine. This paper introduces the status quo of rescue medicine and expounds the practical experience related to rescue medicine as practiced by author's unit, in order to provide a reference for the establishment of the discipline and its future development.

  2. [Importance of helicopter rescue].

    PubMed

    Hofer, G; Voelckel, W G

    2014-03-01

    Helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) have become a main part of prehospital emergency medical services over the last 40 years. Recently, an ongoing discussion about financial shortage and personal shortcomings question the role of cost-intensive air rescue. Thus, the value of HEMS must be examined and discussed appropriately. Since the number of physician-staffed ground ambulances may decrease due to the limited availability of qualified physicians, HEMS may fill the gap. In addition patient transfer to specialized hospitals will require an increasing number of air transports in order to minimize prehospital time. The higher risk ratio for HEMS missions when compared with ground rescue requires a rigorous quality management system. When it comes to missions in remote and exposed areas, the scope of medical treatment must be adjusted to the individual situation. Medical competence is key in order to balance guideline compliant or maximal care versus optimal care characterized as a mission-specific, individualized emergency care concept. Although, medical decision making and treatment is typically based on the best scientific evidence, personal skills, competence, and the mission scenario will determine the scope of interventions suitable to improve outcome. Thus, the profile of requirements for the HEMS medical crew is high.

  3. 46 CFR 108.560 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rescue boats. 108.560 Section 108.560 Shipping COAST... Lifesaving Equipment § 108.560 Rescue boats. Each unit must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.156. A lifeboat is accepted as a rescue boat if it also...

  4. 46 CFR 108.560 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rescue boats. 108.560 Section 108.560 Shipping COAST... Lifesaving Equipment § 108.560 Rescue boats. Each unit must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.156. A lifeboat is accepted as a rescue boat if it also...

  5. 46 CFR 108.560 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rescue boats. 108.560 Section 108.560 Shipping COAST... Lifesaving Equipment § 108.560 Rescue boats. Each unit must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.156. A lifeboat is accepted as a rescue boat if it also...

  6. 46 CFR 108.560 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rescue boats. 108.560 Section 108.560 Shipping COAST... Lifesaving Equipment § 108.560 Rescue boats. Each unit must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.156. A lifeboat is accepted as a rescue boat if it also...

  7. Locate and rescue system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Two types of search and rescue systems not involving satellites are studied; one using a network radio communications link and the other a characteristic beacon signal. Line of slight limitation of VHF radio and beacon signals limit the range (approximately 25 miles) between the origin of the distress signal and the mobile rescue unit.

  8. Psychological Factors in Wilderness Rescue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogilvie, Bruce C.

    This presentation provides wilderness rescue workers with an overview of the psychological reactions of victims of accidents and natural disasters and suggested responses for rescuers and caregivers. A personal account of rescue and death in a drowning accident illustrates how the rescuer can also be traumatized by such an incident and may suffer…

  9. Evolutionary rescue beyond the models

    PubMed Central

    Gomulkiewicz, Richard; Shaw, Ruth G.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory model systems and mathematical models have shed considerable light on the fundamental properties and processes of evolutionary rescue. But it remains to determine the extent to which these model-based findings can help biologists predict when evolution will fail or succeed in rescuing natural populations that are facing novel conditions that threaten their persistence. In this article, we present a prospectus for transferring our basic understanding of evolutionary rescue to wild and other non-laboratory populations. Current experimental and theoretical results emphasize how the interplay between inheritance processes and absolute fitness in changed environments drive population dynamics and determine prospects of extinction. We discuss the challenge of inferring these elements of the evolutionary rescue process in field and natural settings. Addressing this challenge will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of population persistence that combines processes of evolutionary rescue with developmental and ecological mechanisms. PMID:23209173

  10. Avalanche Survival After Rescue With the RECCO Rescue System: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Grasegger, Katharina; Strapazzon, Giacomo; Procter, Emily; Brugger, Hermann; Soteras, Inigo

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of survival of a completely buried avalanche victim after being located with the radar-based RECCO Rescue System. In the winter of 2015, 2 off-piste skiers were completely buried in an avalanche near the secured ski area in Baqueira Beret, Spain. The first victim was located with the RECCO Rescue System in less than 35 minutes and was alive and conscious at extrication. This system emits radio waves and requires a specific reflector. It is a portable device that is used by more than 600 rescue organizations worldwide, especially in secured ski areas. The device should be brought to the avalanche site together with electronic avalanche transceivers, a probing team, and avalanche dogs. In the hands of experienced professionals, the device may allow rapid location of victims not carrying an electronic avalanche transceiver. Although it is not the first successful extrication of a victim with the RECCO Rescue System, it is the first case published in the medical literature and is intended to encourage data collection and to increase our understanding of the effectiveness of this device in avalanche rescue.

  11. Effective treatment of cervical incompetence in a monochorionic monoamniotic twin pregnancy with a rescue cervical cerclage and pessary--a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kosińska-Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Szymusik, Iwona; Bomba-Opoń, Dorota; Brawura-Biskupski-Samaha, Robert; Wegrzyn, Piotr; Wielgoś, Mirosław

    2012-12-01

    A monochorionic monoamniotic (MCMA) twin pregnancy is the rarest form of twin gestation, accounting for around 1:10000 to 1:20000 of all deliveries regardless of the region of the world. All multiple gestations have a higher risk of preterm delivery due to either preterm uterine contractions or asymptomatic cervical shortening (cervical incompetence). A case of a 28-year-old primigravida in MCMA twin pregnancy with cervical incompetence diagnosed at 22 weeks of gestation is presented. After obtaining cervical swabs, negative laboratory infection parameters and confirming concordant gestational age on ultrasound scan with no structural abnormalities of both fetuses, the patient was qualified for an emergency cervical cerclage according to Wurm-Hefner method. Five days after the procedure, a cervical pessary was additionally inserted. She was administered antibiotics and steroids. The wellbeing of both fetuses was strictly monitored by means of cardiotocography tracing and ultrasound examinations, on which they were both eutrophic, with no abnormalities in Doppler blood flow patterns. Spontaneous premature rupture of membranes took place at 32 weeks of gestation, a cesarean section was performed and two female fetuses of 1740 g and 1760 g were delivered. They both required antibiotics because of congenital pneumonia, but no respiratory support was necessary The twins were discharged from the hospital 22 days after birth in good general condition. This case of a rescue cervical cerclage and pessary used simultaneously can be an example of an effective method of cervical incompetence treatment in twin pregnancies.

  12. Drowning rescue, throw assist (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Drowning may occur wherever there is water, whether it is only a few inches in the bottom of the tub, or thousands of feet in the ocean. People should be aware of life-saving techniques from rescue to resuscitation.

  13. Drowning rescue, board assist (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Drowning may occur wherever there is water, whether it is only a few inches in the bottom of the tub or thousands of feet in the ocean. People should be aware of life-saving techniques from rescue to resuscitation.

  14. Drowning rescue, reaching assist (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Drowning may occur wherever there is water, whether it is only a few inches in the bottom of the tub or thousands of feet in the ocean. People should be aware of life-saving techniques from rescue to resuscitation.

  15. Donepezil Rescues Spatial Learning and Memory Deficits following Traumatic Brain Injury Independent of Its Effects on Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tzong-Shiue; Kim, Ahleum; Kernie, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is ubiquitous and effective treatments for it remain supportive largely due to uncertainty over how endogenous repair occurs. Recently, we demonstrated that hippocampal injury-induced neurogenesis is one mechanism underlying endogenous repair following TBI. Donepezil is associated with increased hippocampal neurogenesis and has long been known to improve certain aspects of cognition following many types of brain injury through unknown mechanisms. By coupling donepezil therapy with temporally regulated ablation of injury-induced neurogenesis using nestin-HSV transgenic mice, we investigated whether the pro-cognitive effects of donepezil following injury might occur through increasing neurogenesis. We demonstrate that donepezil itself enhances neurogenesis and improves cognitive function following TBI, even when injury-induced neurogenesis was inhibited. This suggests that the therapeutic effects of donepezil in TBI occur separately from its effects on neurogenesis. PMID:25714524

  16. Donepezil rescues spatial learning and memory deficits following traumatic brain injury independent of its effects on neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tzong-Shiue; Kim, Ahleum; Kernie, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is ubiquitous and effective treatments for it remain supportive largely due to uncertainty over how endogenous repair occurs. Recently, we demonstrated that hippocampal injury-induced neurogenesis is one mechanism underlying endogenous repair following TBI. Donepezil is associated with increased hippocampal neurogenesis and has long been known to improve certain aspects of cognition following many types of brain injury through unknown mechanisms. By coupling donepezil therapy with temporally regulated ablation of injury-induced neurogenesis using nestin-HSV transgenic mice, we investigated whether the pro-cognitive effects of donepezil following injury might occur through increasing neurogenesis. We demonstrate that donepezil itself enhances neurogenesis and improves cognitive function following TBI, even when injury-induced neurogenesis was inhibited. This suggests that the therapeutic effects of donepezil in TBI occur separately from its effects on neurogenesis.

  17. Community rescue in experimental metacommunities

    PubMed Central

    Low-Décarie, Etienne; Kolber, Marcus; Homme, Paige; Lofano, Andrea; Dumbrell, Alex; Gonzalez, Andrew; Bell, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The conditions that allow biodiversity to recover following severe environmental degradation are poorly understood. We studied community rescue, the recovery of a viable community through the evolutionary rescue of many populations within an evolving community, in metacommunities of soil microbes adapting to a herbicide. The metacommunities occupied a landscape of crossed spatial gradients of the herbicide (Dalapon) and a resource (glucose), whereas their constituent communities were either isolated or connected by dispersal. The spread of adapted communities across the landscape and the persistence of communities when that landscape was degraded were strongly promoted by dispersal, and the capacity to adapt to lethal stress was also related to community size and initial diversity. After abrupt and lethal stress, community rescue was most frequent in communities that had previously experienced sublethal levels of stress and had been connected by dispersal. Community rescue occurred through the evolutionary rescue of both initially common taxa, which remained common, and of initially rare taxa, which grew to dominate the evolved community. Community rescue may allow productivity and biodiversity to recover from severe environmental degradation. PMID:26578777

  18. 46 CFR 199.262 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rescue boats. 199.262 Section 199.262 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Cargo Vessels § 199.262 Rescue boats. (a) Each cargo vessel must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval...

  19. 46 CFR 199.262 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rescue boats. 199.262 Section 199.262 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Cargo Vessels § 199.262 Rescue boats. (a) Each cargo vessel must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval...

  20. 46 CFR 199.262 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rescue boats. 199.262 Section 199.262 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Cargo Vessels § 199.262 Rescue boats. (a) Each cargo vessel must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval...

  1. 46 CFR 199.262 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rescue boats. 199.262 Section 199.262 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Cargo Vessels § 199.262 Rescue boats. (a) Each cargo vessel must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval...

  2. 46 CFR 199.262 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rescue boats. 199.262 Section 199.262 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Cargo Vessels § 199.262 Rescue boats. (a) Each cargo vessel must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval...

  3. 46 CFR 108.560 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rescue boats. 108.560 Section 108.560 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.560 Rescue boats. Each unit must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue...

  4. Rescuing effects of RXR agonist bexarotene on aging-related synapse loss depend on neuronal LRP1.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masaya; Shinohara, Mitsuru; Yamazaki, Yu; Liu, Chia-Chen; Rogers, Justin; Bu, Guojun; Kanekiyo, Takahisa

    2016-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays a critical role in maintaining synaptic integrity by transporting cholesterol to neurons through the low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein-1 (LRP1). Bexarotene, a retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist, has been reported to have potential beneficial effects on cognition by increasing brain apoE levels and lipidation. To investigate the effects of bexarotene on aging-related synapse loss and the contribution of neuronal LRP1 to the pathway, forebrain neuron-specific LRP1 knockout (nLrp1(-/-)) and littermate control mice were administered with bexarotene-formulated diet (100mg/kg/day) or control diet at the age of 20-24 months for 8 weeks. Upon bexarotene treatment, levels of brain apoE and ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1) were significantly increased in both mice. While levels of PSD95, glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1), and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor NR1 subunit (NR1), which are key postsynaptic proteins that regulate synaptic plasticity, were decreased with aging, they were restored by bexarotene treatment in the brains of control but not nLrp1(-/-) mice. These results indicate that the beneficial effects of bexarotene on synaptic integrity depend on the presence of neuronal LRP1. However, we also found that bexarotene treatment led to the activation of glial cells, weight loss and hepatomegaly, which are likely due to hepatic failure. Taken together, our results demonstrate that apoE-targeted treatment through the RXR pathway has a potential beneficial effect on synapses during aging; however, the therapeutic application of bexarotene requires extreme caution due to its toxic side effects.

  5. Cold-water immersion and iced-slush ingestion are effective at cooling firefighters following a simulated search and rescue task in a hot environment.

    PubMed

    Walker, Anthony; Driller, Matthew; Brearley, Matt; Argus, Christos; Rattray, Ben

    2014-10-01

    Firefighters are exposed to hot environments, which results in elevated core temperatures. Rapidly reducing core temperatures will likely increase safety as firefighters are redeployed to subsequent operational tasks. This study investigated the effectiveness of cold-water immersion (CWI) and iced-slush ingestion (SLUSH) to cool firefighters post-incident. Seventy-four Australian firefighters (mean ± SD age: 38.9 ± 9.0 years) undertook a simulated search and rescue task in a heat chamber (105 ± 5 °C). Testing involved two 20-min work cycles separated by a 10-min rest period. Ambient temperature during recovery periods was 19.3 ± 2.7 °C. Participants were randomly assigned one of three 15-min cooling protocols: (i) CWI, 15 °C to umbilicus; (ii) SLUSH, 7 g·kg(-1) body weight; or (iii) seated rest (CONT). Core temperature and strength were measured pre- and postsimulation and directly after cooling. Mean temperatures for all groups reached 38.9 ± 0.9 °C at the conclusion of the second work task. Both CWI and SLUSH delivered cooling rates in excess of CONT (0.093 and 0.092 compared with 0.058 °C·min(-1)) and reduced temperatures to baseline measurements within the 15-min cooling period. Grip strength was not negatively impacted by either SLUSH or CONT. CWI and SLUSH provide evidence-based alternatives to passive recovery and forearm immersion protocols currently adopted by many fire services. To maximise the likelihood of adoption, we recommend SLUSH ingestion as a practical and effective cooling strategy for post-incident cooling of firefighters in temperate regions.

  6. Physiological effects of stress related to helicopter travel in Federal Emergency Management Agency search-and-rescue canines.

    PubMed

    Perry, E; Gulson, N; Liu Cross, T-W; Swanson, K S

    2017-01-01

    Working canines are deployed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), as part of a National Disaster Response Plan. Stress associated with helicopter flight and the resulting physical effects on the dog are unknown. Our objective was to test the hypotheses that (1) helicopter travel affects the physiology and faecal microbiota of working canines, but that (2) physiological consequences of helicopter travel will not negatively affect their work performance. A total of nine FEMA canines were loaded onto helicopters and flown for 30 min in July 2015. Rectal temperature, behavioural stress indicators and saliva swabs (for cortisol) were collected at baseline, loading, mid-flight and post-flight. After flight, canines completed a standardised search exercise to monitor work performance. Faecal samples were collected for microbial DNA extraction and Illumina sequencing. All canines were on a standardised diet (CANIDAE(®) Grain Free PURE Land(®)) for 3 weeks prior to the study. Visible indicators of stress were observed at loading and at mid-flight and corresponded with an increase (P < 0·05) in salivary cortisol from 5·4 µg/l (baseline) to 6·4 µg/l (loading). Additionally, rectal temperature increased (P < 0·05) from 38·61°C (baseline) to 39·33°C (mid-flight) and 39·72°C (post-flight). Helicopter travel did not affect search performance (P > 0·05). We found that α- and β-diversity measures of faecal microbiota were not affected (P > 0·05). Our data suggest that although helicopter travel may cause physiological changes that have been associated with stress in working dogs, it does not make an impact on their search performance or the stability of faecal microbiota.

  7. Vasoprotective effect of vitamin E: rescue of ethanol-induced atherosclerosis and inflammatory stress in rat vascular wall.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Norouzi, Leila; Khadem Ansari, Mohammad-Hasan; Ilkhanizadeh, Behrouz; Gharaaghaji, Rasool

    2013-08-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption increases the incidence of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced susceptibility to cardiovascular disease continue to be defined. This study examines the hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption plausibly induces vascular wall abnormalities via inflammatory reactions. In addition, it intends to find out whether vitamin E inhibits the abnormalities induced by ethanol in rats' vascular wall. Twenty four male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n=8): Control ©, ethanol (E), and vitamin E treated ethanol (VETE) group. After 6weeks, the aortic and coronary wall changes, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), alpha-1 glycoprotein and haptoglobin amounts in plasma, C-reactive protein levels(CRP), as well as the amount of aortic IL-6 were evaluated. The results revealed the elevation of polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte in the vascular wall, disorganization of endothelium with ballooning of cells, proliferation of vasa-vasorum with an increase in the IL-6, CRP, as well as a decrease in VEGF and an increase in alpha-1 glycoprotein and haptoglobin in the ethanol group compared to the control group. Significant amelioration of aortic and coronary wall changes, along with the restoration of elevated level of IL6, CRP, and the decreased level of VEGF compared to that of the controls were found in vitamin E-treated animals. These findings strongly support the idea that heavy and chronic ethanol consumption initiates atherosclerosis by inflammatory stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by vitamin E as an anti-inflammatory agent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional redundancy of the kinases MEK1 and MEK2: Rescue of the Mek1 mutant phenotype by Mek2 knock-in reveals a protein threshold effect.

    PubMed

    Aoidi, Rifdat; Maltais, Annie; Charron, Jean

    2016-01-26

    The mammalian genome contains two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK)-encoding genes, Mek1 and Mek2. MEKs phosphorylate and activate the two extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) isoforms ERK1 and ERK2. Mek1(-/-) embryos die due to placental defects, whereas Mek2(-/-) mice survive with a normal life span and fertility, suggesting that MEK1 has functions not shared by MEK2. However, most Mek1(+/-)Mek2(+/-) embryos also die from placental defects, indicating that both Mek genes contribute to placental development. To assess the functional specificity of the Mek1 and Mek2 genes, we produced a Mek1 knock-in allele in which the Mek2 coding sequences were placed under the control of Mek1 regulatory sequences (Mek1(2) allele). Mek1(2/2) mice were viable with no apparent phenotype, indicating rescue by MEK2 and functional redundancy between the two MEK proteins. However, Mek1(2/-) embryos with Mek2 in only one of the Mek1 alleles and the other Mek1 allele null died from abnormal placenta, suggesting a dosage effect. Analysis of mice from a Mek1 Mek2 allelic series revealed that the occurrence of the placenta phenotype correlated with the amount of MEK protein independently of which MEK isoform was produced. Thus, although MEK1 and MEK2 can substitute for each other, a minimum amount of MEK is critical for placenta development and embryo survival. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. The ghosts of selection past reduces the probability of plastic rescue but increases the likelihood of evolutionary rescue to novel stressors in experimental populations of wild yeast.

    PubMed

    Samani, Pedram; Bell, Graham

    2016-03-01

    Persistence by adaptation is called evolutionary rescue. Evolutionary rescue is more likely in populations that have been previously exposed to lower doses of the same stressor. Environmental fluctuations might also reduce the possibility of rescue, but little is known about the effect of evolutionary history on the likelihood of rescue. In this study, we hypothesised that the ubiquitous operation of generalised stress responses in many organisms increases the likelihood of rescue after exposure to other stressors. We tested this hypothesis with experimental populations that had been exposed to long-term starvation and were then selected on different, unrelated stressors. We found that prior adaptation to starvation imposes contrary effects on the plastic and evolutionary responses of populations to subsequent stressors. When first exposed to new stressors, such populations become extinct more often. If they survive the initial exposure to the new stressors, however, they are more likely to undergo evolutionary rescue. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  10. Immature embryo rescue and culture.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiuli; Gmitter, Fred G; Grosser, Jude W

    2011-01-01

    Embryo culture techniques have many significant applications in plant breeding, as well as basic studies in physiology and biochemistry. Immature embryo rescue and culture is a particularly attractive technique for recovering plants from sexual crosses where the majority of embryos cannot survive in vivo or become dormant for long periods of time. Overcoming embryo inviability is the most common reason for the application of embryo rescue techniques. Recently, fruit breeding programs have greatly increased the interest in exploiting interploid hybridization to combine desirable genetic traits of complementary parents at the triploid level for the purpose of developing improved seedless fruits. However, the success of this approach has only been reported in limited number of species due to various crossing barriers and embryo abortion at very early stages. Thus, immature embryo rescue provides an alternative means to recover triploid hybrids, which usually fail to completely develop in vivo. This chapter will provide a brief discussion of the utilization of interploid crosses between a monoembryonic diploid female with an allotetraploid male in a citrus cultivar improvement program, featuring a clear and comprehensive illustration of successful protocols for immature embryo rescue and culture. The protocols will cover the complete process from embryo excision to recovered plant in the greenhouse and can easily be adapted to other plant commodities. Factors affecting the success and failure of immature embryo rescue to recover triploid progeny from interploid crosses will be discussed.

  11. Assessing the efficacy of rescue equipment in lifeguard resuscitation efforts for drowning.

    PubMed

    Barcala-Furelos, Roberto; Szpilman, David; Palacios-Aguilar, Jose; Costas-Veiga, Javier; Abelairas-Gomez, Cristian; Bores-Cerezal, Antonio; López-García, Sergio; Rodríguez-Nuñez, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    The whole drowning process usually occurs within seconds to a few minutes. An early rescue may stop and/or prevent most medical complications. Fins, rescue tube, and rescue board (RB) are the equipment most frequently used by lifeguards. Our objective was to compare, in a water rescue quasiexperimental trial, these different pieces of rescue equipment to define the safest and with the lower rescue time as well as to assess their effects on the lifeguards' physiological state and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performance. A controlled trial was conducted to study the time effect of 4 different rescue techniques and assess CPR quality, along with the physiological effects of each rescue technique (blood lactate and subjective Borg's scale effort perception) on 35 lifeguards. Among the final sample subjects (n = 23), a total of 92 rescues were completed. Total water rescue time was longer without equipment (NE). The total rescue time was significantly lower using RB (P < .001). Similar good quality of CPR before and after water rescue was observed in all trials (P > .05), although correct ventilations represented less than 50% of total in all trials. Blood lactate increased after all rescues. The subjective effort Borg's scale showed significantly less effort using RB vs without equipment, fins, and fins and rescue tube. The use of propelling and/or floating equipment saves precious time with repercussions in the reduction of drowning mortality and morbidity. The RB offers a significant advantage. Lifeguards need more CPR training, especially considering the importance of efficient ventilations for drowning victims. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Joseph Conrad's tormented Rescue (fantasy).

    PubMed

    Freedman, William

    2014-02-01

    Joseph Conrad was a notoriously tormented writer for whom the creative act was often a punishment severe enough to drive him into paralyzing depressions that delayed the completion of his novels, sometimes for years. By far the most agonizing of these projects was The Rescue, a novel he began in 1898, abandoned a year later, tried unsuccessfully to continue several times over the next two decades, but was only able to resume in 1918 and to complete, after another tortured two-year struggle, in 1920. An explanation for this incapacity, that is powerfully suggested by the novel's evocative title and perhaps unintentionally ironic subtitle (A Romance of the Shallows) has not yet been explored. Using Freud's 1910 essay on the rescue fantasy, "Contributions to the Psychology of Love: A Special Type of Choice of Object Made by Men," and Emanuel Berman's instructive revision and expansion of the concept in his 2003 American Imago essay, "Ferenczi, Rescue, and Utopia," I argue that a substantial explanation for Conrad's tormented history with The Rescue is ascribable to its quite remarkably faithful treatment of a rescue fantasy with deep and disabling resonance for its author. More specifically, the difficulty was compounded by the novel's dramatization of the soul-crushing conflict between two such fantasies: one in the service of the masculine ideal of unflinching dedication to a heroic purpose, the other promising satisfaction to the equally potent demands of emotional and sexual desire. Features of Conrad's narrative fit so tightly and consistently with the theory as Freud (and Abraham) proposed and as Berman elaborated it that The Rescue offers itself as one of those rare and reinforcing instances wherein the literary text seems to validate the psychoanalytic theory at least as persuasively as the theory "understands" the text.

  13. Design of an interim space rescue ferry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halsell, James D., Jr.; Widhalm, Joseph W.; Whitsett, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper proposes a stop-gap nonoptimum vehicle for transferring astronauts from a tumbling stranded spacecraft to a nearby rescue spacecraft. The design is limited to the use of available or 'soon-to-be' available flight-qualified hardware and consists of three major components: the manned maneuvering unit, the personnel rescue enclosure, and the apogee kick motor capture device. The apogee kick motor capture device is modified to serve as the connection between the manned maneuvering unit and the personnel rescue enclosure. The performance of this interim rescue vehicle is analyzed with NASA flight simulation software to test the feasibility of the design. Results show that the control system of the manned maneuvering unit adequately limits uncommanded rotations during all simulated maneuvers in the primary control mode but not during transverse translations in the backup control mode. Impingement of thruster plumes on the personnel rescue enclosure is shown to be of some importance in certain maneuvers. The satellite stabilization mode of the control system is found to have significant rotational-to-translational coupling that has associated adverse effects on flying qualities, making the mode undesirable for the rescue mission.

  14. Design of an interim space rescue ferry vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halsell, James D., Jr.; Widhalm, Joseph W.; Whitsett, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper proposes a stop-gap nonoptimum vehicle for transferring astronauts from a tumbling stranded spacecraft to a nearby rescue spacecraft. The design is limited to the use of available or 'soon-to-be' available flight-qualified hardware and consists of three major components: the manned maneuvering unit, the personnel rescue enclosure, and the apogee kick motor capture device. The apogee kick motor capture device is modified to serve as the connection between the manned maneuvering unit and the personnel rescue enclosure. The performance of this interim rescue vehicle is analyzed with NASA flight simulation software to test the feasibility of the design. Results show that the control system of the manned maneuvering unit adequately limits uncommanded rotations during all simulated maneuvers in the primary control mode but not during transverse translations in the backup control mode. Impingement of thruster plumes on the personnel rescue enclosure is shown to be of some importance in certain maneuvers. The satellite stabilization mode of the control system is found to have significant rotational-to-translational coupling that has associated adverse effects on flying qualities, making the mode undesirable for the rescue mission.

  15. Rotorcraft and Enabling Robotic Rescue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines some of the issues underlying potential robotic rescue devices (RRD) in the context where autonomous or manned rotorcraft deployment of such robotic systems is a crucial attribute for their success in supporting future disaster relief and emergency response (DRER) missions. As a part of this discussion, work related to proof-of-concept prototyping of two notional RRD systems is summarized.

  16. Three types of rescue can avert extinction in a changing environment

    PubMed Central

    Hufbauer, Ruth A.; Szűcs, Marianna; Kasyon, Emily; Youngberg, Courtney; Koontz, Michael J.; Richards, Christopher; Tuff, Ty; Melbourne, Brett A.

    2015-01-01

    Setting aside high-quality large areas of habitat to protect threatened populations is becoming increasingly difficult as humans fragment and degrade the environment. Biologists and managers therefore must determine the best way to shepherd small populations through the dual challenges of reductions in both the number of individuals and genetic variability. By bringing in additional individuals, threatened populations can be increased in size (demographic rescue) or provided with variation to facilitate adaptation and reduce inbreeding (genetic rescue). The relative strengths of demographic and genetic rescue for reducing extinction and increasing growth of threatened populations are untested, and which type of rescue is effective may vary with population size. Using the flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) in a microcosm experiment, we disentangled the genetic and demographic components of rescue, and compared them with adaptation from standing genetic variation (evolutionary rescue in the strictest sense) using 244 experimental populations founded at either a smaller (50 individuals) or larger (150 individuals) size. Both types of rescue reduced extinction, and those effects were additive. Over the course of six generations, genetic rescue increased population sizes and intrinsic fitness substantially. Both large and small populations showed evidence of being able to adapt from standing genetic variation. Our results support the practice of genetic rescue in facilitating adaptation and reducing inbreeding depression, and suggest that demographic rescue alone may suffice in larger populations even if only moderately inbred individuals are available for addition. PMID:26240320

  17. 46 CFR 133.135 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rescue boats. 133.135 Section 133.135 Shipping COAST... Requirements for All OSVs § 133.135 Rescue boats. (a) Each OSV must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.156 and equipped as specified in table 133.175 of this...

  18. 46 CFR 133.135 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rescue boats. 133.135 Section 133.135 Shipping COAST... Requirements for All OSVs § 133.135 Rescue boats. (a) Each OSV must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.156 and equipped as specified in table 133.175 of this...

  19. 46 CFR 133.135 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rescue boats. 133.135 Section 133.135 Shipping COAST... Requirements for All OSVs § 133.135 Rescue boats. (a) Each OSV must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.156 and equipped as specified in table 133.175 of this...

  20. 46 CFR 133.135 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rescue boats. 133.135 Section 133.135 Shipping COAST... Requirements for All OSVs § 133.135 Rescue boats. (a) Each OSV must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.056 and equipped as specified in table 133.175 of this...

  1. 46 CFR 133.135 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rescue boats. 133.135 Section 133.135 Shipping COAST... Requirements for All OSVs § 133.135 Rescue boats. (a) Each OSV must carry at least one rescue boat. Each rescue boat must be approved under approval series 160.156 and equipped as specified in table 133.175 of this...

  2. Rescues conducted by surfers on Australian beaches.

    PubMed

    Attard, Anna; Brander, Robert W; Shaw, Wendy S

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the demographics, occurrence, location, primary hazards and outcomes involved in rescues performed by surfers on Australian beaches. Conservative estimates suggest that the number of rescues conducted by Australian surfers each year is on par with the number conducted by volunteer surf lifesavers. Surfers perform a considerable number of serious rescues in both lifesaver/lifeguard patrolled (45%) and unpatrolled (53%) beach locations. Rip currents represent the major physical hazard leading to rescue (75%) and the dominant emotional response of people rescued is one of panic (85%). Most surfer rescue events occur during conditions of moderate waves and sunny, fine weather with the highest proportion of rescues occurring on quiet beaches with few people around (26%). Swimming is the activity associated with most rescue events (63%), followed by board riding (25%). Males aged 18-29 represent the largest demographic of people rescued. Surfers with prior water-safety training are more likely to perform a higher number of rescues, however ability to perform rescues is not associated with formal training, but rather number of years' experience surfing. Seventy-eight percent of surfers were happy to help, while 28% expressed feelings of annoyance or inconvenience, generally towards unwary swimmers. Results of this research suggest that 63% of surfers feel they have saved a life. This value may be enhanced through improved training of surfers in basic water safety rescue techniques. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 46 CFR 117.210 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rescue boats. 117.210 Section 117.210 Shipping COAST... Number and Type of Survival Craft § 117.210 Rescue boats. (a) Each vessel must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant OCMI determines that: (1) The vessel is sufficiently maneuverable, arranged...

  4. 46 CFR 117.210 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rescue boats. 117.210 Section 117.210 Shipping COAST... Number and Type of Survival Craft § 117.210 Rescue boats. (a) Each vessel must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant OCMI determines that: (1) The vessel is sufficiently maneuverable, arranged...

  5. 46 CFR 199.202 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rescue boats. 199.202 Section 199.202 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Passenger Vessels § 199.202 Rescue boats... least one rescue boat approved under approval series 160.156 that is equipped as specified in table 199...

  6. 46 CFR 199.202 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rescue boats. 199.202 Section 199.202 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Passenger Vessels § 199.202 Rescue boats... least one rescue boat approved under approval series 160.156 that is equipped as specified in table 199...

  7. 46 CFR 180.210 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rescue boats. 180.210 Section 180.210 Shipping COAST...) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Number and Type of Survival Craft § 180.210 Rescue boats. (a) A vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant...

  8. 46 CFR 169.517 - Rescue boat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rescue boat. 169.517 Section 169.517 Shipping COAST... and Firefighting Equipment Primary Lifesaving Equipment § 169.517 Rescue boat. All vessels certificated for exposed or partially protected waters service must have a suitable motor rescue boat, except...

  9. 46 CFR 169.517 - Rescue boat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rescue boat. 169.517 Section 169.517 Shipping COAST... and Firefighting Equipment Primary Lifesaving Equipment § 169.517 Rescue boat. All vessels certificated for exposed or partially protected waters service must have a suitable motor rescue boat, except...

  10. 46 CFR 180.210 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rescue boats. 180.210 Section 180.210 Shipping COAST...) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Number and Type of Survival Craft § 180.210 Rescue boats. (a) A vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant...

  11. 46 CFR 117.210 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rescue boats. 117.210 Section 117.210 Shipping COAST... Number and Type of Survival Craft § 117.210 Rescue boats. (a) Each vessel must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant OCMI determines that: (1) The vessel is sufficiently maneuverable, arranged...

  12. 46 CFR 180.210 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rescue boats. 180.210 Section 180.210 Shipping COAST...) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Number and Type of Survival Craft § 180.210 Rescue boats. (a) A vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant...

  13. 46 CFR 169.517 - Rescue boat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rescue boat. 169.517 Section 169.517 Shipping COAST... and Firefighting Equipment Primary Lifesaving Equipment § 169.517 Rescue boat. All vessels certificated for exposed or partially protected waters service must have a suitable motor rescue boat, except...

  14. 46 CFR 117.210 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rescue boats. 117.210 Section 117.210 Shipping COAST... Number and Type of Survival Craft § 117.210 Rescue boats. (a) Each vessel must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant OCMI determines that: (1) The vessel is sufficiently maneuverable, arranged...

  15. 46 CFR 199.202 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rescue boats. 199.202 Section 199.202 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Passenger Vessels § 199.202 Rescue boats... least one rescue boat approved under approval series 160.156 that is equipped as specified in table 199...

  16. 46 CFR 199.202 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rescue boats. 199.202 Section 199.202 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Passenger Vessels § 199.202 Rescue boats... least one rescue boat approved under approval series 160.156 that is equipped as specified in table 199...

  17. 46 CFR 180.210 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rescue boats. 180.210 Section 180.210 Shipping COAST...) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Number and Type of Survival Craft § 180.210 Rescue boats. (a) A vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant...

  18. 46 CFR 169.517 - Rescue boat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rescue boat. 169.517 Section 169.517 Shipping COAST... and Firefighting Equipment Primary Lifesaving Equipment § 169.517 Rescue boat. All vessels certificated for exposed or partially protected waters service must have a suitable motor rescue boat, except...

  19. 46 CFR 117.210 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rescue boats. 117.210 Section 117.210 Shipping COAST... Number and Type of Survival Craft § 117.210 Rescue boats. (a) Each vessel must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant OCMI determines that: (1) The vessel is sufficiently maneuverable, arranged...

  20. 46 CFR 169.517 - Rescue boat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rescue boat. 169.517 Section 169.517 Shipping COAST... and Firefighting Equipment Primary Lifesaving Equipment § 169.517 Rescue boat. All vessels certificated for exposed or partially protected waters service must have a suitable motor rescue boat, except...

  1. 46 CFR 199.202 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rescue boats. 199.202 Section 199.202 Shipping COAST... SYSTEMS FOR CERTAIN INSPECTED VESSELS Additional Requirements for Passenger Vessels § 199.202 Rescue boats... least one rescue boat approved under approval series 160.156 that is equipped as specified in table 199...

  2. 46 CFR 180.210 - Rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rescue boats. 180.210 Section 180.210 Shipping COAST...) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Number and Type of Survival Craft § 180.210 Rescue boats. (a) A vessel of more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length must carry at least one rescue boat unless the cognizant...

  3. Kinematic Simulation of a universal rescue vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, I. A.; Smirnova, E. Y.; Krasheninnikov, M. S.; Koshurina, A. A.; Dorofeev, R. A.; E Gai, V.

    2017-01-01

    The rescue of people in disaster through autonomous means of evacuation in some cases is the only way to save their lives. Rescue Mission often takes place in remote locations. The paper studies modeling of a universal rescue vehicle with a rotary-screw propeller.

  4. Rescue missions for totally buried avalanche victims: conclusions from 12 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Hohlrieder, Matthias; Thaler, Stephanie; Wuertl, Walter; Voelckel, Wolfgang; Ulmer, Hanno; Brugger, Hermann; Mair, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The planning and execution of avalanche rescue missions to search for totally buried avalanche victims are mostly based on personal experience and preference, as evidence-based information from literature is almost completely missing. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify major factors determining the survival probability of totally buried victims during avalanche rescue missions carried out by organized rescue teams (Austrian Mountain Rescue Service, Tyrol). During the 12-year period studied, 109 totally buried persons (56 off-piste, 53 backcountry), were rescued or recovered; 18.3% survived to hospital discharge. Median depth of burial was 1.25 m; median duration of burial was 85 min. The majority (61.6%) of the rescue missions were conducted under considerably dangerous avalanche conditions. The probability of survival was highest when located visually and lowest for those located by avalanche transceiver; survival did not significantly differ between those found by rescue dogs and those located with avalanche probes. Multivariate analysis revealed short duration of burial and off-piste terrain to be the two independent predictors of survival. Whenever companion rescue fails, snow burial in an avalanche is associated with extraordinarily high mortality. Searching the avalanche debris with probe lines seems to be equally effective as compared to searching with rescue dogs. The potential hazard for rescuers during avalanche rescue missions comes mainly from self-triggered avalanches, hence thorough mission planning and critical risk-benefit assessment are of utmost importance for risk reduction.

  5. Submarine Rescue Decompression Procedure from Hyperbaric Exposures up to 6 Bar of Absolute Pressure in Man: Effects on Bubble Formation and Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Hugon, Julien; Castagna, Olivier; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Jammes, Yves; Hugon, Michel; Risberg, Jan; Pény, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in submarine rescue systems have allowed a transfer under pressure of crew members being rescued from a disabled submarine. The choice of a safe decompression procedure for pressurised rescuees has been previously discussed, but no schedule has been validated when the internal submarine pressure is significantly increased i.e. exceeding 2.8 bar absolute pressure. This study tested a saturation decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar, the maximum operating pressure of the NATO submarine rescue system. The objective was to investigate the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) and clinical and spirometric indices of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Two groups were exposed to a Nitrogen-Oxygen atmosphere (pO2 = 0.5 bar) at either 5 bar (N = 14) or 6 bar (N = 12) for 12 h followed by 56 h 40 min resp. 60 h of decompression. When chamber pressure reached 2.5 bar, the subjects breathed oxygen intermittently, otherwise compressed air. Repeated clinical examinations, ultrasound monitoring of venous gas embolism and spirometry were performed during decompression. During exposures to 5 bar, 3 subjects had minor subjective symptoms i.e. sensation of joint discomfort, regressing spontaneously, and after surfacing 2 subjects also experienced joint discomfort disappearing without treatment. Only 3 subjects had detectable intravascular bubbles during decompression (low grades). No bubbles were detected after surfacing. About 40% of subjects felt chest tightness when inspiring deeply during the initial phase of decompression. Precordial burning sensations were reported during oxygen periods. During decompression, vital capacity decreased by about 8% and forced expiratory flow rates decreased significantly. After surfacing, changes in the peripheral airways were still noticed; Lung Diffusion for carbon monoxide was slightly reduced by 1% while vital capacity was normalized. The procedure did not result in serious symptoms of DCS or

  6. Submarine rescue decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar of absolute pressure in man: effects on bubble formation and pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Hugon, Julien; Castagna, Olivier; Meckler, Cédric; Vallée, Nicolas; Jammes, Yves; Hugon, Michel; Risberg, Jan; Pény, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in submarine rescue systems have allowed a transfer under pressure of crew members being rescued from a disabled submarine. The choice of a safe decompression procedure for pressurised rescuees has been previously discussed, but no schedule has been validated when the internal submarine pressure is significantly increased i.e. exceeding 2.8 bar absolute pressure. This study tested a saturation decompression procedure from hyperbaric exposures up to 6 bar, the maximum operating pressure of the NATO submarine rescue system. The objective was to investigate the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) and clinical and spirometric indices of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Two groups were exposed to a Nitrogen-Oxygen atmosphere (pO2 = 0.5 bar) at either 5 bar (N = 14) or 6 bar (N = 12) for 12 h followed by 56 h 40 min resp. 60 h of decompression. When chamber pressure reached 2.5 bar, the subjects breathed oxygen intermittently, otherwise compressed air. Repeated clinical examinations, ultrasound monitoring of venous gas embolism and spirometry were performed during decompression. During exposures to 5 bar, 3 subjects had minor subjective symptoms i.e. sensation of joint discomfort, regressing spontaneously, and after surfacing 2 subjects also experienced joint discomfort disappearing without treatment. Only 3 subjects had detectable intravascular bubbles during decompression (low grades). No bubbles were detected after surfacing. About 40% of subjects felt chest tightness when inspiring deeply during the initial phase of decompression. Precordial burning sensations were reported during oxygen periods. During decompression, vital capacity decreased by about 8% and forced expiratory flow rates decreased significantly. After surfacing, changes in the peripheral airways were still noticed; Lung Diffusion for carbon monoxide was slightly reduced by 1% while vital capacity was normalized. The procedure did not result in serious symptoms of DCS or

  7. Nurse Specialty Certification, Inpatient Mortality, and Failure to Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Kendall-Gallagher, Deborah; Aiken, Linda H.; Sloane, Douglas M.; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine if hospital proportion of staff nurses with specialty certification is associated with risk-adjusted inpatient 30-day mortality and failure to rescue (deaths in surgical inpatients following a major complication). Design Secondary analysis of risk-adjusted adult general, orthopedic, and vascular surgical inpatients discharged during 2005–2006 (n = 1,283,241) from 652 nonfederal hospitals controlling for state, hospital, patient, and nursing characteristics by linking outcomes, administrative, and nurse survey data (n = 28,598). Method Nurse data, categorized by education and certification status, were aggregated to the hospital level. Logistic regression models were used to estimate effects of specialty certification and other nursing characteristics on mortality and failure to rescue. Findings Hospital proportion of baccalaureate and certified baccalaureate staff nurses were associated with mortality and failure to rescue; no effect of specialization was seen in the absence of baccalaureate education. A 10% increase in hospital proportion of baccalaureate and certified baccalaureate staff nurses, respectively, decreased the odds of adjusted inpatient 30-day mortality by 6% and 2%; results for failure to rescue were identical. Conclusions Nurse specialty certification is associated with better patient outcomes; effect on mortality and failure to rescue in general surgery patients is contingent upon baccalaureate education. Clinical Relevance Investment in a baccalaureate-educated workforce and specialty certification has the potential to improve the quality of care. PMID:21605323

  8. Mountain rescue stretchers: usability trial.

    PubMed

    Hignett, Sue; Willmott, Joseph Wayne; Clemes, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    In the UK mountain rescues are carried out by highly trained volunteers in all weather conditions and at any time of the day/night. They interface with other services when they hand over the casualty to either land or air ambulances. The design of the stretcher is important to the safety of both the volunteers and casualties. This paper reports a usability trial to evaluate the features of mountain rescue stretchers and identify characteristics for future design. Two mountain rescue teams in the English Lake District participated in a five week field experiment. Data were collected using postural analysis with Rapid Entire Body Analysis, Body Part Discomfort Surveys, Rated Perceived Exertion and focus groups to compare the performance of four stretchers: Split Thomas, Ferno Titan, MacInnes mark 6 and MacInnes mark 7. None of the stretchers had an overall advantage, with benefits for some features counterbalanced by disadvantages resulting from others. All the stretchers produced shoulder discomfort with the Split Thomas and MacInnes 6 lowering the postural risks through the use of skids/wheel in the carrying phase. The key design features for future MR stretchers include: reduced unloaded weight (e.g. light weight materials and mesh platforms); undercarriage system to reduce the carrying load; adjustable handles at the front and back positions; flexible carrying system with an optional harness attachment; ease of assembly in adverse environmental conditions; large carrying capacity. It is suggested that military emergency evacuation should be considered in addition to mountain rescue tasks to identify a larger commercial market for development.

  9. Toward a behavioral ecology of rescue behavior.

    PubMed

    Hollis, Karen L; Nowbahari, Elise

    2013-07-18

    Although the study of helping behavior has revolutionized the field of behavioral ecology, scientific examination of rescue behavior remains extremely rare, except perhaps in ants, having been described as early as 1874. Nonetheless, recent work in our laboratories has revealed several new patterns of rescue behavior that appear to be much more complex than previously studied forms. This precisely-directed rescue behavior bears a remarkable resemblance to what has been labeled empathy in rats, and thus raises numerous philosophical and theoretical questions: How should rescue behavior (or empathy) be defined? What distinguishes rescue from other forms of altruism? In what ways is rescue behavior in ants different from, and similar to, rescue in other non-human animals? What selection pressures dictate its appearance? In this paper, we review our own experimental studies of rescue in both laboratory and field, which, taken together, begin to reveal some of the behavioral ecological conditions that likely have given rise to rescue behavior in ants. Against this background, we also address important theoretical questions involving rescue, including those outlined above. In this way, we hope not only to encourage further experimental analysis of rescue behavior, but also to highlight important similarities and differences in very distant taxa.

  10. Soft Selective Sweeps in Evolutionary Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Benjamin A.; Pennings, Pleuni S.; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2017-01-01

    Evolutionary rescue occurs when a population that is declining in size because of an environmental change is rescued from extinction by genetic adaptation. Evolutionary rescue is an important phenomenon at the intersection of ecology and population genetics, and the study of evolutionary rescue is critical to understanding processes ranging from species conservation to the evolution of drug and pesticide resistance. While most population-genetic models of evolutionary rescue focus on estimating the probability of rescue, we focus on whether one or more adaptive lineages contribute to evolutionary rescue. We find that when evolutionary rescue is likely, it is often driven by soft selective sweeps where multiple adaptive mutations spread through the population simultaneously. We give full analytic results for the probability of evolutionary rescue and the probability that evolutionary rescue occurs via soft selective sweeps. We expect that these results will find utility in understanding the genetic signatures associated with various evolutionary rescue scenarios in large populations, such as the evolution of drug resistance in viral, bacterial, or eukaryotic pathogens. PMID:28213477

  11. Adaptive mobility for rescue robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blitch, John G.

    2003-09-01

    It has often been observed that the most daunting aspect of any crisis response is managing the "unknown unknowns" that inevitably plague incident commanders and emergency personnel at all levels responsible for life and death decisions on a minute by minute basis. In structural collapse situations, for example, rescue crews rarely have even a coarse picture of the number or disposition of people or material scattered amongst the twisted beams and piles of concrete that typically entomb would-be survivors. How can the incident commander decide which beam to lift or even which section of the building to search first in the absence of information of what lies beneath. Even the slightest tug on a concrete slab can collapse potential life harboring void spaces below killing potential survivors in the process. In deploying mobile robots to assist in rescue operations we combined the traditional advantages of machine immunity to fatigue, hazardous materials and environmental controls, with the mechanical design freedom that allowed small platforms to penetrate deep into rubble to expand both situational awareness and operational influence of rescue services at the World Trade Center and mountainous snow-bound caves in Afghanistan. We learned a great deal from these experiences with regard to robot emloyment and design. This paper endeavors to share a few of our more prominent lessons learned regarding portable robot mobility as a means to manage user expectations and stimulate more innovative and adaptive design.

  12. Rescue Interventions in Biological and Physical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Sean

    2011-03-01

    Gene knockout experiments on single cells have established that expression of most genes is not needed for optimal growth. Yet, environmental and genetic perturbations to these organisms are known to be accompanied by the transient activation of a large number of latent metabolic pathways, suggesting that the temporarily activated reactions increase growth in the presence of perturbations. We have tested this hypothesis computationally and found, surprisingly, that the availability of latent pathways tends in fact to inhibit growth after genetic perturbations. This adverse effect indicates that latent pathway activation is derivative of a suboptimal response and that consequently, growth can actually be improved by removing these pathways from the network. In this talk, I will relate this counterintuitive effect to very recent research showing that a loss in network performance inflicted by an external perturbation can be mitigated by the application of additional perturbations. The challenge is to identify such ``rescues'' under constraints that limit the type of perturbations that can be made. I will present an approach to identify such eligible rescues for general networks modeled as dynamical systems, and present computational examples for biological and physical networks.

  13. Search and rescue by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, E.; Wilder, F. N.

    1978-01-01

    A system of satellites, ground stations and user equipments is proposed to provide an operational demonstration, using existing technology, for the timely detection and position location of general aviation aircraft and marine distress incidents so that rescue efforts can be started as soon as possible. The spaceborne equipment will consist of a transponder capable of receiving signals from existing and planned distress beacons at 121.5, 243.0 and 406.0 MHz, and transmitting at 1543 MHz. The program has generated international interest with Canada, France and the USSR presently planning to participate jointly with the U.S. in the development of the space and ground hardware.

  14. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Wallentine, Brad D.; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F.; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol{sup −1} (15.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the

  15. Phaseolus immature embryo rescue technology.

    PubMed

    Geerts, Pascal; Toussaint, André; Mergeai, Guy; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Predominant among the production constraints of the common bean Phaseolus vulgaris are infestation of Ascochyta blight, Bean Golden Mosaic virus (BGMV), and Bean Fly. Interbreeding with Phaseolus -coccineus L. and/or Phaseolus polyanthus Greenm has been shown to provide P. vulgaris with greater resistance to these diseases. For interspecific crosses to be successful, it is important to use P. coccineus and P. polyanthus as female parents; this prevents rapid reversal to the recurrent parent P. vulgaris. Although incompatibility barriers are post-zygotic, early hybrid embryo abortion limits the success of F1 crosses. While rescue techniques for globular and early heart-shaped embryos have improved in recent years, -success in hybridization remains very low. In this study, we describe six steps that allowed us to rescue 2-day-old P. vulgaris embryos using a pod culture technique. Our methods consisted of (i) pod culture, (ii) extraction and culture of immature embryos, (iii) dehydration of embryos, (iv) germination of embryos, (v) rooting of developed shoots, and (vi) hardening of plantlets.

  16. Search and Rescue. Auxiliary Operational Specialty Course. Student Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coast Guard, Washington, DC.

    This text, based on the National Search and Rescue (SAR) Plan, was prepared to provide a course of study on common procedures for SAR operations so that any basically qualified person in the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary can effectively accomplish a SAR mission and act as on-scene commander if required. There are 13 chapters: Introduction to Search…

  17. 46 CFR 133.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 133.140 Section 133.140... SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.140 Stowage of rescue boats. (a) Rescue boats must be stowed as follows: (1) Each rescue boat must be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) Each rescue boat...

  18. 46 CFR 133.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 133.140 Section 133.140... SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.140 Stowage of rescue boats. (a) Rescue boats must be stowed as follows: (1) Each rescue boat must be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) Each rescue boat...

  19. 46 CFR 133.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 133.140 Section 133.140... SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.140 Stowage of rescue boats. (a) Rescue boats must be stowed as follows: (1) Each rescue boat must be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) Each rescue boat...

  20. 46 CFR 133.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 133.140 Section 133.140... SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.140 Stowage of rescue boats. (a) Rescue boats must be stowed as follows: (1) Each rescue boat must be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) Each rescue boat...

  1. 46 CFR 133.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 133.140 Section 133.140... SYSTEMS Requirements for All OSVs § 133.140 Stowage of rescue boats. (a) Rescue boats must be stowed as follows: (1) Each rescue boat must be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) Each rescue boat...

  2. Fire Service Training. Rescue Practices. (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    One of a set of fourteen instructional outlines for use in a course to train novice firemen, this guide covers the topic of rescue operations. Two types of rescue functions are recognized: the primary one consists of locating and saving trapped victims, and the secondary one of recovering bodies and making the area safe for other workers and…

  3. Rescue coronary stenting in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Enrico; Meneghetti, Paolo; Molinari, Gionata; Zardini, Piero

    1996-01-01

    Failed rescue coronary angioplasty is a high risk situation because of high mortality. Coronary stent has given us the chance of improving and maintaining the patency of the artery. We report our preliminary experience of rescue stenting after unsuccessful coronary angioplasty.

  4. Teaching Holocaust Rescue: A Problematic Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindquist, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Determining how to teach about rescue during the Holocaust presents many dilemmas to teachers as they plan Holocaust curricula. Rescue is often overemphasized, and faulty perspectives about rescuers and their actions may cause students to develop distorted views about this aspect of Holocaust history. This article explores several factors that…

  5. Satellite search and rescue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. T.

    The success of rescue operations in the case of the survivors of aircraft crashes depends crucially on the rapid detection of the aircraft location. Similar considerations apply in the case of marine distress. For this reason, the U.S. is currently participating in a program called Cospas/Sarsat, an international cooperative humanitarian effort designed to assist in saving the lives of aviators and mariners in distress. The other original participants in the program include France, Canada, and the Soviet Union. The program began as an experiment with the launch of the first spacecraft, Cospas I, in June 1982. The Cospas/Sarsat partners are engaged in work concerning a second experiment, involving a new generation distress beacon operating on a frequency of 406 MHz. Details regarding the Cospas/Sarsat constellation are discussed, and attention is given to the immediate and the long-term outlook.

  6. 46 CFR 160.156-13 - Approval inspections and tests for prototype rescue boats and fast rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... boats and fast rescue boats. 160.156-13 Section 160.156-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... EQUIPMENT Rescue Boats and Fast Rescue Boats (SOLAS) § 160.156-13 Approval inspections and tests for prototype rescue boats and fast rescue boats. (a) After the Commandant notifies the manufacturer that the...

  7. Lunar mission safety and rescue: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A technical summary is presented of the escape/rescue and the hazards analyses for manned missions and operations in the 1980 time frame. Hazards are interpreted as hazards to man, not to equipment, program schedule, or program objectives. Hazards in 39 individual areas are analyzed, and corrective measures are recommended. Over 200 safety guidelines are proposed, based on significant hazards. Escape and rescue situtations and requirements are identified and analyzed, and escape/survival/rescue concepts are defined to cope with each escape/rescue situation. Areas in which research or technical development efforts could improve mission safety are identified. It is concluded that the primary emphasis should be on survival and escape provisions, with rescue required only where self-help cannot bring the endangered crewmen to a safe haven.

  8. The impact of nursing surveillance on failure to rescue.

    PubMed

    Shever, Leah L

    2011-01-01

    Greater amounts of nursing surveillance is thought to decrease failure to rescue but studies to date have used nurse staffing levels as a proxy for nursing surveillance. The purpose of this nursing effectiveness study was to examine the unique treatment effect of nursing surveillance on failure to rescue. Data were abstracted from 9 electronic clinical data repositories including the nursing documentation system that used the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) to record nursing care. Nursing surveillance was quantified as "high use" when the subjects received it an average of 12 times per day or more. Propensity scores were used to match subjects who had received high-dose nursing surveillance with subjects who received low-dose nursing surveillance (average of less than 12 times a day). The results indicate that when nursing surveillance is performed an average of 12 times a day or greater, there is a significant (p = .0058) decrease in the odds of experiencing failure to rescue (odds ratio [OR] = 0.52) compared to when surveillance was delivered an average of less than 12 times a day. Additional unique variables included in this study are robust levels of nurse staffing based on hourly data, medical treatments, pharmaceutical treatments, and nursing treatments. The use of propensity scores helped determine the unique contribution of nursing surveillance on failure to rescue in this observational study.

  9. Benzylamine antihyperglycemic effect is abolished by AOC3 gene invalidation in mice but not rescued by semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase expression under the control of aP2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Grès, Sandra; Bour, Sandy; Valet, Philippe; Carpéné, Christian

    2012-12-01

    Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) is a transmembrane enzyme that metabolizes primary amines from endogenous or dietary origin. SSAO is highly expressed in adipose, smooth muscle and endothelial cells. In each of these cell types, SSAO is implicated in different biological functions, such as glucose transport activation, extracellular matrix maturation and leucocyte extravasation, respectively. However, the physiological functions of SSAO and their involvement in pathogenesis remain uncompletely characterized. To better understand the role of adipose tissue SSAO, we investigated whether it was necessary and/or sufficient to produce the antihyperglycemic effect of the SSAO-substrate benzylamine, already reported in mice. Therefore, we crossed SSAO-deficient mice invalidated for AOC3 gene and transgenic mice expected to express human SSAO in an adipocyte-specific manner, under the control of aP2 promoter. The aP2-human AOC3 construct (aP2-hAOC3) was equally expressed in the adipose tissue of mice expressing or not the native murine form and almost absent in other tissues. However, the corresponding SSAO activity found in adipose tissue represented only 20 % that of control mice. As a consequence, the benzylamine antihyperglycemic effect observed during glucose tolerance test in control was abolished in AOC3-KO mice but not rescued in mice expressing aP2-hAOC3. The capacity of benzylamine or methylamine to activate glucose uptake in adipocytes exhibited parallel variations in the corresponding genotypes. Although the aP2-hAOC3 construct did not allow a total rescue of SSAO activity in adipose tissue, it could be assessed from our observations that adipocyte SSAO plays a pivotal role in the increased glucose tolerance promoted by pharmacological doses of benzylamine.

  10. Hubble Space Telescope Crew Rescue Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlin, Teri L.; Canga, Michael; Boyer, Roger; Thigpen, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In the aftermath of the 2003 Columbia accident NASA removed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) from the Space Shuttle manifest. Reasons cited included concerns that the risk of flying the mission would be too high. There was at the time no viable technique to repair the orbiter s thermal protection system if it were to be damaged by debris during ascent. Furthermore in the event of damage, since the mission was not to the International Space Station, there was no safe haven for the crew to wait for an extended period of time for a rescue. The HST servicing mission was reconsidered because of improvements in the ascent debris environment, the development of techniques for the astronauts to perform on orbit repairs to damage thermal protection, and the development of a strategy to provide a crew rescue capability. However, leading up to the launch of servicing mission, the HST crew rescue capability was a recurring topic. For HST there was a limited amount of time available to perform a crew rescue because of the limited consumables available on the Orbiter. The success of crew rescue depends upon several factors including when a problem is identified, when and to what extent power down procedures are begun, and where the rescue vehicle is in its ground processing cycle. Severe power downs maximize crew rescue success but would eliminate the option for the orbiter servicing the HST to attempt a landing. Therefore, crew rescue success needed to be weighed against preserving the ability of the orbiter to have landing option in case there was a problem with the rescue vehicle. This paper focuses on quantification of the HST mission loss of crew rescue capability using Shuttle historical data and various power down capabilities. That work supported NASA s decision to proceed with the HST service mission, which was successfully completed on May 24th 2009.

  11. Search and rescue in Alaska's national parks.

    PubMed

    Heggie, Travis W

    2008-11-01

    Recreational travel to wilderness destinations such as national parks is increasing. The inherent risks present in such destinations can result in injury and illness, have a significant impact on local medical resources, and end with expensive search and rescue operations. In order to increase our understanding of the activities and situations which lead to wilderness search and rescue incidents, this study examines search and rescue operations from National Park Service units in Alaska. A retrospective review of all search and rescue incident reports filed by National Park Service units in Alaska during 2002. During 2002 there were 25 reported search and rescue incidents involving 38 individuals. The majority of incidents (19 of 25) occurred at Denali National Park and Preserve. Thirteen fatalities were reported in six incidents, nine incidents involved traumatic injuries, eight involved illnesses, and two involved both injuries and an illness. Mountain climbing (20) and hiking (8) were the most common subject activities at the time search and rescue assistance was required. Climbing solo (4), uneven and wet terrain (4), falls into crevasses (3), and a lack of experience or ability (3) were the factors most commonly contributing to search and rescue incidents. Nineteen helicopters were utilized in 15 operations and fixed-wing aircraft were utilized in seven operations. Males accounted for 33 of the 38 individuals involved in all search and rescue incidents and United States citizens accounted for 74% of the individuals involved. The mountain environment higher than 4500m was the most common search and rescue environment (11). The average cost was USD $6253. Search and rescue operations in Alaska can be expensive and end with severe health consequences. Preventive education efforts at park visitor centers and at the lower and upper base camps on Mt. McKinley should be continued. In addition, pre-departure travel education efforts via the internet should be expanded

  12. [Investigation on the psychological quality of mine rescue staff].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Wang, Ruzhu; Liu, Yuan; Bai, Yuping; Ma, Dong; Zhang, Chunmin; Zhang, Jiajia; Yuan, Teng; Huang, Na; Yang, Ping; Guo, Feifei; Sun, Haixia; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Fengzeng; Yao, Sanqiao

    2014-04-01

    participating rescue, and life events in the year effect the psychological quality of mine rescue staff.

  13. Indirect evolutionary rescue: prey adapts, predator avoids extinction.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Masato; Miner, Brooks E

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have increasingly recognized evolutionary rescue (adaptive evolution that prevents extinction following environmental change) as an important process in evolutionary biology and conservation science. Researchers have concentrated on single species living in isolation, but populations in nature exist within communities of interacting species, so evolutionary rescue should also be investigated in a multispecies context. We argue that the persistence or extinction of a focal species can be determined solely by evolutionary change in an interacting species. We demonstrate that prey adaptive evolution can prevent predator extinction in two-species predator-prey models, and we derive the conditions under which this indirect evolutionary interaction is essential to prevent extinction following environmental change. A nonevolving predator can be rescued from extinction by adaptive evolution of its prey due to a trade-off for the prey between defense against predation and population growth rate. As prey typically have larger populations and shorter generations than their predators, prey evolution can be rapid and have profound effects on predator population dynamics. We suggest that this process, which we term 'indirect evolutionary rescue', has the potential to be critically important to the ecological and evolutionary responses of populations and communities to dramatic environmental change.

  14. 33 CFR 127.1505 - Emergency response and rescue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED... and rescue pending the arrival of resources for firefighting or pollution control. Response and rescue...

  15. 33 CFR 127.1505 - Emergency response and rescue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED... and rescue pending the arrival of resources for firefighting or pollution control. Response and rescue...

  16. Protective Effect of Sevoflurane Postconditioning against Cardiac Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via Ameliorating Mitochondrial Impairment, Oxidative Stress and Rescuing Autophagic Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuchun; Luo, Zhenzhong; Hua, Fuzhou; Yuan, Linhui; Zhou, Zhidong; Liu, Qin; Du, Xiaohong; Chen, Sisi; Zhang, Lieliang; Xu, Guohai

    2015-01-01

    ameliorating mitochondrial impairment, oxidative stress and rescuing autophagic clearance. PMID:26263161

  17. Air Cushion Crash Rescue Vehicle (ACCRV)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    x 13.3 x 5.7 Battery Incl. Monitors 1 DC Defibril- 11.90 3.8 x 13.3 x 9.2 Battery Inc\\. lator 106 -) 0) ho cd o +-> w c cd 3...reverse if necessary and identify by block number) Current USAF crash rescue vehicles have been designed to operate on the roads, ramps, taxiways...Cushion Crash Rescue Vehicle (ACCRV) has been designed by integrating a retractable air cushion system with a crash rescue vehicle. This report

  18. Space safety and rescue 1984-1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, G. W.

    The present conference on spacecraft crew safety and rescue technologies and operations considers safety aspects of Space Shuttle ground processing, the Inmarsat and COSPAS/SARSAT emergency location satellite systems, emergency location and rescue communications using Geosat, the use of the Manned Maneuvering Unit for on-orbit rescue operations, NASA Space Station safety design and operational considerations, and the medico-legal implications of space station operation. Also discussed are the operational and environmental aspects of EPIRBS, mobile satellites for safety and disaster response, Inmarsat's role in the Future Global Maritime Distress and Safety System, and test results of the L-band satellite's EPIRB system.

  19. Development of Space Shuttle Rescue and Recovery Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As the first Space Shuttle launch was still in our future, many from NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD) and NASA contractors were busy planning for not only a nominal launch and return, but contingency operations at the launch pad and landing sites. Prior to the first launch, detailed coordination, planning and simulations were conducted at all three locations and internal rescue procedures were taught at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Later in the Program, the Transoceanic Abort Landing (TAL) sites were added in Europe and Africa. For the 51L mission a new TAL site was brought on line in Morocco. However, upon launch, the Shuttle Program experienced it's first lost. During the following months a complete review of all contingency operations (launch and landing) was completed. Many enhancements were made based on the reviews following. A Mode VIII water rescue was developed for NASA by the DoD before the STS-26 launch. Different concepts were explored and being debated by NASA. Training of the contingency forces was required before final decisions were made forcing the teaching of two different sets of procedures. To assist with training, a video was developed for the fire/crash/rescue personnel. This accompanied the detailed extraction procedures that were developed by a combination of KSC and DoD firemen. Training for the fire/crash/rescue personnel at Vandenberg AFB was also being planned before the accident happen. The fire/crash/rescue mockup that was being built at Chanute AFB was diverted to Edwards AFB. Educational Objectives: With the emphasis on Commercial Crew Programs for Space flight it is important that all involved understand what is required to prepare for contingencies. Cost effective means of being prepared for contingencies are needed. Questions: 1. When should planning for nominal and contingency operations begin? 2. What type of training aids are needed for contingency operations? 3. Who were the major contributors to Shuttle contingency

  20. Challenging the clinical relevance of folinic acid over rescue after high dose methotrexate (HDMTX).

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ian J

    2013-11-01

    The use of adequate folinic acid rescue (in clinically relevant doses) after high dose methotrexate will prevent neurotoxicity without reducing treatment results. A literature search was performed to test the hypothesis that no evidence for the existence of folinic acid over-rescue of high-dose methotrexate (MTX) in clinically relevant situations exists (evidence that too much folinic acid reduced cure rate). Examples of folinic acid over-rescue after lower doses of MTX were found and has been cited as evidence of over rescue of high dose MTX. Mega doses of folinic acid, used when toxic levels of MTX occurred, also could neutralize the MTX effect. Data were found to support the contention that higher levels of MTX require disproportionally higher folinic acid doses for rescue. Careful examination of the available studies after HDMTX yielded more convincing alternative explanations for reduction in cure rate than over rescue. Little convincing evidence for the existence of over rescue after HDMTX was found. The rescue of high-dose MTX with an appropriate dose of folinic acid that can prevent toxicity, especially neurotoxicity, was not shown to reduce the therapeutic effect. No evidence was found that higher doses of folinic acid after high dose MTX reduces the therapeutic effect. Acceptance of the hypothesis can prevent harm being caused (especially brain damage) by reversing the trend of dose reduction in FA rescue. The recognition that the use of higher folinic acid doses is safe, can prevent neurotoxicity, and does not reduce prognosis has important implications for the development of effective non toxic treatment protocols. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fire and Rescue Technology. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valesey, Brigitte G.

    1997-01-01

    Provides occupational information about fire and rescue operations personnel, such as fire science, fire protection engineering, emergency medical technicians, and firefighters. Provides information about organizations in these fields. (JOW)

  2. Physics Involved in Air Search and Rescue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egler, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes how a simple radio homing device can be used to allow students to participate in a search and rescue mission similar to that which the Civil Air Patrol engages in when locating planes that have crashed. (ZWH)

  3. NASA's Search-and-Rescue Technology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation depicts the next-generation search and rescue system, the DASS. Under this system, instruments used to relay emergency beacon signals will be installed on GPS satellites. When one em...

  4. Physics Involved in Air Search and Rescue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egler, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes how a simple radio homing device can be used to allow students to participate in a search and rescue mission similar to that which the Civil Air Patrol engages in when locating planes that have crashed. (ZWH)

  5. Drowning rescue on ice, board assist (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Drowning may occur wherever there is water, whether it is only a few inches in the bottom of the tub or thousands of feet in the ocean. People should be aware of life-saving techniques from rescue to resuscitation.

  6. Fire and Rescue Technology. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valesey, Brigitte G.

    1997-01-01

    Provides occupational information about fire and rescue operations personnel, such as fire science, fire protection engineering, emergency medical technicians, and firefighters. Provides information about organizations in these fields. (JOW)

  7. An introduction to mountain search and rescue.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lanny

    2004-05-01

    Alpine search and rescue teams must perform each incident response safely. To do so requires experience, organizational skills, technical training, and ability. In addition, teams should interface with emergency medical control advisors who are familiar with local terrain, mountain rescue operations, and the evacuation techniques employed. To facilitate safety and organization, each mission can be divided into four linked stages: location, reach, stabilize, and evacuate.

  8. Investigation into the practice of ensuring a steady blood supply for medical rescue during the Wenchuan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Yi, Mei

    2009-08-01

    In the rescue that follows a major natural disaster, blood donation is a unique, necessary method to assist the injured. To achieve effective assurance of the blood supply for medical rescue in an orderly fashion, the current procedure must be adjusted by using scientific prediction, analysis, and adaptation. After the process of ensuring the blood supply for medical rescue during the Wenchuan Earthquake, the Ministry of Health of China, with great efforts, continues to investigate and reflect upon the application of the above principals during actual practice. Objectively, these efforts will lead to better results and establish a standard supplying blood during a disaster rescue.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope Crew Rescue Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlin, Teri L.; Canga, Michael A.; Cates, Grant R.

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of the 2003 Columbia accident, NASA removed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) from the Space Shuttle manifest. Reasons cited included concerns that the risk of flying the mission would be too high. The HST SM4 was subsequently reinstated and flown as Space Transportation System (STS)-125 because of improvements in the ascent debris environment, the development of techniques for astronauts to perform on orbit repairs to damaged thermal protection, and the development of a strategy to provide a viable crew rescue capability. However, leading up to the launch of STS-125, the viability of the HST crew rescue capability was a recurring topic. For STS-125, there was a limited amount of time available to perform a crew rescue due to limited consumables (power, oxygen, etc.) available on the Orbiter. The success of crew rescue depended upon several factors, including when a problem was identified; when and what actions, such as powering down, were begun to conserve consumables; and where the Launch on Need (LON) vehicle was in its ground processing cycle. Crew rescue success also needed to be weighed against preserving the Orbiter s ability to have a landing option in case there was a problem with the LON vehicle. This paper focuses on quantifying the HST mission loss of crew rescue capability using Shuttle historical data and various power down strategies. Results from this effort supported NASA s decision to proceed with STS-125, which was successfully completed on May 24th 2009.

  10. [Model and enlightenment from rescue of August 2nd Kunshan explosion casualty].

    PubMed

    Tan, Q; Qiu, H B; Sun, B W; Shen, Y M; Nie, L J; Zhang, H W

    2016-01-01

    On August 2nd, 2014, a massive dust explosion occurred in a factory of Kunshan, resulting in a mass casualty involving 185 burn patients. They were transported to 20 medical institutions in Jiangsu province and Shanghai. More than one thousand of medical personnel of our country participated in this emergency rescue, and satisfactory results were achieved. In this paper, the characteristics of this accident were analyzed, the positive effects of interdisciplinary cooperation were affirmed, and the contingency plan, rescue process and pattern, and reserve, organization and management of talents during this rescue process were reviewed retrospectively.

  11. 30 CFR 49.18 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.18 Section 49.18 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.18 Training for mine rescue...

  12. 30 CFR 49.18 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.18 Section 49.18 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.18 Training for mine rescue...

  13. 30 CFR 49.15 - Mine rescue station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mine rescue station. 49.15 Section 49.15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.15 Mine rescue station. (a) Every operator...

  14. 30 CFR 49.5 - Mine rescue station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mine rescue station. 49.5 Section 49.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines § 49.5 Mine rescue station. (a) Except...

  15. 30 CFR 49.15 - Mine rescue station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mine rescue station. 49.15 Section 49.15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.15 Mine rescue station. (a) Every operator...

  16. 30 CFR 49.5 - Mine rescue station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mine rescue station. 49.5 Section 49.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines § 49.5 Mine rescue station. (a) Except...

  17. 30 CFR 49.15 - Mine rescue station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mine rescue station. 49.15 Section 49.15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.15 Mine rescue station. (a) Every operator...

  18. 30 CFR 49.18 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.18 Section 49.18 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.18 Training for mine rescue...

  19. 30 CFR 49.5 - Mine rescue station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mine rescue station. 49.5 Section 49.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines § 49.5 Mine rescue station. (a) Except...

  20. 30 CFR 49.18 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.18 Section 49.18 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.18 Training for mine rescue...

  1. 30 CFR 49.15 - Mine rescue station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mine rescue station. 49.15 Section 49.15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.15 Mine rescue station. (a) Every...

  2. 30 CFR 49.15 - Mine rescue station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mine rescue station. 49.15 Section 49.15 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.15 Mine rescue station. (a) Every...

  3. 46 CFR 108.565 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 108.565 Section 108.565... AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.565 Stowage of rescue boats. (a) Rescue boats must be stowed as follows: (1) Each rescue boat must be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) Each...

  4. 46 CFR 108.565 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 108.565 Section 108.565... AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.565 Stowage of rescue boats. (a) Rescue boats must be stowed as follows: (1) Each rescue boat must be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) Each...

  5. 46 CFR 108.565 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 108.565 Section 108.565... AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.565 Stowage of rescue boats. (a) Rescue boats must be stowed as follows: (1) Each rescue boat must be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) Each...

  6. 46 CFR 108.565 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 108.565 Section 108.565... AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.565 Stowage of rescue boats. (a) Rescue boats must be stowed as follows: (1) Each rescue boat must be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) Each...

  7. 30 CFR 49.2 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mine served by a mine rescue team shall be located more than two hours ground travel time from the mine... underground mine shall: (1) Establish at least two mine rescue teams which are available at all times when... least two mine rescue teams are available at all times when miners are underground. (b) Each mine rescue...

  8. 30 CFR 49.12 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ground travel time from the mine rescue station with which the rescue team is associated. (g) As used in... all times when miners are underground; or (2) Enter into an arrangement for mine rescue services which assures that at least two mine rescue teams are available at all times when miners are underground. (b...

  9. 30 CFR 49.12 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ground travel time from the mine rescue station with which the rescue team is associated. (g) As used in... all times when miners are underground; or (2) Enter into an arrangement for mine rescue services which assures that at least two mine rescue teams are available at all times when miners are underground. (b...

  10. 30 CFR 49.12 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ground travel time from the mine rescue station with which the rescue team is associated. (g) As used in... all times when miners are underground; or (2) Enter into an arrangement for mine rescue services which assures that at least two mine rescue teams are available at all times when miners are underground. (b...

  11. 30 CFR 49.2 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... than two hours ground travel time from the mine rescue station with which the rescue team is associated... teams which are available at all times when miners are underground; or (2) Enter into an arrangement for mine rescue services which assures that at least two mine rescue teams are available at all times when...

  12. 30 CFR 49.2 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mine served by a mine rescue team shall be located more than two hours ground travel time from the mine... underground mine shall: (1) Establish at least two mine rescue teams which are available at all times when... least two mine rescue teams are available at all times when miners are underground. (b) Each mine rescue...

  13. 30 CFR 49.12 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ground travel time from the mine rescue station with which the rescue team is associated. (g) As used in... all times when miners are underground; or (2) Enter into an arrangement for mine rescue services which assures that at least two mine rescue teams are available at all times when miners are underground. (b...

  14. 30 CFR 49.2 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mine served by a mine rescue team shall be located more than two hours ground travel time from the mine... underground mine shall: (1) Establish at least two mine rescue teams which are available at all times when... least two mine rescue teams are available at all times when miners are underground. (b) Each mine rescue...

  15. 49 CFR 238.114 - Rescue access windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rescue access windows. 238.114 Section 238.114... § 238.114 Rescue access windows. (a) Number and location. Except as provided in paragraph (a)(1)(ii) of... rescue access windows. At least one rescue access window shall be located in each side of the car...

  16. Importance of teamwork, communication and culture on failure-to-rescue in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Ghaferi, A A; Dimick, J B

    2016-01-01

    Surgical mortality increases significantly with age. Wide variations in mortality rates across hospitals suggest potential levers for improvement. Failure-to-rescue has been posited as a potential mechanism underlying these differences. A review was undertaken of the literature evaluating surgery, mortality, failure-to-rescue and the elderly. This was followed by a review of ongoing studies and unpublished work aiming to understand better the mechanisms underlying variations in surgical mortality in elderly patients. Multiple hospital macro-system factors, such as nurse staffing, available hospital technology and teaching status, are associated with differences in failure-to-rescue rates. There is emerging literature regarding important micro-system factors associated with failure-to-rescue. These are grouped into three broad categories: hospital resources, attitudes and behaviours. Ongoing work to produce interventions to reduce variations in failure-to-rescue rates include a focus on teamwork, communication and safety culture. Researchers are using novel mixed-methods approaches and theories adapted from organizational studies in high-reliability organizations in an effort to improve the care of elderly surgical patients. Although elderly surgical patients experience failure-to-rescue events at much higher rates than their younger counterparts, patient-level effects do not sufficiently explain these differences. Increased attention to the role of organizational dynamics in hospitals' ability to rescue these high-risk patients will establish high-yield interventions aimed at improving patient safety. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. 46 CFR 160.156-7 - Design, construction and performance of rescue boats and fast rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design, construction and performance of rescue boats and... Boats and Fast Rescue Boats (SOLAS) § 160.156-7 Design, construction and performance of rescue boats and... immersion suits. (ii) Each rescue boat should be designed following standard human engineering practices...

  18. Group Task Force on Satellite Rescue and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Group Task Force was chartered by the Administrator of NASA to recommend 'a policy outlining the criteria, the design standards, and the pricing model to guide NASA in assessing the responsibilities for government and nongovernment Satellite Rescue and Repair Missions.' Criteria for accepting such missions, risks, and benefits to all sectors of our economy involved in satellite services, adequacy of planning and training, and the impact on NASA's primary mission were reviewed. The Group began by asking a more fundamental question; is satellite rescue and repair a logical element of NASA's mission? Factors considered were: (1) the probability of rescue or repair opportunities arising; (2) the economic justification for such attempts; (3) the benefits to NASA, both from such ad hoc learning experiences in space operations and the impact on the public perception of NASA; (4) the effect of such unanticipated missions on NASA's scheduled activities; (5) any potential effect on NASA's technical capability to work in space; and (6) any potential effect on U.S. economic competitiveness.

  19. Rescuing failed oral implants via Wnt activation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xing; Li, Jingtao; Chen, Tao; Mouraret, Sylvain; Dhamdhere, Girija; Brunski, John B.; Zou, Shujuan; Helms, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim Implant osseointegration is not always guaranteed and once fibrous encapsulation occurs clinicians have few options other than implant removal. Our goal was to test whether a WNT protein therapeutic could rescue such failed implants. Material and Methods Titanium implants were placed in over-sized murine oral osteotomies. A lack of primary stability was verified by mechanical testing. Interfacial strains were estimated by finite element modelling and histology coupled with histomorphometry confirmed the lack of peri-implant bone. After fibrous encapsulation was established peri-implant injections of a liposomal formulation of WNT3A protein (L-WNT3A) or liposomal PBS (L-PBS) were then initiated. Quantitative assays were employed to analyse the effects of L-WNT3A treatment. Results Implants in gap-type interfaces exhibited high interfacial strains and no primary stability. After verification of implant failure, L-WNT3A or L-PBS injections were initiated. L-WNT3A induced a rapid, significant increase in Wnt responsiveness in the peri-implant environment, cell proliferation and osteogenic protein expression. The amount of peri-implant bone and bone in contact with the implant were significantly higher in L-WNT3A cases. Conclusions These data demonstrate L-WNT3A can induce peri-implant bone formation even in cases where fibrous encapsulation predominates. PMID:26718012

  20. Equipment of medical backpacks in mountain rescue.

    PubMed

    Elsensohn, Fidel; Soteras, Inigo; Resiten, Oliver; Ellerton, John; Brugger, Hermann; Paal, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a survey of equipment in medical backpacks for mountain rescuers and mountain emergency physicians. The aim was to investigate whether there are standards for medical equipment in mountain rescue organizations associated with the International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine (ICAR MEDCOM). A questionnaire was completed by 18 member organizations from 14 countries. Backpacks for first responders are well equipped to manage trauma, but deficiencies in equipment to treat medical emergencies were found. Paramedic and physicians' backpacks were well equipped to provide advanced life support and contained suitable drugs. We recommend that medical backpacks should be equipped in accordance with national laws, the medical emergencies in a given region, and take into account the climate, geography, medical training of rescuers, and funding of the organization. Automated external defibrillator provision should be improved. The effects of temperature on the drugs and equipment should be considered. Standards for training in the use and maintenance of medical tools should be enforced. First responders and physicians should only use familiar tools and drugs.

  1. Organizations of food redistribution and rescue.

    PubMed

    Mousa, T Y; Freeland-Graves, J H

    2017-09-06

    Food insecurity affects 13.4% of the USA population, despite the fact that 30-40% of all food is deposited in a landfill. Food rescue nutrition is the process of redistribution of surplus food to the impoverished. The aim of this study is to document the extent of involvement of organizations in food rescue nutrition. In this cross-sectional study, a survey about organizations involved in food rescue nutrition was developed, validated, and then tested. Directors of 100 organizations involved in food rescue nutrition from eight Southwestern States in the USA participated in this research. These organizations provided an average of 2 million kg of food to more than 40,000 clients each month. Food assistance programs had an average of eight workers and 3081 volunteers. In addition to food, these organizations provided other services such as clothing, clinical, and childcare. The agencies encountered several challenges, including lack of resources that resulted in reducing food portions and turning away clients. The extent of involvement of community-based programs in food rescue nutrition was strong in eight Southwestern states in the USA. Organizations involved in food redistribution helped alleviate food insecurity in their clients. Sustainability of these charitable networks was dependent on availability of resources and sufficient volunteers. Health professionals should encourage these organizations by providing support through donations of time, money, and/or food. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Rescue model for the bystanders' intervention in emergencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, H.-H.; Jung, W.-S.; Moon, H.-T.

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the effect of social interaction on the bystanders' intervention in emergency situations we introduce a rescue model which includes the effects of the victim's acquaintance with bystanders and those among bystanders. This model reproduces the surprising experimental result that the helping rate tends to decrease although the number of bystanders k increases. The model also shows that given the coupling effect among bystanders, for a certain range of small k the helping rate increases according to k and that coupling effect plays both positive and negative roles in emergencies.

  3. [Air rescue: current significance and practical issues].

    PubMed

    Schellhaaß, A; Popp, E

    2014-12-01

    Germany has a nationwide and powerful helicopter emergency medical services system (HEMS), which executes primary rescue missions and interhospital transfer of intensive care patients. In recent years the range of HEMS missions has become modified due to demographic changes and structural changes in the healthcare system. Furthermore, the number of HEMS missions is steadily increasing. If reasonably used air rescue contributes to desired reductions in overall preclinical time. Moreover, it facilitates prompt transport of patients to a hospital suitable for definitive medical care and treatment can be initiated earlier which is a particular advantage for severely injured and critically ill patients. Because of complex challenges during air rescue missions the qualifications of the HEMS personnel have to be considerably higher in comparison with ground based emergency medical services.

  4. Guidelines for rescue training of the lay public.

    PubMed

    Abrams, J I; Pretto, E A; Angus, D; Safar, P

    1993-01-01

    The fundamental goal of emergency medical response in disaster is to save lives and reduce injury and permanent disability. It has been observed that urgent emergency medical care of seriously injured earthquake casualties trapped under building rubble, cannot be provided unless the victims have been extricated and transported to medical facilities by friends or relatives, or are accessible to field rescue and medical teams. Equally important is the fact that extrication of seriously injured, trapped victims by laypersons is hazardous, unless the following conditions are met: 1) the rescuer has basic knowledge of extrication, and; 2) there is early application of effective life-supporting first-aid (LSFA) and/or advanced trauma life support (ATLS) at the scene. Time is the critical factor in such an effort. In previous studies of death and dying in earthquakes, it was noted that extrication of trapped victims will be attempted by survivors. Therefore, it is suggested that citizens living in regions of high seismic risk and trained in basic search and rescue and in LSFA are the most immediate resource for early response after an earthquake. An accompanying paper addresses the issue of citizen LSFA training. This paper focuses on the basic concepts of search and rescue training for the lay public.

  5. RESCU: A real space electronic structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud-Rioux, Vincent; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present RESCU, a powerful MATLAB-based Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) solver. We demonstrate that RESCU can compute the electronic structure properties of systems comprising many thousands of atoms using modest computer resources, e.g. 16 to 256 cores. Its computational efficiency is achieved from exploiting four routes. First, we use numerical atomic orbital (NAO) techniques to efficiently generate a good quality initial subspace which is crucially required by Chebyshev filtering methods. Second, we exploit the fact that only a subspace spanning the occupied Kohn-Sham states is required, and solving accurately the KS equation using eigensolvers can generally be avoided. Third, by judiciously analyzing and optimizing various parts of the procedure in RESCU, we delay the O (N3) scaling to large N, and our tests show that RESCU scales consistently as O (N2.3) from a few hundred atoms to more than 5000 atoms when using a real space grid discretization. The scaling is better or comparable in a NAO basis up to the 14,000 atoms level. Fourth, we exploit various numerical algorithms and, in particular, we introduce a partial Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm to achieve efficiency gains for systems comprising more than 10,000 electrons. We demonstrate the power of RESCU in solving KS-DFT problems using many examples running on 16, 64 and/or 256 cores: a 5832 Si atoms supercell; a 8788 Al atoms supercell; a 5324 Cu atoms supercell and a small DNA molecule submerged in 1713 water molecules for a total 5399 atoms. The KS-DFT is entirely converged in a few hours in all cases. Our results suggest that the RESCU method has reached a milestone of solving thousands of atoms by KS-DFT on a modest computer cluster.

  6. The Duty to Rescue and Investigators' Obligations.

    PubMed

    MacKay, Douglas; Rulli, Tina

    We examine current applications of the moral duty to rescue to justify clinical investigators' duties of ancillary care and standard of care to subjects in resource-poor settings. These applications fail to explain why investigators possess obligations to research participants, in particular, and not to people in need, in general. Further, these applications fail to recognize the normative significance of the institutional role of the investigators. We offer a positive account of the duty to rescue for investigators as institutional agents, with duties to populations rather than merely individuals.

  7. A novel rescue-tube device for in-water resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lungwitz, Yannick P; Nussbaum, Benedikt L; Paulat, Klaus; Muth, Claus-Martin; Kranke, Peter; Winkler, Bernd E

    2015-04-01

    In-water resuscitation (IWR) is recommended in the 2010 guidelines of the European Resuscitation Council. As IWR represents a physical challenge to the rescuer, a novel Rescue Tube device with an integrated "Oxylator" resuscitator might facilitate IWR. The aim of the present study was the assessment of IWR using the novel Rescue Tube device. Tidal and minute volumes were recorded using a modified Laerdal Resusci Anne mannequin. Furthermore, rescue time, water aspiration, submersions, and physical exertion were assessed. In this randomized cross-over trial, 17 lifeguards performed four rescue maneuvers over a 100-m distance in open water in random order: no ventilation (NV), mouth-to-mouth ventilation (MMV), Oxylator-aided mask ventilation (OMV), and Oxylator-aided laryngeal tube ventilation (OLTV). OLTV resulted in effective ventilation over the entire rescue distance with the highest mean minute volumes (NV 0, MMV 2.9, OMV 4.1, OLTV 7.6 L · min(-1)). NV was the fastest rescue maneuver while IWR prolonged the rescue maneuver independently of the method of ventilation (mean total rescue time: NV 217, MMV 280, OMV 292, OLTV 290 s). Aspiration of substantial amounts of water occurred only during MMV (mean NV 20, MMV 215, OMV 15, OLTV 6 ml). NV and OLTV were rated as moderately challenging by the lifeguards, whereas MMV and OMV were rated as substantially demanding on a 0-10 visual analog scale (NV 5.3, MMV 7.8, OMV 7.6, OLTV 5.9). The device might facilitate IWR by providing effective ventilation with minimal aspiration and by reducing physical effort. Another advantage is the possibility of delivering 100% oxygen.

  8. Medical Rescue of China International Search & Rescue Team (CISAR) in Nepal Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiong; Yang, Zhen; Lv, Qi; Liu, Hai-Feng; Ding, Hui; Yu, Meng-Yang; Zeng, Xi-Huan; Wang, Xin; Fan, Hao-Jun

    2016-05-18

    On April 25, 2015, a massive 8.1-magnitude earthquake struck Nepal at 2:11 pm (Beijing time). The 68-member-strong China International Search & Rescue Team (CISAR) left for Nepal at 6 am, April 26, to help with relief work. The CISAR was the first foreign team to rescue a survivor who was trapped beneath the rubble in the Gongabu area after the earthquake. On May 8, the team fulfilled the search-and-rescue mission and returned to Beijing. During the 2 weeks of rescue work, the team treated more than 3700 victims and cleared approximately 430 buildings. In this rescue mission, 10 experienced medical officers (including nine doctors and a nurse) from the General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Force (PAP) comprised the medical team of CISAR. In this report, we focus on the medical rescues by CISAR and discuss the characteristics of the medical rescue in Nepal. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 3).

  9. Genetic Deletion of Neuronal PPARγ Enhances the Emotional Response to Acute Stress and Exacerbates Anxiety: An Effect Reversed by Rescue of Amygdala PPARγ Function.

    PubMed

    Domi, Esi; Uhrig, Stefanie; Soverchia, Laura; Spanagel, Rainer; Hansson, Anita C; Barbier, Estelle; Heilig, Markus; Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Ubaldi, Massimo

    2016-12-14

    PPARγ is one of the three isoforms of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs). PPARγ is activated by thiazolidinediones such as pioglitazone and is targeted to treat insulin resistance. PPARγ is densely expressed in brain areas involved in regulation of motivational and emotional processes. Here, we investigated the role of PPARγ in the brain and explored its role in anxiety and stress responses in mice. The results show that stimulation of PPARγ by pioglitazone did not affect basal anxiety, but fully prevented the anxiogenic effect of acute stress. Using mice with genetic ablation of neuronal PPARγ (PPARγ(NestinCre)), we demonstrated that a lack of receptors, specifically in neurons, exacerbated basal anxiety and enhanced stress sensitivity. The administration of GW9662, a selective PPARγ antagonist, elicited a marked anxiogenic response in PPARγ wild-type (WT), but not in PPARγ(NestinCre) knock-out (KO) mice. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry, we observed that acute stress exposure resulted in a different pattern of neuronal activation in the amygdala (AMY) and the hippocampus (HIPP) of PPARγ(NestinCre) KO mice compared with WT mice. No differences were found between WT and KO mice in hypothalamic regions responsible for hormonal response to stress or in blood corticosterone levels. Microinjection of pioglitazone into the AMY, but not into the HIPP, abolished the anxiogenic response elicited by acute stress. Results also showed that, in both regions, PPARγ colocalizes with GABAergic cells. These findings demonstrate that neuronal PPARγ is involved the regulation of the stress response and that the AMY is a key substrate for the anxiolytic effect of PPARγ. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARγ) is a classical target for antidiabetic therapies with thiazolidinedione compounds. PPARγ agonists such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone are in clinical use for the treatment of insulin resistance. PPARγ has recently

  10. The Development and Application of Cellular Sensitivity Biomarkers for the Detection and Measurement of Toxic Effects in Normal and Malignant Cells From Patients Receiving High-Dose Meiphalan (L-PAM) With Autologous Peripheral Blood Progenitor Cell Rescue in the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    cells. Cancer Res., 49,511-511. Hercbergs A, F. Brok-Simoni, F. Holtzman, J. Bar-am, J.T. Leith and H.J. Brenner (1992) Erythrocyte glutathione and tumour ...Toxic Effects in Normal and Malignant Cells From Patients Receiving High-Dose Melphalan (L-PAM) With Autologous Peripheral Blood Peripheral Blood...Progenitor Cell Rescue in the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Atif M. Hussein, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Duke University

  11. Rescuing degrading aquifers in the Central Coastal Plain of North Carolina (USA): Just process, effective groundwater management policy, and sustainable aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Alex K.; Klein, Wendy A.

    2014-07-01

    Strategic management of degrading coastal aquifers in eastern North Carolina (USA) became imperative after a severe imbalance occurred between withdrawal and recharge rates. To ameliorate this growing problem, an aggressive water policy was developed through public input by creating the Central Coastal Plain Capacity Use Area (CCPCUA) to maintain beneficial use of groundwater resources. Insights from social psychology, and socio-legal studies are used to evaluate how procedural justice and public participation played major roles to resolving groundwater resource management problems. A mixed methods approach uses archival data and interviews with various rule-making participants to assess the process of stakeholder involvement that led to creation of the policy. In addition, data analysis techniques are utilized to evaluate the effects of the policy on aquifer health (through water levels) over a ˜10 year period. Results suggest that not only did a stakeholder group participate in a process that was deemed fair, understandable, and relatively easy to administer for users and regulators, but public participation resulted in an effective plan that ensures the long-term sustainable use of groundwater. Declining groundwater withdrawals and recovering water levels suggest that the rule is achieving its intended goal of protecting the aquifers from depletion and degradation. This paper touches on global themes that are essential to water demand and consumption, water management techniques, and water resources protection.

  12. 'We didn't know anything, it was a mess!' Emergent structures and the effectiveness of a rescue operation multi-team system.

    PubMed

    Fleştea, Alina Maria; Fodor, Oana Cătălina; Curşeu, Petru Lucian; Miclea, Mircea

    2017-01-01

    Multi-team systems (MTS) are used to tackle unpredictable events and to respond effectively to fast-changing environmental contingencies. Their effectiveness is influenced by within as well as between team processes (i.e. communication, coordination) and emergent phenomena (i.e. situational awareness). The present case study explores the way in which the emergent structures and the involvement of bystanders intertwine with the dynamics of processes and emergent states both within and between the component teams. Our findings show that inefficient transition process and the ambiguous leadership generated poor coordination and hindered the development of emergent phenomena within the whole system. Emergent structures and bystanders substituted leadership functions and provided a pool of critical resources for the MTS. Their involvement fostered the emergence of situational awareness and facilitated contingency planning processes. However, bystander involvement impaired the emergence of cross-understandings and interfered with coordination processes between the component teams. Practitioner Summary: Based on a real emergency situation, the present research provides important theoretical and practical insights about the role of bystander involvement in the dynamics of multi-team systems composed to tackle complex tasks and respond to fast changing and unpredictable environmental contingencies.

  13. Dynamics of evolutionary rescue in changing environments and the emergence of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Saddler, Clare A; Valckenborgh, Frank; Tanaka, Mark M

    2014-01-07

    Populations can go extinct when their environments deteriorate, but evolutionary rescue occurs when a shrinking population adapts to the new environmental conditions. The emergence of resistance from a drug sensitive bacterial population under treatment can be regarded as an instance of evolutionary rescue. Understanding evolutionary rescue in a particular context such as drug resistance requires knowledge of how the environment changes and how selection coefficients change as a result. In this study, we propose a model for evolutionary rescue under three different scenarios of environmental change: abrupt change, periodic fluctuation and gradual decay. The model makes use of the notion of reaction norms to describe fitness values that depend on both genotype and environmental state. We find that although drug sensitive bacterial populations may be large, allowing them to generate resistant mutants frequently, a harsh abrupt change due to the drug usually drives them extinct. Evolutionary rescue occurs far more frequently under the milder forms of environmental change we investigated. Rescue is favoured when the absolute fitnesses of individuals remain sufficiently high over the range of environment qualities experienced by the population. The minimum environment quality, which is inversely related to drug dose in the antibiotic context, is thus an important factor. Interestingly, in the periodic fluctuation model, the inter-dose period is less influential in promoting rescue through resistance unless the minimum environment quality is in a particular range. We also investigated fitness trade-offs across environments including the case of a resistant allele not subject to any trade-off (a "superbug"). This fitness trade-off affects the probability of rescue in decaying environments, but surprisingly has only a weak effect in the periodic fluctuation scenario. Finally, we use the model to show how niche construction, whereby organisms are the source of environmental

  14. Rescue efforts management and characteristics of casualties of the Wenchuan earthquake in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lulu; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yi

    2011-07-01

    On 12 May 2008, the Wenchuan earthquake, registering 8 on the Richter scale, hit the Sichuan province, China. Management of the rescue efforts and characteristics of casualties were studied. This is an observational descriptive study. Data were gathered from health services reports from the day of the earthquake on 12 May to 8 September 2008, as well as from field research. Information on the types of injuries from other studies of this earthquake was also reviewed. Casualties were concentrated in the hardest-hit areas of the province, and the number of deaths in those areas accounted for 77.10% of the total. Within the first 7 days, the types of injuries reported were mainly within the trauma/wound category (74.1-98.6%). After the seventh day, acute upper-respiratory-tract infections were the leading problem. Rescue forces included local, regional, military and foreign health personnel. The rescue work followed the principle of 'centralising the wounded, the experts, the resources, and the treatment,' and a three-level medical evacuation system was established. The Wenchuan medical rescue effort presented several problems. The experience is reflected in these points: (1) establish an effective command and communication centre to ensure that medical rescue resources are deployed in time; (2) treat the wounded within the first 7 days; (3) prepare healthcare resources for both surgical and general medicine services; (4) establish contingency rescue plans with a coordinated effort; (5) insist on the principles of triage and adopt flexible evacuation and transfer methods.

  15. The probability of evolutionary rescue: towards a quantitative comparison between theory and evolution experiments

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Guillaume; Aguilée, Robin; Ramsayer, Johan; Kaltz, Oliver; Ronce, Ophélie

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary rescue occurs when a population genetically adapts to a new stressful environment that would otherwise cause its extinction. Forecasting the probability of persistence under stress, including emergence of drug resistance as a special case of interest, requires experimentally validated quantitative predictions. Here, we propose general analytical predictions, based on diffusion approximations, for the probability of evolutionary rescue. We assume a narrow genetic basis for adaptation to stress, as is often the case for drug resistance. First, we extend the rescue model of Orr & Unckless (Am. Nat. 2008 172, 160–169) to a broader demographic and genetic context, allowing the model to apply to empirical systems with variation among mutation effects on demography, overlapping generations and bottlenecks, all common features of microbial populations. Second, we confront our predictions of rescue probability with two datasets from experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (bacterium). The tests show the qualitative agreement between the model and observed patterns, and illustrate how biologically relevant quantities, such as the per capita rate of rescue, can be estimated from fits of empirical data. Finally, we use the results of the model to suggest further, more quantitative, tests of evolutionary rescue theory. PMID:23209169

  16. The probability of evolutionary rescue: towards a quantitative comparison between theory and evolution experiments.

    PubMed

    Martin, Guillaume; Aguilée, Robin; Ramsayer, Johan; Kaltz, Oliver; Ronce, Ophélie

    2013-01-19

    Evolutionary rescue occurs when a population genetically adapts to a new stressful environment that would otherwise cause its extinction. Forecasting the probability of persistence under stress, including emergence of drug resistance as a special case of interest, requires experimentally validated quantitative predictions. Here, we propose general analytical predictions, based on diffusion approximations, for the probability of evolutionary rescue. We assume a narrow genetic basis for adaptation to stress, as is often the case for drug resistance. First, we extend the rescue model of Orr & Unckless (Am. Nat. 2008 172, 160-169) to a broader demographic and genetic context, allowing the model to apply to empirical systems with variation among mutation effects on demography, overlapping generations and bottlenecks, all common features of microbial populations. Second, we confront our predictions of rescue probability with two datasets from experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (bacterium). The tests show the qualitative agreement between the model and observed patterns, and illustrate how biologically relevant quantities, such as the per capita rate of rescue, can be estimated from fits of empirical data. Finally, we use the results of the model to suggest further, more quantitative, tests of evolutionary rescue theory.

  17. EMERGENCY VICTIM CARE AND RESCUE, INSTRUCTOR'S MANUAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORANDO, ROCCO V.; STOVER, WILBUR F.

    DEVELOPED AT THE STATE LEVEL BY SQUADMEN AND TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL PERSONNEL, THIS MANUAL IS FOR USE BY A QUALIFIED SQUADMAN IN TEACHING FULL-TIME AND VOLUNTEER EMERGENCY AND RESCUE WORKERS IN AN EMERGENCY SQUAD STATION OR TRAINING CENTER. TEACHING GUIDES ARE PROVIDED FOR A 30-HOUR COURSE ON EMERGENCY VICTIM CARE AND A 20-HOUR COURSE ON VICTIM…

  18. Rescuing Dogs in the Frederick Community | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Many Frederick National Lab employees have a favorite cause to which they volunteer a significant amount of time. For Dianna Kelly, IT program manager/scientific program analyst, Office of Scientific Operations, and Courtney Kennedy, associate technical project manager, Business Enterprise Systems, that cause is dog rescue.

  19. REM sleep rescues learning from interference.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Duggan, Katherine A; Mednick, Sara C

    2015-07-01

    Classical human memory studies investigating the acquisition of temporally-linked events have found that the memories for two events will interfere with each other and cause forgetting (i.e., interference; Wixted, 2004). Importantly, sleep helps consolidate memories and protect them from subsequent interference (Ellenbogen, Hulbert, Stickgold, Dinges, & Thompson-Schill, 2006). We asked whether sleep can also repair memories that have already been damaged by interference. Using a perceptual learning paradigm, we induced interference either before or after a consolidation period. We varied brain states during consolidation by comparing active wake, quiet wake, and naps with either non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM), or both NREM and REM sleep. When interference occurred after consolidation, sleep and wake both produced learning. However, interference prior to consolidation impaired memory, with retroactive interference showing more disruption than proactive interference. Sleep rescued learning damaged by interference. Critically, only naps that contained REM sleep were able to rescue learning that was highly disrupted by retroactive interference. Furthermore, the magnitude of rescued learning was correlated with the amount of REM sleep. We demonstrate the first evidence of a process by which the brain can rescue and consolidate memories damaged by interference, and that this process requires REM sleep. We explain these results within a theoretical model that considers how interference during encoding interacts with consolidation processes to predict which memories are retained or lost.

  20. REM sleep rescues learning from interference

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Elizabeth A.; Duggan, Katherine A.; Mednick, Sara C.

    2015-01-01

    Classical human memory studies investigating the acquisition of temporally-linked events have found that the memories for two events will interfere with each other and cause forgetting (i.e., interference; Wixted, 2004). Importantly, sleep helps consolidate memories and protect them from subsequent interference (Ellenbogen, Hulbert, Stickgold, Dinges, & Thompson-Schill, 2006). We asked whether sleep can also repair memories that have already been damaged by interference. Using a perceptual learning paradigm, we induced interference either before or after a consolidation period. We varied brain states during consolidation by comparing active wake, quiet wake, and naps with either non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM), or both NREM and REM sleep. When interference occurred after consolidation, sleep and wake both produced learning. However, interference prior to consolidation impaired memory, with retroactive interference showing more disruption than proactive interference. Sleep rescued learning damaged by interference. Critically, only naps that contained REM sleep were able to rescue learning that was highly disrupted by retroactive interference. Furthermore, the magnitude of rescued learning was correlated with the amount of REM sleep. We demonstrate the first evidence of a process by which the brain can rescue and consolidate memories damaged by interference, and that this process requires REM sleep. We explain these results within a theoretical model that considers how interference during encoding interacts with consolidation processes to predict which memories are retained or lost. PMID:25498222

  1. All-weather capability for rescue helicopters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreitmair-Steck, Wolfgang; Haisch, Stefan

    2001-08-01

    In Germany as well as in numerous other countries the air rescue system has been extended significantly since the first operation of the rescue helicopter Christoph 1. The primary target of the air rescue system was to guarantee fast and efficient emergency medical services for victims of accidents. During the years, the scope of the helicopter operations has been extended not only to other types of emergency medical services, but also to secondary medical services like the displacement of patients from hospitals to special service hospitals. While in general the displacement of patients is operated from well known and registered helipads, the primary rescue service currently has to rely on available onboard systems only. Those operations are risky and challenging for the pilots because of time pressure and the danger of obstacles in the environment of the helicopter. In addition, reduced visibility due to fog, rainfall or low light levels can further increase the risks or can make the services unavailable at all. Almost one decade ago, Eurocopter started the investigation of technologies and systems that could help the pilots to perform their tasks with reduced workload and risk, and to allow for a 24 h operation of helicopters irrespective of the weather conditions. After a number of preliminary studies, in 1995 the research program 'All-weather helicopter' has been started as a joint effort of Eurocopter and the supplier industry in Europe. The first phase of the program has been successfully completed in 1999 and the second phase is currently in progress.

  2. Combat Search and Rescue - Military Stepchild

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    development of combat search and rescue has dwindled to the point of being inconsequential. The corporate knowledge gained in Vietnam is over twenty years old... comnat conditions was then, and remains now, an important but dangerous one. The problems of successfully performing it remain as prevalent today as

  3. Emergency Medical Rescue in a Radiation Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Briesmeister, L.; Ellington, Y.; Hollis, R.; Kunzman, J.; McNaughton, M.; Ramsey, G.; Somers, B.; Turner, A.; Finn, J.

    1999-09-14

    Previous experience with emergency medical rescues in the presence of radiation or contamination indicates that the training provided to emergency responders is not always appropriate. A new course developed at Los Alamos includes specific procedures for emergency response in a variety of radiological conditions.

  4. Amphetamine-induced sensitization has little effect on multiple learning paradigms and fails to rescue mice with a striatal learning defect.

    PubMed

    Eldred, Kiara C; Palmiter, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants such as amphetamine (AMPH) is associated with synaptic modifications that are thought to underlie learning and memory. Because AMPH enhances extracellular dopamine in the striatum where dopamine and glutamate signaling are essential for learning, one might expect that the molecular and morphological changes that occur in the striatum in response to AMPH, including changes in synaptic plasticity, would affect learning. To ascertain whether AMPH sensitization affects learning, we tested wild-type mice and mice lacking NMDA receptor signaling in striatal medium spiny neurons in several different learning tests (motor learning, Pavlovian association, U-maze escape test with strategy shifting) with or without prior sensitization to AMPH. Prior sensitization had minimal effect on learning in any of these paradigms in wild-type mice and failed to restore learning in mutant mice, despite the fact that the mutant mice became sensitized by the AMPH treatment. We conclude that the changes in synaptic plasticity and many other signaling events that occur in response to AMPH sensitization are dissociable from those involved in learning the tasks used in our experiments.

  5. Rescuing Loading Induced Bone Formation at Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sundar; Ausk, Brandon J.; Prasad, Jitendra; Threet, Dewayne; Bain, Steven D.; Richardson, Thomas S.; Gross, Ted S.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing incidence of osteoporosis worldwide requires anabolic treatments that are safe, effective, and, critically, inexpensive given the prevailing overburdened health care systems. While vigorous skeletal loading is anabolic and holds promise, deficits in mechanotransduction accrued with age markedly diminish the efficacy of readily complied, exercise-based strategies to combat osteoporosis in the elderly. Our approach to explore and counteract these age-related deficits was guided by cellular signaling patterns across hierarchical scales and by the insight that cell responses initiated during transient, rare events hold potential to exert high-fidelity control over temporally and spatially distant tissue adaptation. Here, we present an agent-based model of real-time Ca2+/NFAT signaling amongst bone cells that fully described periosteal bone formation induced by a wide variety of loading stimuli in young and aged animals. The model predicted age-related pathway alterations underlying the diminished bone formation at senescence, and hence identified critical deficits that were promising targets for therapy. Based upon model predictions, we implemented an in vivo intervention and show for the first time that supplementing mechanical stimuli with low-dose Cyclosporin A can completely rescue loading induced bone formation in the senescent skeleton. These pre-clinical data provide the rationale to consider this approved pharmaceutical alongside mild physical exercise as an inexpensive, yet potent therapy to augment bone mass in the elderly. Our analyses suggested that real-time cellular signaling strongly influences downstream bone adaptation to mechanical stimuli, and quantification of these otherwise inaccessible, transient events in silico yielded a novel intervention with clinical potential. PMID:20838577

  6. Use of the visual range of detection to estimate effective sweep width for land search and rescue based on 10 detection experiments in North America.

    PubMed

    Koester, Robert J; Chiacchia, Kenneth B; Twardy, Charles R; Cooper, Donald C; Frost, John R; Robe, R Quincy

    2014-06-01

    Standard-of-practice search management requires that the probability of detection (POD) be determined for each search resource after a task. To calculate the POD, a detection index (W) is obtained by field experiments. Because of the complexities of the land environment, search planners need a way to estimate the value of W without conducting formal experiments. We demonstrate a robust empirical correlation between detection range (Rd) and W, and argue that Rd may reliably be used as a quick field estimate for W. We obtained the average maximum detection range (AMDR), Rd, and W values from 10 detection experiments conducted throughout North America. We measured the correlation between Rd and W, and tested whether the apparent relationship between W and Rd was statistically significant. On average we found W ≈ 1.645 × Rd with a strong correlation (R(2) = .827). The high-visibility class had W ≈ 1.773 × Rd (also R(2) = .867), the medium-visibility class had W ≈ 1.556 × Rd (R(2) = .560), and the low-visibility had a correction factor of 1.135 (R(2) = .319) for Rd to W. Using analysis of variance and post hoc testing, only the high- and low-visibility classes were significantly different from each other (P < .01). We also found a high correlation between the AMDR and Rd (R(2) = .9974). Although additional experiments are required for the medium- and low-visibility search objects and in the dry-domain ecoregion, we suggest search planners use the following correction factors to convert field-measured Rd to an estimate of the effective sweep width (W): high-visibility W = 1.8 × Rd; medium-visibility W = 1.6 × Rd; and low-visibility W = 1.1 × Rd. © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society Published by Wilderness Medical Society All rights reserved.

  7. 46 CFR 199.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nor its stowage arrangements will interfere with the operation of any survival craft at any other...) Each rescue boat must have a means provided for recharging the rescue boat batteries from the...

  8. ISS Update: Orion Recovery and Rescue Lead Tom Walker

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Tom Walker, Orion Recovery and Rescue Lead, about how the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is being used to train rescue and recovery personnel f...

  9. Point-of-care ultrasonography during rescue operations on board a Polish Medical Air Rescue helicopter

    PubMed Central

    Gałązkowski, Robert; Sobczyk, Dorota; Żyła, Zbigniew; Drwiła, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound examination has been increasingly widely used in pre-hospital care. The use of ultrasound in rescue medicine allows for a quick differential diagnosis, identification of the most important medical emergencies and immediate introduction of targeted treatment. Performing and interpreting a pre-hospital ultrasound examination can improve the accuracy of diagnosis and thus reduce mortality. The authors’ own experiences are presented in this paper, which consist in using a portable, hand-held ultrasound apparatus during rescue operations on board a Polish Medical Air Rescue helicopter. The possibility of using an ultrasound apparatus during helicopter rescue service allows for a full professional evaluation of the patient's health condition and enables the patient to be brought to a center with the most appropriate facilities for their condition. PMID:26674604

  10. Point-of-care ultrasonography during rescue operations on board a Polish Medical Air Rescue helicopter.

    PubMed

    Darocha, Tomasz; Gałązkowski, Robert; Sobczyk, Dorota; Żyła, Zbigniew; Drwiła, Rafał

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound examination has been increasingly widely used in pre-hospital care. The use of ultrasound in rescue medicine allows for a quick differential diagnosis, identification of the most important medical emergencies and immediate introduction of targeted treatment. Performing and interpreting a pre-hospital ultrasound examination can improve the accuracy of diagnosis and thus reduce mortality. The authors' own experiences are presented in this paper, which consist in using a portable, hand-held ultrasound apparatus during rescue operations on board a Polish Medical Air Rescue helicopter. The possibility of using an ultrasound apparatus during helicopter rescue service allows for a full professional evaluation of the patient's health condition and enables the patient to be brought to a center with the most appropriate facilities for their condition.

  11. Minimum-fuel rescue trajectories for the Extravehicular Excursion Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, W. T.; Neff, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of determining minimum-fuel trajectories for rescuing astronauts or equipment which become separated from a Space Station is addressed. Using the Clohessy-Wiltshire equations of relative motion and assuming impulsive Delta-Vs, the minimum-fuel rescue problem is shown to be a parameter optimization problem. Minimum-fuel rescue trajectories are found for seventeen test cases using a recursive quadratic programming algorithm. The results are analyzed and general rules for astronaut rescue and equipment retrieval are developed.

  12. Safety in alpine helicopter rescue operations--minimal requirements of alpine skills for rescue personnel.

    PubMed

    Küpper, Thomas; Hillebrandt, David; Steffgen, Juergen; Schöffl, Volker

    2013-11-01

    There is a lack of data to establish minimal requirements for technical alpine climbing skills needed by rescue teams involved in alpine helicopter rescue operations to perform such operations safely. A year of rescue operations (N = 2731) were investigated for the technical difficulties of the terrain. The difficulties were graded according to the Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme (UIAA) scale for rocky terrain and steepness for ice slopes. For 99.7% of the operations, the terrain could be accurately evaluated. In at least 30.7% of all rescue operations, personal advanced alpine climbing skills were required for the rescue personnel, and in 6.0%, the difficulties of the rocky terrain correspond to UIAA scale grade III with another 2.4% to UIAA grade IV or above. About 1.5% of all operations took place in ice faces steeper than 50°. To be able to manage 90% of all operations safely, all crew members, except the pilot, must be competent at climbing rock terrain of UIAA scale grade IV and ice of 50° steepness using appropriate rescue, rope, and belaying techniques. These recommendations include a technical safety margin for adverse conditions, such as bad weather.

  13. Resource Guide for Search and Rescue Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaValla, Patrick

    The bibliography about search and rescue training materials lists booklets, books, manuals, films, papers, periodicals, and pamphlets that treat many aspects of search and rescue situations: general, cave, disaster, and mountain rescues; strategy tactics; communications; knots and ropes; outdoor living; dogs; tracking; map and compass; survival;…

  14. Maryland Fire-Rescue Education and Training System. Organizational Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Fire-Rescue Education and Training Commission.

    This is a description of the Maryland system which was created to evaluate local fire-rescue education and training needs and capabilities and to assist local authorities with fire-rescue education and training. In the first of four parts, an historical presentation is used to identify and describe in general terms the state fire, rescue, and…

  15. 47 CFR 80.1125 - Search and rescue coordinating communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Search and rescue coordinating communications...) Operating Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1125 Search and rescue coordinating... responsible for controlling a search and rescue operation will also coordinate the distress traffic relating...

  16. 47 CFR 80.1125 - Search and rescue coordinating communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Search and rescue coordinating communications...) Operating Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1125 Search and rescue coordinating... responsible for controlling a search and rescue operation will also coordinate the distress traffic relating...

  17. 47 CFR 80.1125 - Search and rescue coordinating communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Search and rescue coordinating communications...) Operating Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1125 Search and rescue coordinating... responsible for controlling a search and rescue operation will also coordinate the distress traffic relating...

  18. 30 CFR 49.8 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.8 Section 49.8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines § 49.8 Training for...

  19. 30 CFR 49.8 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.8 Section 49.8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines § 49.8 Training for...

  20. 30 CFR 49.8 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.8 Section 49.8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines § 49.8 Training for...

  1. 30 CFR 49.2 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Availability of mine rescue teams. 49.2 Section 49.2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS § 49.2 Availability of mine rescue teams. (a) Except where...

  2. 30 CFR 49.12 - Availability of mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Availability of mine rescue teams. 49.12 Section 49.12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.12 Availability of mine...

  3. 30 CFR 49.8 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.8 Section 49.8 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS § 49.8 Training for mine rescue teams. (a) Prior to serving on a mine...

  4. 30 CFR 49.5 - Mine rescue station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mine rescue station. 49.5 Section 49.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS § 49.5 Mine rescue station. (a) Except where alternative compliance is permitted, every...

  5. 30 CFR 49.5 - Mine rescue station.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mine rescue station. 49.5 Section 49.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS § 49.5 Mine rescue station. (a) Except where alternative compliance is permitted, every...

  6. 30 CFR 49.18 - Training for mine rescue teams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Training for mine rescue teams. 49.18 Section 49.18 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.18 Training for mine...

  7. 46 CFR 131.855 - Lifeboats and rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lifeboats and rescue boats. 131.855 Section 131.855... Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.855 Lifeboats and rescue boats. (a) The following must be plainly marked or painted on each side of the bow of each lifeboat and rescue boat in block...

  8. 46 CFR 131.855 - Lifeboats and rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lifeboats and rescue boats. 131.855 Section 131.855... Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.855 Lifeboats and rescue boats. (a) The following must be plainly marked or painted on each side of the bow of each lifeboat and rescue boat in block...

  9. 46 CFR 199.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 199.140 Section 199.140... boats. (a) General. Rescue boats must be stowed— (1) To be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) In a position suitable for launching and recovery; (3) In a way that neither the rescue boat...

  10. 46 CFR 199.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 199.140 Section 199.140... boats. (a) General. Rescue boats must be stowed— (1) To be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) In a position suitable for launching and recovery; (3) In a way that neither the rescue boat...

  11. 46 CFR 131.855 - Lifeboats and rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lifeboats and rescue boats. 131.855 Section 131.855... Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.855 Lifeboats and rescue boats. (a) The following must be plainly marked or painted on each side of the bow of each lifeboat and rescue boat in block...

  12. 46 CFR 131.855 - Lifeboats and rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lifeboats and rescue boats. 131.855 Section 131.855... Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.855 Lifeboats and rescue boats. (a) The following must be plainly marked or painted on each side of the bow of each lifeboat and rescue boat in block...

  13. 46 CFR 199.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 199.140 Section 199.140... boats. (a) General. Rescue boats must be stowed— (1) To be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) In a position suitable for launching and recovery; (3) In a way that neither the rescue boat...

  14. 46 CFR 199.140 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 199.140 Section 199.140... boats. (a) General. Rescue boats must be stowed— (1) To be ready for launching in not more than 5 minutes. (2) In a position suitable for launching and recovery; (3) In a way that neither the rescue boat...

  15. 46 CFR 131.855 - Lifeboats and rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lifeboats and rescue boats. 131.855 Section 131.855... Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.855 Lifeboats and rescue boats. (a) The following must be plainly marked or painted on each side of the bow of each lifeboat and rescue boat in block...

  16. 47 CFR 80.1125 - Search and rescue coordinating communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Search and rescue coordinating communications...) Operating Procedures for Distress and Safety Communications § 80.1125 Search and rescue coordinating... Coordination Center responsible for controlling a search and rescue operation will also coordinate the...

  17. Resource Guide for Search and Rescue Training Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaValla, Patrick

    The bibliography about search and rescue training materials lists booklets, books, manuals, films, papers, periodicals, and pamphlets that treat many aspects of search and rescue situations: general, cave, disaster, and mountain rescues; strategy tactics; communications; knots and ropes; outdoor living; dogs; tracking; map and compass; survival;…

  18. 46 CFR 108.565 - Stowage of rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of rescue boats. 108.565 Section 108.565 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Lifesaving Equipment § 108.565 Stowage of rescue boats. (a) Rescue boats must be...

  19. Special article: rescue therapies for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linda L; Aldrich, J Matthew; Shimabukuro, David W; Sullivan, Kristina R; Taylor, John M; Thornton, Kevin C; Gropper, Michael A

    2010-09-01

    The recent H1N1 epidemic has resulted in a large number of deaths, primarily from acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. We reviewed the current strategies to rescue patients with severe hypoxemia. Included in these strategies are high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, airway pressure release ventilation, inhaled vasodilators, and the use of extracorporeal life support. All of these strategies are targeted at improving oxygenation, but improved oxygenation alone has yet to be demonstrated to correlate with improved survival. The risks and benefits of these strategies, including cost-effectiveness data, are discussed.

  20. Psychiatric disorders after terrorist bombings among rescue workers and bombing survivors in Nairobi and rescue workers in Oklahoma City.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gus; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Narayanan, Pushpa; Lee, Sungkyu; Thielman, Samuel; North, Carol S

    2016-02-01

    To examine the prevalence of psychopathology in 52 male rescue workers responding to the 1998 U.S. Embassy bombing in Nairobi, Kenya, comparing them with 176 male rescue workers responding to the 1995 Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, bombing and with 105 directly exposed male civilian survivors of the Nairobi bombing. The Diagnostic Interview Schedule/Disaster Supplement assessed pre-disaster and post-disaster psychiatric disorders and variables related to demographics, exposure, disaster perceptions, and coping in all 3 disaster subgroups. The most prevalent post-disaster disorders were posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (22%) and major depressive disorder (MDD) (27%) among Nairobi rescue workers, which were more than 2 and 4 times higher, respectively, than among Oklahoma City rescue workers. Alcohol use disorder was the most prevalent pre- and post-disaster disorder among Oklahoma City rescue workers. Nairobi rescue workers had a prevalence of PTSD and MDD not significantly different from Nairobi civilian survivors. Nairobi rescue workers were more symptomatic than Oklahoma City rescue workers and were as symptomatic as Nairobi civilian survivors. The vulnerability of Nairobi rescue workers to psychological sequelae may be a reflection of their volunteer, rather than professional, status. These findings contribute to understanding rescue worker mental health, especially among volunteer rescue workers, with potential implications for the importance of professional status of rescue workers in conferring protection from adverse mental health outcomes.

  1. Invited commentary: rescuing Robinson Crusoe.

    PubMed

    Oakes, J Michael

    2008-07-01

    Estimating the independent effect of "place" on health outcomes has proven quite difficult. In this issue of the Journal, Auchincloss and Diez Roux contribute a lucid introduction to agent-based simulation models and argue that they may be a fruitful alternative to current approaches to the problem. Insofar as conceptual understanding must precede empirical investigation, this author agrees. Given the obvious shortcoming of pure simulations, the key benefit of agent-based models lies in their ability to alter our thinking and/or theory. Among other things, the approach permits analysts to model (i.e., conceptualize) system dynamics, more realistic social treatment effects, endogenous contexts, and a more congenial image of human behavior.

  2. Issues in intelligent robots for search and rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Jennifer L.; Micire, Mark; Murphy, Robin R.

    2000-07-01

    Since the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing and Kobe, Japan, earthquake, robotics researchers have been considering search and rescue as a humanitarian research domain. The recent devastation in Turkey and Taiwan, compounded with the new Robocup Rescue and AAAI Urban Search and Rescue robot competition, may encourage more research. However, roboticists generally go not have access to domain experts: the emergency workers or first providers. This paper shares our understanding of urban search and rescue, based on our active research in this area and training sessions with rescue workers from the Hillsborough County (Florida) Fire Departments. The paper is intended to be a stepping stone for roboticists entering the field.

  3. Rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Beck-Fruchter, Ronit; Lavee, Michal; Weiss, Amir; Geslevich, Yoel; Shalev, Eliezer

    2014-03-01

    To assess the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of rescue intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in cases of fertilization failure, using a scientific literature search. Systematic review. Centers for reproductive care. Infertility patients with total or partial fertilization failure during an IVF cycle. An electronic literature search was performed in PubMed from 1992 through May 2013. The search was then expanded by using listed references from selected articles. Pregnancy rate. The secondary outcome measures were fertilization rate, normal fertilization rate, cleavage rate, birth rate, and malformation rate. Thirty-eight studies including 1,863 patients were included. The pooled pregnancy rate was 14.4%; 194 babies were delivered. Rescue ICSI can result in the delivery of a healthy newborn, although the pregnancy rates are low. The clinical evidence did not indicate an elevated rate of malformations, although the data are limited and incomplete. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Skylab rescue space vehicle flight readiness test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jevitt, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    A Skylab Rescue Space Vehicle flight readiness test is described which ensures that space vehicle systems are in a state of flight readiness and are compatible with associated ground support equipment. The functions of propellant loading, umbilical ejection, ignition, holddown arm release, liftoff, and service arm and tail service mast retraction are simulated. The test outline is presented along with a list of references, intercommunications information, operations interface control chart, and flight test.

  5. Combat Search and Rescue in Desert Storm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    literally thou- sands of airmen. It extensively documented what is now con- sidered the “ golden age” of rescue. This work is meant to follow in those...Bergan 23 Norwich 21 Tbird 56 Caesar 44 Jackal 11 Quicksand 12 Sunliner 403 Stroke 65 Clap 74 Newport 15 Corvette 03 Slate 46Stamford 01 Wolf 01...covered with AAA.52 CDR Bob Stumpf in the strike package remembered the scene. Seeing the glow stretching across the horizon and the “ golden BBs

  6. Rescuing Downed Aircrews: The Value of Time

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Warning and Control System C2 command and control CAS close air support CDF cumulative density function CSAR combat search and rescue FROG free...destroying Iraqi FROG (free rocket over ground) missile batteries. The aircraft was hit by a missile while engaging enemy forces and crashed into the...members were soon captured. 8. January 18, 1991, USMC OV-10: The aircraft was flying in Kuwait searching for targets, such as Iraqi artillery and FROG

  7. Lidar techniques for search and rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Four techniques for using LIDAR in Search and Rescue Operations will be discussed. The topic will include laser retroreflection, laser-induced fluorescence in the visible, laser-induced fluorescence during daylight hours, and laser-induced fluorescence in the uv. These techniques use high-repetition rate lasers at a variety of frequencies to induce either fluorescence in dye markers or retroreflection from plastic corner cubes on life preservers and other emergency markers.

  8. Medical considerations in the use of helicopters in mountain rescue.

    PubMed

    Tomazin, Iztok; Kovacs, Tim

    2003-01-01

    The outcome of patient care can be dramatically improved by bringing rapid rescue and medical care to the mountain rescue scene and by rapid transport to a medical facility. The use of a helicopter for these purposes is common. It is necessary when it has clear advantages for victims in comparison with ground rescue and transport. Helicopters should work within the existing emergency medical system and must be staffed by appropriate mountain rescue and medically trained personnel. Activation time should be as short as possible. Activation of a helicopter for a mountain rescue should primarily include indication and assessment of flight and safety conditions. No other mediators or delaying factors should be permitted. The main safety criteria are appropriate mountain rescue and flight training, competence of air and ground crews, radio communication between the air and ground crews, and mission briefing before the rescue. Criteria for a helicopter used for mountain rescue are proper medical and rescue equipment, load capacity, adequate space, and others. There are two main groups of indications for use of a helicopter for mountain rescue: the patient's condition and the circumstances at the site of the accident. All persons responsible for the activation of the helicopter rescue operation should be aware of specific problems in the mountains or wilderness.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations within avalanche rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiweger, Ingrid; Genswein, Manuel; Schweizer, Jürg

    2016-04-01

    Refining concepts for avalanche rescue involves calculating suitable settings for rescue strategies such as an adequate probing depth for probe line searches or an optimal time for performing resuscitation for a recovered avalanche victim in case of additional burials. In the latter case, treatment decisions have to be made in the context of triage. However, given the low number of incidents it is rarely possible to derive quantitative criteria based on historical statistics in the context of evidence-based medicine. For these rare, but complex rescue scenarios, most of the associated concepts, theories, and processes involve a number of unknown "random" parameters which have to be estimated in order to calculate anything quantitatively. An obvious approach for incorporating a number of random variables and their distributions into a calculation is to perform a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. We here present Monte Carlo simulations for calculating the most suitable probing depth for probe line searches depending on search area and an optimal resuscitation time in case of multiple avalanche burials. The MC approach reveals, e.g., new optimized values for the duration of resuscitation that differ from previous, mainly case-based assumptions.

  10. Big Data Cognition for City Emergency Rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Chen, Yongxin; Wang, Weisheng

    2016-11-01

    There are many kinds of data produced in the city daily life, which operates as an elementary component of the citizen life support system. The city unexpected incidents occurs in a seemingly unpredictable patterns. With the Big Data analysis the emergency rescue can be carried out efficiently. In this paper, the Big Data cognition for city emergency rescue is studied from four perspectives. From the data volume perspective, the spatial data analysis technology is divided into two parts, the indoor data and the outdoor data. From the data velocity perspective, the big data is collected from the eyes in the sky and objects on-the-ground networks, together with demographic data. From the data variety analysis perspective, the population distribution data, the socio-economic data and model estimates are included. From the data value mining perspective, the crime model estimates are studied. In the end, the application in the big public venues emergency rescue is introduced, which is located in Urumqi, Xinjiang, China.

  11. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team removes a crew member from a mock Shuttle. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters later are used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise concluded with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  12. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the simulated rescue mission, the KSC response team takes part in the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercised all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters later are used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise concluded with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.'

  13. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility, the KSC response team removes a Shuttle 'crew' member from the mock orbiter. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters later are used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise concluded with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  14. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility, the KSC response team removes a Shuttle 'crew' member from the mock orbiter. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters later are used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise concluded with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  15. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team removes a crew member from a mock Shuttle. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters later are used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise concluded with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  16. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the simulated rescue mission, the KSC response team takes part in the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercised all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters later are used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise concluded with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.'

  17. Hypoxaemic rescue therapies in acute respiratory distress syndrome: Why, when, what and which one?

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Carol; Carteaux, Guillaume; Tuxen, David V; Davies, Andrew R; Pellegrino, Vin; Capellier, Gilles; Cooper, David J; Nichol, Alistair

    2013-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an inflammatory condition of the lungs which can result in refractory and life-threatening hypoxaemic respiratory failure. The risk factors for the development of ARDS are many but include trauma, multiple blood transfusions, burns and major surgery, therefore this condition is not uncommon in the severely injured patient. When ARDS is severe, high-inspired oxygen concentrations are frequently required to minimise hypoxaemia. In these situations clinicians commonly utilise interventions termed 'hypoxaemic rescue therapies' in an attempt to improve oxygenation, as without these, conventional mechanical ventilation can be associated with high mortality. However, their lack of efficacy on mortality when used prophylactically in generalised ARDS cohorts has resulted in their use being confined to clinical trials and the subset of ARDS patients with refractory hypoxaemia. First line hypoxaemic rescue therapies include inhaled nitric oxide, prone positioning, alveolar recruitment manoeuvres and high frequency oscillatory ventilation, which have all been shown to be effective in improving oxygenation. In situations where these first line rescue therapies are inadequate extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation has emerged as a lifesaving second line rescue therapy. Rescue therapies in critically ill patients with traumatic injuries presents specific challenges and requires careful assessment of both the short and longer term benefits, therapeutic limitations, and specific adverse effects before their use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rescue of tau-induced synaptic transmission pathology by paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Erez, Hadas; Shemesh, Or A.; Spira, Micha E.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological studies of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other tauopathies have revealed that the onset of cognitive decline correlates better with synaptic dysfunctions than with hallmark pathologies such as extracellular amyloid-β plaques, intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau or neuronal loss. Recent experiments have also demonstrated that anti-cancer microtubule (MT)-stabilizing drugs can rescue tau-induced behavioral decline and hallmark neuron pathologies. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying tau-induced synaptic dysfunction as well as those involved in the rescue of cognitive decline by MTs-stabilizing drugs remain unclear. Here we began to study these mechanisms using the glutaminergic sensory-motoneuron synapse derived from Aplysia ganglia, electrophysiological methods, the expression of mutant-human tau (mt-htau) either pre or postsynaptically and the antimitotic drug paclitaxel. Expression of mt-htau in the presynaptic neurons led to reduced excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) amplitude generated by rested synapses within 3 days of mt-htau expression, and to deeper levels of homosynaptic depression. mt-htau-induced synaptic weakening correlated with reduced releasable presynaptic vesicle pools as revealed by the induction of asynchronous neurotransmitter release by hypertonic sucrose solution. Paclitaxel totally rescued tau-induced synaptic weakening by maintaining the availability of the presynaptic vesicle stores. Postsynaptic expression of mt-htau did not impair the above described synaptic-transmission parameters for up to 5 days. Along with earlier confocal microscope observations from our laboratory, these findings suggest that tau-induced synaptic dysfunction is the outcome of impaired axoplasmic transport and the ensuing reduction in the releasable presynaptic vesicle stores rather than the direct effects of mt-htau or paclitaxel on the synaptic release mechanisms. PMID:24574970

  19. ESA innovation rescues Ultraviolet Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-10-01

    experience to have the opportunity to do an in-depth review of operational procedures established in 1978 and be given the chance to streamline these through the application of the tools available to engineers and scientists in 1995." The innovative arrangements were designed and developed at the ESA IUE Observatory, which is located in Spain at ESA's Villafranca Satellite Tracking Station in Villanueva de la Canada near Madrid. As a result, ESA is now performing all of WE's science observations (16 hours per day) from the Villafranca station. All the processing of the observations transmitted by the satellite and the subsequent rapid data distribution to the research scientists world-wide is now done from Villafranca. NASA does maintain its role in the programme in the area of operational spacecraft maintenance support, satellite communications and data re-processing for IUE's Final Archive. Thus the IUE Project could be extended and the final IUE observing program can now be implemented. In particular, this will involve critical studies on comets (e,g. on Comet Hale-Bopp), on stellar wind structures, on the enigmatic mini-quasars (which are thought to power the nuclei of Active Galaxies), as well as performing pre- studies which will optimize the utilization of the Hubble Space Telescope. Prof. R.M. Bonnet, Director of the ESA Science Programme comments "I am quite pleased that we have been able to secure the extension of our support for the scientists in Europe and the world to this highly effective mission. Also the scientists can be proud of the utilization of IUE, with more than 3000 learned publications and 200 Doctoral dissertations based on data from IUE. Through this they demonstrate in turn to be very appreciative of our efforts in the Science Programme".

  20. Rescue microsurgery with bypass and stent removal following Pipeline treatment of a giant internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Christian A; Taussky, Philip; Park, Min S; Neil, Jayson A; Couldwell, William T

    2015-12-01

    We report the microsurgical rescue and removal of a Pipeline stent embolization of a giant internal carotid artery terminus aneurysm. After the initial placement of a Pipeline Embolization Device (PED), it migrated proximally to the cavernous carotid with the distal end free in the middle of the aneurysm, resulting in only partial aneurysm neck coverage. The patient underwent microsurgical rescue with trapping, bypass, and opening of the aneurysm with PED removal. The vessel remained patent in the proximal segment previously covered by the Pipeline stent. Microsurgical rescue for definitive aneurysm treatment with PED removal can be safe and effective for aneurysms unsuccessfully treated with PED.

  1. [Present status and future prospects of third line rescue regimens for H. pylori infection].

    PubMed

    Furuta, Takahisa; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Uotani, Takahiro; Sahara, Shu; Ichikawa, Hitomi

    2013-08-01

    Recent reports have suggested that the candidates of the third rescue regimens for H. pylori infection in Japan are fluoroquinolone-based regimens and the dual therapy with high doses of proton pump inhibitor and amoxicillin. Of fluoroquinolones, sitafloxacin has the strong anti-H. pylori effect as AMPC has and is effective for strains resistant to levofloxacin. Sitafloxacin-based regimens have been reported to yield relatively sufficient eradication rates as the third line therapy. The dual therapy with high doses of proton pump inhibitor and amoxicillin has also been reported to attain the sufficient rescue rates. To achieve the high rescue eradication rates, the eradication regimens must be designed based on well-understanding of reasons for eradication failure, such as the resistance patterns of the bacteria, and the pharmacological characteristics of agents used for H. pylori eradication therapy.

  2. Rescue pallidotomy for dystonia through implanted deep brain stimulation electrode

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric; Taira, Takaomi; Hariz, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS), where removal of implants is indicated due to hardware related infections, are not candidates for later re-implantation. In these patients a rescue lesion through the DBS electrode has been suggested as an option. In this case report we present a patient where a pallidotomy was performed using the DBS electrode. Case Description: An elderly woman with bilateral Gpi DBS suffered an infection around the left burr hole involving the DBS electrode. A unilateral lesion was performed through the DBS electrode before it was removed. No side effects were encountered. Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) dystonia movement scale score was 39 before DBS. With DBS before lesioning BFM score was 2.5 points. The replacement of the left sided stimulation with a pallidotomy resulted in only a minor deterioration of the score to 5 points. Conclusions: In the case presented here a small pallidotomy performed with the DBS electrode provided a satisfactory effect on the patient's dystonic symptoms. Thus, rescue lesions through the DBS electrodes, although off-label, might be considered in patients with Gpi DBS for dystonia when indicated. PMID:27990311

  3. Genetic rescue and inbreeding depression in Mexican wolves.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Richard J; Siminski, Peter; Woolf, Melissa; Hedrick, Philip W

    2007-09-22

    Although inbreeding can reduce individual fitness and contribute to population extinction, gene flow between inbred but unrelated populations may overcome these effects. Among extant Mexican wolves (Canis lupus baileyi), inbreeding had reduced genetic diversity and potentially lowered fitness, and as a result, three unrelated captive wolf lineages were merged beginning in 1995. We examined the effect of inbreeding and the merging of the founding lineages on three fitness traits in the captive population and on litter size in the reintroduced population. We found little evidence of inbreeding depression among captive wolves of the founding lineages, but large fitness increases, genetic rescue, for all traits examined among F1 offspring of the founding lineages. In addition, we observed strong inbreeding depression among wolves descended from F1 wolves. These results suggest a high load of deleterious alleles in the McBride lineage, the largest of the founding lineages. In the wild, reintroduced population, there were large fitness differences between McBride wolves and wolves with ancestry from two or more lineages, again indicating a genetic rescue. The low litter and pack sizes observed in the wild population are consistent with this genetic load, but it appears that there is still potential to establish vigorous wild populations.

  4. A novel method for tissue-specific RNAi rescue in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Joachim G; David, Guido; Hassan, Bassem A

    2009-07-01

    Targeted gene silencing by RNA interference allows the study of gene function in plants and animals. In cell culture and small animal models, genetic screens can be performed--even tissue-specifically in Drosophila--with genome-wide RNAi libraries. However, a major problem with the use of RNAi approaches is the unavoidable false-positive error caused by off-target effects. Until now, this is minimized by computational RNAi design, comparing RNAi to the mutant phenotype if known, and rescue with a presumed ortholog. The ultimate proof of specificity would be to restore expression of the same gene product in vivo. Here, we present a simple and efficient method to rescue the RNAi-mediated knockdown of two independent genes in Drosophila. By exploiting the degenerate genetic code, we generated Drosophila RNAi Escape Strategy Construct (RESC) rescue proteins containing frequent silent mismatches in the complete RNAi target sequence. RESC products were no longer efficiently silenced by RNAi in cell culture and in vivo. As a proof of principle, we rescue the RNAi-induced loss of function phenotype of the eye color gene white and tracheal defects caused by the knockdown of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan. Our data suggest that RESC is widely applicable to rescue and validate ubiquitous or tissue-specific RNAi and to perform protein structure-function analysis.

  5. Prediction of cancer rescue p53 mutants in silico using Naïve Bayes learning methodology.

    PubMed

    Ramani, R Geetha; Jacob, Shomona Gracia

    2013-11-01

    This research is focussed on predicting through Naïve Bayes learning, the possible p53 rescue mutants from amino-acid substitutions at the second, third and fourth site recombination that could reinstate normal p53 activity. The Naïve Bayes probability values of the amino-acid substitutions at the respective site-wise recombination were utilized to formulate the proposed Genetic Mutant Marker Extraction (GMME) technique that could unearth the hot spot cancer, strong rescue and weak rescue mutants. The p53 mutation records depicting the amino-acid substitutions obtained by yeast assays comprising of nearly 16,700 records, available at the University of California, Machine Learning Repository, were utilized as the training dataset for the GMME technique. The proposed GMME technique revealed the hot spot cancer mutants, strong rescue and weak rescue mutants leading to the detection of probable genetic markers for Cancer prediction from the surface regions 96-289 constituting the second, third and fourth site recombinations. Thus far, computational approaches have been able to predict rescue markers at region-specific mutations (96-105, 114-123, 130-156 and 223- 232) with respect to the second site recombination for three hot spot cancer mutants only viz, P152L, R158L and G245S. The GMME technique aimed at predicting possible rescue markers for p53 mutants at the second, third and fourth site recombinations revealing novel rescue markers for fourteen hot spot cancer mutants. Moreover, the GMME technique can be extended effectively to increasing number of recombinant sites that can be efficiently utilized to predict novel rescue markers.

  6. Efficient post-disaster patient transportation and transfer: experiences and lessons learned in emergency medical rescue in Aceh after the 2004 Asian tsunami.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Hui; Zheng, Jing-Chen

    2014-08-01

    This descriptive study aimed to present experiences and lessons learned in emergency medical rescue after the 2004 Asian tsunami in terms of transportation and transfer of patients and coordination of medical rescue forces. After the tsunami, numerous rescue institutions and international organizations rushed to Aceh province to aid in the rescue work. To coordinate various aspects of medical rescue efforts, an airport-based joint patient transfer center was developed. Within the framework of the joint transport center, rescue teams, militaries, and international institutions worked together to jointly triage, rapidly treat, and transfer patients. As members of the Chinese International Search and Rescue team, we were involved in the rescue efforts in the joint patient transfer center, and treated and transferred a total of 217 injured patients, the majority of whom were triaged as level II, followed by level III, and level I. The top three diseases were trauma/wound infection, respiratory system disease, and digestive system disease. The airport-based joint patient transfer center provided an efficient mechanism for successfully coordinating various aspects of the medical rescue efforts to transfer patients. Large-scale air transport, available health resources, and effective triage criteria also played an essential role in patient transportation and transfer.

  7. Antenatal corticosteroid timing: accuracy after the introduction of a rescue course protocol.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Neeta K; Tronnes, Ashlie A; Dunlap, Benjamin S; Schulkin, Jay; Lannon, Sophia M

    2016-01-01

    Antenatal corticosteroid administration is a critical fetal intervention, and the use of a rescue protocol is now standard practice. Rescue antenatal corticosteroid may improve overall accuracy of antenatal corticosteroid administration timing, but this observation and its effect on the initial course is unknown. We sought to compare the accuracy of antenatal corticosteroid administration before and after the implementation of a rescue antenatal corticosteroid protocol. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who received a minimum of 1 dose of antenatal corticosteroid from 2006-2012 at the University of Washington Medical Center with the use of the University of Washington Medical Center Pharmacy Database. For inclusion, subjects were required to be admitted, receive the initial antenatal corticosteroid course at 24-34 weeks gestation, and deliver at University of Washington Medical Center. We designated 2 groups that were based on when rescue antenatal corticosteroid became standard practice at University of Washington Medical Center: before rescue antenatal corticosteroid (2006-2008) and after rescue antenatal corticosteroid (2009-2012). Primary outcome was delivery within any optimal antenatal corticosteroid window, which was defined as 48 hours to 7 days after the first dose or third dose. We also compared delivery within the optimal window of the initial and rescue antenatal corticosteroid courses independently and assessed antenatal corticosteroid timing by the indication for delivery. Chi squared and independent sample t-tests were used to compare results. From 2006-2012, 1356 women met inclusion criteria, 601 before and 755 after rescue antenatal corticosteroid. The study groups demonstrated similar demographics, with the exception of more white women in the group after rescue antenatal corticosteroid (47% vs 60%; P < .01) and delivered at comparable gestational ages (32.7 vs 32.6 weeks; P = .59). Availability of a second course did not

  8. Biobotic insect swarm based sensor networks for search and rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, Alper; Lobaton, Edgar; Sichitiu, Mihail; Hedrick, Tyson; Latif, Tahmid; Dirafzoon, Alireza; Whitmire, Eric; Verderber, Alexander; Marin, Juan; Xiong, Hong

    2014-06-01

    The potential benefits of distributed robotics systems in applications requiring situational awareness, such as search-and-rescue in emergency situations, are indisputable. The efficiency of such systems requires robotic agents capable of coping with uncertain and dynamic environmental conditions. For example, after an earthquake, a tremendous effort is spent for days to reach to surviving victims where robotic swarms or other distributed robotic systems might play a great role in achieving this faster. However, current technology falls short of offering centimeter scale mobile agents that can function effectively under such conditions. Insects, the inspiration of many robotic swarms, exhibit an unmatched ability to navigate through such environments while successfully maintaining control and stability. We have benefitted from recent developments in neural engineering and neuromuscular stimulation research to fuse the locomotory advantages of insects with the latest developments in wireless networking technologies to enable biobotic insect agents to function as search-and-rescue agents. Our research efforts towards this goal include development of biobot electronic backpack technologies, establishment of biobot tracking testbeds to evaluate locomotion control efficiency, investigation of biobotic control strategies with Gromphadorhina portentosa cockroaches and Manduca sexta moths, establishment of a localization and communication infrastructure, modeling and controlling collective motion by learning deterministic and stochastic motion models, topological motion modeling based on these models, and the development of a swarm robotic platform to be used as a testbed for our algorithms.

  9. GIS plays key role in NYC Rescue and Relief Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    New York City, Sept. 17—The posters of missing loved ones are pasted onto New York City walls and street signs six days after 2 hijacked commercial airlines destroyed the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan on September 11. Several miles uptown from “ground zero,” heightened security hovers around the city's Office of Emergency Management rescue and relief command center, an around-the-clock operation. Police, firefighters, military, officials with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, communications technicians, and a beehive of others work in controlled chaos in this cavernous, convention center-sized hall, lined with computers and adorned with several American flags.After the original command center at 7 World Trade Center collapsed to rubble as an after-effect of the plane strikes, city officials scrambled to recreate it. Alan Leidner, director of New York's citywide geographic information systems (GIS), and who is with the Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications, knew that maps would be an integral component of the rescue and relief efforts. Maps provide emergency workers and others with accurate and detailed scientific data in the form of visual aids upon which they can make informed decisions.

  10. Rescue of failed filtering blebs with ab interno trephination.

    PubMed

    Shihadeh, Wisam A; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of ab interno automated trephination as a technique for rescuing failed mature filtering blebs. A retrospective chart review of 40 failed blebs of 38 patients who had a posttrephination follow-up period of at least 3 months was done. With success defined as intraocular pressure (IOP) <21 mm Hg and at least a 20% reduction from baseline on the same or fewer number of pretrephination medications, 30/40 eyes (75%) fit these criteria over the entire course of follow-up. Among all 40 eyes, there was a significant reduction of IOP from pretrephination to 3 months (P<.001). The percentage of patients requiring 2 or more medications declined from 90% pretrephination to 21% at 3 months (P<.0001), and was stable thereafter. Some patients were able to eliminate all medications. Patients who did not meet the criteria of success regained successful IOP control with other modalities of management. Complications were few. We believe that ab interno trephination is an excellent option for rescuing selected failed filtering blebs.

  11. Hybrid wireless sensor network for rescue site monitoring after earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Wang, Shuo; Tang, Chong; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Hu, Weijian; Tan, Min; Gao, Bowei

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses the design of a low-cost, low-complexity, and rapidly deployable wireless sensor network (WSN) for rescue site monitoring after earthquakes. The system structure of the hybrid WSN is described. Specifically, the proposed hybrid WSN consists of two kinds of wireless nodes, i.e., the monitor node and the sensor node. Then the mechanism and the system configuration of the wireless nodes are detailed. A transmission control protocol (TCP)-based request-response scheme is proposed to allow several monitor nodes to communicate with the monitoring center. UDP-based image transmission algorithms with fast recovery have been developed to meet the requirements of in-time delivery of on-site monitor images. In addition, the monitor node contains a ZigBee module that used to communicate with the sensor nodes, which are designed with small dimensions to monitor the environment by sensing different physical properties in narrow spaces. By building a WSN using these wireless nodes, the monitoring center can display real-time monitor images of the monitoring area and visualize all collected sensor data on geographic information systems. In the end, field experiments were performed at the Training Base of Emergency Seismic Rescue Troops of China and the experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the monitor system.

  12. Rescue of keratin 18/19 doubly deficient mice using aggregation with tetraploid embryos.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Michael; Watson, Erica D; Schwaluk, Tanja; Magin, Thomas M

    2005-03-01

    We have previously shown that the targeted deletions of both type I keratins (K) 18 and 19 cause lethality by embryonic day (e) 9.5 due to fragility and cytolysis of trophoblast giant cells. The development of the embryo proper appeared to be unaffected and its death was caused by nutrient deficiency. In order to address the function of keratins within the embryo proper, lethality due to extraembryonic tissue failure must be overcome. One approach to rescue doubly deficient embryos is by aggregating knockout embryos with tetraploid wild-type embryos. As a general tool, tetraploid aggregation can be used to rescue embryonic lethality caused by defects in extraembryonic tissues like the placenta, trophoblast or yolk sac. We rescued K18-/- K19-/- embryos until e11.5, using this approach, proving that the loss of the keratin cytoskeleton causes defects in the trophoblast giant cell layer, but has no effect on early development of the embryo proper.

  13. Retrospective on the construction and practice of a state-level emergency medical rescue team.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhang; Haitao, Guo; Xin, Wang; Yundou, Wang

    2014-10-01

    For the past few years, disasters like earthquakes, landslides, mudslides, tsunamis, and traffic accidents have occurred with an ever-growing frequency, coverage, and intensity greatly beyond the expectation of the public. In order to respond effectively to disasters and to reduce casualties and property damage, countries around the world have invested more efforts in the theoretical study of emergency medicine and the construction of emergency medical rescue forces. Consequently, emergency medical rescue teams of all scales and types have come into being and have played significant roles in disaster response work. As the only state-level emergency medical rescue force from the Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, the force described here has developed, through continuous learning and practice, a characteristic mode in terms of grouping methods, equipment system construction, and training.

  14. Depressed Myocardial Contractility: Can It Be Rescued?

    PubMed

    Weber, Karl T

    2016-10-01

    Current dogma suggests patients with advanced systolic heart failure have an irreversible depression in myocardial contractility. Recent experience with improved ventricular function during continuous flow ventricular assist devices used as destination therapy would suggest otherwise. Herein, cellular and molecular signaling involved in reversing depressed myocardial contractility would be addressed. This includes cardiomyocyte thyroid hormone signaling responsible for the reexpression of fetal gene program that preserves cell efficiency (work and energy consumed) and the rescue of an endogenous population of atrophic myocytes bordering on microdomains of fibrosis to improve contractile mass. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. National Search and Rescue Manual. Addendum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    1 . Purpose: This notice provides a change to subject addendum. S 2 . Discussion: This change provides the following revisions ...1933 U. S . COAST GUARD ADDENDUM TO THE NATIONAL SEARCH AND RESCUE MANUAL " AUG I 2 1978 CG-308 * LETTER OF PROMULGATION 1 . Prpose The Coast Guard...NOT above 500 feet or 180 not. cc S " (CO M10) 1 - 2 C4-7 011.4135 TARGET 3 4 SWIND FIGURE 2 STANDARD DROP PATTERN FOR FREE FALL DELIVERY (Upwind

  16. Search and rescue with serpentine robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choset, Howie M.; Hull, Douglas; Luntz, Jonathan E.; Shammas, Ellie; Rached, Tarek; Dent, Christina C.

    2000-07-01

    Serpentine robots offer advantages over traditional mobile robots and robot arms because they have enhanced flexibility and reachability; especially in convoluted environments. These mechanisms are especially well suited for search and rescue operations where making contact with surviving victims trapped in a collapsed building is essential. The same flexibility that makes serpentine robots incredibly useful also makes them difficult to design and control. This paper will describe the current status of serpentine robot design and path planning underway in our research group and point towards future directions of research.

  17. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices lifting an injured crew member to an Air Force HH-60 helicopter for transport to a local hospital. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to reach and prepare the 'crew' five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker -- for preliminary triage. The exercise will conclude with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  18. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the woods next to the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team takes part in training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters later are used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise concluded with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  19. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices carrying an injured crew member to an Air Force HH-60 helicopter for transport to a local hospital. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to reach the site, drop emergency equipment and later remove the 'crew' five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  20. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices carrying an injured crew member to an Air Force HH-60 helicopter for transport to a local hospital. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to reach the site, drop emergency equipment and later remove the 'crew' five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  1. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices lifting an injured crew member to an Air Force HH-60 helicopter for transport to a local hospital. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to reach and prepare the 'crew' five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker -- for preliminary triage. The exercise will conclude with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  2. Survey of space escape/rescue/survivability capabilities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleisig, R.; Bolger, P. H.; Heath, G. W.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of preventive or remedial systems to achieve safer space flight operations. Escape, rescue, and survival systems are defined by categories: on board, prepositioned aid, and earth-launched concepts. The survey considers separable escape or survival capsules; standby escape or rescue systems; and earth-launched manned and unmanned rescue systems. Reports covering such systems are listed, and the contents are classified as to scope of investigation, space mission, and design approach. Mission classes considered are earth orbit, lunar, and interplanetary. Results of the space escape, rescue, and survivability investigations are summarized in terms of system features and performance, including apparent voids or limitations in rescue capability. Recovery requirements and resources for space rescue are discussed.

  3. Failure to rescue patients from early critical complications of oesophagogastric cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weledji, Elroy P.; Verla, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    ‘Failure to rescue’ is a significant cause of mortality in gastrointestinal surgery. Differences in mortality between high and low-volume hospitals are not associated with large difference in complication rates but to the ability of the hospital to effectively rescue patients from the complications. We reviewed the critical complications following surgery for oesophageal and gastric cancer, their prevention and reasons for failure to rescue. Strategies focussing on perioperative optimization, the timely recognition and management of complications may be essential to improving outcome in low-volume hospitals. PMID:27054032

  4. Who is going to rescue the rescuers? Post-traumatic stress disorder among rescue workers operating in Greece during the European refugee crisis.

    PubMed

    Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Chatzea, Vasiliki-Eirini; Vlachaki, Sofia-Aikaterini; Melidoniotis, Evangelos; Pistolla, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    During the European refugee crisis, numerous Greek and international rescue workers are operating in Lesvos, offering search, rescue, and first aid services. Exposure to stressful life events while engaging in this rescue work can result in developing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The study aimed to assess the prevalence of PTSD and explore potential differences between different categories of rescuers. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 217 rescue workers. Participants were grouped according to affiliation: "Greek Professionals Rescuers/GPR", "International Professionals Rescuers/IPR" and "Volunteer Rescuers/VR". The PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) was utilized. All tests were two-tailed (a = 0.05). Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, and multivariate logistic regression were performed. Overall probable PTSD prevalence found was 17.1%. Rates varied significantly per rescuer's category; 23.1% in GPR, 11.8% in IPR, and 14.6% in VR (p = 0.02). GPR demonstrated the highest risk compared to IPR and VR (p < 0.001). Females had approximately two times higher risk. Other significant risk factors included marital status, age, and number of children. Lack of previous experience, longer operation period, longer shift hours, and handling dead refugees and dead children were also considered major risk factors. Rescue workers providing substantial aid to the refugees and migrants at Lesvos experience significant psychological distress. The present findings indicate the urgent need for targeted interventions. Further studies are needed to address long-term effects of the refugee crisis on rescuers, and explore effective measures to prevent PTSD.

  5. Structure-function relationships in the hammerhead ribozyme probed by base rescue.

    PubMed Central

    Peracchi, A; Matulic-Adamic, J; Wang, S; Beigelman, L; Herschlag, D

    1998-01-01

    We previously showed that the deleterious effects from introducing abasic nucleotides in the hammerhead ribozyme core can, in some instances, be relieved by exogenous addition of the ablated base and that the relative ability of different bases to rescue catalysis can be used to probe functional aspects of the ribozyme structure [Peracchi et al., Proc NatAcad Sci USA 93:11522]. Here we examine rescue at four additional positions, 3, 9, 12 and 13, to probe transition state interactions and to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of base rescue as a tool for structure-function studies. The results confirm functional roles for groups previously probed by mutagenesis, provide evidence that specific interactions observed in the ground-state X-ray structure are maintained in the transition state, and suggest formation in the transition state of other interactions that are absent in the ground state. In addition, the results suggest transition state roles for some groups that did not emerge as important in previous mutagenesis studies, presumably because base rescue has the ability to reveal interactions that are obscured by local structural redundancy in traditional mutagenesis. The base rescue results are complemented by comparing the effects of the abasic and phenyl nucleotide substitutions. The results together suggest that stacking of the bases at positions 9, 13 and 14 observed in the ground state is important for orienting other groups in the transition state. These findings add to our understanding of structure-function relationships in the hammerhead ribozyme and help delineate positions that may undergo rearrangements in the active hammerhead structure relative to the ground-state structure. Finally, the particularly efficient rescue by 2-methyladenine at position 13 relative to adenine and other bases suggests that natural base modifications may, in some instance, provide additional stability by taking advantage of hydrophobic interactions in folded RNAs

  6. Civil Engineers Hone Search, Rescue Skills at Combat Town,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-27

    MarineLINK > Marine Corps News > CIVIL ENGINEERS HONE SEARCH, RESCUE SKILLS AT COMBAT TOWN > Posted 08/27/98 01:20:21 AM — More CPAO Camp Butler...news articles CIVIL ENGINEERS HONE SEARCH, RESCUE SKILLS AT COMBAT TOWN By Sgt. Brent C. Powell CENTRAL TRAINING AREA, Okinawa, Japan (Aug 28...was formed approximately one-year ago. They came to Combat Town here to conduct three days of search and rescue operations to sharpen their skills

  7. Post-disaster medical rescue strategy in tropical regions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang-hui; Hou, Shi-ke; Zheng, Jing-chen; Fan, Hao-jun; Song, Jian-qi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earthquakes, floods, droughts, storms, mudslides, landslides, and forest wild fires are serious threats to human lives and properties. The present study aimed to study the environmental characteristics and pathogenic traits, recapitulate experiences, and augment applications of medical reliefs in tropical regions. METHODS: Analysis was made on work and projects of emergency medical rescue, based on information and data collected from 3 emergency medical rescue missions of China International Search and Rescue Team to overseas earthquakes and tsunamis aftermaths in tropical disaster regions — Indonesia-Aceh, Indonesia-Yogyakarta, and Haiti-Port au Prince. RESULTS: Shock, infection and heat stroke were frequently encountered in addition to outbreaks of infectious diseases, skin diseases, and diarrhea during post-disaster emergency medical rescue in tropical regions. CONCLUSIONS: High temperature, high humidity, and proliferation of microorganisms and parasites are the characteristics of tropical climate that impose strict requirements on the preparation of rescue work including selective team members suitable for a particular rescue mission and the provisioning of medical equipment and life support materials. The overseas rescue mission itself needs a scientific, efficient, simple workflow for providing efficient emergency medical assistance. Since shock and infection are major tasks in post-disaster treatment of severely injured victims in tropical regions, the prevention and diagnosis of hyperthermia, insect-borne infectious diseases, tropic skin diseases, infectious diarrhea, and pest harms of disaster victims and rescue team staff should be emphasized during the rescue operations. PMID:25215034

  8. Post-disaster medical rescue strategy in tropical regions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Hui; Hou, Shi-Ke; Zheng, Jing-Chen; Fan, Hao-Jun; Song, Jian-Qi

    2012-01-01

    Earthquakes, floods, droughts, storms, mudslides, landslides, and forest wild fires are serious threats to human lives and properties. The present study aimed to study the environmental characteristics and pathogenic traits, recapitulate experiences, and augment applications of medical reliefs in tropical regions. Analysis was made on work and projects of emergency medical rescue, based on information and data collected from 3 emergency medical rescue missions of China International Search and Rescue Team to overseas earthquakes and tsunamis aftermaths in tropical disaster regions - Indonesia-Aceh, Indonesia-Yogyakarta, and Haiti-Port au Prince. Shock, infection and heat stroke were frequently encountered in addition to outbreaks of infectious diseases, skin diseases, and diarrhea during post-disaster emergency medical rescue in tropical regions. High temperature, high humidity, and proliferation of microorganisms and parasites are the characteristics of tropical climate that impose strict requirements on the preparation of rescue work including selective team members suitable for a particular rescue mission and the provisioning of medical equipment and life support materials. The overseas rescue mission itself needs a scientific, efficient, simple workflow for providing efficient emergency medical assistance. Since shock and infection are major tasks in post-disaster treatment of severely injured victims in tropical regions, the prevention and diagnosis of hyperthermia, insect-borne infectious diseases, tropic skin diseases, infectious diarrhea, and pest harms of disaster victims and rescue team staff should be emphasized during the rescue operations.

  9. Mine rescue capsule dynamics modeling and stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuyi; Li, Jingjing; Sun, Yaobin

    2013-10-01

    Mine rescue capsule is used for emergency mine shelter. It should meet the impact of anti- explosion, water pressure of anti-static load, fire prevention and good air tightness performance. At present, mine rescue capsule design is mainly based on traditional experience design of sealed pressure vessels. In-depth theoretical analysis on structure and mechanical calculation for rescue capsule is lack. The structure deformation and distribution of equivalent stress were investigated under different explosion pressure conditions based on the elastic-plastic finite element theory and software ANSYS. The results provide certain design basis for the mine rescue capsule structural design.

  10. Redefining Technical Rescue and Casualty Care for SOF: Part 1.

    PubMed

    McKay, S D; Johnston, J; Callaway, D W

    2012-01-01

    Trauma care in the tactical environment is complex; it requires a unique blend of situational awareness, foresight, medical skill, multitasking, and physical strength. Rescue is a critical, but often over-looked, component of nearly all tactical trauma casualty management. Successful full spectrum casualty management requires proficiency in four areas: casualty access, assessment, stabilization, and extraction. When complex rescue situations arise (casualty removal from roof tops, mountain terrain, collapsed structures, wells, or a karez), casualty care often becomes further complicated. Special Operations units have historically looked to civilian technical rescue techniques and equipment to fill this ?rescue gap.? Similar to the evolution of pre-hospital military medicine from civilian guidelines (e.g. Advanced Trauma Life Support) (ATLS)) to an evidence-based, tactical-specific guideline (Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC)), an evolution is required within the rescue paradigm. This shift from civilian-based technical rescue guidelines towards an Operational Rescue? capability allows tactical variables such as minimal equipment, low light/night vision goggles (NVG) considerations, enemy threats, and variable evacuation times to permeate through the individual rescue skill set. Just as with TCCC, in which the principles of casualty care remain consistent, the practices must be adapted to end-users environment, so it is with rescue. 2012.

  11. The Pain and the Gain of Rescuing Historic Science Data: The Nimbus Data Rescue Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaher, D. W.; Campbell, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    While technology of our satellite systems have greatly improved the quality of observations over the past 50 years, it is the legacy of the first global coverage environment satellites, the Nimbus systems launched by NASA in the mid-1960s, that marks the beginning of a unique perspective from space. Such early data can extend our climate record and provide important context in longer-term climate changes. Unfortunately, the Nimbus data nearly disappeared before its value was recognized and attempts to recover the data were undertaken. While the Nimbus data was never truly lost, it was in a form that could not be read and was not organized in a way that could be accessed with modern computer systems. The rescue and recovery of the Nimbus data began in 2007 with an initiative by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Without the Goddard efforts, the early Nimbus data might be forever dark. The Nimbus Rescue Project has just completed processing and archival of the Nimbus 4 visible and infrared observations from 1970 and 1971. This adds to our rescue efforts from Nimbus 1, 2 and 3 for 1964, 1966 and 1969. The procedures to recover the Nimbus data, from both film and tape, could be used by other data rescue projects, however the algorithms presented will tend to be Nimbus specific. The compositing of the mapped minimum brightness over weekly intervals resulted in never before seen views of the Polar Regions, such as a visible light view of the Antarctic ice extent from October 1970 (Figure 1). The Nimbus data recovery and reprocessing into modern formats was important, however it was the utility of the data as a part of the satellite climate record that made it valuable. Data rescue projects are often both difficult and time consuming but the data they bring back to the science community makes these efforts worthwhile.

  12. [Anaesthesia under unfavorable conditions - rescue helicopter].

    PubMed

    Knacke, Peer G; Gehring, Hartmut; Saur, Petra

    2011-03-01

    Rescue helicopters are used for emergency care and transport of emergency patients. The dimension of the cabin is clearly limited. A transport is carried out under spatial narrowness and high noise levels. Acoustic alarms or noises caused by the patient are hardly to be perceived, so that the view at optical alarms is necessary. Environmental conditions affect the concentration on the patient. Rearrangement maneuvers represent the most critical phases. Always the whole apparative monitoring and respirator must be in the field of view of the emergency doctor, drugs to the care must be handy to be quickly administered, the quantity of oxygen has to be observed. Infusions and option of airway management are ready to set in advance. Standardized work with the aid of algorithms and knowledge of treatment recommendations and guidelines help to prevent errors. To optimize the care of emergency patients, special training courses for the crew of rescue helicopters are offered. A training simulator to practice different scenarios and the establishment of a CIRS system are recommended.

  13. Rescue of measles viruses from cloned DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Radecke, F; Spielhofer, P; Schneider, H; Kaelin, K; Huber, M; Dötsch, C; Christiansen, G; Billeter, M A

    1995-01-01

    A system has been established allowing the rescue of replicating measles viruses (MVs) from cloned DNA. On one hand, plasmids were constructed from which MV antigenomic RNAs with the correct termini are transcribed by phage T7 RNA polymerase. On the other hand, helper cells derived from the human embryonic kidney 293 cell line were generated constitutively expressing T7 RNA polymerase together with MV nucleocapsid protein and phosphoprotein. Simultaneous transfection of the helper cells with the MV antigenomic plasmid and with a plasmid encoding the MV polymerase under direction of a T7 promoter led to formation of syncytia from which MVs were easily recovered. A genetic tag comprising three nucleotide changes was present in the progeny virus. As a first application of reverse genetics, a segment of 504 nucleotides from the 5' non-coding region of the fusion gene was deleted, leading to an MV variant whose replication behaviour in Vero cells was indistinguishable from that of the laboratory Edmonston B strain. Since no helper virus is involved, this system, in principle, should be applicable to the rescue of any member of the large virus order Mononegavirales, i.e. viruses with a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genome. Images PMID:8846771

  14. Leadership lessons from the Chilean mine rescue.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Faaiza; Edmondson, Amy C; Leonard, Herman B

    2013-01-01

    Three years ago, when a cave-in at the San José mine in Chile trapped 33 men under 700,000 metric tons of rock, experts estimated the probability of getting them out alive at less than 1%. Yet, after spending a record 69 days underground, all 33 were hoisted up to safety. The inspiring story of their rescue is a case study in how to lead in situations where the stakes, risk, and uncertainty are incredibly high and time pressure is intense. Today executives often find themselves in similar straits. When they do, many feel torn. Should they be directive, taking charge and commanding action? Or should they be empowering, enabling innovation and experimentation? As the successful example of André Sougarret, the chief of the mine rescue operation, shows, the answer is yes--to both. The choice is a false dichotomy. Implementing this dual approach involves three key tasks. Each has directive and enabling components. The first task is envisioning, which requires instilling both realism and hope. The second task is enrolling, which means setting clear boundaries for who is on and off the team, but inviting in helpful collaborators. The third task is engaging--leading disciplined execution while encouraging innovation and experimentation. The authors of this article describe how Sougarret ably juggled all of these tasks, orchestrating the efforts of hundreds of people from different organizations, areas of expertise, and countries in an extraordinary mission that overcame impossible odds.

  15. Comparison of rescue and relief activities within 72 hours of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Matsunari, Yuko; Yoshimoto, Nao

    2013-12-01

    To clarify the factors and reasons for the differences in the outcomes of rescue and relief efforts in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, mainly focusing on the numbers of rescue/relief staffs and casualties in the period within 72 hours of the atomic bombings in August 1945. By retrieving the data and information from the records and reports concerning the disasters in the two cities, together with other publications as to the damages by the atomic bombings and subsequent rescue-relief activities, and restoration activities. It seems that there was less damage in Nagasaki, where a stronger atomic bomb was used than in Hiroshima. There were crucial geographic factors that led to the different effects in terms of the numbers of victims; however, systematic organization and mobilization of rescue and relief staffs, maintenance of functional transportation, and advanced medical knowledge and public warning with regard to disaster all may have contributed to a lower death toll and increase in survivors in Nagasaki.

  16. Lactate rescues neuronal sodium homeostasis during impaired energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Karus, Claudia; Ziemens, Daniel; Rose, Christine R

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we established that recurrent activity evokes network sodium oscillations in neurons and astrocytes in hippocampal tissue slices. Interestingly, metabolic integrity of astrocytes was essential for the neurons' capacity to maintain low sodium and to recover from sodium loads, indicating an intimate metabolic coupling between the 2 cell types. Here, we studied if lactate can support neuronal sodium homeostasis during impaired energy metabolism by analyzing whether glucose removal, pharmacological inhibition of glycolysis and/or addition of lactate affect cellular sodium regulation. Furthermore, we studied the effect of lactate on sodium regulation during recurrent network activity and upon inhibition of the glial Krebs cycle by sodium-fluoroacetate. Our results indicate that lactate is preferentially used by neurons. They demonstrate that lactate supports neuronal sodium homeostasis and rescues the effects of glial poisoning by sodium-fluoroacetate. Altogether, they are in line with the proposed transfer of lactate from astrocytes to neurons, the so-called astrocyte-neuron-lactate shuttle. PMID:26039160

  17. Genomic consequences of genetic rescue in an insular population of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis).

    PubMed

    Miller, J M; Poissant, J; Hogg, J T; Coltman, D W

    2012-04-01

    Genetic rescue is a management intervention whereby a small population is supplemented with individuals from other populations in an attempt to reverse the effects of inbreeding and increased genetic load. One such rescue was recently documented in the population of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) within the National Bison Range wildlife refuge (Montana, USA). Here, we examine the locus-specific effects of rescue in this population using a newly developed genome-wide set of 195 microsatellite loci and first-generation linkage map. We found that the rate of introgression varied among loci and that 111 loci, 57% of those examined, deviated from patterns of neutral inheritance. The most common deviation was an excess of homozygous genotypes relative to neutral expectations, indicative of directional selection. As in previous study of this rescue, individuals with more introduced alleles had higher reproductive success and longevity. In addition, we found 30 loci, distributed throughout the genome, which seem to have individual effects on these life history traits. Although the potential for outbreeding depression is a major concern when translocating individuals between populations, we found no evidence of such effects in this population.

  18. Collaboration between Extension and Industry: Coordination and Assessment of Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porr, C. A. Shea; Shultz, Alyx M.; Gimenez, Rebecca; Splan, Rebecca K.

    2016-01-01

    Rescuing large animals from emergency situations can be fraught with dangers not only to the animals but also to the rescuers. People involved at the scene of such an emergency are most likely to include first responders, horse owners, and veterinarians. These groups need to be aware of how they can best work together to effect a safe and…

  19. Collaboration between Extension and Industry: Coordination and Assessment of Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porr, C. A. Shea; Shultz, Alyx M.; Gimenez, Rebecca; Splan, Rebecca K.

    2016-01-01

    Rescuing large animals from emergency situations can be fraught with dangers not only to the animals but also to the rescuers. People involved at the scene of such an emergency are most likely to include first responders, horse owners, and veterinarians. These groups need to be aware of how they can best work together to effect a safe and…

  20. Self-rescue strategies for EVA crewmembers equipped with the SAFER backpack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor; Baughman, David

    1994-01-01

    An extravehicular astronaut who becomes separated from a space station has three options available: grappling the station immediately by means of a 'shepherd's crook' device; rescue by either a second crewmember flying an MMU or a robotic-controlled MMU; or self-rescue by means of a propulsive system. The first option requires very fast response by a tumbling astronaut; the second requires constant availability of an MMU, as well as a rendezvous procedure thousands of feet from the station. This paper will consider the third option, propulsive self-rescue. In particular, the capability of the new Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) propulsive backpack, which is to be tested on STS-64 in Sep. 1994, will be studied. This system possesses an attitude hold function that can automatically detumble an astronaut after separation. On-orbit tests of candidate self-rescue systems have demonstrated the need for such a feature. SAFER has a total delta(v) capability of about 10 fps, to cover both rotations and translations, compared with a possible separation rate of 2.5 fps. But the delta(v) required for self-rescue is critically dependent on the delay before return can be initiated, as a consequence of orbital effects. A very important practical question is then whether the total delta(v) of SAFER is adequate to perform self-rescue for worst case values of separation speed, time to detumble, and time for the astronaut to visually acquire the station. This paper shows that SAFER does indeed have sufficient propellant to carry out self-rescue in all realistic separation cases, as well as in cases which are considerably more severe than anything likely to be encountered in practice. The return trajectories and total delta(v)'s discussed are obtained by means of an 'inertial line-of-sight targeting' scheme, derived in the paper, which allows orbital effects to be corrected by making use of the visual information available to the pilot, namely the line-of-sight direction to the

  1. Automated external defibrillator rescues among children with diagnosed and treated long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pundi, Kavitha N; Bos, J Martijn; Cannon, Bryan C; Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a potentially lethal yet highly treatable cardiac channelopathy. A comprehensive LQTS-directed treatment program often includes an automated external defibrillator (AED). The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of AED rescues among children evaluated, risk-stratified, and treated in an LQTS specialty center. We performed a retrospective review of the electronic medical records to identify 1665 patients evaluated in our Genetic Heart Rhythm Clinic (1999-2013). Subset analysis was performed on 291 children managed without an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD). The average age at diagnosis was 8.3 ± 5.7 years with an average. QTc of 463 ± 40 ms (17% ≥500 ms). The represented LQTS genotypes included type 1 (LQT1) in 52%, type 2 (LQT2) in 35%, and type 3 (LQT3) in 7%. During follow-up, 3 of 291 children (1%) had a cardiac arrest with an appropriate AED rescue (2/51 symptomatic, 1/240 asymptomatic). The first AED rescue occurred during exercise in a symptomatic 3-year-old boy with compound LQT1 treated with beta-blocker and videoscopic left cardiac sympathetic denervation (LCSD). The second AED rescue occurred in a remotely symptomatic 14-year-old boy with high-risk LQT2 (QTc >550 ms) on a beta-blocker who previously declined a prophylactic ICD. The third AED rescue involved an asymptomatic 17-year-old girl with LQT3 on mexiletine who collapsed in school. An AED should seldom be necessary in an appropriately treated child with LQTS. Nevertheless, despite only 3 AED rescues in more than 1700 patient-years, an AED can be a lifesaving and cost-effective part of an LQTS patient's comprehensive sudden death prevention program. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rescue of cardiac leptin receptors in db/db mice prevents myocardial triglyceride accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michael E; Maready, Matthew W; Hall, John E; Stec, David E

    2014-08-01

    Increased leptin levels have been suggested to contribute to cardiac hypertrophy and attenuate cardiac lipid accumulation in obesity, although it has been difficult to separate leptin's direct effects from those caused by changes in body weight and adiposity. To determine whether leptin attenuates cardiac lipid accumulation in obesity or directly causes left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), we generated a novel mouse model in which the long form of the leptin receptor (LepR) was "rescued" only in cardiomyocytes of obese db/db mice. Reexpression of cardiomyocyte leptin receptors in db/db mice did not cause LVH but reduced cardiac triglycerides and improved cardiac function. Compared with lean wild-type (WT) or db/db-cardiac LepR rescue mice, db/db mice exhibited significantly lower E/A ratio, a measurement of early to late diastolic filling, which averaged 1.5 ± 0.07 in db/db vs. 1.9 ± 0.08 and 1.8 ± 0.11 in WT and db/db-cardiac LepR rescue mice, respectively. No differences in systolic function were observed. Although db/db and db/db-cardiac LepR rescue mice exhibited similar increases in plasma triglycerides, insulin, glucose, and body weight, cardiac triglycerides were significantly higher in db/db compared with WT and db/db cardiac LepR rescue mice, averaging 13.4 ± 4.2 vs. 3.8 ± 1.6 vs. 3.8 ± 0.7 mg/g, respectively. These results demonstrate that despite significant obesity and increases in plasma glucose and triglycerides, db/db cardiac LepR rescue mice are protected against myocardial lipid accumulation. However, we found no evidence that leptin directly causes LVH. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. MSHA (Mine Safety ad Health Administration) approved mine rescue - training module (coal): rescue of survivors and recovery of bodies. Mine rescue team series

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Mine rescue teams utilize all of their training skills to locate missing miners during a rescue operation. Teams explore inby to search for, and bring-out survivors after a mine disaster. The teams attempt to evacuate injured and trapped miners safely according to recommended rescue and recovery methods. This training module is intended to provide teams with the proper methods, factors and the numerous considerations in locating possible survivors during a mine emergency. The material also describes the proper methods for opening a barricade, for administering first aid, for handling injured miners, plus the special requirements for recovery of bodies after a mine disaster.

  4. 30 CFR 49.60 - Requirements for a local mine rescue contest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... EDUCATION AND TRAINING MINE RESCUE TEAMS Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines § 49.60 Requirements...) Participate in a simulated mine rescue team exercise while being timed and observed by trained judges who... have completed annual training for mine rescue contest judges. (b) A local mine rescue contest...

  5. 33 CFR 149.314 - What are the approval and stowage requirements for rescue boats?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for rescue boats? 149.314 Section 149.314 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... requirements for rescue boats? (a) Rescue boats must be approved under approval series 160.156. A lifeboat is acceptable as a rescue boat if it also meets the requirements for a rescue boat under approval series 160.156...

  6. 33 CFR 149.314 - What are the approval and stowage requirements for rescue boats?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for rescue boats? 149.314 Section 149.314 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... requirements for rescue boats? (a) Rescue boats must be approved under approval series 160.156. A lifeboat is acceptable as a rescue boat if it also meets the requirements for a rescue boat under approval series 160.156...

  7. 33 CFR 149.314 - What are the approval and stowage requirements for rescue boats?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for rescue boats? 149.314 Section 149.314 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... requirements for rescue boats? (a) Rescue boats must be approved under approval series 160.156. A lifeboat is acceptable as a rescue boat if it also meets the requirements for a rescue boat under approval series 160.156...

  8. 33 CFR 149.314 - What are the approval and stowage requirements for rescue boats?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for rescue boats? 149.314 Section 149.314 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... requirements for rescue boats? (a) Rescue boats must be approved under approval series 160.156. A lifeboat is acceptable as a rescue boat if it also meets the requirements for a rescue boat under approval series 160.156...

  9. 33 CFR 149.314 - What are the approval and stowage requirements for rescue boats?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for rescue boats? 149.314 Section 149.314 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... requirements for rescue boats? (a) Rescue boats must be approved under approval series 160.156. A lifeboat is acceptable as a rescue boat if it also meets the requirements for a rescue boat under approval series 160.156...

  10. Emotional Reactions of Rescue Workers Following a Tornado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCammon, Susan L.; And Others

    Rescue and medical workers may be at risk for negative emotional experience following intervention efforts in disaster situations. To examine this possibility, 120 rescue and hospital personnel responded to a survey of their emotional reactions and coping behaviors 3 months after a devastating tornado. Twenty-eight subjects had been involved in…

  11. Project Rescue: So Close and yet so Far

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laster, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This is the third installment in a four-part series that follows the exploits of Gene, a well-established CIO of a sizable IT organization at a top-100 university. Gene has been working with his team to regain the trust of the campus through Project Rescue, a 30-day turnaround plan focused on demonstrating IT's value. Project Rescue has two…

  12. 77 FR 39745 - General Aviation Search and Rescue

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... No: 2012-16410] NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD General Aviation Search and Rescue The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a 2- day forum focused on general aviation search and rescue operations on July 17 and 18, 2012. In the United States, following the crash of a general aviation...

  13. A "No-Rescue" Wilderness Experience: What Are the Implications?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Rick

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of the moral implications of a "no-rescue" wilderness area (rugged, remote, possibly dangerous areas featuring no trails, signs, patrols, or search-and-rescue) considers such aspects as lack of liability, right of choice by visitors, and conflicting perspectives on the subject. (CB)

  14. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), a fire/rescue worker practices disembarking from an Air Force HH-60 helicopter. The KSC response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary traige. The helicopters are used later to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  15. Rep. Bill Nelson inside a personal rescue sphere

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1985-09-25

    U.S. Representative Bill Nelson (D.,Florida) gives a thumbs up signal from inside a small ball called a personal rescue sphere (PRS). The PRS is not part of STS 61-C hardware, but serves to evaluate a subject's reaction to close quarters. The photo was taken through a visor on the 39-inch diameter fabric rescue sphere.

  16. Project Rescue: So Close and yet so Far

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laster, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This is the third installment in a four-part series that follows the exploits of Gene, a well-established CIO of a sizable IT organization at a top-100 university. Gene has been working with his team to regain the trust of the campus through Project Rescue, a 30-day turnaround plan focused on demonstrating IT's value. Project Rescue has two…

  17. 29 CFR 553.215 - Ambulance and rescue service employees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO EMPLOYEES OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Fire... rescue service employees. (a) Ambulance and rescue service employees of a public agency other than a fire protection or law enforcement agency may be treated as employees engaged in fire protection or law...

  18. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), a fire/rescue worker practices disembarking from an Air Force HH-60 helicopter. The KSC response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary traige. The helicopters are used later to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  19. Search and rescue activity on Denali, 1990 to 2008.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott E; Brillhart, Aaron; Dow, Jennifer; Grissom, Colin K

    2010-06-01

    To describe search and rescue activity performed by the National Park Service (NPS) on Denali, the highest point in North America. A retrospective review was performed of all search and rescue (SAR) operations by the NPS from 1990 to 2008. Descriptive analysis was used to describe these cases as well as chi-square and logistic regression analysis to determine which mountaineers were more likely to require a rescue. During the study period, 1.16% of all Denali climbers required NPS SAR response. The majority of medical cases (68.9%) were due to high altitude and cold injuries, and the majority of traumatic cases (76.2%) resulted from a fall. Mountaineers that attempt routes other than the standard West Buttress route are more likely to require rescue. Climbers are 3% more likely to require a rescue with each year of advancing age. Similarly, mountaineers from Asia are more likely to require a rescue (odds ratio = 4.1), although this trend has diminished in the past decade. Mountaineers and rescuers should educate themselves on the environmental, logistical, and medical origins of Denali rescues. Certain demographic groups on certain routes are more likely to require a rescue on Denali. Rescuers should be aware of these groups and have the knowledge and capabilities to care for the medical issues that are common on SAR responses. Copyright (c) 2010 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 78 FR 79010 - Criteria to Certify Coal Mine Rescue Teams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... Safety and Health Administration Criteria to Certify Coal Mine Rescue Teams AGENCY: Mine Safety and... Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has updated the coal mine rescue team certification criteria. The... every five years. One of the criteria for a mine operator to certify the qualifications of a coal...

  1. 49 CFR 238.114 - Rescue access windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... suitable, alternate arrangement for rescue access is provided. (iii) For passenger cars ordered prior to... passenger train emergency. (c) Dimensions. Each rescue access window in a passenger car, including a... 1, 2011, shall have an unobstructed opening with minimum dimensions of 26 inches horizontally by 24...

  2. 49 CFR 238.114 - Rescue access windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... suitable, alternate arrangement for rescue access is provided. (iii) For passenger cars ordered prior to... passenger train emergency. (c) Dimensions. Each rescue access window in a passenger car, including a... 1, 2011, shall have an unobstructed opening with minimum dimensions of 26 inches horizontally by 24...

  3. 49 CFR 238.114 - Rescue access windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... suitable, alternate arrangement for rescue access is provided. (iii) For passenger cars ordered prior to... passenger train emergency. (c) Dimensions. Each rescue access window in a passenger car, including a... 1, 2011, shall have an unobstructed opening with minimum dimensions of 26 inches horizontally by 24...

  4. 49 CFR 238.114 - Rescue access windows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... suitable, alternate arrangement for rescue access is provided. (iii) For passenger cars ordered prior to... passenger train emergency. (c) Dimensions. Each rescue access window in a passenger car, including a... 1, 2011, shall have an unobstructed opening with minimum dimensions of 26 inches horizontally by 24...

  5. Rescue from replication stress during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Fragkos, Michalis; Naim, Valeria

    2017-04-03

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and a common feature of human disorders, characterized by growth defects, neurodegeneration, cancer predisposition, and aging. Recent evidence has shown that DNA replication stress is a major driver of genomic instability and tumorigenesis. Cells can undergo mitosis with under-replicated DNA or unresolved DNA structures, and specific pathways are dedicated to resolving these structures during mitosis, suggesting that mitotic rescue from replication stress (MRRS) is a key process influencing genome stability and cellular homeostasis. Deregulation of MRRS following oncogene activation or loss-of-function of caretaker genes may be the cause of chromosomal aberrations that promote cancer initiation and progression. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of replication stress, focusing on its persistence in mitosis as well as the mechanisms and factors involved in its resolution, and the potential impact of incomplete replication or aberrant MRRS on tumorigenesis, aging and disease.

  6. National Organization for Women v. Operation Rescue.

    PubMed

    1989-12-06

    Abortion clinics and abortion rights groups petitioned the U.S. District Court to enjoin permanently the blockading of legal abortion clinics in Washington, D.C. and northern Virginia by antiabortion activists. The court held that Operation Rescue's activities constituted a conspiracy (coordinated action to accomplish some purpose by unlawful means) motivated by discrimination against women seeking abortions. Since many women travel to Washington area facilities from out of state, the defendants' conspiracy illegally obstructed interstate travel. In addition, since the defendants entered and remained on the plaintiffs' property after being forbidden to do so for the purpose of interfering with the owners' rights, their conduct violated Virginia's trespass statutes; it also constituted nuisance and interference with business under Virginia law.

  7. Rescue from replication stress during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Naim, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and a common feature of human disorders, characterized by growth defects, neurodegeneration, cancer predisposition, and aging. Recent evidence has shown that DNA replication stress is a major driver of genomic instability and tumorigenesis. Cells can undergo mitosis with under-replicated DNA or unresolved DNA structures, and specific pathways are dedicated to resolving these structures during mitosis, suggesting that mitotic rescue from replication stress (MRRS) is a key process influencing genome stability and cellular homeostasis. Deregulation of MRRS following oncogene activation or loss-of-function of caretaker genes may be the cause of chromosomal aberrations that promote cancer initiation and progression. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of replication stress, focusing on its persistence in mitosis as well as the mechanisms and factors involved in its resolution, and the potential impact of incomplete replication or aberrant MRRS on tumorigenesis, aging and disease. PMID:28166452

  8. Nitric oxide rescues thalidomide mediated teratogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Siamwala, Jamila H.; Veeriah, Vimal; Priya, M. Krishna; Rajendran, Saranya; Saran, Uttara; Sinha, Swaraj; Nagarajan, Shunmugam; T, Pradeep; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide, a sedative drug given to pregnant women, unfortunately caused limb deformities in thousands of babies. Recently the drug was revived because of its therapeutic potential; however the search is still ongoing for an antidote against thalidomide induced limb deformities. In the current study we found that nitric oxide (NO) rescues thalidomide affected chick (Gallus gallus) and zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. This study confirms that NO reduced the number of thalidomide mediated limb deformities by 94% and 80% in chick and zebrafish embryos respectively. NO prevents limb deformities by promoting angiogenesis, reducing oxidative stress and inactivating caspase-3 dependent apoptosis. We conclude that NO secures angiogenesis in the thalidomide treated embryos to protect them from deformities. PMID:22997553

  9. An intelligent maritime search and rescue directing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Anmin; Sui, Haigang

    2006-10-01

    Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR) is the fast, systematical and efficient operations to rescue persons in maritime distress at sea and control the spread of distress incident. This paper introduces an intelligent maritime search and rescue directing system built by Tianjin Maritime Safety Administration. It is an intelligent assistant tool used in the operation of maritime search and rescue. It integrates five subsystems - marine communication system, vessel monitoring system, intelligent decision assistant system, on-scene information collecting system, and remote directing system. It is a representative application system of Locate Based Service. This system is successfully applied in Tianjin Maritime Safety Administration and China 2006's BoHai Sea Search and Rescue.

  10. 46 CFR 160.156-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of rescue boats and fast rescue...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Production inspections, tests, quality control, and..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND... inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of rescue boats and fast rescue boats. (a) Unless...

  11. 46 CFR 160.156-15 - Production inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of rescue boats and fast rescue...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Production inspections, tests, quality control, and..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND... inspections, tests, quality control, and conformance of rescue boats and fast rescue boats. (a) Unless...

  12. 46 CFR 160.156-11 - Fabrication of prototype rescue boats and fast rescue boats for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... (B) The hull, canopy, and major structural laminates of each prototype FRP rescue boat must be tested... component, such as the hull, canopy, and inner liner(s) of each prototype FRP rescue boat, must be examined... spray lay-up technique, the hull and canopy thicknesses must be measured using ultrasonic or...

  13. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zongchao; Banworth, Marcellus J.; Makkia, Rasha; Conley, Shannon M.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Cooper, Mark J.; Naash, Muna I.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the rhodopsin gene cause retinal degeneration and clinical phenotypes including retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and congenital stationary night blindness. Effective gene therapies have been difficult to develop, however, because generating precise levels of rhodopsin expression is critical; overexpression causes toxicity, and underexpression would result in incomplete rescue. Current gene delivery strategies routinely use cDNA-based vectors for gene targeting; however, inclusion of noncoding components of genomic DNA (gDNA) such as introns may help promote more endogenous regulation of gene expression. Here we test the hypothesis that inclusion of genomic sequences from the rhodopsin gene can improve the efficacy of rhodopsin gene therapy in the rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of RP. We utilize our compacted DNA nanoparticles (NPs), which have the ability to transfer larger and more complex genetic constructs, to deliver murine rhodopsin cDNA or gDNA. We show functional and structural improvements in RKO eyes for up to 8 months after NP-mediated gDNA but not cDNA delivery. Importantly, in addition to improvements in rod function, we observe significant preservation of cone function at time points when cones in the RKO model are degenerated. These results suggest that inclusion of native expression elements, such as introns, can significantly enhance gene expression and therapeutic efficacy and may become an essential option in the array of available gene delivery tools.— Han, Z., Banworth, M. J., Makkia, R., Conley, S. M., Al-Ubaidi, M. R., Cooper, M. J., Naash, M. I. Genomic DNA nanoparticles rescue rhodopsin-associated retinitis pigmentosa phenotype. PMID:25713057

  14. Rescue Arterial Revascularization Using Cryopreserved Iliac Artery Allograft in Liver Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Mohkam, Kayvan; Darnis, Benjamin; Rode, Agnès; Hetsch, Nathalie; Balbo, Gregorio; Bourgeot, Jean-Paul; Mezoughi, Salim; Demian, Hassan; Ducerf, Christian; Mabrut, Jean-Yves

    2017-08-01

    Management of hepatic arterial complications after liver transplant remains challenging. The aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of rescue arterial revascularization using cryopreserved iliac artery allografts in this setting. Medical records of patients with liver transplants who underwent rescue arterial revascularization using cryopreserved iliac artery allografts at a single institution were reviewed. From 1992 to 2015, 7 patients underwent rescue arterial revascularization using cryopreserved iliac artery allografts for hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm (3 patients), thrombosis (2 patients), aneurysm (1 patient), or stenosis (1 patient). Two patients developed severe complications, comprising one biliary leakage treated percutaneously, and one acute necrotizing pancreatitis causing death on postoperative day 29. After a median follow-up of 75 months (range, 1-269 mo), 2 patients had an uneventful long-term course, whereas 4 patients developed graft thrombosis after a median period of 120 days (range, 2-488 d). Among the 4 patients who developed graft thrombosis, 1 patient developed ischemic cholangitis, 1 developed acute ischemic hepatic necrosis and was retransplanted, and 2 patients did not develop any further complications. Despite a high rate of allograft thrombosis, rescue arterial revascularization using cryopreserved iliac artery allografts after liver transplant is an effective and readily available approach, with a limited risk of infection and satisfactory long-term graft and patient survival.

  15. Phosphodiesterase Inhibition Rescues Chronic Cognitive Deficits Induced by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Titus, David J.; Sakurai, Atsushi; Kang, Yuan; Furones, Concepcion; Jergova, Stanislava; Santos, Rosmery; Sick, Thomas J.; Atkins, Coleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) modulates several cell signaling pathways in the hippocampus critical for memory formation. Previous studies have found that the cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway is downregulated after TBI and that treatment with a phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor rolipram rescues the decrease in cAMP. In the present study, we examined the effect of rolipram on TBI-induced cognitive impairments. At 2 weeks after moderate fluid-percussion brain injury or sham surgery, adult male Sprague Dawley rats received vehicle or rolipram (0.03 mg/kg) 30 min before water maze acquisition or cue and contextual fear conditioning. TBI animals treated with rolipram showed a significant improvement in water maze acquisition and retention of both cue and contextual fear conditioning compared with vehicle-treated TBI animals. Cue and contextual fear conditioning significantly increased phosphorylated CREB levels in the hippocampus of sham animals, but not in TBI animals. This deficit in CREB activation during learning was rescued in TBI animals treated with rolipram. Hippocampal long-term potentiation was reduced in TBI animals, and this was also rescued with rolipram treatment. These results indicate that the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram rescues cognitive impairments after TBI, and this may be mediated through increased CREB activation during learning. PMID:23516287

  16. A killer-rescue system for self-limiting gene drive of anti-pathogen constructs.

    PubMed

    Gould, Fred; Huang, Yunxin; Legros, Mathieu; Lloyd, Alun L

    2008-12-22

    A number of genetic mechanisms have been suggested for driving anti-pathogen genes into natural populations. Each of these mechanisms requires complex genetic engineering, and most are theoretically expected to permanently spread throughout the target species' geographical range. In the near term, risk issues and technical limits of molecular methods could delay the development and use of these mechanisms. We propose a gene-drive mechanism that can be self-limiting over time and space, and is simpler to build. This mechanism involves one gene that codes for toxicity (killer) and a second that confers immunity to the toxic effects (rescue). We use population-genetic models to explore cases with one or two independent insertions of the killer gene and one insertion of the rescue gene. We vary the dominance and penetrance of gene action, as well as the magnitude of fitness costs. Even with the fitness costs of 10 per cent for each gene, the proportion of mosquitoes expected to transmit the pathogen decreases below 5 per cent for over 40 generations after one 2:1 release (engineered:wild) or after four 1:2 releases. Both the killer and rescue genes will be lost from the population over time, if the rescue construct has any associated fitness cost. Molecular approaches for constructing strains are discussed.

  17. A Killer–Rescue system for self-limiting gene drive of anti-pathogen constructs

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Fred; Huang, Yunxin; Legros, Mathieu; Lloyd, Alun L

    2008-01-01

    A number of genetic mechanisms have been suggested for driving anti-pathogen genes into natural populations. Each of these mechanisms requires complex genetic engineering, and most are theoretically expected to permanently spread throughout the target species' geographical range. In the near term, risk issues and technical limits of molecular methods could delay the development and use of these mechanisms. We propose a gene-drive mechanism that can be self-limiting over time and space, and is simpler to build. This mechanism involves one gene that codes for toxicity (killer) and a second that confers immunity to the toxic effects (rescue). We use population-genetic models to explore cases with one or two independent insertions of the killer gene and one insertion of the rescue gene. We vary the dominance and penetrance of gene action, as well as the magnitude of fitness costs. Even with the fitness costs of 10 per cent for each gene, the proportion of mosquitoes expected to transmit the pathogen decreases below 5 per cent for over 40 generations after one 2 : 1 release (engineered : wild) or after four 1 : 2 releases. Both the killer and rescue genes will be lost from the population over time, if the rescue construct has any associated fitness cost. Molecular approaches for constructing strains are discussed. PMID:18765342

  18. Phosphodiesterase inhibition rescues chronic cognitive deficits induced by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Titus, David J; Sakurai, Atsushi; Kang, Yuan; Furones, Concepcion; Jergova, Stanislava; Santos, Rosmery; Sick, Thomas J; Atkins, Coleen M

    2013-03-20

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) modulates several cell signaling pathways in the hippocampus critical for memory formation. Previous studies have found that the cAMP-protein kinase A signaling pathway is downregulated after TBI and that treatment with a phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor rolipram rescues the decrease in cAMP. In the present study, we examined the effect of rolipram on TBI-induced cognitive impairments. At 2 weeks after moderate fluid-percussion brain injury or sham surgery, adult male Sprague Dawley rats received vehicle or rolipram (0.03 mg/kg) 30 min before water maze acquisition or cue and contextual fear conditioning. TBI animals treated with rolipram showed a significant improvement in water maze acquisition and retention of both cue and contextual fear conditioning compared with vehicle-treated TBI animals. Cue and contextual fear conditioning significantly increased phosphorylated CREB levels in the hippocampus of sham animals, but not in TBI animals. This deficit in CREB activation during learning was rescued in TBI animals treated with rolipram. Hippocampal long-term potentiation was reduced in TBI animals, and this was also rescued with rolipram treatment. These results indicate that the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram rescues cognitive impairments after TBI, and this may be mediated through increased CREB activation during learning.

  19. The Rescue and Rehabilitation of Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in Southeast Queensland.

    PubMed

    Burton, Emily; Tribe, Andrew

    2016-09-15

    Koala populations in southeast Queensland are under threat from many factors, particularly habitat loss, dog attack, vehicle trauma and disease. Animals not killed from these impacts are often rescued and taken into care for rehabilitation, and eventual release back to the wild if deemed to be healthy. This study investigated current rescue, rehabilitation and release data for koalas admitted to the four major wildlife hospitals in southeast Queensland (Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital (AZWH), Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary Hospital (CWH), Moggill Koala Hospital (MKH) and the Royal Society for the Prevention Against Cruelty to Animals Wildlife Hospital at Wacol (RSPCA)), and suggests aspects of the practice that may be changed to improve its contribution to the preservation of the species. It concluded that: (a) the main threats to koalas across southeast Queensland were related to urbanization (vehicle collisions, domestic animal attacks and the disease chlamydiosis); (b) case outcomes varied amongst hospitals, including time spent in care, euthanasia and release rates; and (c) the majority (66.5%) of rescued koalas were either euthanized or died in care with only 27% released back to the wild. The results from this study have important implications for further research into koala rescue and rehabilitation to gain a better understanding of its effectiveness as a conservation strategy.

  20. A grafted ovarian fragment rescues host fertility after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Batchvarov, Iordan Stefanov; Taylor, Rachel Williamson; Bustamante-Marín, Ximena; Czerwinski, Michael; Johnson, Erika Segear; Kornbluth, Sally; Capel, Blanche

    2016-12-01

    Can host fertility be rescued by grafting of a fragment of a healthy ovary soon after chemotherapy? We found that grafting a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive fragment from a healthy isogenic ovary to the left ovary of a chemo-treated host rescued function and fertility of the grafted host ovary, and resulted in the production of host-derived offspring as late as the sixth litter after chemotherapy (CTx) treatment, whereas none of the ungrafted controls produced a second litter. In women and girls undergoing chemotherapy, infertility and premature ovarian failure are frequent outcomes. There are accumulating reports of improved endocrine function after autotransplantation of an ovarian fragment, raising the possibility that the transplant is beneficial to the endogenous ovary. We first established a CTx treatment regimen that resulted in the permanent loss of fertility in 100% of female mice of the FVB inbred strain. We grafted an isogenic ovary fragment from a healthy female homozygous for a GFP transgene to the left ovary of 100 CTx-treated hosts, and compared fertility to 39 ungrafted controls in 6 months of continuous matings, using GFP to distinguish offspring derived from the graft, and those derived from the host. Immunofluoresece and western blot analysis of 39 treated ovaries during and 15 days after CTx treatment revealed elevated apoptosis, rapid loss of granulosa cells and an increased recruitment of growing follicles. Using immunofluorescence and confocal imaging, we tracked the outcome of the grafted tissue over 4 months and its effect on the adjacent and contralateral ovary of the host. Fifty-three percent of grafted females produced a second litter whereas none of the ungrafted females produced a second litter. The likelihood that this could occur by chance is very low (P < 0.0001). These results are shown only in mice, and whether or how they might apply to chemotherapy patients subjected to different CTx regimens is not yet clear. Our

  1. Self-Expanding Metal Stent (SEMS): an innovative rescue therapy for refractory acute variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Changela, Kinesh; Ona, Mel A; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-12-01

    Acute variceal bleeding (AVB) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis or less commonly splenic vein thrombosis. Pharmacological and endoscopic interventions are cornerstones in the management of variceal bleeding but may fail in 10 - 15 % of patients. Rescue therapy with balloon tamponade (BT) or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be required to control refractory acute variceal bleeding effectively but with some limitations. The self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) is a covered, removable tool that can be deployed in the lower esophagus under endoscopic guidance as a rescue therapy to achieve hemostasis for refractory AVB. To evaluate the technical feasibility, efficacy, and safety of SEMS as a rescue therapy for AVB. In this review article, we have performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series describing SEMS as a rescue therapy for AVB. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, limitations, and complications are discussed. At present, 103 cases have been described in the literature. Studies have reported 97.08 % technical success rates in deployment of SEMS. Most of the stents were intact for 4 - 14 days with no major complications reported. Stent extraction had a success rate of 100 %. Successful hemostasis was achieved in 96 % of cases with only 3.12 % found to have rebleeding after placement of SEMS. Stent migration, which was the most common complication, was observed in 21 % of patients. SEMS is a safe and effective alternative approach as a rescue therapy for refractory AVB.

  2. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices stabilizing an injured crew member before transport to a local hospital by helicopter. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers who will prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters later will help remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  3. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices stabilizing an injured crew member before transport to a local hospital by an Air Force HH-60 helicopter. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters are then used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  4. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices stabilizing an injured crew member before transport to a local hospital by helicopter. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four Air Force HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers who will prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters later will help remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  5. The KSC response team takes part in simulated rescue mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During a simulated rescue mission in the woods near the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), the KSC response team practices stabilizing an injured crew member before transport to a local hospital by an Air Force HH-60 helicopter. The response team is training for the unlikely scenario of a Shuttle mishap at the SLF. The Mode 7 simulation of an astronaut rescue exercises all aspects of command and control, search and rescue, and medical procedures required for a successful rescue. The remote location of the mock-up prevents a totally land-based crew rescue, and calls on a NASA UH-1 helicopter to locate the site and four HH-60 helicopters to drop emergency equipment and fire/rescue workers to prepare the 'crew' for preliminary triage. The helicopters are then used to remove the crew five astronaut candidates, one representative from the Vehicle Integration Test office, and one fire/rescue worker. The exercise will conclude with airlifted 'patients' arriving safely in the emergency rooms of participating area hospitals.

  6. Integrating data rescue into the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Ciara; Ciaran, Broderick; Mary, Curley; Conor, Daly; Catriona, Duffy; Thorne, Peter; Treanor, Mairead; Walsh, Seamus; Murphy, Conor

    2017-04-01

    The availability of long-term observational data at fine time scales (e.g. daily or sub-daily) is paramount to examining changes in the magnitude, duration, intensity, and frequency of extreme events and to assess whether or not the likelihood of recent events has changed throughout the historical record. The capacity to extend current observational data holdings is, however, largely dependent on the resources available to carry out the digitisation and transcription process. This paper presents an ambitious research led teaching experiment in which undergraduate students engaged in a substantial data rescue effort to transcribe over 1 million daily rainfall values and associated metadata across Ireland for the period 1860-1939. The aim of the project was first, to motivate students by engaging them in a practical exercise whereby their contribution has considerable value to research, second, to expose students to the basic processes involved in climate data rescue, and third, to examine the potential for students to produce accurate and reliable observational data. Students were provided with digital images of annual rainfall sheets recovered from the national archives together with templates used by Met Éireann in transcribing the data. Using video and text supports, together with an online discussion forum for additional support, students double keyed more than 1400 station years of rainfall data. The assessment process was linked to creating a correct data series whereby differences in double keyed sheets were identified and a master (correct) series created by teaching staff. Three hundred station years of data previously transcribed by Met Éireann was used as a benchmark against which students showed that they were as accurate as the professionals in the process. The success of the students makes a major contribution to understanding the historic climate variability of Ireland, a sentinel location on the western margins of Europe. Given the large volumes of

  7. Physical capacity of rescue personnel in the mining industry

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian B; McDonald, Michael D; Hunt, Andrew P; Parker, Tony W

    2008-01-01

    Background The mining industry has one of the highest occupational rates of serious injury and fatality. Mine staff involved with rescue operations are often required to respond to physically challenging situations. This paper describes the physical attributes of mining rescue personnel. Methods 91 rescue personnel (34 ± 8.6 yrs, 1.79 ± 0.07 m, 90 ± 15.0 kg) participating in the Queensland Mines Rescue Challenge completed a series of health-related and rescue-related fitness tasks. Health-related tasks comprised measurements of aerobic capacity (VO2max), abdominal endurance, abdominal strength, flexibility, lower back strength, leg strength, elbow flexion strength, shoulder strength, lower back endurance, and leg endurance. Rescue-related tasks comprised an incremental carry (IC), coal shovel (CS), and a hose drag (HD), completed in this order. Results Cardiovascular (VO2max) and muscular endurance was average or below average compared with the general population. Isometric strength did not decline with age. The rescue-related tasks were all extremely demanding with heart rate responses averaging greater than 88% of age predicted maximal heart rates. Heart rate recovery responses were more discriminating than heart rates recorded during the tasks, indicating the hose drag as the most physically demanding of the tasks. Conclusion Relying on actual rescues or mining related work to provide adequate training is generally insufficient to maintain, let alone increase, physical fitness. It is therefore recommended that standards of required physical fitness be developed and mines rescue personnel undergo regularly training (and assessment) in order to maintain these standards. PMID:18847510

  8. Successful live birth after rescue ICSI following failed fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neeta; Malhotra, Neena; Shende, Unnati; Tiwari, Abanish

    2013-01-01

    In a conventional IVF cycle unexpected complete fertilization failure may occur in 10-25% of infertile women. To overcome this barrier of fertilization failure, some investigators have suggested intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) on day 1 of an unfertilized mature oocyte, the so called “rescue ICSI”. We report a case of fertilization failure followed by rescue ICSI resulting in a live birth. Although the success of rescue ICSI is still questionable, this procedure is worth an attempt in order to give the best chance to the couple in that cycle. PMID:23869158

  9. Medical rescue of naval combat: challenges and future.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hai; Hou, Li-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2015-01-01

    There has been no large-scale naval combat in the last 30 years. With the rapid development of battleships, weapons manufacturing and electronic technology, naval combat will present some new characteristics. Additionally, naval combat is facing unprecedented challenges. In this paper, we discuss the topic of medical rescue at sea: what challenges we face and what we could do. The contents discussed in this paper contain battlefield self-aid buddy care, clinical skills, organized health services, medical training and future medical research programs. We also discuss the characteristics of modern naval combat, medical rescue challenges, medical treatment highlights and future developments of medical rescue at sea.

  10. SARSAT: A rescue system for ships and airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The SARSAT rescue system is described and alternative systems discussed, with SARSAT functioning as either independent satellite within an emergency call system or as an additional search and rescue payload of another satellite system. Geostationary and polar orbits are compared. A low cost SARSAT rescue system utilizing four satellites in a quasi solar, sun synchronized orbit at 1000 kilometers is proposed. Three multiple start satellites in a 57 degree orbit, with a fourth satellite in reserve at a lower orbit are described. Alternative transport systems are discussed and a recommended time table from project approval to launch is given.

  11. Space shuttle search and rescue experiment using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Larson, R. W.; Zelenka, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of a synthetic aperture radar for search and rescue applications was demonstrated with aircraft experiments. One experiment was conducted using the ERIM four-channel radar and several test sites in the Michigan area. In this test simple corner-reflector targets were successfully imaged. Results from this investigation were positive and indicate that the concept can be used to investigate new approaches focused on the development of a global search and rescue system. An orbital experiment to demonstrate the application of synthetic aperture radar to search and rescue is proposed using the space shuttle.

  12. Successful live birth after rescue ICSI following failed fertilization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neeta; Malhotra, Neena; Shende, Unnati; Tiwari, Abanish

    2013-01-01

    In a conventional IVF cycle unexpected complete fertilization failure may occur in 10-25% of infertile women. To overcome this barrier of fertilization failure, some investigators have suggested intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) on day 1 of an unfertilized mature oocyte, the so called "rescue ICSI". We report a case of fertilization failure followed by rescue ICSI resulting in a live birth. Although the success of rescue ICSI is still questionable, this procedure is worth an attempt in order to give the best chance to the couple in that cycle.

  13. Operation rescue: domestic terrorism or legitimate civil rights protest?

    PubMed

    Nathanson, B

    1989-01-01

    Nathanson, a prominent participant in the abortion debate in the United States, describes the mission and methods of Operation Rescue. An activist anti-abortion organization whose members protest against legalized abortion by staging peaceful, nonviolent sit-ins at abortion clinics, Operation Rescue's tactics affect pregnant women, abortion facilities, law enforcement agencies, pro-choice advocates, and bystanders. Nathanson discusses the moral features unique to Operation Rescue, as well as counterarguments against the legitimacy of its activities, in an attempt to determine whether the organization's actions are a legitimate form of civil disobedience.

  14. Influence of a 100-M Simulated In-Water Rescue on Cardiopulmonary Parameters.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Rodríguez, Núria; Abraldes, J Arturo

    2017-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after a drowning episode is performed under fatigue conditions. However, the characterization of CPR in this context is still unknown. Our purpose was to investigate the effect of a 100-m simulated in-water rescue on CPR and physiological parameters in trained certified lifeguards. Thirty trained certified lifeguards (age 24.6 ± 3.8 yrs; height 178.2 ± 7.4 cm and weight 76.9 ± 10.6 kg) completed two protocols using an adult manikin: (i) 4-min CPR after 4-min baseline conditions (CPR), and (ii) 4-min CPR after a 100-m simulated in-water rescue in the sea (CPR Rescue), both with a compression-ventilation ratio of 30:2. Physiological parameters of the subjects were continuously measured (breath-by-breath) during baseline and CPR conditions, using a telemetric portable gas analyzer (K4b (2) , Cosmed, Rome, Italy) and CPR techniques analyzed using two HD video cameras (Sony, HDR PJ30VE, Japan). The 100-m simulated in-water rescue induced higher values of physiological related parameters all over the 4-min CPR exercise (e.g. Tidal Volume: 1.5 ± 0.4 and 2.4 ± 0.5 L; VO2: 15.9 ± 3.9 and 22.8 ± 3.2 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); R: 0.9 ± 0.1 and 1.2 ± 0.1, for CPR and CPR Rescue, respectively). However, the compression rate was higher in CPR Rescue compared to the CPR in the first (cycle 3: 85 ± 12 vs. 78 ± 9 s) and last three complete cycles (cycle 12: 100 ± 12 and 85 ± 12 s), and, in both conditions, it increased from the first to the last CPR complete cycle. Fatigue induced by the 100-m simulated in-water rescue had a strong physiological expression but a minimal impact on CPR performance. Key words: CPR; fatigue; lifeguards; VO2.

  15. Phenotypic plasticity in evolutionary rescue experiments

    PubMed Central

    Chevin, Luis-Miguel; Gallet, Romain; Gomulkiewicz, Richard; Holt, Robert D.; Fellous, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Population persistence in a new and stressful environment can be influenced by the plastic phenotypic responses of individuals to this environment, and by the genetic evolution of plasticity itself. This process has recently been investigated theoretically, but testing the quantitative predictions in the wild is challenging because (i) there are usually not enough population replicates to deal with the stochasticity of the evolutionary process, (ii) environmental conditions are not controlled, and (iii) measuring selection and the inheritance of traits affecting fitness is difficult in natural populations. As an alternative, predictions from theory can be tested in the laboratory with controlled experiments. To illustrate the feasibility of this approach, we briefly review the literature on the experimental evolution of plasticity, and on evolutionary rescue in the laboratory, paying particular attention to differences and similarities between microbes and multicellular eukaryotes. We then highlight a set of questions that could be addressed using this framework, which would enable testing the robustness of theoretical predictions, and provide new insights into areas that have received little theoretical attention to date. PMID:23209170

  16. IMMEDIATE RESCUE DESIGNS IN PEDIATRIC ANALGESIC TRIALS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Berde, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Designing analgesic clinical trials in pediatrics requires a balance between scientific, ethical and practical concerns. A previous consensus group recommended immediate-rescue designs using opioid sparing as a surrogate measure of analgesic efficacy. We summarize the performance of rescue analgesic designs in pediatric trials of four commonly used classes of analgesics: opioids, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and local anesthetics. Methods Medline, Embase, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library and Web of science were searched in April 2013. The 85 studies selected were randomized or controlled clinical trials using immediate rescue paradigms in postoperative pain settings. A random effects meta-analysis was used to synthesize predefined outcomes using Hedges’ G. Difference between the means of the treatment arms were also expressed as a percentage of the corresponding value in the placebo group (placebo-treatment/placebo). Distributions of pain scores in study and control groups and relationships between opioid sparing and pain scores were examined. Results For each of the four study drug classes, significant opioid sparing was demonstrated in a majority of studies by one or more of the following endpoints: (1) total dose (mg/kg/h), (2) percentage of children requiring rescue medication and (3) time to first rescue medication (minutes). Pain scores averaged 2.4/10 in study groups, 3.4/10 in control groups. Conclusions Opioid sparing is a feasible pragmatic endpoint for pediatric pain analgesic trials. This review serves to guide future research in pediatric analgesia trials, which could test whether some specific design features may improve assay sensitivity while minimizing the risk of unrelieved pain. PMID:25222831

  17. In vivo model of adeno-associated virus vector persistence and rescue.

    PubMed Central

    Afione, S A; Conrad, C K; Kearns, W G; Chunduru, S; Adams, R; Reynolds, T C; Guggino, W B; Cutting, G R; Carter, B J; Flotte, T R

    1996-01-01

    Gene therapy vectors based on human DNA viruses could be mobilized or rescued from individuals who are subsequently infected with the corresponding wild-type (wt) helper viruses. This phenomenon has been effectively modeled in vitro with both adenovirus (Ad) and adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors but has not previously been studied in vivo. In the current study, we have developed an in vivo model to study the interactions of a recombinant AAV vector (AAV-CFTR) with wt AAV type 2 (AAV2) and a host range mutant Ad (Ad2HR405) for which monkey cells are permissive (D.E.Brough, S.A.Rice, S.Sell, and D.F.Klessig, J. Virol. 55:206-212, 1985). AAV-CFTR was administered to the respiratory epithelium of the nose or lung of rhesus macaques. Primary cells were harvested from the infusion site at time points up to 3 months after vector administration to confirm vector DNA persistence. Vector DNA was present in episomal form and could be rescued in vitro only by addition of wt AAV2 and Ad. In in vivo rescue studies, vector was administered before or after wt-AAV2 and Ad2HR405 infection, and the shedding of AAV-CFTR was examined. Ad2HR405 and wt-AAV2 infections were established in the nose with concomitant administration. wt-AAV2 replication occurred in the lung when virus was administered directly at a high titer to the lower respiratory tract. AAV-CFTR vector rescue was also observed in the latter setting. Although these studies were performed with small numbers of animals within each group, it appears that AAV-CFTR DNA persists in the primate respiratory tract and that this model may be useful for studies of recombinant AAV vector rescue. PMID:8627804

  18. Rescue of cardiac leptin receptors in db/db mice prevents myocardial triglyceride accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael E.; Maready, Matthew W.; Hall, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Increased leptin levels have been suggested to contribute to cardiac hypertrophy and attenuate cardiac lipid accumulation in obesity, although it has been difficult to separate leptin's direct effects from those caused by changes in body weight and adiposity. To determine whether leptin attenuates cardiac lipid accumulation in obesity or directly causes left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), we generated a novel mouse model in which the long form of the leptin receptor (LepR) was “rescued” only in cardiomyocytes of obese db/db mice. Reexpression of cardiomyocyte leptin receptors in db/db mice did not cause LVH but reduced cardiac triglycerides and improved cardiac function. Compared with lean wild-type (WT) or db/db-cardiac LepR rescue mice, db/db mice exhibited significantly lower E/A ratio, a measurement of early to late diastolic filling, which averaged 1.5 ± 0.07 in db/db vs. 1.9 ± 0.08 and 1.8 ± 0.11 in WT and db/db-cardiac LepR rescue mice, respectively. No differences in systolic function were observed. Although db/db and db/db-cardiac LepR rescue mice exhibited similar increases in plasma triglycerides, insulin, glucose, and body weight, cardiac triglycerides were significantly higher in db/db compared with WT and db/db cardiac LepR rescue mice, averaging 13.4 ± 4.2 vs. 3.8 ± 1.6 vs. 3.8 ± 0.7 mg/g, respectively. These results demonstrate that despite significant obesity and increases in plasma glucose and triglycerides, db/db cardiac LepR rescue mice are protected against myocardial lipid accumulation. However, we found no evidence that leptin directly causes LVH. PMID:24939734

  19. The Lantibiotic NAI-107 Efficiently Rescues Drosophila melanogaster from Infection with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300

    PubMed Central

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Cruz, João C. S.; Donadio, Stefano; Jenssen, Håvard

    2016-01-01

    We used the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a cost-effective in vivo model to evaluate the efficacy of novel antibacterial peptides and peptoids for treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. A panel of peptides with known antibacterial activity in vitro and/or in vivo was tested in Drosophila. Although most peptides and peptoids that were effective in vitro failed to rescue lethal effects of S. aureus infections in vivo, we found that two lantibiotics, nisin and NAI-107, rescued adult flies from fatal infections. Furthermore, NAI-107 rescued mortality of infection with the MRSA strain USA300 with an efficacy equivalent to that of vancomycin, a widely applied antibiotic for the treatment of serious MRSA infections. These results establish Drosophila as a useful model for in vivo drug evaluation of antibacterial peptides. PMID:27381394

  20. Further analysis of EVA self-rescue data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, Adam R.

    A means for rescuing a stranded extravehicular activity (EVA) astronaut is necessary to ensure safe space station operations. One promising device is a hand-held thruster similar to the Hand-Held Maneuvering Unit (HHMU) from the Gemini and Skylab programs. A study was performed in the Virtual Interactive Environment Workstation (VIEW) at NASA Ames Research Center. Three Initial (Separation) Velocities (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m/s) were crossed with five Initial spin velocities (0, +/- 0.1, +/- 0.3) to yield 15 different trials. An Attitude Hold system was also modeled, which, when combined with the 15 combinations of separation and spin velocity, provided 30 distinct trails. Recent examinations of the data reveal that Initial (Separation) Velocity and Initial Spin Velocity each produced main effects and combined to produce an interaction effect on Solution Time. Solution Time increased with Initial Velocity and absolute Initial Spin Velocity. Final Roll Angle also increased Initial Spin Velocity. Attitude Hole Fuel increased with absolute Initial Spin Velocity. Interaction effects revealed that main effects were less pronounced at the lowest Initial Velocity level.

  1. It's Often Family to The Rescue During Opioid ODs

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165671.html It's Often Family to the Rescue During Opioid ODs ... Narcan, Evzio) -- and found that family members used it in about 20 percent of slightly over 4, ...

  2. It's Snakes to the Rescue for Heart Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166383.html It's Snakes to the Rescue for Heart Patients Venom ... by inhibiting platelets and preventing blood clotting. However, it is often at the cost of serious bleeding ...

  3. Space shuttle search and rescue experiment using synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Larson, R. W.; Zelenka, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    Langley Research Center, NASA, is developing a concept for using a spaceborne synthetic aperture radar with passive reflectors for search and rescue applications. The feasibility of a synthetic aperture radar for search and rescue applications has been demonstrated with aircraft experiments. One experiment was conducted using the ERIM four-channel radar and several test sites in the Michigan area. In this test simple corner-reflector targets were successfully imaged. Results from this investigation were positive and indicate that the concept can be used to investigate new approaches focused on the development of a global search and rescue system. An orbital experiment to demonstrate the application of synthetic aperture radar to search and rescue is proposed using the space shuttle.

  4. Space rescue operations in the early 1980's.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, J. W.; Schaefer, H.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of planning requirements for space rescue missions in connection with an emergency situation involving a manned satellite with a small crew. A space rescue mission may be divided basically into three major operational phases including the response time phase, the phase concerned with the rescue operations, and the final phase which begins with the casting-off operation from the rendezvous position with the distressed vehicle. The types of possible emergency situations are discussed together with the space rescue equipment, a pressurized emergency module, an unpressurized emergency module, a portable airlock, an attachable docking fixture, a fluid jet type detumble system, a stick-on rocket type detumble system, and an antitumbling space vehicle.

  5. 30 CFR 57.4362 - Underground rescue and firefighting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4362 Underground rescue...

  6. 30 CFR 57.4362 - Underground rescue and firefighting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4362 Underground rescue and firefighting operations. Following evacuation of a mine in a fire emergency, only persons wearing and trained...

  7. 30 CFR 57.4362 - Underground rescue and firefighting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4362 Underground rescue and firefighting operations. Following evacuation of a mine in a fire emergency, only persons wearing and trained...

  8. 30 CFR 57.4362 - Underground rescue and firefighting operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MINES Fire Prevention and Control Firefighting Procedures/alarms/drills § 57.4362 Underground rescue and firefighting operations. Following evacuation of a mine in a fire emergency, only persons wearing and trained...

  9. Cardiac Arrest? Someday, Drones May Come to Your Rescue

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_166543.html Cardiac Arrest? Someday, Drones May Come to Your Rescue Like something from ... 13, 2017 TUESDAY, June 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Drones have been proposed for some pretty mundane uses, ...

  10. Drowning rescue on the ice, human chain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Drowning may occur wherever there is water, whether it is only a few inches in the bottom of the tub or thousands of feet in the ocean. People should be aware of life-saving techniques from rescue to resuscitation.

  11. The habitus of 'rescue' and its significance for implementation of rapid response systems in acute health care.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Nicola; Humphrey, Charlotte; Sandall, Jane

    2014-11-01

    The need to focus on patient safety and improve the quality and consistency of medical care in acute hospital settings has been highlighted in a number of UK and international reports. When patients on a hospital ward become acutely unwell there is often a window of opportunity for staff, patients and relatives to contribute to the 'rescue' process by intervening in the trajectory of clinical deterioration. This paper explores the social and institutional processes associated with the practice of rescue, and implications for the implementation and effectiveness of rapid response systems (RRSs) within acute health care. An ethnographic case study was conducted in 2009 in two UK hospitals (focussing on the medical directorates in each organisation). Data collection involved 180 h of observation, 35 staff interviews (doctors, nurses, health care assistants and managers) and documentary review. Analysis was informed by Bourdieu's logic of practice and his relational concept of the 'field' of the general medical ward. Three themes illustrated the nature of rescue work within the field and collective rules which guided associated occupational distinction practices: (1) the 'dirty work' of vital sign recording and its distinction from diagnostic (higher order) interpretive work; (2) the moral order of legitimacy claims for additional help; and (3) professional deference and the selective managerial control of rescue work. The discourse of rescue provided a means of exercising greater control over clinical uncertainty. The acquisition of 'rescue capital' enabled the social positioning of health care assistants, nurses and doctors, and shaped use of the RRS on the wards. Boundary work, professional legitimation and jurisdictional claims defined the social practice of rescue, as clinical staff had to balance safety, professional and organisational concerns within the field. This paper offers a nuanced understanding of patient safety on the front-line, challenging notions of

  12. Health status and physical fitness of mines rescue brigadesmen.

    PubMed

    Tomaskova, Hana; Jirak, Zdenek; Lvoncik, Samuel; Buzga, Marek; Zavadilova, Vladislava; Trlicova, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess health status of regular and part-time mines rescue brigadesmen. A group of 685 mines rescue brigadesmen was examined within the preventive testing - a basic internal, biochemistry and anthropometric examination, physical fitness testing. The average age of the subjects was 41.96±7.18 years, the average exposure in mining was 20±8.1 years, out of that 11.95±7.85 years as mines rescue brigadesmen. Elevated levels of total serum cholesterol (T-CH) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-CH) were found in over 1/2 of the subjects. Systolic hypertension (systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mm Hg) was confirmed in 34%, overweight (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25) in 62.3% and obesity (BMI ≥ 30) in 20.4% of the examined mines rescue brigadesmen. The metabolic syndrome was found in 15.2% of persons. The highest physical fitness was found in mines rescue brigadesmen and the lowest in mine officers. Limit values of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2 max/kg) determined by the management of the mine rescue station were not reached by every 3rd of all mines rescue brigadesmen. Compared with the control group of the Czech and Slovak population, the rescuers are taller, have greater BMI, higher percentage of body fat in all age categories and proportionally to that they achieve a higher maximum minute oxygen uptake; however, in relative values per kg of body weight their physical fitness is practically the same as that of the controls. The prevalence of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and VO2 max/kg in the group of the mines rescue brigadesmen is comparable with that in the general untrained Czech population. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. Epidemiological and medical aspects of canyoning rescue operations.

    PubMed

    Soteras, Inigo; Subirats, Enric; Strapazzon, Giacomo

    2015-04-01

    To describe the characteristics of canyoning rescue operations (CRO), type and severity of injuries or illnesses, and on-site medical procedures. A retrospective analysis of all CRO data from an emergency medical rescue team in Aragon, Spain, between 1 August 1999 and 31 July 2009. A total of 520 patients were identified, with a male to female ratio of 1.4. The median age was 32 years (range 10-73 years). The median time from the emergency call to admission to an acute care facility (or evacuation for uninjured patients) was 90 min (range 10-860 min). In 329 (63.3%) cases technical skills or ability in the terrain with some grade of difficulty was required. Accessibility of the incident site was associated with type of rescue (p<0.0001), where patients in incident sites with moderate to extremely difficult access were more often rescued by ground rescue alone or supported by air rescue than by air rescue alone. 419 (80.6%) patients had trauma-related injuries. The most common injuries involved the lower extremities (74%). The percentage of patients with a NACA score ≥4 was higher for medical/environmental illnesses than traumatic injuries (p<0.0001), despite that the total number was smaller. 175 (33.7%) patients received analgesics. 370 (71.2%) patients required splinting/immobilization. Major life-saving medical interventions were rarely performed on-site. The length and exposure to environmental factors validates the importance of emergency physicians and paramedics in CRO. Physicians and paramedics should be familiar with Pre-hospital Trauma Life Support, medical procedures related to environmental, topographical and logistical conditions, and helicopter rescue operations including winch operations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reconceptualising failure to rescue in midwifery: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Hastings-Tolsma, Marie; Nolte, Anna G W

    2014-06-01

    to reconceptualise the concept of failure to rescue, distinguishing it from its current scientific usage as a surveillance strategy to recognise physiologic decline. failure to rescue has been consistently defined as a failure to save a patient׳s life after development of complications. The term, however, carries a richer connotation when viewed within a midwifery context. Midwives have historically believed themselves to be the vanguards of normal, physiologic processes, including birth. This philosophy mandates careful consideration of what it means to promote normal birth and the consequences of failure to rescue women from processes which challenge that outcome. the Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMED, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases were searched from the period of 1992-2014 using the key terms of concept analysis, failure-to-rescue, childbirth, midwifery outcomes, obstetrical outcomes, suboptimal care, and patient outcomes. English language reports were used exclusively. The search yielded 45 articles which were reviewed in this paper. a critical analysis of the published literature was undertaken as a means of determining the adequacy of the concept for midwifery practice and to detail how it relates to other concepts important in development of a conceptual framework promoting normal birth processes. failure to rescue within the context of the midwifery model of care requires robust attention to a midwifery managed setting and surveillance based on a caring presence, patient protection, and midwifery partnership with patient. clarifying the definition of failure to rescue in childbirth and defining its attributes can help inform midwifery providers throughout the world of the ethical importance of considering failure to rescue in clinical practice. Relevance to midwifery care mandates use of failure to rescue as both a process and outcome measure. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Archaeological Rescue Excavation and Digitalization of Cultural Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varea, S.; Lemerle, J.-B.

    2013-07-01

    We present in this paper the original work and projects of AFT, a French company working in the complementary fields of topography, archaeological rescue excavation and digitalization of cultural heritage. Here are described more precisely the application of 3D scanning in archaeology, especially in rescue excavation, and the wish of the company to be ahead of its time in this field., followed by two examples, one in heritage object studies, the other in heritage building studies.

  16. Defectors Can Create Conditions That Rescue Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Waite, Adam James; Cannistra, Caroline; Shou, Wenying

    2015-12-01

    Cooperation based on the production of costly common goods is observed throughout nature. This is puzzling, as cooperation is vulnerable to exploitation by defectors which enjoy a fitness advantage by consuming the common good without contributing fairly. Depletion of the common good can lead to population collapse and the destruction of cooperation. However, population collapse implies small population size, which, in a structured population, is known to favor cooperation. This happens because small population size increases variability in cooperator frequency across different locations. Since individuals in cooperator-dominated locations (which are most likely cooperators) will grow more than those in defector-dominated locations (which are most likely defectors), cooperators can outgrow defectors globally despite defectors outgrowing cooperators in each location. This raises the possibility that defectors can lead to conditions that sometimes rescue cooperation from defector-induced destruction. We demonstrate multiple mechanisms through which this can occur, using an individual-based approach to model stochastic birth, death, migration, and mutation events. First, during defector-induced population collapse, defectors occasionally go extinct before cooperators by chance, which allows cooperators to grow. Second, empty locations, either preexisting or created by defector-induced population extinction, can favor cooperation because they allow cooperator but not defector migrants to grow. These factors lead to the counterintuitive result that the initial presence of defectors sometimes allows better survival of cooperation compared to when defectors are initially absent. Finally, we find that resource limitation, inducible by defectors, can select for mutations adaptive to resource limitation. When these mutations are initially present at low levels or continuously generated at a moderate rate, they can favor cooperation by further reducing local population size

  17. Defectors Can Create Conditions That Rescue Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Adam James; Cannistra, Caroline; Shou, Wenying

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation based on the production of costly common goods is observed throughout nature. This is puzzling, as cooperation is vulnerable to exploitation by defectors which enjoy a fitness advantage by consuming the common good without contributing fairly. Depletion of the common good can lead to population collapse and the destruction of cooperation. However, population collapse implies small population size, which, in a structured population, is known to favor cooperation. This happens because small population size increases variability in cooperator frequency across different locations. Since individuals in cooperator-dominated locations (which are most likely cooperators) will grow more than those in defector-dominated locations (which are most likely defectors), cooperators can outgrow defectors globally despite defectors outgrowing cooperators in each location. This raises the possibility that defectors can lead to conditions that sometimes rescue cooperation from defector-induced destruction. We demonstrate multiple mechanisms through which this can occur, using an individual-based approach to model stochastic birth, death, migration, and mutation events. First, during defector-induced population collapse, defectors occasionally go extinct before cooperators by chance, which allows cooperators to grow. Second, empty locations, either preexisting or created by defector-induced population extinction, can favor cooperation because they allow cooperator but not defector migrants to grow. These factors lead to the counterintuitive result that the initial presence of defectors sometimes allows better survival of cooperation compared to when defectors are initially absent. Finally, we find that resource limitation, inducible by defectors, can select for mutations adaptive to resource limitation. When these mutations are initially present at low levels or continuously generated at a moderate rate, they can favor cooperation by further reducing local population size

  18. Relationship between psychological distress and resilience in rescue workers

    PubMed Central

    Yasien, Saba; Nasir, Jamal Abdul; Shaheen, Tayabba

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the relationship between psychological distress and resilience in rescue workers. Following hypothesis was formulated; there would be negative correlation between psychological distress and resilience in rescue workers. Method: A correlational study was conducted from June-August 2015 in Rahim Yar Khan, Punjab, Pakistan. The sample of the present study consisted of 100 rescue workers. The age of the participants ranged from 23 to 40 year old with the mean age of 27.4±3.9 years. Demographic information form, Kessler psychological distress scale and adult resilience measure were administered on the participants to assess the level of psychological distress and resilience. Results: Pearson product moment coefficient of correlation was applied to analyze the relationship of psychological distress and resilience. Analysis of the result indicated that there is negative relationship between psychological distress and resilience (r= -0.203, p<0.01) in rescue workers. Further, contextual factors (r= -0.292, p<0.05) and its subcomponents including spiritual beliefs (r= -0.239, p<0.05) and cultural resources (r= -0.287, p<0.01) were also found to be inversely correlated with psychological distress. Conclusion: The research evidenced that rescue workers were experiencing psychological distress Resilience factors should be considered while designing trainings to preserve mental health and to enhance the psychological well-being of rescue workers. PMID:27381539

  19. Space safety and rescue 1991; Proceedings of the 24th International IAA Symposium, Montreal, Canada, Oct. 5-11, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Gloria W.

    Various papers on space safety and rescue are presented. The topics addressed include: the human factor in spacecraft operation, space rescue system analysis and design, safety operation experiment M-V launch vehicle, laser systems for spacecraft hull protection, EVA self-rescue simulation in the virtual interactive environment workstation, crew escape subsystems for space transportation subsystems, enhancing safety for future space transportation systems, manned spaceflight certification, activities on space debris in Europe, management of the orbital environment, orbital space debris problem, analysis of the necessity and the effectiveness of countermeasures to prevent a chain reaction of collisions, examination of possible collisions in space, quantifying the orbital debris environment, breakup in geostationary orbit and possible creation of a debris ring, effects of chemical propulsion on the environment.

  20. 46 CFR 160.056-4 - Approval tests of prototype rescue boat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... unserviceable shall result from this drop. (b) Stability and freeboard test. The rescue boat shall have... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approval tests of prototype rescue boat. 160.056-4... tests of prototype rescue boat. (a) Drop test. The rescue boat, fully equipped, shall be dropped, in...

  1. 15 CFR 270.202 - Coordination with search and rescue efforts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Coordination with search and rescue... rescue efforts. NIST will coordinate its investigation with any search and rescue or search and recovery efforts being undertaken at the site of the building failure, including FEMA urban search and rescue teams...

  2. 15 CFR 270.202 - Coordination with search and rescue efforts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Coordination with search and rescue... rescue efforts. NIST will coordinate its investigation with any search and rescue or search and recovery efforts being undertaken at the site of the building failure, including FEMA urban search and rescue teams...

  3. 78 FR 35974 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Coal Mine Rescue Teams; Arrangements for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... Safety and Health Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Coal Mine Rescue Teams... protecting the safety and health of miners. 30 CFR Part 49, Mine Rescue Teams, Subpart B--Mine Rescue Teams for Underground Coal Mines, sets standards related to the availability of mine rescue teams;...

  4. 46 CFR 199.160 - Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery... Vessels § 199.160 Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements. (a) Each rescue boat must... be used to meet this requirement. (b) Each rescue boat embarkation and launching arrangement must...

  5. 46 CFR 160.056-4 - Approval tests of prototype rescue boat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Approval tests of prototype rescue boat. 160.056-4..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Rescue Boat § 160.056-4 Approval tests of prototype rescue boat. (a) Drop test. The rescue boat, fully equipped, shall be dropped, in a...

  6. 33 CFR 149.315 - What embarkation, launching, and recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet? 149.315 Section 149.315 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST..., launching, and recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet? (a) Each rescue boat must be capable of being... boat embarkation and launching arrangement must permit the rescue boat to be boarded and launched in...

  7. 46 CFR 160.056-4 - Approval tests of prototype rescue boat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Approval tests of prototype rescue boat. 160.056-4..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Rescue Boat § 160.056-4 Approval tests of prototype rescue boat. (a) Drop test. The rescue boat, fully equipped, shall be dropped, in a...

  8. 46 CFR 199.160 - Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery... Vessels § 199.160 Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements. (a) Each rescue boat must... be used to meet this requirement. (b) Each rescue boat embarkation and launching arrangement must...

  9. 46 CFR 12.10-9 - Endorsement for proficiency in fast rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Endorsement for proficiency in fast rescue boats. 12.10... rescue boats. (a) Each person engaged or employed as a lifeboatman proficient in fast rescue boats must... fast rescue boats, an applicant must: (1) Be qualified as a lifeboatman with proficiency in survival...

  10. 46 CFR 12.10-9 - Endorsement for proficiency in fast rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Endorsement for proficiency in fast rescue boats. 12.10... rescue boats. (a) Each person engaged or employed as a lifeboatman proficient in fast rescue boats must... fast rescue boats, an applicant must: (1) Be qualified as a lifeboatman with proficiency in survival...

  11. 33 CFR 149.315 - What embarkation, launching, and recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet? 149.315 Section 149.315 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST..., launching, and recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet? (a) Each rescue boat must be capable of being... boat embarkation and launching arrangement must permit the rescue boat to be boarded and launched in...

  12. 46 CFR 160.056-4 - Approval tests of prototype rescue boat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Approval tests of prototype rescue boat. 160.056-4..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Rescue Boat § 160.056-4 Approval tests of prototype rescue boat. (a) Drop test. The rescue boat, fully equipped, shall be dropped, in a...

  13. 46 CFR 12.10-9 - Endorsement for proficiency in fast rescue boats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Endorsement for proficiency in fast rescue boats. 12.10... rescue boats. (a) Each person engaged or employed as a lifeboatman proficient in fast rescue boats must... fast rescue boats, an applicant must: (1) Be qualified as a lifeboatman with proficiency in survival...

  14. 33 CFR 149.315 - What embarkation, launching, and recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet? 149.315 Section 149.315 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST..., launching, and recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet? (a) Each rescue boat must be capable of being... boat embarkation and launching arrangement must permit the rescue boat to be boarded and launched in...

  15. 46 CFR 199.160 - Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery... Vessels § 199.160 Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements. (a) Each rescue boat must... be used to meet this requirement. (b) Each rescue boat embarkation and launching arrangement must...

  16. 33 CFR 149.315 - What embarkation, launching, and recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet? 149.315 Section 149.315 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST..., launching, and recovery arrangements must rescue boats meet? (a) Each rescue boat must be capable of being... boat embarkation and launching arrangement must permit the rescue boat to be boarded and launched in...

  17. 46 CFR 160.056-4 - Approval tests of prototype rescue boat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Approval tests of prototype rescue boat. 160.056-4..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Rescue Boat § 160.056-4 Approval tests of prototype rescue boat. (a) Drop test. The rescue boat, fully equipped, shall be dropped, in a...

  18. 46 CFR 199.160 - Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery... Vessels § 199.160 Rescue boat embarkation, launching and recovery arrangements. (a) Each rescue boat must... be used to meet this requirement. (b) Each rescue boat embarkation and launching arrangement must...

  19. 75 FR 28200 - Safety Zone; Washington State Department of Transportation Ferries Division Marine Rescue...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Transportation Ferries Division Marine Rescue Response (M2R) Full-Scale Exercise for a Mass Rescue Incident (MRI... Transportation Ferries Division (WSF) is conducting a Marine Rescue Response (M2R) full-scale exercise in Port Madison. This training exercise will simulate a mass rescue incident (MRI) and will involve an...

  20. Project CHECO Southeast Asia Report. USAF Search and Rescue, November 1967 - June 1969

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1969-07-30

    evolution of SAR forces to meet combat recovery needs had been slow, and was now barely beginning to keep pace. Since that time, significant changes have...effecting the rescue was sufficient to allow the enemy to converge on and capture the aircrewmen. In other cases, wounded men died due to shock or...Conclusion: the computer’s been hit. It’s loso Terrain radar still working though. VSD still shows terrain countours. Action! Stop the automatic

  1. Reference frame congruency in search-and-rescue tasks.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Nada J; Keillor, Jocelyn; Hollands, Justin G; Chignell, Mark H

    2009-04-01

    Our aim was to investigate how the congruency between visual displays and auditory cues affects performance on various spatial tasks. Previous studies have demonstrated that spatial auditory cues, when combined with visual displays, can enhance performance and decrease workload. However, this facilitation was achieved only when auditory cues shared a common reference frame (RF) with the visual display. In complex and dynamic environments, such as airborne search and rescue (SAR), it is often difficult to ensure such congruency. In a simulated SAR operation, participants performed three spatial tasks: target search, target localization, and target recall. The interface consisted of the camera view of the terrain from the aircraft-mounted sensor, a map of the area flown over, a joystick that controlled the sensor, and a mouse. Auditory cues were used to indicate target location. While flying in the scenario, participants searched for targets, identified their locations in one of two coordinate systems, and memorized their location relative to the terrain layout. Congruent cues produced the fastest and most accurate performance. Performance advantages were observed even with incongruent cues relative to neutral cues, and egocentric cues were more effective than exocentric cues. Although the congruent cues are most effective, in cases in which the same cue is used across spatial tasks, egocentric cues are a better choice than exocentric cues. Egocentric auditory cues should be used in display design for tasks that involve RF transformations, such as SAR, air traffic control, and unmanned aerial vehicle operations.

  2. Performance standards for urban search and rescue robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Elena; Jacoff, Adam

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we describe work in performance standards for urban search and rescue (USAR) robots begun in 2004 by the Department of Homeland Security. This program is being coordinated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and will result in consensus standards developed through ASTM International, under the Operational Equipment Subcommittee of their Homeland Security Committee. The first phase of the program involved definition of requirements by subject matter experts. Responders participated in a series of workshops to identify deployment categories for robots, performance categories, and ranges of acceptable or target performance in the various categories. Over one hundred individual requirements were identified, within main categories such as Human-System Interaction, Logistics, Operating Environment, and System (which includes Chassis, Communications, Mobility, Payload, Power, and Sensing). To ensure that the robot developers and eventual end users work closely together, "responders meet robots" events at situationally relevant sites are being held to refine and extend the performance requirements and develop standard test methods. The results of these standard performance tests will be captured in a compendium of existing and developmental robots with classifications and descriptors to differentiate particular robotic capabilities. This, along with ongoing efforts to categorize situational USAR constraints such as building collapse types or the presence of hazardous materials, will help responders match particular robotic capabilities to response needs. In general, these efforts will enable responders to effectively use robotic tools to enhance their effectiveness while reducing risk to personnel during disasters.

  3. Betaine rescue of an animal model with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) catalyses the synthesis of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, the folate derivative utilized in homocysteine remethylation to methionine. A severe deficiency of MTHFR results in hyperhomocysteinaemia and homocystinuria. Betaine supplementation has proven effective in ameliorating the biochemical abnormalities and the clinical course in patients with this deficiency. Mice with a complete knockout of MTHFR serve as a good animal model for homocystinuria; early postnatal death of these mice is common, as with some neonates with low residual MTHFR activity. We attempted to rescue Mthfr−/− mice from postnatal death by betaine supplementation to their mothers throughout pregnancy and lactation. Betaine decreased the mortality of Mthfr−/− mice from 83% to 26% and significantly improved somatic development from postnatal day 1, compared with Mthfr−/− mice from unsupplemented dams. Biochemical evaluations demonstrated higher availability of betaine in suckling pups, decreased accumulation of homocysteine, and decreased flux through the trans-sulphuration pathway in liver and brain of Mthfr−/− pups from betaine-supplemented dams. We observed disturbances in proliferation and differentiation in the cerebellum and hippocampus in the knockout mice; these changes were ameliorated by betaine supplementation. The dramatic effects of betaine on survival and growth, and the partial reversibility of the biochemical and developmental anomalies in the brains of MTHFR-deficient mice, emphasize an important role for choline and betaine depletion in the pathogenesis of homocystinuria due to MTHFR deficiency. PMID:15217352

  4. Rescue of retinal degeneration by intravitreally injected adult bone marrow–derived lineage-negative hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Atsushi; Dorrell, Michael Ian; Kinder, Karen; Moreno, Stacey K.; Nusinowitz, Steven; Banin, Eyal; Heckenlively, John; Friedlander, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations afflict 1 in 3,500 individuals and are a heterogeneous group of diseases that result in profound vision loss, usually the result of retinal neuronal apoptosis. Atrophic changes in the retinal vasculature are also observed in many of these degenerations. While it is thought that this atrophy is secondary to diminished metabolic demand in the face of retinal degeneration, the precise relationship between the retinal neuronal and vascular degeneration is not clear. In this study we demonstrate that whenever a fraction of mouse or human adult bone marrow–derived stem cells (lineage-negative hematopoietic stem cells [Lin– HSCs]) containing endothelial precursors stabilizes and rescues retinal blood vessels that would ordinarily completely degenerate, a dramatic neurotrophic rescue effect is also observed. Retinal nuclear layers are preserved in 2 mouse models of retinal degeneration, rd1 and rd10, and detectable, albeit severely abnormal, electroretinogram recordings are observed in rescued mice at times when they are never observed in control-treated or untreated eyes. The normal mouse retina consists predominantly of rods, but the rescued cells after treatment with Lin– HSCs are nearly all cones. Microarray analysis of rescued retinas demonstrates significant upregulation of many antiapoptotic genes, including small heat shock proteins and transcription factors. These results suggest a new paradigm for thinking about the relationship between vasculature and associated retinal neuronal tissue as well as a potential treatment for delaying the progression of vision loss associated with retinal degeneration regardless of the underlying genetic defect. PMID:15372100

  5. Experimental test of genetic rescue in isolated populations of brook trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Zachary L.; Coombs, Jason A.; Hudy, Mark; Nislow, Keith H.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic rescue is an increasingly considered conservation measure to address genetic erosion associated with habitat loss and fragmentation. The resulting gene flow from facilitating migration may improve fitness and adaptive potential, but is not without risks (e.g., outbreeding depression). Here, we conducted a test of genetic rescue by translocating ten (five of each sex) brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from a single source to four nearby and isolated stream populations. To control for the demographic contribution of translocated individuals, ten resident individuals (five of each sex) were removed from each recipient population. Prior to the introduction of translocated individuals, the two smallest above-barrier populations had substantially lower genetic diversity, and all populations had reduced effective number of breeders relative to adjacent below-barrier populations. In the first reproductive bout following translocation, 31 of 40 (78%) translocated individuals reproduced successfully. Translocated individuals contributed to more families than expected under random mating and generally produced larger full-sibling families. We observed relatively high (>20%) introgression in three of the four recipient populations. The translocations increased genetic diversity of recipient populations by 45% in allelic richness and 25% in expected heterozygosity. Additionally, strong evidence of hybrid vigour was observed through significantly larger body sizes of hybrid offspring relative to resident offspring in all recipient populations. Continued monitoring of these populations will test for negative fitness effects beyond the first generation. However, these results provide much-needed experimental data to inform the potential effectiveness of genetic rescue-motivated translocations.

  6. The Drosophila melanogaster hybrid male rescue gene causes inviability in male and female species hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Barbash, D A; Roote, J; Ashburner, M

    2000-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster mutation Hmr rescues inviable hybrid sons from the cross of D. melanogaster females to males of its sibling species D. mauritiana, D. simulans, and D. sechellia. We have extended previous observations that hybrid daughters from this cross are poorly viable at high temperatures and have shown that this female lethality is suppressed by Hmr and the rescue mutations In(1)AB and D. simulans Lhr. Deficiencies defined here as Hmr(-) also suppressed lethality, demonstrating that reducing Hmr(+) activity can rescue otherwise inviable hybrids. An Hmr(+) duplication had the opposite effect of reducing the viability of female and sibling X-male hybrid progeny. Similar dose-dependent viability effects of Hmr were observed in the reciprocal cross of D. simulans females to D. melanogaster males. Finally, Lhr and Hmr(+) were shown to have mutually antagonistic effects on hybrid viability. These data suggest a model where the interaction of sibling species Lhr(+) and D. melanogaster Hmr(+) causes lethality in both sexes of species hybrids and in both directions of crossing. Our results further suggest that a twofold difference in Hmr(+) dosage accounts in part for the differential viability of male and female hybrid progeny, but also that additional, unidentified genes must be invoked to account for the invariant lethality of hybrid sons of D. melanogaster mothers. Implications of our findings for understanding Haldane's rule-the observation that hybrid breakdown is often specific to the heterogametic sex-are also discussed. PMID:10747067

  7. Rescuing Joint Personnel Recovery: Using Air Force Capability to Address Joint Shortfalls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Combat Rescue Officer career field, graduating the Combat Rescue Officer Course in 2003. His first CRO assignment was at the 38th Rescue Squadron...9 commands to prepare for requests for DOD assets should the need arise. The USAF Rescue community is no stranger to DSCA operations. The 347th...focusing the search and rescue efforts of all responding assets while ensuring a safe, mishap-free operation. Over 400 USAF members from the active duty

  8. Dialysis Access Hemorrhage: Access Rescue from a Surgical Emergency.

    PubMed

    Inui, Tazo; Boulom, Valy; Bandyk, Dennis; Lane, John S; Owens, Erik; Barleben, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Hemorrhage from a dialysis access can be a life-threatening condition. This study details our experience using access rescue strategies, including in situ graft replacement, primary repair, or conversion to an autogenous fistula, coupled with treatment of central vein occlusion to maintain access usage in patients presenting with conduit hemorrhage. During a 3-year period (2012-2014), 26 patients (14 women, 12 men) on chronic hemodialysis were treated for access conduit bleeding (n = 18) or life-threatening hemorrhage (n = 8), located in the upper extremity (n = 23) or thigh (n = 3). All patients had developed bleeding from a skin eschar/ulcer over a bovine (n = 9) or polytetrafluoroethylene (n = 9) bridge graft, or aneurysmal autogenous fistula (n = 8). A retrospective review of outcome relative to clinical signs, etiology of conduit bleeding (infection, wall erosion), and the type of rescue procedure(s) was performed. Duplex ultrasound testing was used to guide therapy based on the presence of aneurysmal degeneration, perigraft fluid, or access flow pattern indicative of venous outflow obstruction. One-half of the patients were taken emergently to the operating room for hemorrhage control or impending rupture of an infected false aneurysm, the remaining repaired on an urgent basis. In 18 patients, emergency room personnel attempted control of access site bleeding by suturing (n = 14) or tourniquet (n = 4). Dialysis access salvage was achieved in 22 (85%) of 26 patients by in situ conduit replacement using a rifampin-soaked polytetrafluoroethylene conduit (n = 19) or primary repair (n = 3). Two patients with sepsis and ruptured, infected false aneurysm were treated by ligation, and 2 patients with nonsalvable access had conversion to an autogenous fistula. One-third of rescued accesses (n = 7) had staged endovascular treatment of central vein stenosis. One patient died within 30 days. All dialysis access revisions remained patent and used

  9. Rapamycin Rescues the Poor Developmental Capacity of Aged Porcine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Hyun Yong; Moon, Jeremiah Jiman; Park, Min Jee; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Park, Se Pill

    2014-01-01

    Unfertilized oocytes age inevitably after ovulation, which limits their fertilizable life span and embryonic development. Rapamycin affects mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) expression and cytoskeleton reorganization during oocyte meiotic maturation. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of rapamycin treatment on aged porcine oocytes and their in vitro development. Rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes for 24 h (68 h in vitro maturation [IVM]; 44 h+10 μM rapamycin/24 h, 47.52±5.68) or control oocytes (44 h IVM; 42.14±4.40) significantly increased the development rate and total cell number compared with untreated aged oocytes (68 h IVM, 22.04±5.68) (p<0.05). Rapamycin treatment of aged IVM oocytes for 24 h also rescued aberrant spindle organization and chromosomal misalignment, blocked the decrease in the level of phosphorylated-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and increased the mRNA expression of cytoplasmic maturation factor genes (MOS, BMP15, GDF9, and CCNB1) compared with untreated, 24 h-aged IVM oocytes (p<0.05). Furthermore, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity and DNA fragmentation (p<0.05), and downregulated the mRNA expression of mTOR compared with control or untreated aged oocytes. By contrast, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes increased mitochondrial localization (p<0.05) and upregulated the mRNA expression of autophagy (BECN1, ATG7, MAP1LC3B, ATG12, GABARAP, and GABARAPL1), anti-apoptosis (BCL2L1 and BIRC5; p<0.05), and development (NANOG and SOX2; p<0.05) genes, but it did not affect the mRNA expression of pro-apoptosis genes (FAS and CASP3) compared with the control. This study demonstrates that rapamycin treatment can rescue the poor developmental capacity of aged porcine oocytes. PMID:25049998

  10. Effects of glucosamine sulfate on the use of rescue non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in knee osteoarthritis: Results from the Pharmaco-Epidemiology of GonArthroSis (PEGASus) study.

    PubMed

    Rovati, Lucio C; Girolami, Federica; D'Amato, Massimo; Giacovelli, Giampaolo

    2016-02-01

    The use of Symptomatic Slow-Acting Drugs in Osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) may be expected to decrease the use of concomitant medications for rescue analgesia, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The Pharmaco-Epidemiology of GonArthroSis (PEGASus) study was designed to assess this possibility. PEGASus was a cohort study of continuous recruitment of patients with "dynamic" exposure to the investigated SYSADOA (crystalline glucosamine sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, chondroitin sulfate, diacerein, and avocado-soybean unsaponifiables, all at approved dosages). Investigators were rheumatologists or general practitioners randomly selected from French telephone lists. Patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis (OA) were recruited when consulting an investigator for a symptom flare and were prescribed, or not, one of the SYSADOAs as per clinical judgment. Follow-up visits were as per routine medical practice in the 12 months following enrollment, with telephone interviews after 1 month and at 4-month intervals thereafter up to 24 months. Use of NSAIDs was recorded, as well as the dynamism of treatment exposure consisting of continuing the prescribed SYSADOA, switching, discontinuation or initiation of a SYSADOA. Patient exposure was expressed in 2-month time units, with any NSAID use as Yes/No binary outcome during each unit. Odds ratios [OR and 95% confidence interval (CI)] of NSAID use were calculated for periods of exposure to each SYSADOA, by multivariate logistic regression for an 80% power and 95% confidence to see a decrease of at least 15%. This report consists of the full data pertaining to crystalline glucosamine sulfate, while results of other SYSADOAs were summarized as available from the French Health Authority (HAS) website (www.has-sante.fr). Of 6451 patients in the PEGASus cohort, 315 patients received crystalline glucosamine sulfate, they were exposed for 481 2-month time units and had an incident use of NSAIDs of 18.7%. In the

  11. Occupational meanings and coping practices of rescue workers in an earthquake disaster.

    PubMed

    Stuhlmiller, C M

    1994-06-01

    On 17 October 1989, an earthquake measuring 7.1 on the Richter scale struck the San Francisco Bay Area, causing the collapse of .76 miles of a double-decker roadway (known as the Cypress Street Viaduct), resulting in the death of 42 people. A study examined the effects of rescue work at 6 and 20 months after the event, among 42 people including: military pararescuers, firefighters, transportation workers, and coroner-investigators. The researcher explored the rescuers' motivations, actions, coping strategies, interactions, and understanding of their responses to the event, as well as the practical wisdom each acquired. This article focuses on the 6-month data, and reports the specific work meanings and practices that shaped forms of involvement, issues of stress, and sources of coping that influenced the experience of rescue work in this disaster.

  12. Resolving ethical dilemmas in suicide prevention: the case of telephone helpline rescue policies.

    PubMed

    Mishara, Brian L; Weisstub, David N

    2010-04-01

    The ethical basis of suicide prevention is illustrated by contrasting helpline emergency rescue policies of the Samaritans and the AAS and the U.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline network. We contrast moralist, relativist, and libertarian ethical premises and question whether suicide can be rational. Samaritans respect a caller's right to decide to die by suicide; U.S. helplines oblige emergency intervention during an attempt even against the caller's will. We analyze the effect of emergency rescue when there is high suicide risk but an attempt has not been initiated. We examine links between values and actions, needs for empirical evidence to guide practice, and propose vigorous dialogue about values in the gray zone of moral practice.

  13. Flight tests with enhanced/synthetic vision system for rescue helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Hiroka; Funabiki, Kohei; Iijima, Tomoko; Tawada, Kazuho; Yoshida, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) has been conducting a research project named SAVERH (Situation Awareness and Visual Enhancer for Rescue Helicopter) with Shimadzu Corporation and NEC from 2008. SAVERH aims at inventing a method of presenting suitable information to the pilot to support search and rescue missions. An integrated system comprising an HMD (Helmet-Mounted Display) and a FLIR (Forward Looking Infrared) sensor were installed in a JAXA research helicopter, and a series of flight tests was conducted to evaluate the benefit of presenting FLIR images on the HMD in night flight. Three pilots evaluated the display system during six night flights, considering terrain and position awareness. The tests showed that use of FLIR gave better route tracking performance, and the effectiveness of head-slaved FLIR on an approach task was shown by subjective pilot rating.

  14. Obesity-programmed mice are rescued by early genetic intervention.

    PubMed

    Bumaschny, Viviana F; Yamashita, Miho; Casas-Cordero, Rodrigo; Otero-Corchón, Verónica; de Souza, Flávio S J; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J

    2012-11-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting half a billion people worldwide. Major difficulties in managing obesity are the cessation of continued weight loss in patients after an initial period of responsiveness and rebound to pretreatment weight. It is conceivable that chronic weight gain unrelated to physiological needs induces an allostatic regulatory state that defends a supranormal adipose mass despite its maladaptive consequences. To challenge this hypothesis, we generated a reversible genetic mouse model of early-onset hyperphagia and severe obesity by selectively blocking the expression of the proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc) in hypothalamic neurons. Eutopic reactivation of central POMC transmission at different stages of overweight progression normalized or greatly reduced food intake in these obesity-programmed mice. Hypothalamic Pomc rescue also attenuated comorbidities such as hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic steatosis and normalized locomotor activity. However, effectiveness of treatment to normalize body weight and adiposity declined progressively as the level of obesity at the time of Pomc induction increased. Thus, our study using a novel reversible monogenic obesity model reveals the critical importance of early intervention for the prevention of subsequent allostatic overload that auto-perpetuates obesity.

  15. Can education rescue genetic liability for cognitive decline?

    PubMed

    Cook, C Justin; Fletcher, Jason M

    2015-02-01

    Although there is a vast literature linking education and later health outcomes, the mechanisms underlying these associations are relatively unknown. In the spirit of some medical literature that leverages developmental abnormalities to understand mechanisms of normative functioning, we explore the ability of higher educational attainments to "rescue" biological/genetic liabilities in brain function through inheritance of a variant of the APOE gene shown to lead to cognitive decline, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease in old age. Deploying a between-sibling design that allows quasi-experimental variation in genotype and educational attainment within a standard gene-environment interaction framework, we show evidence that the genetic effects of the "risky" APOE variant on old-age cognitive decline are absent in individuals who complete college (vs. high school graduates). Auxiliary analyses suggest that the likely mechanisms of education are most consistent through changing brain processes (i.e., "how we think") and potentially building cognitive reserves, rather than alleviating old age cognitive decline through the channels of higher socioeconomic status and resources over the life course. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Microtubule stabilising peptides rescue tau phenotypes in-vivo

    PubMed Central

    Quraishe, Shmma; Sealey, Megan; Cranfield, Louise; Mudher, Amritpal

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic, filamentous network underpinning cellular structure and function. In Alzheimer’s disease, the microtubule cytoskeleton is compromised, leading to neuronal dysfunction and eventually cell death. There are currently no disease-modifying therapies to slow down or halt disease progression. However, microtubule stabilisation is a promising therapeutic strategy that is being explored. We previously investigated the disease-modifying potential of a microtubule-stabilising peptide NAP (NAPVSIPQ) in a well-established Drosophila model of tauopathy characterised by microtubule breakdown and axonal transport deficits. NAP prevented as well as reversed these phenotypes even after they had become established. In this study, we investigate the neuroprotective capabilities of an analogous peptide SAL (SALLRSIPA). We found that SAL mimicked NAP’s protective effects, by preventing axonal transport disruption and improving behavioural deficits, suggesting both NAP and SAL may act via a common mechanism. Both peptides contain a putative ‘SIP’ (Ser-Ile-Pro) domain that is important for interactions with microtubule end-binding proteins. Our data suggests this domain may be central to the microtubule stabilising function of both peptides and the mechanism by which they rescue phenotypes in this model of tauopathy. Our observations support microtubule stabilisation as a promising disease-modifying therapeutic strategy for tauopathies like Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27910888

  17. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks can rescue cooperation in microbial populations

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Fenoll, Clara; Cavaliere, Matteo; Martínez-García, Esteban; Poyatos, Juan F.

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial populations whose growth depends on the cooperative production of public goods are usually threatened by the rise of cheaters that do not contribute but just consume the common resource. Minimizing cheater invasions appears then as a necessary mechanism to maintain these populations. However, that invasions result instead in the persistence of cooperation is a prospect that has yet remained largely unexplored. Here, we show that the demographic collapse induced by cheaters in the population can actually contribute to the rescue of cooperation, in a clear illustration of how ecology and evolution can influence each other. The effect is made possible by the interplay between spatial constraints and the essentiality of the shared resource. We validate this result by carefully combining theory and experiments, with the engineering of a synthetic bacterial community in which the public compound allows survival to a lethal stress. The characterization of the experimental system identifies additional factors that can matter, like the impact of the lag phase on the tolerance to stress, or the appearance of spontaneous mutants. Our work explains the unanticipated dynamics that eco-evolutionary feedbacks can generate in microbial communities, feedbacks that reveal fundamental for the adaptive change of ecosystems at all scales. PMID:28211914

  18. LUCAS(™)2 in Danish Search and Rescue Helicopters.

    PubMed

    Winther, Kasper; Bleeg, René Christian

    2016-01-01

    Prehospital resuscitation is often challenging. Giving uninterrupted and effective compressions is relatively impossible during transportation. In 2012, The Royal Danish Air Force received a donation of 8 mechanical chest compression devices (LUCAS(™)2; Physio-Control/Jolife AB, Lund, Sweden) to be used onboard the Danish search and rescue (SAR) helicopters. The scope of this investigation was to establish whether or not mechanical chest compression devices should be considered a necessity onboard the Danish SAR helicopters. Data were compiled from SAR medical journals. From the data collected, observations were made as to when LUCAS(™)2 was used and what diagnosis the SAR physician made. One thousand ninety missions were registered in the 24-month research period, and LUCAS(™)2 was used in 25 missions. Cardiac emergencies amounted for 25% of the missions. The Danish SAR helicopters retrieved 33 drowned/hypothermic patients during the research period, and the LUCAS(™)2 was used in 11 of the patients requiring resuscitation. The LUCAS(™)2 was frequently used during other emergencies like sudden cardiac arrest. Cardiac emergencies were the predominant type of mission. LUCAS(™)2 is now considered mandatory on Danish SAR helicopters. Copyright © 2016 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rescue of nonsense mutations by amlexanox in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nonsense mutations are at the origin of many cancers and inherited genetic diseases. The consequence of nonsense mutations is often the absence of mutant gene expression due to the activation of an mRNA surveillance mechanism called nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Strategies to rescue the expression of nonsense-containing mRNAs have been developed such as NMD inhibition or nonsense mutation readthrough. Methods Using a dedicated screening system, we sought molecules capable to block NMD. Additionally, 3 cell lines derived from patient cells and harboring a nonsense mutation were used to study the effect of the selected molecule on the level of nonsense-containing mRNAs and the synthesis of proteins from these mutant mRNAs. Results We demonstrate here that amlexanox, a drug used for decades, not only induces an increase in nonsense-containing mRNAs amount in treated cells, but also leads to the synthesis of the full-length protein in an efficient manner. We also demonstrated that these full length proteins are functional. Conclusions As a result of this dual activity, amlexanox may be useful as a therapeutic approach for diseases caused by nonsense mutations. PMID:22938201

  20. Obesity-programmed mice are rescued by early genetic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bumaschny, Viviana F.; Yamashita, Miho; Casas-Cordero, Rodrigo; Otero-Corchón, Verónica; de Souza, Flávio S.J.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting half a billion people worldwide. Major difficulties in managing obesity are the cessation of continued weight loss in patients after an initial period of responsiveness and rebound to pretreatment weight. It is conceivable that chronic weight gain unrelated to physiological needs induces an allostatic regulatory state that defends a supranormal adipose mass despite its maladaptive consequences. To challenge this hypothesis, we generated a reversible genetic mouse model of early-onset hyperphagia and severe obesity by selectively blocking the expression of the proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc) in hypothalamic neurons. Eutopic reactivation of central POMC transmission at different stages of overweight progression normalized or greatly reduced food intake in these obesity-programmed mice. Hypothalamic Pomc rescue also attenuated comorbidities such as hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hepatic steatosis and normalized locomotor activity. However, effectiveness of treatment to normalize body weight and adiposity declined progressively as the level of obesity at the time of Pomc induction increased. Thus, our study using a novel reversible monogenic obesity model reveals the critical importance of early intervention for the prevention of subsequent allostatic overload that auto-perpetuates obesity. PMID:23093774