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Sample records for air basin surrounding

  1. Air quality interventions and spatial dynamics of air pollution in Delhi and its surroundings

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh; Foster, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper examines the spatial distribution of air pollution in response to recent air quality regulations in Delhi, India. Air pollution was monitored at 113 sites spread across Delhi and its surrounding areas from July–December 2003. From the analysis of these data three important findings emerge. First, air pollution levels in Delhi and its surroundings were significantly higher than that recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Second, air quality regulations in the city adversely affected the air quality of the areas surrounding Delhi. Third, industries and trucks were identified as the major contributors of both fine and coarse particles. PMID:23105916

  2. [Toxic fungi in Buenos Aires City and surroundings].

    PubMed

    Romano, Gonzalo M; Iannone, Leopoldo; Novas, María V; Carmarán, Cecilia; Romero, Andrea I; López, Silvia E; Lechner, Bernardo E

    2013-01-01

    In Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales,Universidad de Buenos Aires there is a service called Servicio de Identificación de Hongos Tóxicos, directed by researchers of the Program of Medicinal Plants and Fungi Involved in Biological Degradation (PROPLAME-PRHIDEB, CONICET) that assist hospitals and other health establishments, identifying the different samples of fungi and providing information about their toxicity, so that patients can receive the correct treatment. The objective of the present study was to analyze all the cases received from 1985 to 2012. This analysis permitted the confection of a table identifying the most common toxic species. The information gathered revealed that 47% of the patients were under 18 years of age and had eaten basidiomes; the remaining 53% were adults who insisted that they were able to distinguish edible from toxic mushrooms. Chlorophyllum molybdites turned out to be the main cause of fungal intoxication in Buenos Aires, which is commonly confused with Macrolepiota procera, an edible mushroom. In the second place Amanita phalloides was registered, an agaric known to cause severe symptoms after a long period of latency (6-10 hours), and which can lead to hepatic failure even requiring a transplant to prevent severe internal injuries or even death, is not early and correctly treated. PMID:24152394

  3. Bacterial plume emanating from the air surrounding swine confinement operations.

    PubMed

    Green, Christopher F; Gibbs, Shawn G; Tarwater, Patrick M; Mota, Linda C; Scarpino, Pasquale V

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the levels of bacteria in the air plume immediately upwind at 25 m and downwind at locations 25 m, 50 m, 100 m, and 150 m from a confined animal feeding operation (CAFO). It was hypothesized that this would give insight into determining the maximal distance that bacterial organisms release from a CAFO could travel, which would be important in determining the optimal siting distance for future CAFO in relation to high population areas. The Andersen two-stage sampler was used to collect all of the bacterial samples from the animal confinement facilities. The data show a marked increase in bacterial CFUs/m3 inside the facility (18,132 CFU/m3 average) versus upwind (63 CFU/m3 average) anda steady down wind decrease out to approximately 150 m. Staphylococcus aureus was found to account for 76% of the organisms recovered. We conclude that the optimal placement of a swine CAFO would be at least 200 m from a residential area. PMID:16482973

  4. Tectonic implications of flexural modeling of the Uinta Mountains and surrounding basins since early Eocene time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratigan, D.; Heller, P.; Trampush, S. M.; Chen, P.; Dueker, K.

    2012-12-01

    across southern Wyoming is an order of magnitude higher, and across Utah is an order of magnitude lower, than previous estimates based on analysis of Cretaceous deflections, suggesting possible changes in rigidity through time. In addition, assuming lakes in the Uinta and Green River basins were connected at the time of deposition of the paleodatum, the difference in present elevation of the inflection point of the subsidence profiles suggests that there has been a net isostatic offset between the two basins. The origins of this offset might be due to regional isostatic differences from lithospheric density contrasts. Future work will include 3-D flexural modeling across all of the basins surrounding the Uinta Mountains, including the Piceance Creek, Sand Wash, and Washakie Basins.

  5. Pneumocystis jirovecii in the air surrounding patients with Pneumocystis pulmonary colonization.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Solène; Pougnet, Laurence; Damiani, Céline; Fréalle, Emilie; Guéguen, Paul; Virmaux, Michèle; Ansart, Séverine; Jaffuel, Sylvain; Couturaud, Francis; Delluc, Aurélien; Tonnelier, Jean-Marie; Castellant, Philippe; Le Meur, Yann; Le Floch, Gaétan; Totet, Anne; Menotti, Jean; Nevez, Gilles

    2015-06-01

    In this study, Pneumocystis jirovecii was detected and characterized in the air surrounding patients with Pneumocystis pulmonary colonization. Air samples were collected in the rooms of 10 colonized patients using Coriolis® μ air sampler at 1m and 5m from the patient's head. P. jirovecii DNA was amplified and genotyped in pulmonary and air samples at the mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA gene. P. jirovecii DNA was detected in 5 of the 10 air samples collected at 1m and in 5 of the 10 other air samples collected at 5m. P. jirovecii genotyping was successful in 4 pairs or triplets of air and pulmonary samples. Full genotype matches were observed in 3 of the 4 pairs or triplets of air and pulmonary samples. These results provide original data supporting P. jirovecii exhalation from colonized patients and emphasize the risk of P. jirovecii nosocomial transmission from this patient population. PMID:25801779

  6. Surrounding Greenness and Exposure to Air Pollution During Pregnancy: An Analysis of Personal Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    de Nazelle, Audrey; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; Schembari, Anna; Cirach, Marta; Amoly, Elmira; Figueras, Francesc; Basagaña, Xavier; Ostro, Bart; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Background: Green spaces are reported to improve health status, including beneficial effects on pregnancy outcomes. Despite the suggestions of air pollution–related health benefits of green spaces, there is no available evidence on the impact of greenness on personal exposure to air pollution. Objectives: We investigated the association between surrounding greenness and personal exposure to air pollution among pregnant women and to explore the potential mechanisms, if any, behind this association. Methods: In total, 65 rounds of sampling were carried out for 54 pregnant women who resided in Barcelona during 2008–2009. Each round consisted of a 2-day measurement of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and a 1-week measurement of nitric oxides collected simultaneously at both the personal and microenvironmental levels. The study participants were also asked to fill out a time–microenvironment–activity diary during the sampling period. We used satellite retrievals to determine the surrounding greenness as the average of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in a buffer of 100 m around each maternal residential address. We estimated the impact of surrounding greenness on personal exposure levels, home-outdoor and home-indoor pollutant levels, and maternal time-activity. Results: Higher residential surrounding greenness was associated with lower personal, home-indoor, and home-outdoor PM2.5 levels, and more time spent at home-outdoor. Conclusions: We found lower levels of personal exposure to air pollution among pregnant women residing in greener areas. This finding may be partly explained by lower home-indoor pollutant levels and more time spent in less polluted home-outdoor environment by pregnant women in greener areas. PMID:22647671

  7. Seismic structure of the crust and uppermost mantle of South America and surrounding oceanic basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chulick, Gary S.; Detweiler, Shane; Mooney, Walter D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new set of contour maps of the seismic structure of South America and the surrounding ocean basins. These maps include new data, helping to constrain crustal thickness, whole-crustal average P-wave and S-wave velocity, and the seismic velocity of the uppermost mantle (Pn and Sn). We find that: (1) The weighted average thickness of the crust under South America is 38.17 km (standard deviation, s.d. ±8.7 km), which is ∼1 km thinner than the global average of 39.2 km (s.d. ±8.5 km) for continental crust. (2) Histograms of whole-crustal P-wave velocities for the South American crust are bi-modal, with the lower peak occurring for crust that appears to be missing a high-velocity (6.9–7.3 km/s) lower crustal layer. (3) The average P-wave velocity of the crystalline crust (Pcc) is 6.47 km/s (s.d. ±0.25 km/s). This is essentially identical to the global average of 6.45 km/s. (4) The average Pn velocity beneath South America is 8.00 km/s (s.d. ±0.23 km/s), slightly lower than the global average of 8.07 km/s. (5) A region across northern Chile and northeast Argentina has anomalously low P- and S-wave velocities in the crust. Geographically, this corresponds to the shallowly-subducted portion of the Nazca plate (the Pampean flat slab first described by Isacks et al., 1968), which is also a region of crustal extension. (6) The thick crust of the Brazilian craton appears to extend into Venezuela and Colombia. (7) The crust in the Amazon basin and along the western edge of the Brazilian craton may be thinned by extension. (8) The average crustal P-wave velocity under the eastern Pacific seafloor is higher than under the western Atlantic seafloor, most likely due to the thicker sediment layer on the older Atlantic seafloor.

  8. An Investigation of Air Quality Surrounding Lake Merritt in Oakland, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ararso, I.; Casino, N.; Chen, B.; Johnson, J.; Koerber, K. W.; Lau, S.; Truisi, V.; Yanez, M.; Yeung, A.; Unigarro, M.; Vue, G.; Garduno, L.; Cuff, K.

    2005-12-01

    Lake Merritt is a naturally occurring inlet from the San Francisco Bay that was converted into an urban lake near downtown Oakland in 1860. The Lake itself is located within the Lake Merritt Park and Wildlife Refuge, home to over 90 species of migrating waterfowl, as well as a variety of aquatic wildlife. Its close proximity to downtown, several busy roads, and two major highways makes Lake Merritt a popular destination that is easily accessible to Oakland residents, but also puts it at risk for impaired air quality due to automobile exhaust. In an effort to assess air quality near Lake Merritt, we measured percent oxygen and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in ambient air. These two gases can be used to assess air quality because the significant build up of CO2, which primarily results from the incomplete combustion of personal automobile engines, can result in the reduction of oxygen to concentration levels that are hazardous to human and other life. During the Summer of 2005, air samples from over 90 different locations were collected and used to make these measurements. Measurements were made with PASCO data-loggers attached to sensors that use infrared detectors to measure the amount of energy absorbed by carbon dioxide and oxygen molecules. Results were statistically analyzed, mapped, and used to assess the overall quality of air surrounding the Lake. Preliminary analysis of oxygen data indicates that higher concentration levels occur near sections of the Lake that are furthest removed from major roads, as well as in areas that have significant amounts of vegetation. In fact, the highest value recorded in this study was measured in a sample obtained near a grove of trees in a portion of the park that has the most vegetation, and that is furthest removed from major roads. Air quality here is high primarily due to the absence of CO2 build up associated with automobile traffic. The lowest values recorded were measured in samples collected along a stretch of

  9. Magnetic properties of cherts from the Basque-Cantabrian basin and surrounding regions: archeological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrasoaña, Juan; Beamud, Elisabet; Olivares, Maitane; Murelaga, Xabier; Tarriño, Andoni; Baceta, Juan; Etxebarria, Nestor

    2016-04-01

    We present the first rock magnetic study of archeologically-relevant chert samples from the Basque-Cantabrian basin (BCB) and surrounding regions, which was conducted in order to test the usefulness of non-destructive magnetic properties for assessing chert quality, distinguishing source areas, and identifying heated samples in the archeological record. Our results indicate that the studied BCB cherts are diamagnetic and have very low amounts of magnetic minerals. The only exception is the chert of Artxilondo, which has a mean positive magnetic susceptibility associated with larger concentrations of magnetic minerals. But even in this case, the magnetic susceptibility is within the lower range of other archeologically-relevant cherts elsewhere, which indicates that the studied BCB cherts can be considered as flint. The similar mean values for all magnetic properties, along with their associated large standard deviations, indicates that rock magnetic methods are of limited use for sourcing different types of flint except in some specific contexts involving the Artxilondo flint. With regards to the identification of chert heating in the archeological record, our results indicate only a minor magnetic enhancement of BCB natural flint samples upon heating, which we attribute to the low amount of non-silica impurities. In any case, the diamagnetic behavior of most BCB natural flints, along with the local use only of the Artxilondo type, suggests that any flint tool within the core of the BCB with positive magnetic susceptibility values is likely to have been subjected to heating for improving its knapping properties. Further studies are necessary to better identify the type, origin and grain size of magnetic minerals in BCB natural flints, and to apply non-destructive magnetic properties to flint tools in order to identify the use of heat treatment in the BCB archeological record.

  10. Decomposition Odour Profiling in the Air and Soil Surrounding Vertebrate Carrion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chemical profiling of decomposition odour is conducted in the environmental sciences to detect malodourous target sources in air, water or soil. More recently decomposition odour profiling has been employed in the forensic sciences to generate a profile of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by decomposed remains. The chemical profile of decomposition odour is still being debated with variations in the VOC profile attributed to the sample collection technique, method of chemical analysis, and environment in which decomposition occurred. To date, little consideration has been given to the partitioning of odour between different matrices and the impact this has on developing an accurate VOC profile. The purpose of this research was to investigate the decomposition odour profile surrounding vertebrate carrion to determine how VOCs partition between soil and air. Four pig carcasses (Sus scrofa domesticus L.) were placed on a soil surface to decompose naturally and their odour profile monitored over a period of two months. Corresponding control sites were also monitored to determine the VOC profile of the surrounding environment. Samples were collected from the soil below and the air (headspace) above the decomposed remains using sorbent tubes and analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 249 compounds were identified but only 58 compounds were common to both air and soil samples. This study has demonstrated that soil and air samples produce distinct subsets of VOCs that contribute to the overall decomposition odour. Sample collection from only one matrix will reduce the likelihood of detecting the complete spectrum of VOCs, which further confounds the issue of determining a complete and accurate decomposition odour profile. Confirmation of this profile will enhance the performance of cadaver-detection dogs that are tasked with detecting decomposition odour in both soil and air to locate victim remains. PMID:24740412

  11. Simulations of a cold-air pool associated with elevated wintertime ozone in the Uintah Basin, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neemann, E. M.; Crosman, E. T.; Horel, J. D.; Avey, L.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations are used to investigate the meteorological characteristics of the 31 January-6 February 2013 cold-air pool in the Uintah Basin, Utah, and the resulting high ozone concentrations. Flow features affecting cold-air pools and air quality in the Uintah Basin are studied, including the following: penetration of clean air into the basin from across the surrounding mountains, elevated easterlies within the inversion layer, and thermally driven slope and valley flows. The sensitivity of the boundary layer structure to snow cover variations and cloud microphysics are also examined. Snow cover increases boundary layer stability by enhancing the surface albedo, reducing the absorbed solar insolation at the surface, and lowering near-surface air temperatures. Snow cover also increases ozone levels by enhancing solar radiation available for photochemical reactions. Ice-dominant clouds enhance cold-air pool strength compared to liquid-dominant clouds by increasing nocturnal cooling and decreasing longwave cloud forcing.

  12. Two-Phase PIV: Fuel-Spray Interaction with Surrounding Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankers, Stefan; Gotthardt, Mark; Stengler, Thomas; Ohmstede, Gerhard; Hentschel, Werner

    The demand for improvement of combustion-engine processes leads to a great need for detailed experimental information about the complicated processes of injection, breakup and propagation of the fuel jet and the vaporization of the fuel. Thus, in the presented work it was the aim to visualize the air flow that is induced by the injected fuel jet and also to explore the air entrainment into the fuel spray. This was done using two-phase PIV (particle image velocimetry). The fuel jet was illuminated with a Nd:YAG PIV-laser and PIV analysis was done by simply measuring the elastically scattered light of the fuel droplets. For the investigation of the surrounding air propylene-carbonate doped with DCM-dye was dispersed and the droplets were added to the continuous gas flow upstream of the chamber. Scattered and fluorescence signals, respectively, were detected perpendicular to the laser sheet with a CCD camera. To detect the gas flow, the scattered light from the liquid fuel was suppressed by an OG 590 longpass filter glass that transmits the fluorescence signal of the DCM-dye. It was possible to measure both the fuel jet and the gas flow in the presence of the fuel spray and a clear separation of the two phases could be achieved. In both (fuel and air) vector pictures corresponding vortices could be identified near the air/fuel boundary layer. Maximum velocities in the jet are depending on the operation conditions up to 150ms-1 and the gas flow has typically a velocity of 1 to 10ms-1. In the region next to the injector the air was pressed away during the injection. After the end of the injection a strong fast air entrainment flow into this region can be observed that compensates the pressure difference.

  13. Air Quality in Mecca and Surrounding Holy Places in Saudi Arabia during Hajj: Initial Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, I. J.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Siddique, A.; Barletta, B.; Blake, N. J.; Gartner, A.; Khwaja, H. A.; Meinardi, S.; Zeb, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The Arabian Peninsula experiences severe air pollution yet is highly understudied in terms of surface measurements of ozone and its precursors. Every year the air pollution in Saudi Arabia is intensified by additional traffic and activities during Hajj, the world's largest religious pilgrimage that draws 3‒4 million pilgrims to Mecca (population of 2 million). Using whole air sampling and high-precision measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and 97 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), we performed an initial survey of air quality in Mecca, its tunnels, and surrounding holy sites during the 2012 Hajj (October 24-27; n = 77). This is the first time such a campaign has been undertaken. Levels of the combustion tracer CO and numerous VOCs were strongly elevated along the pilgrimage route, especially in the tunnels of Mecca, and are a concern for human health. For example CO reached 57 ppmv in the tunnels, exceeding the 30-min exposure guideline of 50 ppmv. Benzene, a known carcinogen, reached 185 ppbv in the tunnels, exceeding the 1-hr exposure limit of 9 ppbv. The gasoline evaporation tracer i-pentane was the most abundant VOC during Hajj, reaching 1200 ppbv in the tunnels. Even though VOC concentrations were generally lower during a follow-up non-Hajj sampling period (April, 2013), many were still comparable to other large cities suffering from poor air quality. Major VOC sources during Hajj included vehicular exhaust, gasoline evaporation, liquefied petroleum gas, and air conditioners. Of the measured compounds, reactive alkenes (associated with gasoline evaporation) and CO showed the strongest potential to form ground-level ozone. Therefore efforts to curb ozone formation likely require dual targeting of both combustive and evaporative fossil fuel sources. However, modeling and other measurements (e.g., nitrogen oxides) are also needed to fully understand Mecca's oxidative environment. We also present specific recommendations to reduce VOC emissions and exposure in

  14. Air quality in Mecca and surrounding holy places in Saudi Arabia during Hajj: initial survey.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Isobel J; Aburizaiza, Omar S; Siddique, Azhar; Barletta, Barbara; Blake, Nicola J; Gartner, Aaron; Khwaja, Haider; Meinardi, Simone; Zeb, Jahan; Blake, Donald R

    2014-01-01

    The Arabian Peninsula experiences severe air pollution, the extent and sources of which are poorly documented. Each year in Saudi Arabia this situation is intensified during Hajj, the Holy Pilgrimage of Islam that draws millions of pilgrims to Mecca. An initial study of air quality in Mecca and surrounding holy sites during the 2012 Hajj (October 24-27) revealed strongly elevated levels of the combustion tracer carbon monoxide (CO, up to 57 ppmv) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) along the pilgrimage route-especially in the tunnels of Mecca-that are a concern for human health. The most abundant VOC was the gasoline evaporation tracer i-pentane, which exceeded 1200 ppbv in the tunnels. Even though VOC concentrations were generally lower during a follow-up non-Hajj sampling period (April 2013), many were still comparable to other large cities suffering from poor air quality. Major VOC sources during the 2012 Hajj study included vehicular exhaust, gasoline evaporation, liquefied petroleum gas, and air conditioners. Of the measured compounds, reactive alkenes and CO showed the strongest potential to form ground-level ozone. Because the number of pilgrims is expected to increase in the future, we present emission reduction strategies to target both combustive and evaporative fossil fuel sources. PMID:24983190

  15. An Assessment of Air Quality in the Surrounding Holy Places of Mecca, Saudi Arabia during Hajj

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khwaja, H. A.; Aburizaiza, O. S.; Siddique, A.; Hussain, M. M.; Khatib, F.; Zeb, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    The associations of exposure to air pollution and adverse human health effects have been demonstrated in many epidemiologic studies. Hajj, an annual pilgrimage of Islam, draws millions of pilgrims from more than 200 countries for religious rituals in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. The city is surrounded by mountains with a population of 1.7 million, which gets doubles or even more during Hajj. The city centers on the Grand Mosque (Masjid Al-haram), connected with the network of tunnels. Main Hajj pilgrimage route for five days extends 20 km to the east and includes "Mina", "Arafat", and "Muzdalifah". A detailed study was conducted in Mecca, its tunnels, and surrounding holy places during Hajj (October 13-17, 2013). Spatial and temporal variations in total suspended particulate (TSP), PM10 , PM7 , PM2.5 , PM1 , ozone (O3), and black carbon (BC) levels along the route were recorded using portable monitors and GPS to assess the status of air quality. This is the first study to elucidate the exposure to air pollutants among pilgrims. Extremely high levels of all pollutants were observed during the intensive measuring periods. For example, the PM7 , PM2.5 , O3, and BC concentrations of up to 9,433 µg/m3, 484 µg/m3, 444 ppb, and 468 µg/m3, respectively, were observed. Results of this investigation revealed that most routes had on average exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) standards for PM10 and PM2.5 . The reasons for the high air pollutants concentrations are most probably high volume of traffic, construction work, re-suspension of particles, and geographical conditions (arid regions). The pilgrim's longer trip duration lead to their highest whole trip exposure to air pollutants, which indicate that they are possibly subject to higher health risk. Better understanding of air pollution exposure and their determinants in the environments will contribute to the development of more appropriate exposure reductive strategies and have significant public health meanings.

  16. Strain rates and contemporary deformation in the Snake River Plain and surrounding Basin and Range from GPS and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Suzette J.; McCaffrey, Robert; King, Robert W.

    2008-08-01

    We used new horizontal global positioning system (GPS) velocitiesalong with earthquakes, faults, and volcanic features to assesshow strain is accommodated in the northern Basin and Range Province.We estimated horizontal velocities for 132 stations within theSnake River Plain and the surrounding Basin and Range from GPSphase data collected from 1994 to 2007. These velocities showregional-scale clockwise rotation suggestive of driving forcesbeyond those associated with the Yellowstone hotspot. Withinthe western Centennial tectonic belt, the GPS measurements indicatethat the Basin and Range is extending at a rate an order ofmagnitude greater than the Snake River Plain, which explainsits low seismicity. Between these two regions, we discern the"Centennial shear zone," a NE-trending zone of right-lateralshear with estimated slip rates that increase northeastwardfrom 0.9 ± 0.3 mm/yr in the SW to 1.7 ± 0.2 mm/yrin NE. We interpret the new GPS velocities to indicate: (1)right-lateral shear may be accommodated by strike-slip earthquakeson NE-trending faults in the Centennial shear zone; (2) threeBasin and Range faults (Lost River, Lemhi, and Beaverhead) terminateat the Snake River Plain margin; and (3) extension in the SnakeRiver Plain occurs at a much lower rate than the rate of normalfaulting in the western Centennial tectonic belt.

  17. Sedimentary basin evolution and the link with the deformation of surrounding orogens in European case-studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matenco, Liviu

    2014-05-01

    Sedimentary basin evolution and the link with the deformation of surrounding orogens in European case-studies Liviu C. Matenco Department of Earth Sciences, Utrecht University, Budapestlaan 4, 3584 CD Utrecht, the Netherlands Intra-plate contractional deformation and far-field transmission of strain generated at active deforming plate boundaries play a crucial role in inverting extensional basins and the kinematics of thrust belts in Mediterranean orogens (e.g., Ziegler et al., 1995; Ziegler et al., 1998). At the same time, the structural evolution of rifts is significantly controlled by the lithospheric rheology, the availability of inherited crustal weak zones with potential to be re-activated, the mode of extension and the type of crustal material being deformed (Ziegler and Cloetingh, 2004; Ziegler et al., 2006). These critical inferences has proven of major importance for the study of sedimentary basins, in particular relevant for the evolution of Central and SE European mountain chains and associated sedimentary basins. Far-field transmission of contractional strain has proven to be of important for the geometry of both foreland and back-arc basins, such as the Carpathians or Dinaridic forelands and the Pannonian Basin or Black Sea back-arcs. Crustal scale weak zones and rheological contrasts such as inherited nappe stacks or major plate boundaries have been proven recently to be of major importance in conditioning subsequent basin formation and associated footwall exhumation in extensional domains such as the Aegean, Rhodope or the transition from the Dinarides to the Pannonian basin. At a regional level, areas characterized by changes in contractional polarity have proven to efficiently transmit the strain at large distances and condition the localization of major structures, such as the change from the Alpine to the Dinaridic polarity or the change from the Carpathians to the Dinaridic polarity. The same areas were prone to the first order localization of

  18. Relationship between displacement and gravity change of Uemachi faults and surrounding faults of Osaka basin, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, N.; Kitada, N.; Kusumoto, S.; Itoh, Y.; Takemura, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Osaka basin surrounded by the Rokko and Ikoma Ranges is one of the typical Quaternary sedimentary basins in Japan. The Osaka basin has been filled by the Pleistocene Osaka group and the later sediments. Several large cities and metropolitan areas, such as Osaka and Kobe are located in the Osaka basin. The basin is surrounded by E-W trending strike slip faults and N-S trending reverse faults. The N-S trending 42-km-long Uemachi faults traverse in the central part of the Osaka city. The Uemachi faults have been investigated for countermeasures against earthquake disaster. It is important to reveal the detailed fault parameters, such as length, dip and recurrence interval, so on for strong ground motion simulation and disaster prevention. For strong ground motion simulation, the fault model of the Uemachi faults consist of the two parts, the north and south parts, because of the no basement displacement in the central part of the faults. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology started the project to survey of the Uemachi faults. The Disaster Prevention Institute of Kyoto University is carried out various surveys from 2009 to 2012 for 3 years. The result of the last year revealed the higher fault activity of the branch fault than main faults in the central part (see poster of "Subsurface Flexure of Uemachi Fault, Japan" by Kitada et al., in this meeting). Kusumoto et al. (2001) reported that surrounding faults enable to form the similar basement relief without the Uemachi faults model based on a dislocation model. We performed various parameter studies for dislocation model and gravity changes based on simplified faults model, which were designed based on the distribution of the real faults. The model was consisted 7 faults including the Uemachi faults. The dislocation and gravity change were calculated based on the Okada et al. (1985) and Okubo et al. (1993) respectively. The results show the similar basement displacement pattern to the

  19. Investigation of drop impact on dry and wet surfaces with consideration of surrounding air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yisen; Lian, Yongsheng; Sussman, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations were conducted to investigate drop impingement and splashing on both dry and wet surfaces at impact velocities greater than 50 m/s with the consideration of the effect of surrounding air. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the variable density pressure projection method on a dynamic block structured adaptive grid. The moment of fluid method was used to reconstruct interfaces separating different phases. A dynamic contact angle model was used to define the boundary condition at the moving contact line. Simulations showed that lowering the ambient gas density can suppress dry surface splashing, which is in agreement with the experiments. A recirculation zone was observed inside the drop after contact: a larger recirculation zone was formed earlier in the higher gas density case than in the lower gas density case. Increasing gas density also enhances the creation of secondary droplets from the lamella breakup. For high speed impact on a dry surface, lowering ambient gas density attenuates splashing. However, ambient air does not significantly affect splashing on a wet surface. Simulations showed that the splashed droplets are primarily from the exiting liquid film.

  20. 40 CFR 81.159 - Great Basin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Great Basin Valley Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.159 Great Basin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Great Basin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (California) consists of the territorial...

  1. 40 CFR 81.242 - Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.242 Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) consists of the territorial...

  2. 40 CFR 81.242 - Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.242 Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Pecos-Permian Basin Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) consists of the territorial...

  3. 40 CFR 81.159 - Great Basin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Great Basin Valley Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.159 Great Basin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Great Basin Valley Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (California) consists of the territorial...

  4. Geohydrologic characterization of the area surrounding the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins

    SciTech Connect

    Liikala, T.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Aimo, N.J.; Bates, D.J.; Gilmore, T.J.; Jensen, E.J.; Last, G.V.; Oberlander, P.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Oster, K.R.; Roome, L.R.; Simpson, J.C.; Teel, S.S.; Westergard, E.J.

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to achieve regulatory compliance with the applicable ground-water monitoring requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC). An assessment-level compliance monitoring project was established for the 183-H Basins because hazardous waste constituents were known to have entered the ground water beneath the facility. Three phases were defined for this project, with work being concentrated in five areas: geology, hydrology, ground-water monitoring, geochemistry, and ground-water modeling. These characterization activities have resulted in the definition of principal lithologic and hydrostratigraphic units. Ground-water monitoring results indicated a contamination peak, which occurred between April and August 1986. Further monitoring has shown that nitrate, sodium, gross alpha, and gross beta are the clearest indicators of ground-water contamination attributable to the 183-H Basins. In addition, the concentrations of these contaminants are affected by variations in Columbia River stage. Future studies will focus on continued ground-water monitoring throughout the closure and post-closure periods for the 183-H Basins, sampling of the Columbia River and nearby ground-water springs, and soil sampling adjacent to the facility. 45 refs., 90 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Cenozoic evolution of the Pamir plateau recorded in surrounding basins, implications on Asian climate and land-sea distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont-Nivet, Guillaume; Yang, Wei; Blayney, Tamsin; Proust, Jean-Noel; Guo, Zhaojie; Grothe, Arjen; Mandic, Oleg; Fionori, Chiara; Bougeois, Laurie; Najman, Yanina

    2015-04-01

    The Cenozoic Pamir orogen formed in response to the India-Asia collision. Existing datasets shows that the range grew since ca. 25 Ma, however the early Cenozoic history remains particularly enigmatic. In that peculiar period, global climate changed from greenhouse to icehouse, the proto-Paratethys sea retreated out of Asia and continental aridification as well as monsoons established over Asia. These environmental changes are held responsible for major floral and faunal crises including the emergence of plant communities and the dispersion of key mammal groups from Asia onto other continents. However, the causal relationships between these events remains to be established because of the lack of accurate age constraints on their geological records. Here, we provide well-dated stratigraphic records using magneto- and bio-stratigraphy from the basins surrounding the Pamir. Southeast of the Pamir, along the Kunlun Shan into the southwestern Tarim Basin, Eocene marine deposits are continuously overlain by 41 to 15 Ma continental redbeds themselves overlain by conglomerates in a classic foreland sequence with upward increasing grain-size, accumulation rates and provenance proximity. However, North of the Pamir along the southwestern Tian Shan and West of the Pamir into the Afghan-Tadjik Basin, the entire Oligocene period appears to be missing from the record between the last marine and the first continental sediments dated to the Early Miocene. This supports a simple basin evolution model in response to initial Pamir indentation with Eocene foreland basin activation in the Southeast related to the Kunlun Shan northward thrusting, followed much later by early Miocene activation of the northern foreland basin related to the southwestern Tian Shan overthrusting. The coeval activation of a lithospheric right-lateral strike-slip system along the Pamir/Tarim boundary may have enabled to transfer deformation from the India-Asia collision zone to the Tian Shan and possibly the

  6. Strain Rates and Contemporary Deformation in the Snake River Plain and Surrounding Basin and Range From GPS and Seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    S. J. Payne; R. McCaffrey; R. W. King

    2008-08-01

    New horizontal GPS velocities along with earthquakes, faults, and volcanic features are used to assess how strain is accommodated in the Northern Basin and Range Province. We used GPS phase data collected from 1994 to 2007 to estimate horizontal velocities for 132 stations within the Snake River Plain (SRP) and surrounding basin and range. These velocities show regional scale clockwise rotation indicating basal driving forces beyond those associated with the Yellowstone Hotspot. Within the western Centennial Tectonic Belt (CTB), the GPS measurements indicate the basin and range is extending at a rate between 5x10-9/yr and 10x10-9/yr, which is an order of magnitude greater than the strain rate we observe with GPS in the SRP, explaining its low seismicity. Between these two regions is the “Centennial Shear Zone”, a NE-trending zone of right-lateral shear with estimated slip rates that increase northeastward from 0.9±0.3 mm/yr in the SW to 1.7±0.2 mm/yr in NE. We interpret the new GPS velocities to indicate: 1) right-lateral shear may be accommodated by strike-slip earthquakes on NE-trending faults in the Centennial Shear Zone; 2) three basin and range faults (Lost River, Lemhi, and Beaverhead) do not extend into the SRP, but instead terminate at the SRP margin; and 3) extension in the SRP occurs at a much lower rate than the rate of normal faulting in the western CTB.

  7. Moho structure of the South China Sea basin and the surrounding from constrained 3-D gravity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhaocai, W.; Jinyao, G.

    2014-12-01

    We have obtained the Moho depth of the South China Sea basin using gravity data with the 191 control points from seismic data and sonobuoys. To obtain the residual mantle Bouguer anomaly (RMBA), we deducted the anomaly from lateral changes in bathymetry or topography, the gravity anomaly due to changes in sediment thickness and density from the free air anomaly firstly, and then corrected the lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly from the rifted margin to the spread ridge. According to the relationship between the control points and RMBA, we calculated the initial Moho depth, from which, we done an iterative cycle of gravity inversion to predict the final Moho depth and crustal thickness. To calculate the lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly, we defined a critical thinning factor for the initiation of oceanic crust production, and a maximum oceanic crustal thickness; for this study area, values of 0.5 and 9 km were used respectively, consistent with the Moho depth of 20km and 14km respectively, with the initial thickness of continental crust of 32km. The RMS(root mean square) difference with the control points is 1.54km. Over most of the South China Sea basin, the Moho depth is 11 and 13km, the crustal thickness is 5-8km. The Moho depth of the Northwest sub basin has values between 12 and 13km, the crustal thickness is mostly ~7km. The NW trending fault divides obviously the extinct spreading centers of the East and southwest sub basin. Meanwhile, on the north side of the two sub basin extinct spreading centers, the crustal thickness is slightly thicker 1km than the south. The ocean-continent transition (OCT) is enclosed by the 14km and 20km Moho depth contour. At the East sub basin, the OCT shows asymmetry, and is broader and longer on the northern margin than the southern margin. One of the most noticeable characteristics in the northeastern margin of the OCT is that the crustal thickness is 10-16km. However, at the southwest sub basin, the OCT is symmetrical.

  8. Digital tabulation of stratigraphic data from oil and gas wells in the Santa Maria Basin and surrounding areas, central California coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Langenheim, V.E.; Shumaker, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    Stratigraphic information from 694 oil and gas exploration wells from the onshore Santa Maria basin and surrounding areas are herein compiled in digital form from reports that were released originally in paper form. The Santa Maria basin is located within the southwesternmost part of the Coast Ranges and north of the western Transverse Ranges on the central California coast. Knowledge of the location and elevation of stratigraphic tops of formations throughout the basin is a first step toward understanding depositional trends and the structural evolution of the basin through time.

  9. Morphostructural characterization of the Charco basin and its surrounding areas in the Chihuahua segment of north Mexican Basin and Range Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiani, Francesco; Menichetti, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The Chihuahua Basin and Range (CBR) is the eastern branch of the northern Mexican Basin and Range Province that, from a morphostructural point of view, presently is one amongst the lesser-known zones of the southern portion of the North America Basin and Range Province. The study area covers an approximately 800 km2-wide portion of the CBR and encompasses the fault-bounded Charco basin and its surrounding areas. The bedrock of the area pertains to the large siliceous-igneous province of the Sierra Madre Occidental and consists of volcanoclastic rocks including Oligocene dacite, rhyolite, rhyolitic tuffs, and polimitic conglomerates. The region is characterized by a series of NW-SE oriented valleys delimited by tilted monoclinal blocks bounded by high angle, SW-dipping, normal faults. Abrupt changes in elevation, alternating between narrow faulted mountain chains and flat arid valleys or basins are the main morphological elements of the area. The valleys correspond to structural grabens filled with Plio-Pleistocene continental sediments. These grabens are about 10 km wide, while the extensional fault system extend over a distance of more than 15 km. The mountain ranges are in most cases continuous over distances that range from 10 to 70 km including different branches of the extensional and transfer faults. The morphogenesis is mainly erosive in character: erosional landforms (such as rocky scarps, ridges, strath-terraces, erosional pediment, reverse slopes, landslide scar zones, litho-structural flat surfaces) dominate the landscape. In contrast, Quaternary depositional landforms are mainly concentrated within the flat valleys or basins. The Quaternary deposits consist of wide alluvial fans extending to the foot of the main ridges, fluvial and debris-slope deposits. The morphostructural characterization of the area integrated different methodologies, including: i) geomorphological and structural field analyses; ii) remote sensing and geo-morphometric investigations

  10. Mantle diapirism and the formation of newly formed basins and surrounding centrifugally vergence orogens in the Mediterranean and Caribbean regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, M. A.; Koronovskii, N. V.; Raznitsin, Yu. N.; Svalova, V. B.

    2015-11-01

    Mantle diapirism contributes considerably to the formation of newly formed basins and surrounding centrifugally vergence fold-thrust belts in the Mediterranean and Caribbean regions. Mantle diapirism results from density inversion in the geosphere of astenosphere+lithosphere geosystem. Such inversion has become a driving force in the background of increasing heat flow caused by the heat-resistant convergence of Africa and Eurasia (in the case of the Mediterranean region) and North and South Americas (Caribbean region) in the Cenozoic. Mantle diapirism is caused by unstable gravity in the periods of tectonomagmatic activations. The analytical solution of the problem yields the critical parameters coupling the mantle flow dynamics and surface relief evolution. The difference between the structures and evolutions for Mediterranean and Caribbean regions is the following. In the Mediterranean region, the mantle diapirism produces newly formed basins of intercontinental seas at the final stage of Africa-Eurasia convergence (in the Cenozoic). In the Caribbean region, intensive mantle diapirism first disjoined the North and South Americas in the Mesozoic, and then played the same role as in the Mediterranean for the convergence of these continents in the Cenozoic.

  11. Dusty air masses transport between Amazon Basin and Caribbean Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euphrasie-Clotilde, Lovely; Molinie, Jack; Prospero, Joseph; Feuillard, Tony; Brute, Francenor; Jeannot, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Depend on the month, African desert dust affect different parts of the North Atlantic Ocean. From December to April, Saharan dust outbreaks are often reported over the amazon basin and from May to November over the Caribbean islands and the southern regions of USA. This annual oscillation of Saharan dust presence, related to the ITCZ position, is perturbed some time, during March. Indeed, over Guadeloupe, the air quality network observed between 2007 and 2012 several dust events during March. In this paper, using HISPLIT back trajectories, we analyzed air masses trajectories for March dust events observed in Guadeloupe, from 2007 to 2012.We observed that the high pressure positions over the Atlantic Ocean allow the transport of dusty air masses from southern region of West Africa to the Caribbean Sea with a path crossing close to coastal region of French Guyana. Complementary investigations including the relationship between PM10 concentrations recorded in two sites Pointe-a-Pitre in the Caribbean, and Cayenne in French Guyana, have been done. Moreover we focus on the mean delay observed between the times arrival. All the results show a link between pathway of dusty air masses present over amazon basin and over the Caribbean region during several event of March. The next step will be the comparison of mineral dust composition for this particular month.

  12. Geographical and Geomorphological Effects on Air Temperatures in the Columbia Basin's Signature Vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, L.; Pogue, K. R.; Bader, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Columbia Basin of Washington and Oregon is one of the most productive grape-growing areas in the United States. Wines produced in this region are influenced by their terroir - the amalgamation of physical and cultural elements that influence grapes grown at a particular vineyard site. Of the physical factors, climate, and in particular air temperature, has been recognized as a primary influence on viticulture. Air temperature directly affects ripening in the grapes. Proper fruit ripening, which requires precise and balanced levels of acid and sugar, and the accumulation of pigment in the grape skin, directly correlates with the quality of wine produced. Many features control air temperature within a particular vineyard. Elevation, latitude, slope, and aspect all converge to form complex relationships with air temperatures; however, the relative degree to which these attributes affect temperatures varies between regions and is not well understood. This study examines the influence of geography and geomorphology on air temperatures within the American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) of the Columbia Basin in eastern Washington and Oregon. The premier vineyards within each AVA, which have been recognized for producing high-quality wine, were equipped with air temperature monitoring stations that collected hourly temperature measurements. A variety of temperature statistics were calculated, including daily average, maximum, and minimum temperatures. From these values, average diurnal variation and growing degree-days (10°C) were calculated. A variety of other statistics were computed, including date of first and last frost and time spent below a minimum temperature threshold. These parameters were compared to the vineyard's elevation, latitude, slope, aspect, and local topography using GPS, ArcCatalog, and GIS in an attempt to determine their relative influences on air temperatures. From these statistics, it was possible to delineate two trends of temperature variation

  13. AMBIENT AIR MEASUREMENTS OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE IN THE CALIFORNIA SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentrations have been measured at two locations (Claremont and Riverside) in the California South Coast Air Basin during the months of July and August 1977. Three different analytical methods were employed: a chemiluminescent method and two colorimetri...

  14. [Observations and comparison analysis of air pollution in Beijing and nearly surrounding areas during Beijing 2008 Olympic Games].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-Qiang; Ji, Dong-Sheng; Song, Tao; Lin, Hong; Wang, Yue-Si; Jiang, Chang-Sheng

    2010-12-01

    In order to study regional air quality, evaluate the interaction of air quality among Beijing and four cities and assess the effects of regional collaborative emission abatement in Beijing and surrounding areas for the Olympic Games period on regional air quality, and seek an effective means of early warning of air pollution, a monitoring network on observation of atmospheric pollutants in Beijing and four nearby cities which were Zhuozhou, Langfang, Xianghe and Yanjiao, was established to measure concentrations of NO(x), O3 and particulate matter in June 2008. The results show that the primary pollutants in Beijing and nearly surrounding areas are particulates during the study periods. The average mass concentrations of PM10 were (114 +/- 66) microg/m3 and (128 +/- 59) microg/m3 in Beijing and nearby cities, respectively, while the average mass concentrations of PM2.5 were (77 +/- 47) microg/m3 and (81 +/- 51) microg/m3, respectively. The average maximum hourly mass concentrations of O3 were (164 +/- 52) microg/m3 and (165 +/- 55) microg/m3, as well as the average mass concentrations of NO(x) were (58 +/- 23) microg/m3 and (25 +/- 14) microg/m3 in Beijing and nearby cities, respectively. Compared to June, concentrations of PM10, PM2.5, O3, NO(x) decreased by 69%, 62%, 18% and 41% during the Olympic period (from August 8 to 24) and 56%, 49%, 17% and 16% during the Paralympic Games period (from September 6 to 17) in Beijing. The mass concentration of PM2.5 was affected by the surrounding areas of Beijing seriously. The relative high concentrations of NO(x) in Beijing implied NO(x) had the potential tendency to be transported to the surrounding areas. Ozone showed regional pollution characteristics in summer. It shows that the monitoring network on observation of atmospheric pollutants in Beijing and nearly surrounding areas is significant in early warning of air pollution, and could provide scientific support for interregional cooperation of air pollution control

  15. Environmental inequality: Air pollution exposures in California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Julian D.

    Environmental inequality is quantified here using linear regression, based on results from a recent mobility-based exposure model for 25,064 individuals in California's South Coast Air Basin [Marshall et al., 2006. Inhalation intake of ambient air pollution in California's South Coast Air Basin. Atmospheric Environment 40, 4381-4392]. For the four primary pollutants studied (benzene, butadiene, chromium particles, and diesel particles), mean exposures are higher than average for people who are nonwhite, are from lower-income households, and live in areas with high population density. For ozone (a secondary pollutant), the reverse holds. Holding constant attributes such as population density and daily travel distance, mean exposure differences between whites and nonwhites are 16-40% among the five pollutants. These findings offer a baseline to compare against future conditions or to evaluate the impact of proposed policies.

  16. NO{sub x} emissions of a jet diffusion flame which is surrounded by a shroud of combustion air

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, P.X.; White, F.P.; Mathur, M.P.; Ekmann, J.M.

    1996-08-01

    The present work reports an experimental study on the behavior of a jet flame surrounded by a shroud of combustion air. Measurements focussed on the flame length and the emissions of NO{sub x}, total unburned hydrocarbons, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}. Four different fuel flow rates (40.0, 78.33, 138.33, and 166.6 cm/s), air flow rates up to 2500 cm{sup 3}/s and four different air injector diameters (0.079 cm, 0. 158 cm, 0.237 cm, and 0.316 cm) were used. The shroud of combustion air causes the flame length to decrease by a factor proportional to 1/[p{sub a}/p{sub f} + C{sub 2}({mu}{sub a}Re,a/{mu}{sub f}Re,f){sup 2}]{sup {1/2}}. A substantial shortening of the flame length occurred by increasing the air injection velocity keeping fuel rate fixed or conversely by lowering the fuel flow rate keeping air flow rate constant. NO{sub x} emissions ranging from 5 ppm to 64 ppm were observed and the emission of NO{sub x} decreased strongly with the increased air velocity. The decrease of NO{sub x} emissions was found to follow a similar scaling law as does the flame length. However, the emission of the total hydrocarbons increased with the increased air velocity or the decreased fuel flow rate. A crossover condition where both NO{sub x} and unburned- hydrocarbon emissions are low, was identified. At an air-to-fuel velocity ratio of about 1, the emissions of NO{sub x} and the total hydrocarbons were found to be under 20 ppm.

  17. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the 105N Basin Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Coenenberg, E.T.

    1994-05-01

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations.

  18. MULTISCALE MODELING OF AIR FLOW IN SALT LAKE CITY AND THE SURROUNDING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    M. BROWN; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    A general overview is given of a modeling effort to simulate the fate and transport of a tracer within the downtown core of Salt Lake City and beyond into the Salt Lake Basin. The problem crosses three significant scales where different physics are predominant: atmospheric mesoscale, city scale, and building scale. Three different computational fluid dynamics models were used, each with strengths at particular spatial and temporal scales. We show preliminary results and discuss what we believe to be the relevant phenomenon one must model as one crosses from atmospheric scale to engineering scale flow problems. We also describe our model validation efforts, including wind-tunnel and tow-tank experiments and a recently completed urban field experiment.

  19. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval to stabilize the 105N Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces-to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin is a reinforced unlined concrete structure 150 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 24 feet deep. The basin is segregated into seven areas sharing a common pool of water; the Discharge/Viewing (``D``) Pit, the fuel segregation pit (including a water tunnel that connects the ``D`` pit and segregation pit), two storage basins designated as North Basin and South Basin, two cask load-out pits, and a fuel examination area. The North Basin floor is entirely covered and the South Basin is partly covered by a modular array of cubicles formed by boron concrete posts and boron concrete panels.

  20. Particulate matter in the indoor air of classrooms—exploratory results from Munich and surrounding area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, H.; Twardella, D.; Dietrich, S.; Heitmann, D.; Schierl, R.; Liebl, B.; Rüden, H.

    Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated the association between particle mass (PM) concentration in outside air and the occurrence of health related problems and/or diseases. However, much less is known about indoor PM concentrations and associated health risks. In particular, data are needed on air quality in schools, since children are assumed to be more vulnerable to health hazards and spend a large part of their time in classrooms. On this background, we evaluated indoor air quality in 64 schools in the city of Munich and a neighbouring district outside the city boundary. In winter 2004-2005 in 92 classrooms, and in summer 2005 in 75 classrooms, data on indoor air climate parameters (temperature, relative humidity), carbon dioxide (CO 2) and various dust particle fractions (PM 10, PM 2.5) were collected; for the latter both gravimetrical and continuous measurements by laser aerosol spectrometer (LAS) were implemented. In the summer period, the particle number concentration (PNC), was determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Additionally, data on room and building characteristics were collected by use of a standardized form. Only data collected during teaching hours were considered in analysis. For continuously measured parameters the daily median was used to describe the exposure level in a classroom. The median indoor CO 2 concentration in a classroom was 1603 ppm in winter and 405 ppm in summer. With LAS in winter, median PM concentrations of 19.8 μg m -3 (PM 2.5) and 91.5 μg m -3 (PM 10) were observed, in summer PM concentrations were significantly reduced (median PM 2.5=12.7 μg m -3, median PM 10=64.9 μg m -3). PM 2.5 concentrations determined by the gravimetric method were in general higher (median in winter: 36.7 μg m -3, median in summer: 20.2 μg m -3) but correlated strongly with the LAS-measured results. In explorative analysis, we identified a significant increase of LAS-measured PM 2.5 by 1.7 μg m -3 per increase

  1. Volatile tritiated organic acids in stack effluents and in air surrounding contaminated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Belot, Y.; Camus, H.; Marini, T.; Raviart, S. )

    1993-06-01

    A small fraction of the tritium released into the atmosphere from tritium-handling or solid waste storage facilities was shown to be in the form of volatile organic acids. The same compounds were also found, but at a much higher proportion, in the tritium evolved at room temperature from highly contaminated materials placed under air atmospheres. This might be due to the oxidation and labeling of hydrocarbon(s) by mechanisms that are presumably of a radiolytic nature. The new forms could have an impact on operational requirements and waste management strategies within a tritium facility and a fusion reactor hall. Further data are needed to assess the related doses.

  2. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

    2011-07-01

    The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

  3. Basin-scale contributions of Cr, Ni and Co from Ortegal Complex to the surrounding coastal environment (SW Europe).

    PubMed

    Prego, Ricardo; Caetano, Miguel; Ospina-Alvarez, Natalia; Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos

    2014-01-15

    The enrichment of Cr and Ni in the coastal zones is usually associated with anthropogenic sources such as the tanning, galvanization, ceramic, and cement industries. However, geological complexes of specific lithologic composition located near shorelines may act as natural sources of metals to the continental shelf. Cape Ortegal (SW Europe) is an ultramafic complex that has Cr, Ni and Co enriched in rocks due to the minerals chromite, chromospinel, gersdorfite and pentlandite. Thus, the hypothesis that this geological complex contributes to metal enrichment in Ortigueira and Barqueiro Rias and the adjacent continental shelf was tested. Chromium, Ni, and Co were determined in water and in suspended particulate matter of ria tributaries, rainfall, surface sediments, mussels, and algae. High contents of Cr (max. 1670mg·kg(-1)) and Ni (max. 1360 mg · kg(-1)) were found in the sediments surrounding Cape Ortegal and the Ortigueira Ria as a result of erosion of exposed cliffs. Dissolved Cr and Ni concentrations in fluvial waters were significantly higher in the rivers that crosses the Ortegal Complex, i.e. Lourido (0.47 μg Cr · L(-1); 9.4 μg Ni · L(-1)) and Landoi (0.37 μg Cr · L(-1); 4.3 μg Ni · L(-1)), in comparison with the nearby basin out of the complex influence (Sor River: <0.01 μg Cr · L(-1); 0.57 μg Ni · L(-1)). The annual fluvial contributions of Cr and Ni to the Ortigueira Ria were higher than fluxes into the Barqueiro Ria. Moreover, the increase in Cr and Ni in the rainfall in summer demonstrated the importance of the atmosphere pathway for introducing these elements into the aquatic environment. As a consequence, the contents of these metals in soft tissues and shell of mussels and algae from the Ortigueira Ria were higher than the organisms from Barqueiro Ria. Thus, geological complexes, such as the Cape Ortegal, located in an uncontaminated area, can increase the land-sea exchange of trace metals. PMID:24055665

  4. Influence of surrounding structures upon the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the outdoor unit of a split air-conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chengjun; Liu, Jiang; Pan, Jie

    2014-07-01

    DC-inverter split air-conditioner is widely used in Chinese homes as a result of its high-efficiency and energy-saving. Recently, the researches on its outdoor unit have focused on the influence of surrounding structures upon the aerodynamic and acoustic performance, however they are only limited to the influence of a few parameters on the performance, and practical design of the unit requires more detailed parametric analysis. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics(CFD) and computational aerodynamic acoustics(CAA) simulation based on FLUENT solver is used to study the influence of surrounding structures upon the aforementioned properties of the unit. The flow rate and sound pressure level are predicted for different rotating speed, and agree well with the experimental results. The parametric influence of three main surrounding structures(i.e. the heat sink, the bell-mouth type shroud and the outlet grille) upon the aerodynamic performance of the unit is analyzed thoroughly. The results demonstrate that the tip vortex plays a major role in the flow fields near the blade tip and has a great effect on the flow field of the unit. The inlet ring's size and throat's depth of the bell-mouth type shroud, and the through-flow area and configuration of upwind and downwind sections of the outlet grille are the most important factors that affect the aerodynamic performance of the unit. Furthermore, two improved schemes against the existing prototype of the unit are developed, which both can significantly increase the flow rate more than 6 %(i.e. 100 m3·h-1) at given rotating speeds. The inevitable increase of flow noise level when flow rate is increased and the advantage of keeping a lower rotating speed are also discussed. The presented work could be a useful guideline in designing the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of the split air-conditioner in engineering practice.

  5. 76 FR 17347 - Revision to the California State Implementation Plan, Great Basin Unified Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ...) * * * (D) Great Basin Unified Air Pollution Control District (1) Rule 201, ``Exemptions,'' adopted on... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revision to the California State Implementation Plan, Great Basin Unified Air Pollution Control District CFR Correction In Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 52 (Sec....

  6. Air pollution in Athens basin and health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Economopoulou, Alexia A; Economopoulos, Alexander P

    2002-12-01

    An inventory of air pollution sources within the Athens basin is carried out for the years 1989, 1992 and 1998 and the results are inputted in a climatological model for predicting ambient concentrations. Despite of the significant growth in the number of road vehicles and the deteriorating traffic, the emissions and ambient concentrations of fine particulates, CO, NOx and VOC appear to remain reasonably constant over for the period 1989 to 1998, while these of SO2 and Pb are reduced, mainly due to the renewal of vehicle fleet, the use of catalytic technologies and the improved quality of the used fuel. The results further indicate that for CO, NOx and VOC the major source is road traffic, while for PM2.5 and SO2 both space heating and traffic share responsibility. The air pollutant concentrations monitored by the network of 11 stations are reviewed and statistics related to air quality guidelines are presented. As fine particulate levels are not monitored, approximate PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations are derived from black smoke ones on basis of experimentally determined conversion factors. The computed and monitored air pollution levels are compared and found in reasonable agreement. The results of the above analysis show that the levels of all 'classical' pollutants, with the exception of SO2 and Pb, exceed significantly the WHO guidelines and are thus expected to exert a significant health impact. The latter could be quantified in relation to the PM2.5 or PM10 levels on the basis of risk assessment information developed by the World Health Organization (WHO). The results show that the existing levels of fine particle concentrations in Athens increase significantly the mortality and morbidity, and reduce the average longevity of the entire population from 1.3 to 1.7 years. PMID:12503898

  7. Chapter D. Effects of Urbanization on Stream Ecosystems in the Willamette River Basin and Surrounding Area, Oregon and Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, Ian R.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Carpenter, Kurt D.; Arnsberg, Andrew J.; Johnson, Henry M.; Hughes, Curt A.; Sarantou, Michael J.; Rinella, Frank A.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the effects of urbanization on physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of stream ecosystems in 28 watersheds along a gradient of urbanization in the Willamette River basin and surrounding area, Oregon and Washington, from 2003 through 2005. The study that generated the report is one of several urban-effects studies completed nationally by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Watersheds were selected to minimize natural variability caused by factors such as geology, elevation, and climate, and to maximize coverage of different stages of urban development among watersheds. Because land use or population density alone often are not a complete measure of urbanization, a combination of land use, land cover, infrastructure, and socioeconomic variables were integrated into a multimetric urban intensity index (UII) to represent the degree of urban development in each watershed. Physical characteristics studied include stream hydrology, stream temperature, and habitat; chemical characteristics studied include sulfate, chloride, nutrients, pesticides, dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic carbon, and suspended sediment; and biological characteristics studied include algal, macroinvertebrate, and fish assemblages. Semipermeable membrane devices, passive samplers that concentrate trace levels of hydrophobic organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls, also were used. The objectives of the study were to (1) examine physical, chemical, and biological responses along the gradient of urbanization and (2) determine the major physical, chemical, and landscape variables affecting the structure of aquatic communities. Common effects documented in the literature of urbanization on instream physical, chemical, and biological characteristics, such as increased contaminants, increased streamflow flashiness, increased concentrations of chemicals, and changes in

  8. Air and Ground Surface Temperature Relations in a Mountainous Basin, Wolf Creek, Yukon Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roadhouse, Emily A.

    The links between climate and permafrost are well known, but the precise nature of the relationship between air and ground temperatures remains poorly understood, particularly in complex mountain environments. Although previous studies indicate that elevation and potential incoming solar radiation (PISR) are the two leading factors contributing to the existence of permafrost at a given location, additional factors may also contribute significantly to the existence of mountain permafrost, including vegetation cover, snow accumulation and the degree to which individual mountain landscapes are prone to air temperature inversions. Current mountain permafrost models consider only elevation and aspect, and have not been able to deal with inversion effects in a systematic fashion. This thesis explores the relationship between air and ground surface temperatures and the presence of surface-based inversions at 27 sites within the Wolf Creek basin and surrounding area between 2001 and 2006, as a first step in developing an improved permafrost distribution TTOP model. The TTOP model describes the relationship between the mean annual air temperature and the temperature at the top of permafrost in terms of the surface and thermal offsets (Smith and Riseborough, 2002). Key components of this model are n-factors which relate air and ground climate by establishing the ratio between air and surface freezing (winter) and thawing (summer) degree-days, thus summarizing the surface energy balance on a seasonal basis. Here we examine (1) surface offsets and (2) freezing and thawing n-factor variability at a number of sites through altitudinal treeline in the southern Yukon. Thawing n-factors (nt) measured at individual sites remained relatively constant from one year to the next and may be related to land cover. During the winter, the insulating effect of a thick snow cover results in higher surface temperatures, while thin snow cover results in low surface temperatures more closely

  9. Chapter B: Regional Geologic Setting of Late Cenozoic Lacustrine Diatomite Deposits, Great Basin and Surrounding Region: Overview and Plans for Investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    Freshwater diatomite deposits are present in all of the Western United States, including the Great Basin and surrounding regions. These deposits are important domestic sources of diatomite, and a better understanding of their formation and geologic settings may aid diatomite exploration and land-use management. Diatomite deposits in the Great Basin are the products of two stages: (1) formation in Late Cenozoic lacustrine basins and (2) preservation after formation. Processes that favored long-lived diatom activity and diatomite formation range in decreasing scale from global to local. The most important global process was climate, which became increasingly cool and dry from 15 Ma to the present. Regional processes included tectonic setting and volcanism, which varied considerably both spatially and temporally in the Great Basin region. Local processes included basin formation, sedimentation, hydrology, and rates of processes, including diatom growth and accumulation; basin morphology and nutrient and silica sources were important for robust activity of different diatom genera. Only optimum combinations of these processes led to the formation of large diatomite deposits, and less than optimum combinations resulted in lakebeds that contained little to no diatomite. Postdepositional processes can destroy, conceal, or preserve a diatomite deposit. These processes, which most commonly are local in scale, include uplift, with related erosion and changes in hydrology; burial beneath sedimentary deposits or volcanic flows and tuffs; and alteration during diagenesis and hydrothermal activity. Some sedimentary basins that may have contained diatomite deposits have largely been destroyed or significantly modified, whereas others, such as those in western Nevada, have been sufficiently preserved along with their contained diatomite deposits. Future research on freshwater diatomite deposits in the Western United States and Great Basin region should concentrate on the regional

  10. Aspergillus fumigatus and mesophilic moulds in air in the surrounding environment downwind of non-hazardous waste landfill sites.

    PubMed

    Schlosser, Olivier; Robert, Samuel; Debeaupuis, Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Non-hazardous waste landfilling has the potential to release biological agents into the air, notably mould spores. Some species, such as Aspergillus fumigatus, may be a cause of concern for at-risk nearby residents. However, air concentration in the surrounding environment of non-hazardous waste landfill sites is poorly documented. An extensive sampling programme was designed to investigate the relationship between culturable mesophilic moulds and A. fumigatus concentrations in air and distance downwind of non-hazardous waste landfill sites. On-site and off-site repeated measurements were performed at four landfill sites during cold and warm seasons. A high-flow air-sampler device was selected so as to allow peak concentration measurement. Linear mixed-effects models were used to explain variability in the concentrations in air over time and across sites, seasons, instantaneous meteorological conditions and discharged waste tonnage. Concentrations of mesophilic moulds and A. fumigatus at off-site upwind sampling locations were compared with concentrations at each of the downwind sampling locations. At the tipping face location, peak concentration reached 480,000CFUm(-3) for mesophilic moulds and 9300CFUm(-3) for A. fumigatus. Compared with upwind background levels, these concentrations were, on average, approximately 20 and 40 times higher respectively. A steep decline in the concentration of both mesophilic moulds and A. fumigatus was observed between the tipping face location and the downwind property boundary (reduction by 77% and 84% respectively), followed by a low decline leading to a 90% and 94% reduction in concentration at 200m from the property boundary and beyond. With the 200m and 500m downwind sampling point values added together, the 97.5th percentile of concentration was 6013CFUm(-3) and 87CFUm(-3) for mesophilic moulds and A. fumigatus, respectively. Other determining factors were the discharged waste tonnage, the season, instantaneous temperature

  11. Typical synoptic situations and their impacts on the wintertime air pollution in the Guanzhong basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bei, Naifang; Li, Guohui; Huang, Ru-Jin; Cao, Junji; Meng, Ning; Feng, Tian; Liu, Suixin; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Qiang; Molina, Luisa T.

    2016-06-01

    Rapid industrialization and urbanization have caused severe air pollution in the Guanzhong basin, northwestern China, with heavy haze events occurring frequently in recent winters. Using the NCEP reanalysis data, the large-scale synoptic situations influencing the Guanzhong basin during wintertime of 2013 are categorized into six types to evaluate the contribution of synoptic situations to the air pollution, including "north-low", "southwest-trough", "southeast-high", "transition", "southeast-trough", and "inland-high". The FLEXPART model has been utilized to demonstrate the corresponding pollutant transport patterns for the typical synoptic situations in the basin. Except for "southwest-trough" and "southeast-high" (defined as favorable synoptic situations), the other four synoptic conditions (defined as unfavorable synoptic situations) generally facilitate the accumulation of air pollutants, causing heavy air pollution in the basin. In association with the measurement of PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 µm) in the basin, the unfavorable synoptic situations correspond to high PM2.5 mass concentrations or poor air quality and vice versa. The same analysis has also been applied to winters of 2008-2012, which shows that the basin was mainly influenced by the unfavorable synoptic situations during wintertime leading to poor air quality. The WRF-CHEM model has further been applied to simulate the selected 6 days representing the typical synoptic situations during the wintertime of 2013, and the results generally show a good agreement between the modeled distributions and variations of PM2.5 and the corresponding synoptic situations, demonstrating reasonable classification for the synoptic situations in the basin. Detailed meteorological conditions, such as temperature inversion, low-level horizontal wind speed, and planetary boundary layer, all contribute to heavy air pollution events in the basin under unfavorable synoptic conditions

  12. Air pollution source/receptor relationships in South Coast Air Basin, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, N.

    1993-12-31

    This research project includes the application of some existing receptor models to study the air pollution source/receptor relationships in the South Coast Air Basin of southern California, the development of a new receptor model and the testing and the modifications of some existing models. These existing receptor models used include principal component factor analysis, potential source contribution function analysis, Kohonen`s neural network combined with Prim`s minimal spanning tree, and direct trilinear decomposition followed by a matrix reconstruction. The ambient concentration measurements used in this study are a subset of the data collected during the 1987 field exercise of Southern California Air Quality Study. It consists of a number of gaseous and particulate pollutants analyzed from samples collected by SCAQS samplers at eight sampling sites. Based on the information of emission inventories, meterology and ambient concentrations this receptor modeling study has revealed mechanisms that influence the air quality in SoCAB. Some of the mechanisms affecting the air quality in SoCAB that were revealed during this study include the following aspects. The SO{sub 2} collected at sampling sites is mainly contributed by refineries in the coastal area and the ships equipped with oil-fired boilers off shore. Combustion of fossil fuel by automobiles dominates the emission of NO{sub x} that is subsequently transformed and collected at sampling sites. Electric power plants also contribute HNO{sub 3} to the sampling sites. A large feedlot in the eastern region of SoCAB has been identified as the major source of NH{sub 3}. Possible contributions from other industrial sources such as smelters and incenerators were also revealed. The results of this study also suggest the possibility of DMS (dimethylsuflide) and NH{sub 3} emissions from off-shore sediments that have been contaminated by waste sludge disposal.

  13. Identification and Tracking of Polluted Air Masses in the South-Central Coast Air Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G. E.; Douglas, S. G.; Kessler, R. C.; Killus, J. P.

    1991-05-01

    does not intrude. Systematic transport between air basins calls for regional-scale photochemical modeling to accurately address issues concerning exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone observed in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.

  14. An aerial radiological survey of the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base and surrounding area, Fairborn, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over areas of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) and the immediate surrounding area, during the period July 7 through 20, 1994. The survey was conducted to measure and map the gamma radiation in the area. This mission was the first aerial radiation survey conducted at WPAFB. In the surveyed area, five small localized sources of gamma radiation were detected which were atypical of naturally-occurring radionuclides. On WPAFB property, these sources included a radiation storage facility in Area B (krypton-85) and an ash pile near the Area C flight line (low energy gamma activity). In the area covered outside WPAFB boundaries, sources included cesium-137 in excess of worldwide fallout over a landfill in a northern Dayton industrial area, an X-ray radiography source over a steel plant in the same industrial area, and a mixture of cesium-137 in excess of worldwide fallout and possibly iridium-192 in an area near Crystal Lakes, Ohio. The naturally-occurring gamma emitters (uranium-238 and progeny, thorium and progeny, and potassium-40) were detected in the remaining area with a total exposure rate range of 4 to 16 {mu}R/h; this range is typical of that found in the United States, 1 to 20 {mu}R/h.

  15. The sinuous ridge and channel network within Rahway Vallis and the wider contextual study of the surrounding Rahway Basin, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsdale, Jason; Balme, Matthew; Conway, Susan; Gallagher, Colman

    2014-05-01

    Rahway Vallis is a previously identified shallow v-shaped valley network in the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter data, located at 10°N 175°E, within the Cerberus Plains in the Elysium Planitia region of Mars. Rahway Vallis is situated in low-lying terrain bounded to west, north and east by older highlands, and to the south by the flood-carved channel system Marte Vallis. Here we present a study of the low-lying area in which Rahway Vallis sits, which we refer to as the "Rahway basin". The floor of the Rahway basin is extremely flat (sloping at 0.02° south-east) and hosts a branching network of ridge and channel systems. The aim of this project is to determine the genesis of these branching forms, in particular to test the hypothesis that they are glaciofluvial in origin. Using topographic cross-profiles of the channels that are identifiable in CTX 6 m/pixel images, we have found that they are set within broader v-shaped valley that has almost no morphological expression. These valleys have a convex-up, shallow (around 15 metres vertically compared to several kilometres in the horizontal) V-shaped profiles that are consistent in form across the whole Rahway Basin. Long profiles show the channels to deepen with respect to the bank height downslope. Both channels and valley show a consistent downhill gradient from west to east. The channels typically widen down-slope and increase in width at confluences. If these are water-cut channels, they reach Strahler stream orders of 4, consistent with a contributory network with multiple sources. Associated with the channels are sinuous ridges, typically several kilometres long, 20 m across, with heights on the order of 10 m. They sometimes form branching networks leading into the channels but also form individually and parallel to the channels. Possible explanations for the sinuous ridges include inverted fluvial channels and eskers. However despite looking through ca. 250 CTX images across the Rahway basin, no other glacial

  16. An assessment of ozone concentrations within and near the Lake Tahoe Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolislager, Leon J.; VanCuren, Richard; Pederson, James R.; Lashgari, Ash; McCauley, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    The Lake Tahoe Atmospheric Deposition Study (LTADS) was conducted by the Air Resources Board of the State of California (CARB) primarily to generate refined estimates of the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, phosphorous, and particulate matter directly to Lake Tahoe, which straddles the border between the states of California and Nevada near Reno, Nevada. The enhanced air quality monitoring during LTADS also included ozone measurements, which yielded additional insights into atmospheric processes and the role of transport in determining ozone concentrations within the Lake Tahoe Air Basin. The Lake Tahoe Air Basin is located generally downwind of air basins with major emissions of ozone precursors (e.g., VOCs, NOx), capable of generating significant ozone concentrations. Furthermore, vegetation on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada contribute biogenic organic compounds to the air mass. Ozone concentrations within the Tahoe Basin infrequently exceed the local 1-h threshold set to protect forest health (0.08 ppm) and the California 8-h ambient air quality standard (0.070 ppm). A concern then is the potential contribution of regional emission sources to the ozone concentrations observed in the Tahoe Basin. The ozone data collected during LTADS helped to better characterize the relative contribution of local and regional pollution sources to ozone air quality within the Tahoe Basin. The data indicate potential 1- or 2-day intact transport on rare occasions but generally the mixing of the atmosphere over the Sierra Nevada disperses the anthropogenic ozone throughout the boundary layer, which is generally more than a kilometer or two deep during the day. The data analysis indicates that emissions from upwind air basins add to the atmospheric burden of ozone concentrations, raising the regional concentrations in the Sierra Nevada. Given the large background and upwind enhancements relative to the ambient air quality standards, the local contribution does not need to

  17. Determining Spatial Distribution And Air-Water Exchange Of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons In Stormwater Runoff Catchment Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaraneni, V. K.; Schifman, L. A.; Craver, V.; Boving, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    Stormwater runoff is a conduit for several pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in to surface and ground water bodies. The control of runoff and pollutants is typically addressed by best management practices (BMPs), such as retention/detention ponds or catchment basins in general. The effectiveness of catchment basins in reducing the volume of runoff and removal of some contaminants has been established. However, very little is known about the fate of the contaminants settled within these structures. In coastal regions and places with shallow groundwater tables accumulation of high concentrations of PAHs in the bottom sediments poses a potential threat for groundwater contamination. The concentrations of PAHs accumulated in the sediments of these catchment basins will primarily depend on the sources of runoff origin and the surrounding land use. Due to the physico-chemical characteristics of PAHs, their transport not only can occur in the liquid and solid phase, but it is also possible that gaseous emissions can be produced from BMP systems. For the purpose of this study, five stormwater catchment basins along the I-95 corridor in Rhode Island were selected based on the stormwater runoff origin and covering (industrial, urban, highway, and commercial) land uses. To study the stratification of PAHs sediment cores one foot were collected and analyzed for 31PAHs (16 EPA parent PAH and 15 methylated PAHs). In order to determine whether the catchment basins are a source of atmospheric pollution polyethylene passive samplers were deployed to determine the freely dissolved PAHs in the water column and gas phase PAHs at the air-water interface. This presentation will describe how PAH fluxes move between three environmental compartments (sediments, water column, atmosphere) within the five stormwater catchment basins. Further, it will be investigated whether these BMP structures can act as contaminant sources rather than sinks and whether BMP

  18. Cold-Air-Pool Structure and Evolution in a Mountain Basin: Peter Sinks, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, Craig B.; Whiteman, Charles D.; Horel, John D.

    2003-06-01

    The evolution of potential temperature and wind structure during the buildup of nocturnal cold-air pools was investigated during clear, dry, September nights in Utah's Peter Sinks basin, a 1-km-diameter limestone sinkhole that holds the Utah minimum temperature record of -56 C. The evolution of cold-pool characteristics depended on the strength of prevailing flows above the basin. On an undisturbed day, a 30 C diurnal temperature range and a strong nocturnal potential temperature inversion (22 K in 100 m) were observed in the basin. Initially, downslope flows formed on the basin sidewalls. As a very strong potential temperature jump (17 K) developed at the top of the cold pool, however, the winds died within the basin and over the sidewalls. A persistent turbulent sublayer formed below the jump. Turbulent sensible heat flux on the basin floor became negligible shortly after sunset while the basin atmosphere continued to cool. Temperatures over the slopes, except for a 1 to 2-m-deep layer, became warmer than over the basin center at the same altitude. Cooling rates for the entire basin near sunset were comparable to the 90 W m-2 rate of loss of net longwave radiation at the basin floor, but these rates decreased to only a few watts per square meter by sunrise. This paper compares the observed cold-pool buildup in basins with inversion buildup in valleys.

  19. Reaction rate constant for dry air oxidation of K Basin fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Trimble, D.J.

    1998-04-29

    The rate of oxidation of spent nuclear fuel stored in the K Basin water is an important parameter when assessing the processes and accident scenarios for preparing the fuel for dry storage. The literature provides data and rate laws for the oxidation of unirradiated uranium in various environments. Measurement data for the dry air oxidation of K Basin fuel is compared to the literature data for linear oxidation in dry air. Equations for the correlations and statistical bounds to the K Basin fuel data and the literature data are selected for predicting nominal and bounding rates for the dry air oxidation of the K Basin fuel. These rate equations are intended for use in the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Technical Data book.

  20. Regional magnetic and gravity features of the Gibson Dome area and surrounding region, Paradox Basin, Utah : a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildenbrand, T.G.; Kucks, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of regional gravity and magnetic anomaly maps have been carried out to assist in the evaluation of the Gibson Dome area as a possible repository site for high-level radioactive waste. Derivative, wavelength-filtered, and trend maps were compiled to aid in properly locating major geophysical trends corresponding to faults, folds, and lithologic boundaries. The anomaly maps indicate that Paradox Basin is characterized by a heterogeneous Precambrian basement, essentially a metamorphic complex of gneisses and schist intruded by granitic rocks and mafic to ultramafic bodies. Interpreted Precambrian structures trend predominantly northwest and northeast although east-west trending features are evident. Prominent gravity lows define the salt anticlines. Structural and lithologic trends in the Gibson Dome area are closely examined. Of greatest interest is a series of circular magnetic highs trending west-northwest into the Gibson Dome area. Further study of the exact definition and geologic significance of this series of anomalies is warranted.

  1. Air quality impacts of motor vehicle emissions in the south coast air basin: Current versus more stringent control scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, Susan; Kidokoro, Toru; Sonoda, Yukihiro; Lohman, Kristen; Karamchandani, Prakash; Chen, Shu-Yun; Minoura, Hiroaki

    2012-02-01

    States are working to comply with the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Often, regulations restricting vehicle emissions are promulgated in order to attain compliance with the NAAQS. Currently, more stringent vehicle emission regulations are being considered by government agencies. This paper compares emissions from passenger cars and light duty trucks under the current California Low Emission Vehicle (LEV II) standards to a control scenario which was anticipated in 2008 to become LEV III (referred to as "more stringent control" in this paper) and determines if the scenario would result in additional improvements to air quality in California's South Coast Air Basin. The air quality modeling was performed using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) for years 2005, 2014 and 2020. The more stringent control sensitivity study simulated a scenario in which all new passenger cars and light duty trucks in the California South Coast Air Basin in year 2016 achieve Super Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle (SULEV) tail pipe emissions, zero evaporative emissions and more stringent aggressive driving requirements. The total on-road vehicles emissions difference when averaged across the South Coast Air Basin showed the more stringent scenario compared to LEV II to have reductions of 1% for oxides of nitrogen (NO x), 1% for as reactive organic gases (ROG) and 5% for carbon monoxide (CO) in 2030. LEV II modeled ozone levels in the western areas of the basin increased in 2014 and 2020 as compared to 2005, because these areas are VOC-sensitive and the reductions in NO x emissions in these regions are larger than the VOC reductions. In other areas of the South Coast Basin, ozone is reduced by 1.5% or less. The more stringent control scenario modeled levels of ozone have a maximum decrease from LEV II levels by 1% or less in 2014 and 1.5% or less in 2020.

  2. Ozone trends in California`s South Coast Air Basin, 1976--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Cohanim, S.; Cassmassi, J.; Bassett, M.

    1998-12-31

    The South Coast Air Basin (Basin) of Southern California exhibits the worst air quality in the nation, as measured by the annual number of days exceeding the 1-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone. Hourly pollutant concentration data collected by the South Coast Air Quality Management District`s air monitoring network are compared to the existing 1-hour and new 8-hour federal ozone ambient air quality standards to depict ozone trends and compliance in the Basin. Results of trend analyses for the different areas of the Basin are presented for the 1-hour and 8-hour standards, and the relative stringency of the existing and new federal standards is examined. Based on an analysis of the effect of the recently adopted federal standard on ozone compliance in the Basin, ozone concentrations exceed the new federal 8-hour standard level more often than the existing 1-hour standard in most locations. However, examination of the trends in design values for the 1-hour and 8-hour ozone standards suggests that for most locations in the Basin the new standard probably should not be significantly more difficult to attain than the existing standard. The weather-adjusted ozone trend analysis in the Basin confirms the fact that the downtrends in ozone concentrations and number of days exceeding standards are real and independent of annual variation in weather. An analysis of weekday/weekend differences in exceedances for the existing 1-hour and new 8-hour ozone standards show a higher number of days exceeding both standards on weekends for most locations in the Basin, with differences being more evident in the 1990s than in the late 1970s and 1980s

  3. Cenozoic evolution of the Pamir plateau recorded in surrounding basins, implications on Asian climate, land-sea distribution and biotic crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont Nivet, G.; Yang, W.; Blayney, T.; Bougeois, L.; Manceau, C.; Najman, Y.; Proust, J. N.; Guo, Z.; Grothe, A.; Mandic, O.; Fioroni, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Cenozoic Pamir orogen formed in response to the India-Asia collision. Existing datasets shows that the range grew since ca. 25 Ma, however the early Cenozoic history remains unconstrained. In that period, global climate changed from greenhouse to icehouse, the proto-Paratethys sea retreated out of Asia and continental aridification as well as monsoons established over Asia. These environmental changes are held responsible for major floral and faunal crises. However, the causal relationships between these events remains to be established because of the lack of accurate age constraints on their geological records. Here, we provide well-dated stratigraphic records using magneto- and bio-stratigraphy from the basins surrounding the Pamir. Southeast of the Pamir, along the Kunlun Shan into the southwestern Tarim Basin, Eocene marine deposits are continuously overlain by 41 to 15 Ma continental redbeds themselves overlain by conglomerates in a classic foreland sequence with upward increasing grain-size, accumulation rates and provenance proximity. However, North of the Pamir along the southwestern Tian Shan and West of the Pamir into the Afghan-Tadjik Basin, the entire Oligocene period appears to be missing from the record between the last marine and the first continental sediments dated to the Early Miocene. This supports a simple model in response to initial Eocene Pamir indentation with foreland basin activation in the Southeast related to the Kunlun Shan northward thrusting, followed much later by early Miocene activation of the northern foreland basin related to the southwestern Tian Shan overthrusting. The coeval activation of a lithospheric right-lateral strike-slip system along the Pamir/Tarim boundary may have enabled to transfer deformation from the India-Asia collision to the Tian Shan and possibly the Talas Fergana fault. This simple model suggests the following two-stage paleoenvironmental evolution: (1) Late Eocene sea retreat linked to the onset of

  4. Impact of Clean Air Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in Neuse River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated impacts of Clean Air Act (CAA) nitrogen emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) models were used. Two scenar...

  5. Inhalation intake of ambient air pollution in California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Julian D.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; McKone, Thomas E.; Deakin, Elizabeth; W Nazaroff, William

    Reliable estimates of inhalation intake of air pollution and its distribution among a specified population are important for environmental epidemiology, health risk assessment, urban planning, and environmental policy. We computed distributional characteristics of the inhalation intake of five pollutants for a group of ˜25,000 people (˜29,000 person-days) living in California's South Coast Air Basin. Our approach incorporates four main inputs: temporally resolved information about people's location (latitude and longitude), microenvironment, and activity level; temporally and spatially explicit model determinations of ambient concentrations; stochastically determined microenvironmental adjustment factors relating the exposure concentration to the ambient concentration; and, age-, gender-, and activity-specific breathing rates. Our study is restricted to pollutants of outdoor origin, i.e. it does not incorporate intake in a microenvironment from direct emissions into that microenvironment. Median estimated inhalation intake rates (μg d -1) are 53 for benzene, 5.1 for 1,3-butadiene, 8.7×10 -4 for hexavalent chromium in fine particulate matter (Cr-PM 2.5), 30 for diesel fine particulate matter (DPM 2.5), and 68 for ozone. For the four primary pollutants studied, estimated median intake rates are higher for non-whites and for individuals in low-income households than for the population as a whole. For ozone, a secondary pollutant, the reverse is true. Accounting for microenvironmental adjustment factors, population mobility and temporal correlations between pollutant concentrations and breathing rates affects the estimated inhalation intake by 40% on average. The approach presented here could be extended to quantify the impact on intakes and intake distributions of proposed changes in emissions, air quality, and urban infrastructure.

  6. Air Pollution Source/receptor Relationships in South Coast Air Basin, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ning

    This research project includes the application of some existing receptor models to study the air pollution source/receptor relationships in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) of southern California, the development of a new receptor model and the testing and the modifications of some existing models. These existing receptor models used include principal component factor analysis (PCA), potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis, Kohonen's neural network combined with Prim's minimal spanning tree (TREE-MAP), and direct trilinear decomposition followed by a matrix reconstruction. The ambient concentration measurements used in this study are a subset of the data collected during the 1987 field exercise of Southern California Air Quality Study (SCAQS). It consists of a number of gaseous and particulate pollutants analyzed from samples collected by SCAQS samplers at eight sampling sites, Anaheim, Azusa, Burbank, Claremont, Downtown Los Angeles, Hawthorne, Long Beach, and Rubidoux. Based on the information of emission inventories, meteorology and ambient concentrations, this receptor modeling study has revealed mechanisms that influence the air quality in SoCAB. Some of the mechanisms affecting the air quality in SoCAB that were revealed during this study include the following aspects. The SO_2 collected at sampling sites is mainly contributed by refineries in the coastal area and the ships equipped with oil-fired boilers off shore. Combustion of fossil fuel by automobiles dominates the emission of NO_{rm x} that is subsequently transformed and collected at sampling sites. Electric power plants also contribute HNO_3 to the sampling sites. A large feedlot in the eastern region of SoCAB has been identified as the major source of NH_3. Possible contributions from other industrial sources such as smelters and incinerators were also revealed. The results of this study also suggest the possibility of DMS (dimethylsulfide) and NH_3 emissions from off-shore sediments

  7. Land and federal mineral ownership coverage for the Uinta Basin, Wasatch Plateau and surrounding areas, northeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biewick, L.H.; Green, G.A.

    1999-01-01

    This Arc/Info coverage contains land status and Federal and State mineral ownership for approximately 25,900 square miles in northeastern Utah. The polygon coverage (which is also provided here as a shapefile) contains three attributes of ownership information for each polygon. One attribute indicates whether the surface is State owned, privately owned, consists of Tribal and Indian lands, or, if Federally owned, which Federal agency manages the land surface. Another attribute indicates where the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) maintains full or partial subsurface mineral rights. The third attribute indicates which energy minerals, if any, are owned by the Federal govenment. This coverage is based on land management status and Federal and State mineral ownership data compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the former U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM), and the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration at a scale of 1:100,000. This coverage was compiled primarily to serve the USGS National Oil and Gas Resource Assessment Project in the Uinta-Piceance Basin Province and the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment Project in the Colorado Plateau.

  8. Energy efficiency and the environment: Innovative ways to improve air quality in the Los Angeles Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschard, R.

    1993-02-01

    This paper focuses on novel, innovative approaches for reducing or delaying the production of photochemical smog in the Los Angeles Basin. These approaches include modifying the surface characteristics of the basin by increasing surface albedo and an extensive tree-planting program. The changes in surface conditions are designed to reduce the basin air temperatures, especially during the summer months, which will result in two possible effects. First, a decrease in temperature would lead to a reduction in energy use with an associated decline in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and a lowering of evaporative emission of reactive organic gases. Reductions in these smog precursors could improve the air quality of the basin without imposing additional emissions regulations. The second effect is associated with the possible causal relationship between air temperature and smog formation (i.e., lower temperatures and lower incidence of smog). Since this approach to mitigating air emissions is broad, the studies to date have concentrated on how changes in surface characteristics affect the meteorological conditions of the basin and on how these meteorological changes subsequently affect smog production. A geographic information system database of key surface characteristics (i.e., vegetative cover, albedo, moisture availability, and roughness) was compiled, and these characteristics were evaluated using prognostic meteorological models. The results of two- and three-dimensional meteorological simulations will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  9. Energy efficiency and the environment: Innovative ways to improve air quality in the Los Angeles Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ritschard, R.

    1993-02-01

    This paper focuses on novel, innovative approaches for reducing or delaying the production of photochemical smog in the Los Angeles Basin. These approaches include modifying the surface characteristics of the basin by increasing surface albedo and an extensive tree-planting program. The changes in surface conditions are designed to reduce the basin air temperatures, especially during the summer months, which will result in two possible effects. First, a decrease in temperature would lead to a reduction in energy use with an associated decline in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) and a lowering of evaporative emission of reactive organic gases. Reductions in these smog precursors could improve the air quality of the basin without imposing additional emissions regulations. The second effect is associated with the possible causal relationship between air temperature and smog formation (i.e., lower temperatures and lower incidence of smog). Since this approach to mitigating air emissions is broad, the studies to date have concentrated on how changes in surface characteristics affect the meteorological conditions of the basin and on how these meteorological changes subsequently affect smog production. A geographic information system database of key surface characteristics (i.e., vegetative cover, albedo, moisture availability, and roughness) was compiled, and these characteristics were evaluated using prognostic meteorological models. The results of two- and three-dimensional meteorological simulations will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  10. Seismotectonics of the Antalya Basin and surrounding regions in eastern Mediterranean from 8 to 28 December 2013 Mw 5.0-5.8 earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görgün, Ethem; Kalafat, Doğan; Kekovalı, Kıvanç

    2016-05-01

    The 8-28 December 2013 Mw 5.0-5.8 Antalya Basin earthquake sequence in eastern Mediterranean is examined. Centroid moment tensors for 16 earthquakes with moment magnitudes (Mw) between 3.6 and 5.8 are determined by applying a waveform inversion method. All earthquakes are shallow focus thrust events at a depth of 40-45 km. The seismic moments (Mo) of the earthquakes are estimated as 4.10 × 1016-5.54 × 1017 N m and rupture durations of the mainshocks are 20-22 s. The focal mechanisms of the aftershocks are mainly thrust faulting with a strike-slip component and reveal NW-SE trending direction of T-axis in the entire activated region. According to high-resolution hypocenter relocation of the Antalya earthquake sequence, seven main clusters are revealed. The aftershock activity in the observation period between 1 December 2013 and 23 January 2015 extends in an N to S direction. A seismic cross-section indicates that a complex pattern of the hypocenter distribution with the activation of seven segments. The westernmost cluster (cluster 1) is associated with a fault plane trending mainly WNW-ESE and dipping vertical, while the cluster 5 is related to a fault plane trending NNE-SSW and dipping towards SSE. The best constrained focal depths indicate that the aftershock sequence is mainly confined in the crust (depth < 40 km) and are operating in the approximate depth range from 3 to 110 km. A stress tensor inversion of focal mechanism data is performed to obtain a more precise picture of the Antalya Basin stress field. The stress tensor inversion results indicate a predominant thrust stress regime with a NE-SW oriented maximum horizontal compressive stress (SH). According to variance of the stress tensor inversion, to first order, the Antalya Basin is characterized by a homogeneous interplate stress field. The Coulomb stress change associated with two mainshocks are also investigated to evaluate any significant enhancement of stresses along the Antalya Basin and

  11. Observations of the Valley of Mexico Basin Ventilation Through the Tenango del Aire- Amecameca Geographical Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Suarez, G.; Torres-Jarón, R.; Steinbrecher, R.; Junkermann, W.; Torres-Jaramillo, A.; Garcia, A. R.; Mar-Morales, B.

    2007-05-01

    Past air quality modeling exercises have suggested the existence of basin drainage flows which may transport Mexico City Metropolitan Area's air pollution plume outside the Valley of Mexico Basin. The MCMA-2006 field campaign offered the opportunity to study the basin ventilation through a geographical gap in the southeast mountains of the basin. A mobile monitoring lab was placed at the Tenango del Aire town, a unique site located in this gap for measuring the pass of air masses from (and towards) the MCMA to (and from) the Cuautla Valley. O3, CO, NOx, NOy, CH2O global and UV radiation and MLH were measured continuously during MILAGRO from March 2 until April 6, together with other chemical species. Complementary backward and forward trajectories were constructed for the site using MCCM in prognostic mode during MILAGRO. An exploratory analysis of the air pollution roses measured at Tenango showed a sharp dominance of two flow patterns: one from the north well associated with relatively higher levels of primary pollutants and ozone levels; and another one from the south typically associated with lower levels primary pollutants but not so low of secondary ones as ozone. On the other hand, measured CO data at Tenango were compared with CO data measured at one local monitoring station in the town of Ocuituco in the State of Morelos. Ocuituco is located to the south of Tenango towards the Cuautla Valley. The preliminary results suggest that the back and forth pass of air masses through the Tenango del Aire - Amecameca area can be an important process in the regional transport of air pollution between two valleys and their metropolitan areas within the Central Mexico region.

  12. Air quality climate in the Columbia River Basin. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, S.A.

    1998-08-01

    Aspects of climate that influence air quality in the Columbia River Basin of the Northwestern United States are described. A few, relatively simple, analytical tools were developed to show the spatial and temporal patterns of mean-monthly mixing heights, precipitation scavenging, upper level and surface trajectory winds, and drought that inhibit pollution uptake. Also, potential changes in air quality from the effects of increasing greenhouse gases are discussed.

  13. PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF NITRATE AEROSOLS IN THE LOS ANGELES AIR BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric aerosol was sampled with a low pressure impactor at a coastal, an urban, and an agricultural site in the Los Angeles air basin. The material collected on each stage was analyzed for nitrate by direct vaporization into a chemiluminescent analyzer, sensitive at nano...

  14. Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in Neuse River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated impacts of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) NOx emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, USA from 1990 to 2020. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-...

  15. Sources of Atmospheric Pollutants Impacting Air and Water Quality in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertler, A. W.; Cahill, T. A.; Gillies, J.; Kuhns, H.

    2008-12-01

    Starting in the second half of the 20th century, decline in Lake Tahoe's water clarity and degradation in the basin's air quality have become major concerns due to its unique scenic features. Gaseous and particulate nitrogen (N) and particulate phosphorus (P) loading via direct atmospheric deposition and sediment transport to the lake have also been implicated as responsible for its eutrophication and decline in water clarity. Estimates suggest that atmospheric N deposition contributes 55% of the total N loading to the lake, while atmospheric P deposition contributes 15% of the total P loading. In order to improve both air quality and, as a consequence, water quality, it is necessary to develop an understanding of the sources of the atmospheric pollutants. Once this is accomplished, it is possible to implement cost-effective strategies to reduce this impact. This paper summarizes the findings of a series of studies performed to determine the levels and sources of ambient air pollutants in the basin. Projects have included the development of a Tahoe-specific emissions inventory, long-term measurements of road dust resuspension, modeling to determine the fraction of pollutants coming from in-basin vs. out-of-basin sources, particulate source apportionment, and estimates of nitric acid deposition. These studies found that the pollutants most closely connected to the decline in water quality come largely from within basin sources, as opposed to those coming from the Central Valley and upwind urban areas of California. These results indicate regulators need to control pollutant emissions within the Tahoe basin in order to reduce the impact of atmospheric pollutants on both air and water quality.

  16. Comparison of Vertical Soundings and Sidewall Air Temperature Measurements in a Small Alpine Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Eisenbach, Stefan; Pospichal, Bernhard; Steinacker, Reinhold

    2004-11-01

    Tethered balloon soundings from two sites on the floor of a 1-km diameter limestone sinkhole in the Eastern Alps are compared with pseudo-vertical temperature ‘soundings’ from three lines of temperature data loggers on the basin’s northwest, southwest and southeast sidewalls. Under stable nighttime conditions with low background winds, the pseudo-vertical profiles from all three lines were good proxies for free air temperature soundings over the basin center, with a mean nighttime cold temperature bias of about 0.4°C and a standard deviation of 0.4°C. Cold biases were highest in the upper basin where relatively warm air subsides to replace air that spills out of the basin through the lowest altitude saddle. On a windy night, standard deviations increased to 1 - 2°C. After sunrise, the varying exposures of the data loggers to sunlight made the pseudo-vertical profiles less useful as proxies for free air soundings. The good correspondence between sidewall and free air temperatures during high static stability conditions suggests that sidewall soundings will prove useful in monitoring temperatures and vertical temperature gradients in the sinkhole. The sidewall soundings can produce more frequent profiles at less cost than tethersondes or rawinsondes, and provide valuable advantages for some types of meteorological analyses.

  17. The impact of circulation patterns on regional transport pathways and air quality over Beijing and its surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. P.; Zhu, T.; Zhang, Q. H.; Li, C. C.; Shu, H. L.; Ying, Y.; Dai, Z. P.; Wang, X.; Liu, X. Y.; Liang, A. M.; Shen, H. X.; Yi, B. Q.

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the air pollution characteristics of synoptic-scale circulation in the Beijing megacity, and provided quantitative evaluation of the impacts of circulation patterns on air quality during the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics. Nine weather circulation types (CTs) were objectively identified over the North China region during 2000-2009, using obliquely rotated T-mode principal component analysis (PCA). The resulting CTs were examined in relation to the local meteorology, regional transport pathways, and air quality parameters, respectively. The FLEXPART-WRF model was used to calculate 48-h backward plume trajectories for each CT. Each CT was characterized with distinct local meteorology and air mass origin. CT 1 (high pressure to the west with a strong pressure gradient) was characterized by a northwestern air mass origin, with the smallest local and southeasterly air mass sources, and CT 6 (high pressure to the northwest) had air mass sources mostly from the north and east. On the contrary, CTs 5, 8, and 9 (weak pressure field, high pressure to the east, and low pressure to the northwest, respectively) were characterized by southern and southeastern trajectories, which indicated a greater influence of high pollutant emission sources. In turn, poor air quality in Beijing (high loadings of PM10, BC, SO2, NO2, NOx, O3, AOD, and low visibility) was associated with these CTs. Good air quality in Beijing was associated with CTs 1 and 6. The average visibilities (with ±1σ) in Beijing for CTs 1 and 6 during 2000-2009 were 18.5 ± 8.3 km and 14.3 ± 8.5 km, respectively. In contrast, low visibility values of 6.0 ± 3.5 km, 6.6 ± 3.7 km, and 6.7 ± 3.6 km were found in CTs 5, 8, and 9, respectively. The mean concentrations of PM10 for CTs 1, 6, 5, 8, and 9 during 2005-2009 were 90.3 ± 76.3 μg m-3, 111.7 ± 89.6 μg m-3, 173.4 ± 105.8 μg m-3, 158.4 ± 90.0 μg m-3, and 151.2 ± 93.1 μg m-3, respectively. Analysis of the relationship between

  18. Studies on the Impact of Municipal Waste Dumps on Surrounding Soil and Air Quality of Two Cities in Northern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elaigwu, S. E.; Ajibola, V. O.; Folaranmi, F. M.

    Atmospheric pollution from municipal refuse dumps and vehicular traffic are matters of growing interest, often leading to temporary restrictions in urban areas. This study aimed at evaluating bioaccumulation and effects caused by airborne pollutants from refuse dumps. Specimens of the moss Funaria capsularis collected in five sites in the urban areas of Zaria and Kaduna, Nigeria and trace metals (cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead and zinc) were measured. The overall results of this exploratory study suggest the utility of F. capsularis as a lower plant for biomonitoring the environmental impact of atmospheric pollution in urban areas. The impact of these dump sites on surrounding soils was also studied.

  19. The impact of circulation patterns on regional transport pathways and air quality over Beijing and its surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. P.; Zhu, T.; Zhang, Q. H.; Li, C. C.; Shu, H. L.; Ying, Y.; Dai, Z. P.; Liu, X. Y.; Liang, A. M.; Shen, H. X.

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the air pollution characteristics of synoptic-scale circulation in the Beijing megacity, and provided holistic evaluation of the impacts of circulation patterns on air quality during the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics. Nine weather circulation types (CTs) were objectively identified over the North China region during 2000-2009, using obliquely rotated T-mode principal component analysis (PCA). The resulting CTs were examined in relation to the local meteorology, regional transport pathways, and air quality parameters, respectively. The FLEXPART-WRF model was used to calculate 48-h backward plume trajectories for each CT. Nine CTs were characterized, with distinct local meteorology and air mass origins. CT 1 (high to the west with a strong pressure gradient) was characterized by a northwestern origin, with the smallest local and southeasterly air mass sources, and CT 6 (high to the northwest) had air mass sources mostly from the north and east. In contrast, CTs 5, 8, and 9 (unique, high to the east, and low to the northwest, respectively) were characterized by southern and southeastern trajectories, which indicated a greater influence of high pollutant emission sources. In turn, poor air quality in Beijing (high loadings of PM10, BC, SO2, NO2, O3, AOD, and low visibility) was associated with these CTs. Good air quality in Beijing was associated with CTs 1 and 6. The average visibilities (with ±1 σ) in Beijing for CTs 1 and 6 during 2000-2009 were 18.5 ± 8.3 km and 14.3 ± 8.5 km, respectively. In contrast, poor visibility values of 6.0 ± 3.5 km, 6.6 ± 3.7 km, and 6.7 ± 3.6 km were found in CTs 5, 8, and 9, respectively. The mean concentrations of PM10 for CTs 1, 6, 5, 8, and 9 during 2005-2009 were 90.3 ± 76.3 μg m-3, 111.7 ± 89.6 μg m-3, 173.4 ± 105.8 μg m-3, 158.4 ± 90.0 μg m-3, and 151.2 ± 93.1 μg m-3, respectively. Analysis of the relationship between circulation pattern and air quality during the emission control period

  20. Acute effects of air pollution changes in schoolchildren: the Gardanne coal basin study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpin, D.; Kleisbauer, J. P.; Fondarai, A.; Francheterre, A.; Fondarai, J.; Graland, B.; Viala, A.

    1988-12-01

    In the literature, studies devoted to shortterm effects of air pollution episodes in children have provided controversial results. To evaluate if acute air pollution changes in the Gardanne coal basin (France) could have deleterious effects on children's pulmonary function, we studied 160 children on two different days. Each in-school examination consisted of a short questionnaire and a spirometric assessment. The area included districts of high and low pollution levels. In the former, the two examinations took place at different air pollution levels whereas, in the latter, the air pollution levels were comparable. We obtained higher spirometric values during the second examination, regardless of air pollution changes and suggesting a learning effect, which vanished when we used FEV1/FVC ratio. The difference in FEV1/FVC between days of low and high pollution was significant but merely equal to 2%. There was no change of clinical symptom score.

  1. Air toxics in coal: Distribution and abundance of selected trace elements in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, S.S.; Stanton, R.W.

    1994-12-31

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments identified 12 potentially toxic elements, called ``air toxics,`` that may be released during the combustion of coal. The elements identified in the amendments are As, Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and U (radionuclides). In this study, the distribution and concentration of these elements were examined, on a whole-coal basis, in samples from two cores of the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed (Paleocene, Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation), in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The distribution of these elements in the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed is also compared to the distribution of the same elements in a correlative coal bed, the Anderson-Dietz 1 coal bed in the Powder River Basin of Montana.

  2. The impact of sea breeze under different synoptic patterns on air pollution within Athens basin.

    PubMed

    Mavrakou, Thaleia; Philippopoulos, Kostas; Deligiorgi, Despina

    2012-09-01

    Air quality in densely populated urban coastal areas is directly related to the coupling of the synoptic and the local scale flows. The dispersion conditions within Athens basin, under the influence of different meteorological forcings, lead to distinct spatio-temporal air pollution patterns. The aim of the current observational research is to identify and examine the effect of sea breeze under different atmospheric circulation patterns on air pollution levels for a one-year study period (2007). The study employs surface pressure maps, routine meteorological observations at two coastal sites and nitrogen monoxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and ozone (O(3)) concentrations from a network of four air quality stations within the Athens basin. A three-step methodology is applied that incorporates a set of criteria for classifying atmospheric circulation and identifying sea breeze events under each circulation pattern. Two types of sea breeze development are identified (pure sea breeze-PSB and modified sea breeze-MSB) with distinct characteristics. Sea breeze is found to develop more frequently under offshore compared to onshore and parallel to the shoreline background flows. Poor dispersion conditions (high nitrogen oxides-NO(x) and O(3) concentrations) are connected to the pure sea breeze cases and to those cases where sea breeze interacts with a moderate northerly flow during the warm period. The levels of NO(x) and O(3) for the northern Athens basin area are found to be significantly higher during the sea breeze days compared to the Etesian days. Regarding the diurnal variation of ozone for the sea breeze days, peak concentrations and higher intra-daily ranges are observed. Day-to-day pollution accumulation (build-up effect) is measured for O(3) at the northern stations in the Athens basin. PMID:22766425

  3. Synoptic climatological analysis of persistent cold air pools over the Carpathian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabóné André, Karolina; Bartholy, Judit; Pongrácz, Rita

    2016-04-01

    A persistent cold air pool (PCAP) is a winter-time, anticyclone-related weather event over a relatively large basin. During this time the air is colder near the surface than aloft. This inversion near the surface can last even for weeks. As the cold air cools down, relative humidity increases and fog forms. The entire life cycle of a PCAP depends on the large scale circulation pattern. PCAP usually appears when an anticyclone builds up after a cold front passed over the examined basin, and it is usually destructed by a coming strong cold front of another midlatitude cyclone. Moreover, the intensity of the anticyclone affects the intensity of the PCAP. PCAP may result in different hazards for the population: (1) Temperature inversion in the surface layers together with weak wind may lead to severe air pollution causing health problems for many people, especially, elderly and children. (2) The fog and/or smog during chilly weather conditions often results in freezing rain. Both fog and freezing rain can distract transportation and electricity supply. Unfortunately, the numerical weather prediction models have difficulties to predict PCAP formation and destruction. One of the reasons is that PCAP is not defined objectively with a simple formula, which could be easily applied to the numerical output data. However, according to some recommendations from the synoptic literature, the shallow convective potential energy (SCPE) can be used to mathematically describe PCAP. In this study, we used the ERA-Interim reanalysis datasets to examine this very specific weather event (i.e., PCAP) over the Carpathian Basin. The connection between the mean sea level pressure and some PCAP measures (e.g., SCPE, energy deficit, etc.) is evaluated. For instance, we used logistic regression to identify PCAP periods over the Carpathian Basin. Then, further statistical analysis includes the evaluation of the length and intensity of these PCAP periods.

  4. A Review of the Current Geographic Distribution of and Debate Surrounding Electronic Cigarette Clean Air Regulations in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Joy; Vuolo, Mike; Kelly, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present the results of a systematic review of state, county, and municipal restrictions on the use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in public spaces within the United States, alongside an overview of the current legal landscape. The lack of federal guidance leaves lower-level jurisdictions to debate the merits of restrictions on use in public spaces without sufficient scientific research. As we show through a geographic assessment of restrictions, this has resulted in an inconsistent patchwork of e-cigarette use bans across the United States of varying degrees of coverage. Bans have emerged over time in a manner that suggests a “bottom up” diffusion of e-cigarette clean air policies. Ultimately, the lack of clinical and scientific knowledge on the risks and potential harm reduction benefits has led to precautionary policymaking, which often lacks grounding in empirical evidence and results in spatially uneven diffusion of policy. PMID:25463920

  5. Airborne measurements of air pollution chemistry and transport. 1: Initial survey of major air basins in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloria, H. R.; Pitts, J. N., Jr.; Behar, J. V.; Bradburn, G. A.; Reinisch, R. F.; Zafonte, L.

    1972-01-01

    An instrumented aircraft has been used to study photochemical air pollution in the State of California. Simultaneous measurements of the most important chemical constituents (ozone, total oxidant, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides, as well as several meteorological variables) were made. State-of-the-art measurement techniques and sampling procedures are discussed. Data from flights over the South Coast Air Basin, the San Francisco Bay Area, the San Joaquin Valley, the Santa Clara and Salinas Valleys, and the Pacific Ocean within 200 miles of the California coast are presented. Pollutants were found to be concentrated in distant layers up to at least 18,000 feet. In many of these layers, the pollutant concentrations were much higher than at ground level. These findings bring into serious question the validity of the present practice of depending solely on data from ground-based monitoring stations for predictive models.

  6. New Directions: Questions surrounding suspended particle mass used as a surrogate for air quality and for regulatory control of ambient urban air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoare, John L.

    2014-07-01

    The original choice of particulate matter mass (PM) as a realistic surrogate for gross air pollution has gradually evolved into routine use nowadays of epidemiologically-based estimates of the monetary and other benefits expected from regulating urban air quality. Unfortunately, the statistical associations facilitating such calculations usually are based on single indices of air pollution whereas the health effects themselves are more broadly based causally. For this and other reasons the economic benefits of control tend to be exaggerated. Primarily because of their assumed inherently inferior respirability, particles ≥10 μm are generally excluded from such considerations. Where the particles themselves are chemically heterogeneous, as in an urban context, this may be inappropriate. Clearly all air-borne particles, whether coarse or fine, are susceptible to inhalation. Hence, the possibility exists for any adhering potentially harmful semi-volatile substances to be subsequently de-sorbed in vivo thereby facilitating their transport deeper into the lungs. Consequently, this alone may be a sufficient reason for including rather than rejecting during air quality monitoring the relatively coarse 10-100 μm particle fraction, ideally in conjunction with routine estimation of the gaseous co-pollutants thereby facilitating a multi-pollutant approach apropos regulation.

  7. Cardiorespiratory Biomarker Responses in Healthy Young Adults to Drastic Air Quality Changes Surrounding the 2008 Beijing Olympics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfeng; Zhu, Tong; Kipen, Howard; Wang, Guangfa; Huang, Wei; Rich, David; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Yuedan; Lu, Shou-En; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Diehl, Scott; Hu, Min; Tong, Jian; Gong, Jicheng; Thomas, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Associations between air pollution and cardiorespiratory mortality and morbidity have been well established, but data to support biologic mechanisms underlying these associations are limited. We designed this study to examine several prominently hypothesized mechanisms by assessing Beijing residents’ biologic responses, at the biomarker level, to drastic changes in air quality brought about by unprecedented air pollution control measures implemented during the 2008 Beijing Olympics. To test the hypothesis that changes in air pollution levels are associated with changes in biomarker levels reflecting inflammation, hemostasis, oxidative stress, and autonomic tone, we recruited and retained 125 nonsmoking adults (19 to 33 years old) free of cardiorespiratory and other chronic diseases. Using the combination of a quasi-experimental design and a panel-study approach, we measured biomarkers of autonomic dysfunction (heart rate [HR*] and heart rate variability [HRV]), of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress (plasma C-reactive protein [CRP], fibrinogen, blood cell counts and differentials, and urinary 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG]), of pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress (fractional exhaled nitric oxide [FeNO], exhaled breath condensate [EBC] pH, EBC nitrate, EBC nitrite, EBC nitrite+nitrate [sum of the concentrations of nitrite and nitrate], and EBC 8-isoprostane), of hemostasis (platelet activation [plasma sCD62P and sCD40L], platelet aggregation, and von Willebrand factor [vWF]), and of blood pressure (systolic blood pressure [SBP] and diastolic blood pressure [DBP]). These biomarkers were measured on each subject twice before, twice during, and twice after the Beijing Olympics. For each subject, repeated measurements were separated by at least one week to avoid potential residual effects from a prior measurement. We measured a large suite of air pollutants (PM2.5 [particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter] and constituents, sulfur

  8. Evaluation of air quality in Chengdu, Sichuan Basin, China: are China's air quality standards sufficient yet?

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Jaffe, Daniel; Tang, Ya; Bresnahan, Meaghan; Song, Jie

    2015-05-01

    Air quality evaluation is important in order to inform the public about the risk level of air pollution to human health. To better assess air quality, China released its new national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS-2012) and the new method to classify air quality level (AQL) in 2012. In this study, we examined the performance of China's NAAQS-2012 and AQL classification method through applying them, the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, and the US AQL classification method to evaluate air quality in Chengdu, the largest city in southwestern China. The results show that annual mean concentrations of PM₁₀, PM₂.₅, SO₂, NO₂, and O₃ at the seven urban sites were in the ranges of 138-161, 87-98, 18-32, 54-70, and 42-57 μg/m(3), respectively, and the annual mean concentrations of CO were in the range of 1.09-1.28 mg/m(3). Chengdu is located in one of the four largest regions affected by haze in China, and PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ were the top air pollutants, with annual concentrations over 2 times of their standards in NAAQS-2012 and over 7 times of the WHO guidelines. Annual mean concentrations of the pollutants were much lower at the background site (LYS) than at the urban sites, but the annual mean concentrations of PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ at LYS were 3.5 and 5.7 times of the WHO guidelines, respectively. These suggest that severe air pollution in Chengdu was largely associated with local emissions but also related to regional air pollution. The compliance rates of PM₁₀ , PM₂.₅, SO₂, and O₃ met China's NAAQS-2012 standards four times more frequently than they met the WHO guidelines, as NAAQS-2012 uses the loosest interim target (IT) standards of WHO for these four pollutants. Air pollution in Chengdu was estimated and stated to be less severe using China's classification than using the US classification, as China uses weaker concentration breakpoints and benign descriptions of AQL. Furthermore, China's AQL classification method

  9. An aerial radiological survey of the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base and surrounding area, Tucson, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey, which was conducted from March 1 to 13, 1995, covered a 51-square-mile (132-square-kilometer) area centered on the Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (DMAFB) in Tucson, Arizona. The results of the survey are reported as contours of bismuth-214 ({sup 214}Bi) soil concentrations, which are characteristic of natural uranium and its progeny, and as contours of the total terrestrial exposure rates extrapolated to one meter above ground level. All data were scaled and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the DMAFB area. The terrestrial exposure rates varied from 9 to 20 microroentgens per hour at one meter above the ground. Elevated levels of terrestrial radiation due to increased concentrations of {sup 214}Bi (natural uranium) were observed over the Southern Pacific railroad yard and along portions of the railroad track bed areas residing both within and outside the base boundaries. No man-made, gamma ray-emitting radioactive material was observed by the aerial survey. High-purity germanium spectrometer and pressurized ionization chamber measurements at eight locations within the base boundaries were used to verify the integrity of the aerial results. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to be in agreement. However, the ground-based measurements were able to detect minute quantities of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) at six of the eight locations examined. The presence of {sup 137}Cs is a remnant of fallout from foreign and domestic atmospheric nuclear weapons testing that occurred in the 1950s and early 1960s. Cesium-137 concentrations varied from 0.1 to 0.3 picocuries per gram, which is below the minimum detectable activity of the aerial system.

  10. Toxicological assessment of concentrations of volatile organic compounds found in the ambient air of Seabrook, Texas and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Latrice Bundage

    Seabrook, Texas, a residential community located in the southeast fringes of Houston, Texas, the fourth largest metropolis in the United States, is adjacent to a major industrial complex of petrochemical plants, chemical plants, refineries, hazardous materials storage facilities, and the intertwining of pipelines. The close proximity of residential communities to industrial complexes and their emission sources creates concern of the potential adverse health effects that could be a result of long-term exposure to Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) even at low concentration. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential adverse health affects of low-level exposure of benzene, styrene, and 1, 1-dichloroethene that residents may experience. The case study utilized the screening data performed in a previous study conducted by the TSU NASA URC Laboratory. The sample results were compared to Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) guideline standards known as Effects Screening Levels (ESLs) to determine whether the ambient concentration levels were aligned with the TCEQ's pre-determined health cut off values. Special interest in the probable affects on lung epithelial cells and hepatic cells by the inhalation of benzene, styrene and 1,1-dichloroethene was examined by low level exposure (0.100ppm to 4ppm) of these chemicals for 4- and 6-hour exposure periods to determine whether the cells metabolic activity is adversely affected. Cytotoxicity of test chemicals was investigated utilizing MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay protocol. Validation of the presence of benzene, styrene and 1,1-dichloroethene was performed by incubating a known dilution of the respective chemical for 4- and 6-hours to determine the approximate remaining concentration that should remain in the test media after the given exposure in the 37° incubator. Results of the study show little difference in the viability of the cells at the concentrations

  11. Facies analysis of Tertiary basin-filling rocks of the Death Valley regional ground-water system and surrounding areas, Nevada and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Fridrich, Christopher J.; Taylor, Emily

    2001-01-01

    Existing hydrologic models of the Death Valley region typically have defined the Cenozoic basins as those areas that are covered by recent surficial deposits, and have treated the basin-fill deposits that are concealed under alluvium as a single unit with uniform hydrologic properties throughout the region, and with depth. Although this latter generalization was known to be flawed, it evidently was made because available geologic syntheses did not provide the basis for a more detailed characterization. As an initial attempt to address this problem, this report presents a compilation and synthesis of existing and new surface and subsurface data on the lithologic variations between and within the Cenozoic basin fills of this region. The most permeable lithologies in the Cenozoic basin fills are freshwater limestones, unaltered densely welded tuffs, and little-consolidated coarse alluvium. The least permeable lithologies are playa claystones, altered nonwelded tuffs, and tuffaceous and clay-matrix sediments of several types. In all but the youngest of the basin fills, permeability probably decreases strongly with depth owing to a typically increasing abundance of volcanic ash or clay in the matrices of the clastic sediments with increasing age (and therefore with increasing depth in general), and to increasing consolidation and alteration (both hydrothermal and diagenetic) with increasing depth and age. This report concludes with a categorization of the Cenozoic basins of the Death Valley region according to the predominant lithologies in the different basin fills and presents qualitative constraints on the hydrologic properties of these major lithologic categories.

  12. Facies Analysis of Tertiary Basin-Filling Rocks of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water System and Surrounding Areas, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect

    Sweetkind, D.S.; Fridrich, C.J.; Taylor, Emily

    2002-04-04

    Existing hydrologic models of the Death Valley region typically have defined the Cenozoic basins as those areas that are covered by recent surficial deposits, and have treated the basin-fill deposits that are concealed under alluvium as a single unit with uniform hydrologic properties throughout the region, and with depth. Although this latter generalization was known to be flawed, it evidently was made because available geologic syntheses did not provide the basis for a more detailed characterization. As an initial attempt to address this problem, this report presents a compilation and synthesis of existing and new surface and subsurface data on the lithologic variations between and within the Cenozoic basin fills of this region. The most permeable lithologies in the Cenozoic basin fills are freshwater limestones, unaltered densely welded tuffs, and little-consolidated coarse alluvium. The least permeable lithologies are playa claystones, altered nonwelded tuffs, and tuffaceous and cl ay-matrix sediments of several types. In all but the youngest of the basin fills, permeability probably decreases strongly with depth owing to a typically increasing abundance of volcanic ash or clay in the matrices of the clastic sediments with increasing age (and therefore with increasing depth in general), and to increasing consolidation and alteration (both hydrothermal and diagenetic) with increasing depth and age. This report concludes with a categorization of the Cenozoic basins of the Death Valley region according to the predominant lithologies in the different basin fills and presents qualitative constraints on the hydrologic properties of these major lithologic categories.

  13. Characterization of reactants, mechanisms, and species in South Coast Air Basin cloudwater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, L.W.; Anderson, J.A.; Alexander, N.L.; Blumenthal, D.L.; Knuth, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Sonoma Technology, Inc. (STI) conducted a study in 1985 for the California Air Resources Board in which an aircraft was used to collect cloud water, aerosol, and gas samples and to make other air-quality and meteorological measurements in stratus clouds in the Los Angeles Basin. The study continued the research on Los Angeles Basin stratus begun in 1981. The ambient concentrations of most non-volatile dissolved species in the cloud water usually decreased with time, showing that removal processes were important. Increases with time in lead and ammonia concentrations in the cloud water showed that vertical mixing was important. There was a slight tendency for nitrate concentrations to increase with time, but sulfate concentrations were relatively constant because of the very small sulfur concentrations in the clouds. The settling of droplets out of stratus clouds through air below the clouds containing ammonia and the evaporation of these relatively large droplets is suggested as a significant mechanism for the formation of large, nitrate-containing aerosol particles below the clouds.

  14. Stable isotope composition of waters in the Great Basin, United States 1. Air-mass trajectories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Harris, J.M.; Smith, G.I.; Johnson, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Isentropic trajectories, calculated using the NOAA/Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory's isentropic transport model, were used to determine air-parcel origins and the influence of air mass trajectories on the isotopic composition of precipitation events that occurred between October 1991 and September 1993 at Cedar City, Utah, and Winnemucca, Nevada. Examination of trajectories that trace the position of air parcels backward in time for 10 days indicated five distinct regions of water vapor origin: (1) Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific, (2) central Pacific, (3) tropical Pacific, (4) Gulf of Mexico, and (5) continental land mass. Deuterium (??D) and oxygen-18 (??18O) analyses were made of precipitation representing 99% of all Cedar City events. Similar analyses were made on precipitation representing 66% of the precipitation falling at Winnemucca during the same period. The average isotopic composition of precipitation derived from each water vapor source was determined. More than half of the precipitation that fell at both sites during the study period originated in the tropical Pacific and traveled northeast to the Great Basin; only a small proportion traversed the Sierra Nevada. The isotopic composition of precipitation is determined by air-mass origin and its track to the collection station, mechanism of droplet formation, reequilibration within clouds, and evaporation during its passage from cloud to ground. The Rayleigh distillation model can explain the changes in isotopic composition of precipitation as an air mass is cooled pseudo-adiabatically during uplift. However, the complicated processes that take place in the rapidly convecting environment of cumulonimbus and other clouds that are common in the Great Basin, especially in summer, require modification of this model because raindrops that form in the lower portion of those clouds undergo isotopic change as they are elevated to upper levels of the clouds from where they eventually drop to the

  15. Stable isotope composition of waters in the Great Basin, United States 1. Air-mass trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Irving; Harris, Joyce M.; Smith, George I.; Johnson, Craig A.

    2002-10-01

    Isentropic trajectories, calculated using the NOAA/Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory's isentropic transport model, were used to determine air-parcel origins and the influence of air mass trajectories on the isotopic composition of precipitation events that occurred between October 1991 and September 1993 at Cedar City, Utah, and Winnemucca, Nevada. Examination of trajectories that trace the position of air parcels backward in time for 10 days indicated five distinct regions of water vapor origin: (1) Gulf of Alaska and North Pacific, (2) central Pacific, (3) tropical Pacific, (4) Gulf of Mexico, and (5) continental land mass. Deuterium (δD) and oxygen-18 (δ18O) analyses were made of precipitation representing 99% of all Cedar City events. Similar analyses were made on precipitation representing 66% of the precipitation falling at Winnemucca during the same period. The average isotopic composition of precipitation derived from each water vapor source was determined. More than half of the precipitation that fell at both sites during the study period originated in the tropical Pacific and traveled northeast to the Great Basin; only a small proportion traversed the Sierra Nevada. The isotopic composition of precipitation is determined by air-mass origin and its track to the collection station, mechanism of droplet formation, reequilibration within clouds, and evaporation during its passage from cloud to ground. The Rayleigh distillation model can explain the changes in isotopic composition of precipitation as an air mass is cooled pseudo-adiabatically during uplift. However, the complicated processes that take place in the rapidly convecting environment of cumulonimbus and other clouds that are common in the Great Basin, especially in summer, require modification of this model because raindrops that form in the lower portion of those clouds undergo isotopic change as they are elevated to upper levels of the clouds from where they eventually drop to the

  16. Characterizing Air Temperature Changes in the Tarim Basin over 1960–2012

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Dongmei; Wang, Xiujun; Zhao, Chenyi; Wu, Xingren; Jiang, Fengqing; Chen, Pengxiang

    2014-01-01

    There has been evidence of warming rate varying largely over space and between seasons. However, little has been done to evaluate the spatial and temporal variability of air temperature in the Tarim Basin, northwest China. In this study, we collected daily air temperature from 19 meteorological stations for the period of 1960–2012, and analyzed annual mean temperature (AMT), the annual minimum (Tmin) and maximum temperature (Tmax), and mean temperatures of all twelve months and four seasons and their anomalies. Trend analyses, standard deviation of the detrended anomaly (SDDA) and correlations were carried out to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of various mean air temperatures. Our data showed that increasing trend was much greater in the Tmin (0.55°C/10a) than in the AMT (0.25°C/10a) and Tmax (0.12°C/10a), and the fluctuation followed the same order. There were large spatial variations in the increasing trends of both AMT (from −0.09 to 0.43 °C/10a) and Tmin (from 0.15 to 1.12°C/10a). Correlation analyses indicated that AMT had a significantly linear relationship with Tmin and the mean temperatures of four seasons. There were also pronounced changes in the monthly air temperature from November to March at decadal time scale. The seasonality (i.e., summer and winter difference) of air temperature was stronger during the period of 1960–1979 than over the recent three decades. Our preliminary analyses indicated that local environmental conditions (such as elevation) might be partly responsible for the spatial variability, and large scale climate phenomena might have influences on the temporal variability of air temperature in the Tarim Basin. In particular, there was a significant correlation between index of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and air temperature of May (P = 0.004), and between the index of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and air temperature of July (P = 0.026) over the interannual to decadal time scales. PMID

  17. Characterizing air temperature changes in the Tarim Basin over 1960-2012.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dongmei; Wang, Xiujun; Zhao, Chenyi; Wu, Xingren; Jiang, Fengqing; Chen, Pengxiang

    2014-01-01

    There has been evidence of warming rate varying largely over space and between seasons. However, little has been done to evaluate the spatial and temporal variability of air temperature in the Tarim Basin, northwest China. In this study, we collected daily air temperature from 19 meteorological stations for the period of 1960-2012, and analyzed annual mean temperature (AMT), the annual minimum (T min) and maximum temperature (Tmax), and mean temperatures of all twelve months and four seasons and their anomalies. Trend analyses, standard deviation of the detrended anomaly (SDDA) and correlations were carried out to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of various mean air temperatures. Our data showed that increasing trend was much greater in the T min (0.55°C/10a) than in the AMT (0.25°C/10a) and Tmax (0.12°C/10a), and the fluctuation followed the same order. There were large spatial variations in the increasing trends of both AMT (from -0.09 to 0.43 °C/10a) and T min (from 0.15 to 1.12°C/10a). Correlation analyses indicated that AMT had a significantly linear relationship with T min and the mean temperatures of four seasons. There were also pronounced changes in the monthly air temperature from November to March at decadal time scale. The seasonality (i.e., summer and winter difference) of air temperature was stronger during the period of 1960-1979 than over the recent three decades. Our preliminary analyses indicated that local environmental conditions (such as elevation) might be partly responsible for the spatial variability, and large scale climate phenomena might have influences on the temporal variability of air temperature in the Tarim Basin. In particular, there was a significant correlation between index of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and air temperature of May (P = 0.004), and between the index of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and air temperature of July (P = 0.026) over the interannual to decadal time scales. PMID:25375648

  18. An assessment the effects of human-caused air pollution on resources within the interior Columbia River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoettle, A.W.; Tonnessen, K.; Turk, J.; Vimont, J.; Amundson, Ronald; Acheson, A.; Peterson, J.

    1999-01-01

    An assessment of existing and potential impacts to vegetation, aquatics, and visibility within the Columbia River basin due to air pollution was conducted as part of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. This assessment examined the current situation and potential trends due to pollutants such as ammonium, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulates, carbon, and ozone. Ecosystems and resources at risk are identified, including certain forests, lichens, cryptogamic crusts, high-elevation lakes and streams, arid lands, and class I areas. Current monitoring data are summarized and air pollution sources identified. The assessment also includes a summary of data gaps and suggestions for future research and monitoring related to air pollution and its effects on resources in the interior Columbia River basin.

  19. Assessment of the effects of human-caused air pollution on resources within the interior Columbia River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Schoettle, A.W.; Tonnessen, K.; Turk, J.; Vimont, J.; Amundson, R.

    1999-07-01

    An assessment of existing and potential impacts to vegetation, acquatics and visibility within the Columbia River basin due to air pollution was conducted as part of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. This assessment examined the current situation and potential trends due to pollutants such as ammonium, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulates, carbon, and ozone. Ecosystems and resources at risk are identified, including certain forest, lichens, cryptogamic crusts, high-elevation lakes and streams, arid land, and class 1 areas. Current monitoring data are summarized and air pollution sources identified. The assessment also includes a summary of data gaps and suggestions for future research and monitoring related to air pollution and its effects on resources in the interior Columbia River basin.

  20. The Paleocene stratigraphic records in the Central Netherlands and close surrounding basins: Highlighting the different responses to a late Danian change in stress regime within the Central European Basin System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, J.

    2015-09-01

    Despite their similar structural style of inversion under Late Cretaceous compressional stress, basins in the Central European Basin System showed different kinematic responses to a late Danian change in the European intra-plate stress-field. The Late Cretaceous phase was recognized throughout the Central European Basin System by compressional inversion of the Mesozoic rifts, and the simultaneous formation of marginal troughs. The late Danian change in stress regime resulted in a Middle Paleocene phase which excited longer wavelength of vertical surface movements. In several basins in Central Europe, this Middle Paleocene phase was characterized by domal uplift of the Late Cretaceous inversion zones and their proximal areas, which was interpreted to result from a sudden relaxation of the in-plane tectonic stress (a so-called relaxation inversion). Based on the Paleocene stratigraphic records, this study shows that some basins in the south-western part of the Central European Basin System experienced subsidence of the Late Cretaceous inversion zones during the Middle Paleocene phase, or the complete opposite vertical surface movements of a relaxation inversion. Two possible mechanisms (superposition of relaxation inversions and lithospheric folding during compression) are discussed that could provide an explanation for the opposite late Danian and Selandian vertical surface movements of nearby basins in the Central European Basin System.

  1. Third Pole Environment (TPE) program: a new base for the study of "water-ice-air-ecosystem-human" interactions on the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, T.; Thompson, L. G.; Mosbrugger, V.; Ma, Y.; Zhang, F.; Yang, X.; Joswiak, D. R.; Wang, W.

    2011-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau and surrounding mountains, referred to by scientists as the Third Pole, stretches from the Pamir and Hindu Kush in the west to the Hengduan Mountain in the east, from the Kunlun and Qilian mountain in the north to the Himalayas in the south, covering an area over 5000km2 with an elevation higher than 4000m. Like the Arctic and Antarctica, the Third Pole is one of the most sensitive areas responding to global climate change due to its high altitude and the presence of permafrost and glaciers, which are most sensitive to global warming. UNESCO, SCOPE and the Chinese Academy of Sciences are launching an international scientific program, the Third Pole Environment (TPE) Program, to attract international research institutions and academic talents to focus on a theme of "water-ice-air-ecosystem-human" interactions in the Third Pole region, to reveal environmental change processes and mechanisms on the Third Pole and their influences on and regional responses to global changes, and thus to serve for enhancement of human adaptation to the changing environment and realization of human-nature harmony (www.tpe.ac.cn/en/).

  2. OHIO RIVER BASIN ENERGY STUDY: AIR QUALITY AND RELATED IMPACTS. VOLUME I. DOCUMENTATION IN SUPPORT OF KEY ORBES AIR QUALITY FINDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared as part of the Ohio River Basin Energy Study (ORBES), a multi-disciplinary research program supported by the Environmental Protection Agency. The extensive air quality analysis undertaken for the ORBES included examination of pollutant emissions and resul...

  3. A Plume Head and Tail in the Bengal Basin and Bay of Bengal: Rajmahal and Sylhet Traps with Surrounding Alkalic Volcanism and the Ninetyeast Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, A. R.; Weaver, K. L.; Sengupta, S.

    2001-12-01

    Although the 116-113 Ma-old Rajmahal-Sylhet Traps of the Bengal basin, potentially covering an area > 2x105 km2, can be directly linked via Ninetyeast Ridge to the Kerguelen Plume, more than 5,000 kms away, it is generally believed that this flood basalt volcanism originated from a normal MORB-type mantle at the boundary of a mantle plume. This model, primarily based on geochemical analysis of a limited number of Rajmahal basalts, requires initiation of rifting of the eastern Indian margin by a smaller thermal flux than necessary for creating a large igneous province. Here we show that the extent of volcanism associated with the Rajmahal-Sylhet Traps is far greater than usually assumed, thus requiring a direct involvement of the Kerguelen Plume. In addition to the surface exposures of the flood basalts in Rajmahal-Sylhet, the basaltic rocks have been encountered in many parts of the Bengal Basin in bore holes reaching a maximum thickness of 600 m in the western margin of the Basin (Sengupta, Bull. AAPG, 1966) Most importantly, several suites of ultrapotassic and alkalic intrusive complexes, similar to those associated with the Deccan and Siberia Traps, occur over wide areas within and outside the Basin: i) southwest of the surface exposures of Rajmahal basalts, distance 200km, intrusive in Lower Gondwana coalbeds, Ar-Ar age 114 Ma (P.R. Renne, personal communication), ii) 400 km north of Rajmahal, exposed in Sikkim, intrusive into metamorphic crystalline nappes of the Himalayas; distance here is not real and must be a minimum as the nappes have been transported from the north, iii) northeast of Rajmahal in Meghalaya State, distance 550 km, intrusive into metamorphic Precambrian basement rocks. Nd-Sr isotopic ratios and trace element characteristics of these above ultrapotassic and alkaline rocks are consistent with their origin associated with the Kerguelen Plume. The wide range in Nd-Sr array for these rocks, including the Sylhet and Rajmahal basalts, shows

  4. Weakening of the weekend ozone effect over California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidar, S.; Hardesty, R. M.; Kim, S.-W.; Langford, A. O.; Oetjen, H.; Senff, C. J.; Trainer, M.; Volkamer, R.

    2015-11-01

    We have observed lower nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) during a hot weekend (summer 2010) from aircraft over the entire South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). Surface concentrations of NO2, O3, and temperature from 1996 to 2014 corroborate that this lower O3 on weekends is increasingly likely in recent years. While higher surface O3 on the weekends (weekend ozone effect, WO3E) remains widespread, the spatial extent and the trend in the probability of WO3E occurrences (PWO3E) have decreased significantly compared to a decade ago. This decrease is mostly the result of lower O3 on hot weekends in recent years. PWO3E is lowest in the eastern SoCAB. The major decrease happened during the 2008 economic recession, after which PWO3E has stabilized at a 15-25% lower level throughout most of the basin. Future NOx reductions are likely to be increasingly effective at reducing O3 pollution initially under hot conditions in the coming decade.

  5. Reductions in human benzene exposure in the California South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruin, Scott A.; Denis, Michael J. St; Winer, Arthur M.; Colome, Steven D.; Lurmann, Frederick W.

    Benzene typically contributes a significant fraction of the human cancer risk associated with exposure to urban air pollutants. In recent years, concentrations of benzene in ambient air have declined in many urban areas due to the use of reformulated gasolines, lower vehicle emissions, and other control measures. In the California South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) ambient benzene concentrations have been reduced by more than 70% since 1989. To estimate the resulting effect on human exposures, the Regional Human Exposure (REHEX) model was used to calculate benzene exposures in the SoCAB for the years 1989 and 1997. Benzene concentration distributions in 14 microenvironments (e.g. outdoor, home, vehicle, work) were combined with California time-activity patterns and census data to calculate exposure distributions for 11 demographic groups in the SoCAB. For 1997, the calculated average benzene exposure for nonsmoking adults in the SoCAB was 2 ppb, compared to 6 ppb for 1989. For nonsmokers, about half of the 1997 exposure was due to ambient air concentrations (including their contributions to other microenvironments), but only 4% for smokers. Passive tobacco smoke contributed about one-fourth of all exposure for adult nonsmokers. In-transit microenvironments and attached garages contributed approximately 15 and 10%, respectively. From 1989 to 1997, decreases in passive smoke exposure accounted for about one-sixth of the decrease in exposure for nonsmoking adults, with the remainder due to decreases in ambient concentrations. The reductions in exposure during this time period indicate the effectiveness of reformulated fuels, more stringent emission standards, and smoking restrictions in significantly reducing exposure to benzene.

  6. Electrical Behavior of SnO2 Polycrystalline Ceramic Pieces Formed by Slip Casting: Effect of Surrounding Atmosphere (Air and CO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Paz, C. J.; Ochoa-Muñoz, Y.; Ponce, M. A.; Rodríguez-Páez, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Pieces of porous polycrystalline SnO2 with and without cobalt have been formed by the slip-casting method, using ceramic powders synthesized by the controlled precipitation method. A suitable methodology was developed for forming and sintering the pieces to enable controlled modification of their microstructure, principally grain size, porosity, and type of intergranular contacts. Better control of the microstructure was obtained in the samples containing cobalt. In these, predominance of open necks and intergranular contacts was observed, which can represent Schottky barriers. Because of its good structural homogeneity, porosity, and small grain size (of the order of 1 μm), the sample with 2 mol.% Co sintered at 1250°C for 2 h was selected for electrical characterization by complex impedance spectroscopy, varying the operating temperature, concentration and nature of the surrounding gas (air or CO), and bias voltage. The resulting R p and C p curves were very sensitive to variation in these parameters, being most obvious for the C p curves, which showed a phenomenon of low-frequency dispersion when bias voltages other than zero were used, in the presence of O2, and at operating temperature of 280°C. The electrical behavior of the SnO2 with 2 mol.% Co sample sintered at 1250°C was consistent with the nature and microstructural characteristics of the active material and was justified based on the presence of shallow- and deep-type defects, and variations in barrier height and width, caused by adsorption of gas molecules.

  7. Spatial and vertical distribution and risk assessment of natural radionuclides in soils surrounding the lignite-fired power plants in Megalopolis basin, Greece.

    PubMed

    Papaefthymiou, H V; Manousakas, M; Fouskas, A; Siavalas, G

    2013-01-01

    Twenty soil profile samples and fourteen surface soil samples collected from the vicinity of the lignite-fired power plants in the Megalopolis basin (Greece) were analysed for their natural radionuclide concentration and (137)Cs, since fossil fuels are associated with naturally occurring radioactive materials and hence with radiological impact. No significant enhancement of surface soil radioactivity levels in the vicinity of lignite-fired plants was observed. A downcore decreasing trend of (137)Cs was observed in a number of cores reflecting its atmospheric origin, whereas the uniform distribution observed in a number of other cores gave information on the mechanical alteration of the soil. The average dose rate value was found to be 63 ± 22 nGy h(-1), while the annual average effective dose from the terrestrial gamma radiation was found to be 0.08 ± 0.03 mSv. PMID:23511709

  8. Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the Neuse River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, M. C.; Knightes, C. D.; Dennis, R. L.; Cooter, E. J.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigated impacts of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) NOx emissions regulations on the fate and transport of nitrogen for two watersheds in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina, USA from 1990 to 2020. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system were used. CMAQ simulated atmospheric chemical transport and nitrogen deposition. This data was entered into SWAT which simulated watershed hydrology and water quality. Two cases were investigated: one that incorporates CAAA regulatory emissions controls in CMAQ simulation (with) and a second case that does not (without). SWAT model results forecasted a 70% decrease in inorganic nitrogen discharge from the Little River watershed and a 50% decrease for the Nahunta watershed by 2020 under the emission control (with) scenario. Denitrification and plant nitrogen uptake played important roles in nitrogen discharge from each watershed. The nitrogen discharge response time following a change in atmospheric nitrogen deposition was 4 years for the Nahunta watershed and 2 years for the Little River watershed. The longer response time for Nahunta is primarily due to a higher percentage of soybean land cover (22.5% [Nahunta]; 1.6% [Little River]). Agricultural land covers had varied nitrogen response times to changes in atmospheric deposition, particularly for soybean, hay and corn. The studied watersheds retained >80% of all nitrogen delivered by agriculture fertilization, biological fixation and atmospheric deposition.

  9. Radioactive Air Emissions Notice of Construction for the 105-KW Basin integrated water treatment system filter vessel sparging vent

    SciTech Connect

    Kamberg, L.D.

    1998-02-23

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct, pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07, for the Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Filter Vessel Sparging Vent at 105-KW Basin. Additionally, the following description, and references are provided as the notices of startup, pursuant to 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1) and (2) in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants. The 105-K West Reactor and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin were constructed in the early 1950s and are located on the Hanford Site in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KW Basin contains 964 Metric Tons of SNF stored under water in approximately 3,800 closed canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 17 years. The 105-KW Basin is constructed of concrete with an epoxy coating and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. The IWTS, which has been described in the Radioactive Air Emissions NOC for Fuel Removal for 105-KW Basin (DOE/RL-97-28 and page changes per US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office letter 97-EAP-814) will be used to remove radionuclides from the basin water during fuel removal operations. The purpose of the modification described herein is to provide operational flexibility for the IWTS at the 105-KW basin. The proposed modification is scheduled to begin in calendar year 1998.

  10. Ammonia sources and ammonium nitrate formation in the California South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Holloway, J. S.; Cai, C.; Kaduwela, A.; McKeen, S. A.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.

    2011-12-01

    The South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) of California is designated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as being in non-attainment of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for both PM2.5 and PM10. Formation of fine aerosol nitrates (e.g., ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3)) from gas-phase ammonia (NH3) and nitric acid (HNO3) accounts for a significant fraction of the PM2.5 mass. Quantifying the sources of NH3 in the SoCAB is important for developing aerosol control strategies. Fast-time resolution observations of NH3, particulate ammonium (NH4+), and carbon monoxide (CO) made aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the CalNex 2010 campaign are used to quantify and compare the major NH3 sources to the SoCAB atmosphere: automobiles and dairy farms. From the automobile NH3:CO emission ratio inferred from the WP-3D observations and CO inventory data the NH3 automobile emissions in the SoCAB are estimated at 38 ± 15 metric tons day-1. Atmospheric mass fluxes are calculated for observed NH3 plumes from dairy farms to estimate the NH3 dairy farm emissions at 27 ± 14 to 120 ± 60 metric tons day-1. Comparison with two emission inventories show good agreement for the automobile NH3:CO emission ratio, however, both inventories under predict NH3 emissions from the dairy farms. The observations suggest that automobiles and dairy farms contributed similar amounts of NH3 to the SoCAB in May 2010. However, observed particle mass was greater downwind from dairy farms, where high NH3 mixing ratios from more concentrated sources shift the NH4NO3 equilibrium toward favorable thermodynamic conditions for the condensation of NH4NO3 onto particles.

  11. Observations of Cooling Summer Daytime Temperatures (1948-2005) in Growing Urban Coastal California Air Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornstein, R.; Lebassi, B.; Gonzalez, J.

    2008-12-01

    The study evaluated long-term (1948-2005) air temperatures in California (CA) during summer (June- August). The aggregate CA results showed asymmetric warming, as daily minimum temperatures increased faster than daily maximum temperatures. The spatial distributions of daily maximum temperatures in the heavily urbanized South Coast and San Francisco Bay Area air basins, however, exhibited a complex pattern, with cooling at low-elevation (mainly urban) coastal-areas and warming at (mainly rural) inland areas. Previous studies have suggested that cooling summer max temperatures in CA were due to increased irrigation, coastal upwelling, or cloud cover. The current hypothesis, however, is that this temperature pattern arises from a 'reverse-reaction' to greenhouse gas (GHG) induced global-warming. In this hypothesis, the global warming of inland areas resulted in an increased (cooling) sea breeze activity in coastal areas. The coastal cooling thus resulted as urban heat island (UHI) warming was weaker than the reverse-reaction cooling; if there was no UHI effect, then the cooling would be even stronger. The cooling or warming trends at several pairs of nearby urban and non- urban sites were compared in an effort to separate out the urban heat island (UHI) and global warming components of the trend. Average temperatures from global circulation models show warming that decreases from inland areas of California to its coastal areas. Such large scale models, however, cannot resolve these smaller scale topographic and coastal effects. Meso-scale modeling on a 4 km grid is thus being carried out to evaluate the contributions from GHG global-warming and land-use changes, including UHI development, to the observed trends. Significant societal impacts may result from this observed reverse-reaction to GHG- warming; possible beneficial effects include decreased maximum: O3 levels, human thermal-stress, and per- capita energy requirements for cooling.

  12. Ammonia sources in the California South Coast Air Basin and their impact on ammonium nitrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J. A.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Holloway, J. S.; McKeen, S. A.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.

    2012-04-01

    Observations from the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during CalNex in May and June 2010 are used to quantify ammonia (NH3) emissions from automobiles and dairy facilities in the California South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) and assess their impact on particulate ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) formation. These airborne measurements in the SoCAB are used to estimate automobile NH3 emissions, 62 ± 24 metric tons day-1, and dairy facility NH3 emissions, 33 ± 16 to 176 ± 88 metric tons day-1. Emission inventories agree with the observed automobile NH3:CO emission ratio, but substantially underpredict dairy facility NH3 emissions. Conditions observed downwind of the dairy facilities were always thermodynamically favorable for NH4NO3 formation due to high NH3 mixing ratios from the concentrated sources. Although automobile emissions generated lower NH3 mixing ratios, they also can thermodynamically favor NH4NO3 formation. As an aerosol control strategy, addressing the dairy NH3 source would have the larger impact on reducing SoCAB NH4NO3 formation.

  13. Air temperature change in the southern Tarim River Basin, China, 1964-2011.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Benfu; Xu, Jianhua; Chen, Zhongsheng; Bai, Ling; Li, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The temperature data from 3 meteorological stations (Kashi, Ruoqiang, and Hotan) in the South of Tarim River Basin (STRB) during 1964-2011 were analyzed by Mann-Kendall test and correlation analysis. The results from Mann-Kendall test show that the surface temperature (ST), 850 hPa temperature (T850), and 700 hPa temperature (T700) exhibited upward trends, while 300 hPa temperature (T300) revealed a downward trend. On the whole, the change rate of ST, T850, T700, and T300 was 0.26~0.46°C/10a, 0.15~0.40°C/10a, 0.03~0.10°C/10a, and -0.38~-0.13°C/10a, respectively. For the periods, ST and T850 declined during 1964-1997 and then rose during 1998-2011. T700 declined during 1964-2005 and then rose during 2006-2011, while T300 rose from 1964 to 1970s and then declined. The results from correlation analysis show that T850 and T700 positively correlated with ST (P<0.01) at the all three stations and there was a negative correlation between T300 and ST at Hotan (P<0.1), while the correlation is not significant at Kashi and Ruoqiang. The results indicate that there were gradient differences in the response of upper-air temperature (UT) to ST change. PMID:24348192

  14. Impacts of electronically photo-excited NO2 on air pollution in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensberg, J. J.; Carreras-Sospedra, M.; Dabdub, D.

    2010-02-01

    A new path for hydroxyl radical formation via photo-excitation of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and the reaction of photo-excited NO2 with water is evaluated using the UCI-CIT model for the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB). Two separate studies predict different reaction rates, which differ by nearly an order of magnitude, for the reaction of photo-excited NO2 with water. Impacts of this new chemical mechanism on ozone and particulate matter formation, while utilizing both reaction rates, are quantified by simulating two summer episodes. First, sensitivity simulations are conducted to evaluate the uncertainty in the rate of reaction of photo-excited NO2 with water reported in the literature. Results indicate that the addition of photo-excited NO2 chemistry increases peak 8-h average ozone and particulate matter concentrations. The importance of this new chemistry is then evaluated in the context of pollution control strategies. A series of simulations are conducted to generate isopleths for ozone and particulate matter concentrations, varying baseline nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions. Isopleths are obtained using 1987 emissions, to represent past conditions, and 2005, to represent current conditions in the SoCAB. Results show that the sensitivity of modeled pollutant control strategies due to photoexcitation decreases with the decrease in baseline emissions from 1987 to 2005. Results show that including NO2 photo-excitation, increases the sensitivity of ozone concentration with respect to changes in NOx emissions for both years. In particular, decreasing NOx emissions in 2005 when NO2 photo-excitation is included, while utilizing the higher reaction rate, leads to ozone relative reduction factors that are 15% lower than in a case without photo-excited NO2. This implies that photoexcitation increases the effectiveness in reducing ozone through NOx emissions reductions alone, which has implications for the assessment of future

  15. A combination of air and fluid drilling technique for zones of lost circulation in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, S.L.; Niederhofer, J.D.; Beavers, W.M.

    1986-02-01

    Structural geologic information available for the coal-bearing formations in the Black Warrior basin documents the occurrence of numerous fault and fracture zones. A combination air/fluid drilling technique may be advantageous to coalbed-methane operations in this and other areas with similar hydrologic and geologic conditions. The authors successfully used this technique recently on coalbed-methane wells in Tuscaloosa County, AL.

  16. Air mass distribution and the heterogeneity of the climate change signal in the Hudson Bay/Foxe Basin region, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Andrew; Gough, William

    2016-08-01

    The linkage between changes in air mass distribution and temperature trends from 1971 to 2010 is explored in the Hudson Bay/Foxe Basin region. Statistically significant temperature increases were found of varying spatial and temporal magnitude. Concurrent statistically significant changes in air mass frequency at the same locations were also detected, particularly in the declining frequency of dry polar (DP) air. These two sets of changes were found to be linked, and we thus conclude that the heterogeneity of the climatic warming signal in the region is at least partially the result of a fundamental shift in the concurrent air mass frequency in addition to global and regional changes in radiative forcing due to increases in long-lived greenhouse gases.

  17. Hydrocarbon emissions from twelve urban shade trees of the Los Angeles, California, Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corchnoy, Stephanie B.; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    The large-scale planting of shade trees in urban areas to counteract heat-island effects and to minimize energy use is currently being discussed. Among the costs to be considered in a cost/benefit analysis of such a program is the potential for additional reactive organic compounds in the atmosphere due to emissions from these trees. In this program, 15 species of potential shade trees for the Los Angeles Air Basin were studied and emission rates were determined for 11 of these trees, with one further tree (Crape myrtle) exhibiting no detectable emissions. The emission rates normalized to dry leaf weight and corrected to 30°C were (in μg g -1 h -1), ranked from lowest to highest emission rate: Crape myrtle, none detected; Camphor, 0.03; Aleppo pine, 0.15; Deodar cedar, 0.29; Italian Stone pine, 0.42; Monterey pine, 0.90; Brazilian pepper, 1.3; Canary Island pine, 1.7; Ginkgo, 3.0; California pepper, 3.7; Liquidambar, 37; Carrotwood, 49. In addition to the emission rates per unit biomass, the biomass per tree must be factored into any assessment of the relative merits of the various trees, since some trees have higher biomass constants than others. The present data shows that there are large differences in emission rates among different tree species and this should be factored into decision-making as to which shade trees to plant. Based solely on the presently determined emission rates, the Crape myrtle and Camphor tree are good choices for large-scale planting, while the Carrotwood tree and Liquidambar are poor choices due to their high isoprene emission rates.

  18. Warming spring air temperatures, but delayed spring streamflow in an Arctic headwater basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaogang; Marsh, Philip; Yang, Daqing

    2015-06-01

    This study will use the Mann-Kendall (MK) non-parametric trend test to examine timing changes in spring (early May to the end of June) streamflow records observed by the Water Survey of Canada during 1985-2011 in an Arctic headwater basin in the Western Canadian Arctic. The MK test shows a general delay in the five timing measures of springtime streamflow, which are based on the 5 percentile (Q5), 10 percentile (Q10), 50 percentile (Q50), 90 percentile (Q90), and 95 percentile (Q95) dates of spring runoff, respectively. However, much stronger trend signals were clearly noted for the high percentiles than that for the low and middle percentiles, indicating different effects of hydroclimate processes working on the timing of springtime streamflow. In contrast, the earlier snowmelt onset derived from daily mean temperatures was found over the 27-year study period. In addition, multiple relationships were correlated between these five timing measures of spring runoff and five hydroclimate indicators (total snowfall, snowmelt onset, spring temperature fluctuation, spring rainfall, and spring rainfall timing) in order to identify possible causes on the changes of springtime streamflow timing. The results indicate that the differences are due to the contradictory effects of winter-spring air temperature changes, temperature fluctuation during the melting period, and spring rainfall to spring runoff. The earlier snowmelt onset, which is attributed to the winter-spring warming, and spring temperature fluctuation that works in the opposite way, result in the minor timing changes of Q5, Q10, and Q50. The increase in spring rainfall and its delayed timing have a significant impact on the dates of Q90 and Q95. Moreover, the decreased total snow accumulation over the winter season only has a minor influence on the timing of springtime streamflow.

  19. Primary particulate matter from ocean-going engines in the Southern California Air Basin.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Harshit; Eden, Rudy; Zhang, Xinqiu; Fine, Philip M; Katzenstein, Aaron; Miller, J Wayne; Ospital, Jean; Teffera, Solomon; Cocker, David R

    2009-07-15

    The impact of primary fine particulate matter (PM2.5) from ship emissions within the Southern California Air Basin is quantified by comparing in-stack vanadium (V) and nickel (Ni) measurements from in-use ocean-going vessels (OGVs) with ambient measurements made at 10 monitoring stations throughout Southern California. V and Ni are demonstrated as robust markers for the combustion of heavy fuel oil in OGVs, and ambient measurements of fine particulate V and Ni within Southern California are shown to decrease inversely with increased distance from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach (ports). High levels of V and Ni were observed from in-stack emission measurements conducted on the propulsion engines of two different in-use OGVs. The in-stack V and Ni emission rates (g/h) normalized by the V and Ni contents in the fuel tested correlates with the stack total PM emission rates (g/h). The normalized emission rates are used to estimate the primary PM2.5 contributions from OGVs at 10 monitoring locations within Southern California. Primary PM2.5 contributions from OGVs were found to range from 8.8% of the total PM2.5 at the monitoring location closest to the port (West Long Beach) to 1.4% of the total PM2.5 at the monitoring location 80 km inland (Rubidoux). The calculated OGV contributions to ambient PM2.5 measurements at the 10 monitoring sites agree well with estimates developed using an emission inventory based regional model. Results of this analysis will be useful in determining the impacts of primary particulate emissions from OGVs upon worldwide communities downwind of port operations. PMID:19708372

  20. Air Temperature Change in the Southern Tarim River Basin, China, 1964–2011

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Benfu; Chen, Zhongsheng; Li, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The temperature data from 3 meteorological stations (Kashi, Ruoqiang, and Hotan) in the South of Tarim River Basin (STRB) during 1964–2011 were analyzed by Mann-Kendall test and correlation analysis. The results from Mann-Kendall test show that the surface temperature (ST), 850 hPa temperature (T850), and 700 hPa temperature (T700) exhibited upward trends, while 300 hPa temperature (T300) revealed a downward trend. On the whole, the change rate of ST, T850, T700, and T300 was 0.26~0.46°C/10a, 0.15~0.40°C/10a, 0.03~0.10°C/10a, and −0.38~−0.13°C/10a, respectively. For the periods, ST and T850 declined during 1964–1997 and then rose during 1998–2011. T700 declined during 1964–2005 and then rose during 2006–2011, while T300 rose from 1964 to 1970s and then declined. The results from correlation analysis show that T850 and T700 positively correlated with ST (P < 0.01) at the all three stations and there was a negative correlation between T300 and ST at Hotan (P < 0.1), while the correlation is not significant at Kashi and Ruoqiang. The results indicate that there were gradient differences in the response of upper-air temperature (UT) to ST change. PMID:24348192

  1. Summary of air quality regulations and recommended guidelines for oil shale development in the Colorado Piceance Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ondov, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    The Piceance Basin of northwestern Colorado contains the greatest domestic concentration of oil shale deposits favorably located for economical recovery. These deposits are defined geologically to be at least 30-ft thick with at least 30 gal of oil per ton of shale; by conservative estimate, they contain nearly 300-billion barrels (bbl) of recoverable shale oil. The technologies used to extract this oil will need to comply with federal and state environmental protection regulations, particularly those governing ambient air quality. The regulatory framework for preventing degradation of ambient air quality was amended on August 7, 1980, and these rules are especially applicable for controlling air pollution in oil shale recovery areas such as the Piceance Basin. In this report the amended regulations and those that existed before their promulgation are described and compared. In addition, recommended guidelines that can be used as criteria for protecting public health from nonregulated air pollutants are discussed. Finally, proposals for additional federal standards are introduced, and examples of regulatory options such as emission fees and emission-density zones currently being evaluated are presented.

  2. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction debris removal 105-KE basin

    SciTech Connect

    HAYS, C.B.

    1999-10-06

    The 105-KE Basin contains 1,150 Metric Tonnes of Uranium (MTU) of N Reactor fuel, along with less than half a MTU of single pass reactor (SPR) fuel. In addition to the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the 105-KE Basin, extensive quantities of debris and a substantial amount of sludge have accumulated in the basin. The 105-KE Basin fuel and sludge are not encapsulated and, as a result, corroding fuel has produced contamination products that are deposited on the basin walls, floor, and equipment. contamination products produce radiation dose exposures to the workers. To decrease worker exposures, this Notice of Construction (NOC) describes dose reduction modifications under consideration to mitigate worker radiation exposure from the basin walls and exposed piping. The major equipment egress paths from the basin (the dummy elevator pit and the south loadout pit) are blocked completely with debris and/or empty canisters. Therefore in addition to dose reduction, this NOC also describes debris removal activities and equipment. Recently, the primary water treatment system has been without mechanical filtration capabilities. This NOC describes planned modifications to the primary water treatment system to restore mechanical filtration by restarting the cartridge filters. The proposed modifications described in this NOC are expected to commence in the Fall of 1995. Finally, the NOC describes two other basin activities, fuel and sludge movement, that are expected to be routine in the future.

  3. A study on the atmospheric concentrations of primary and secondary air pollutants in the Athens basin performed by DOAS and DIAL measuring techniques.

    PubMed

    Kalabokas, P D; Papayannis, A D; Tsaknakis, G; Ziomas, I

    2012-01-01

    In this work an analysis of continuous Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of primary and secondary air pollutants (SO(2), NO(2) and O(3)) in the Athens basin is performed combined with Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) vertical ozone measurements obtained inside the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) and the lower free troposphere. The measurements took place during the period May 2005-February 2007, at the National Technical University of Athens Campus (200 m above sea level (asl.), 37.96 °N, 23.78 °E). The SO(2) and NO(2) DOAS measurements showed maximum 1-hour mean values (around 20 μg/m(3) and 74 μg/m(3), respectively) in winter and did not exceed the current European Union (EU) air quality standards (European Council Directive 2008/50/EC), in contrast to ozone, which shows its maximum (around 128 μg/m(3)) in summer and frequently exceeds the EU standard for human health protection (120 μg/m(3)). If the measurements are classified according to the two most frequent flow-patterns of the air masses in the Athens basin (northern-southern circulation), it is observed that in general the atmospheric concentrations of all measured pollutants including ozone are higher when the southern circulation occurs, in comparison to the corresponding values under the northern circulation. The vertical ozone profiles obtained by DIAL were also higher under the southern circulation. During the summer months a mean difference (between the southern-northern circulations) of the order of 15-20 μg/m(3), maximized at the 0.9-1.1 km and 1.7-1.8 km height, was observed within the PBL. It was also observed that the summer surface ozone levels remained relatively high (around 80-110 μg/m(3)) even during strong northerly winds, verifying the high levels of rural surface ozone in the surrounding area reported by previous studies. PMID:22153607

  4. Simulation of regional-scale groundwater flow in the Azul River basin, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varni, Marcelo R.; Usunoff, Eduardo J.

    A three-dimensional modular model (MODFLOW) was used to simulate groundwater flow in the Azul River basin, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, in order to assess the correctness of the conceptual model of the hydrogeological system. Simulated heads satisfactorily match observed heads in the regional water-table aquifer. Model results indicate that: (1) groundwater recharge is not uniform throughout the region but is best represented by three recharge rates, decreasing downgradient, similar to the distribution of soils and geomorphological characteristics; and (2) evapotranspiration rates are larger than previous estimates, which were made by using the Thornthwaite-Mather method. Evapotranspiration rates estimated by MODFLOW agree with results of independent studies of the region. Model results closely match historical surface-flow records, thereby suggesting that the model description of the aquifer-river relationship is correct. Résumé Un modèle modulaire tridimensionnel (MODFLOW) a été utilisé pour simuler les écoulements souterrains dans le bassin de la rivière Azul (Province de Buenos Aires, Argentine), dans le but d'évaluer la justesse du modèle conceptuel du système hydrogéologique. La piézométrie simulée s'ajuste de façon satisfaisante à celle observée pour l'ensemble de la nappe. Les résultats du modèle indiquent que: (1) la recharge de la nappe n'est pas uniforme sur toute la région, mais qu'elle est mieux approchée par trois valeurs différentes, décroissant vers l'aval-gradient, en suivant la même distribution que les sols et les caractéristiques géomorphologiques et (2) l'évapotranspiration est nettement plus importante que prévu initialement à partir de la méthode de Thornthwaite-Mather. Les valeurs d'évapotranspiration fournies par MODFLOW concordent bien avec les résultats d'autres études portant sur la région. Les résultats du modèle reproduisent convenablement les chroniques de débit des écoulements de surface

  5. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction fuel removal for 105-KE basin

    SciTech Connect

    Kamberg, L.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-11

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.96 for the modifications, installation of new equipment, and fuel removal and sludge relocation activities at 105-KE Basin. The 105-K east reactor and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin (105-KE Basin) were constructed in the early 1950s and are located in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KE Basin contains 1,152 metric tons of SNF stored underwater in 3,673 open canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 24 years. The 105-KE Basin is constructed of unlined concrete and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. The fuel is corroding and an estimated 1,700 cubic feet of sludge, containing radionuclides and miscellaneous materials, have accumulated in the basin. The 105-KE Basin has leaked radiologically contaminated water to the soil beneath the basin in the past most likely at the construction joint between the foundation of the basin and the foundation of the reactor. The purpose of the activities described in this Notice of Construction (NOC) is to enable the retrieval and transport of the fuel to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). This NOC describes modifications, the installation of new equipment, and fuel removal and sludge relocation activities expected to be routine in the future. Debris removal activities described in this NOC will supersede the previously approved NOC (DOE/RL-95-65). The proposed modifications described are scheduled to begin in calendar year 1997.

  6. Evaluation of PARIS performance in the South Central Coast Air Basin. Volume 2. Technical report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, S.G.; Daly, C.; Moore, G.E.; Myers, T.C.

    1991-12-01

    The primary goal of the study was to compare PARIS model performance in simulating ozone in the South Central Coast Air Basin (SCCAB) for 22-24 September 1985 using alternative wind fields. One wind field was generated by the Diagnostic Wind Model (DWM), and the other by the Colorado State University Mesoscale Model (CSUMM). The overall objective of the South Central Coast Cooperative Aerometric Monitoring Program (SCCCAMP) project was to develop a means of assessing the aggregate impact of offshore petroleum industry sources on onshore ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations.

  7. Evaluation of PARIS performance in the South Central Coast Air Basin. Volume 1. Executive Summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, S.G.; Daly, C.; Moore, G.E.; Myers, T.C.

    1991-12-01

    The primary goal of the study was to compare PARIS model performance in simulating ozone in the South Central Coast Air Basin (SCCAB) for 22-24 September 1985 using alternative wind fields. One wind field was generated by the Diagnostic Wind Model (DWM), and the other by the Colorado State University Mesoscale Model (CSUMM). The overall objective of the South Central Coast Cooperative Aerometric Monitoring Program (SCCCAMP) project was to develop a means of assessing the aggregate impact of offshore petroleum industry sources on onshore ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations.

  8. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  9. A geospatial time-aware web interface to deliver information about air pollution and exposure in a big city and its surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogliolo, M. P.; Contino, G.

    2014-11-01

    A GIS-based web-mapping system is presented, aimed at providing specialists, stakeholders and population with a simple, while scientifically rigorous, way to obtain information about people exposure to air pollution in the city of Rome (Italy). It combines a geo-spatial visualization with easy access to time dimension and to quantitative information. The study is part of the EXPAH (Population Exposure to PAHs) LIFE+ EC Project, which goal is to identify and quantify children and elderly people exposure to PM2.5-bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere of Rome, and to assess the impact on human health. The core of the system is a GIS, which database contains data and results of the project research activity. They include daily indoor and outdoor ground measurements and daily maps from simulation modeling of atmospheric PAHs and PM2.5 concentration for the period June 2011-May 2012, and daily and average exposure maps. Datasets have been published as time-enabled standard OGC Web Map Services (WMS). A set of web mapping applications query the web services to produce a set of interactive and time-aware thematic maps. Finding effective ways to communicate risk for human health, and environmental determinants for it, is a topical and challenging task: the web mapping system presented is a prototype of a possible model to disseminate scientific results on these items, providing a sight into impacts of air pollution on people living and working in a big city, and shipping information about the overall exposure, its spatial pattern and levels at specific locations.

  10. An aerial radiological survey of the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and surrounding area, Titusville, Florida: Date of survey: October 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the entire Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) was performed during the period 9 through 23 October 1985. This survey was conducted in three parts. First, a low resolution, low sensitivity background survey was performed that encompassed the entire KSC and CCAFS area. Next, two smaller, high resolution, high sensitivity surveys were conducted: the first focused on Launch Complexes 39A and 39B, and the second on the Shuttle Landing Facility. The areas encompassed by the surveys were 200, 5.5, and 8.5 square miles (500, 14, and 22 sq km), respectively. The purpose of these surveys was to provide information useful for an emergency response to a radiological accident. Results of the background survey are presented as isoradiation contour maps of both total exposure rate and man-made gross count superimposed on a mosaic of recent aerial photographs. Results of the two small, detailed surveys are also presented as an isoradiation contour map of exposure rate on the aerial photograph base. These data were evaluated to establish sensitivity limits for mapping the presence of plutonium-238. Natural background exposure rates at the Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station are very low, generally ranging from 4 to 6.5 microroentgens per hour (..mu..R/h) and less than 4 ..mu..R/h in wet areas. However, exposure rates in developed areas were observed to be higher due to the importation of construction materials not characteristic of the area. 8 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. REDUCTIONS IN HUMAN BENZENE EXPOSURE IN THE CALIFORNIA SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN. (R827352C004)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benzene typically contributes a significant fraction of the human cancer risk associated with exposure to urban air pollutants. In recent years, concentrations of benzene in ambient air have declined in many urban areas due to the use of reformulated gasolines, lower vehicle e...

  12. Combined effects of precipitation and air temperature on soil moisture in different land covers in a humid basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huihui; Liu, Yuanbo

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in hydrological processes. Although the combined effects of multiple climatic factors in different land cover conditions are highly valuable for water resource management, a complete understanding of these effects remains unclear. This study used a cluster analysis approach to investigate the combined effects of precipitation and air temperature, rather than a single factor, in different land covers for an area over the Poyang Lake Basin in China from 2003 to 2009. Specifically, monthly soil moisture was classified into eight clusters according to the change in precipitation and air temperature; the clusters describe a range of climates from the extreme of wet-hot to that of dry-cold. For an individual climate factor, our results showed that the contribution of air temperature to soil moisture is greater than that of precipitation, and the effect of air temperature is more sensitive in different land covers. When considering the combined effects of precipitation and air temperature, soil moisture varies with land cover; however, the variation in a normal climate cluster is greater than in an extreme climate cluster. This indicated that land cover is the dominant factor in soil moisture variation in normal climatic conditions, whereas climate is the dominant factor in extreme conditions. As climate shifts from the wet-hot to the dry-cold cluster, soil moisture decreases for all land covers, with the minimum rate occurring in forest conditions. Meanwhile, soil moisture deficit and saturation are more likely to occur in grassland and forest areas, indicating that forest cover might mitigate drought. The results of this study provide an effective approach to investigate the combined effects of climate factors on soil moisture for various land covers in humid areas. This study also supports the management of water resources in changing climates.

  13. Characterizing Emissions from Prescribed Fires and Assessing Impacts to Air Quality in the Lake Tahoe Basin Using Dispersion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamakal, Tom M.

    A PM2.5 monitoring network was established around Lake Tahoe during fall 2011, which, in conjunction with measurements at prescribed burns and smoke dispersion modeling based on the Fire Emission Production Simulator and the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (FEPS-HYSPLIT) Model, served to evaluate the prescribed burning impacts on air quality. Emissions from pile and understory prescribed burns were characterized using a mobile air monitoring system. In field PM2.5 emission factors showed ranges consistent with laboratory combustion of wet and dry fuels. Measurements in the smoke plume showed progression from flaming to smoldering phase consistent with FEPS and PM2.5 emission factors generally increased with decreasing combustion efficiency. Model predicted smoke contributions are consistent with elevated ambient PM2.5 concentrations in three case studies, and high meteorological model resolution (2km x 2 km) seems to produce accurate smoke arriving times. In other cases, the model performance is difficult to evaluate due to low predicted smoke contributions relative to the typical ambient PM2.5 level. Synergistic assessment of modeling and measurement can be used to determine basin air quality impact. The findings from this study will help land management agencies better understand the implications of managing fire at the wildland-urban interface.

  14. Distribution of hazardous air pollutant trace elements, total sulfur, and ash in coals from five Tertiary basins in the Rocky Mountain Region

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Arithmetic mean values of the contents of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) trace elements named in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, and uranium), ash, and total sulfur were statistically compared on a whole-coal basis for Paleocene coals from five Tertiary basins in the Rocky Mountain Region. The study of proximate and elemental analyses indicate a relationship between trace element contents and paleogeography.

  15. Prospective air pollutant emissions inventory for the development and production of unconventional natural gas in the Karoo basin, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, Katye E.; Stone, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    The increased use of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques to produce gas from unconventional deposits has led to concerns about the impacts to local and regional air quality. South Africa has the 8th largest technically recoverable shale gas reserve in the world and is in the early stages of exploration of this resource. This paper presents a prospective air pollutant emissions inventory for the development and production of unconventional natural gas in South Africa's Karoo basin. A bottom-up Monte Carlo assessment of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2), particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5), and non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) emissions was conducted for major categories of well development and production activities. NOx emissions are estimated to be 68 tons per day (±42; standard deviation), total NMVOC emissions are 39 tons per day (±28), and PM2.5 emissions are 3.0 tons per day (±1.9). NOx and NMVOC emissions from shale gas development and production would dominate all other regional emission sources, and could be significant contributors to regional ozone and local air quality, especially considering the current lack of industrial activity in the region. Emissions of PM2.5 will contribute to local air quality, and are of a similar magnitude as typical vehicle and industrial emissions from a large South African city. This emissions inventory provides the information necessary for regulatory authorities to evaluate emissions reduction opportunities using existing technologies and to implement appropriate monitoring of shale gas-related activities.

  16. Distribution of Large Visible and Buried Impact Basins on Mars: Comparison with Free-Air Gravity, Crustal Thickness and Magnetization Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    A comparison of the distribution of visible and buried impact basins (Quasi-Circular Depressions or QCDs) on Mars > 200 km in diameter with free air gravity, crustal thickness and magnetization models shows some QCDs have coincident gravity anomalies but most do not. Very few QCDs have closely coincident magnetization anomalies, and only the oldest of the very large impact basins have strong magnetic anomalies within their main rings. Crustal thickness data show a large number of Circular Thinned Areas (CTAs). Some of these correspond to known impact basins, while others may represent buried impact basins not always recognized as QCDs in topography data alone. If true, the buried lowlands may be even older than we have previously estimated.

  17. GREEN RIVER AIR QUALITY MODEL DEVELOPMENT: METEOROLOGICAL DATA - AUGUST 1980 FIELD STUDY IN THE PICEANCE CREEK BASIN OIL SHALE RESOURCES AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Special meteorological and air quality studies were conducted during August 1980 in the Piceance Creek Basin oil shale resource area of Northwestern Colorado as part of the EPA-sponsored Green River Ambient Model Assessment program. The objective of the limited field program was ...

  18. Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 2. HOx radical production.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Robert J

    2004-02-01

    The production of HOx radicals in the South Coast Air Basin of California is investigated during the smog episode of September 9, 1993 using the California Institute of Technology (CIT) air-quality model. Sources of HOx(hydroxyl, hydroperoxy, and organic peroxy radicals) incorporated into the associated gas-phase chemical mechanism include the combination of excited-state singlet oxygen (formed from ozone (O3) photolysis (hv)) with water, the photolysis of nitrous acid, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and carbonyl compounds (formaldehyde (HCHO) or higher aldehydes and ketones), the consumption of aldehydes and alkenes (ALK) by the nitrate radical, and the consumption of alkenes by O3 and the oxygen atom (O). At a given time or location for surface cells and vertical averages, each route of HOx formation may be the greatest contributor to overall formation except HCHO-hv, H2O2-hv, and ALK-O, the latter two of which are insignificant pathways in general. The contribution of the ALK-O3 pathway is dependent on the stoichiometric yield of OH, but this pathway, at least for the studied smog episode, may not be as generally significant as previous research suggests. Future emissions scenarios yield lower total HOx production rates and a shift in the relative importance of individual pathways. PMID:14968860

  19. Air-Photograph Based Estimates of Channel Widening within the Minnesota River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echterling, C.; Conway, J.; Graves, J.; Lauer, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Minnesota River is a major tributary of the Mississippi River that has experienced a roughly two-fold increase in mean April-November discharge over the past century. Because the Minnesota River supplies the majority of sediment to the Mississippi at the confluence, sediment sources within the basin, and in particular within the Le Sueur River sub-basin, have recently been the subject of several detailed sediment budget studies. One of the potential sediment sources is associated with channel widening. In the present study, we focus on channel widening as a potential source of sediment in the Minnesota, Little Cobb, Maple, Blue Earth, Le Sueur, Redwood, Cottonwood, and Watonwan Rivers, Minnesota. Using aerial photographs, changes in channel bankfull width were measured over the period from 1937 to 2009. Historic photographs were georeferenced to recent high-resolution imagery using a minimum of ten ground control points and a second order polynomial transformation in ArcGIS 9.3. Water surface width and the width between vegetation lines (which we take to be equivalent to the bankfull width) were determined by hand for representative reaches of a minimum of ten meander bends along each river. We chose to digitize by hand to avoid computer misclassification associated with the highly variable color spectra in the historic photographs and because this allowed us to visually interpolate the bank line where scattered overhanging vegetation partially obscured the banks. In general, bankfull width has increased steadily by between 20 and 50 percent over the period of photographic record. However, because our basic method focuses only on the vegetation line, it is possible in principle that the observed changes in width are primarily related to ecological change (i.e. to a change in the elevation at which vegetation colonizes the banks) and not directly to an increase in channel volume (and hence to a net export of sediment from these reaches). To determine whether the

  20. Meteorological and photochemical modeling of large-scale albedo changes in the South Coast Air Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, K.T.; Mirabella, V.A.

    1998-12-31

    The effectiveness of large-scale surface albedo changes as an ozone control strategy is investigated. These albedo changes are part of the Cool Communities strategy that calls for the use of lighter colored roofing and paving materials as well as an increase in tree planting. The advanced mesoscale model MM5 was used to analyze the associated effects on ambient temperature, mixing depth and winds. The MM5 model was modified to accept surface properties derived from a satellite-based land use database. Preprocessors were also developed to allow a research-oriented model such as MM5 to be user friendly and amenable to practical, routine air quality modeling applications. Changes in ozone air quality are analyzed with the Urban Airshed Model (UAM). Results of the MM5/UAM simulations of the SCAQS August 26--28, 1987 ozone episode are presented and compared to those obtained with the CSUMM/UAM models.

  1. Chemical compositions and radiative properties of dust and anthropogenic air masses study in Taipei Basin, Taiwan, during spring of 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shih-Yu; Fang, Guor-Cheng; Chou, Charles C.-K.; Chen, Wei-Nai

    Asia is one of the major sources of not only mineral dust but also anthropogenic aerosols. Continental air masses associated with the East Asian winter monsoon always contain high contents of mineral dust and anthropogenic species and transported southeastward to Taiwan, which have significant influences on global atmospheric radiation transfer directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation in each spring. However, few measurements for the long-range transported aerosol and its optical properties were announced in this area, between the Western Pacific and the southeastern coast of Mainland China. The overall objective of this work is to quantify the optical characteristics of different aerosol types in the Eastern Asian. In order to achieve this objective, meteorological parameters, concentrations of PM 10 and its soluble species, and optical property of atmospheric scattering coefficients were measured continuously with 1 h time-resolved from 11 February to 7 April 2004 in Taipei Basin (25°00'N, 121°32'E). In this work, the dramatic changes of meteorological parameters such as temperature and winds were used to determine the influenced period of each air mass. Continental, strong continental, marine, and stagnant air masses defined by the back-trajectory analysis and local meteorology were further characterized as long-range transport pollution, dust, clean marine, and local pollution aerosols, respectively, according to the diagnostic ratios. The aerosol mass scattering efficiency of continental pollution, dust, clean marine, and local pollution aerosols were ranged from 1.3 to 1.6, 0.7 to 1.0, 1.4 and 1.4 to 2.3 m 2 g -1, respectively. Overall, there are two distinct populations of aerosol mass scattering efficiencies, one for an aerosol chemical composition dominated by dust (<1.0 m 2 g -1) and the other for an aerosol chemical composition dominated by anthropogenic pollutants (1.3-2.3 m 2 g -1), which were similar to the previous measurements with

  2. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I.; Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  3. Sources of fine particulate species in ambient air over Lake Champlain Basin, VT

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Gao; Amy E. Gildemeister; Kira Krumhansl; Katherine Lafferty; Philip K. Hopke; Eugene Kim; Richard L. Poirot

    2006-11-15

    This study is a part of an ongoing investigation of the types and locations of emission sources that contribute fine particulate air contaminants to Underhill, VT. The air quality monitoring data used for this study are from the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments network for the period of 2001-2003 for the Underhill site. The main source-receptor modeling techniques used are the positive matrix factorization (PMF) and potential source contribution function (PSCF). This new study is intended as a comparison to a previous study of the 1988-1995 Underhill data that successfully revealed a total of 11 types of emission sources with significant contributions to this rural site. This new study has identified a total of nine sources: nitrate-rich secondary aerosol, wood smoke, East Coast oil combustion, automobile emission, metal working, soil/dust, sulfur-rich aerosol type I, sulfur-rich aerosol type II, and sea salt/road salt. Furthermore, the mass contributions from the PMF identified sources that correspond with sampling days with either good or poor visibility were analyzed to seek possible correlations. It has been shown that sulfur-rich aerosol type I, nitrate aerosol, and automobile emission are the most important contributors to visibility degradation. Soil/dust and sea salt/road salt also have an added effect. 38 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. 33 CFR 334.600 - TRIDENT Basin adjacent to Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false TRIDENT Basin adjacent to... DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.600 TRIDENT Basin adjacent to Canaveral Harbor at Cape... at latitude 28°24′37″, longitude 80°35′26″ and the entire basin. (b) Regulations. (1) No...

  5. 33 CFR 334.600 - TRIDENT Basin adjacent to Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false TRIDENT Basin adjacent to... DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.600 TRIDENT Basin adjacent to Canaveral Harbor at Cape... at latitude 28°24′37″, longitude 80°35′26″ and the entire basin. (b) Regulations. (1) No...

  6. Analysis of Ozone Transportation in Tlaxcala-Puebla Mexico Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera-Huertas, H.; Torres, R.; Ruiz-Suárez, L. G.; Garcia, J.; Gutierrez, W.; Torres, A.

    2014-12-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation conducted between March and April 2012 on the influence of air pollutants transport in the Puebla-Tlaxcala Valley airshed are presented. The campaign included ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and meteorological variables monitoring at surface in Huaquechula, Chipilo and Amozoc rural sites, and measurements of O3 vertical profile O3 and meteorology in Chipilo. The synoptic conditions during the campaign showed dominance of "Norte" conditions favoring air masses circulation from Pacific Ocean crossing southern Mexican Plateau to the Gulf of Mexico that influences the establishment of evening southeasterly winds in the Puebla-Tlaxcala Valley. Wind roses and contaminants analysis in surface for O3 during entire campaign indicates that before noon the movement of air masses was dominated by runoff of Malinche toward the southeast and south of the valley; and in the afternoon a regional pattern of winds from southwest Valley prevails coming from Cuautla Valley and south of Morelos State. The analysis of three representative days of atmospheric circulation in the valley as well as anthropogenic diurnal activity, a rate of morning increase in O3 concentrations similar at all three sites was observed, even in the absence of precursors such as NO2 during some weekends. By analyzing and engage data from O3 vertical profile and surface meteorology data, we could infer that there are minimal ozone contributions from local sources, but important from regional origin, and even O3 entrainment in height brought to the surface when mixing layer is growing. The back trajectory analysis from Chipilo at noon indicates that could be additional contributions of O3 from both Cuautla Valley and other areas of pollutants emission such as Tula, (in the north of Mexico City), and that weekend effect with the occurrence of high O3 levels observed there extends to this region. Although interbasin exchange of pollutants between the Puebla-Tlaxcala Valley

  7. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si -Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; et al

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research andmore » Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.« less

  8. Quantifying Molecular Hydrogen Emissions and an Industrial Leakage Rate for the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, M. C.; Schroeder, J.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The poorly understood atmospheric budget and distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) have invited further research since the discovery that emissions from a hydrogen-based economy could have negative impacts on the global climate system and stratospheric ozone. The burgeoning fuel cell electric vehicle industry in the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB) presents an opportunity to observe and constrain urban anthropogenic H2 emissions. This work presents the first H2 emissions estimate for the SoCAB and calculates an upper limit for the current rate of leakage from production and distribution infrastructure within the region. A top-down method utilized whole air samples collected during the Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) onboard the NASA DC-8 research aircraft from 23-25 June 2015 to estimate H2 emissions from combustion and non-combustion sources. H2:carbon monoxide (CO) and H2:carbon dioxide ratios from airborne observations were compared with experimentally established ratios from pure combustion source ratios and scaled with the well-constrained CO emissions inventory to yield H2 emissions of 24.9 ± 3.6 Gg a-1 (1σ) from combustion engines and 8.2 ± 4.7 Gg a-1 from non-combustion sources. Total daily production of H2 in the SoCAB was compared with the top-down results to estimate an upper limit leakage rate (5%) where all emissions not accounted for by incomplete combustion in engines were assumed to be emitted from H2 infrastructure. For bottom-up validation, the NOAA Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory dispersion model was run iteratively with all known stationary sources in attempt to constrain emissions. While this investigation determined that H2 emissions from non-combustion sources in the SoCAB are likely significant, more in-depth analysis is required to better predict the atmospheric implications of a hydrogen economy.

  9. Ozone Formation Potentials from Different Anthropogenic Emission Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds in California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Luo, D.; Croes, B.

    2010-12-01

    Different volatile organic compounds (VOC) exhibit different propensities for ozone formation. Two approaches were used to study the relative ozone formation potentials (source reactivities) of different anthropogenic VOC emission source categories in California’s South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The first approach combined emission speciation profiles for total organic gases (TOG) with maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scales for VOC species. The second approach quantified ozone impacts from different sources by performing 3-dimensional air quality model sensitivity analyses involving increased TOG emissions from particular sources. The source reactivities for 58 VOC emission categories in SoCAB derived from these two approaches agree reasonably well (R2 = ~0.9). Both approaches revealed the two emissions source types with the highest TOG reactivity were mobile sources and managed forest burning. Also, a reactivity-based TOG emission inventory for SoCAB in 2005 was produced by combining the source reactivities from both approaches with TOG emissions from anthropogenic source categories. The top five reactivity-based source categories are: light-duty passenger cars, off-road equipments, consumer products, light-duty trucks, and recreational boats. This is in contrast to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, which indicates that farming operations (mainly from animal waste) was one of the five largest mass-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources. Compared to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, the reactivity-based TOG emission inventory more appropriately represents the ozone formation potentials from emission sources, and highlights those sources that should be targeted for future regulations.

  10. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si-Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wofsy, Steve C.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Kort, Eric A.; Fischer, Marc L.; Trainer, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research and Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. We estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.

  11. Ozone formation potentials of organic compounds from different emission sources in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianjun; Luo, Dongmin

    2012-08-01

    Different organic compounds exhibit different propensities for ozone formation. Two approaches were used to study the ozone formation potentials or source reactivities of different anthropogenic organic compounds emission categories in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The first approach was based on the combination of total organic gases (TOG) emission speciation profiles and the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scale of organic species. The second approach quantified ozone impacts from different emission sources by performing 3-dimensional air quality model sensitivity analysis involving increased TOG emissions from particular sources. The source reactivities derived from these two approaches agree reasonably well for 58 anthropogenic organic compounds emission categories in the SoCAB. Both approaches identify TOG emissions from mobile sources as having the highest reactivity. Source reactivities from both approaches were also combined with TOG emissions from each source category to produce a 2005 reactivity-based anthropogenic TOG emission inventory for the SoCAB. The top five reactivity-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources in the SoCAB during 2005 were: light-duty passenger cars, off-road equipment, consumer products, light-duty trucks category 2 (i.e., 3751-5750 lb), and recreational boats. This is in contrast to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, which indicates that livestock waste and composting emission categories were two of the five largest mass-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources. The reactivity-based TOG emission inventory is an important addition to the mass-based TOG emission inventory because it represents the ozone formation potentials from emission sources and can be used to assist in determining targeted sources for developing organic compounds reduction policies.

  12. Influential role of black carbon in the soil-air partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the Indus River Basin, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Usman; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Mahmood, Adeel; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Jones, Kevin C; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2015-09-01

    Levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were assessed in surface soils and passive air samples from the Indus River Basin, and the influential role of black carbon (BC) in the soil-air partitioning process was examined. ∑26-PCBs ranged between 0.002-3.03 pg m(-3) and 0.26-1.89 ng g(-1) for passive air and soil samples, respectively. Lower chlorinated (tri- and tetra-) PCBs were abundant in both air (83.9%) and soil (92.1%) samples. Soil-air partitioning of PCBs was investigated through octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) and black carbon-air partition coefficients (KBC-A). The results of the paired-t test revealed that both models showed statistically significant agreement between measured and predicted model values for the PCB congeners. Ratios of fBCKBC-AδOCT/fOMKOA>5 explicitly suggested the influential role of black carbon in the retention and soil-air partitioning of PCBs. Lower chlorinated PCBs were strongly adsorbed and retained by black carbon during soil-air partitioning because of their dominance at the sampling sites and planarity effect. PMID:25933089

  13. The Impact of African Dust on PM10 Air Quality in the Caribbean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Decades of aerosol measurements on Barbados and Miami have yielded a broad picture of African mineral dust transport to the Caribbean Basin. These measurements show that in summer the aerosol mass is often dominated by dust. At such times over 90% of the dust mass is comprised of particles less than 10 μm aerodynamic diameter and thus fits the EPA criteria for PM10. A number of sites in the Caribbean monitor PM10 using the same instrumentation commonly deployed in European and United States networks. By comparing data from individual islands that have multiple monitoring sites (e.g., Puerto Rico, Martinique, Guadeloupe), it is shown that during dust events PM10 concentrations track very closely and that local sources have a minor impact on PM10 above about 15 to 20 μg m-3. Moreover the PM10 measurements are coherent with the movement of dust clouds over the islands as observed by satellites. In this way dust movement can be tracked at PM10 sites along the Gulf and southeast coasts of the United States. To assess the specific impact of African dust on PM10 in the region, I compare the daily records of dust measurements at Miami and Barbados with concurrent measurements made at proximate PM10 sites. I then use these relationships and the long term dust measurements at Barbados and Miami to assess the long-term variability of PM10 across the region. At Barbados the record goes back 50 years and provides a basis of assessing the effects of climate variability on PM10 transport. This study shows that there is great variability on scales ranging from daily to decadal. The impact of the droughts in the 1970s and 1980s was particularly significant. Across the Caribbean, the rates of exceedances of the WHO PM10 guideline is comparable to those observed in many major urban areas in Europe and the US. The dominance of dust in large PM10 events and the absence of major pollution sources on many islands offers the opportunity to study the health impacts of desert dust in

  14. Tracking the fingerprints and combined TOC-black carbon mediated soil-air partitioning of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) in the Indus River Basin of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Usman; Sánchez-García, Laura; Rehman, Muhammad Yasir Abdur; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Mahmood, Adeel; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Jones, Kevin C; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the first investigation of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) in air and soil samples from ecologically important sites of the Indus River Basin, Pakistan. The concentrations of ∑39-PCNs in air and soil were found in a range between 1-1588 pg m(-3) and 0.02-23 ng g(-1) while the mean TEQ values were calculated to be 5.4E(-04) pg TEQ m(-3) and 1.6E(+01) pg TEQ g(-1), respectively. Spatially, air and soil PCN concentrations were found to be high at Rahim Yar Khan (agricultural region). Lower-medium chlorinated PCNs (sum of tri-, tetra- and penta-CNs) predominated in both air and soil, altogether constituting 87 and 86% of total PCNs in the two environmental matrices, respectively. According to the data, soil-air partitioning of PCNs was interpreted to be similarly controlled by the combined effect of black carbon and organic matter in the Indus River Basin, with no preferential implication of the recalcitrant organic form. PMID:26613673

  15. Diurnal and weekday variations in the source contributions of ozone precursors in California's South Coast Air Basin.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Eric M; Campbell, David E; Zielinska, Barbara; Sagebiel, John C; Bowen, John L; Goliff, Wendy S; Stockwell, William R; Lawson, Douglas R

    2003-07-01

    For at least 30 years, ozone (O3) levels on weekends in parts of California's South Coast (Los Angeles) Air Basin (SoCAB) have been as high as or higher than on weekdays, even though ambient levels of O3 precursors are lower on weekends than on weekdays. A field study was conducted in the Los Angeles area during fall 2000 to test whether proposed relationships between emission sources and ambient nonmethane hydrocarbon (NMHC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) levels can account for observed diurnal and day-of-week variations in the concentration and proportions of precursor pollutants that may affect the efficiency and rate of O3 formation. The contributions to ambient NMHC by motor vehicle exhaust and evaporative emissions, estimated using chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor modeling, ranged from 65 to 85% with minimal day-of-week variation. Ratios of ambient NOx associated with black carbon (BC) to NOx associated with carbon monoxide (CO) were approximately 1.25 +/- 0.22 during weekdays and 0.76 +/- 0.07 and 0.52 +/- 0.07 on Saturday and Sunday, respectively. These results demonstrate that lower NOx emissions from diesel exhaust can be a major factor causing lower NOx mixing ratios and higher NMHC/NOx ratios on weekends. Nonmobile sources showed no significant day-of-week variations in their contributions to NMHC. Greater amounts of gasoline emissions are carried over on Friday and Saturday evenings but are, at most, a minor factor contributing to higher NMHC/NOx ratios on weekend mornings. PMID:12880072

  16. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si -Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wofsy, Steve C.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Kort, Eric A.; Fischer, Marc L.; Trainer, Michael

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research and Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.

  17. Cooling of daytime temperatures in coastal California air basins during 1969-2005: Monthly and extreme value trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, J.; Bornstein, R. D.; Charland, A.; Gonzalez, J.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of long-term (1969-2005) air temperatures in California (CA) during summer (June-August) previously showed an aggregate CA asymmetric warming, as daily minimum temperatures increased faster than daily maximum values Tmax. The spatial distributions of daily Tmax temperatures in the heavily urbanized South Coast and San Francisco Bay Area air basins were more complex pattern, with cooling at low-elevation coastal-areas and warming at inland areas. Our hypothesis was that this temperature pattern arose from a “reverse-reaction” to greenhouse gas induced global-warming, in that the global warming of inland areas resulted in an increased (cooling) sea breeze activity in coastal areas. These results appeared in the July 2009 issue of the J. of Climate. Extension of this analysis over the entire year now shows that the cooling trend in average Tmax values occurred during most months, with warming trends only during winter months. The largest rate of cooling, however, occurred in June (-0.95 K/decade), indicating that an earlier initiation of sea breeze activity may be the most important cooling factor, relative to increases in its intensity, duration, and/or penetration. Possible beneficial effects of the cooling were discussed (e.g., decreased maximum O3 and human thermal-stress levels), but as these impact would occur during periods of maximum Tmax values, the previous analysis was thus expanded to includes trends in the frequency of high Tmax values, i.e., 85, 90, 95, and 100oF. Results showed that all of these frequencies were decreasing, with rates decreasing with Tmax value (from -0.27 to -0.04 days/year, respectively). While this result is expected, as the frequency of occurrence decreases with Tmax value (from about 50 to about 3 per year, respectively), the percent decrease in frequency showed the opposite results, i.e., it was largest with the highest Tmax value (from -0.57 to -1.57 %/year, respectively). In addition, the rate of decrease of annual

  18. Assessing the combined influence of TOC and black carbon in soil-air partitioning of PBDEs and DPs from the Indus River Basin, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Usman; Mahmood, Adeel; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Jones, Kevin C; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2015-06-01

    Levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and dechlorane plus (DPs) were investigated in the Indus River Basin from Pakistan. Concentrations of ∑PBDEs and ∑DPs were ranged between 0.05 and 2.38 and 0.002-0.53 ng g(-1) in the surface soils while 1.43-22.1 and 0.19-7.59 pg m(-3) in the passive air samples, respectively. Black carbon (fBC) and total organic carbon (fTOC) fractions were also measured and ranged between 0.73 and 1.75 and 0.04-0.2%, respectively. The statistical analysis revealed strong influence of fBC than fTOC on the distribution of PBDEs and DPs in the Indus River Basin soils. BDE's congener profile suggested the input of penta-bromodiphenylether (DE-71) commercial formulation in the study area. Soil-air partitioning of PBDEs were investigated by employing octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) and black carbon-air partition coefficients (KBC-A). The results of both models suggested the combined influence of total organic carbon (absorption) and black carbon (adsorption) in the studied area. PMID:25795070

  19. The Influence of African Dust on Air Quality in the Caribbean Basin: An Integrated Analysis of Satellite Retrievals, Ground Observations, and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Prospero, J. M.; Chin, M.; Randles, C. A.; da Silva, A.; Bian, H.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term surface measurements in several locations extending from northeastern coast of South America to Miami in Florida have shown that African dust arrives in the Greater Caribbean Basin throughout a year. This long-range transported dust frequently elevates the level of particulate matter (PM) above the WHO guideline for PM10, which raises a concern of possible adverse impact of African dust on human health in the region. There is also concern about how future climate change might affect dust transport and its influence on regional air quality. In this presentation we provide a comprehensive characterization of the influence of African dust on air quality in the Caribbean Basin via integrating the ground observations with satellite retrievals and model simulations. The ground observations are used to validate and evaluate satellite retrievals and model simulations of dust, while satellite measurements and model simulations are used to extend spatial coverage of the ground observations. An analysis of CALIPSO lidar measurements of three-dimensional distribution of aerosols over 2007-2014 yields altitude-resolved dust mass flux into the region. On a basis of 8-year average and integration over the latitude zone of 0°-30°N, a total of 76 Tg dust is imported to the air above the Greater Caribbean Basin, of which 34 Tg (or 45%) is within the lowest 1 km layer and most relevant to air quality concern. The seasonal and interannual variations of the dust import are well correlated with ground observations of dust in Cayenne, Barbados, Puerto Rico, and Miami. We will also show comparisons of the size-resolved dust amount from both NASA GEOS-5 aerosol simulation and MERRA-2 aerosol reanalysis (i.e., column aerosol loading being constrained by satellite measurements of radiance at the top of atmosphere) with the ground observations and satellite measurement.

  20. FIREPLACE SURROUND. THIS SURROUND WAS FOUND IN THE NORTHEAST BED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FIREPLACE SURROUND. THIS SURROUND WAS FOUND IN THE NORTHEAST BED CHAMBER IN THREE PIECES. ITS DELICATE ADAMESQUE DETAILING—IN KEEPING WITH THE DRAWING ROOM AND DINING ROOM DOOR ARCHITRAVES—AND THE PRESENCE OF LATER FIREPLACE SURROUNDS IN THESE ROOMS INDICATE THAT IT PROBABLY WAS ONCE INSTALLED IN ONE OF THE TWO PUBLIC SPACES - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. Fine-scale simulation of ammonium and nitrate over the South Coast Air Basin and San Joaquin Valley of California during CalNex-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, James T.; Baker, Kirk R.; Nowak, John B.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Markovic, Milos Z.; VandenBoer, Trevor C.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Weber, Rodney J.; Roberts, James M.; Veres, Patrick R.; Gouw, Joost A.; Beaver, Melinda R.; Newman, Sally; Misenis, Chris

    2014-03-01

    National ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) have been set for PM2.5 due to its association with adverse health effects. PM2.5 design values in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) and San Joaquin Valley of California exceed NAAQS levels, and NH4+ and NO3- make up the largest fraction of total PM2.5 mass on polluted days. Here we evaluate fine-scale simulations of PM2.5 NH4+ and NO3- with the Community Multiscale Air Quality model using measurements from routine networks and the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change 2010 campaign. The model correctly simulates broad spatial patterns of NH4+ and NO3- including the elevated concentrations in eastern SoCAB. However, areas for model improvement have been identified. NH3 emissions from livestock and dairy facilities appear to be too low, while those related to waste disposal in western SoCAB may be too high. Analyses using measurements from flights over SoCAB suggest that problems with NH3 predictions can influence NO3- predictions there. Offline ISORROPIA II calculations suggest that overpredictions of NHx in Pasadena cause excessive partitioning of total nitrate to the particle phase overnight, while underpredictions of Na+ cause too much partitioning to the gas phase during the day. Also, the model seems to underestimate mixing during the evening boundary layer transition leading to excessive nitrate formation on some nights. Overall, the analyses demonstrate fine-scale variations in model performance within and across the air basins. Improvements in inventories and spatial allocations of NH3 emissions and in parameterizations of sea spray emissions, evening mixing processes, and heterogeneous ClNO2 chemistry could improve model performance.

  2. 33 CFR 334.600 - TRIDENT Basin adjacent to Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. 334.600 Section 334... Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. (a) The danger zone. From the west side of... the Commanding Officer, Naval Ordnance Test Unit, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, or such agencies...

  3. 33 CFR 334.600 - TRIDENT Basin adjacent to Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. 334.600 Section 334... Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. (a) The danger zone. From the west side of... the Commanding Officer, Naval Ordnance Test Unit, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, or such agencies...

  4. 33 CFR 334.600 - TRIDENT Basin adjacent to Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. 334.600 Section 334... Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. (a) The danger zone. From the west side of... the Commanding Officer, Naval Ordnance Test Unit, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, or such agencies...

  5. Predicting Air Quality Impacts Associated with Oil and Gas Development in the Uinta Basin Using EPA’s Photochemical Air Quality Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rural areas with close proximity to oil and natural gas operations in Utah have experienced winter ozone levels that exceed EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Through a collaborative effort, EPA Region 8 – Air Program, ORD, and OAQPS used the Commun...

  6. Risk assessment of heavy metals in air, water, vegetables, grains, and related soils irrigated with biogas slurry in Taihu Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Bian, Bo; Zhou, Ling Jun; Li, Lei; Lv, Lin; Fan, Ya Min

    2015-05-01

    Metal contamination in farmlands irrigated with biogas slurry is of great concern because of its potential health risks to local inhabitants. Health risks that depend heavily on multi-pathway exposure to heavy metals (e.g., Pb, Cd, Cr, Zn, Cu, and As) in water, soil, air, and local food were studied through field sampling in Taihu Basin, China. Results show that Zn, Pb, and Cd in soils irrigated with biogas slurry exceed the soil quality standard values, and grown vegetables and grains contaminated with Pb and Cd exceed the permissible limits. Food ingestion plays an important role in the total average daily dose of metals, especially for Cu and Zn, which account for 94 and 91%, respectively. Non-carcinogenic risks posed to adults mainly result from Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, and As through food ingestion and from Cr through soil ingestion. The highest non-carcinogenic risk was determined from food ingestion, followed by soil ingestion, air inhalation, air ingestion, and dermal contact with air. Carcinogenic risks to adults are 6.68 to 7.00 times higher than the safe level and can be attributed to Cr, As, and Cd pollution. The estimated risks mainly result from As and Cd through food ingestion and from Cr through soil ingestion. Both cancer and non-cancer risks through dermal contact can be ignored. Therefore, attention should be paid to health risks imposed by adults' multi-pathway exposure to heavy metals in vegetables, grains, and related soils irrigated with biogas slurry in Taihu Basin. Effective measures should be implemented to control heavy metal pollution and protect potentially exposed adults. PMID:25794576

  7. A Direct Measurement Study of Air Emissions from Oil & Natural Gas Production Pads in the DJ Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA and industry cooperators conducted a one-week emission measurement study of 23 oil and natural gas well pads in the Denver-Julesburg Basin in July, 2011. The purpose of the study was to characterize emissions from individual production components and to evaluate the performa...

  8. A Direct Measurement Study of Air Emissions from Oil & Natural Gas Production Pads in the Denver-Julesburg Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA and industry cooperators conducted a one-week emission measurement study of 23 oil and natural gas well pads in the Denver-Julesburg Basin in July, 2011. The purpose of the study was to characterize emissions from individual production components and to evaluate the performa...

  9. Impact of Port Fouad offshore gas project on surrounding environment

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, E.N.M.

    1996-11-01

    EIA study was undertaken to assess the impact of the proposed Port Fouad Gas Development Plant on the surrounding environment. An environmental inventory was undertaken to present the baseline data of the surrounding environment. The surrounding environment of the site can be classified as unpolluted and contains significant natural resources such as Ashtoum El-Gamil Protectorate and Lake Manzala in addition to nearby residential areas such as a touristic village to the east and El-Garabaa Village to the west. The effect of the released wastes on the surrounding environment was evaluated and assessed in accordance with the local- and intentional standard specifications for air and water quality.

  10. Airborne Measurements of Ammonia and Implications for Ammonium Nitrate Formation in the Central Valley and the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Brock, C. A.; Frost, G. J.; Holloway, J. S.; McKeen, S. A.; Peischl, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is the dominant gas-phase base in the troposphere. As a consequence, NH3 abundance influences aerosol formation and composition. Ammonium nitrate aerosol is formed from the reaction of gas phase NH3 and nitric acid (HNO3). Anthropogenic emissions of NH3 and NOx (NO + NO2), which in sunlight can be oxidized to form HNO3, can react to form ammonium nitrate aerosol. Agricultural activity (i.e., dairy farms), and urban centers (i.e., Fresno, Los Angeles) are sources of ammonium nitrate gas-phase precursors in both the Central Valley and the South Coast Air Basin. Airborne measurements of NH3, HNO3, particle composition, and particle size distribution were made aboard the NOAA WP-3D research aircraft during May and June 2010 in the Central Valley and the South Coast Air Basin of California, as part of CalNex 2010 (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change). The highest mixing ratios of NH3, well over 100 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv), were measured downwind of dairy farms. The high NH3 mixing ratios were highly anti-correlated with HNO3 mixing ratios on fast time scales (~1 s) that correspond to short flight distances (~100 m). During these periods particulate nitrate (NO3-) concentrations increased, indicating ammonium nitrate formation. The meteorological and chemical environments during these periods will be studied to determine the factors driving or limiting ammonium nitrate formation and the resulting regional differences. Finally, the relationship between the NH3 observations and NH3 sources will be examined to assess the emissions and their contribution to ammonium nitrate abundance.

  11. Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model for Simulating Winter Ozone Formation in the Uinta Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Areas with close proximity to oil and natural gas operations in rural Utah have experienced winter ozone levels that exceed EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Through a collaborative effort, EPA Region 8 – Air Program, ORD, and OAQPS used the Commun...

  12. The effectiveness of circulating aeration in air and high purity oxygen systems for control of VOC emissions from aeration basins

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Keener, T.C.; Bishop, P.L.; Orton, T.L.; Wang, M.; Siddiqui, K.F.

    1997-12-31

    A simple steady state circulating aeration system (CAS) model has been used to study the effects of volatility and degradability on the fate of VOCs in both air and high purity oxygen (HPO) systems. With increase of circulation ratio in an air CAS, air emissions by stripping can be significantly reduced for compounds of low degradabilities and high volatilities. Enhancement of biodegradation is more significant for compounds of high degradabilities and volatilities. A large portion of VOCs will remain in the wastewater when circulation ratio is high, especially for VOCs that are difficult to degrade. In HPO systems, emissions by stripping are much less than air systems. However, VOCs will remain in the wastewater if they have poor degradabilities. Volatilities of VOCs are not important in HPO systems. Due to their wide range and large uncertainties, degradation rate constants are a major factor determining the effectiveness of a CAS for VOC emission control

  13. Contamination mechanisms of air basin with tritium in venues of underground nuclear explosions at the former Semipalatinsk test site.

    PubMed

    Lyakhova, O N; Lukashenko, S N; Larionova, N V; Tur, Y S

    2012-11-01

    During the period of testing from 1945 to 1962 at the territory of Semipalatinsk test site (STS) within the Degelen Mountains in tunnels, 209 underground nuclear explosions were produced. Many of the tunnels have seasonal water seepage in the form of streams, through which tritium migrates from the underground nuclear explosion (UNE) venues towards the surface. The issue of tritium contamination occupies a special place in the radioactive contamination of the environment. In this paper we assess the level and distribution of tritium in the atmospheric air of ecosystems with water seepage at tunnels № 176 and № 177, located on "Degelen" site. There has been presented general nature of tritium distribution in the atmosphere relative to surface of a watercourse which has been contaminated with tritium. The basic mechanisms were studied for tritium distribution in the air of studied ecosystems, namely, the distribution of tritium in the systems: water-atmosphere, tunnel air-atmosphere, soil water-atmosphere, vegetation-atmosphere. An analytical calculation of tritium concentration in the atmosphere by the concentration of tritium in water has been performed. There has experimentally obtained the dependence for predictive assessment of tritium concentrations in air as a function of tritium concentration in one of the inlet sources such as water, tunnel air, soil water, vegetation, etc.. The paper also describes the general nature of tritium distribution in the air in the area "Degelen". PMID:22672895

  14. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  15. [The origin and quality of water for human consumption: the health of the population residing in the Matanza-Riachuelo river basin area in Greater Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Monteverde, Malena; Cipponeri, Marcos; Angelaccio, Carlos; Gianuzzi, Leda

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the origin and quality of water used for consumption in a sample of households in Matanza-Riachuelo river basin area in Greater Buenos Aires, Argentina. The results of drinking water by source indicated that 9% of water samples from the public water system, 45% of bottled water samples and 80% of well water samples were not safe for drinking due to excess content of coliforms, Escherichia coli or nitrates. Individuals living in households where well water is the main source of drinking water have a 55% higher chance of suffering a water-borne disease; in the cases of diarrheas, the probability is 87% higher and in the case of dermatitis, 160% higher. The water for human consumption in this region should be provided by centralized sources that assure control over the quality of the water. PMID:23680749

  16. Physicochemical and ecotoxicological based assessment of bottom sediments from the Luján River basin, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Leticia; Bulus Rossini, Gustavo; Salibián, Alfredo; Ronco, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    The physicochemical analysis of bottom sediments of the Lujan River was done on samples from 14 sites situated along its course and covered grain size and organic matter, total N and P, sulfides, heavy metals, organochlorine, and pyrethroid pesticides. In addition, acute 10-day whole-sediment laboratory toxicity tests were carried with each sample, using the native amphipod Hyalella curvispina as test organism. In order to correlate both types of results, data were assessed by multivariate analysis, including principal component analysis (PCA). The physicochemical profile of samples resulted similar along the river course, though several anomalous data were registered in the middle course of the river, mainly in samples taken downstream a large industrial complex; with a few exceptions in upper basin sites characterized by the dominance of agricultural activities, the pesticides concentration were consistently below the analytical detection limits. Almost 50% of the samples induced adverse effects on the amphipod when testing sublethal and lethal end points. The toxicity of the samples in terms of survival rate was extremely high in two sites, in particular in samples taken downstream the Pilar industrial complex. The integration of a selection of physicochemical and toxicological parameters of the sediments by PCA allowed discriminating areas of the river basin according the type and intensity of their particular pollution condition. PMID:23179726

  17. L'évolution paléoenvironnementale des faunes de poissons du Crétacé supérieur du bassin du Tafilalt et des régions avoisinantes (Sud-Est du Maroc) : implications paléobiogéographiquesPalaeoenvironmental evolution of the fish assemblages from the Late Cretaceous of the Tafilalt basin and surrounding areas, southeastern Morocco: palaeogeographical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavin, Lionel; Boudad, Larbi; Duffaud, Sylvain; Kabiri, Lahcen; Le Lœuff, Jean; Rouget, Isabelle; Tong, Haiyan

    2001-11-01

    A critical revision of published data along with new field data allow to draw up the succession of the fish faunas from the Lower Cenomanian to the Lower Turonian in the Tafilalt basin and surrounding areas (southeast Morocco). The analysis of these faunas shows changes from freshwater to marine palaeoenvironments. The palaeogeographic distribution of some taxa is discussed. It shows that the crossing of strictly freshwater organisms between Africa and South America was likely impossible at the time of the formation of the deposits resting around the Tafilalt basin and named 'Kem Kem beds'. The Cenomano-Turonian transgression reached the Erfoud-Errachidia carbonate platform from the Central Tethys, and then connected the central Atlantic.

  18. The influence of frozen soil change on water balance in the upper Yellow River Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuo, L.; Zhao, L.; Zhou, B.

    2013-12-01

    Yellow River supports 30% of China's population and 13% of China's total cultivated area. About 35% of the Yellow River discharge comes from the upper Yellow River Basin. Seasonally frozen, continuous and isolated permafrost soils coexist and cover the entire upper Yellow River Basin. The spatial distribution of various frozen soisl is primarily determined by the elevation in the basin. Since the past five decades, air temperature has increased by a rate of 0.03 C/year in the upper Yellow River Basin. Many studies reported the conversions of continuous to isolated permafrost soil, permafrost soil to seasonally frozen soil and the thickening of the active layer due to rising temperature in the basin. However, very few studies reported the impact of the change of frozen soil on the water balance in the basin. In this study, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model is applied in the upper Yellow River Basin to study the change of frozen soil and its impact on the water balance. Soil temperature and soil liquid content measured up to 3 m below ground surface at a number of sites in the upper Yellow River Basin and the surroundings are used to evaluate the model simulation. Streamflow is also calibrated and validated using historical streamflow records. The validated VIC model is then used to investigate the frozen soil change and the impact of the change on water balance terms including surface runoff, baseflow, evapotranspiration, soil water content, and streamflow in the basin.

  19. Spatial Distribution, Air-Water Fugacity Ratios and Source Apportionment of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in the Lower Great Lakes Basin.

    PubMed

    Khairy, Mohammed; Muir, Derek; Teixeira, Camilla; Lohmann, Rainer

    2015-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) continue to be contaminants of concern across the Great Lakes. It is unclear whether current concentrations are driven by ongoing primary emissions from their original uses, or whether ambient PCBs are dominated by their environmental cycling. Freely dissolved PCBs in air and water were measured using polyethylene passive samplers across Lakes Erie and Ontario during summer and fall, 2011, to investigate their spatial distribution, determine and apportion their sources and to asses their air-water exchange gradients. Average gaseous and freely dissolved ∑29 PCB concentrations ranged from 5.0 to 160 pg/m(3) and 2.0 to 55 pg/L respectively. Gaseous concentrations were significantly correlated (R(2) = 0.80) with the urban area within a 3-20 km radius. Fugacity ratios indicated that the majority of PCBs are volatilizing from the water thus acting as a secondary source for the atmosphere. Dissolved PCBs were probably linked to PCB emissions from contaminated sites and areas of concern. Positive matrix factorization indicated that although volatilized Aroclors (gaseous PCBs) and unaltered Aroclors (dissolved PCBs) dominate in some samples, ongoing non-Aroclor sources such as paints/pigments (PCB 11) and coal/wood combustion showed significant contributions across the lower Great Lakes. Accordingly, control strategies should give further attention to PCBs emitted from current use sources. PMID:25915412

  20. Observation of a reverse ozone weekend effect in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) during summer 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidar, Sunil; Oetjen, Hilke; Senff, Christoph; Alvarez, Raul, II; Hardesty, Michael; Langford, Andrew; Kim, Si-Wan; Trainer, Michael; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-04-01

    Ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are two important component of air pollution. Ambient levels of these two species are inextricably linked due to the chemical coupling of O3 and NOx (NO + NO2). Horizontal maps of vertical column amounts of NO2 and O3 vertical profiles were measured aboard the NOAA Twin Otter research aircraft during the CalNex and CARES field campaigns in summer 2010 by CU AMAX-DOAS and NOAA TOPAZ lidar instruments. A total of 52 flights (up to 4 hours each) were carried out between May 19 and July 19 covering most of California. Measurements of column integrated quantities over boundary layer height characterize the total pollutant load present in the atmosphere. Simultaneous vertical column measurements of NO2 and O3 are used to investigate the horizontal variability in Ox (= O3 + NO2) for selected case studies. We evaluate Ox partition over different chemical regimes/air masses such as urban pollution hotspots, clean background conditions, and assess differences in Ox partitioning between weekdays and weekends. The observation of elevated O3 during weekends is a wide spread phenomenon in California. Our column observations also provide an innovative means to investigate the question of whether surface in-situ measurements of Ox partitioning at monitoring stations are indicative over the entire planetary boundary layer height.

  1. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  2. Parsing surrounding space into regions.

    PubMed

    Franklin, N; Henkel, L A; Zangas, T

    1995-07-01

    Surrounding space is not inherently organized, but we tend to treat it as though it consisted of regions (e.g., front, back, right, and left). The current studies show that these conceptual regions have characteristics that reflect our typical interactions with space. Three experiments examined the relative sizes and resolutions of front, back, left, and right around oneself. Front, argued to be the most important horizontal region, was found to be (a) largest, (b) recalled with the greatest precision, and (c) described with the greatest degree pf detao. Our findings suggest that some of the characteristics of the category model proposed by Huttenlocher, Hedges, and Duncan (1991) regarding memory for pictured circular displays may be generalized to space around oneself. More broadly, our results support and extend the spatial framework analysis of representation of surrounding space (Franklin & Tversky, 1990). PMID:7666754

  3. Geology of Sarawak deep water and its surroundings

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, M.I.; Mohamad, A.M.; Ganesan, M.S.; Aziz, S.A. )

    1994-07-01

    A geological and geophysical investigation based primarily on seismic data indicates that four tectonostratigraphic zonations are recognizable in the Sarawak deep water and its surroundings. Zone A is a 7-8-km-thick Tertiary sedimentary basin in Sarawak deep water characterized by north-south-trending buried hills, extensional fault-bounded features, and local occurrences of compressional structures, and is separated from the northwest Sabah platform (zone B) by a major north-south-trending basin margin fault. This margin fault is distinct from the northwest-southeast transform fault known as Baram-Tinjar Line. The northwest Sabah platform, an attenuated continental crust that underwent late Mesozoic-Tertiary crystal stretching and rifting, is characterized by northeast-southwest-tending rift systems and generally up to 4 km-thick sedimentary cover. The leading edge of the northwest Sabah platform that was subducted beneath the northwest Borneo crust is marked by the Sabah trough (zone C). The western Sarawak deep water is occupied by a 13-km-thick, north-south-trending basin, the west Luconia delta province (zone D), demonstrating post mid-Miocene deltaic growth faults and toe-thrusts. Crustal offsets of the South China Sea Basin, north-south-trending basin margin fault between zones A and B, and extensional and compressional structures in zone A are evidence for north-south-directed transform motions leading to the development of the Sarawak deep-water Tertiary basin. Four main sedimentation phases describe the sedimentation history in Sarawak deep water and its surroundings. Oligocene-Miocene coastal plain sediments form the main hydrocarbon plays in the Sarawak deep water, and the numerous occurrences of amplitude anomalies clearly suggest a working hydrocarbon charge system.

  4. Trends in selected ambient volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations and a comparison to mobile source emission trends in California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yanbo; Fuentes, Mark; Rieger, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Trends in ambient concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) in the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) are compared to trends in VOC emissions from Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles (LDGV) tested on chassis dynamometers and to trends observed in tunnel studies during the same period to understand the impacts of gasoline vehicle emissions on ambient VOC concentrations from 1999 to 2009. Annual median concentrations for most ambient VOCs decreased 40% from 1999 to 2009 in the SoCAB, based on data from the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (PAMS). Annual concentration decreases of most compounds, except 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, are highly correlated with the decrease of acetylene, a marker for tailpipe emissions from LDGV. This indicates that ambient VOC concentration decreases were likely due to tailpipe emission reductions from gasoline vehicles. Air Toxics Monitoring Network data also support this conclusion. Benzene concentration-normalized ratios for most compounds except ethane, propane, isoprene, and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane were stable even as these compound concentrations decreased significantly from 1999 to 2009. Such stability suggests that the main sources of ambient VOC were still the same from 1999 to 2009. The comparison of trends in dynamometer testing and tunnel studies also shows that tailpipe emissions remained the dominant source of tunnel LDGV emissions. The pronounced changes in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane ratios due to the introduction of Phase 3 gasoline also confirm the substantial impact of LDGV emissions on ambient VOCs. Diurnal ambient VOC data also suggest that LDGV tailpipe emissions remained the dominant source of ambient VOCs in the SoCAB in 2009. Our conclusion, which is that current inventory models underestimate VOC emissions from mobile sources, is consistent with that of several recent studies of ambient trends in the SoCAB. Our study showed that tailpipe emissions remained a bigger contributor to ambient VOCs than evaporative

  5. Comparison of two different sea-salt aerosol schemes as implemented in air quality models applied to the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Guerrero, P.; Jorba, O.; Pay, M. T.; Montavez, J. P.; Jerez, S.; Gomez-Navarro, J. J.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    A number of attempts have been made to incorporate sea-salt aerosols (SSA) source functions in chemistry transport models with varying results according to the complexity of the scheme considered. This contribution compares the inclusion of two different SSA algorithms in two chemistry transport models: CMAQ and CHIMERE. The main goal is to examine the differences in average SSA mass and composition and to study the seasonality of the prediction of SSA when applied to the Mediterranean area with high resolution in a reference year. Dry and wet deposition schemes are also analyzed to better understand the differences observed between both models in the target area. The applied emission algorithm in CHIMERE uses a semi-empirical formulation which obtains the surface emission rate of SSA as a function of the surface wind speed cubed and particle size. The emission parameterization included within CMAQ is somehow more sophisticated, since fluxes of SSA are corrected with relative humidity. In order to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, the participating algorithms as implemented in the chemistry transport models were evaluated against AOD measurements from Aeronet and available surface measurements in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean area, showing biases around -0.003 and -1.2 μg m-3, respectively. The results indicate that both models represent accurately the patterns and dynamics of SSA and its non-uniform behavior in the Mediterranean basin, showing a strong seasonality. The levels of SSA vary strongly across the Western and the Eastern Mediterranean, reproducing CHIMERE higher annual levels in the Aegean Sea (12 μg m-3) and CMAQ in the Gulf of Lion (9 μg m-3). The large difference found for the ratio PM2.5/total SSA in CMAQ and CHIMERE is also investigated. The dry and wet removal rates are very similar for both models despite the different schemes implemented. Dry deposition essentially follows the surface drag stress patterns, meanwhile wet

  6. Comparison of two different sea-salt aerosol schemes as implemented in air quality models applied to the Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Guerrero, P.; Jorba, O.; Pay, M. T.; Montávez, J. P.; Jerez, S.; Gómez-Navarro, J. J.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2011-05-01

    A number of attempts have been made to incorporate sea-salt aerosol (SSA) source functions in chemistry transport models with varying results according to the complexity of the scheme considered. This contribution compares the inclusion of two different SSA algorithms in two chemistry transport models: CMAQ and CHIMERE. The main goal is to examine the differences in average SSA mass and composition and to study the seasonality of the prediction of SSA when applied to the Mediterranean area with high resolution for a reference year. Dry and wet deposition schemes are also analyzed to better understand the differences observed between both models in the target area. The applied emission algorithm in CHIMERE uses a semi-empirical formulation which obtains the surface emission rate of SSA as a function of the particle size and the surface wind speed raised to the power 3.41. The emission parameterization included within CMAQ is somehow more sophisticated, since fluxes of SSA are corrected with relative humidity. In order to evaluate their strengths and weaknesses, the participating algorithms as implemented in the chemistry transport models were evaluated against AOD measurements from Aeronet and available surface measurements in Southern Europe and the Mediterranean area, showing biases around -0.002 and -1.2 μg m-3, respectively. The results indicate that both models represent accurately the patterns and dynamics of SSA and its non-uniform behavior in the Mediterranean basin, showing a strong seasonality. The levels of SSA strongly vary across the Western and the Eastern Mediterranean, reproducing CHIMERE higher annual levels in the Aegean Sea (12 μg m-3) and CMAQ in the Gulf of Lion (9 μg m-3). The large difference found for the ratio PM2.5/total SSA in CMAQ and CHIMERE is also investigated. The dry and wet removal rates are very similar for both models despite the different schemes implemented. Dry deposition essentially follows the surface drag stress patterns

  7. A 2000-yr reconstruction of air temperature in the Great Basin of the United States with specific reference to the Medieval Climatic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinemann, Scott A.; Porinchu, David F.; MacDonald, Glen M.; Mark, Bryan G.; DeGrand, James Q.

    2014-09-01

    A sediment core representing the past two millennia was recovered from Stella Lake in the Snake Range of the central Great Basin in Nevada. The core was analyzed for sub-fossil chironomids and sediment organic content. A quantitative reconstruction of mean July air temperature (MJAT) was developed using a regional training set and a chironomid-based WA-PLS inference model (r2jack = 0.55, RMSEP = 0.9°C). The chironomid-based MJAT reconstruction suggests that the interval between AD 900 and AD 1300, corresponding to the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA), was characterized by MJAT elevated 1.0°C above the subsequent Little Ice Age (LIA), but likely not as warm as recent conditions. Comparison of the Stella Lake temperature reconstruction to previously published paleoclimate records from this region indicates that the temperature fluctuations inferred to have occurred at Stella Lake between AD 900 and AD 1300 correspond to regional records documenting hydroclimate variability during the MCA interval. The Stella Lake record provides evidence that elevated summer temperature contributed to the increased aridity that characterized the western United States during the MCA.

  8. Multi-objective trade-offs for fuel cell-based auxiliary power units: case study of South California Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratto, Francesco; Diwekar, Urmila M.

    Auxiliary power units (APUs) are energy devices that complement the main internal combustion engine of a vehicle providing power for the non-propulsion needs. There are several goals or objectives that need to be achieved for designing and operating fuel cell-based APUs. The system should have as high efficiency as possible, but also be economically viable with cost or profits competitive with the existing technology. Not only should the environmental impacts of the chemicals released during the process be as low as possible, but also the human health impact has to be minimum. This becomes an extremely challenging multi-objective problem and its solution leads to the quantification of the trade-offs between the different objectives. The fact that these multiple objectives are often conflicting in nature and can have completely different trends with respect to multiple process variables makes the representation and analysis of the trade-off information an extremely formidable task. The solution of the multi-objective optimization of the system, which comprehends sensitivity analysis, payoff table and optimal trade-off surfaces, is illustrated. The case study that was chosen for the simulations is South California Air Basin and the assumptions that were taken to model this region are briefly discussed.

  9. Bad Air Day

    MedlinePlus

    ... children living near busy roadways—surrounded by particulate air pollution—are more likely to develop asthma and other ... found that genes may affect your response to air pollution. At least one gene seems to protect against ...

  10. Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 1. Ozone formation metrics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Robert J; Revelle, Meghan K; Dabdub, Donald

    2004-02-01

    Metrics associated with ozone (O3) formation are investigated using the California Institute of Technology (CIT) three-dimensional air-quality model. Variables investigated include the O3 production rate (P(O3)), O3 production efficiency (OPE), and total reactivity (the sum of the reactivity of carbon monoxide (CO) and all organic gases that react with the hydroxyl radical). Calculations are spatially and temporally resolved; surface-level and vertically averaged results are shown for September 9, 1993 for three Southern California locations: Central Los Angeles, Azusa, and Riverside. Predictions indicate increasing surface-level O3 concentrations with distance downwind, in line with observations. Surface-level and vertically averaged P(O3) values peak during midday and are highest downwind; surface P(O3) values are greater than vertically averaged values. Surface OPEs generally are highest downwind and peak during midday in downwind locations. In contrast, peaks occur in early morning and late afternoon in the vertically averaged case. Vertically averaged OPEs tend to be greater than those for the surface. Total reactivities are highest in upwind surface locations and peak during rush hours; vertically averaged reactivities are smaller and tend to be more uniform temporally and spatially. Total reactivity has large contributions from CO, alkanes, alkenes, aldehydes, unsubstituted monoaromatics, and secondary organics. Calculations using estimated emissions for 2010 result in decreases in P(O3) values and reactivities but increases in OPEs. PMID:14968859

  11. Air resources

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This section describes the ambient (surrounding) air quality of the TVA region, discusses TVA emission contributions to ambient air quality, and identifies air quality impacts to human health and welfare. Volume 2 Technical Document 2, Environmental Consequences, describes how changes in TVA emissions could affect regional air quality, human health, environmental resources, and materials. The primary region of the affected environment is broadly defined as the state of Tennessee, as well as southern Kentucky, western Virginia, southern West Virginia, western North Carolina, and northern Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. This area represents the watershed of the Tennessee River and the 201 counties of the greater TVA service area. Emissions from outside the Tennessee Valley region contribute to air quality in the Valley. Also, TVA emissions are transported outside the Valley and have some impact on air quality beyond the primary study area. Although the study area experiences a number of air quality problems, overall air quality is good.

  12. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  13. METHODS DEVELOPMENT FOR ASSESSING AIR POLLUTION CONTROL BENEFITS. VOLUME II. EXPERIMENTS IN VALUING NON-MARKET GOODS: A CASE STUDY OF ALTERNATIVE BENEFIT MEASURES OF AIR POLLUTION CONTROL IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This volume includes the empirical results obtained from two experiments to measure the health and aesthetic benefits of air pollution control. Each experiment involved the same six neighborhood pairs, where the pairings were made on the basis of similarities in housing character...

  14. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008).

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  15. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  16. Intense air-sea exchange and heavy rainfall: impact of the northern Adriatic SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocchi, P.; Davolio, S.

    2016-02-01

    Over the northern Adriatic basin, intense air-sea interactions are often associated with heavy precipitation over the mountainous areas surrounding the basin. In this study, a high-resolution mesoscale model is employed to simulate three severe weather events and to evaluate the effect of the sea surface temperature on the intensity and location of heavy rainfall. The sensitivity tests show that the impact of SST varies among the events and it mainly involves the modification of the PBL characteristics and thus the flow dynamics and its interaction with the orography.

  17. Nitrous oxide and methane in Atlantic and Mediterranean waters in the Strait of Gibraltar: Air-sea fluxes and inter-basin exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Paz, M.; Huertas, I. E.; Flecha, S.; Ríos, A. F.; Pérez, F. F.

    2015-11-01

    The global ocean plays an important role in the overall budget of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), as both gases are produced within the ocean and released to the atmosphere. However, for large parts of the open and coastal oceans there is little or no spatial data coverage for N2O and CH4. Hence, a better assessment of marine emissions estimates is necessary. As a contribution to remedying the scarcity of data on marine regions, N2O and CH4 concentrations have been determined in the Strait of Gibraltar at the ocean Fixed Time series (GIFT). During six cruises performed between July 2011 and November 2014 samples were collected at the surface and various depths in the water column, and subsequently measured using gas chromatography. From this we were able to quantify the temporal variability of the gas air-sea exchange in the area and examine the vertical distribution of N2O and CH4 in Atlantic and Mediterranean waters. Results show that surface Atlantic waters are nearly in equilibrium with the atmosphere whereas deeper Mediterranean waters are oversaturated in N2O, and a gradient that gradually increases with depth was detected in the water column. Temperature was found to be the main factor responsible for the seasonal variability of N2O in the surface layer. Furthermore, although CH4 levels did not reveal any feature clearly associated with the circulation of water masses, vertical distributions showed that higher concentrations are generally observed in the Atlantic layer, and that the deeper Mediterranean waters are considerably undersaturated (by up to 50%). Even though surface waters act as a source of atmospheric N2O during certain periods, on an annual basis the net N2O flux in the Strait of Gibraltar is only 0.35 ± 0.27 μmol m-2 d-1, meaning that these waters are almost in a neutral status with respect to the atmosphere. Seasonally, the region behaves as a slight sink for atmospheric CH4 in winter and as a source in spring and fall. Approximating

  18. Cool Colored Roofs to Save Energy and Improve Air Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William; Berdahl, Paul

    2005-08-23

    Urban areas tend to have higher air temperatures than their rural surroundings as a result of gradual surface modifications that include replacing the natural vegetation with buildings and roads. The term ''Urban Heat Island'' describes this phenomenon. The surfaces of buildings and pavements absorb solar radiation and become extremely hot, which in turn warm the surrounding air. Cities that have been ''paved over'' do not receive the benefit of the natural cooling effect of vegetation. As the air temperature rises, so does the demand for air-conditioning (a/c). This leads to higher emissions from power plants, as well as increased smog formation as a result of warmer temperatures. In the United States, we have found that this increase in air temperature is responsible for 5-10% of urban peak electric demand for a/c use, and as much as 20% of population-weighted smog concentrations in urban areas. Simple ways to cool the cities are the use of reflective surfaces (rooftops and pavements) and planting of urban vegetation. On a large scale, the evapotranspiration from vegetation and increased reflection of incoming solar radiation by reflective surfaces will cool a community a few degrees in the summer. As an example, computer simulations for Los Angeles, CA show that resurfacing about two-third of the pavements and rooftops with reflective surfaces and planting three trees per house can cool down LA by an average of 2-3K. This reduction in air temperature will reduce urban smog exposure in the LA basin by roughly the same amount as removing the basin entire onroad vehicle exhaust. Heat island mitigation is an effective air pollution control strategy, more than paying for itself in cooling energy cost savings. We estimate that the cooling energy savings in U.S. from cool surfaces and shade trees, when fully implemented, is about $5 billion per year (about $100 per air-conditioned house).

  19. Elevated Wintertime Ozone in Utah's Uinta Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. S.; Moore, K. D.; Hill, S.; Harper, K.

    2011-12-01

    Seemingly anomalous elevated wintertime ozone (O3) levels were first observed in Wyoming's Upper Green River Basin (UGRB) in 2005 and have been recorded most in subsequent winters. While research continues, it has been hypothesized that the unacceptable levels are a unique combination of stagnant meteorology, enhanced insolation due to relatively high elevations and snow increased albedo, and abundant precursor sources owing to the region's recent rapid expansion of oil and gas exploration and production. The UGRB area has over 4,700 recorded gas/oil wells and sits mostly in rural Sublette County which has an estimated population of 7,925, an area of 12,644 km2, and a basin floor elevation around 2200 m asl, surrounded on three sides with mountains up to 4,200 km asl. Similarly, the Uinta Basin in northeastern Utah is a rural area prone to frequent low-level wintertime inversion episodes and persistent snow cover, with an expanding economy significantly based on gas and oil development and production (approximately 11,500 wells, with an estimated 17,000 more planned in the future years). The Basin lies primarily in Duchesne and Uintah Counties which have a combined population of approximately 51,200 and an area of about 19,982 km2. The floor of the Basin has a typical elevation around 1,560 m asl and is surrounded by mountains up to 4,120 m asl. Ambient measurements at four sites in the winter of 2009-2010 found many instances of ozone concentrations well above the current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS; 75 ppb, 8-hr average, 4th highest value). To more fully characterize the behavior and geographical extent of the Uinta Basin's wintertime O3 issue, the Uintah Impact Mitigation Special Service District (UIMSSD) funded a study which included deploying 10 portable O3 monitors (2B Technologies, Inc., Model 205, Dual Beam) throughout the Basin. Furthermore, cooperative partners including the USEPA, BLM, UDAQ, NPS, and Golder Associates provided

  20. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Flevaris, Anastasia V.; Murray, Scott O.

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension. PMID:25630380

  1. Air Pollution Over the Ganges Basin and Northwest Bay of Bengal in the Early Postmonsoon Season Based on NASA MERRAero Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Da Silva, Arlindo M.; Starobinets, Boris; Alpert, Pinhas

    2014-01-01

    The MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero) has been recently developed at NASA's Global Modeling Assimilation Office. This reanalysis is based on a version of the Goddard Earth Observing System-5 (GEOS-5) model radiatively coupled with Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport aerosols, and it includes assimilation of bias-corrected aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on both Terra and Aqua satellites. In October over the period 2002-2009, MERRAero showed that AOT was lower over the east of the Ganges basin than over the northwest of the Ganges basin: this was despite the fact that the east of the Ganges basin should have produced higher anthropogenic aerosol emissions because of higher population density, increased industrial output, and transportation. This is evidence that higher aerosol emissions do not always correspond to higher AOT over the areas where the effects of meteorological factors on AOT dominate those of aerosol emissions. MODIS AOT assimilation was essential for correcting modeled AOT mainly over the northwest of the Ganges basin, where AOT increments were maximal. Over the east of the Ganges basin and northwest Bay of Bengal (BoB), AOT increments were low and MODIS AOT assimilation did not contribute significantly to modeled AOT. Our analysis showed that increasing AOT trends over northwest BoB (exceeding those over the east of the Ganges basin) were reproduced by GEOS-5, not because of MODIS AOT assimilation butmainly because of the model capability of reproducing meteorological factors contributing to AOT trends. Moreover, vertically integrated aerosol mass flux was sensitive to wind convergence causing aerosol accumulation over northwest BoB.

  2. How Does Mediterranean Basin's Atmosphere Become Weak Moisture Source During Negative Phase of NAO: Use of AIRS, AMSR, TOVS, & TRMM Satellite Datasets Over Last Two NAO Cycles to Examine Governing Controls on E-P

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Mehta, Amita V.

    2008-01-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a noted 'concentration" basin in that it almost continuously exhibits positive evaporation minus precipitation (E - P ) properties -- throughout the four seasons and from one year to the next. Nonetheless, according to the ECMWF Era-40 48-year (1958-2005) climate reanalysis dataset, for various phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) when the pressure gradient between Portugal and Iceland becomes either very relaxed (large negative NAO-Index) or in transition (small positive or negative NAO-Index), the atmospheric moisture source properties of the basin become weak, at times even reversed for several months (i.e., negative E - P). This behavior poses numerous questions concerning how and why these events occur. Moreover, it begs the question of what it would take for the basin to reach its tipping point in which P would exceed E throughout the rainy season (some six months) on an annually persistent basis -- and the sea would possibly transform to a recurring "dilution" basin. This talk investigates these questions by: (1) establishing over a period from 1979 to present, based on detailed analyses of satellite retrieval products from a combination of NASA-AQUA, NOAA-LEO, NASA/JAXA Scatterometer, and NASA-TRMM platforms, plus additional specialized satellite data products and ancillary meteorological datasets, the actual observation-based behavior of E - P, (2) diagnosing the salient physical and meteorological mechanisms that lead to the weaker E - P events during the analysis period, partly based on analyzing surface and upper air data at discrete stations in the western and eastern Mediterranean -- while at the same time evaluating the quality of the ERA-40 data over this same time period, (3) conducting GCM and high-resolution regional modeling experiments to determine if perturbed but realistic meteorological background conditions could maintain Mediterranean as a "dilution" basin through the October to March rainy season on

  3. Increasing impact of urban fine particles (PM2.5) on areas surrounding Chinese cities

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lijian; Zhou, Weiqi; Li, Weifeng

    2015-01-01

    The negative impacts of rapid urbanization in developing countries have led to a deterioration in urban air quality, which brings increasing negative impact to its surrounding areas (e.g. in China). However, to date there has been rare quantitative estimation of the urban air pollution to its surrounding areas in China.We thus evaluated the impact of air pollution on the surrounding environment under rapid urbanization in Chinese prefectures during 1999 – 2011. We found that: (1) the urban environment generated increasing negative impact on the surrounding areas, and the PM2.5 concentration difference between urban and rural areas was particularly high in large cities. (2) Nearly half of the Chinese prefectures (156 out of 350) showed increased impact of urban PM2.5 pollution on its surrounding areas. Those prefectures were mainly located along two belts: one from northeast China to Sichuan province, the other from Shanghai to Guangxi province. Our study demonstrates the deterioration in urban air quality and its potential impacts on its surrounding areas in China. We hope that the results presented here will encourage different approaches to urbanization to mitigate the negative impact caused by urban air pollution, both in China and other rapidly developing countries. PMID:26219273

  4. Geology of the Caloris basin, Mercury: a view from MESSENGER.

    PubMed

    Murchie, Scott L; Watters, Thomas R; Robinson, Mark S; Head, James W; Strom, Robert G; Chapman, Clark R; Solomon, Sean C; McClintock, William E; Prockter, Louise M; Domingue, Deborah L; Blewett, David T

    2008-07-01

    The Caloris basin, the youngest known large impact basin on Mercury, is revealed in MESSENGER images to be modified by volcanism and deformation in a manner distinct from that of lunar impact basins. The morphology and spatial distribution of basin materials themselves closely match lunar counterparts. Evidence for a volcanic origin of the basin's interior plains includes embayed craters on the basin floor and diffuse deposits surrounding rimless depressions interpreted to be of pyroclastic origin. Unlike lunar maria, the volcanic plains in Caloris are higher in albedo than surrounding basin materials and lack spectral evidence for ferrous iron-bearing silicates. Tectonic landforms, contractional wrinkle ridges and extensional troughs, have distributions and age relations different from their counterparts in and around lunar basins, indicating a different stress history. PMID:18599772

  5. Assessing the impact of petrol stations on their immediate surroundings.

    PubMed

    Morales Terrés, Isabel M; Miñarro, Marta Doval; Ferradas, Enrique González; Caracena, Antonia Baeza; Rico, Jonathan Barberá

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a novel methodology for evaluating the extent to which petrol stations affect their surroundings. The method is based on the fact that the ratio of the concentrations of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon pollutants in the air of the petrol stations and their surroundings (basically determined by vapor emissions from unburned gasoline) differs from the ratio found in urban air, which is mainly influenced by traffic emissions. Bearing this in mind, the spatial limit of influence of petrol stations in any direction would be the first point, moving away from the station, where the ratio becomes equal to the urban background ratio. Application of the methodology involves multipoint measuring campaigns of the air at the studied petrol station and built-up area in general and processing the data with software capable of providing isoconcentration contours. The procedure should help local authorities in terms of land management, so that a "belt" can be established around petrol stations where housing or vulnerable populations and activities such as those in schools, hospitals and community centers should be restricted. PMID:20810207

  6. AERIAL OF VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING & SURROUNDING AREA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    AERIAL OF VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING & SURROUNDING AREA KSC-377C-0082.41 116-KSC-377C-82.41, P-15877, ARCHIVE-04151 Aerial view - Shuttle construction progress - VAB and Orbiter Processing Facilities - direction northwest.

  7. Potential Impact of Clean Air Act Regulations on Nitrogen Fate and Transport in the Neuse River Basin: a Modeling Investigation Using CMAQ and SWAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been extensive analysis of Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) regulation impacts to changes in atmospheric nitrogen deposition; however, few studies have focused on watershed nitrogen transfer particularly regarding long-term predictions. In this study, we investigated impa...

  8. A New Search for Lunar Mascon Basins using Detrended Kaguya (SELENE) Gravity: Implications for GRAIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombard, A. J.; Hauck, S. A.; Balcerski, J.

    2012-12-01

    The collection of GRAIL data and imminent release of its first gravity models will revolutionize understanding of the lunar interior, which motivates an assessment of the current state of knowledge. A primary goal of the GRAIL mission is to understand better mascon basins, large impact craters that display significant positive free-air and Bouguer gravity anomalies. Discovered in a handful of nearside basins during preparations for the Apollo landings and recently expanded by the global Kaguya (SELENE) gravity models, an important question is why is not every large crater a mascon basin, as less than half of the 41 impact basins > 300 km in diameter (minus South Pole-Aitken) have been previously determined to be mascons. An issue not generally considered in the identification of mascons is that the topography, and hence Bouguer gravity, display long-wavelength regional signals that might mask some mascons. Here, we use the SGM100i Kaguya gravity model and LRO's LOLA shape model to examine the free-air, topographic (arising solely from topography), and Bouguer gravity, detrended by omitting the first 5 spherical harmonic degrees from our expansions. In contrast to past studies, we find that most large basins (28 of 41) display characteristics of mascons (e.g., a strong positive Bouguer anomaly generally narrower than the surface rim). Negative annuli surrounding the central highs in the free-air gravity do not exist in the Bouguer gravity, with only 2 definitive exceptions. The fact that the majority of the Bouguer anomalies are narrower than the basin rim and that the negative free-air annulus appears to be a product of the surface topography has implications for the formation of the basins. We propose that beneath a forming large basin, the mantle uplifts in response to the large isostatic imbalance with the transient crater, while the surface topography forms from not only upward but inward collapse of the transient crater's rim wall and adjustment of the melt

  9. Radon-hazard potential the Beaver basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    Indoor-radon levels in the Beaver basin of southwestern Utah are the highest recorded to date in Utah, ranging from 17.5 to 495 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Because the U.S. Environment Protection Agency considers indoor-radon levels above 4 pCi/L to represent a risk of lung cancer from long-term exposure, the Utah Geological Survey is preparing a radon-hazard-potential map for the area to help prioritize indoor testing and evaluate the need for radon-resistant construction. Radon is a chemically inert radioactive gas derived from the decay of uranium-238, which is commonly found in rocks and soils. Soil permeability, depth to ground water, and uranium/thorium content of source materials control the mobility and concentration of radon in the soil. Once formed, radon diffuses into the pore space of the soil and then to the atmosphere or into buildings by pressure-driven flow of air or additional diffusion. The Beaver basin has been a topographic and structural depression since late Miocene time. Paleocene to Miocene volcanic and igneous rocks border the basin. Uraniferous alluvial-fan, piedmont-slope, flood-plain, and lacustrine sediments derived from the surrounding volcanic rocks fill the basin. A soil-gas radon and ground radioactivity survey in the Beaver basin shows that soils have high levels of radon gas. In this survey, uranium concentrations range from 3 to 13 parts per million (ppm) and thorium concentrations range from 10 to 48 ppm. Radon concentrations in the soil gas ranged from 85 to 3,500 pCi/L. The highest concentrations of uranium, thorium, and radon gas and the highest radon-hazard-potential are in the well-drained permeable soils in the lower flood- plain deposits that underlie the city of Beaver.

  10. The deep Ionian Basin revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugend, Julie; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Arsenikos, Stavros; Frizon de Lamotte, Dominique; Blanpied, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The deep Eastern Mediterranean Basins (Ionian and Herodotus) are characterized by thick sedimentary sequences overlying an extremely thinned basement evidenced from different geophysical methods. Yet, the nature of the crust (continental or oceanic) and the timing of the extreme crustal and lithosphere thinning in the different sub-basins remain highly controversial, casting doubts on the tectonic setting related to the formation of this segment of the North Gondwana paleo-margin. We focus on the Ionian Basin located at the western termination of the Eastern Mediterranean with the aim of identifying, characterizing and mapping the deepest sedimentary sequences. We present tentative age correlations relying on calibrations and observations from the surrounding margins and basins (Malta shelf and Escarpment, Cyrenaica margin, Sirte Basin, Apulian Platform). Two-ship deep refraction seismic data (Expanding Spread Profiles from the PASIPHAE cruise) combined with reprocessed reflection data (from the ARCHIMEDE survey) enabled us to present a homogeneous seismic stratigraphy across the basin and to investigate the velocity structure of its basement. Based on our results, and on a review of geological and geophysical observations, we suggest an Upper Triassic-Early Dogger age for the formation of the deep Ionian Basin. The nature of the underlying basement remains uncertain, both highly-thinned continental and slow-spreading type oceanic crust being compatible with the available constraints. The narrow size and relatively short-lived evolution of the Ionian Basin lead us to suggest that it is more likely the remnant of an immature oceanic basin than of a stable oceanic domain. Eventually, upscaling these results at the scale of the Eastern Mediterranean Basins highlights the complex interaction observed between two propagating oceans: The Central Atlantic and Neo-Tethys.

  11. Modeling the weekly cycle of NOx and CO emissions and their impacts on O3 in the Los Angeles-South Coast Air Basin during the CalNex 2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.; McDonald, B. C.; Baidar, S.; Brown, S. S.; Dube, B.; Ferrare, R. A.; Frost, G. J.; Harley, R. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Lee, H.-J.; McKeen, S. A.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Oetjen, H.; Ortega, I.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Scarino, A. J.; Senff, C. J.; Thalman, R.; Trainer, M.; Volkamer, R.; Wagner, N.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Waxman, E.; Young, C. J.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a new nitrogen oxide (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission inventory for the Los Angeles-South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) expanding the Fuel-based Inventory for motor-Vehicle Emissions and applied it in regional chemical transport modeling focused on the California Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) 2010 field campaign. The weekday NOx emission over the SoCAB in 2010 is 620 t d-1, while the weekend emission is 410 t d-1. The NOx emission decrease on weekends is caused by reduced diesel truck activities. Weekday and weekend CO emissions over this region are similar: 2340 and 2180 t d-1, respectively. Previous studies reported large discrepancies between the airborne observations of NOx and CO mixing ratios and the model simulations for CalNex based on the available bottom-up emission inventories. Utilizing the newly developed emission inventory in this study, the simulated NOx and CO mixing ratios agree with the observations from the airborne and the ground-based in situ and remote sensing instruments during the field study. The simulations also reproduce the weekly cycles of these chemical species. Both the observations and the model simulations indicate that decreased NOx on weekends leads to enhanced photochemistry and increase of O3 and Ox (=O3 + NO2) in the basin. The emission inventory developed in this study can be extended to different years and other urban regions in the U.S. to study the long-term trends in O3 and its precursors with regional chemical transport models.

  12. Identifying separate components of surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Murray, Scott O.

    2016-01-01

    Surround suppression is a well-known phenomenon in which the response to a visual stimulus is diminished by the presence of neighboring stimuli. This effect is observed in neural responses in areas such as primary visual cortex, and also manifests in visual contrast perception. Studies in animal models have identified at least two separate mechanisms that may contribute to surround suppression: one that is monocular and resistant to contrast adaptation, and another that is binocular and strongly diminished by adaptation. The current study was designed to investigate whether these two mechanisms exist in humans and if they can be identified psychophysically using eye-of-origin and contrast adaptation manipulations. In addition, we examined the prediction that the monocular suppression component is broadly tuned for orientation, while suppression between eyes is narrowly tuned. Our results confirmed that when center and surrounding stimuli were presented dichoptically (in opposite eyes), suppression was orientation-tuned. Following adaptation in the surrounding region, no dichoptic suppression was observed, and monoptic suppression no longer showed orientation selectivity. These results are consistent with a model of surround suppression that depends on both low-level and higher level components. This work provides a method to assess the separate contributions of these components during spatial context processing in human vision. PMID:26756172

  13. HFC-152a and HFC-134a emission estimates and characterization of CFCs, CFC replacements, and other halogenated solvents measured during the 2008 ARCTAS campaign (CARB phase) over the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, B.; Nissenson, P.; Meinardi, S.; Dabdub, D.; Rowland, F.; Vancuren, R. A.; Pederson, J.; Blake, D. R.

    2010-11-01

    This work presents results from the NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) study. Whole air samples were obtained on board research flights that flew over California during June 2008 and analyzed for selected volatile organic compounds, including several halogenated species. Samples collected over the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB), which includes much of Los Angeles (LA) County, were compared with samples from inflow air masses over the Pacific Ocean. The levels of many halocarbon species were enhanced significantly over the SoCAB, including compounds regulated by the Montreal Protocol and subsequent amendments (e.g., enhancements of 13 pptv and 11 pptv for CFC-11 and CFC-12, respectively). Emissions estimates of HFC-152a (0.98±0.05 Gg) and HFC-134a (1.40±0.11 Gg) in LA County for 2008 were obtained using the observed HFC:CO enhancement ratio. The emission rates were extrapolated to the SoCAB (1.48±0.07 Gg for HFC-152a and 2.12±0.17 Gg for HFC-134a) and US (30.1±1.5 Gg for HFC-152a and 43.0±3.4 Gg for HFC-134a) using population data. In addition, emission rates of the two HFCs in LA County and SoCAB also were calculated by a second method that utilizes air quality modeling. Estimates obtained using both methods agree well.

  14. HFC-152a and HFC-134a emission estimates and characterization of CFCs, CFC replacements, and other halogenated solvents measured during the 2008 ARCTAS campaign (CARB phase) over the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, B.; Nissenson, P.; Meinardi, S.; Dabdub, D.; Sherwood Rowland, F.; Vancuren, R. A.; Pederson, J.; Diskin, G. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2011-03-01

    This work presents results from the NASA Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) study. Whole air samples were obtained on board research flights that flew over California during June 2008 and analyzed for selected volatile organic compounds, including several halogenated species. Samples collected over the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB), which includes much of Los Angeles (LA) County, were compared with samples from inflow air masses over the Pacific Ocean. The levels of many halocarbon species were enhanced significantly over the SoCAB, including compounds regulated by the Montreal Protocol and subsequent amendments. Emissions estimates of HFC-152a (1,1-difluoroethane, CH3CHF2; 0.82 ± 0.11 Gg) and HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, CH2FCF3; 1.16 ± 0.22 Gg) in LA County for 2008 were obtained using the observed HFC:carbon monoxide (CO) enhancement ratio. Emission rates also were calculated for the SoCAB (1.60 ± 0.22 Gg yr-1 for HFC-152a and 2.12 ± 0.28 Gg yr-1 for HFC-134a) and then extrapolated to the United States (32 ± 4 Gg yr-1 for HFC-152a and 43 ± 6 Gg yr-1 for HFC-134a) using population data. In addition, emission rates of the two HFCs in LA County and SoCAB were calculated by a second method that utilizes air quality modeling. Emissions estimates obtained using both methods differ by less than 25% for the LA County and less than 45% for the SoCAB.

  15. Air surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the air surveillance and monitoring programs currently in operation at that Hanford Site. Atmospheric releases of pollutants from Hanford to the surrounding region are a potential source of human exposure. For that reason, both radioactive and nonradioactive materials in air are monitored at a number of locations. The influence of Hanford emissions on local radionuclide concentrations was evaluated by comparing concentrations measured at distant locations within the region to concentrations measured at the Site perimeter. This section discusses sample collection, analytical methods, and the results of the Hanford air surveillance program. A complete listing of all analytical results summarized in this section is reported separately by Bisping (1995).

  16. Analysis of ambient SO 2 concentrations and winds in the complex surroundings of a thermal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlakar, P.

    2004-11-01

    SO2 pollution is still a significant problem in Slovenia, especially around large thermal power plants (TPPs), like the one at Šoštanj. The Šoštanj TPP is the exclusive source of SO2 in the area and is therefore a perfect example for air pollution studies. In order to understand air pollution around the Šoštanj TPP in detail, some analyses of emissions and ambient concentrations of SO2 at six automated monitoring stations in the surroundings of the TPP were made. The data base from 1991 to 1993 was used when there were no desulfurisation plants in operation. Statistical analyses of the influence of the emissions from the three TPP stacks at different measuring points were made. The analyses prove that the smallest stack (100 m) mainly pollutes villages and towns near the TPP within a radius of a few kilometres. The medium stack's (150 m) influence is noticed at shorter as well as at longer distances up to more than ten kilometres. The highest stack (230 m) pollutes mainly at longer distances, where the plume reaches the higher hills. Detailed analyses of ambient SO2 concentrations were made. They show the temporal and spatial distribution of different classes of SO2 concentrations from very low to alarming values. These analyses show that pollution patterns at a particular station remain the same if observed on a yearly basis, but can vary very much if observed on a monthly basis, mainly because of different weather patterns. Therefore the winds in the basin (as the most important feature influencing air pollution dispersion) were further analysed in detail to find clusters of similar patterns. For cluster analysis of ground-level winds patterns in the basin around the Šoštanj Thermal Power Plant, the Kohonen neural network and Leaders' method were used. Furthermore, the dependence of ambient SO2 concentrations on the clusters obtained was analysed. The results proved that effective cluster analysis can be a useful tool for compressing a huge wind data base

  17. Stereoscopic surround displays using interference filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peikert, Silvio; Gerhardt, Jérémie

    2012-03-01

    To achieve stereoscopy on surround displays interference filters have some advantages over other techniques. However these filters introduce strong color differences between the projectors, which may reveal that the display is compound by multiple projectors. This article presents methods for a computationally efficient correction of the colorimetric properties of multi-projector surround displays. This correction is based on automated measurements by multiple cameras and a spectrometer. The described methods were validated by applying them to a stereoscopic dome display made up of 16 high definition projectors equipped with Infitec filters. On that display we achieved a significant improvement of the colorimetric properties compared to regular soft-edge blending. Our reference setup shows that the multi-projector approach combined with interference filters allows to build highly immersive stereoscopic surround displays fulfilling today's requirements on spatial resolution, frame rates and interaction latencies.

  18. Protective air lock

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Herbert W.

    1976-03-30

    A device suitable for preventing escape and subsequent circulation of toxic gases comprising an enclosure which is sealed by a surrounding air lock, automatic means for partially evacuating said enclosure and said air lock and for ventilating said enclosure and means for disconnecting said enclosure ventilating means, whereby a relatively undisturbed atmosphere is created in said enclosure.

  19. Center-Surround Inhibition in Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Kiyonaga, Anastasia; Egner, Tobias

    2016-01-11

    Directing visual attention toward a particular feature or location in the environment suppresses processing of nearby stimuli [1-4]. Echoing the center-surround organization of retinal ganglion cell receptive fields [5], and biasing of competitive local neuronal dynamics in favor of task-relevant stimuli [6], this "inhibitory surround" attention mechanism accentuates the demarcation between task-relevant and irrelevant items. Here, we show that internally maintaining a color stimulus in working memory (WM), rather than visually attending the stimulus in the external environment, produces an analogous pattern of inhibition for stimuli that are nearby in color space. Replicating a well-known effect of attentional capture by stimuli that match WM content [7], visual attention was biased toward (task-irrelevant) stimuli that exactly matched a WM item. This bias was curtailed, however, for stimuli that were very similar to the WM content (i.e., within the inhibitory zone surrounding the focus of WM) and recovered for less similar stimuli (i.e., beyond the bounds of the inhibitory surround). Moreover, the expression of this inhibition effect was positively associated with WM performance across observers. In a second experiment, inhibition also occurred between two similar items simultaneously held in WM. This suggests that maintenance in WM is characterized by an excitatory peak centered on the focus of (internal) attention, surrounded by an inhibitory zone to limit interference by irrelevant and confusable representations. Here, thus, we show for the first time that the same center-surround selection mechanism that focuses visual attention on sensory stimuli also selectively maintains internally activated representations in WM. PMID:26711496

  20. Precambrian shield and basement tectonics in sedimentary basin analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Touborg, J.F.

    1984-04-01

    This study focused on the use of (1) regional structural analysis of basement and Precambrian rocks surrounding a sedimentary basin, and (2) tracing basement structures into the sedimentary basin. The structural analysis of the Precambrian shield has a fundamental bearing on interpretation of overlying sedimentary cover rocks. This is expressed in the southern part of the Hudson's Bay basin and its southeastern arm, the Moose River basin. For instance, the rims of both basins are controlled by faults or graben structures. Approximately 13 major fault systems with strike lengths of 200-300 km (125-186 mi) or more can be traced from the exposed Precambrian shield into the basin in terms of lineament arrays and/or aeromagnetic and/or gravity signature. The data suggest reactivation of faults during basin sedimentation. This type of basement structural analysis in areas adjacent to sedimentary basins can provide a valuable interpretation base for subsequent seismic surveys and basin evaluation.

  1. The Palouse Basin Participatory Model Pilot Project: A Participatory Approach to Bi-state Groundwater Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beall, A.; Fiedler, F.; Boll, J.; Cosens, B.; Harris, C.

    2008-12-01

    In March 2008, The University of Idaho Waters of the West, the Palouse Basin Aquifer Committee and its Citizen Advisory Group undertook a pilot project to explore the use of participatory modeling to assist with water resource management decisions. The Palouse basin supplies Moscow, Idaho, Pullman, Washington, and surrounding communities with high quality groundwater. However, water levels in the major aquifer systems have been declining since records have been kept. Solutions are complicated by jurisdictional considerations and limited alternatives for supply. We hope that by using a participatory approach major conflicts will be avoided. Group system dynamics modeling has been used for various environmental concerns such as air quality, biological management, water quality and quantity. These models create a nexus of science, policy, and economic and social concerns, which enhances discussion of issues surrounding the use of natural resources. Models may be developed into educational and or decision support tools which can be used to assist with planning processes. The long-term goal of the Palouse basin project is to develop such a model. The pilot project participants include hydrologists, facility operators, policy makers and local citizens. The model they have developed integrates issues such as scientific uncertainty, groundwater volumes, and potential conservation measures and costs. Preliminary results indicate that participants are satisfied with the approach and are looking to use the model for education and to help direct potential research. We will present the results of the pilot project, including the developed model and insights from the process.

  2. Energy Saving Potentials and Air Quality Benefits of Urban Heat Island Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem

    2005-08-23

    Urban areas tend to have higher air temperatures than their rural surroundings as a result of gradual surface modifications that include replacing the natural vegetation with buildings and roads. The term ''Urban Heat Island'' describes this phenomenon. The surfaces of buildings and pavements absorb solar radiation and become extremely hot, which in turn warm the surrounding air. Cities that have been ''paved over'' do not receive the benefit of the natural cooling effect of vegetation. As the air temperature rises, so does the demand for air-conditioning (a/c). This leads to higher emissions from power plants, as well as increased smog formation as a result of warmer temperatures. In the United States, we have found that this increase in air temperature is responsible for 5-10% of urban peak electric demand for a/c use, and as much as 20% of population-weighted smog concentrations in urban areas. Simple ways to cool the cities are the use of reflective surfaces (rooftops and pavements) and planting of urban vegetation. On a large scale, the evapotranspiration from vegetation and increased reflection of incoming solar radiation by reflective surfaces will cool a community a few degrees in the summer. As an example, computer simulations for Los Angeles, CA show that resurfacing about two-third of the pavements and rooftops with reflective surfaces and planting three trees per house can cool down LA by an average of 2-3K. This reduction in air temperature will reduce urban smog exposure in the LA basin by roughly the same amount as removing the basin entire onroad vehicle exhaust. Heat island mitigation is an effective air pollution control strategy, more than paying for itself in cooling energy cost savings. We estimate that the cooling energy savings in U.S. from cool surfaces and shade trees, when fully implemented, is about $5 billion per year (about $100 per air-conditioned house).

  3. Issues Surrounding Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugden, David; Kirby, Amanda; Dunford, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Like other developmental disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, specific language impairment and dyslexia, there is no shortage of debate surrounding the condition of Developmental Coordination Disorder. The present article takes a global view of many of these debatable issues, starting with definition and terminology, moving…

  4. KE Basin water dispositioning engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Hunacek, G.S.; Gahir, S.S.

    1994-09-23

    This engineering study is a feasibility study of KE Basin water treatment to an acceptable level and dispositioning the treated water to Columbia River, ground through ETF or to air through evaporation.

  5. Digital tabulation of stratigraphic data from oil and gas wells in Cuyama Valley and surrounding areas, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Bova, Shiera C.; Langenheim, V.E.; Shumaker, Lauren E.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Stratigraphic information from 391 oil and gas exploration wells from Cuyama Valley, California, and surrounding areas are herein compiled in digital form from reports that were released originally in paper form. The Cuyama Basin is located within the southeasternmost part of the Coast Ranges and north of the western Transverse Ranges, west of the San Andreas fault. Knowledge of the location and elevation of stratigraphic tops of formations throughout the basin is a first step toward understanding depositional trends and the structural evolution of the basin through time, and helps in understanding the slip history and partitioning of slip on San Andreas and related faults.

  6. Crustal structure of China and surrounding regions from P wave traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Youshun; ToksöZ, M. Nafi

    2006-03-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) P wave velocity model is developed for the crust and uppermost mantle of China and the surrounding area by applying the tomography method of Zhao et al. using 500,000 high-quality P wave first arrivals extracted from the Annual Bulletin of Chinese Earthquakes (ABCE). This tomographic method can accommodate velocity discontinuities such as the Moho in addition to smooth velocity variations. The spatial resolution is 1° × 1° in the horizontal direction and 10 km in depth. The velocity images of the upper crust correspond well with the surface geologic features such as basins and the Tibetan Plateau. High-velocity anomalies are found in the lower crust beneath the Precambrian regions (Tarim Basin, Ordos Basin, Sichuan Basin, and western half of Songliao Basin). The highest-velocity anomaly is beneath the Sichuan Basin. High- and low-velocity anomalies imaged beneath the Bohai Gulf are associated with the presence of a major Cenozoic rift system. In the lower crust beneath the South China Block, P wave velocities are lower in the north than in the south. The Indochina Block shows low velocities both in the crust and in the uppermost mantle due to volcanism. The Pn velocities in the Tibet area are higher than those in other areas largely due to thicker crust. Tomographic model significantly reduces the traveltime residuals. Tests conducted by relocating large explosions and earthquakes validate the 3-D velocity model.

  7. Georgia Basin-Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report, 2012 was undertaken to characterize the air quality within the Georgia Basin/Puget Sound region,a vibrant, rapidly growing, urbanized area of the Pacific Northwest. The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characteri...

  8. Comparative study of compensation mechanism of lunar impact basins from new gravity field model of SELENE (Kaguya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, N.; Sugita, S.; Matsumoto, K.; Goossens, S.; Ishihara, Y.; Noda, H.; Ssasaki, S.; Iwata, T.; Hanada, H.; Araki, H.

    2009-04-01

    The gravity field is a fundamental physical quantity for the study of the internal structure and the evolution of planetary bodies. The most significant problem of the previous lunar gravity models, however, is the lack of direct observations of the far side gravity signals [1]. We then developed a satellite-to-satellite Doppler tracking sub-system for SELENE [2]. In this study, we adopt our new gravity field model with nearly full coverage of the lunar far side to discuss dichotomy of the lunar basins. Because all the nearside impact basins are filled with extensive mare basalt deposits, it is difficult to estimate the subsurface structures, such as uplift of the Moho surface, from gravity measurements. In contrast, far-side impact basins have much less or no mare basalt coverage. This may allow us to investigate the internal structure underneath impact basins. Such knowledge will be important in understanding the response of a solid planetary body to large meteoritic impacts and also the thermal state of the Moon during the late heavy bombardment period. There are distinctive differences between the anomalies of the near side principal mascons and the far side basins. As shown previously [1, 3], the near side principal mascons have sharp shoulders with a gravity plateau and a weakly negative gravity anomaly in the surroundings. In contrast, the far side basins are characterized by concentric rings of positive and negative anomalies. The circular gravity highs agree well with the topographic rims of the basins revealed by SELENE topography model STM-359_grid-02 [4]. In our gravity model, Orientale, Mendel-Rydberg, Lorentz, and Humboldtianum show more affinity with the far side basins than the near side principal mascons [5]. Korolev, Mendeleev, Planck, and Lorentz basins have sharp central peaks of which magnitude in free-air anomalies is almost equivalent to the one in Bouguer anomalies. On the other hand, Orientale, Mendel-Rydberg, Humboldtianum, Moscoviense

  9. High-resolution mantle tomography of China and surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinli; Zhao, Dapeng

    2006-09-01

    A high-resolution P wave tomographic model of the crust and mantle down to 1100 km depth under China and surrounding regions is determined by using about one million arrival times of P, pP, PP, and PcP waves from 19,361 earthquakes recorded by 1012 seismic stations. The subducting Pacific slab is imaged clearly as a high-velocity zone from the oceanic trenches down to about 600 km depth, and intermediate-depth and deep earthquakes are located within the slab. The Pacific slab becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone under east China. The western edge of the stagnant slab is roughly coincident with a surface topographic boundary in east China. The active Changbai and Wudalianchi intraplate volcanoes in northeast China are underlain by significant slow anomalies in the upper mantle, above the stagnant Pacific slab. These results suggest that the active intraplate volcanoes in NE China are not hot spots but a kind of back-arc volcano associated with the deep subduction of the Pacific slab and its stagnancy in the transition zone. Under the Mariana arc, however, the Pacific slab penetrates directly down to the lower mantle. The active Tengchong volcano in southwest China is related to the eastward subduction of the Burma microplate. The subducting Indian and Philippine Sea plates are also imaged clearly. The Indian plate has subducted down to 200-300 km depth under the Tibetan Plateau with a horizontal moving distance of about 500 km. High-velocity anomalies are revealed in the upper mantle under the Tarim basin, Ordos, and Sichuan basin, which are three stable blocks in China.

  10. Stratigraphy of the Caloris basin, Mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCauley, J.F.; Guest, J.E.; Schaber, G.G.; Trask, N.J.; Greeley, R.

    1981-01-01

    The 1300-km-diameter Caloris impact basin is surrounded by well-defined ejecta units that can be recognized from more than 1000 km, radially outward from the basin edge. A formal rock stratigraphic nomenclature is proposed for the Caloris ejecta units, which are collectively called the Caloris Group. Each of the individual formations within the Group are described and compared to similar rock units associated with the lunar Imbrium and Orientale basins. A crater degradation chronology, linked the the Caloris event, is also proposed to assist in stratigraphic correlation on a Mercury-wide basis. ?? 1981.

  11. Playing It Safe: Assessing Cumulative Impact and Social Vulnerability through an Environmental Justice Screening Method in the South Coast Air Basin, California

    PubMed Central

    Sadd, James L.; Pastor, Manuel; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Scoggins, Justin; Jesdale, Bill

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory agencies, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and state authorities like the California Air Resources Board (CARB), have sought to address the concerns of environmental justice (EJ) advocates who argue that chemical-by-chemical and source-specific assessments of potential health risks of environmental hazards do not reflect the multiple environmental and social stressors faced by vulnerable communities. We propose an Environmental Justice Screening Method (EJSM) as a relatively simple, flexible and transparent way to examine the relative rank of cumulative impacts and social vulnerability within metropolitan regions and determine environmental justice areas based on more than simply the demographics of income and race. We specifically organize 23 indicator metrics into three categories: (1) hazard proximity and land use; (2) air pollution exposure and estimated health risk; and (3) social and health vulnerability. For hazard proximity, the EJSM uses GIS analysis to create a base map by intersecting land use data with census block polygons, and calculates hazard proximity measures based on locations within various buffer distances. These proximity metrics are then summarized to the census tract level where they are combined with tract centroid-based estimates of pollution exposure and health risk and socio-economic status (SES) measures. The result is a cumulative impacts (CI) score for ranking neighborhoods within regions that can inform diverse stakeholders seeking to identify local areas that might need targeted regulatory strategies to address environmental justice concerns. PMID:21655129

  12. Parana basin

    SciTech Connect

    Zalan, P.V.; Wolff, S.; Conceicao, J.C.J.; Vieira, I.S.; Astolfi, M.A.; Appi, V.T.; Zanotto, O.; Neto, E.V.S.; Cerqueira, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Parana basin is a large intracratonic basin in South America, developed entirely on continental crust and filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks ranging in age from Silurian to Cretaceous. It occupies the southern portion of Brazil (1,100,000 km/sup 2/ or 425,000 mi/sup 2/) and the eastern half of Paraguay (100,000 km/sup 2/ or 39,000 mi/sup 2/); its extension into Argentina and Uruguay is known as the Chaco-Parana basin. Five major depositional sequences (Silurian, Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Juro-Cretaceous) constitute the stratigraphic framework of the basin. The first four are predominantly siliciclastic in nature, and the fifth contains the most voluminous basaltic lava flows of the planet. Maximum thicknesses are in the order of 6000 m (19,646 ft). The sequences are separated by basin wide unconformities related in the Paleozoic to Andean orogenic events and in the Mesozoic to the continental breakup and sea floor spreading between South America and Africa. The structural framework of the Parana basin consists of a remarkable pattern of criss-crossing linear features (faults, fault zones, arches) clustered into three major groups (N45/sup 0/-65/sup 0/W, N50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/E, E-W). The northwest- and northeast-trending faults are long-lived tectonic elements inherited from the Precambrian basement whose recurrent activity throughout the Phanerozoic strongly influenced sedimentation, facies distribution, and development of structures in the basin. Thermomechanical analyses indicate three main phases of subsidence (Silurian-Devonian, late Carboniferous-Permian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) and low geothermal gradients until the beginning of the Late Jurassic Permian oil-prone source rocks attained maturation due to extra heat originated from Juro-Cretaceous igneous intrusions. The third phase of subsidence also coincided with strong tectonic reactivation and creation of a third structural trend (east-west).

  13. Volatile organic compound emissions from the oil and natural gas industry in the Uinta Basin, Utah: point sources compared to ambient air composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, C.; Geiger, F.; Edwards, P. M.; Dube, W.; Pétron, G.; Kofler, J.; Zahn, A.; Brown, S. S.; Graus, M.; Gilman, J.; Lerner, B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; de Gouw, J. A.; Roberts, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    The emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin, Utah were measured at a ground site in Horse Pool and from a NOAA mobile laboratory with PTR-MS instruments. The VOC compositions in the vicinity of individual gas and oil wells and other point sources such as evaporation ponds, compressor stations and injection wells are compared to the measurements at Horse Pool. High mixing ratios of aromatics, alkanes, cycloalkanes and methanol were observed for extended periods of time and short-term spikes caused by local point sources. The mixing ratios during the time the mobile laboratory spent on the well pads were averaged. High mixing ratios were found close to all point sources, but gas wells using dry-gas collection, which means dehydration happens at the well, were clearly associated with higher mixing ratios than other wells. Another large source was the flowback pond near a recently hydraulically re-fractured gas well. The comparison of the VOC composition of the emissions from the oil and natural gas wells showed that wet gas collection wells compared well with the majority of the data at Horse Pool and that oil wells compared well with the rest of the ground site data. Oil wells on average emit heavier compounds than gas wells. The mobile laboratory measurements confirm the results from an emissions inventory: the main VOC source categories from individual point sources are dehydrators, oil and condensate tank flashing and pneumatic devices and pumps. Raw natural gas is emitted from the pneumatic devices and pumps and heavier VOC mixes from the tank flashings.

  14. Volatile organic compound emissions from the oil and natural gas industry in the Uintah Basin, Utah: oil and gas well pad emissions compared to ambient air composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warneke, C.; Geiger, F.; Edwards, P. M.; Dube, W.; Pétron, G.; Kofler, J.; Zahn, A.; Brown, S. S.; Graus, M.; Gilman, J. B.; Lerner, B. M.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; de Gouw, J. A.; Roberts, J. M.

    2014-10-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas production in the Uintah Basin, Utah were measured at a ground site in Horse Pool and from a NOAA mobile laboratory with PTR-MS instruments. The VOC compositions in the vicinity of individual gas and oil wells and other point sources such as evaporation ponds, compressor stations and injection wells are compared to the measurements at Horse Pool. High mixing ratios of aromatics, alkanes, cycloalkanes and methanol were observed for extended periods of time and for short-term spikes caused by local point sources. The mixing ratios during the time the mobile laboratory spent on the well pads were averaged. High mixing ratios were found close to all point sources, but gas well pads with collection and dehydration on the well pad were clearly associated with higher mixing ratios than other wells. The comparison of the VOC composition of the emissions from the oil and natural gas well pads showed that gas well pads without dehydration on the well pad compared well with the majority of the data at Horse Pool, and that oil well pads compared well with the rest of the ground site data. Oil well pads on average emit heavier compounds than gas well pads. The mobile laboratory measurements confirm the results from an emissions inventory: the main VOC source categories from individual point sources are dehydrators, oil and condensate tank flashing and pneumatic devices and pumps. Raw natural gas is emitted from the pneumatic devices and pumps and heavier VOC mixes from the tank flashings.

  15. Trends of air pollution in the Western Mediterranean Basin from a 13-year database: A research considering regional, suburban and urban environments in Mallorca (Balearic Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerro, J. C.; Cerdà, V.; Pey, J.

    2015-02-01

    This study is focused in the evolution of NO, NO2, SO2, O3 and PM10 concentrations, from 2000 to 2012, at urban, suburban and regional observatories in the Balearic Islands (Spain), an insular region in the Western Mediterranean. At urban and suburban areas, daily patterns of most pollutants are strongly linked to land-traffic emissions, being the regional background less influenced. SO2 variations, however, are mostly driven by the impact of other sources different from road traffic, including shipping emissions and power generation. Urban NOx, SO2 and PM10 concentrations exhibit a common weekly pattern, with a very slight accumulation during the weekdays and sharp decreases (15-39%) on weekends. Our long-term database displays clear decreasing NO and NO2 concentrations from 2000 onwards, prominent in the urban environment (-1.1 μg/m3 year), and moderate in suburban and regional areas (up to -0.3 μg/m3 year). At urban sites, O3 behaviour (+1.0 μg/m3 year) is opposite to that of NO, one of its main depletion agents. A moderate O3 increasing trend (+0.5 μg/m3 year) is detected at regional background areas, whereas a modest decreasing trend occurred at the suburban background (-0.4 μg/m3 year), probably caused by enhanced vehicular emissions over these areas induced by urban planning and mobility policies. Finally, substantial PM10 drops are obvious, -0.7 μg/m3 year at urban and suburban areas, and -0.5 μg/m3 year in the regional background. Our results link the sharpest declines to air masses from western to northern sectors, pointing to effective pollution abatement strategies at a European scale. Some additional benefits are connected to the implementation of diverse local policies. The effect of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) was investigated. Negative NAO phases were related to additional air quality benefits, while positive phases mostly contributed to air degradation.

  16. Canada Basin revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosher, David C.; Shimeld, John; Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Chian, D; Lebedeva-Ivanova, Nina; Jackson, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    More than 15,000 line-km of new regional seismic reflection and refraction data in the western Arctic Ocean provide insights into the tectonic and sedimentologic history of Canada Basin, permitting development of new geologic understanding in one of Earth's last frontiers. These new data support a rotational opening model for southern Canada Basin. There is a central basement ridge possibly representing an extinct spreading center with oceanic crustal velocities and blocky basement morphology characteristic of spreading centre crust surrounding this ridge. Basement elevation is lower in the south, mostly due to sediment loading subsidence. The sedimentary succession is thickest in the southern Beaufort Sea region, reaching more than 15 km, and generally thins to the north and west. In the north, grabens and half-grabens are indicative of extension. Alpha-Mendeleev Ridge is a large igneous province in northern Amerasia Basin, presumably emplaced synchronously with basin formation. It overprints most of northern Canada Basin structure. The seafloor and sedimentary succession of Canada Basin is remarkably flat-lying in its central region, with little bathymetric change over most of its extent. Reflections that correlate over 100s of kms comprise most of the succession and on-lap bathymetric and basement highs. They are interpreted as representing deposits from unconfined turbidity current flows. Sediment distribution patterns reflect changing source directions during the basin’s history. Initially, probably late Cretaceous to Paleocene synrift sediments sourced from the Alaska and Mackenzie-Beaufort margins. This unit shows a progressive series of onlap unconformities with a younging trend towards Alpha and Northwind ridges, likely a response to contemporaneous subsidence. Sediment source direction appeared to shift to the Canadian Arctic Archipelago margin for the Eocene and Oligocene, likely due to uplift of Arctic islands during the Eurekan Orogeny. The final

  17. Spirit's Surroundings on 'West Spur,' Sol 305

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This 360-degree panorama shows the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as of the rover's 305th martian day, or sol, (Nov. 11, 2004). At that point, Spirit was climbing the 'West Spur' of the 'Columbia Hills.' The rover had just finished inspecting a rock called 'Lutefisk' and was heading uphill toward an area called 'Machu Picchu.' Spirit used its navigational camera to take the images combined into this mosaic. The rover's location when the images were taken is catalogued as the mission's site 89, position 205. The view is presented here as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  18. ECAIM : Air Quality Studies and its Impact in Central Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Suárez, L. G.; Torres, R.; Garcia-Reynoso, J. A.; Zavala-Hidalgo, J.; Grutter, M.; Delgado-Campos, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2014-12-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area has been the object of several well know intensive campaigns. Since MARI (1991) , IMADA (1997), MCMA 2003 and MILAGRO (2006). The spatial scope of these studies have gone from urban to regional to continental, with the focus on MCMA as an emissions source. During MILAGRO, the influence on MCMA of wildfires and agricultural biomass burning around the megacity was considered. However, around Mexico City a crown of metropolis and middle size cities make a region known as the Central Mexico Regional Crow (CRCM for its acronym in Spanish language) or Central Mexico City Belt. It contains 32 million inhabitants and produces 40% of national gross product. The region undergoes an uncontrolled urban sprawl. Evidence is building-up on complex air pollution transport processes between the air basins within CRCM. However, only MCMA counts with reliable long-term records of criteria pollutants monitoring. Only few intensive campaigns have been done in the air basins surrounding MCMA. ECAIM project has several goals: a) To use ground and satellite observations to assess emissions inventories; b) To use ground and satellite observations to assess the performance of air quality models for the whole region; c) to produce critical levels exceedence maps; d) To produce a preliminary diagnostic of air quality for the CRCM; e) to produce a preliminary estimate of the cost of air pollution within the CRCM. In this work we show the method approach to use the best available information from local AQM networks, field campaigns, satellite observations and modeling to achieve those goals. We show some preliminary results.

  19. Multimode Surface Wave Tomography Of Asia And Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    We construct a large-scale, high-resolution, 3-D model of the upper mantle beneath Asia, Australia, and surrounding oceans. Automated Multimode Inversion of surface waves (Lebedev and Nolet, 2000) is used to extract the waveform phase information from the regional S and fundamental-mode wavetrains and relate it to structural per- turbations in the Earth. Efficient selection of the wavetrains uncontaminated by scat- tered waves ensures high accuracy of the measurements. Full automation allows us to constrain the tomographic model using a large waveform data set of about twenty thousand vertical-component seismograms and to achieve lateral resolution of 400- 700 km, varying with the local ray-path coverage. The tectonically diverse region of study encompasses units ranging from stable Archean cratons and the oldest ocean floor on Earth to currently opening backarc basins. The western half of the Pacific ``Ring of Fire" dominates the cross-sections down to 150 km depth. At greater depths, a pattern of prominent high-velocity anoma- lies is created by the deep roots of Precambrian continental units (Yangtze, India, Siberia, and Kazakhstan), oceanic lithosphere subducted in the Western Pacific, and the Indian lithosphere descending beneath Tibet. High-velocity continental roots are present beneath some Precambrian units but absent beneath others, depending on their tectonic history. Laterally, the roots can reach beyond the present extent of the overly- ing Archean-Proterozoic crust by as much as a few hundred kilometers.

  20. Inversion of Extensional Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Pfiffner, O. Adrian

    The evolution of extensional sedimentary basins is governed by the surrounding stress field and can, therefore, be expected to be highly sensitive to variations in these stresses. Important changes in basin geometry are to be expected in the case of an even short-lived reversal from extension to compression. We investigate the evolu- tion of fold and thrust structures which form in compression after extension, when basin forming processes have come to a complete stop. To this purpose, we use a two- dimensional, viscoplastic model and start our experiments from a pre-existing exten- sional geometry. We illustrate the sensitivity of the evolving structures to inherited extensional geometry, sedimentary and erosional processes, and material properties. One series of our model experiments involves the upper- to middle crust only in order to achieve a high detail in the basin area. We find that our results agree with examples from nature and analogue studies in, among others, the uplift and rotation of syn-rift sediments, the propagation of shear zones into the post-rift sediments and, in specific cases, the development of back-thrusts or basement short-cut faults. We test the out- come of these models by performing a second series of model simulations in which basins on a continental margin are inverted through their progressive approach of a subduction zone. These latter models are on the scale of the whole upper mantle.

  1. Predicting Maximum Lake Depth from Surrounding Topography

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Jeffrey W.; Milstead, W. Bryan; Urrutia, M. Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Information about lake morphometry (e.g., depth, volume, size, etc.) aids understanding of the physical and ecological dynamics of lakes, yet is often not readily available. The data needed to calculate measures of lake morphometry, particularly lake depth, are usually collected on a lake-by-lake basis and are difficult to obtain across broad regions. To span the gap between studies of individual lakes where detailed data exist and regional studies where access to useful data on lake depth is unavailable, we developed a method to predict maximum lake depth from the slope of the topography surrounding a lake. We use the National Elevation Dataset and the National Hydrography Dataset – Plus to estimate the percent slope of surrounding lakes and use this information to predict maximum lake depth. We also use field measured maximum lake depths from the US EPA's National Lakes Assessment to empirically adjust and cross-validate our predictions. We were able to predict maximum depth for ∼28,000 lakes in the Northeastern United States with an average cross-validated RMSE of 5.95 m and 5.09 m and average correlation of 0.82 and 0.69 for Hydrological Unit Code Regions 01 and 02, respectively. The depth predictions and the scripts are openly available as supplements to this manuscript. PMID:21984945

  2. Spatial trends, sources, and air-water exchange of organochlorine pesticides in the Great Lakes basin using low density polyethylene passive samplers.

    PubMed

    Khairy, Mohammed; Muir, Derek; Teixeira, Camilla; Lohmann, Rainer

    2014-08-19

    Polyethylene passive samplers were deployed during summer and fall of 2011 in the lower Great Lakes to assess the spatial distribution and sources of gaseous and freely dissolved organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and their air-water exchange. Average gaseous OCP concentrations ranged from nondetect to 133 pg/m(3). Gaseous concentrations of hexachlorobenzene, dieldrin, and chlordanes were significantly greater (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.05) at Lake Erie than Lake Ontario. A multiple linear regression implied that both cropland and urban areas within 50 and 10 km buffer zones, respectively, were critical parameters to explain the total variability in atmospheric concentrations. Freely dissolved OCP concentrations (nondetect to 114 pg/L) were lower than previously reported. Aqueous half-lives generally ranged from 1.7 to 6.7 years. Nonetheless, concentrations of p,p'-DDE and chlordanes were higher than New York State Ambient Water Quality Standards for the protection of human health from the consumption of fish. Spatial distributions of freely dissolved OCPs in both lakes were influenced by loadings from areas of concern and the water circulation patterns. Flux calculations indicated net deposition of γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, heptachlor-epoxide, and α- and β-endosulfan (-0.02 to -33 ng/m(2)/day) and net volatilization of heptachlor, aldrin, trans-chlordane, and trans-nonachlor (0.0 to 9.0 ng/m(2)/day) in most samples. PMID:25019318

  3. Lidar Monitoring of Mexico City's Atmosphere During High Air Pollution Episodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, C. R., Jr.; Archuleta, F. L.; Hof, D. E.; Karl, R. R., Jr.; Tiee, J. J., Jr.; Eichinger, W. E.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Tellier, L.

    1992-01-01

    Over the last two decades, Mexico City, like many large industrial and populous urban areas, has developed a serious air pollution problem, especially during the winter months when there are frequent temperature inversions and weak winds. The deteriorating air quality is the result of several factors. The basin within which Mexico City lies in Mexico's center of political, administrative and economic activity, generating 34 percent of the gross domestic product and 42 percent of the industrial revenue, and supporting a population which is rapidly approaching the 20 million mark. The basin is surrounded by mountains on three sides which end up preventing rapid dispersal of pollutants. Emissions from the transportation fleet (more than 3 million vehicles) are one of the primary pollution sources, and most are uncontrolled. Catalytic converters are just now working their way into the fleet. The Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative in an international collaboration project between the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mexican Petroleum Institute are dedicated to the investigation of the air quality problem in Mexico City. The main objective of the project is to identify and assess the cost and benefits of major options being proposed to improve the air quality. The project is organized into three main activity areas: (1) modeling and simulation; (2) characterization and measurements; and (3) strategic evaluation.

  4. The Central European Permian Basins; Rheological and structural controls on basin history and on inter-basin connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Jeroen; Van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2014-05-01

    We analyse the relative importance of the major crustal-scale fault zones and crustal architecture in controlling basin formation, deformation and the structural connections between basins. The North and South Permian Basins of Central Europe are usually defined by the extend of Rotliegend sedimentary and volcanic units and not by a common tectonic origin or development. Instead, the sub-basins that together form the Permian Basins are each controlled by different structural and/or rheological controls that are inherited from Early Paleozoïc and older geodynamic processes, they are even located in different crustal/lithospheric domains. The North Permian basin is located on Baltic crust that was thinned during Late Proterozoïc - Early Paleozoïc times. South of the Thor suture, the South Permian basin and its sub-basins are located on Avalonian crust (Southern North Sea and North German Basins) and on the transition of East European cratonic and Avalonian crust (Polish Through). The size of crustal domains and of the faults that govern basin formation requires a regional-scale to assess their impact on basins and sub-basins. In the case of the Permian Basins this encompasses East Avalonia and surroundings, roughly speaking the area north of the Variscan Rheïc suture, east of the Atlantic and southwest of the Teisseyre-Tornquist line. This approach sheds light on the effects of long lived differences in crustal fabric which are responsible for spatial heterogeneity in stress and strain magnitudes and zonations of fracturing, burial history and temperature history. The focus on understanding the geomechanical control of large crustal-scale fault structures will provide the constraints and geometrical and compositional input for local models of stress and strain. Considering their fundamentally different structural and rheological controls, the Permian (sub)basins have a remarkably common history of subsidence and inversion, suggesting a more or less continuous

  5. The Cluster of Galaxies Surrounding Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Frazer N.; Ledlow, Michael J.; Morrison, Glenn E.; Hill, John M.

    1997-10-01

    We report optical imaging and spectroscopy of 41 galaxies in a 22' square region surrounding Cygnus A. The results show that there is an extensive rich cluster associated with Cyg A of Abell richness of at least 1 and possibly as high as 4. The velocity histogram has two peaks, one centered on Cyg A and a more significant peak redshifted by about 2060 km s-1 from the velocity of Cyg A. The dynamical centroid of the spatial distribution is also shifted somewhat to the northwest. However, statistical tests show only weak evidence that there are two distinct clusters. The entire system has a velocity dispersion of 1581 km s-1, which is slightly larger than other, well-studied examples of rich clusters.

  6. Autofluorescence of tissue surrounding malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Wolfgang; Bohle, Rainer M.; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard; Vahrson, H.; Mussmann, J.

    1998-04-01

    In vitro fluorescence measurements on pap smears of ascites, pleura, or Douglas confirmed results obtained previously with different types of tissue: Cancer tissue fluoresces hardly and is surrounded by a 'fluorescence belt.' Investigations of cytological smears (e.g. Pap smears) have revealed the possible participation of granulocytes in this 'immune' reaction. Furthermore, there seems to be obvious differences in the fluorescence response of pap smears between ovarial- carcinomas and peritoneal carcinomas based on ovarial carcinoma. This observation cannot be explained yet. Because of its sensitivity and specificity the fluorescence method can be used as an additional tool for the evaluation of the tumor invasion front. Preferably it might be used for frozen sections of biopsies and surgical excisions.

  7. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  8. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009).

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

  9. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  10. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687 (Polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008).

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

  11. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008).

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

  12. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009).

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

  13. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction. North is at the top.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  14. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    This view is presented as a vertical projection with geometric seam correction.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  15. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    This view is presented as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

  16. Propagation of seismic ground motion in the Kanto Basin, Japan.

    PubMed

    Koketsu, K; Kikuchi, M

    2000-05-19

    The pattern of ground motion for a magnitude 5.7 earthquake near Tokyo was captured by 384 strong ground motion instruments across the Kanto sedimentary basin and its surroundings. The records allow the visualization of the propagation of long-period ground motion in the basin and show the refraction of surface waves at the basin edge. The refracted wave does not travel directly from the earthquake epicenter, but traverses the basin obliquely to the edge. The surface wave inside the basin propagates more slowly than that outside such that the wavefronts separate from each other, and the refracted wave heals the discrepancy in the speed of advance of the wavefronts inside and outside the basin. The refracted arrival is dominant near the edge of the Kanto basin. PMID:10817997

  17. INTEGRATING GEOPHYSICS, GEOLOGY, AND HYDROLOGY TO DETERMINE BEDROCK GEOMETRY CONTROLS ON THE ORIGIN OF ISOLATED MEADOW COMPLEXES WITHIN THE CENTRAL GREAT BASIN, NEVADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian meadow complexes found in mountain ranges of the Central Great Basin physiographic region (western United States) are of interest to researchers as they contain significant biodiversity relative to the surrounding basin areas. These meadow complexes are currently degradi...

  18. Development of foreland basins around western Sichuan basin, and implications for mountain building in eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Liu, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Sichuan basin is surrounded by the Tibetan Plateau to the west, and the Michang Shan and Daba Shan mountains to the north and northwest. Foreland basins have been developed along the western and northern margins of the Sichuan basin since Triassic, receiving sediments with significant along-strike variations. These sediment records provide useful insights into the history of mountain building around the Sichuan Basin. We have collected exploration well data from western Sichuan Basin. Using backstripping, we reconstructed the basement deformation history, which reflect sedimentary and tectonic loadings related to mountain building. We used a 3-D numerical modeling technique with multi-grid technique to simulate flexural deformation of the Sichuan Basin lithosphere, and to infer tectonic loading and mountain building along western and northern margins of the Sichuan Basin from the late Triassic to the Cenozoic. Our results suggest that the shortening of the Daba Shan and Michuan Shan orogens mainly occurred during the late Jurassic-Cretaceous. During Cenozoic, the tectonic loading mainly occurred along the southwestern margins of the Sichuan Basin, corresponding to the development of the Longmen Shan mountain belt. The tectonic loading of the northern Longmen Shan on the Sichuan Basin has been markedly reduced since the Cenozoic, evidenced by the lack of Cenozoic foreland basin development. This indicates mechanical decoupling between uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and the Sichuan Basin, consistent with the deep down-cutting of the Longmen Shan fault and predominantly strike-slip motion on the fault. The limited Cenozoic foreland basin development in the southwestern margin of the Sichuan Basin is consistent with localized high-angle thrusting of the southern Longmen Shan mountains. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grants 41104046).

  19. Nocturnal drainage wind characteristics in two converging air sheds

    SciTech Connect

    Gedayloo, T.; Clements, W.E.; Barr, S.; Archuleta, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    During the short experimental period in the Grants Basin of Northeastern New Mexico a survey was conducted on the complex meteorology of this area. Emphasis was placed on the nocturnal drainage flow because of the potential hazards to the populated areas of Milan and Grants from the effluents of the uranium mining and milling operation in this area. This investigation has shown that the nocturnal drainage flow patterns agree with the winds predicted on the basis of the complex terrain of the area. Because of the surface cooling at night (over 25/sup 0/C during summer and about 20/sup 0/C during winter), air from elevated surrounding areas flows to the low lying regions consequently setting up a nocturnal drainage flow. This regime exists over 60% of the time during summer months and over 65% of the time during winter months with a depth generally less than 200 m. In the San Mateo air shed the drainage flow is east northeast, and in the Ambrosia Lake air shed it is from northwest. The confluence of these two air flows contributes mainly to the drainage flow through the channel formed by La Ja Mesa and Mesa Montanosa. The analysis of data collected by the recording Flats Station confirms the prediction that although the area south of the channel region broadens considerably causing a reduction in flow speed, contributions from the southside of La Jara Mesa and Mesa Montanosa partly compensate for this reduction. The position of this recording station is 15 to 20 km from the populated towns of Milan and Grants. A drainage flow speed of approximately 2.2 m s/sup -1/ and the duration of over 11 hours as recorded by this station indicates that air from the San Mateo and Ambrosia Lake regions may be transported southwards to these population centers during a nocturnal period. In order to test this prediction, a series of multi-atmospheric tracer experiments were conducted in the Grants Basin.

  20. Sharpless 170 and the surrounding interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, R. S.; McCutcheon, W. H.; Purton, C. R.; Dewdney, P. E.

    2004-10-01

    Sharpless 170 is a diffuse HII region ionized by a single main sequence O-star located near the periphery of a small dense molecular cloud at a distance of ˜2 kpc. We describe wide-field observations of the region in the radio continuum, in HI and CO-lines, and in the far-infrared which delineate the major ionized, atomic, molecular and dust components of the gas affected by the exciting star. From the thermal continuum emission we estimate the mass of ionized gas at ˜350 M⊙ within a radius of ˜7 pc. The HI (λ21 cm) and far-infrared observations show an extended low-density atomic component, of ˜1000 M⊙, within an irregular boundary surrounding the ionized gas of mean radius ˜10 pc. Mean densities in the HI and HII are similar, in the range 9-16 nucleons cm-3. CO emission shows a molecular cloud of ˜1150 M⊙ within an area 6 pc × 4 pc with densities ˜2000 nucleons cm-3. A compact infrared component coincides with the cloud. The exciting star is located on the near side of the cloud, just inside the southern periphery. Sh170 is an example of a young HII region with the ionized gas, seen in Hα emission, streaming outward in the manner of a ``champagne flow''. Although the observed velocities of the HI are close to the mean velocity of the CO cloud, the morphology of the associated atomic hydrogen closely resembles that seen in the surrounds of other young HII regions which show clear evidence of expansion of their HI. We propose that much of the HI is a diffuse dissociation zone beyond the ionization front, in directions from the star within a wide annulus, approximately transverse to the line-of-sight, between the dense photon-bounded region on the far side of the star and the density-bounded ionized flow region on the near side. In this view, much of the associated atomic gas, like the ionized gas, has been eroded from the molecular cloud in a small fraction (≤10%) of the star's main sequence lifetime.

  1. The Interstellar Medium Surrounding the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Priscilla C.; Redfield, Seth; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2011-09-01

    The Solar System is embedded in a flow of low-density, warm, and partially ionized interstellar material that has been sampled directly by in situ measurements of interstellar neutral gas and dust in the heliosphere. Absorption line data reveal that this interstellar gas is part of a larger cluster of local interstellar clouds, which is spatially and kinematically divided into additional small-scale structures indicating ongoing interactions. An origin for the clouds that is related to star formation in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association is suggested by the dynamic characteristics of the flow. Variable depletions observed within the local interstellar medium (ISM) suggest an inhomogeneous Galactic environment, with shocks that destroy grains in some regions. Although photoionization models of the circumheliospheric ISM do an excellent job of reproducing the observed properties of the surrounding ISM, the unknown characteristics of the very low-density hot plasma filling the Local Bubble introduces uncertainty about the source of ionization and nature of cloud boundaries. Recent observations of small cold clouds provide new insight into the processes affecting the local ISM. A fuller understanding of the local ISM can provide insights into the past and future Galactic environment of the Sun, and deeper knowledge of the astrospheres of nearby stars.

  2. Color appearance: neutral surrounds and spatial contrast.

    PubMed

    Smith, V C; Jin, Q; Pokorny, J

    1998-11-01

    The experimental data in this paper show that chromatic bars presented in alternation with equiluminant neutral-appearing bars are seen as more saturated than the same chromaticity presented as a uniform rectangle. This effect was diminished but not eliminated when test and match stimuli were presented within a slightly dimmer neutral surround. The test stimulus was a 2 x 5 degrees rectangle with a 0.7 cpd square wave grating composed of alternating equiluminant chromatic test bars and neutral bars. Asymmetric matching was used to match the test bar appearance to a uniform 2 x 5 degrees comparison rectangle. Test and comparison stimuli were presented to separate eyes in a haploscope and appeared flanking a central fixation target. Data were collected with test and inducing stimuli on the cardinal axes of color space. Test bars separated by neutral bars appeared more saturated than the comparison rectangle for both the l- and s-axis directions. Manipulation of excitation on one cardinal axis did not affect the appearance matches made for the other cardinal axis. PMID:9893836

  3. INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD SURROUNDING THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Whang, Y. C.

    2010-02-20

    This paper presents a three-dimensional analytical solution, in the limit of very low plasma beta-ratio, for the distortion of the interstellar magnetic field surrounding the heliopause. The solution is obtained using a line dipole method that is the integration of point dipole along a semi-infinite line; it represents the magnetic field caused by the presence of the heliopause. The solution allows the variation of the undisturbed magnetic field at any inclination angle. The heliosphere is considered as having blunt-nosed geometry on the upwind side and it asymptotically approaches a cylindrical geometry having an open exit for the continuous outflow of the solar wind on the downwind side. The heliopause is treated as a magnetohydrodynamic tangential discontinuity; the interstellar magnetic field lines at the boundary are tangential to the heliopause. The interstellar magnetic field is substantially distorted due to the presence of the heliopause. The solution shows the draping of the field lines around the heliopause. The magnetic field strength varies substantially near the surface of the heliopause. The effect on the magnetic field due to the presence of the heliopause penetrates very deep into the interstellar space; the depth of penetration is of the same order of magnitude as the scale length of the heliosphere.

  4. Ultrastructure of mitochondrial nucleoid and its surroundings.

    PubMed

    Prachař, Jarmil

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial nucleoids (hereafter nucleoids) contain genetic information, mitochondrial DNA, prerequisite for mitochondrial functioning, particularly information required for mitochondrial electron transport. To understand nucleoid functioning, it is imperative to know its ultrastructure and dynamics in the context of the actual mitochondrial state. In this study, we document the internal structure, different positions of nucleoids inside the mitochondrial tube and their different morphology. The nucleoid cores appear in section as circular or slightly oval objects ranging from 50 to 100 nm in diameter. They are mainly located in the matrix between cristae inside the mitochondrial tube but they are also frequently found close to the inner mitochondrial surface. In tightly packed form, their interior exhibits sophisticated nucleoprotein regularity. The core surroundings form an electron-lucent thick layer which is probably partitioned into separate chambers. We suggest that the morphology of nucleoids mirrors the mode of energy production, glycolysis versus oxidative phosphorylation. The new high resolution transmission electron microscopy method enabled us to obtain morphological characteristics on yet unpublished level. PMID:27174900

  5. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11841 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11841

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009).

    This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

    The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  6. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1798 (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11850 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11850

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo 180-degree view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,798th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (Feb. 13, 2009). North is on top.

    This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

    The rover had driven 111 meters (364 feet) southward on the preceding sol. Tracks from that drive recede northward in this view. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches).

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  7. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1687 (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11739 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11739

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this stereo, 360-degree view of the rover's surroundings on the 1,687th Martian day, or sol, of its surface mission (Oct. 22, 2008). The view appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses.

    Opportunity had driven 133 meters (436 feet) that sol, crossing sand ripples up to about 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall. The tracks visible in the foreground are in the east-northeast direction.

    Opportunity's position on Sol 1687 was about 300 meters southwest of Victoria Crater. The rover was beginning a long trek toward a much larger crater, Endeavour, about 12 kilometers (7 miles) to the southeast.

    This panorama combines right-eye and left-eye views presented as cylindrical-perspective projections with geometric seam correction.

  8. Opportunity's Surroundings on Sol 1818 (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11846 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a color stereo pair for PIA11846

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,818th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 5, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends.

    This view combines images from the left-eye and right-eye sides of the navigation camera. It appears three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses with the red lens on the left.

    The rover had driven 80.3 meters (263 feet) southward earlier on that sol. Tracks from the drive recede northward in this view.

    The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and lighter-toned bedrock.

    This view is presented as a cylindrical-perspective projection with geometric seam correction.

  9. Geographic Information Retrieval for Just Your Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Norihito; Toda, Hiroyuki

    Geographic information retrieval (GIR) is a new research area that aims at the retrieval of geographic-related documents based not only on keyword relevance but also on geographic relationships between the query and the geographic information in texts. It is natural for people to want information related to just their surroundings. Conventional GIR systems, however, have relatively poor granularity, such as city or province, because they use geographic information in restricted ways -- mostly just for filtering. To address this problem, we propose a geographic scoring method that considers extent implied by each geographic names appeared in texts to emphasize geographic names that focus specific areas, rather than broad geographic names. Furthermore, to improve robustness against errors in pre-processing such as geo-parsing and geo-coding, we also propose a noise elimination method based on clustering. Evaluation is conducted using standard TREC-style evaluation metrics including MAP, R-precision, and so on. The results show that our method outperforms two baseline approaches: full-text search and using the nearest point in the text.

  10. Oil in the Malvinas Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Galeazzi, J.S.

    1996-08-01

    The Malvinas Basin is petroliferous. The main source rocks are Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous outer shelf to basinal shales known as the Pampa Rincon and Lower Inoceramus formations. Main reservoirs are fluvial and shallow-marine sandstones of the coeval Springhill Formation. On the western flank of the basin, 17 wells drilled the Cenozoic and Mesozoic column. Three of these wells discovered hydrocarbons within the Springhill Formation, and one discovered oil in Early Paleogene sandstones. Additionally, some wells recorded shows at different levels within the stratigraphic succession. A detailed overview of the drilled portion of the basin permitted the construction of a sequence stratigraphic framework, and yielded clues on a complex history of deformation. Interpretation of facies and stratal stacking and termination patterns determined that the main reservoir and source rocks were deposited in a ramp-style depositional setting. They represent the lower transgressive phase of a Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous megasequence deposited during the early sag stage of the basin. Alternative reservoirs to the Springhill sandstones include early Paleogene glauconitic sandstones and carbonates, and Miocene deep-water turbidites. Structural trap styles include normal fault features of Jurassic to Early Cretaceous age, and compressional and inverted positive structures due to Neogene compression. Possible combination and stratigraphic traps include: little tested onlap pinchout of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous and Paleogene sandstones and untested erosionally truncated Paleogene sandstones; Early Paleogene carbonate buildups and Miocene deep-water turbidite mounds. The understanding of the geology of the western Malvinas Basin is the key to success of exploration in the huge frontier surrounding areas.

  11. Discharge forecasts in mountain basins based on satellite snow cover mapping. [Dinwoody Creek Basin, Wyoming and the Dischma Basin, Switzerland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinec, J.; Rango, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A snow runoff model developed for European mountain basins was used with LANDSAT imagery and air temperature data to simulate runoff in the Rocky Mountains under conditions of large elevation range and moderate cloud cover (cloud cover of 40% or less during LANDSAT passes 70% of the time during a snowmelt season). Favorable results were obtained for basins with area not exceeding serval hundred square kilometers and with a significant component of subsurface runoff.

  12. Intrashelf basins: A geologic model for source-bed and reservoir facies deposition within carbonate shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, G. Jr. )

    1993-09-01

    Intrashelf basins (moats, inshore basins, shelf basins, differentiated shelf, and deep-water lagoons of others) are depressions of varying sizes and shapes that occur within tectonically passive and regionally extensive carbonate shelves. Intrashelf basins grade laterally and downdip (seaward) into shallow-water carbonates of the regional shelf, are separated from the open marine basin by the shelf margin, and are largely filled by fine-grained subtidal sediments having attributes of shallow- and deeper water sedimentation. These basins are commonly fringed or overlain by carbonate sands, reefs, or buildups. These facies may mimic those that occur along the regional shelf margin, and they can have trends that are at a high angle to that of the regional shelf. Intrashelf basins are not intracratonic basins. The history of most intrashelf basins is a few million to a few tens of million of years. Examples of intrashelf basins are known throughout the Phanerozoic; the southern portion of the Holocene Belize shelf is a modern example of an intrashelf basin. Two types of intrashelf basins are recognized. Coastal basins pass updip into coastal clastics of the craton with the basin primarily filled by fine clastics. Shelf basins occur on the outer part of the shelf, are surrounded by shallow-water carbonate facies, and are filled by peloidal lime mud, pelagics, and argillaceous carbonates. Intrashelf basins are commonly the site of organic-rich, source-bed deposition, resulting in the close proximity of source beds and reservoir facies that may fringe or overlie the basin. Examples of hydrocarbon-charged reservoirs that were sourced by an intrashelf basin include the Miocene Bombay High field, offshore India; the giant Jurassic (Arab-D) and Cretaceous (Shuaiba) reservoirs of the Arabian Shelf; the Lower Cretaceous Sunniland trend, South Florida basin; and the Permian-Pennsylvanian reservoirs surrounding the Tatum basin in southeastern New Mexico.

  13. Impacts of Artificial Reefs on Surrounding Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoukian, Sarine

    Artificial reefs are becoming a popular biological and management component in shallow water environments characterized by soft seabed, representing both important marine habitats and tools to manage coastal fisheries and resources. An artificial reef in the marine environment acts as an open system with exchange of material and energy, altering the physical and biological characteristics of the surrounding area. Reef stability will depend on the balance of scour, settlement, and burial resulting from ocean conditions over time. Because of the unstable nature of sediments, they require a detailed and systematic investigation. Acoustic systems like high-frequency multibeam sonar are efficient tools in monitoring the environmental evolution around artificial reefs, whereas water turbidity can limit visual dive and ROV inspections. A high-frequency multibeam echo sounder offers the potential of detecting fine-scale distribution of reef units, providing an unprecedented level of resolution, coverage, and spatial definition. How do artificial reefs change over time in relation to the coastal processes? How accurately does multibeam technology map different typologies of artificial modules of known size and shape? How do artificial reefs affect fish school behavior? What are the limitations of multibeam technology for investigating fish school distribution as well as spatial and temporal changes? This study addresses the above questions and presents results of a new approach for artificial reef seafloor mapping over time, based upon an integrated analysis of multibeam swath bathymetry data and geoscientific information (backscatter data analysis, SCUBA observations, physical oceanographic data, and previous findings on the geology and sedimentation processes, integrated with unpublished data) from Senigallia artificial reef, northwestern Adriatic Sea (Italy) and St. Petersburg Beach Reef, west-central Florida continental shelf. A new approach for observation of fish

  14. Liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.J.

    1994-04-01

    This presentation examines liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps and discusses them in relation to two recent cases that arose in Ventura County, California. Following a brief history of regulatory interest in oil drilling mud and its common hazardous substances, various cause of action arising from oil drilling mud deposits are enumerated, followed by defenses to these causes of action. Section 8002 (m) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is mentioned, as are constituents of oil and gas waste not inherent in petroleum and therefore not exempt from regulation under the petroleum exclusion in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act. Key legal words such as hazardous substance, release, public and private nuisance, trespass, responsible parties, joint and several liability, negligence, and strict liability are explained. The effects on liability of knowledge of the deposits, duty to restore land to its original condition, consent to the deposit of oil drilling mud, and noncompliance and compliance with permit conditions are analyzed. The state-of-the-art defense and research to establish this defense are mentioned. The newly created cause of action for fear of increased risk of cancer is discussed. Issues on transfer of property where oil drilling mud has been deposited are explored, such as knowledge of prior owners being imputed to later owners, claims of fraudulent concealment, and as is' clauses. The effects on the oil and gas industry of the California Court of Appeals for the Second District rulings in Dolan v. Humacid-MacLeod and Stevens v. McQueen are speculated.

  15. Understanding Community Norms Surrounding Tobacco Sales

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Patricia A.; Malone, Ruth E.

    2014-01-01

    Background In the US, denormalizing tobacco use is key to tobacco control; less attention has been paid to denormalizing tobacco sales. However, some localities have placed limits on the number and type of retailers who may sell tobacco, and some retailers have abandoned tobacco sales voluntarily. Understanding community norms surrounding tobacco sales may help accelerate tobacco denormalization. Methods We conducted 15 focus groups with customers of California, New York, and Ohio retailers who had voluntarily discontinued tobacco sales to examine normative assumptions about where cigarettes should or should not be sold, voluntary decisions to discontinue tobacco sales, and government limits on such sales. Results Groups in all three states generally agreed that grocery stores that sold healthy products should not sell tobacco; California groups saw pharmacies similarly, while this was a minority opinion in the other two states. Convenience stores were regarded as a natural place to sell tobacco. In each state, it was regarded as normal and commendable for some stores to want to stop selling tobacco, although few participants could imagine convenience stores doing so. Views on government's role in setting limits on tobacco sales varied, with California and New York participants generally expressing support for restrictions, and Ohio participants expressing opposition. However, even those who expressed opposition did not approve of tobacco sales in all possible venues. Banning tobacco sales entirely was not yet normative. Conclusion Limiting the ubiquitous availability of tobacco sales is key to ending the tobacco epidemic. Some limits on tobacco sales appear to be normative from the perspective of community members; it may be possible to shift norms further by problematizing the ubiquitous presence of cigarettes and drawing connections to other products already subject to restrictions. PMID:25180772

  16. Overhead View of Area Surrounding Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Overhead view of the area surrounding the Pathfinder lander illustrating the Sojourner traverse. Red rectangles are rover positions at the end of sols 1-30. Locations of soil mechanics experiments, wheel abrasion experiments, and APXS measurements are shown. The A numbers refer to APXS measurements as discussed in the paper by Rieder et al. (p. 1770, Science Magazine, see image note). Coordinates are given in the LL frame.

    The photorealistic, interactive, three-dimensional virtual reality (VR) terrain models were created from IMP images using a software package developed for Pathfinder by C. Stoker et al. as a participating science project. By matching features in the left and right camera, an automated machine vision algorithm produced dense range maps of the nearfield, which were projected into a three-dimensional model as a connected polygonal mesh. Distance and angle measurements can be made on features viewed in the model using a mouse-driven three-dimensional cursor and a point-and-click interface. The VR model also incorporates graphical representations of the lander and rover and the sequence and spatial locations at which rover data were taken. As the rover moved, graphical models of the rover were added for each position that could be uniquely determined using stereo images of the rover taken by the IMP. Images taken by the rover were projected into the model as two-dimensional 'billboards' to show the proper perspective of these images.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  17. Microscopic Meteoritic Material Surrounding Meteorite Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. R.; Hodge, P.

    1993-07-01

    Meteoritic impact-related particles around meteorite craters can have several forms: (1) ablation spherules formed from the melt layer during atmospheric entry; (2) fragments of meteoritic metal formed by the shattering of the meteorite on impact; (3) fragments of metal oxide with meteoritic Fe/Ni ratios; (4) glassy spherules made up of a mixture of target rock and meteoritic material, formed by condensation of impact vapor; and (5) fragments of vesicular material formed from the impact melt. We are investigating the nature of the particles collected from soil surrounding the following craters: Odessa (Texas), Kaalijarvi (Estonia), Boxhole, Dalgaranga, Henbury, Snelling, Veevers, and Wolfe Creek (all Australia). No impact-related particles have been identified in the Veevers or Snelling samples. The Odessa samples include both meteoritic fragments (type 3) and Fe/Ni spherules (type 1). The Henbury samples include particles of type 4 [1] and type 2. The Boxhole samples include particles of types 1 and 4 [2]. The Kaalijarvi particles, being studied cooperatively with Reet Tiimaa of the Institute of Gelogy of the Estonian Academy of Sciences, include particles of type 3 and 5. The type 3 particles from Kaalijarvi are primarily kamacite, with small amounts of taenite. They have oxidized, Ni-free surface layers, probably formed by weathering. The vesicular particles are primarily made of glass that has a bulk composition that indicates that they are about half meteorite and half target rock material. The glass suggests partial recrystallization, with dendritic patterns of slightly different composition. Inclusions of quartz grains also occur and the outer layer in some cases is pure iron oxide. Many of the bubbles have their inner walls laced with patterns of iron condensate, often dendritic and in some cases in the form of stars. References: [1] Hodge P. W. and Wright F. W. (1971) JGR, 76, 3880-3895. [2] Hodge P. W. and Wright F. W. (1973) Meteoritics, 8, 315-320.

  18. Aerosol climatology over Mexico City basin: Characterization of their optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabali-Sandoval, Giovanni; Valdéz-Barrón, Mauro; Bonifaz-Alfonso, Roberto; Riveros-Rosas, David; Estévez, Héctor

    2015-04-01

    Climatology of aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA) and size parameters were analyzed using a 15-year (1999-2014) data set from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) observations over Mexico City basin. Since urban air pollution is one of the biggest problems that face this megacity, many studies addressing these issues have been published. However few studies have examined the climatology of aerosol taking into account their optical properties over long-time period. Pollution problems in Mexico City have been generated by the daily activities of some 21 million people coupled with the vast amount of industry located within the city's metropolitan area. Another contributing factor is the unique geographical setting of the basin encompassing Mexico City. The basin covers approximately 5000 km2 of the Mexican Plateau at an average elevation of 2250 m above sea level (ASL) and is surrounded on three sides by mountains averaging over 3000 m ASL. In this work we present preliminary results of aerosol climatology in Mexico City.

  19. 77 FR 70707 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley and South Coast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley and... Ambient Air Quality Standards in the San Joaquin Valley and the South Coast Air Basin. These technical...) in the San Joaquin Valley and South Coast (Los Angeles) Air Basin and included provisions of...

  20. Population structure of honey bees in the Carpathian Basin (Hungary) confirms introgression from surrounding subspecies.

    PubMed

    Péntek-Zakar, Erika; Oleksa, Andrzej; Borowik, Tomasz; Kusza, Szilvia

    2015-12-01

    Carniolan honey bees (Apis mellifera carnica) are considered as an indigenous subspecies in Hungary adapted to most of the ecological and climatic conditions in this area. However, during the last decades Hungarian beekeepers have recognized morphological signs of the Italian honey bee (Apis mellifera ligustica). As the natural distribution of the honey bee subspecies can be affected by the importation of honey bee queens or by natural gene flow, we aimed at determining the genetic structure and characteristics of the local honey bee population using molecular markers. All together, 48 Hungarian and 84 foreign (Italian, Polish, Spanish, Liberian) pupae and/or workers were used for mitochondrial DNA analysis. Additionally, 53 sequences corresponding to 10 subspecies and the Buckfast hybrid were downloaded from GenBank. For the nuclear analysis, 236 Hungarian and 106 foreign honey bees were genotyped using nine microsatellites. Heterozygosity values, population-specific alleles, FST values, principal coordinate analysis, assignment tests, structure analysis, and dendrograms were calculated. Haplotype and nucleotide diversity values showed moderate values. We found that one haplotype (H9) was dominant in Hungary. The presence of the black honey bee (Apis mellifera mellifera) was negligible, but a few individuals resembling other subspecies were identified. We proved that the Hungarian honey bee population is nearly homogeneous but also demonstrated introgression from the foreign subspecies. Both mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite analyses corroborated the observations of the beekeepers. Molecular analyses suggested that Carniolan honey bee in Hungary is slightly affected by Italian and black honey bee introgression. Genetic differences were detected between Polish and Hungarian Carniolan honey bee populations, suggesting the existence of at least two different gene pools within A. m. carnica. PMID:27069597

  1. Miocene tephrochronology in the northern Basin and Range

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, M.E.; Brown, F.H.; Nash, W.P. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-04-01

    Silicic air-fall tephra layers with unaltered glass shards preserved in Miocene basins of the northern Basin and Range Province (NBR) were sampled from well-exposed sections in the Goose Creek (GCB) and Ibapah (IB) basins in the northeastern NBR, and the El Pasco basin (EPB) in the southwestern NBR. Each basin may contain up to 50 tephras. Glass shards from individual tephras in any one basin are compositionally distinct, as shown by XRF and electron microprobe analysis. Seventeen tephra correlate between two or more basins; 12 of these are regionally important, providing precise stratigraphic ties across the NbR. Four regionally correlative tephras are white biotitic ashes from southern Nevada sources, whereas eight are gray vitric ashes from Yellowstone hot spot sources. Dates on tephra layers and lava flows in the basins, and on ashflow units correlated with four other tephra provide a preliminary chronology for the tephra in the all basins. In each section [Delta]h/[Delta]t appears constant on time scales [>=]1 Ma, but variation in [Delta]h/[Delta]t is demonstrated from IB, and is likely typical of all basins. Sedimentation in all five basins begins in the time interval of 14.5--12.5 Ma, which may represent the beginning of a phase of regional extension in the NBR. Post-[approximately]9.5 Ma deformation has affected all basins and likely contributed to the termination of sedimentation in the exposed areas of these basins.

  2. Topography of Beethoven and Tolstoj Basins, Mercury: Implications for Lithospheric Flexure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, S. L.; Watters, T. R.

    2005-12-01

    Interior structures of two mercurian basins, Beethoven and Tolstoj, are characterized using topography derived from Mariner 10 stereo images. The topography of the two mercurian basins is similar to that of lunar mare-filled basins, such as Serenitatis. In addition to topography, the tectonic features within Beethoven and Tolstoj basins are compared to those of lunar basins. Beethoven and Tolstoj basins exhibit little evidence of deformation compared to Caloris basin and their lunar counterparts. Well-developed basin-concentric wrinkle ridges and arcuate graben are characteristic of many lunar basins and are thought to result from lithospheric flexure in response to the superisostatic load from the mare basalts. The presence of wrinkle ridges in the floor of Caloris basin suggests that the basin interior has undergone compression, possibly the result of subsidence of the interior fill. Because both Beethoven and Tolstoj lack basin-concentric wrinkle ridges and arcuate graben, we suggest that either Mercury's elastic lithosphere was too strong for significant lithospheric flexure and subsidence to occur, or the basin fill material provides little density contrast and thus exerts little net load on the mercurian lithosphere. Compositional evidence from color-derived parameter images of Tolstoj basin indicates that the basin fill has an FeO abundance comparable to that of average mercurian crust. This suggests that the basin fill has a similar density to the surrounding crustal material and that the load may be insufficient to induce flexure.

  3. Flow-specific trends in river-water quality resulting from the effects of the Clean Air Act in three mesoscale, forested river basins in the northeastern United States through 2002.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Peter S; Shanley, James B

    2006-09-01

    Two new methods for assessing temporal trends in stream-solute concentrations at specific streamflow ranges were applied to long (40 to 50-year) but sparse (bi-weekly to quarterly sampling) stream-water quality data collected at three forested mesoscale basins along an atmospheric deposition gradient in the northeastern United States (one in north-central Pennsylvania, one in southeastern New York, and one in eastern Maine). The three data sets span the period since the implementation of the Clean Air Act in 1970 and its subsequent amendments. Declining sulfate (O4(2-)) trends since the mid 1960s were identified for all 3 rivers by one or more of the 4 methods of trend detection used. Flow-specific trends were assessed by segmenting the data sets into 3-year and 6-year blocks, then determining concentration-discharge relationships for each block. Declining sulfate (O4(2-)) trends at median flow were similar to trends determined using a Seasonal Kendall Tau test and Sen slope estimator. The trend of declining O4(2-) concentrations differed at high, median and low flow since the mid 1980s at YWC and NR, and at high and low flow at WR, but the trends leveled or reversed at high flow from 1999 through 2002. Trends for the period of record at high flows were similar to medium- and low-flow trends for Ca2++ Mg2+ concentrations at WR, non-significant at YWC, and were more negative at low flow than at high flow at NR; trends in nitrate (NO3-), and alkalinity (ALK) concentrations were different at different flow conditions, and in ways that are consistent with the hydrology and deposition history at each watershed. Quarterly sampling is adequate for assessing average-flow trends in the chemical parameters assessed over long time periods (approximately decades). However, with even a modest effort at sampling a range of flow conditions within each year, trends at specified flows for constituents with strong concentration-discharge relationships can be evaluated and may allow

  4. Flow-specific trends in river-water quality resulting from the effects of the clean air act in three mesoscale, forested river basins in the northeastern United States through 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murdoch, Peter S.; Shanley, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Two new methods for assessing temporal trends in stream-solute concentrations at specific streamflow ranges were applied to long (40 to 50-year) but sparse (bi-weekly to quarterly sampling) stream-water quality data collected at three forested mesoscale basins along an atmospheric deposition gradient in the northeastern United States (one in north-central Pennsylvania, one in southeastern New York, and one in eastern Maine). The three data sets span the period since the implementation of the Clean Air Act in 1970 and its subsequent amendments. Declining sulfate (SO2-4) trends since the mid 1960s were identified for all 3 rivers by one or more of the 4 methods of trend detection used. Flow-specific trends were assessed by segmenting the data sets into 3-year and 6-year blocks, then determining concentration-discharge relationships for each block. Declining sulfate (SO2-4) trends at median flow were similar to trends determined using a Seasonal Kendall Tau test and Sen slope estimator. The trend of declining SO2-4 concentrations differed at high, median and low flow since the mid 1980s at YWC and NR, and at high and low flow at WR, but the trends leveled or reversed at high flow from 1999 through 2002. Trends for the period of record at high flows were similar to medium- and low-flow trends for Ca2+ + Mg2+ concentrations at WR, non-significant at YWC, and were more negative at low flow than at high flow at NR; trends in nitrate (NO-3), and alkalinity (ALK) concentrations were different at different flow conditions, and in ways that are consistent with the hydrology and deposition history at each watershed. Quarterly sampling is adequate for assessing average-flow trends in the chemical parameters assessed over long time periods (???decades). However, with even a modest effort at sampling a range of flow conditions within each year, trends at specified flows for constituents with strong concentration-discharge relationships can be evaluated and may allow early

  5. An Exploration, for the Upper Indus Basin, of Elevation Dependency in the Relationships Between Locally Observed Near Surface Air Temperature (SAT) and Remotely-Sensed Land Surface Temperature (LST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsythe, N. D.; Fowler, H. J.; Blenkinsop, S.; Kilsby, C. G.; Archer, D. R.; Hardy, A. J.; Holderness, T. D. C.

    2014-12-01

    The distribution of ground-based observations of near-surface air temperature (SAT) is extremely skewed toward low elevation areas. Land surface temperature (LST) remote sensing data products -- from thermal and infrared wavelength satellite imagery -- provide spatial coverage independent of elevation, although they only provide values for "clear sky" conditions, the prevalence of which may be influenced by elevation-dependent factors. It is thus imperative for researchers studying EDW to characterise the relationship between observations of "all-sky" SAT and "clear-sky" thermal/infrared (TIR) LST in order to overcome the extreme sparseness of SAT observations at high elevations. Drawing on local SAT observation data from both manned meteorological stations and AWS units covering an elevation range from 1500 to 4700m asl in the Upper Indus Basin, coupled with cloud climatologies from MODIS and global reanalyses, this study develops "clear-sky" and "all-sky" comparative, site-based climatologies of: [a] ground-observed SAT [b] reanalysis SAT and LST (skin surface temperature) Relationships between these climatologies and corresponding clear-sky/TIR satellite-retrieved LST are quantitatively assessed in the context of elevation-dependency and cloud cover prevalence. The implications of these relationships are discussed in the context of efforts to develop a multi-decadal TIR LST data product. While multi-decadal and even centennial trends are calculated from station-based observations of SAT, the relatively short record lengths of satellite-borne instruments used to produce currently available TIR LST data products better lend themselves to characterisation of interannual variability than trend calculation. Thus progress is detailed on EDW-driven efforts to validate such an LST product for the Himalayan region using historical imagery from the second and third generation of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR/2, AVHRR/3) instrument flown on NOAA

  6. Comparison of Driving Conditions and the Frequency of Rich Open Loop Operation for the South Coast Air Basin and the Federal Test Procedure with a 1991 Ffv Ford Taurus: Implications for Mobile Source Emissions Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Denis, Michael Joseph

    To aid in resolving critical questions about the accuracy of mobile source emissions models (e.g. EMFAC and MOBILE), this study provided a direct evaluation of real-time, on-road vehicle and engine operating parameters, and investigated their relationship to rich open loop emissions and driving pattern characteristics. More than 200,000 seconds of data were collected using a 1991 Ford Taurus under varying conditions in the South Coast Air Basin over a matrix of routes. Dynamometer emissions tests were conducted with the vehicle and the emissions data were used to model on-road emissions. The average on-road speed was 31.2 mph compared to 20.7 mph for the FTP and the maximum acceleration rate on-road was 10.0 mph s^{-1} compared to 3.3 mph s^{-1} for the FTP. Rich open loop operation occurred an average of 0.40% of the time on-road but was not observed during FTP and HFET tests. Factors which increased the frequency of rich open loop operation included aggressive driving, up-hill grades, merging and free flowing traffic conditions. Rich open loop emission rates were ~100, ~1700 and ~ 80 times higher than closed loop for HC, CO and NO_{rm x} (0.038 g s^{-1}, 3.17 g s ^{-1}, and 0.106 g s^ {-1} respectively during open loop operation). Modeling emissions as a function of load and speed was more accurate than with an acceleration-and speed-based model. The average modeled on-road emission rates were lower than the current emissions certification standards, but they were all greater than the emission rates measured for the FTP (33%, 190%, and 120% for HC, CO and NO _{rm x} respectively). Rich open loop operation accounted for ~ 70% of the increase in CO and ~ 40% of the increase in HC and NO, with the remainder attributed to differences between the FTP and on-road driving patterns. The results of the modeling studies suggest emissions from rich open loop operation, because they are not included in the FTP, may account for a portion of the under-estimation of current

  7. Viscoelastic Relaxation of Lunar Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohit, P. S.; Phillips, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    The large lunar impact basins provide a unique glimpse into early lunar history. Here we investigate the possibility that the relief of the oldest lunar basins (with the exception of South-Pole Aitken) has decayed through viscous relaxation. We identify nine ancient multi-ring basins with very low relief and low-amplitude Bouguer and free-air gravity anomalies. The characteristics of these basins are consistent with either 1) relaxation of topographic relief by ductile flow (e.g. Solomon et al., 1982) or 2) obliteration of basin topography during crater collapse immediately following impact. Both scenarios require that the basins formed early in lunar history, when the Moon was hot. The latter possibility appears to be unlikely due to the great topographic relief of South Pole-Aitken basin (SPA), the largest and oldest impact basin on the Moon (with the possible exception of the putative Procellarum basin; Wilhelms, 1987). On the other hand, the thin crust beneath SPA may not have allowed ductile flow in its lower portions, even for a hot Moon, implying that a thicker crust is required beneath other ancient basins for the hypothesis of viscous relaxation to be tenable. Using a semi-analytic, self-gravitating viscoelastic model, we investigate the conditions necessary to produce viscous relaxation of lunar basins. We model topographic relaxation for a crustal thickness of 30 km, using a dry diabase flow law for the crust and dry olivine for the mantle. We find that the minimum temperature at the base of the crust (Tb) permitting nearly complete relaxation of topography by ductile flow on a timescale < 108 yrs is 1400 K, corresponding to a heat flow of 55mW/m2, into the crust. Ductile flow in the lower crust becomes increasingly difficult as the crustal thickness decreases. The crust beneath SPA, thinned by the impact, is only 15-20 km thick and would require Tb ≥ 1550 K for relaxation to occur. The fact that SPA has maintained high-amplitude relief suggests that

  8. Analysis of the geomorphology surrounding the Chang'e-3 landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Lai; Mu, Ling-Li; Zou, Xiao-Duan; Liu, Jian-Jun; Ren, Xin; Zeng, Xing-Guo; Yang, Yi-Man; Zhang, Zhou-Bin; Liu, Yu-Xuan; Zuo, Wei; Li, Han

    2014-12-01

    Chang'e-3 (CE-3) landed on the Mare Imbrium basin in the east part of Sinus Iridum (19.51°W, 44.12°N), which was China's first soft landing on the Moon and it started collecting data on the lunar surface environment. To better understand the environment of this region, this paper utilizes the available high-resolution topography data, image data and geological data to carry out a detailed analysis and research on the area surrounding the landing site (Sinus Iridum and 45 km×70 km of the landing area) as well as on the topography, landform, geology and lunar dust of the area surrounding the landing site. A general topographic analysis of the surrounding area is based on a digital elevation model and digital elevation model data acquired by Chang'e-2 that have high resolution; the geology analysis is based on lunar geological data published by USGS; the study on topographic factors and distribution of craters and rocks in the surrounding area covering 4 km×4 km or even smaller is based on images from the CE-3 landing camera and images from the topographic camera; an analysis is done of the effect of the CE-3 engine plume on the lunar surface by comparing images before and after the landing using data from the landing camera. A comprehensive analysis of the results shows that the landing site and its surrounding area are identified as typical lunar mare with flat topography. They are suitable for maneuvers by the rover, and are rich in geological phenomena and scientific targets, making it an ideal site for exploration.

  9. Geologic Mapping to Constrain the Sources and Timing of Fluvial Activity in Western Ladon Basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, C. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Irwin, R. P.; Grant, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We are mapping two quadrangles in Margaritifer Terra (-15032 and -20032) to define the evolution of the western Ladon basin region as it relates to fluvial/alluvial events occurring on surrounding surfaces.

  10. Photooxidant dynamics in the Mediterranean basin in summer: Results from European research projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MilláN, M. M.; Salvador, R.; Mantilla, E.; Kallos, G.

    1997-04-01

    Most of the Mediterranean Sea is surrounded by mountains 1500 m or higher. Their east and south facing slopes favor the early formation of upslope winds, reinforcing the sea breezes. These slopes also act as orographic chimneys which link the surface winds directly with their return flows aloft, creating recirculations. To characterize the dynamics of pollutants in the Mediterranean basin and to compose a mosaic of the atmospheric circulations involved, the European Commission (EC) supported the following projects: (1) meso-meteorological cycles of air pollution in the Iberian Peninsula (MECAPIP), 1988-1991, intended to document the atmospheric circulations over the Iberian Peninsula; (2) regional cycles of air pollution in the west central Mediterranean area (RECAPMA), 1990-1991, which extended the characterization from the Atlantic coast of Portugal to Italy; and (3) south European cycles of air pollution (SECAP), 1992-1995, for the whole of the basin. The level of interpretation of the data and the elaboration and validation of working hypotheses across the basin have followed, in turn, with the corresponding lags in space and time. The purpose of this paper is to present a summary (to 1995) of the documented, as well as the postulated, processes involved. The MECAPIP and RECAPMA projects have shown that stacked layer systems form along the Spanish Mediterranean coasts, 2-3 km deep and more than 300 km wide, with the most recent layers at the top and the older ones near the sea. These act as a reservoir for aged pollutants to reenter land the next day, and tracer experiments have shown that turnover times are from 2 to 3 days. During the night, part of this system drifts along the coast. Under strong insolation these circulations become "large natural photochemical reactors," where most of the NOx emissions and other precursors are transformed into oxidants, acidic compounds, aerosols, and O3 (exceeding some EC directives for several months). Finally, the

  11. 5. View, oxidizer waste tanks and containment basin in foreground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View, oxidizer waste tanks and containment basin in foreground with Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28) uphill in background, looking northeast. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. Jurassic sedimentary basins in the Central Asian orogenic belt

    SciTech Connect

    Bebeshev, I.I.

    1995-05-01

    The principal stages of development of Jurassic sedimentary basins (from their origin to the end of their existence) in the Central Asian orogenic belt are considered. The interrelations of the basins with the surrounding paleorises are investigated. Paleogeographic maps are compiled representing the evolution of paleolandscapes and revealing their interrelations in space and time for each stage. Areas with the highest prospects for coal are found.

  13. DELUGE AND WATER RECLAMATION BASIN BELOW TEST STAND 1A. Looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DELUGE AND WATER RECLAMATION BASIN BELOW TEST STAND 1-A. Looking north northwest - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Flame Deflector Water System, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Assessing Rail Yard Impact on Local Air Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a technical presentation at the Air and Waste Management Association Measurements Symposium occurring in Durham, NC in April, 2012. The presentation describes preliminary results from air pollution measurements collected surrounding a rail yard in Chicago, IL.

  15. Numerical Simulation Analysis of Deformation Effect of The Upper Mantle Flow to Ordos and Its Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.; Ping, L. C.; Qi, D.

    2014-12-01

    Ordos block is a typical representative of cratonic lithosphere in North China. It is stable in the block ,but around the block there are a series of faulted basins and folded mountains, the new tectonic movement around the block is intense. Some scholars propose that the upper mantle flow is an important factor to the extension activity of the fault zone around the block. But it has never been discussed in detail that how the upper mantle flow affects the movement and deformation around Ordos block? A 3D viscoelastic modeling is realized for studying the deformation effect of the upper mantle flow to Ordos and its surroundings, based on the comprehensive geological and geophysical data ,such as 3d rheological structure, the active blocks of China, thermal structure, shear wave splitting, et al. The modeling results indicate that in the vertical direction, compared with the local uplift and depression caused by the compression among the plates, the uplifting of Ordos block as a whole is mainly effected by mantle upwelling. In general the upper mantle surrounding of Ordos block is upwelling, Linfen basin goes up more faster. In the horizontal direction, The general flow direction of upper mantle in the study area is NE, basically the same as Qingzang block movement direction. But there is a bifurcation flow along the southwestern margin of Liupanshan. Generally speaking, the regional deformation is drive mainly by the movement of Qingzang block and adjacent blocks pushing into each other,the deformation effect of the upper mantle flow to Ordos and its surroundings is a superposition and partial adjustment.

  16. Impact melts of the Orientale and Imbrium basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spudis, P.

    2014-12-01

    The largest impacts on the Moon - those that form the multi-ring basins - can produce thousands of cubic kilometers of melt. This melt is largely concentrated inside the basin, although some is ejected along with the clastic materials that make up the continuous ejecta blanket that surrounds basins. Impact melt is important because it contains information on the crustal target for basins as well as being the most suitable material to date basin-forming events. New geological mapping of the lunar Orientale and Imbrium impact basins has identified likely deposits of both types of impact melt. The Orientale basin (930 km diameter) is well preserved and only partly flooded by later mare basalts. The basin interior melt sheet is represented by the Maunder Formation, a smooth-to-cracked surface unit that covers the innermost basin ring. Study of the composition of the Maunder Fm. as determined by remote sensing shows that it is remarkably uniform both laterally and vertically, with no evidence of differentiation. Surrounding the basin are vast ejecta deposits, most of which are probably made up of clastic material. However, a few isolated deposits contained within basin secondary craters appear melt-like, with low albedo and a cracked surface texture (e.g., Struve L, 20.7° N, 76° W). The larger (1160 km diameter) and slightly older Imbrium basin is mostly filled with mare basalt lava, concealing most of the basin floor. The Imbrium basin exterior shows isolated deposits of melt-like material in several locales, including on the floors of the craters Parrot C (18.5° S, 1.2° E) and Murchison (5.1° N, 0.1° W). These deposits have low albedo and show cracked surfaces, with evidence of ground flow after deposition. Their composition is remarkably similar to highland basaltic impact melts found in the Apollo collections, such as the Apollo 17 impact melts. These features offer the possibility of examining basin impact melt at distances far removed from basin interiors or

  17. Chicxulub impact basin: Gravity characteristics and implications for basin morphology and deep structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpton, Virgil L.; Burke, Kevin; Hall, Stuart A.; Lee, Scott; Marin, Luis E.; Suarez, Gerardo; Quezada-Muneton, Juan Manuel; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime

    1993-01-01

    The K-T-aged Chicxulub Impact Structure is buried beneath the Tertiary carbonate rocks of the Northern Yucatan Platform. Consequently its morphology and structure are poorly understood. Reprocessed Bouguer (onshore) and Free Air (offshore) gravity data over Northern Yucatan reveal that Chicxulub may be a 200-km-diameter multi-ring impact basin with at least three concentric basin rings. The positions of these rings follow the square root of 2 spacing rule derived empirically from analysis of multi-ring basins on other planets indicating that these rings probably correspond to now-buried topographic basin rings. A forward model of the gravity data along a radial transect from the southwest margin of the structure indicates that the Chicxulub gravity signature is compatible with this interpretation. We estimate the basin rim diameter to be 204 +/- 16 km and the central peak ring diameter (D) is 104 +/- 6 km.

  18. Simulating the potential effects of climate change in two Colorado basins and at two Colorado ski areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.; Hay, L.; Markstrom, S.

    2011-01-01

    The mountainous areas of Colorado are used for tourism and recreation, and they provide water storage and supply for municipalities, industries, and agriculture. Recent studies suggest that water supply and tourist industries such as skiing are at risk from climate change. In this study, a distributed-parameter watershed model, the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), is used to identify the potential effects of future climate on hydrologic conditions for two Colorado basins, the East River at Almont and the Yampa River at Steamboat Springs, and at the subbasin scale for two ski areas within those basins. Climate-change input files for PRMS were generated by modifying daily PRMS precipitation and temperature inputs with mean monthly climate-change fields of precipitation and temperature derived from five general circulation model (GCM) simulations using one current and three future carbon emission scenarios. All GCM simulations of mean daily minimum and maximum air temperature for the East and Yampa River basins indicate a relatively steady increase of up to several degrees Celsius from baseline conditions by 2094. GCM simulations of precipitation in the two basins indicate little change or trend in precipitation, but there is a large range associated with these projections. PRMS projections of basin mean daily streamflow vary by scenario but indicate a central tendency toward slight decreases, with a large range associated with these projections. Decreases in water content or changes in the spatial extent of snowpack in the East and Yampa River basins are important because of potential adverse effects on water supply and recreational activities. PRMS projections of each future scenario indicate a central tendency for decreases in basin mean snow-covered area and snowpack water equivalent, with the range in the projected decreases increasing with time. However, when examined on a monthly basis, the projected decreases are most dramatic during fall and

  19. Characteristics, physical - geographical and climate of the basin Lumbardhi in Peja, Republic of Kosovo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanaj, Lavdim; Zeneli, Vildane; Komoraku, Alket

    2010-05-01

    Territory of the Republic of Kosovo has four river basins; basin "White Drini", "Ibar", "Morava e Binces" and "Lepenci". This paper deals: Orografic, hydro geological, geological and climatic characteristics. River basin of Peja "Lumbardhi" is branch of River basin " White Drini', all surface of the basin until shedding to the " White Drini" is 483.00km2 and extends toward east and west. Lumbardhi source of Peja is branch of Mount Çakorr. As right main branches are: River Bjeluha and lake Milishevci, whereas in the left side of river Boga and Alga. Key works: rainfall, air temperature, snow, air humidity, wind, evaporation.

  20. Survey of Emissions Associated with Enclosed Combustor Emission Control Devices in the Denver-Julesburg Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knighton, W. B.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Wormhoult, J.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Brooks, B.; Roscioli, J. R.; Bon, D.; Herndon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play an important role in local and regional air quality. A large source of VOCs comes from the oil and gas industry and the Denver-Julesburg Basin (D-J Basin) has seen a sharp increase in production in recent years primarily due to advances in horizontal drilling techniques. To help curb emissions with extraction and production of natural gas and its associated oil, emission control devices are required for facilities emitting over 6 tons of hydrocarbons per year. Within the ozone non-attainment area, which encompasses Denver and much of the front range, enclosed combustion devices (enclosed flares) are required to reduce hydrocarbon emissions by at least 95%. While certification tests indicate that these enclosed combustor devices provide high destruction removal efficiencies, there is considerable interest in knowing how well they perform in the field. As part of Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) project conducted during the Summer of 2014, the Aerodyne Mobile Laboratory (AML) surveyed oil and gas operations within the Wattenberg gas field and the surrounding D-J Basin. The AML deployed a full suite of gas and particle phase instrumentation providing a comprehensive set of on-line, real-time measurements for the major natural gas components (methane and ethane) and their combustion products (CO2, CO, NOx) using a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Additional gas phase organic gas emissions were made using a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Particle number and composition were determined using a condensation particle counter and an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). A summary of the number of enclosed combustor devices measured and their observed combustion efficiencies will be presented.

  1. Effect of surrounding gases and water vapor on the induced electric current associated with a laser-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuta, Hideyuki

    2016-04-01

    The effect of surrounding gases and water vapor on the laser-induced electric current was investigated. Laser-induced plasma was generated on an aluminum alloy target. The laser-induced plasma was optically examined to estimate the excitation temperature and electron density in room air. There was a linear relationship between the maximum amplitude of the laser-induced current and the electron density. As the electron mean free path of the surrounding gas increased, the observed amplitude of the current increased. The amplitude of the induced current signal in dry air became maximum upon mixing with the optimum amount of water vapor. This enhancement of the induced current signal might be due to the large relative permittivity of water vapor. The laser-induced plasma as a whole seems to be a low-temperature plasma consisting of electrons, a large amount of cold surrounding gas, injected hot atoms, hot ions, and hot particles.

  2. A quarter century of the Pacific Basin Consortium: looking back to move forward.

    PubMed

    Suk, William A

    2016-03-01

    The Pacific Basin Consortium (PBC) was formed 25 years ago to address significant public health challenges to vulnerable populations imposed by environmental threats in the region, including areas surrounding the rim of and in the Pacific Ocean. Originally focused on toxic waste pollution, the PBC has broadened its efforts over the years, embracing a health focus and more of a balance between engineering and public health. This move was informed by the PBC's close relationship with the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Hazardous Substances Basic Research and Training Program (Superfund Research Program, or SRP), which played a dynamic role in the PBC from its early days. In addition, a sub-focus on children's environmental health emerged, which helped set the agenda for children's environmental health research in the region. Progress has also been made in reducing harm from some threats, particularly via extensive interventions to remediate arsenic in drinking water in Bangladesh, western Thailand, and Vietnam. However, many of the environmental health problems in the Pacific Basin region persist, including air pollution, inadequate safe drinking water, undernutrition, and a growing electronic waste problem. In the Pacific Basin and elsewhere, people with the lowest incomes often live in areas with the worst pollution. Although it is difficult to implement, dynamic strategic networking efforts are vital to understanding and correcting the inequities that persist in global environmental health. The PBC can help accomplish this by continuing and expanding its work to foster and enhance collaborations and communications between environmental health and engineering investigators and to integrate investigator-initiated research. As the PBC looks forward, there is also a need to exert increased effort to establish and maintain partnerships, to develop community-based primary-care and health services

  3. Hydroclimate variability in the Nile River Basin during the past 28,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda, Isla S.; Schouten, Stefan; Pätzold, Jürgen; Lucassen, Friedrich; Kasemann, Simone; Kuhlmann, Holger; Schefuß, Enno

    2016-03-01

    It has long been known that extreme changes in North African hydroclimate occurred during the late Pleistocene yet many discrepancies exist between sites regarding the timing, duration and abruptness of events such as Heinrich Stadial (HS) 1 and the African Humid Period (AHP). The hydroclimate history of the Nile River is of particular interest due to its lengthy human occupation history yet there are presently few continuous archives from the Nile River corridor, and pre-Holocene studies are rare. Here we present new organic and inorganic geochemical records of Nile Basin hydroclimate from an eastern Mediterranean (EM) Sea sediment core spanning the past 28 ka BP. Our multi-proxy records reflect the fluctuating inputs of Blue Nile versus White Nile material to the EM Sea in response to gradual changes in local insolation and also capture abrupt hydroclimate events driven by remote climate forcings, such as HS1. We find strong evidence for extreme aridity within the Nile Basin evolving in two distinct phases during HS1, from 17.5 to 16 ka BP and from 16 to 14.5 ka BP, whereas peak wet conditions during the AHP are observed from 9 to 7 ka BP. We find that zonal movements of the Congo Air Boundary (CAB), and associated shifts in the dominant moisture source (Atlantic versus Indian Ocean moisture) to the Nile Basin, likely contributed to abrupt hydroclimate variability in northern East Africa during HS1 and the AHP as well as to non-linear behavior of hydroclimate proxies. We note that different proxies show variable gradual and abrupt responses to individual hydroclimate events, and thus might have different inherent sensitivities, which may be a factor contributing to the controversy surrounding the abruptness of past events such as the AHP. During the Late Pleistocene the Nile Basin experienced extreme hydroclimate fluctuations, which presumably impacted Paleolithic cultures residing along the Nile corridor.

  4. Oxygen surrounding the heart during ischemic conservation determines the myocardial injury during reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yansheng; Bopassa, Jean Chrisostome

    2015-01-01

    There is discrepancy regarding the duration of reperfusion required using 2,3,5-triphenyl-2H-tetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining to assess myocardial infarction in an isolated, perfused heart model. Several investigators prefer long-term reperfusion (120 minutes) to determine myocardial injury, while others have used a shorter duration (30-40 minutes). We investigated whether oxygen surrounding the myocardium during ischemia plays a critical role in the installation of myocardial infarction during reperfusion. Mice hearts were perfused with a Langendorff apparatus using Krebs Henseleit (KH) buffer oxygenated with 95% O2 plus 5% CO2 at 37°C. Hearts were either immersed in KH or suspended in air during 18 minutes of global ischemia in a normothermic, water-jacketed chamber. Hearts then were reperfused for 40, 60, or 90 minutes. We found that hearts immersed in KH had decreased recovery of function and increased myocardial infarct size, reaching a steady-state level after 40 minutes of reperfusion. In contrast, hearts suspended in air approached steady-state after 90 minutes of reperfusion. Thus, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was much lower in air-maintained hearts than in KH-immersed hearts. To investigate whether an increase in oxygen surrounding the myocardium during ischemia might cause further damage, we bubbled the KH solution with nitrogen (KH+N2) rather than oxygen (KH+O2). With this alteration, recovery of cardiac function was improved and myocardial infarct size and mitochondrial ROS production were reduced compared with hearts immersed in KH+O2. In conclusion, short-term (40 minutes) reperfusion is sufficient to reach steady-state myocardial infarct size when hearts are immersed in physiologic solution during ischemia; however, a longer duration of reperfusion (90 minutes) is required if hearts are suspended in air. Thus, oxygen surrounding the heart during ischemia determines the extent of myocardium injury during reperfusion

  5. Luobei graphite mines surrounding ecological environment monitoring based on high-resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaosha; Wan, Huawei; Liu, Xiaoman

    2014-11-01

    Graphite is one of the important industrial mineral raw materials, but the high content of heavy metals in tailings may cause soil pollution and other regional ecological environmental problems. Luobei has already become the largest production base of graphite. To find out the ecological situation in the region, further ecological risk analysis has been carried out. Luobei graphite mine which is located in Yabdanhe basin has been selected as the study area, SVM classifiers method with the support of GF-1 Satellite remote sensing data has been used, which is the first high-resolution earth observation satellite in China. The surrounding ecological environment was monitored and its potential impact on the ecological environment was analyzed by GIS platform. The results showed that the Luobei graphite mine located Yadanhe basin covers an area of 499.65 km2, the main types of forest ecosystems ( 44.05% of the total basin area ), followed by agricultural area( 35.14% ), grass area( 15.52% ), residential area ( 4.34% ), mining area ( 0.64% ) and water area( 0.30% ). By confirming the classification results, the total accuracy is 91.61%, the Kappa coefficient is 0.8991. Overall, GF-1 Satellite data can obtain regional ecosystems quickly, and provide a better data support for regional ecological resource protection zone. For Luobei graphite mines area, farmland and residential areas within its watershed are most vulnerable to mining, the higher proportion of farmland in duck river basin. The regulatory tailings need to be strengthened in the process of graphite mining processing.

  6. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, ... a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  7. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  8. Paleozoic basins in West Africa and the Mauritanide thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Michel

    2005-10-01

    The evolution of the Paleozoic basins of West Africa is strongly depending on the structuration of the different belts which are surrounding the West African Craton. We distinguish the "Taoudeni Basin" located in the center of the craton from the basins located on the West African Craton margin (Tindouf, Tamale and several troughs limiting the western side of the Taoudeni Basin). Other basins are located on top of the Pan-African or Hercynian belts (Bové, Kandi, Ouallen in Semmen and Diourbel basins) or on top of the Proterozoic shields (The Ghana basins). Some are evidenced underneath the Mesozoic-Cenozoic coastal basins (Bové and Ghana basins). The sedimentation started with the Marinoan glacial event (620-580 Ma) and ended with the carbonates of the Early Carboniferous. The main tectonic or climatic events that occurred during this period are registered by the sediments. Among them are, the "Série pourprée glaciogenic deposits, the Pan-African II tectonic event (550-500 Ma) which affects the southwestern part of the Taoudeni Basin, the Late Ordovician glaciogenic event, the Early Silurian marine transgression, the Early Devonian marine regression and the Hercynian tectonic event (330-270 Ma) which affects the Paleozoic basins located on the western and northern parts of the West African Craton. The second part of this paper is devoted to a synthetic review of the Mauritanides Belt which is extending from Southern Senegal to the Moroccan High Atlas. This belt includes both old Pan-African belts and Paleozoic sediments (belonging to the western part of the Bové, Taoudeni and Tindouf basins) tectonised and metamorphosed during the Hercynian orogen. The third part points out the close relationships between the Paleozoic basins and the main tectonic event for the main periods of the West African Craton evolution.

  9. Canyon drainage induced mixing over a large basin

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, J.

    2000-05-01

    Complex terrain surrounding urbanized basins around the world has long been recognized to strongly affect the characteristics of vertical transport and mixing of pollutants. The Department of Energy's Vertical Transport and Mixing (VTMX) program will investigate mixing processes within night-time boundary layers over large urban basins. The program will launch several field experiments within the Salt Lake City basin in the coming years. This modeling study, like many other studies being undertaken by the participants of the VTMX programs, is intended to complement the proposed field experiments by numerically examining some of the flow interactions known to occur in large basins. Using idealized simulations, we particularly investigate drainage flows from deep canyons similar to those along the Wasatch Front into the Salt Lake City basin. Literature shows that under favorable conditions, drainage flows can generate bore waves that may propagate ahead of the density current (e.g., Simpson 1969; Simpson 1982; Crook and Miller 1985). Existence and frequency of such bore waves can profoundly influence the spatial and temporal variability of vertical transport and mixing within large basins. If bore waves do occur on a regular basis within the Salt Lake City basin (a task for the upcoming experiments to determine), then understanding the basin-scale conditions under which these waves are produced and how they may propagate and interact with the city's buildings will be of great importance in characterizing transport and mixing processes within the basin.

  10. Regional and long-range transport scenarios for photo-oxidants on the Mediterranean basin in summer

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.; Mantilla, E.; Salvador, R.; Kallos, G.

    1996-12-31

    Atmospheric research, begun in 1988, has shown that the dynamics of air pollutants in the Mediterranean basin in summer are governed by processes ranging from local to large meso-scale with diurnal cycles. Large scale convection over some regions, and up-slope winds in others, can inject aged pollutants into the Mid-troposphere, where they can participate in long-range processes within Southern and Central Europe. Two scenarios have been identified for the regional and long-range transport of photo-oxidants and other pollutants within, and out of, the Western Mediterranean basin. The first scenario involves the pollutants injected over the Spanish Central Plateau directly into the mid-troposphere, and the second, the reservoir layers created along the Mediterranean coast. In the second scenario the key components are: the semi-permanent high(er) pressure area over the colder waters in the Gulf of Lion-Western Mediterranean basin, the mountain ranges which surround it, and the coastal processes. During the day the coastal circulations renovate the upper reservoir layers while the lower ones are drawn inland with the sea-breeze, and effective flow is mostly perpendicular to the coast.

  11. Simulation of streamflow in small drainage basins in the southern Yampa River basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, R.S.; Norris, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Coal mining operations in northwestern Colorado commonly are located in areas that have minimal available water-resource information. Drainage-basin models can be a method for extending water-resource information to include periods for which there are no records or to transfer the information to areas that have no streamflow-gaging stations. To evaluate the magnitude and variability of the components of the water balance in the small drainage basins monitored, and to provide some method for transfer of hydrologic data, the U.S. Geological Survey 's Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System was used for small drainage basins in the southern Yampa River basin to simulate daily mean streamflow using daily precipitation and air-temperature data. The study area was divided into three hydrologic regions, and in each of these regions, three drainage basins were monitored. Two of the drainage basins in each region were used to calibrate the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System. The model was not calibrated for the third drainage basin in each region; instead, parameter values were transferred from the model that was calibrated for the two drainage basins. For all of the drainage basins except one, period of record used for calibration and verification included water years 1976-81. Simulated annual volumes of streamflow for drainage basins used in calibration compared well with observed values; individual hydrographs indicated timing differences between the observed and simulated daily mean streamflow. Observed and simulated annual average streamflows compared well for the periods of record, but values of simulated high and low streamflows were different than observed values. Similar results were obtained when calibrated model parameter values were transferred to drainage basins that were uncalibrated. (USGS)

  12. Environmental impacts of coal mine and thermal power plant to the surroundings of Barapukuria, Dinajpur, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Nazir; Paul, Shitangsu Kumar; Hasan, Md Muyeed

    2015-04-01

    The study was carried out to analyse the environmental impacts of coal mine and coal-based thermal power plant to the surrounding environment of Barapukuria, Dinajpur. The analyses of coal, water, soil and fly ash were carried out using standard sample testing methods. This study found that coal mining industry and coal-based thermal power plant have brought some environmental and socio-economic challenges to the adjacent areas such as soil, water and air pollution, subsidence of agricultural land and livelihood insecurity of inhabitants. The pH values, heavy metal, organic carbon and exchangeable cations of coal water treated in the farmland soil suggest that coal mining deteriorated the surrounding water and soil quality. The SO4(2-) concentration in water samples was beyond the range of World Health Organisation standard. Some physico-chemical properties such as pH, conductivity, moisture content, bulk density, unburned carbon content, specific gravity, water holding capacity, liquid and plastic limit were investigated on coal fly ash of Barapukuria thermal power plant. Air quality data provided by the Barapukuria Coal Mining Company Limited were contradictory with the result of interview with the miners and local inhabitants. However, coal potentially contributes to the development of economy of Bangladesh but coal mining deteriorates the environment by polluting air, water and soil. In general, this study includes comprehensive baseline data for decision makers to evaluate the feasibility of coal power industry at Barapukuria and the coalmine itself. PMID:25800369

  13. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect

    R. F. Grossman

    2000-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the US Department of Energy's Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,561 km{sup 2} (1,375 mi{sup 2}), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi) north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Population density within 150 km (93 mi) of the NTS is only about 0.2 persons per square kilometer, excluding the Las Vegas area. Restricted access, low population density in the surrounding area, and extended wind transport times are advantageous factors for the activities conducted at the NTS. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  14. The northern Great Basin: a region of continual change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are many controversies and conflicts surrounding land management in the Great Basin. The conflicts often revolve around the maintenance of native plant and animal communities. This paper outlines some of the historical aspects of plant community change and some of the unanticipated impacts of ...

  15. Exploration for coalbed methane gains momentum in Uinta basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gloyn, Robert W.; Sommer, Steven N.

    1993-01-01

    A development program is planned, and at least three other companies are exploring for coalbed methane in the surrounding area. Estimates have been revised by the Utah Geological Survey for the coalbed methane potential of the southern Uinta basin. They are 8 tcf to more than the earlier estimates of 0.8-4.6 tcf.

  16. Water pollution and cyanobacteria's variation of rivers surrounding southern Taihu Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingyang; Huang, Linglin; Tan, Lisha; Yang, Zhe; Baig, Shams Ali; Sheng, Tiantian; Zhu, Hong; Xu, Xinhua

    2013-05-01

    The water quality and cyanobacterial variation of rivers surrounding southern Taihu Lake, China were purposively monitored from 2008 to 2010. Trophic level index (TLI) was used to evaluate the trophic levels of southern Taihu Lake. Results showed a considerable decline in the monitored data compared with 2007, and the data showed downward trends year after year. The TLI decreased from 55.6 to 51.3, which implied that southern Taihu Lake was mildly eutrophic. The water quality and cyanobacterial variation indicated a positive response to the adopted control measures in the southern Taihu Lake basin, but the intra- and inter-annual variability was still quite varied. High concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus typically lead to algae outbreaks, however, the cyanobacteria growth may result in a decline of the concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus. Temperature and other weather conditions are also important factors for algae outbreaks; the risk of blue-green algal blooms still persists. PMID:23789569

  17. Uppermost mantle structure beneath eastern China and its surroundings from Pn and Sn tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Weijia; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2016-04-01

    The Pn and Sn residuals from regional events provide strong constraints on the structure and lithological characteristics of the uppermost mantle beneath eastern China and its surroundings. With the dense Chinese Digital Seismic Network in eastern China, separate Pn and Sn tomographic inversions have been exploited to obtain P and S velocities at a resolution of 2° × 2° or better. The patterns of P velocities are quite consistent with the S velocities at depth of 50 and 60 km, but the amplitude of P wave speed anomalies are a little larger than those of S wave speed. The low P wave speed, high S wave speed, and low Vp/Vs ratio beneath the northern part of Ordos Basin are related to upwelling hot material. Abrupt changes in material properties are indicated from the rapid variations in the Vp/Vs ratio.

  18. 14. INTERIOR VIEW OF FIREPLACE AND SURROUNDING WALL IN FIRST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW OF FIREPLACE AND SURROUNDING WALL IN FIRST FLOOR, NORTHWEST PARLOR, NORTH WALL, WITH SCALE (NOTE WALL STENCILING) - George W. Eckhart House, 810 Main Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  19. INTERIOR DETAIL, SOUTHEAST CABINET FIREPLACE. WHILE THE SURROUND HAS BEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL, SOUTHEAST CABINET FIREPLACE. WHILE THE SURROUND HAS BEEN ALTERED, THE FIREBACK IS LIKELY ORIGINAL OR EARLY TO THE HOUSE - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. Interior view of shower room 216 with original marble surround ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of shower room 2-16 with original marble surround and double sash windows, facing east. - Marine Barracks, Panama Canal, Barracks Building, 100' North of Thatcher Highway, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  1. 17. SPRINGHOUSE, SOUTHWEST SIDE; NOTE BROKEN GRANITE FOUNDATION FROM SURROUNDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. SPRINGHOUSE, SOUTHWEST SIDE; NOTE BROKEN GRANITE FOUNDATION FROM SURROUNDING HILLSIDES. - Hondius Water Line, 1.6 miles Northwest of Park headquarters building & 1 mile Northwest of Beaver Meadows entrance station, Estes Park, Larimer County, CO

  2. 42. DETAIL OF TRIPLE WINDOW ELEMENT WITH DECORATIVE BRICK SURROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. DETAIL OF TRIPLE WINDOW ELEMENT WITH DECORATIVE BRICK SURROUND, ON EAST SIDE OF 1931 SECTION, TAKEN FROM THE EAST. - James Russell Lowell Elementary School, 4501 Crittenden Drive, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  3. Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 BOYD FARMSTEAD SURROUNDED BY STRAWBERRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Everett Weinreb, Photographer, April 1989 BOYD FARMSTEAD SURROUNDED BY STRAWBERRY FIELDS, FROM VALENCIA ROAD, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Irvine Ranch Agricultural Headquarters, Boyd Tenant House, Southeast of Intersection of San Diego & Santa Ana Freeways, Irvine, Orange County, CA

  4. Glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and OMS pods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This 35mm frame, photographed as the Space Shuttle Columbia was orbiting Earth during a 'night' pass, documents the glow phenomenon surrounding the vertical stabilizer and the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods of the spacecraft.

  5. Detail view of door surround, note bracket & ghost of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of door surround, note bracket & ghost of (former) arched opening in the brickwork beside it - Leonard Mackall House, 1686 Thirty-Fourth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. 6. BRIDGE OF CARRIER JFK SURROUNDED BY SCAFFOLDING FOR REHABILITATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. BRIDGE OF CARRIER JFK SURROUNDED BY SCAFFOLDING FOR REHABILITATION UNDER SERVICE LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM (SLEP). - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Dry Dock No. 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. NIH Scientists Shed Light on Mystery Surrounding Hepatitis B Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research 2013 January 2013 (historical) NIH Scientists Shed Light on Mystery Surrounding Hepatitis B Virus Discovery Is ... the University of Oxford, U.K., have shed light on a long-standing enigma about the structure ...

  8. Structure of the Moon's Orientale Basin from Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.; Goossens, S. J.; Asmar, S. W.; Konopliv, A. S.; Lemoine, F. G.; Melosh, J., IV; Neumann, G. A.; Phillips, R. J.; Solomon, S. C.; Watkins, M. M.; Wieczorek, M. A.; Andrews-Hanna, J. C.; Head, J. W., III; Kiefer, W. S.; McGovern, P. J., Jr.; Nimmo, F.; Soderblom, J. M.; Taylor, J.; Johnson, B. C.; Mazarico, E.; Miljkovic, K.; Park, R. S.; Yuan, D. N.

    2014-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL), a dual-spacecraft, gravity-mapping mission that is a component of NASA's Discovery Program, successfully concluded its Primary and Extended Missions, mapping the lunar gravity field from average altitudes of 55 km and 22.5 km, respectively. The mission is currently in its science analysis phase. During the final weeks (the "endgame") of the mapping mission, the orbital altitudes of the two spacecraft were lowered to an average of 11 km above the lunar surface. The endgame mapping strategy was designed to provide the highest-resolution coverage over the Orientale basin, to be used to develop a gravity map of a multi-ring impact basin at unprecedented resolution. In order to achieve the highest-resolution gravitational model of Orientale, we performed a short-arc analysis of GRAIL's Ka-band range rate (KBRR) observations by adjusting a priori field GRGM900A while embedding neighbor smoothing. The combination of a spherical harmonic solution and the local analysis resolves the gravitational structure of Orientale and its environs to 3-5 km, suitable for detailed investigations of basin structure and evolution. The map reveals a correspondence of the inner depression with an excavation cavity that reflects removal of approximately 30 km of crust. The crustal thickness beneath the basin cavity may be as little as 6 km, depending on assumptions regarding the global mean thickness of the crust, the densities of the crust and mantle, and the thickness and density of the impact melt and mare fill. An annulus of negative free-air anomalies is strongest between the Inner and Outer Rook Mountains and is likely due in part to an annulus of thickened crust surrounding the excavation cavity, most likely caused by the crustal overturn during excavation (as suggested by hydrocode models). Gravitational signatures of basin rings are well resolved and distinctive, reflecting substantial fracturing or porosity as well as evidence

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of a Forced Round Turbulent Buoyant Plume in Neutral Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, A. J.; Mansour, N. N.; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Buoyant flows play an important role in various technological and environmental issues. For example, dispersal of pollutants, smoke, or volcano exhaust in the atmosphere, vertical motion of air, formation of clouds and other weather systems, and flows in cooling towers and fires are all determined primarily by buoyancy effects. The buoyancy force in such flows can originate from either a heat source or due to different densities between a fluid and its surroundings. Whatever the cause, the flow can be understood by studying the effects of the tight coupling between the thermal and the velocity fields since density differences can be characterized as temperature differences.

  10. Meso-/Cenozoic thermal and inversion history of the Tarfaya Basin and provenance analysis of the basin fill (Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehrt, Manuel; Glasmacher, Ulrich A.

    2014-05-01

    The Tarfaya Basin is the northern part of the Tarfaya-Laâyoune-Dakhla Basin that extends over 1000 km along the western Saharan margin from the Mauritanian border to the Canary Islands in the north. The basin is bounded by the Mauritanide thrust belt and Precambrian Reguibat Arch in the SE-E and the Palaeozoic fold belt of the Anti-Atlas in the NE. A large amount of Mesozoic terrigenous sedimentary rocks are deposited in most of the basins along the continental margin of Morocco indicating a major episode of erosion occurred during the rift and early post-rift period in the Central Atlantic. In the Tarfaya-Laâyoune-Dakhla Basin, the Mesozoic to Cenozoic sedimentary cover reaches a thickness of up to 12 km. The presence of high surface elevations in the Anti-Atlas mountain belt (2700 m) indicates a potential source area for the surrounding basins, i.e. the Tarfaya Basin. The present study was focused on the thermal and inversion history of the Tarfaya Basin, the provenance of the Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of the basin and additionally on the thermal and exhumation history of the Western Anti-Atlas. In order to characterize the t-T history, apatite and zircon fission-track dating, apatite and zircon (U-Th-Sm)/He dating and furthermore 2-D modelling with 'HeFTy' software has been carried out at Precambrian rocks of the Western Anti-Atlas and Cretaceous to Neogene sedimentary rocks from the Tarfaya Basin. Thermochronological data and t-T path modelling indicate an inversion of the onshore Tarfaya Basin in the Palaeogene. The provenance analysis suggests an almost continuous sediment transport from the Anti-Atlas to the Tarfaya Basin and a simultaneous sediment input from the Reguibat Shield.

  11. Reserves in western basins

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W.

    1992-06-01

    This project requires generation of producible tight gas sand reserve estimates for three western basins. The requirement is to perform such reserve estimates using industry accepted practices so that results will have high credibility and acceptance by the oil and gas industry. The ultimate goal of the project is to encourage development of the tight gas formation by industry through reduction of the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial gas wells. The three geological basins selected for study are the Greater Green River Basin, Uinta Basin and Piceance Basin, located in the Colorado, Utah and Wyoming Rocky Mountain region.

  12. Reserves in western basins

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    This project requires generation of producible tight gas sand reserve estimates for three western basins. The requirement is to perform such reserve estimates using industry accepted practices so that results will have high credibility and acceptance by the oil and gas industry. The ultimate goal of the project is to encourage development of the tight gas formation by industry through reduction of the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial gas wells. The three geological basins selected for study are the Greater Green River Basin, Uinta Basin and Piceance Basin, located in the Colorado, Utah and Wyoming Rocky Mountain region.

  13. Implementing Title III -- Air toxics

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    The South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) is taking three basic approaches to implementing the new National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) from the Title III program: accept and implement, as written, the NESHAPs where few sources are located in the South Coast Air Basin; incorporate with simplification of the NESHAP requirements into AQMD rules when many sources are involved; then seek equivalency by the US EPA; and incorporate with a market-based rule (VOC RECLAIM), part of many NESHAPs which control volatile organic compound as HAPs. Whatever the approach, emphasis will be placed on: streamlining and simplification; helping sources understand requirements and comply; and common sense.

  14. Seismic reflection structure of intracratonic palmyride fold-thrust belt and surrounding Arabian platform, Syria

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, J.H.; Barazangi, M.; Best, J. ); Al-Saad, D.; Sawaf, T.; Al-Otri, M.; Gebran, A. )

    1990-03-01

    Seismic reflection and drill-hole data from central Syria provide a detailed view of the subsurface structure (10-15 km depth) of the relatively little-studied intracratonic Palmyride fold and thrust belt. The data set, together with surface geologic mapping, constrains a structural/stratigraphic section spanning the northeast sector of the belt and the surrounding subprovinces of the Arabian platform. The seismic reflection and drill-hole data show Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences thickening abruptly into the Palmyrides from the adjacent, arched Paleozoic platforms Neogene (alpine) folding and thrusting of the Mesozoic basin, as documented on the seismic data, are sharply restricted to the narrow width of the belt ({approximately}100 km), in contrast to the relatively undeformed Phanerozoic strata of the platforms to the north and south. The seismic and drill-hole data support the hypothesis that the palmyrides began as a Permian-Triassic failed rift connected to the Levantine passive continental margin, which was inverted and complexly deformed by the interfering effects of Cenozoic movements along the Dead Sea transform fault system and the Turkish Bitlis convergent zone. The seismic data provide a first view into the extent and depth of the early basin formation and subsequent compressional deformation, and as such represent a necessary element for constraining reconstructions of northern Middle East plate motions. 20 figs.

  15. Geologic map of Oldonyo Lengai (Oldoinyo Lengai) Volcano and surroundings, Arusha Region, United Republic of Tanzania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Magigita, Masota M.; Kwelwa, Shimba

    2013-01-01

    The geology of Oldonyo Lengai volcano and the southernmost Lake Natron basin, Tanzania, is presented on this geologic map at scale 1:50,000. The map sheet can be downloaded in pdf format for online viewing or ready to print (48 inches by 36 inches). A 65-page explanatory pamphlet describes the geologic history of the area. Its goal is to place the new findings into the framework of previous investigations while highlighting gaps in knowledge. In this way questions are raised and challenges proposed to future workers. The southernmost Lake Natron basin is located along the East African rift zone in northern Tanzania. Exposed strata provide a history of volcanism, sedimentation, and faulting that spans 2 million years. It is here where Oldonyo Lengai, Tanzania’s most active volcano of the past several thousand years, built its edifice. Six new radiometric ages, by the 40Ar/39Ar method, and 48 new geochemical analyses from Oldonyo Lengai and surrounding volcanic features deepen our understanding of the area. Those who prefer the convenience and access offered by Geographic Information Systems (GIS) may download an electronic database, suitable for most GIS software applications. The GIS database is in a Transverse Mercator projection, zone 36, New (1960) Arc datum. The database includes layers for hypsography (topography), hydrography, and infrastructure such as roads and trails.

  16. Analysis of impact of Busch Gardens expansion on air quality of surrounding area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindle, E. C.; Maier, G.; Copeland, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    This report is concerned primarily with the increase in carbon monoxide concentrations and hydrocarbon concentrations induced by the projected increased traffic that would be associated with the parking facilities planned to support the expansion of Busch Gardens (Virginia) planned for the summar of 1976. Of primary concern is the integrated effect of the increased traffic that will be handled by existing facilities and an enlarged parking lot across the highway from the main Busch Garden attraction.

  17. Air cleaning system

    SciTech Connect

    Tidwell, J.H.

    1987-06-16

    This patent describes an air cleaning system comprising: a motor housing; a motor mounted within the housing; a fan attached to and rotatably driven by the motor; a fan chamber surrounding the fan and having an air inlet and outlet; a separator housing means mounted adjacent to and in spaced relation with the motor housing, the separator housing means having an inlet disposed in communication with a chamber within separator housing means; an outlet disposed in communication with the fan chamber; an air driven separator means mounted in chamber of the separator housing means to receive airflow from inlet for rotation of the separator means and removal of foreign matter from airflow by centrifugal force responsive to rotation of the separator means; the airflow is further directed through the outlet of separator housing means to the fan chamber to be ejected by the fan.

  18. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  19. Concentrations, atmospheric partitioning, and air-water/soil surface exchange of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran along the upper reaches of the Haihe River basin, North China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhiqiang; Die, Qingqi; Yang, Yufei; Tang, Zhenwu; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qifei

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/PCDF) were overall measured and compared in ambient air, water, soils, and sediments along the upper reaches of the Haihe River of North China, so as to evaluate their concentrations, profiles, and to understand the processes of gas-particle partitioning and air-water/soil exchange. The following results were obtained: (1) The average concentrations (toxic equivalents, TEQs) of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/PCDF in air, water, sediment, and soil samples were 4,855 fg/m(3), 9.5 pg/L, 99.2 pg/g dry weight (dw), and 56.4 pg/g (203 fg TEQ/m(3), 0.46 pg TEQ/L, 2.2 pg TEQ/g dw, and 1.3 pg TEQ/g, respectively), respectively. (2) Although OCDF, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF, OCDD, and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD were the dominant congeners among four environmental sinks, obvious discrepancies of these congener and homologue patterns of PCDD/PCDF were observed still. (3) Significant linear correlations for PCDD/PCDF were observed between the gas-particle partition coefficient (K p) and the subcooled liquid vapor pressure (P L (0)) and octanol-air partition coefficient (K oa). (4) Fugacity fraction values of air-water exchange indicated that most of PCDD/PCDF homologues were dominated by net volatilization from water into air. The low-chlorinated PCDD/PCDF (tetra- to hexa-) presented a strong net volatilization from the soil into air, while high-chlorinated PCDD/PCDF (hepta- to octa-) were mainly close to equilibrium for air-soil exchange. PMID:24643387

  20. Measurements of Ozone Precursors in the Lake Tahoe Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinska, B.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Gertler, A.; McDaniel, M.; Rayne, S.; Burley, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Tahoe, located at 6,225 ft. (1,897 m) in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, is the largest alpine lake in North America. Known for the clarity of its water and the panorama of surrounding mountains on all sides, Lake Tahoe is a prime tourist attraction in the California - Nevada area. However, the Lake Tahoe Basin is facing significant environmental pollution problems, including declining water clarity and air quality issues. During the period of July 21 - 26, 2012, we conducted a field study in the Basin designed to characterize the precursors and pathways of secondary pollutant formation, including ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Four sites were selected; two were located at high elevations (one each on the western and eastern sides of the Basin) and two were positioned near the Lake level. Ozone and NO/NO2 concentrations were continuously measured. With a resolution of several hours over a 6-day sampling period canister samples were collected for detailed speciation of volatile organic compounds (VOC), 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) impregnated Sep-Pak cartridges for analysis of carbonyl compounds, PM2.5 Teflon and quartz filter samples for determination of mass, organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) concentrations and speciation of organic compounds. Whereas the concentrations of lower molecular weight (mw) C2 - C3 hydrocarbons were generally the highest at all sampling sites, ranging from 25 to 76% of the total measured VOC (over 70 species from C2 to C10), the concentrations of biogenic hydrocarbons, isoprene and α-pinene were significant, ranging from 1.4 to 26% and 1.5 to 30%, respectively, of the total VOC. For comparison, the sum of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) constituted from 2.5 to 37% of the total VOC. All four sites showed maximum ozone concentrations in the range of 60 ppb. However, the lower sites show a pronounced diurnal pattern (i.e. maximum concentrations during the daytime hours, 0900 to 1700, with

  1. Variation of Fundamental Mode Surface Wave Group Velocity Dispersion in Iran and the Surrounding Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rham, D. J.; Preistley, K.; Tatar, M.; Paul, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present group velocity dispersion results from a study of regional fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves propagating across Iran and the surrounding region. Data for these measurements comes from field deployments within Iran by the University of Cambridge (GBR) and the Universite Joseph-Fourier (FRA) in conjunction with International Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Seismology (Iran), in addition to data from IRIS and Geofone. 1D path- averaged dispersion measurements have been made for ~5500 source-receiver paths using multiple filter analysis. We combine these observations in a tomographic inversion to produce group velocity images between 10 and 60 s period. Because of the dense path coverage, these images have substantially higher lateral resolution for this region than is currently available from global and regional group velocity studies. We observe variations in short-period wave group velocity which is consistent with the surface geology. Low group velocities (2.00-2.55 km/s) at short periods (10-20 s), for both Rayleigh and Love waves are observed beneath thick sedimentary deposits; The south Caspian Basin, Black Sea, the eastern Mediterranean, the Persian Gulf, the Makran, the southern Turan shield, and the Indus and Gangetic basins. Somewhat higher group velocity (2.80-3.15 km/s for Rayleigh, and 3.00-3.40 km/s for Love) at these periods occur in sediment poor regions, such as; the Turkish-Iranian plateau, the Arabian shield, and Kazakhstan. At intermediate periods (30-40 s) group velocities over most of the region are low (2.65-3.20 km/s for Rayleigh, and 2.80-3.45 km/s for love) compared to Arabia (3.40-3.70 km/s Rayleigh, 3.50-4.0 km/s Love). At longer periods (50-60 s) Love wave group velocities remain low (3.25-3.70 km/s) over most of Iran, but there are even lower velocities (2.80-3.00 km/s) still associated with the thick sediments of the south Caspian basin, the surrounding shield areas have much higher group velocities (3

  2. Variability of Atmospheric CO2 Over India and Surrounding Oceans and Control by Surface Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, R. K.; Dadhwal, V. K.; Majumdar, A.; Patel, N. R.; Dutt, C. B. S.

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, seasonal and inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 concentration over India and surrounding oceans during 2002-2010 derived from Atmospheric InfrarRed Sounder observation and their relation with the natural flux exchanges over terrestrial Indian and surrounding oceans were analyzed. The natural fluxes over the terrestrial Indian in the form of net primary productivity (NPP) were simulated based on a terrestrial biosphere model governed by time varying climate parameters (solar radiation, air temperature, precipitation etc) and satellite greenness index together with the land use land cover and soil attribute maps. The flux exchanges over the oceans around India (Tropical Indian Ocean: TIO) were calculated based on a empirical model of CO2 gas dissolution in the oceanic water governed by time varying upper ocean parameters such as gradient of partial pressure of CO2 between ocean and atmosphere, winds, sea surface temperature and salinity. Comparison between the variability of atmospheric CO2 anomaly with the anomaly of surface fluxes over India and surrounding oceans suggests that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate. On inter-annual scale, flux exchanges over the tropical north Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate.

  3. System for detecting interfaces between mineral seams and the surrounding earth formations

    SciTech Connect

    Ingle, J.E.; Moon, J.L.

    1981-04-21

    The present invention contemplates a system for detecting an interface between a mineral seam and the surrounding earth formation utilizing a radiation source and a radiation receiver mounted on a miner having a positionable cutter assembly. As the miner is moved into the coal seam, a first distance is continuously sensed between one surface formed in the mineral seam by the miner cutter assembly and the surrounding earth formation and the miner cutter assembly is positioned in response to the sensed first distance. As the miner is withdrawn from the coal seam, a second distance is continuously sensed between one surface formed in the mineral seam by the miner cutter assembly and the surrounding earth formation and the miner cutter assembly is positioned in response to the sensed second distance. A substantial portion of the space between the wall formed in the mineral seam by the miner cutter assembly and the radiation source and radiation receiver is substantially filled with a material having a density greater than the density of air to direct a substantial portion of the radiation through the mineral seam.

  4. Divergent/passive margin basins

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.D. ); Santogrossi, P.A. )

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the detailed geology of the four divergent margin basins and establishes a set of analog scenarios which can be used for future petroleum exploration. The divergent margin basins are the Campos basin of Brazil, the Gabon basin, the Niger delta, and the basins of the northwest shelf of Australia. These four petroleum basins present a wide range of stratigraphic sequences and structural styles that represent the diverse evolution of this large and important class of world petroleum basins.

  5. Trace Elements Speciation of Submicron Particulate Matter (PM1) Collected in the Surroundings of Power Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira; Kaczmarek, Konrad; Mainka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the concentrations of PM1 trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb and Se) content in highly mobile (F1), mobile (F2), less mobile (F3) and not mobile (F4) fractions in samples that were collected in the surroundings of power plants in southern Poland. It also reports source identification by enrichment factors (EF) and a principal component analysis (PCA). There is limited availability of scientific data concerning the chemical composition of dust, including fractionation analyses of trace elements, in the surroundings of power plants. The present study offers important results in order to fill this data gap. The data collected in this study can be utilized to validate air quality models in this rapidly developing area. They are also crucial for comparisons with datasets from similar areas all over the world. Moreover, the identification of the bioavailability of selected carcinogenic and toxic elements in the future might be used as output data for potential biological and population research on risk assessment. This is important in the context of air pollution being hazardous to human health. PMID:26501310

  6. Trace Elements Speciation of Submicron Particulate Matter (PM1) Collected in the Surroundings of Power Plants.

    PubMed

    Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira; Kaczmarek, Konrad; Mainka, Anna

    2015-10-01

    This study reports the concentrations of PM1 trace elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb and Se) content in highly mobile (F1), mobile (F2), less mobile (F3) and not mobile (F4) fractions in samples that were collected in the surroundings of power plants in southern Poland. It also reports source identification by enrichment factors (EF) and a principal component analysis (PCA). There is limited availability of scientific data concerning the chemical composition of dust, including fractionation analyses of trace elements, in the surroundings of power plants. The present study offers important results in order to fill this data gap. The data collected in this study can be utilized to validate air quality models in this rapidly developing area. They are also crucial for comparisons with datasets from similar areas all over the world. Moreover, the identification of the bioavailability of selected carcinogenic and toxic elements in the future might be used as output data for potential biological and population research on risk assessment. This is important in the context of air pollution being hazardous to human health. PMID:26501310

  7. Hanford single-pass reactor fuel storage basin demolition.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jason A

    2003-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Contractor at the Hanford Site is tasked with removing auxiliary reactor structures and leaving the remaining concrete structure surrounding each reactor core. This is referred to as Interim Safe Storage. Part of placing the F Reactor into Interim Safe Storage is the demolition of the fuel storage basin, which was deactivated in 1970 by placing debris material into the basin prior to back filling with soil. Besides the debris material (wooden floor decking, handrails, and monorail pieces), the fuel storage basin contents included the possibility of spent nuclear fuel, fuel buckets, fuel spacers, process tubes, and tongs. Demolition of the fuel storage basin offered many unique radiological control challenges and innovative approaches to demolition. This paper describes how the total effective dose equivalent and contamination were controlled, how the use of a remote operated excavator was employed to remove high-dose-rate material, and how wireless technology was used to monitor changing radiological conditions. PMID:12564339

  8. Hanford Single-Pass Reactor Fuel Storage Basin Demolition.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jason A.

    2003-02-01

    ABSTRACT The Environmental Restoration Contractor at the Hanford Site is tasked with removing auxiliary reactor structures and leaving the remaining concrete structure surrounding each reactor core. This is referred to as Interim Safe Storage. Part of placing the F Reactor into Interim Safe Storage is the demolition of the fuel storage basin, which was deactivated in 1970 by placing debris material into the basin prior to back filling with soil. Besides the debris material (wooden floor decking, handrails, and monorail pieces), the fuel storage basin contents included the possibility of spent nuclear fuel, fuel buckets, fuel spacers, process tubes, and tongs. Demolition of the fuel storage basin offered many unique radiological control challenges and innovative approaches to demolition. This paper describes how the total effective dose equivalent and contamination were controlled, how the use of a remote operated excavator was employed to remove high-dose-rate material, and how wireless technology was used to monitor changing radiological conditions. PMID:12555029

  9. Polyphase basin evolution of the Vienna Basin inferred from 3D visualization of sedimentation setting and quantitative subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun Young; Novotny, Johannes; Wagreich, Michael

    2016-04-01

    This study analyzed and visualized data from 210 wells using a MATLAB-based program (BasinVis 1.0) for 3D visualization of sediment distribution, thickness, and quantitative subsidence of the northern and central Vienna Basin. The sedimentation settings for selected horizons were visualized to 3D sediment distribution maps, isopach maps, and cross-sections. Subsidence of the study area resulted in 3D subsidence depth and rate maps of basement and tectonic subsidences. Due to the special position of the Vienna Basin, the basin evolution was influenced by the regional tectonics of surrounding units. The 2D/3D maps provided insights into the polyphase evolution of the Vienna Basin, which is closely related to changes in the changing regional stress field and the paleoenvironmental setting. In the Early Miocene, the sedimentation and subsidence were shallow and E-W/NE-SW trending, indicating the development of piggy-back basins. During the late Early Miocene, maps show wider sedimentation and abruptly increasing subsidence by sinistral strike-slip faults, which initiated the Vienna pull-apart basin system. The sediments of the Early Miocene were supplied through a small deltaic system entering from the south. After thin sedimentation and shallow subsidence of the early Middle Miocene, the development of the Vienna Basin was controlled and accelerated mainly by NE-SW trending synsedimentary normal faults, especially the Steinberg fault. From the Middle Miocene, the subsidence was decreasing overall, however the tectonic subsidence show regionally different patterns. This study suggests that a major tensional regime change, from transtension to E-W extension, caused laterally varying subsidence across the Vienna Basin. The Late Miocene was characterized by the slowing down of basement and tectonic subsidence. From the middle Middle to Late Miocene, enormous amount of sediments supplied by a broad paleo-Danube delta complex on the western flank of the basin. The latest

  10. Hydrologic Modelling of Katsina-Ala River Basin: AN Emerging Scenario from Lake Nyos Threat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinyede, J. O.; Babamaaji, R.; Vaatough, M.; Adepoju, K. A.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the hydrologic system surrounding crater lakes is of great importance for prevention of flooding damages, conservation of ecological environment, and assessment of socio-economic impact of dam failure on the civilians in the downstream regions. Lake Nyos is a crater lake formed by volcanic activities at the Oku volcanic field on the Cameroon Volcanic Line. It is a freshwater lake with a maximum depth of 200 meter. In 1986, a limnic eruption at the lake emitted 1.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide from the bottom of saturated water into the air and suffocated up to 1,800 people and 3,500 livestock at nearby villages. The lake waters are held in place by a natural dam composed of loosely consolidated volcanic rock, which is now at the verge of collapse due to accelerated erosion. This study was carried out to determine the flood risks and vulnerability of population and infrastructure along Katsina-Ala drainage basins. The project integrated both satellite images and field datasets into a hydrologic model for Katsina-Ala River Basin and its vicinity including the Lake Nyos. ArcHydro was used to construct a hydrologic database as 'data models' and MIKE SHE was employed to conduct hydrologic simulations. Vulnerable infrastructures, population and socio-economic activities were identified to assist the Federal and State governments in disaster mitigation and management plans. The result of the project provides comprehensive knowledge of hydrologic system of Katsina-Ala drainage basin to mitigate potential future disasters from a potential dam failure and manage water resources against such disasters.

  11. Meteorological characteristics of dust storm events in the eastern Great Basin of Utah, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahnenberger, Maura; Nicoll, Kathleen

    2012-12-01

    We assess the mesoscale climatology of dust storm events affecting Salt Lake City, Utah (SLC) since the 1930s, and document the ascendant controls on atmospheric dust generation and transport in the semi-arid Great Basin. Records indicate a seasonal and diurnal pattern, with dust storms typically occurring in spring months during the afternoon. Since 1930, SLC had 379 dust event days (DEDs), averaging 4.7 per year. Air quality station data from populated regions in Utah indicate that dust events produced elevated PM10 exceeding NAAQS on 16 days since 1993, or 0.9 per year. Analysis of DEDs over the period 1948-2010 (n = 331) indicates that approaching mid-level troughs caused 68% of these dust outbreaks and storms. We analyzed two significant DEDs occurring on 19 April 2008 and 4 March 2009, both of which produced elevated particulate matter (PM) levels in the populated region surrounding SLC. Strengthening cyclonic systems are the primary producer of dust outbreaks and storms; the Great Basin Confluence Zone (GBCZ) in the lee of the Sierra Nevada is a known region of cyclogenesis. These cyclonic systems produce strong southwesterly winds in the eastern Great Basin of Utah - termed “hatu winds” - that exceed threshold friction velocities, entrain sediments and loft them into the atmosphere. Plumes identified in MODIS satellite imagery on case study DEDs indicate specific dust source areas, not widespread sediment mobilization. These “hotspots” include playa surfaces at Sevier Dry Lake, Tule Dry Lake, and the Great Salt Lake Desert, as well as Milford Flat, an area burned by Utah's largest wildfire in 2007. The characteristic mountain-valley topography in the Basin & Range physiographic province creates terrain channeling that enhances deflation and funnels dust-bearing winds toward SLC, a growing urban center.

  12. Summertime ozone formation in Xi'an and surrounding areas, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tian; Bei, Naifang; Huang, Ru-Jin; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Qiang; Zhou, Weijian; Tie, Xuexi; Liu, Suixin; Zhang, Ting; Su, Xiaoli; Lei, Wenfang; Molina, Luisa T.; Li, Guohui

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the ozone (O3) formation in China's northwest city of Xi'an and surrounding areas is investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting atmospheric chemistry (WRF-Chem) model during the period from 22 to 24 August 2013, corresponding to a heavy air pollution episode with high concentrations of O3 and PM2.5. The model generally performs well compared to measurements in simulating the surface temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed and direction, near-surface O3 and PM2.5 mass concentrations, and aerosol constituents. High aerosol concentrations in Xi'an and surrounding areas significantly decrease the photolysis frequencies and can reduce O3 concentrations by more than 50 µg m-3 (around 25 ppb) on average. Sensitivity studies show that the O3 production regime in Xi'an and surrounding areas is complicated, varying from NOx to VOC (volatile organic compound)-sensitive chemistry. The industrial emissions contribute the most to the O3 concentrations compared to biogenic and other anthropogenic sources, but neither individual anthropogenic emission nor biogenic emission plays a dominant role in the O3 formation. Under high O3 and PM2.5 concentrations, a 50 % reduction in all the anthropogenic emissions only decreases near-surface O3 concentrations by about 14 % during daytime. The complicated O3 production regime and high aerosol levels pose a challenge for O3 control strategies in Xi'an and surrounding areas. Further investigation regarding O3 control strategies will need to be performed, taking into consideration the rapid changes in anthropogenic emissions that are not reflected in the current emission inventories and the uncertainties in the meteorological field simulations.

  13. Cold Pools in the Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, Charles D.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Shaw, William J.; Hubbe, John M.; Bian, Xindi; Mittelstadt, J.

    2001-01-01

    Persistent midwinter cold air pools produce multi-day periods of cold, dreary weather in valleys and basins. Persistent stable stratification leads to the buildup of pollutants and moisture in the pool. Because the pool sometimes has temperatures below freezing while the air above is warmer, freezing precipitation often occurs with consequent effects on transportation and safety. Forecasting the buildup and breakdown of these cold pools is difficult because the physical mechanisms leading to their formation, maintenance, and destruction have received little study. This paper provides a succinct meteorological definition of a cold pool, develops a climatology of Columbia Basin cold pools, and analyzes remote and in situ temperature and wind sounding data for two winter cold pool episodes that were accompanied by fog and stratus, illustrating many of the physical mechanisms affecting cold pool evolution.

  14. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  15. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  16. REACTOR CORE SURROUNDED BY BERYLLIUM MODERATOR. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR CORE SURROUNDED BY BERYLLIUM MODERATOR. CAMERA LOOKS DOWN AND TOWARD NORTH INTO LOWER GRID CASTING. HOLES OF VARIOUS SIZES ACCOMMODATE COOLANT WATER AND EXPERIMENTAL POSITIONS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 4197. Unknown Photographer, 2/11/1952 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. 10. View of Western Rail and Surrounding Area to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of Western Rail and Surrounding Area to the West (Lakeside Road was named Roxbury Avenue on the original plat. It was renamed Lakeside Road when a portion of the plat was replatted on August 1, 1925) - North Bridge, Spanning Quarton Lake branch of River Rouge, Birmingham, Oakland County, MI

  18. 10. View of Western Rail and Surrounding Area to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. View of Western Rail and Surrounding Area to the West (Lakeside Road was named Roxbury Avenue on the original plat. It was renamed Lakeside Road when a portion of the plat was replatted on August 1, 1925) - South Bridge, Spanning Quarton Lake branch of River Rouge, Birmingham, Oakland County, MI

  19. Challenges Surrounding the Education of Children with Chronic Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Maria, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    While governing bodies have mandated that all students have the right to an education, with disabled students treated to the same rights and opportunities as non-disabled students, policymakers do not always agree on what all-inclusive education should look like. "Challenges Surrounding the Education of Children with Chronic Diseases"…

  20. Biomedical and Market Issues Surrounding the Advent of Biosimilars.

    PubMed

    Cline, Abigail; Turrentine, Jake E

    2016-09-01

    As the patents associated with the biologics are set to expire in the near future, a new type of therapy appears on the horizon, and it is quite similar to the biologics. This commentary examines the biomedical and market issues surrounding the advent of biosimilars. PMID:27329376

  1. Level area surrounding Facility 314 showing the planted ring that ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Level area surrounding Facility 314 showing the planted ring that contains the radial ground wires, note the ring beneath the antenna circles is cleared of vegetation and covered with gravel, view facing southwest - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Radio Station, AF/FRD-10 Circularly Disposed Antenna Array, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Source identification of airborne Escherichia coli of swine house surroundings using ERIC-PCR and REP-PCR.

    PubMed

    Duan, Huiyong; Chai, Tongjie; Liu, Jianzhu; Zhang, Xingxiao; Qi, Chunhua; Gao, Jing; Wang, Yaling; Cai, Yumei; Miao, Zengmin; Yao, Meiling; Schlenker, Gerd

    2009-07-01

    Evidence is mounting that microorganisms originating from livestock impact the air quality of the animal houses themselves and the public in the surrounding neighborhoods. The aim of this study was to develop efficient bacterial source tracking capabilities to identify sources of Escherichia coli aerosol pollution caused by pigs. Airborne E. coli were isolated from indoor air, upwind air (10 and 50 m away) and downwind air samples (10, 50, 100, 200 and 400 m away) for five swine houses using six-stage Andersen microbial samplers and Reuter-Centrifugal samplers (RCS). E. coli strains from pig fecal samples were also collected simultaneously. The enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerize chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and the repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP-PCR) approaches were used to study the genetic variability and to determine the strain relationships among E. coli isolated from different sites in each swine house. Results showed that 35.1% (20/57) of the bacterial DNA fingerprints from the fecal isolates matched with the corresponding strains isolated from indoor and downwind air samples (similarity > or = 90%). E. coli strains from the indoor and downwind air samples were closely related to the E. coli strains isolated from feces, while those isolated from upwind air samples (swine house C) had low similarity (61-69%). Our results suggest that some strains isolated from downwind and indoor air originated in the swine feces. Effective hygienic measures should be taken in animal farms to prevent or minimize the downwind spread of microorganism aerosol. PMID:19349045

  3. GEMAS results from the Pannonian Basin - geochemical signatures in a transnational geological structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslinger, Edith; Jordan, Gyozo; Slaninka, Igor; Sorsa, Ajka; Gulan, Aleksandra; Gosar, Mateja; Hratovic, Hazim; Klos, Volodymyr

    2014-05-01

    The Pannonian Basin, also referred to as Carpathian Basin, has its geological origins in the Pannonian Sea which was part of the Parathetys Sea, from which it was separated around 10 Ma ago. It spreads over large part of the southeastern part of Central Europe. The centre of the Pannonian Basin is located in Hungary and extends to the adjoining countries Austria, Slovakia, Romania, Ukraine, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. The basin is surrounded by the Carpathian Mountains, the Alps, the Dinarides and the Balkan mountains. The Pannonian Basin is filled by Molasse sediments, which were deposited during the Alpine orogenesis and originating from the rising Alpine and Carpathian Mountain chains. The orogenesis continued during the sedimentation into the Molasse basin. The tectonic movements resulted in several cycles of trans- and regressions of the Parathetys, the sedimentation of marine and freshwater sediments as well as a multitude of fractures and cleavages during the orogensis and the subsidence of different parts of the basin. Even if the Pannonian Basin was formed during a complex orogenesis, it can be regarded as a geo- and hydrodynamic unit. In accordance with the geological history, the soils in the Pannonian Basin developed on loose sediments - including significant loess deposits - and are dominated by soil types which also reflect the continental and steppe climate in this area - Planosols, Luvisols, Cambisols, Calcisols, Chernozems and Phaeozems. The basin is extensively used for agricultural purposes. The geochemical patterns Pannonian Basin are considerably different compared to its surroundings due to its geological development. The spatial distribution of some elements (REE (La, Ce), Y, Th, V, Cd, Pb) are clearly different inside and outside the basin area. For this transnational geological and geographical area, the GEMAS results are compiled and multivariate statistics are applied to find common geochemical signatures in relation

  4. Airborne Particulate Transport into the Amazon Basin - The Effect of Atmospheric Processing on Trace Metal Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik; Ochoa-Gonzalez, Raquel; Dong, Shuofei

    2014-05-01

    Dissolution of airborne particulate matter during atmospheric transport is an important process mobilizing nutrient trace metals from the solid phase and making nutrients readily available to remote marine and terrestrial ecosystems after atmospheric deposition. Recent work suggests that this process is accelerated through the effect of air pollution and the acidification of cloud droplets. Large urban areas surrounding the Amazon Basin have introduced vast amounts of anthropogenic air pollutants from industrial emissions and biomass burning, hence this mechanism is potentially important for the nutrient cycling in this area, affecting climate and environmental health alike. To this end in the context of the CLIM AMAZON project, we conducted studies to test the dissolution of mineral and road dust under atmospheric pollution conditions relevant to the region and we set up passive samplers to test particle matter reaching the Amazon Basin for evidence of atmospheric processing. Different mineral acids and deionized water at different pH were used. Batch leaching experiments with dust sourced from the Sahara/Sahel region were setup for 144 hours to simulate the transport time of particulate matter in the atmosphere. Trace metal solubility in mineral acids at low pH was up to five times higher than in deionized water, and approximately twice as high in hydrochloric acid compared to nitric acid. A kinetic model for the solubility in the leaching solutions was developed and it was in good agreement with the experimental data. Further work will test the effect of variable cloud compositions, determine key kinetic and thermodynamic parameters to improve atmospheric reaction models, and characterize the particulate matter collected with the passive samplers.

  5. Satellite Retrieval of Atmospheric Water Budget over Gulf of Mexico- Caribbean Basin: Seasonal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Santos, Pablo; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study presents results from a multi-satellite/multi-sensor retrieval system designed to obtain the atmospheric water budget over the open ocean. A combination of hourly-sampled monthly datasets derived from the GOES-8 5 Imager and the DMSP 7-channel passive microwave radiometer (SSM/I) have been acquired for the Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean Sea basin. Whereas the methodology is being tested over this basin, the retrieval system is designed for portability to any open-ocean region. Algorithm modules using the different datasets to retrieve individual geophysical parameters needed in the water budget equation are designed in a manner that takes advantage of the high temporal resolution of the GOES-8 measurements, as well as the physical relationships inherent to the SSM/I passive microwave signals in conjunction with water vapor, cloud liquid water, and rainfall. The methodology consists of retrieving the precipitation, surface evaporation, and vapor-cloud water storage terms in the atmospheric water balance equation from satellite techniques, with the water vapor advection term being obtained as the residue needed for balance. Thus, we have sought to develop a purely satellite-based method for obtaining the full set of terms in the atmospheric water budget equation without requiring in situ sounding information on the wind profile. The algorithm is partly validated by first cross-checking all the algorithm components through multiple-algorithm retrieval intercomparisons. More fundamental validation is obtained by directly comparing water vapor transports into the targeted basin diagnosed from the satellite algorithm to those obtained observationally from a network of land-based upper air stations that nearly uniformly surround the basin. Total columnar atmospheric water budget results will be presented for an extended annual cycle consisting of the months of October-97, January-98, April-98, July-98, October-98, and January-1999. These results are used to emphasize

  6. Air diverter for supercharger

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.

    1986-10-28

    An engine supercharger is described which consists of a turbine housing, a main turbine wheel of the radial-inflow type located within the turbine housing, a compressor housing having an air entrance passageway, and a compressor wheel of the centrifugal type located within the compressor housing. It also includes a main shaft of annular construction interconnecting the turbine wheel and the compressor wheel whereby the two wheels rotate as a unit, an auxiliary turbine wheel of the axial flow type located downstream from the main turbine wheel, and a fan of the axial flow type located upstream from the compressor wheel. An auxiliary shaft extends within the main shaft between the auxiliary turbine and fan whereby the auxiliary turbine and fan rotate as a unit. An annular air collector chamber means is located immediately downstream from the fan in surrounding relation to the aforementioned entrance passageway for diverting some of the fan air from the compressor wheel. The fan comprises a hub and blades radiating outwardly therefrom. The air collector chamber is defined in part by an annular wall having a free edge located within the fan blade axial profile whereby the annular wall intercepts air discharged from outer tip areas of the fan blades to divert same away from the compressor wheel into the collector chamber.

  7. Modeling anomalous surface - wave propagation across the Southern Caspian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Priestly, K.F.; Patton, H.J.; Schultz, C.A.

    1998-01-09

    The crust of the south Caspian basin consists of 15-25 km of low velocity, highly attenuating sediment overlying high velocity crystalline crust. The Moho depth beneath the basin is about 30 km as compared to about 50 km in the surrounding region. Preliminary modeling of the phase velocity curves shows that this thick sediments of the south Caspian basin are also under-lain by a 30-35 km thick crystalline crust and not by typical oceanic crust. This analysis also suggest that if the effect of the over-pressuring of the sediments is to reduce Poissons` ratio, the over-pressured sediments observed to approximately 5 km do not persist to great depths. It has been shown since 1960`s that the south Caspian basin blocks the regional phase Lg. Intermediate frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) fundamental mode Raleigh waves propagating across the basin are also severely attenuated, but the low frequency surface waves are largely unaffected. This attenuation is observed along the both east-to-west and west-to-east great circle paths across the basin, and therefore it cannot be related to a seismograph site effect. We have modeled the response of surface waves in an idealized rendition of the south Caspian basin model using a hybrid normal mode / 2-D finite difference approach. To gain insight into the features of the basin which cause the anomalous surface wave propagation, we have varied parameters of the basin model and computed synthetic record sections to compare with the observed seismograms. We varied the amount of mantel up-warp, the shape of the boundaries, the thickness and shear wave Q of the sediments and mantle, and the depth of the water layer. Of these parameters, the intermediate frequency surface waves are most severely affected by the sediments thickness and shear wave attenuation. fundamental mode Raleigh wave phase velocities measure for paths crossing the basin are extremely low.

  8. Validation of newly designed regional earth system model (RegESM) for Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuncoglu, Ufuk Utku; Sannino, Gianmaria

    2016-06-01

    We present a validation analysis of a regional earth system model system (RegESM) for the Mediterranean Basin. The used configuration of the modeling system includes two active components: a regional climate model (RegCM4) and an ocean modeling system (ROMS). To assess the performance of the coupled modeling system in representing the climate of the basin, the results of the coupled simulation (C50E) are compared to the results obtained by a standalone atmospheric simulation (R50E) as well as several observation datasets. Although there is persistent cold bias in fall and winter, which is also seen in previous studies, the model reproduces the inter-annual variability and the seasonal cycles of sea surface temperature (SST) in a general good agreement with the available observations. The analysis of the near-surface wind distribution and the main circulation of the sea indicates that the coupled model can reproduce the main characteristics of the Mediterranean Sea surface and intermediate layer circulation as well as the seasonal variability of wind speed and direction when it is compared with the available observational datasets. The results also reveal that the simulated near-surface wind speed and direction have poor performance in the Gulf of Lion and surrounding regions that also affects the large positive SST bias in the region due to the insufficient horizontal resolution of the atmospheric component of the coupled modeling system. The simulated seasonal climatologies of the surface heat flux components are also consistent with the CORE.2 and NOCS datasets along with the overestimation in net long-wave radiation and latent heat flux (or evaporation, E), although a large observational uncertainty is found in these variables. Also, the coupled model tends to improve the latent heat flux by providing a better representation of the air-sea interaction as well as total heat flux budget over the sea. Both models are also able to reproduce the temporal evolution of

  9. Integrated turbine-compressor provides air flow for cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, A.

    1970-01-01

    Modified supersonic turbine cycle provides cooling air to surrounding structures. Simplified mechanical design assures correct balance of air flow, allows direct issue of cool air to the structure, and assists in matching turbine work output to work input required by the compressor.

  10. The Effective Mass of a Ball in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messer, J.; Pantaleone, J.

    2010-01-01

    The air surrounding a projectile affects the projectile's motion in three very different ways: the drag force, the buoyant force, and the added mass. The added mass is an increase in the projectile's inertia from the motion of the air around it. Here we experimentally measure the added mass of a spherical projectile in air. The results agree well…

  11. Constraining the physical properties of Titan's empty lake basins using nadir and off-nadir Cassini RADAR backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelides, R. J.; Hayes, A. G.; Mastrogiuseppe, M.; Zebker, H. A.; Farr, T. G.; Malaska, M. J.; Poggiali, V.; Mullen, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We use repeat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations and complementary altimetry passes acquired by the Cassini spacecraft to study the scattering properties of Titan's empty lake basins. The best-fit coefficients from fitting SAR data to a quasi-specular plus diffuse backscatter model suggest that the bright basin floors have a higher dielectric constant, but similar facet-scale rms surface facet slopes, to surrounding terrain. Waveform analysis of altimetry returns reveals that nadir backscatter returns from basin floors are greater than nadir backscatter returns from basin surroundings and have narrower pulse widths. This suggests that floor deposits are structurally distinct from their surroundings, consistent with the interpretation that some of these basins may be filled with evaporitic and/or sedimentary deposits. Basin floor deposits also express a larger diffuse component to their backscatter, which is likely due to variations in subsurface structure or an increase in roughness at the wavelength scale (Hayes, A.G. et al. [2008]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, 9). We generate a high-resolution altimetry radargram of the T30 altimetry pass over an empty lake basin, with which we place geometric constraints on the basin's slopes, rim heights, and depth. Finally, the importance of these backscatter observations and geometric measurements for basin formation mechanisms is briefly discussed.

  12. Synthetic musk emissions from wastewater aeration basins.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Nabin; Sun, Qinyue; Allen, Jonathan O; Westerhoff, Paul; Herckes, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Wastewater aeration basins at publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) can be emission sources for gaseous or aerosolized sewage material. In the present study, particle and gas phase emissions of synthetic musks from covered and uncovered aeration basins were measured. Galaxolide (HHCB), tonalide (AHTN), and celestolide (ADBI) were the most abundant, ranging from 6704 to 344,306 ng m(-3), 45-3816 ng m(-3), and 2-148 ng m(-3) in the gas phase with particle phase concentrations 3 orders of magnitude lower. The musk species were not significantly removed from the exhaust air by an odor control system, yielding substantial daily emission fluxes (∼ 200 g d(-1) for HHCB) into the atmosphere. However, simple dispersion modeling showed that the treatment plants are unlikely to be a major contributor to ambient air concentrations of these species. Emission of synthetic musk species during wastewater treatment is a substantial fate process; more than 14% of the influent HHCB is emitted to the atmosphere in a POTW as opposed to the <1% predicted by an octanol-water partition coefficient and fugacity-based US EPA fate model. The substantial atmospheric emission of these compounds is most likely due to active stripping that occurs in the aeration basins by bubbling air through the sludge. PMID:21122886

  13. Deep seismic structure of the Atacama basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, B.; Rietbrock, A.

    2004-06-01

    The Atacama basin is a prominent morphological anomaly in the Central Andean forearc. 3D seismic structure beneath the depression and its surroundings has been determined from local earthquake tomography. Depth maps of P-wave velocity and attenuation (1/Qp) through the lithosphere reveal a rheologically strong (high Qp and vp) lithospheric block beneath the basin, surrounded by weak regions (low Qp and vp) beneath Pre- and Western Cordilleras. The anomalous lithospheric structure appears to bar hot asthenospheric mantle from penetrating trenchward, and hence causes the volcanic front to be deflected by the Salar de Atacama basin. The cold block may also influence the thermal structure of the subducted slab causing reduced Benioff seismicity and less hydration of mantle rocks evident from reduced vp/vs ratios. Seismic data are hard to reconcile with extension and lithospheric thinning as a mechanism for subsidence of the basin. Instead, high strength of the Atacama lithospheric block may contribute to basin formation by focussing deformation and uplift along the block's weak edges.

  14. Origin of cratonic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev. Klein, George; Hsui, Albert T.

    1987-12-01

    Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520 460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530 500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Resurgent Permian rifting in the Illinois Basin is inferred because of intrusion of well-dated Permian alnoites; such intrusive rocks are normally associated with rifting processes. The process of formation of these cratonic basins remains controversial. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation (around 550 to 500 Ma), histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian super-continent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

  15. Geologic structure generated by large-impact basin formation observed at the South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtake, Makiko; Uemoto, Kisara; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Morota, Tomokatsu; Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Haruyama, Junichi; Iwata, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Ishihara, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    The South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin is the largest clearly recognized basin on the lunar surface. Determining the composition and structure of the SPA basin interior provides critical constraints on the deep crustal and/or mantle composition of the Moon and improves our understanding of large-basin-forming impact processes. Here we present a new mineralogical map of the SPA basin interior, based on high-spatial-resolution reflectance spectra using the SELENE (Kaguya) multiband imager, which is combined with topographic data in order to interpret the geologic context. The derived mineralogical map suggests extensive distribution of ejected low-Ca pyroxene-dominant mantle material with the presence of purest anorthosite crustal materials surrounding a possible melt pool of 0.26 to 0.33 of the basin diameter near the basin center, which is significantly smaller than that suggested by the crater-scaling law. The absence of clear evidence of lower crustal material is consistent with recent impact simulation results.

  16. Physics and technology of vertical surrounding gate MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Christopher Patrick

    As semiconductor devices are scaled into the sub-0.1mum regime, lithographic issues become paramount in further scaling. Additionally, short-channel and poor subthreshold characteristics continue to plague planar MOSFETs. Double-gate or surrounding-gate MOSFETs fabricated on SOI substrates have shown promise in reducing the short channel problems and achieving a nearly ideal subthreshold slope. These devices are hampered by process complexity and floating body effects. They also remain dependent on lithographic techniques for scaling. The vertical, surrounding-gate MOSFET is starting to attract increasing attention for its ability to overcome these problems. Scaling of the channel length is no longer tied to lithography. They have a much smaller footprint than planar devices and the surrounding gate improves control of the gate over the channel potential reducing short channel effects. The vertical structure also decouples the channel length from the packing density. This work will present both simulation and experimental results which were used to examine the potential for the vertical MOSFET in deep submicron applications. The simulation results show an advantage of the cylindrical, surrounding-gate MOSFET over the double-gate structure for short channel length transistors. This improvement results from the increased proximity of the gate to the channel in the cylindrical structure. The benefit of this improved control is illustrated through derivation of a scaling theory for cylindrical MOSFETs. This scaling theory is used as a basis for comparing the cylindrical, surrounding-gate MOSFET to the double-gate MOSFET. Experimental results for vertical, surrounding-gate MOSFETs fabricated on pillars of silicon down to 300A thick are presented, illustrating the potential for fabricating the device at sub-0.1mum dimensions. The results illustrate the features of the device as it is scaled to small pillar thicknesses. The experimental results are compared to both

  17. The Oquirrh basin revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Erskine, M.C.

    1997-04-01

    The upper Paleozoic succession in the Oquirrh basin in unusually thick, up to 9300 m, and consists mainly of a Pennsylvanian-middle Permian miogeocline of northwestern Utah. Previous workers have suggested a tectonic origin for the Oquirrh basin that is incompatible with the basin location in both time and space. There is no evidence for Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian tectonism in the middle of the miogeocline. Thermal evidence from the Mississippian Mission Canyon shale does no support the implied deep burial of the crustal sag models of basin formation. Stratigraphic and facies evidence indicates a growth fault origin for the basin. Regional isopach maps and facies maps are powerful tools in interpreting depositional environments and in reconstructing fold-and-thrust belts. However, the location of measured sections relative to the location of the growth fault basin. The Charleston-Nebo thrust may have essentially reversed the movement on a growth fault. Thick Oquirrh basin sedimentary rocks may not be required to balance structural sections across this thrust fault. A thin-skinned, extensional growth fault origin for the Oquirrh basin implies that the Cordilleran miogeocline did not participate in the Pennsylvanian north-vergent uplifts of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains.

  18. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  19. Analysis of air quality management with emphasis on transportation sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, T. D.; Divita, E.; Lees, L.

    1980-01-01

    The current environment and practices of air quality management were examined for three regions: Denver, Phoenix, and the South Coast Air Basin of California. These regions were chosen because the majority of their air pollution emissions are related to mobile sources. The impact of auto exhaust on the air quality management process is characterized and assessed. An examination of the uncertainties in air pollutant measurements, emission inventories, meteorological parameters, atmospheric chemistry, and air quality simulation models is performed. The implications of these uncertainties to current air quality management practices is discussed. A set of corrective actions are recommended to reduce these uncertainties.

  20. INTEGRATING DISPERSION MODELING, RECEPTOR MODELING AND AIR MONITORING TO APPORTION INCINERATOR IMPACTS FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approach combining air quality measurements, GIS, receptor and dispersion modeling to apportion the impact of incinerator sources to individuals living in surrounding neighborhoods was presented. his technique wall applied to a Health and Clean Air Study investigating the resp...

  1. Effects of land use on the cooling effect of green areas on surrounding urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2011-12-01

    hundred metres. In addition to the land-use factor, it was found that terrain affected the cooling effect of a green area. The green area in the current study site is located on a hill, and the cold air generated over the green area was effectively advected downslope towards the surrounding urban area. The effect of the hill on the cooling effect had not been presumed, and they might be highly significant. Therefore, We suggest accounting for these results during the planning the layout of the urban block and the urban canyon to effectively use the cooling effect of an urban green area.

  2. Summertime ozone formation in Xi'an and surrounding areas, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, T.; Bei, N.; Huang, R.; Cao, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhou, W.; Tie, X.; Liu, S.; Zhang, T.; Su, X.; Lei, W.; Molina, L. T.; Li, G.

    2015-11-01

    In the study, the ozone (O3) formation is investigated in Xi'an and surrounding areas, China using the WRF-CHEM model during the period from 22 to 24 August 2013 corresponding to a heavy air pollution episode with high concentrations of O3 and PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm). The WRF-CHEM model generally performs well in simulating the surface temperature and relative humidity compared to the observations and also reasonably reproduces the observed temporal variations of the surface wind speed and direction. The convergence formed in Xi'an and surrounding areas is favorable for the accumulation of pollutants, causing high concentrations of O3 and PM2.5. In general, the calculated spatial patterns and temporal variations of near-surface O3 and PM2.5 are consistent well with the measurement at the ambient monitoring stations. The simulated daily mass concentrations of aerosol constituents, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, elemental and organic carbon, are also in good agreement with the filter measurements. High aerosol concentrations in Xi'an and surrounding areas significantly decrease the photolysis frequencies and can reduce near-surface O3 concentrations by more than 50 μg m-3 (around 25 ppb) on average. Sensitivity studies show that the O3 production regime in Xi'an and surrounding areas is complicated, varying from NOx to VOC-sensitive chemistry. The industry emissions contribute the most to the O3 concentrations compared to the natural and other anthropogenic sources, but still do not play a determined role in the O3 formation. The complicated O3 production regime and high aerosol levels constitute a dilemma for O3 control strategies in Xi'an and surrounding areas. In the condition with high O3 and PM2.5 concentrations, decreasing various anthropogenic emissions cannot efficiently mitigate the O3 pollution, and a 50 % reduction of all the anthropogenic emissions only decreases near-surface O3 concentrations by less

  3. Radio observations of supernova remnants and the surrounding molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    Supernova Remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the main source of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The strong SNR shocks provide ideal acceleration sites for particles of at least ˜ 1014 eV/nucleon. Radio continuum studies of SNRs carried out with good sensitivity and high angular resolution convey information about three main aspects of the SNRs: morphology, polarization and spectrum. Based on this information it is possible to localize sites of higher compression and particle acceleration as well as the orientation and degree of order of the magnetic fields, and in some cases even its intensity. All this information, when complemented with the study of the distribution and kinematics of the surrounding interstellar gas, results in a very useful dataset to investigate the role of SNRs as cosmic ray accelerators. In this presentation, I analyze the radio observations of SNRs and surrounding molecular clouds, showing the contribution of these studies to the understanding of the role of SNRs as factories of CRs.

  4. Dynamics of two-component membranes surrounded by viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Komura, Shigeyuki; Yasuda, Kento; Okamoto, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the dynamics of two-component fluid membranes which are surrounded by viscoelastic media. We assume that membrane-embedded proteins can diffuse laterally and induce a local membrane curvature. The mean squared displacement of a tagged membrane segment is obtained as a generalized Einstein relation. When the elasticity of the surrounding media obeys a power-law behavior in frequency, an anomalous diffusion of the membrane segment is predicted. We also consider the situation where the proteins generate active non-equilibrium forces. The generalized Einstein relation is further modified by an effective temperature that depends on the force dipole energy. The obtained generalized Einstein relations are useful for membrane microrheology experiments. PMID:26448393

  5. Clutter modeling of the Denver Airport and surrounding areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrah, Steven D.; Delmore, Victor E.; Onstott, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    To accurately simulate and evaluate an airborne Doppler radar as a wind shear detection and avoidance sensor, the ground clutter surrounding a typical airport must be quantified. To do this, an imaging airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was employed to investigate and map the normalized radar cross sections (NRCS) of the ground terrain surrounding the Denver Stapleton Airport during November of 1988. Images of the Stapleton ground clutter scene were obtained at a variety of aspect and elevation angles (extending to near-grazing) at both HH and VV polarizations. Presented here, in viewgraph form with commentary, are the method of data collection, the specific observations obtained of the Denver area, a summary of the quantitative analysis performed on the SAR images to date, and the statistical modeling of several of the more interesting stationary targets in the SAR database. Additionally, the accompanying moving target database, containing NRCS and velocity information, is described.

  6. Greenstone belts: Their boundaries, surrounding rock terrains and interrelationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percival, J. A.; Card, K. D.

    1986-01-01

    Greenstone belts are an important part of the fragmented record of crustal evolution, representing samples of the magmatic activity that formed much of the Earth's crust. Most belts developed rapidly, in less than 100 Ma, leaving large gaps in the geological record. Surrounding terrains provide information on the context of greenstone belts. The effects of tectonic setting, structural geometry and evolution, associated plutonic activity and sedimentation are discussed.

  7. 14. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, OF 'NAVY PIER' SURROUNDED BY BARGES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, OF 'NAVY PIER' SURROUNDED BY BARGES, AND SHIP LOADING GRAIN AT OUTSHORE HALF OF TERMINAL PIER UNDER CARGO MASTS AND GRAIN GALLERY D, July 7, 1922 (Original negative destroyed, print in Barge Canal Construction Photographs, Box 12, Series 501, Accession No.336-85) - New York Barge Canal, Gowanus Bay Terminal Pier, East of bulkhead supporting Columbia Street, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  8. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  9. Crustal structure of the Iberian Peninsula and surrounding regions from ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villasenor, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present new high-resolution images of the crust in the Iberian Peninsula and surrounding regions using seismic ambient noise. We have compiled continuous recordings of all permanent broadband stations and temporary experiments in the region (IberArray, WILAS, PYROPE, PICASSO) from 2007 to 2014. This dataset consists of more than 400 broadband stations, although not all of them were operating simultaneously. We cross-correlate the three components these continuous recordings between all station pairs to obtain empirical Green's functions (EFGs). From these EGFs we measure group and phase velocities of the fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love waves, and also obtain estimates of Rayleigh wave ellipticity. We then perform a 2D tomographic inversion of the dispersion measurements to obtain phase and group velocity maps of Rayleigh and Love waves for periods from 4 to 40 seconds. The short period dispersion and ellipticity maps show excellent correlation with surface features (i.e. sedimentary basins, internal zones of mountain ranges, and stable regions), while maps for longer periods are a good proxy for crustal thickness. Due to the high station density of the dataset used we are able to image the entire Iberian Peninsula with unprecedented resolution, resolving small scale structures such as the West Alboran and Lower Tagus basins, the high anomaly associated with the Ronda-Beni Bousera peridotites, etc. We also investigate the existence of azimuthal anisotropy of Rayleigh wave velocities as a function of period (i.e. depth) . Given the good correlation of the new dispersion maps with gravity anomalies, estimates of crustal thickness from receiver functions, and P-wave velocities from local earthquake tomography, our ultimate objective is to obtain an integrated model of shear-wave structure that fits all these datasets.

  10. Crustal structure and deformation under the Longmenshan and its surroundings revealed by receiver function data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ya; Liu, Jianxin; Zhou, Keping; Chen, Bo; Guo, Rongwen

    2015-07-01

    The convergence of India and Eurasia and the obstruction from the rigid Sichuan Basin cause the Longmenshan (LMS) to have the steepest topographic gradient at the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. However, the mechanisms of surface uplift are still controversial. In this paper, we estimate the crustal structure and deformation under the LMS and its surroundings by analyzing a large amount of receiver function data recorded by regional seismic networks of the China Earthquake Administration. We apply a comprehensive splitting measurement technique on Ps conversion phase at the Moho (Moho Ps splitting) to calculate crustal anisotropy from azimuthal variations of receiver functions. Our results show that most of the seismic stations beneath the LMS area exhibit significant seismic anisotropy with the splitting time of 0.22-0.94 s and a fast polarization direction of NW-SE, while less or even no crustal anisotropy has been observed under the Sichuan Basin. Comparing the fast polarization directions of Moho Ps splitting with the indicators of lithospheric deformation (such as shear wave splitting, absolute plate motion, and global positioning system) imply a consistent tendency of deformation between the lower crust and upper mantle, but decoupling deformation in the crust beneath the LMS area. We further compare Moho Ps splitting time to that estimated from previous SKS splitting, indicating that crustal anisotropy is an important source of the SKS splitting time in this study area. In addition, a thick crust (>50 km) with high Vp/Vs values (1.74-1.86) is also observed using the H-κ stacking method. These seismic observations are consistent with the scenario that the LMS area has been built by the lower crustal flow. Combined with the seismic reflection/refraction profile and geology studies, we further suggest that the lower crustal flow may extrude upward into the upper crust along the steeply dipping strike faults under the LMS area, resulting in the surface

  11. Isostatic Model and Isostatic Gravity Anomalies of the Arabian Plate and Surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaban, Mikhail K.; El Khrepy, Sami; Al-Arifi, Nassir

    2016-04-01

    The isostatic modeling represents one of the most useful "geological" reduction methods of the gravity field. With the isostatic correction, it is possible to remove a significant part of the effect of deep density heterogeneity, which dominates in the Bouguer gravity anomalies. Although there exist several isostatic compensation schemes, it is usually supposed that a choice of the model is not an important factor to first order, since the total weight of compensating masses remains the same. We compare two alternative models for the Arabian plate and surrounding area. The Airy model gives very significant regional isostatic anomalies, which cannot be explained by the upper crust structure or disturbances of the isostatic equilibrium. Also, the predicted "isostatic" Moho is very different from existing seismic observations. The second isostatic model includes the Moho, which is based on seismic determinations. Additional compensation is provided by density variations within the lithosphere (chiefly in the upper mantle). According to this model, the upper mantle under the Arabian Shield is less dense than under the Platform. In the Arabian platform, the maximum density coincides with the Rub' al Khali, one of the richest oil basin in the world. This finding agrees with previous studies, showing that such basins are often underlain by dense mantle, possibly related to an eclogite layer that has caused their subsidence. The mantle density variations might be also a result of variations of the lithosphere thickness. With the combined isostatic model, it is possible to minimize regional anomalies over the Arabian plate. The residual local anomalies correspond well to tectonic structure of the plate. Still very significant anomalies, showing isostatic disturbances of the lithosphere, are associated with the Zagros fold belt, the collision zone of the Arabian and Eurasian plates.

  12. Numerical simulation on zonal disintegration in deep surrounding rock mass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuguang; Wang, Yuan; Mei, Yu; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Zonal disintegration have been discovered in many underground tunnels with the increasing of embedded depth. The formation mechanism of such phenomenon is difficult to explain under the framework of traditional rock mechanics, and the fractured shape and forming conditions are unclear. The numerical simulation was carried out to research the generating condition and forming process of zonal disintegration. Via comparing the results with the geomechanical model test, the zonal disintegration phenomenon was confirmed and its mechanism is revealed. It is found to be the result of circular fracture which develops within surrounding rock mass under the high geostress. The fractured shape of zonal disintegration was determined, and the radii of the fractured zones were found to fulfill the relationship of geometric progression. The numerical results were in accordance with the model test findings. The mechanism of the zonal disintegration was revealed by theoretical analysis based on fracture mechanics. The fractured zones are reportedly circular and concentric to the cavern. Each fracture zone ruptured at the elastic-plastic boundary of the surrounding rocks and then coalesced into the circular form. The geometric progression ratio was found to be related to the mechanical parameters and the ground stress of the surrounding rocks. PMID:24592166

  13. Geomorphic Evolution of Sputnik Planum and Surrounding Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, A. D.; Moore, J. M.; White, O. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Schenk, P.; Beyer, R. A.; McKinnon, W. B.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.

    2015-12-01

    The informally-named Sputnik Planum is a vast expanse (about 835 km east-west and 1500 km north-south) of N2, CH4, and CO ices which appears craterless at current resolutions, but which gives evidence of both glacial and convective flow in the ices (Stern and the New Horizons Team, Science, 2015). This ice field is surrounded by uplands of varying morphology from hilly terrain to the northeast, plains of apparent ices interspersed with rough terrain to the east, and textured ice surrounding the mountainous terrain to the southwest. The morphology and composition of this bordering terrain will provide clues to the long-term evolution of Sputnik Planum as higher resolution visual and spectral imaging of this region are returned from the New Horizons spacecraft over the next few months. Interactions between Sputnik Planum and surrounding terrain may have involved glacial erosion and deposition. The geomorphic evolution of this region will be discussed in the context of newly-returned encounter data.

  14. Numerical Simulation on Zonal Disintegration in Deep Surrounding Rock Mass

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuguang; Wang, Yuan; Mei, Yu; Zhang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Zonal disintegration have been discovered in many underground tunnels with the increasing of embedded depth. The formation mechanism of such phenomenon is difficult to explain under the framework of traditional rock mechanics, and the fractured shape and forming conditions are unclear. The numerical simulation was carried out to research the generating condition and forming process of zonal disintegration. Via comparing the results with the geomechanical model test, the zonal disintegration phenomenon was confirmed and its mechanism is revealed. It is found to be the result of circular fracture which develops within surrounding rock mass under the high geostress. The fractured shape of zonal disintegration was determined, and the radii of the fractured zones were found to fulfill the relationship of geometric progression. The numerical results were in accordance with the model test findings. The mechanism of the zonal disintegration was revealed by theoretical analysis based on fracture mechanics. The fractured zones are reportedly circular and concentric to the cavern. Each fracture zone ruptured at the elastic-plastic boundary of the surrounding rocks and then coalesced into the circular form. The geometric progression ratio was found to be related to the mechanical parameters and the ground stress of the surrounding rocks. PMID:24592166

  15. Compilation of hydrologic data for White Sands pupfish habitat and nonhabitat areas, northern Tularosa Basin, White Sands Missile Range and Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico, 1911-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naus, C.A.; Myers, R.G.; Saleh, D.K.; Myers, N.C.

    2014-01-01

    The White Sands pupfish (Cyprinodon tularosa), listed as threatened by the State of New Mexico and as a Federal species of concern, is endemic to the Tularosa Basin, New Mexico. Because water quality can affect pupfish and the environmental conditions of their habitat, a comprehensive compilation of hydrologic data for pupfish habitat and nonhabitat areas in the northern Tularosa Basin was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with White Sands Missile Range. The four locations within the Tularosa Basin that are known pupfish habitat areas are the Salt Creek, Malpais Spring and Malpais Salt Marsh, Main Mound Spring, and Lost River habitat areas. Streamflow data from the Salt Creek near Tularosa streamflow-gaging station indicated that the average annual mean streamflow and average annual total streamflow for water years 1995–2008 were 1.35 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) and 983 acre-feet, respectively. Periods of no flow were observed in water years 2002 through 2006. Dissolved-solids concentrations in Salt Creek samples collected from 1911 through 2007 ranged from 2,290 to 66,700 milligrams per liter (mg/L). The average annual mean streamflow and average annual total streamflow at the Malpais Spring near Oscura streamflow-gaging station for water years 2003–8 were 6.81 ft3/s and 584 acre-feet, respectively. Dissolved-solids concentrations for 16 Malpais Spring samples ranged from 3,882 to 5,500 mg/L. Isotopic data for a Malpais Spring near Oscura water sample collected in 1982 indicated that the water was more than 27,900 years old. Streamflow from Main Mound Spring was estimated at 0.007 ft3/s in 1955 and 1957 and ranged from 0.02 to 0.07 ft3/s from 1996 to 2001. Dissolved-solids concentrations in samples collected between 1955 and 2007 ranged from an estimated 3,760 to 4,240 mg/L in the upper pond and 4,840 to 5,120 mg/L in the lower pond. Isotopic data for a Main Mound Spring water sample collected in 1982 indicated that the water was about

  16. A Two-Stage Information-Theoretic Approach to Modeling Landscape-Level Attributes and Maximum Recruitment of Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, William L.; Lee, Danny C.

    2000-11-01

    Many anadromous salmonid stocks in the Pacific Northwest are at their lowest recorded levels, which has raised questions regarding their long-term persistence under current conditions. There are a number of factors, such as freshwater spawning and rearing habitat, that could potentially influence their numbers. Therefore, we used the latest advances in information-theoretic methods in a two-stage modeling process to investigate relationships between landscape-level habitat attributes and maximum recruitment of 25 index stocks of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Columbia River basin. Our first-stage model selection results indicated that the Ricker-type, stock recruitment model with a constant Ricker a (i.e., recruits-per-spawner at low numbers of fish) across stocks was the only plausible one given these data, which contrasted with previous unpublished findings. Our second-stage results revealed that maximum recruitment of chinook salmon had a strongly negative relationship with percentage of surrounding subwatersheds categorized as predominantly containing U.S. Forest Service and private moderate-high impact managed forest. That is, our model predicted that average maximum recruitment of chinook salmon would decrease by at least 247 fish for every increase of 33% in surrounding subwatersheds categorized as predominantly containing U.S. Forest Service and privately managed forest. Conversely, mean annual air temperature had a positive relationship with salmon maximum recruitment, with an average increase of at least 179 fish for every increase in 2 C mean annual air temperature.

  17. Surface deformation of Taipei basin detected by Differential SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chang, C.; Yen, J.; Lin, M.

    2006-12-01

    Taiwan island is located between the southeastern periphery of the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. The two converging plates produced very active tectonics, and can be seen by the high seismicity and deformation rate. Taipei, the highest populated area, center of politics, and economics in Taiwan, is in Taipei basin at the northern part of the island. There are several faults in and surrounding the basin, and the city is threatened with a high geological hazard potential that we should keep monitoring the crustal deformation to prevent and mitigate the disaster effect. The aims of our study is to apply the DInSAR technique to determine the surface deformation of Taipei basin area, and discussing the relation between the manifestation of deformation and the tectonically active region, Shanjiao fault. In the past few years, Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) has been proved to be a powerful technique for monitoring the neotectonic activities and natural hazards. High spatial sampling rate of DInSAR technique allows studies of surface deformations with centimeter accuracy. In this area, we used ERS-1/2 SAR images acquired from 1993 to 2005 to generate 10 differential interferograms and processed the data using DIAPASON developed by CNES and SRTM global DEM.From our results, the deformation rate in Taipei is generally high in the western end of the basin along the Shanjiao fault and decrease eastward, while the subsidence center often appeared in the center of the Taipei basin. The neotectonic activity of the Shanjiao fault appeared to be insignificant by itself but it seemed to separate the subsiding basin from the surrounding areas. Further comparison between our DInSAR results and isopach of the Taipei basin revealed that the subsidence centers appeared in the interferograms did not coincide with the location where the sediments are thickest. Our results from differential interferometry will be compared to other geodetic measurements such as the

  18. Drought Variability in Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meko, D. M.; Touchan, R.

    2010-12-01

    Projections from general circulation models are consistent in identifying the Mediterranean Basin as a region of expected drying in response to increased greenhouse gases. The Mediterranean and its bordering countries, while giving rise to the classic “Mediterranean” climate-type, are characterized by a complex precipitation climatology, with strong influences from land-sea contrasts, topography, intrusions of polar air from various lowland pathways, and occasional tropical influence from systems originating south of the Atlas Mountains. Identification of an anthropogenic signature of drying with instrumental climate data can benefit from information on the natural spatio-temporal variability of drought on time scales of decades to centuries in this complex precipitation regime. An expanding tree-ring network will eventually yield multi-century drought records for the region (117 chronologies now developed or in progress). Aspects of spatio-temporal variability on shorter time scales in the southern part of the Mediterranan Basin (south of about 40°N) are examined in this presentation with the aid of gridded precipitation, temperature and Z-index - a dimensionless intermediate variable in Palmer Drought Index computation. Cross-spectral analysis is applied to summarize covariance of drought-related variables across the region. Ocean-atmosphere circulation indices are explored for direct causative factors in episodes of exceptional widespread seasonal and multi-season drought in the region.

  19. Orientale Impact Basin: Topographic Characterization from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) Data and Implications for Models of Basin Formation and Filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James; Smith, David; Zuber, Maria; Neumann, Gregory; Fassett, Caleb; Whitten, Jennifer; Garrick-Bethell, Ian

    2010-05-01

    The 920 km diameter Orientale basin is the youngest and most well-preserved large multi-ringed impact basin on the Moon; it has not been significantly filled with mare basalts, as have other lunar impact basins, and thus the basin interior deposits and ring structures are very well-exposed and provide major insight into the formation and evolution of planetary multi-ringed impact basins. We report here on the acquisition of new altimetry data for the Orientale basin from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Pre-basin structure had a major effect on the formation of Orientale; we have mapped dozens of impact craters underlying both the Orientale ejecta (Hevelius Formation-HF) and the unit between the basin rim (Cordillera ring-CR) and the Outer Rook ring (OR) (known as the Montes Rook Formation-MRF), ranging up in size to the 630 km diameter Mendel-Rydberg basin just to the south of Orientale; this crater-basin topography has influenced the topographic development of the basin rim (CR), sometimes causing the basin rim to lie at a topographically lower level than the inner basin rings (OR and Inner Rook-IR). In contrast to some previous interpretations, the distribution of these features supports the interpretation that the OR ring is the closest approximation to the basin excavation cavity. The total basin interior topography is highly variable and typically ranges ~6-7 km below the surrounding pre-basin surface, with significant variations in different quadrants. The inner basin depression is about 2-4 km deep below the IR plateau. These data aid in the understanding of the transition from peak-ring to multi-ringed basins and permit the quantitative assessment of post-basin-formation thermal response to impact energy input and uplifted isotherms. The Maunder Formation (MF) consists of smooth plains (on the inner basin depression walls and floor) and corrugated deposits (on the IR plateau); also observed are depressions

  20. Lithium-Air Battery: High Performance Cathodes for Lithium-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    2010-08-01

    BEEST Project: Researchers at Missouri S&T are developing an affordable lithium-air (Li-Air) battery that could enable an EV to travel up to 350 miles on a single charge. Today’s EVs run on Li-Ion batteries, which are expensive and suffer from low energy density compared with gasoline. This new Li-Air battery could perform as well as gasoline and store 3 times more energy than current Li-Ion batteries. A Li-Air battery uses an air cathode to breathe oxygen into the battery from the surrounding air, like a human lung. The oxygen and lithium react in the battery to produce electricity. Current Li-Air batteries are limited by the rate at which they can draw oxygen from the air. The team is designing a battery using hierarchical electrode structures to enhance air breathing and effective catalysts to accelerate electricity production.

  1. Air weapon fatalities.

    PubMed Central

    Milroy, C M; Clark, J C; Carter, N; Rutty, G; Rooney, N

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To describe characteristics of a series of people accidentally and deliberately killed by air powered weapons. METHODS: Five cases of fatal airgun injury were identified by forensic pathologists and histopathologists. The circumstances surrounding the case, radiological examination, and pathological findings are described. The weapon characteristics are also reported. RESULTS: Three of the victims were adult men, one was a 16 year old boy, and one an eight year old child. Four of the airguns were .22 air rifles, the other a .177 air rifle. Two committed suicide, one person shooting himself in the head, the other in the chest. In both cases the guns were fired at contact range. Three of the cases were classified as accidents: in two the pellet penetrated into the head and in one the chest. CONCLUSIONS: One person each year dies from an air powered weapon injury in the United Kingdom. In addition there is considerable morbidity from airgun injuries. Fatalities and injuries are most commonly accidents, but deliberately inflicted injuries occur. Airguns are dangerous weapons when inappropriately handled and should not be considered as toys. Children should not play with airguns unsupervised. Images PMID:9797730

  2. Reserves in western basins

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of tight gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins: the Greater Green River (GGRB), Uinta and Piceance basins. The basins contain vast gas resources that have been estimated in the thousands of Tcf hosted in low permeability clastic reservoirs. This study documents the productive characteristics of these tight reservoirs, requantifies gas in place resources, and characterizes the reserves potential of each basin. The purpose of this work is to promote understanding of the resource and to encourage its exploitation by private industry. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and a final report published. Work is well underway in the Uinta and Piceance basins which are being handled concurrently, with reports on these basins being scheduled for the middle of this year. Since the GGRB portion of the project has been completed, this presentation win focus upon that basin. A key conclusion of this study was the subdivision of the resource, based upon economic and technological considerations, into groupings that have distinct properties with regard to potential for future producibility, economics and risk profile.

  3. Spatial distribution and accumulation of Hg in soil surrounding a Zn/Pb smelter.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingru; Wang, Shuxiao; Wang, Long; Liu, Fang; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Fengyang

    2014-10-15

    Nonferrous metal smelting is an important atmospheric mercury (Hg) emission source that has significant local and global impacts. To quantify the impact of Hg emission from non-ferrous metal smelter on the surrounding soil, an integrated model parameterizing the processes of smelter emission, air dispersion, atmospheric deposition and Hg accumulation in soil was developed. The concentrations of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) around the smelter and the spatial distribution of Hg in the surrounding soil were measured and compared with the model results. Atmospheric deposition of Hg emitted from the smelter was identified as the main source of Hg accumulation in the surrounding soil. From 1960 to 2011, the smelter emitted approximately 105 t of Hg into the atmosphere, of which 15 t deposited locally and resulted in an increase of Hg concentration in soil from 0.12 to 1.77 mg kg(-1). A detailed examination of wind rose and model data suggested that the area within 1.0-1.5 km northwest and southeast of the smelter was most severely impacted. It was estimated that the smelter operation from 1969 to 1990, when large scale emission controls were not implemented, resulted in 6450 μg m(-2)yr(-1) of Hg net deposition and a model simulated increase of 0.40 mg kg(-1) of Hg accumulation in the soil. During the period from 1991 to 2011, atmospheric Hg emission from the smelter alone increased the average concentration in soil from 0.41 mg kg(-1) to 0.45 mg kg(-1). In the past 50 years, over 86% of Hg emitted from this smelter went into the global pool, indicating the importance of controlling Hg emissions from non-ferrous metal smelters. PMID:24612491

  4. 3D Crustal structure of Longmenshan and its surroundings revealed by receiver function data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ya; Liu, jianxin

    2015-04-01

    Due to the convergence of India-Eurasia plates and the obstruction from the Sichuan Basin, Longmenshan (LMS) has suffered the steepest uplifting in the eastern Tibetan Plateau. However, the mechanisms of surface uplift are still controversial. In this paper, we estimate the crustal structure and deformation under LMS and its surroundings by analyzing a large amount of receiver functions data recorded by regional seismic networks of the China Earthquake Administration. A comprehensive splitting measurement technique is used to calculate the seismic anisotropy from azimuthal variations of receiver functions in this paper. Our results show that most of the seismic stations located near LMS exhibit significant seismic anisotropy with the splitting time of 0.22-0.94s and a fast polarization direction of NW-SE. Both the splitting time and fast polarization are comparable to those estimated from SKS/SKKS data, indicating that half of the SKS/SKKS splitting time may be caused by the lower crustal deformation. It also indicates that the deformation patterns of the crust and upper mantle may be vertically coherent, but incoherent between the upper crust and lower crust based on comparison of GPS data. In addition, both the Moho depth and Vp/Vs ratio are estimated using the H-κ stacking method. The results show a distinct difference between the west of LMS and the Sichuan Basin. Stations on the west of LMS have high Vp/Vs values (1.74-1.86) and very thick crust (>55 km), while a relatively low Vp/Vs (~1.70) and shallow Moho depth (<45 km) for the stations on the east of LMS. All of these observations sustain a scenario in which, the lower crustal materials flow and accumulate in the southeastern Songpan-Ganzi and LMS region. Combined with the observation of low effective elastic thickness and a thin lithosphere, we suggest that this lower crustal material may partly extrude along a subvertical trajectory into the weak mantle lithosphere as a result of the continuous

  5. Dependence of fluorescence lifetimes of Y2O3:Eu3+ nanoparticles on the surrounding medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltzer, R. S.; Feofilov, S. P.; Tissue, B.; Yuan, H. B.

    1999-11-01

    The radiative lifetime, τR, of the 5D0 metastable excited state of Eu3+ ions in nanocrystalline monoclinic Y2O3 samples is about four times longer than that in the micron size powder of the same material. The Eu3+ radiative lifetime was measured in nanocrystals surrounded with air as well as those immersed in different liquids. It is shown that the radiative lifetime changes with the index of refraction of the immersion medium and provides a unique test of the standard formula relating τR and the oscillator strength. The magnitude of the effect is determined by the ``filling factor'' (the fraction of the sample volume occupied by nanocrystals) which can therefore be determined.

  6. Atmospheric mercury emissions from mine wastes and surrounding geologically enriched terrains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gustin, M.S.; Coolbaugh, M.F.; Engle, M.A.; Fitzgerald, B.C.; Keislar, R.E.; Lindberg, S.E.; Nacht, D.M.; Quashnick, J.; Rytuba, J.J.; Sladek, C.; Zhang, H.; Zehner, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Waste rock and ore associated with Hg, precious and base metal mining, and their surrounding host rocks are typically enriched in mercury relative to natural background concentrations (<0.1 ??g Hg g-1). Mercury fluxes to the atmosphere from mineralized areas can range from background rates (0-15 ng m-2 h-1) to tens of thousands of ng m-2 h-1. Mercury enriched substrate constitutes a long-term source of mercury to the global atmospheric mercury pool. Mercury emissions from substrate are influenced by light, temperature, precipitation, and substrate mercury concentration, and occur during the day and night. Light-enhanced emissions are driven by two processes: desorption of elemental mercury accumulated at the soil:air interface, and photo reduction of mercury containing phases. To determine the need for and effectiveness of regulatory controls on short-lived anthropogenic point sources the contribution of mercury from geologic non-point sources to the atmospheric mercury pool needs to be quantified. The atmospheric mercury contribution from small areas of mining disturbance with relatively high mercury concentrations are, in general, less than that from surrounding large areas of low levels of mercury enrichment. In the arid to semi-arid west-ern United States volatilization is the primary means by which mercury is released from enriched sites.

  7. Soil mercury levels in the area surrounding the Cerro Prieto geothermal complex, MEXICO.

    PubMed

    Pastrana-Corral, M A; Wakida, F T; García-Flores, E; Rodriguez-Mendivil, D D; Quiñonez-Plaza, A; Piñon-Colin, T D J

    2016-08-01

    Even though geothermal energy is a renewable energy source that is seen as cost-effective and environmentally friendly, emissions from geothermal plants can impact air, soil, and water in the vicinity of geothermal power plants. The Cerro Prieto geothermal complex is located 30 km southeast of the city of Mexicali in the Mexican state of Baja California. Its installed electricity generation capacity is 720 MW, being the largest geothermal complex in Mexico. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the emissions generated by the geothermal complex have increased the soil mercury concentration in the surrounding areas. Fifty-four surface soil samples were collected from the perimeter up to an approximate distance of 7660 m from the complex. Additionally, four soil depth profiles were performed in the vicinity of the complex. Mercury concentration in 69 % of the samples was higher than the mercury concentration found at the baseline sites. The mercury concentration ranged from 0.01 to 0.26 mg/kg. Our results show that the activities of the geothermal complex have led to an accumulation of mercury in the soil of the surrounding area. More studies are needed to determine the risk to human health and the ecosystems in the study area. PMID:27418073

  8. Atmospheric mercury emissions from mine wastes and surrounding geologically enriched terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Gustin, Mae S.; Coolbaugh, M. F.; Engle, M. A.; Fitzgerald, B. C.; Keislar, R. E.; Lindberg, Steven Eric; Nacht, D. M.; Quashnick, J.; Rytuba, J. J.; Sladek, C.; Zhang, Hong; Zehner, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    Waste rock and ore associated with Hg, precious and base metal mining, and their surrounding host rocks are typically enriched in mercury relative to natural background concentrations (<0.1 {micro}g Hg g{sup -1}). Mercury fluxes to the atmosphere from mineralized areas can range from background rates (0-15 ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1}) to tens of thousands of ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1}. Mercury enriched substrate constitutes a long-term source of mercury to the global atmospheric mercury pool. Mercury emissions from substrate are influenced by light, temperature, precipitation, and substrate mercury concentration, and occur during the day and night. Light-enhanced emissions are driven by two processes: desorption of elemental mercury accumulated at the soil:air interface, and photo reduction of mercury containing phases. To determine the need for and effectiveness of regulatory controls on short-lived anthropogenic point sources the contribution of mercury from geologic non-point sources to the atmospheric mercury pool needs to be quantified. The atmospheric mercury contribution from small areas of mining disturbance with relatively high mercury concentrations are, in general, less than that from surrounding large areas of low levels of mercury enrichment. In the arid to semi-arid western United States volatilization is the primary means by which mercury is released from enriched sites.

  9. Stratigraphy of the Caloris Basin, Mercury: Implications for Volcanic History and Basin Impact Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Carolyn M.; Denevi, Brett W.; Barnouin, Olivier S.; Klimczak, Christian; Chabot, Nancy L.; Head, James W.; Murchie, Scott L.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Prockter, Louis M.; Robinson, Mark S.; Solomon, Sean C.; Watters, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Caloris basin, Mercury's youngest large impact basin, is filled by volcanic plains that are spectrally distinct from surrounding material. Post-plains impact craters of a variety of sizes populate the basin interior, and the spectra of the material they have excavated enable the thickness of the volcanic fill to be estimated and reveal the nature of the subsurface. The thickness of the interior volcanic plains is consistently at least 2.5 km, reaching 3.5 km in places, with thinner fill toward the edge of the basin. No systematic variations in fill thickness are observed with long-wavelength topography or azimuth. The lack of correlation between plains thickness and variations in elevation at large horizontal scales within the basin indicates that plains emplacement must have predated most, if not all, of the changes in long-wavelength topography that affected the basin. There are no embayed or unambiguously buried (ghost) craters with diameters greater than 10 km in the Caloris interior plains. The absence of such ghost craters indicates that one or more of the following scenarios must hold: the plains are sufficiently thick to have buried all evidence of craters that formed between the Caloris impact event and the emplacement of the plains; the plains were emplaced soon after basin formation; or the complex tectonic deformation of the basin interior has disguised wrinkle-ridge rings localized by buried craters. That low-reflectance material (LRM) was exposed by every impact that penetrated through the surface volcanic plains provides a means to explore near-surface stratigraphy. If all occurrences of LRM are derived from a single layer, the subsurface LRM deposit is at least 7.5-8.5 km thick and its top likely once made up the Caloris basin floor. The Caloris-forming impact would have generated a layer of impact melt 3-15 km thick; such a layer could account for the entire thickness of LRM. This material would have been derived from a combination of lower crust

  10. Air tamponade of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Orłowski, Tadeusz; Iwanowicz, Katarzyna; Snarska, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    Pneumopericardium is a rare disease defined as the presence of air or gas in the pericardial sac. Among the etiological factors, the following stand out: chest trauma, barotrauma, air-containing fistulas between the pericardium and the surrounding structures, secondary gas production by microorganisms growing in the pericardial sac, and iatrogenic factors. Until now, spontaneous pneumopericardium has been considered a harmless and temporary state, but a review of clinical cases indicates that the presence of air in the pericardium can lead to cardiac tamponade and life-threatening hemodynamic disturbances. We present the case of an 80-year-old patient with a chronic bronchopericardial fistula, who suffered from a cardiac arrest due to air tamponade of the heart. PMID:27516791

  11. Permian evolution of sandstone composition in a complex back-arc extensional to foreland basin: The Bowen Basin, eastern Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.C. . Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis); Fielding, C.R. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Caritat, P de . Dept. of Geology); Wilkinson, M.M. )

    1993-09-01

    The Bowen Basin is a Permo-Triassic, back-arc extensional to foreland basin that developed landward of an intermittently active continental volcanic arc associated with the eastern Australian convergent plate margin. The basin has a complex, polyphase tectonic history that began with limited back-arc crustal extension during the Early Permian. This created a series of north-trending grabens and half grabens which, in the west, accommodated quartz-rich sediment derived locally from surrounding, uplifted continental basement. In the east, coeval calc-alkaline, volcanolithic-rich, and volcaniclastic sediment was derived from the active volcanic arc. This early extensional episode was followed by a phase of passive thermal subsidence accompanied by episodic compression during the late Early Permian to early Late Permian, with little contemporaneous volcanism. In the west, quartzose sediment was shed from stable, polymictic, continental basement immediately to the west and south of the basin, whereas volcanolithic-rich sediment that entered the eastern side of the basin during this time was presumably derived from the inactive, and possibly partly submerged volcanic arc. During the late Late Permian, flexural loading and increased compression occurred along the eastern margin of the Bowen Basin, and renewed volcanism took place in the arc system to the east. Reactivation of this arc led to westward and southward spread of volcanolithic-rich sediment over the entire basin. Accordingly, areas in the west that were earlier receiving quartzose, craton-derived sediment from the west and south were overwhelmed by volcanolithic-rich, arc-derived sediment from the east and north. This transition from quartz-rich, craton-derived sediments to volcanolithic-rich, arc-derived sediments is consistent with the interpreted back-arc extensional to foreland basin origin for the Bowen Basin.

  12. A study of acute respiratory disease in families exposed to different levels of Air pollution in the Great Salt Lake basin, Utah, 1971-1972 and 1972-1973.

    PubMed

    Love, G J; Lan, S P; Shy, C M

    1982-04-01

    The reported incidence of acute respiratory illness in families exposed to different concentrations of air pollution was studied during two consecutive school years. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of increased exposure to sulfur dioxide and suspended particulate matter. In each of four study communities, the mothers of approximately 250 white families were contacted biweekly to obtain information regarding the occurrence of respiratory symptoms in each family member. Annual mean ambient sulfur dioxide concentrations in one community for the three years included in the study (1971-1973) were well above the current air quality standard of 80 micrograms/m3, while in the other three communities the annual sulfur dioxide concentrations were much lower (usually less than 40 micrograms/m3). Suspended particulate matter concentrations in high sulfur dioxide community were close to the limit designated by the annual standard (75 micrograms/m3) but actual exposures in the four communities probably were not excessive. Regression analyses of the data collected showed inconsistent associations between illness rates and educational attainment of the head of household, crowding in the home, bronchitis in parents or smoking of parents. However, once the effects of these factors were removed the adjusted rates showed little association with community of residence. It was concluded that the higher concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the Utah atmosphere could not be the cause of increases in acute respiratory illness in the exposed populations. PMID:7084150

  13. Emission of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from pig fattening farms to surrounding areas.

    PubMed

    von Salviati, Christina; Laube, Henriette; Guerra, Beatriz; Roesler, Uwe; Friese, Anika

    2015-01-30

    The presence of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in livestock such as pigs has been known for some time. However, to date there is little information about the transmission of these resistant bacteria between pig farms and their surroundings. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore this topic by investigating seven German pig fattening farms. Samples from outside (including ground surfaces, ambient air, slurry and digestate from biogas plants) and, in parallel, from inside the pig barns (including pig feces, dust, barn air, flies and mice feces) were examined for ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli and selected isolates were compared by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. 14/17 (82.4%) slurry samples and three of four samples of digestate from biogas plants tested positive for ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli. In the vicinity of the pig barns these resistant bacteria were detected in 14/87 (16.1%) boot swabs taken from various ground surfaces and in 2/36 (6%) ambient air samples. Inside the pig barns, 6/63 (9.5%) barn air samples and a small proportion of flies and mice feces samples were ESBL/AmpC-positive. PFGE analysis proved fecal emission as well as a possible spread via flies, as identical ESBL-E. coli isolates were detected in slurry and on fertilized fields, as well as in flies and pooled feces from inside the barn and slurry. Contaminated slurry presented the major emission source for ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli in the pig fattening farms, but a spread via the airborne route or via different vectors also seems possible. PMID:25465658

  14. Method of making an air electrode material having controlled sinterability

    DOEpatents

    Vasilow, Theodore R.; Kuo, Lewis J. H.; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1994-01-01

    A tubular, porous ceramic electrode structure (3) is made from the sintered admixture of doped lanthanum manganite and an additive containing cerium where a solid electrolyte (4), substantially surrounds the air electrode, and a porous outer fuel electrode (7) substantially surrounds the electrolyte, to form a fuel cell (1).

  15. Method of making an air electrode material having controlled sinterability

    DOEpatents

    Vasilow, T.R.; Kuo, L.J.H.; Ruka, R.J.

    1994-08-30

    A tubular, porous ceramic electrode structure is made from the sintered admixture of doped lanthanum manganite and an additive containing cerium where a solid electrolyte, substantially surrounds the air electrode, and a porous outer fuel electrode substantially surrounds the electrolyte, to form a fuel cell. 2 figs.

  16. Groundwater quality in the Northern Coast Ranges Basins, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathany, Timothy M.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Recharge to the groundwater system is primarily from mixture of ambient sources, including direct percolation of precipitation and irrigation waters, infiltration of runoff from surrounding hills/areas, seepage from rivers and creeks, and subsurface inflow (from non-alluvial geologic units that bound the alluvial basins). The primary sources of discharge are evaporation, discharge to streams, and water pumped for municipal supply and irrigation.

  17. Spring and springbrook fauna of the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, R.J.; Bergey, E.A.; Ward, J.V.

    1982-06-01

    The aquatic macroinvertebrates of Willow Creek, Piceance Creek, Stewart Gulch, and spring sources surrounding Tract C-b in the Piceance Basin were sampled from July 1978 through August 1980 as part of a baseline monitoring program prior to oil-shale development. Macroinvertebrate species lists are included in this report. The spring sources exhibited a somewhat different and more constant physical and chemical environment compared to the streams.

  18. Jurassic tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Junggar basin, NW China: A record of Mesozoic intraplate deformation in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong-Tai; Song, Chuan-Chun; He, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Mesozoic basins in northwest China provide important records for investigating relationships between intraplate deformation in Central Asia and tectonic processes at Asian boundaries. The present study, using well, seismic, outcrop, and thermochronology data in the Junggar Basin and neighboring areas, describes the main features of Jurassic strata in the basin, analyzes the Jurassic evolution of the basin and neighboring mountain belts, and discusses possible mechanisms of Jurassic intraplate deformation in Central Asia. During the Early-Middle Jurassic, episodic uplift of surrounding mountain belts kept the Junggar Basin a contractional closed basin, and alluvial fan, fluvial, delta, and lacustrine depositional environments successively developed from surrounding ranges to the central basin. During the Late Jurassic, the western and central parts of the basin were folded and uplifted, and deposition migrated mainly to the eastern basin. During the latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, pre-Cretaceous strata in the eastern and northeastern Junggar Basin were folded and uplifted, and coarse-grained sediments were transported from surrounding uplifts to the central basin. We suggest that Jurassic episodic deformation events in the Junggar Basin and other areas of Central Asia are related to the Qiangtang collision during the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic, the closure of the western Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean at the Early/Middle Jurassic boundary, a collision of a microcontinent in the Pamir with the southern Asian margin during the late Middle Jurassic-early Late Jurassic, the collision of the Kolyma-Omolon Block with Siberia at the end of the Jurassic, and the subsequent closure of the eastern Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean during the latest Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous.

  19. Features of Distribution of Mercurian Concentric Basins on the Base of Messenger Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, Zhanna; Blue, Jennifer

    MESSENGER images were investigated to expose the distribution of concentric basins on the surface of Mercury. We revealed 49 such objects with outer diameters from 64 km to 488 km, some of which have been formally named (e.g., Bach (214 km), Homer (319 km), Rachmaninov (306 km), Renoir (220 km), Chekhov (194 km), etc.). Fourteen concentric basins are unnamed. Concentric basins share the following common features: the diameter of the outer ridge is twice that of the inner ridge; the surface of the central depression is covered with a fewer number of craters than the surface between the inner and outer ridges; and chains of small craters and valleys usually surround such concentric basins. A histogram of the distribution of these basin dimensions shows that diameters from 160 km to 170 km and 190 km to 220 km are prevalent for concentric basins. About 70% of all concentric basins on Mercury are located in marginal zones between plains and highlands. We have compiled a map of the distribution of concentric basins on the Mercurian surface. It shows that the frequency of concentric basins in the western hemisphere is three times greater than the frequency in the eastern hemisphere. The comparison of concentric basins on Mercury, Moon and Mars is now complete.

  20. Seismic exploration for oil and gas traps in Wind River Basin: a Laramide example

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.R.; Keefer, W.R.

    1985-05-01

    The Wind River Basin in central Wyoming is typical of the large sedimentary and structural basins that formed in the Rocky Mountain region during the Laramide deformation in latest Cretaceous and early Tertiary times. Northeast-southwest-oriented seismic profiles across the Wind River basin and flanking Owl Creek and Bighorn Mountains illustrate the structural configuration and correspondent stratigraphic development of a typical Laramide intermontane basin. Understanding the geometry of the basin margin and the timing of structural movement aids in prospecting for mountain-front subthrust structures, like Tepee Flats field, and stratigraphic traps, like Haybarn field, in fluvial and lacustrine basin-fill sequences. The Wind River basin is structurally asymmetric with the basin axis close to the Owl Creek Mountains and Casper Arch thrusts, which form the north and east basin boundaries. Major Laramide deformation began in latest Cretaceous time (beginning of Lance Formation deposition) with pronounced downwarping of the basin trough and broad doming of parts of the peripheral areas. The intensity of movement increased through the Paleocene and culminated in early Eocene time as high mountains were uplifted along thrust faults. Clastic debris, stripped from the surrounding rising mountain arches, was shed basinward, resulting in a pronounced wedge-shaped accumulation of fluvial and lacustrine sediments now representing the Lance, Fort Union, Indian Meadows, and Wind River Formations.

  1. ORC4 surrounds extruded chromatin in female meiosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu; Ortega, Michael A; Ko, Myungjun; Marh, Joel; Ward, W Steven

    2015-05-01

    Six proteins, ORC1-6, make up the origin recognition complex (ORC) that initiates licensing of DNA replication origins. We have previously reported that subunit ORC2 is localized between the separating maternal chromosomes at anaphase II just after fertilization and is present in zygotic pronuclei at G1. Here, we found that ORC1, 3, and 5 all localize between the chromosomes at anaphase II, but could not be detected in zygotic G1. ORC6 localized to the periphery of the nucleoli at all zygotic stages. We identified an unexpected potential role for ORC4 in polar body formation. We found that in both female meiotic divisions, ORC4 surrounds the set of chromosomes, as a sphere-like structure, that will eventually be discarded in the polar bodies, but not the chromosomes that segregate into the oocyte. None of the other five ORC proteins are involved in this structure. In Zygotic G1, ORC4 surrounds the nuclei of the polar bodies, but was not detectable in the pronuclei. When the zygote entered mitosis ORC4 was only detected in the polar body. However, ORC4 appeared on both sets of separating chromosomes at telophase. At this point, the ORC4 that was in the polar body also migrated into the nuclei, suggesting that ORC4 or an associated protein is modified during the first embryonic cell cycle to allow it to bind DNA. Our results suggest that ORC4 may help identify the chromosomes that are destined to be expelled in the polar body, and may play a role in polar body extrusion. ORC4 surrounds the chromatin that will be extruded in the polar body in both female meiotic divisions, then makes a transition from the cytoplasm to the chromosomes at zygotic anaphase, suggesting multiple roles for this replication licensing protein. PMID:25502171

  2. ORC4 Surrounds Extruded Chromatin in Female Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu; Ortega, Michael A.; Ko, Myungjun; Marh, Joel; Ward, W. Steven

    2014-01-01

    Six proteins, ORC1-6, make up the origin recognition complex (ORC) that initiates licensing of DNA replication origins. We have previously reported that subunit ORC2 is localized between the separating maternal chromosomes at anaphase II just after fertilization and is present in zygotic pronuclei at G1. Here, we found that ORC1, 3, and 5 all localize between the chromosomes at anaphase II, but could not be detected in zygotic G1. ORC6 localized to the periphery of the nucleoli at all zygotic stages. We identified an unexpected potential role for ORC4 in polar body formation. We found that in both female meiotic divisions, ORC4 surrounds the set of chromosomes, as a sphere-like structure, that will eventually be discarded in the polar bodies, but not the chromosomes that segregate into the oocyte. None of the other five ORC proteins are involved in this structure. In Zygotic G1, ORC4 surrounds the nuclei of the polar bodies, but was not detectable in the pronuclei. When the zygote entered mitosis ORC4 was only detected in the polar body. However, ORC4 appeared on both sets of separating chromosomes at telophase. At this point, the ORC4 that was in the polar body also migrated into the nuclei, suggesting that ORC4 or an associated protein is modified during the first embryonic cell cycle to allow it to bind DNA. Our results suggest that ORC4 may help identify the chromosomes that are destined to be expelled in the polar body, and may play a role in polar body extrusion. extrusion. ORC4 surrounds the chromatin that will be extruded in the polar body in both female meiotic divisions, then makes a transition from the cytoplasm to the chromosomes at zygotic anaphase, suggesting multiple roles for this replication licensing protein. PMID:25502171

  3. Spirit's Surroundings on 'West Spur,' Sol 305 (Polar)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This 360-degree panorama shows the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as of the rover's 305th martian day, or sol, (Nov. 11, 2004). At that point, Spirit was climbing the 'West Spur' of the 'Columbia Hills.' The rover had just finished inspecting a rock called 'Lutefisk' and was heading uphill toward an area called 'Machu Picchu.' Spirit used its navigational camera to take the images combined into this mosaic. The rover's location when the images were taken is catalogued as the mission's site 89, position 205. The view is presented here as a polar projection with geometric seam correction.

  4. Spirit's Surroundings on 'West Spur,' Sol 305 (Vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This 360-degree panorama shows the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as of the rover's 305th martian day, or sol, (Nov. 11, 2004). At that point, Spirit was climbing the 'West Spur' of the 'Columbia Hills.' The rover had just finished inspecting a rock called 'Lutefisk' and was heading uphill toward an area called 'Machu Picchu.' Spirit used its navigational camera to take the images combined into this mosaic. The rover's location when the images were taken is catalogued as the mission's site 89, position 205. The view is presented here as a vetical projection with geometric seam correction.

  5. The science and questions surrounding chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ban, Vin Shen; Madden, Christopher J; Bailes, Julian E; Hunt Batjer, H; Lonser, Russell R

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the pathobiology, causes, associated factors, incidence and prevalence, and natural history of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) have been debated. Data from retrospective case series and high-profile media reports have fueled public fear and affected the medical community's understanding of the role of sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the development of CTE. There are a number of limitations posed by the current evidence that can lead to confusion within the public and scientific community. In this paper, the authors address common questions surrounding the science of CTE and propose future research directions. PMID:27032918

  6. EXPLICT CALULATIONS OF HOMOCLINIC TANGLES SURROUNDING MAGNETIC ISLANDS IN TOKAMAKS

    SciTech Connect

    ROEDER, R.K.W.; RAPOPORT, B.I.; EVANS, T.E.

    2002-06-01

    We present explicit calculations of the complicated geometric objects known as homoclinic tangles that surround magnetic islands in the Poincare mapping of a tokamak's magnetic field. These tangles are shown to exist generically in the magnetic field of all toroidal confinement systems. The geometry of these tangles provides an explanation for the stochasticity known to occur near the X-points of the Poincare mapping. Furthermore, the intersection of homoclinic tangles from different resonances provides an explicit mechanism for the non-diffusive transport of magnetic field lines between these resonance layers.

  7. High voltage bushing having weathershed and surrounding stress relief collar

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1981-01-01

    A high voltage electric bushing comprises a hollow elongated dielectric weathershed which encloses a high voltage conductor. A collar formed of high voltage dielectric material is positioned over the weathershed and is bonded thereto by an interface material which precludes moisture-like contaminants from entering between the bonded portions. The collar is substantially thicker than the adjacent weathershed which it surrounds, providing relief of the electric stresses which would otherwise appear on the outer surface of the weathershed. The collar may include a conductive ring or capacitive foil to further relieve electric stresses experienced by the bushing.

  8. Secondary Pollutants in the Lake Tahoe Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinska, B.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Gertler, A.; McDaniel, M.; Burley, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Lake Tahoe, located at 6,225 ft. (1,897 m) in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, is the largest alpine lake in North America. Known for the clarity of its water and the panorama of surrounding mountains on all sides, Lake Tahoe is a prime tourist attraction in the California - Nevada area. However, the Lake Tahoe Basin is facing significant problems in air quality and declining water clarity. In July 21 - 26, 2012, we conducted a field study in the Basin designed to characterize the precursors and pathways of secondary pollutant formation, including ozone, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ammonium nitrate. Four strategic sampling sites were selected inside the Basin; two of these sites were located at high elevation (one each on the western and eastern sides of the Basin) and two were positioned near the Lake level. Ozone and NO/NO2 concentrations were continuously measured. With a resolution of several hours over a 6-day sampling period we collected canister samples for detailed speciation of volatile organic compounds (VOC), 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) impregnated Sep-Pak cartridges for analysis of carbonyl compounds and honeycomb denuder/filter pack samples for measurement of concentrations of ammonia, nitrous acid, nitric acid, and fine particulate ammonium nitrate. We also collected PM2.5 Teflon and quartz filter samples for measurements of mass, organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) concentrations and speciation of organic compounds. Whereas the concentrations of lower molecular weight (mw) C2 - C3 hydrocarbons were generally the highest in all sampling sites, ranging from 25 to 76% of the total measured VOC (over 70 species from C2 to C10), the concentrations of biogenic hydrocarbons, isoprene and α-pinene were significant, ranging from 1.4 to 26% and 1.5 to 30%, respectively, of the total VOC, depending on the site and sampling period. For comparison, the sum of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) constituted from 2.5 to 37% of the

  9. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  10. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  11. Cenozoic thermal history of the Bohai Bay Basin: constraints from heat flow and coupled basin-mountain modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, L.; Wang, J.

    2003-04-01

    Bohai Bay Basin is located in the east of North China Craton. Heat flow measurements show a moderate thermal background (~ 61 mW/m2) in the Bohai Bay Basin, which although experienced multi-phase rifting in the Cenozoic era. In contrast, its surrounding mountain areas are characterized by low heat flow. Constraint by heat flow measurements, the thermal evolution of the Bohai Bay Basin during the Cenozoic era was performed by a numerical basin-mountain model. The model incorporates differential lithosphere stretching and shortening by finite-element method in the Lagrangian frame. The predicted heat flow in the center of the three depressions of the Bohai Bay Basin is calculated to have varied between 51 mW/m2 and 63 mW/m2 through the Cenozoic evolution, indicating a rather smooth variation of basin thermal state, and a cooling trend from the Oligocene to present-day. Model results also suggest that the Taihang Mountains probably uplifted in the Quaternary, which resulted in low heat flow in the mountain area. Both heat flow constraints and modeling imply that a new phase of rifting in the Pliocene existed in the Huanghua and Bozhong Depressions, which was suggested by tectonic subsidence analysis.

  12. Geohydrology of the Irondequoit Creek Basin near Rochester, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.; Zarriello, Phillip J.; Kappel, William M.

    1985-01-01

    Geohydrologic information on the area within and surrounding the Irondequoit Creek basin near Rochester, in north-central New York, is presented on five maps at 1:24,000 scale indicating: (1) locations of glacial geomorphic features, (2) surficial geology, (3) soil permeability, (4) potentiometric-surface altitude and directions of groundwater movement, and (5) groundwater recharge and flow patterns. Also included are 20 geologic sections showing statigraphic relationships, aquifer composition, and depth to bedrock. Each map includes a short text and a list of references. Results indicate that groundwater within the basin flows northward to Irondequoit Bay and Lake Ontario and that the groundwater drainage system is considerably smaller than the overlying surface drainage area. These maps, based on available records and published data, depict the location of major recharge areas, relative rates of recharge, and the direction and rates of groundwater flow within the basin for use in aquifer management. (USGS)

  13. Zuni sequence in Williston basin - evidence for Mesozoic paleotectonism

    SciTech Connect

    Shurr, G.W.; Anna, L.O.; Peterson, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Zuni sequence in the Williston basin is a largescale lithogenetic package bounded by interregional unconformities. Within the sequence, three major subdivisions are separated by unconformities or marker beds and correspond with chronostratigraphic units: (1) Middle and Upper Jurassic, (2) Lower Cretaceous, and (3) Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene. The basin has clear expression in the Jurassic subdivision, poor expression in the Lower Cretaceous, and good expression in the Upper Cretaceous. A series of seven marginal paleotectonic elements surround the basin center on the west, south, and east in the US. Five more marginal elements have been described in Canada. Occurrences of oil in the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous and of natural gas in the Upper Cretaceous are broadly related to the pattern of marginal paleotectonic elements. 14 figures, 1 table.

  14. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION SURROUNDING WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 211853

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei; Qin Shengli

    2012-05-20

    The environment surrounding Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star HD 211853 is studied in molecular, infrared, as well as radio, and H I emission. The molecular ring consists of well-separated cores, which have a volume density of 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3} and kinematic temperature {approx}20 K. Most of the cores are under gravitational collapse due to external pressure from the surrounding ionized gas. From the spectral energy distribution modeling toward the young stellar objects, the sequential star formation is revealed on a large scale in space spreading from the W-R star to the molecular ring. A small-scale sequential star formation is revealed toward core 'A', which harbors a very young star cluster. Triggered star formations are thus suggested. The presence of the photodissociation region, the fragmentation of the molecular ring, the collapse of the cores, and the large-scale sequential star formation indicate that the 'collect and collapse' process functions in this region. The star-forming activities in core 'A' seem to be affected by the 'radiation-driven implosion' process.

  15. Ionization nebulae surrounding supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Chiang, E.; Kallman, T.; Malina, R.

    1994-01-01

    In this work we carry out a theoretical investigation of a new type of astrophysical gaseous nebula, viz., ionized regions surrounding supersoft X-ray sources. Supersoft X-ray sources, many of which have characteristic luminosities of approximately 10(exp 37)-(10(exp 38) ergs/s and effective temperatures of approximately 4 x 10(exp 5) K, were first discovered with the Einstein Observatory. These sources have now been shown to constitute a distinct class of X-ray source and are being found in substantial numbers with ROSAT. We predict that these sources should be surrounded by regions of ionized hydrogen and helium with properties that are distinct from other astrophysical gaseous nebulae. We present caluations of the ionization and temperature structure of these ionization nebulae, as well as the expected optical line fluxes. The ionization profiles for both hydrogen and helium exhibit substantially more gradual transitions from the ionized to the unionized state than is the case for conventional H II regions. The calculated optical line intensitites are presented as absolute fluxes from sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud and as fractions of the central source luminosity. We find, in particular, that (O III) lambda 5008 and He II lambda 4686 are especially prominent in these ionization nebulae as compared to other astrophysical nebulae. We propose that searches for supersoft X-rays via their characteristic optical lines may reveal sources in regions where the soft X-rays are nearly completely absorbed by the interstellar medium.

  16. Surround inhibition in motor execution and motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Toshiyuki; Kaneko, Fuminari; Ohashi, Yukari; Nagata, Hiroshi

    2016-08-26

    Surround inhibition (SI) is a neural mechanism to focus neuronal activity and facilitate selective motor execution (ME). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether SI is also generated during motor imagery (MI). Furthermore, we investigated whether the extent of SI during MI depends on the strength of SI during ME and/or vividness of MI. The extent of SI was examined during MI and ME of index finger flexion. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied at rest, during initiation of the movement (phasic phase) and during tonic muscle contraction of the index finger flexors. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from a surround muscle, abductor digiti minimi (ADM) and a synergistic muscle, the first dorsal interosseous muscle. The amplitude of ADM MEP was reduced during the phasic phase, which indicates that SI occurred during ME. In seven of 14 subjects, SI was also observed during MI, although this effect was not significant. There was a moderate correlation between the extent of SI during ME and MI. Furthermore, good imagers who experienced vivid MI during the MI task showed stronger SI than poor imagers. These results indicate that common neural substrates involved in SI during ME are at least in part recruited during MI. In clinical situations, the therapeutic use of MI to generate vivid MI may be one of effective tool to develop the strength of SI, which facilitate selective execution of desired movements. PMID:27418120

  17. Expected size of shared haplotypes surrounding a common disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Meerman, G.J. te; Meulen, M.A. van der; Sandkuijl, L.A.

    1994-09-01

    If two persons in a founder population share a rare disease, they may share genes involved in that disease Identical By Descent. We have calculated the probability of the size of the region IBD on either side of a shared common gene. Probabilities are plotted for various values of the meiotic count: the number of independent meioses connecting the persons. Even if this number is quite large, the shared area will, given the present density of markers, contain several markers. To be 95% certain that the area surrounding a gene can be delimited to less than 1 cM, approximately 500 meioses need to be observed. The many generations that are required before a gene is separated from its surrounding polymorphisms indicate that association between disease and marker alleles can be explained as IBD around a common gene. In founder populations apparantly unrelated affected persons will likely share disease genes introduced or mutated between 10 and 40 generations ago. Analyzing the overlap of haplotypes gives excellent opportunities to observe implicitly the many meioses required for genetic fine mapping.

  18. Turbulent Mixing in the Ocean and Shelf Seas Surrounding Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padman, L.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean turbulence and mixing data have been collected from the Southern Ocean and coastal seas surrounding Antarctica since the early 1990's. I summarize these observations, discuss their implications for parameterization of diapycnal mixing in southern seas, and identify regions and processes deserving of further study. Mixing data have been acquired from: the western Weddell Sea; Maud Rise in the eastern Weddell Sea; the Bellingshausen Sea continental shelf; the northwest Ross Sea; the shelf break and inner shelf near the Mertz Glacier Tongue; Drake Passage; the region surrounding the South Scotia Ridge; and locations near the Kerguelen Plateau and the adjacent Antarctic coastal zone. Vertical diffusivities estimated for these diverse regions span at least three orders of magnitude. The different regions exhibit a variety of primary mechanisms for mixing including shear-driven instabilities, nonlinear equation-of-state effects (cabbeling and thermobaricity), double diffusion, and boundary-layer stresses and buoyancy exchange. Energy sources include density flows, extreme surface forcing by cold coastal katabatic winds, tide-driven mixing in the benthic layer, and in the pycnocline due to locally strong baroclinic tides; downward propagation of wind-forced near-inertial waves, and flow interactions with large-scale topographic features. From this review I identify regions and processes for which we presently have little information on which to base mixing parameterizations, and suggest field and analysis activities to overcome these limitations in the representation of mixing in Southern Ocean and global models.

  19. Remote Sensing Efficiency for Urban Analysis of Mecca and Surrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imam, Ayman; Alhaddad, Bahaa; Roca, Josep

    2016-06-01

    Situated in the southwest of Saudi Arabia, Mecca is considered the spiritual capital of one and a half billion worldwide Muslims. The city is visited by millions of pilgrims every year. It has undergone significant changes in land cover (LC) since the government first embarked on a series of ambitious development projects 20 years ago to accommodate the growing number of pilgrims and citizens. The main objective of our study is to detect, identify, analyze and measure the evolving land cover and urban morphology composition from multi-temporal satellite images. To characterize the morphological change during a period of twenty years, four satellite images, acquired in 1998 by Landsat TM and in 2003, 2008 and 2013 by Landsat ETM+, were classified into five main categories: Urban, Street, Soil and Vegetation. In addition, DEM has been extracted and included as Mountain. Change detection (CD) analysis is applied using post-classification comparison and GIS. As part of the study, morphological index, such as, Entropy is included for better understanding of urban structures behaviour. Mecca and its surroundings show a noticeable increase in urban and vegetation cover. Urban cover (UC) changes were divided into five radial directions: Northeast, Southeast, Southwest, East, and Northwest. These changes are influenced by mountain ranges surrounding the city and the highways. These revelations can play a significant role towards future planning and development activities, which may further promote urban growth.

  20. Effectively Communicating the Uncertainties Surrounding Ebola Virus Transmission.

    PubMed

    Kilianski, Andy; Evans, Nicholas G

    2015-10-01

    The current Ebola virus outbreak has highlighted the uncertainties surrounding many aspects of Ebola virus virology, including routes of transmission. The scientific community played a leading role during the outbreak-potentially, the largest of its kind-as many of the questions surrounding ebolaviruses have only been interrogated in the laboratory. Scientists provided an invaluable resource for clinicians, public health officials, policy makers, and the lay public in understanding the progress of Ebola virus disease and the continuing outbreak. Not all of the scientific communication, however, was accurate or effective. There were multiple instances of published articles during the height of the outbreak containing potentially misleading scientific language that spurred media overreaction and potentially jeopardized preparedness and policy decisions at critical points. Here, we use articles declaring the potential for airborne transmission of Ebola virus as a case study in the inaccurate reporting of basic science, and we provide recommendations for improving the communication about unknown aspects of disease during public health crises. PMID:26512988

  1. Effectively Communicating the Uncertainties Surrounding Ebola Virus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kilianski, Andy; Evans, Nicholas G.

    2015-01-01

    The current Ebola virus outbreak has highlighted the uncertainties surrounding many aspects of Ebola virus virology, including routes of transmission. The scientific community played a leading role during the outbreak—potentially, the largest of its kind—as many of the questions surrounding ebolaviruses have only been interrogated in the laboratory. Scientists provided an invaluable resource for clinicians, public health officials, policy makers, and the lay public in understanding the progress of Ebola virus disease and the continuing outbreak. Not all of the scientific communication, however, was accurate or effective. There were multiple instances of published articles during the height of the outbreak containing potentially misleading scientific language that spurred media overreaction and potentially jeopardized preparedness and policy decisions at critical points. Here, we use articles declaring the potential for airborne transmission of Ebola virus as a case study in the inaccurate reporting of basic science, and we provide recommendations for improving the communication about unknown aspects of disease during public health crises. PMID:26512988

  2. Vulnerability of Groundwater Recharge to Climate Change in an Alpine Basin (Martis Valley, California)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, A.; Segal, D.; Urióstegui, S. H.; Singleton, M. J.; Moran, J. E.; Esser, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    Martis Valley's groundwater basin is experiencing increasing water demand and changes in the amount and timing of snowmelt due to climate change. Groundwater is the exclusive water supply for the town of Truckee and its surrounding ski resorts and golf courses. The objective of this study was to examine seasonal variability in the aquifer recharge by analyzing supply wells for: 1) tritium and helium isotopes to determine groundwater sources and age, 2) dissolved noble gases to determine recharge temperatures and excess air concentrations and 3) stable isotopes to determine groundwater sources. Recharge temperatures were found to be similar to mean annual air temperatures at lower elevations, suggesting that most recharge is occurring at lower elevations after equilibrating in the vadose zone. Low levels of excess air found in groundwater confirm that most recharge is occurring in the valley alluvium rather than the mountain block. The mean integrated groundwater flow depth was estimated for each well from the temperature difference between recharge and discharge and the geothermal gradient. Groundwater samples contained large amounts of excess terrigenic helium, from both mantle and radiogenic sources. Terrigenic helium and tritium concentrations were used to reconstruct the mixing between the younger and older groundwater sources. Mantle helium originating from the Polaris Fault was used to trace groundwater flow directions. Higher seasonal variability was found in wells with younger groundwater and shallower flow depths, suggesting that changes in the timing and amount of recharge under warmer climate conditions will rather quickly impact at least a portion of the aquifer system in Martis Valley. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing of Recharge Basin Percolation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M.; Allen, E. M.; Hutchinson, A.

    2014-12-01

    Infiltration (spreading) basins are a central component of managed aquifer and recovery operations around the world. The concept is simple. Water is percolated into an aquifer where it can be withdrawn at a later date. However, managing infiltration basins can be complicated by entrapped air in sediments, strata of low permeability, clogging of the recharge surface, and biological growth, among other factors. Understanding the dynamics of percolation in light of these complicating factors provides a basis for making management decisions that increase recharge efficiency. As an aid to understanding percolation dynamics, fiber optic distribute temperature sensing (DTS) was used to track heat as a tracer of water movement in an infiltration basin. The diurnal variation of temperature in the basin was sensed at depth. The time lag between the oscillating temperature signal at the surface and at depth indicated the velocity of water percolation. DTS fiber optic cables were installed horizontally along the basin and vertically in boreholes to measure percolation behavior. The horizontal cable was installed in trenches at 0.3 and 1 m depth, and the vertical cable was installed using direct push technology. The vertical cable was tightly wound to produce a factor of 10 increase in spatial resolution of temperature measurements. Temperature was thus measured every meter across the basin and every 10 cm to a depth of 10 m. Data from the trenched cable suggested homogeneous percolation across the basin, but infiltration rates were a function of stage indicating non-ideal percolation. Vertical temperature monitoring showed significant lateral flow in sediments underlying the basin both during saturation and operation of the basin. Deflections in the vertical temperature profile corresponded with fine grained layers identified in core samples indicating a transient perched water table condition. The three-dimensional flow in this relatively homogenous surficial geology calls

  4. Air Cleaning Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    to remove airborne pathogens from room air depends on several factors, including the airflow rate through the unit’s filter and the airflow patterns in the room. Tested under a variety of conditions, in-room air cleaners, including portable or ceiling mounted units with either a HEPA or a non-HEPA filter, portable units with UVGI lights only, or ceiling mounted units with combined HEPA filtration and UVGI lights, have been estimated to be between 30% and 90%, 99% and 12% and 80% effective, respectively. However, and although their effectiveness is variable, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has acknowledged in-room air cleaners as alternative technology for increasing room ventilation when this cannot be achieved by the building’s HVAC system with preference given to fixed recirculating systems over portable ones. Importantly, the use of an in-room air cleaner does not preclude either the need for health care workers and visitors to use personal protective equipment (N95 mask or equivalent) when entering AII rooms or health care facilities from meeting current regulatory requirements for airflow rates (ventilation rates) in buildings and airflow differentials for effective negative-pressure rooms. The Plasmacluster ion technology, developed in 2000, is an air purification technology. Its manufacturer, Sharp Electronics Corporation, says that it can disable airborne microorganisms through the generation of both positive and negative ions. (1) The functional unit is the hydroxyl, which is a molecule comprised of one oxygen molecule and one hydrogen atom. Plasmacluster ion air purifier uses a multilayer filter system composed of a prefilter, a carbon filter, an antibacterial filter, and a HEPA filter, combined with an ion generator to purify the air. The ion generator uses an alternating plasma discharge to split water molecules into positively and negatively charged ions. When these ions are emitted into the air, they are surrounded by

  5. Salt tectonics in the Sivas basin, Turkey, mini basin development, halokinetic sequences, and fracturation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kergaravat, Charlie; Ribes, Charlotte; Callot, Jean-Paul; Bonnel, Cedric; Ringenbach, Jean-Claude

    2013-04-01

    Sedimentary rock deposited in mini basin records the interaction between the evolution (growth, collapse, weld) of salt structure (diapir, weld, glacier) and sedimentation, forming halokinetic sequences. They are intensively strained along the diapir. At smaller scale, understanding the relationship between local halokinetic sequence, regional stresses acting on basin boundaries, and fracturation is a key to better predict geometry and quality of reservoir facies within mini basins. The Sivas basin, in the central Anatolian plateau of Turkey, contains an exceptional open-air collection of salt tectonic structures. This elongated E-W Oligo-Miocene basin developed above the Taurus-Pontides suture in an overall orogenic context. After deposition of the thick Hafik gypsum formation during the tectonically quiet mid Oligocene period, the mini basins recorded sedimentary sequences from the mid Oligocene to early Miocene, composed of red silts and fluvial sandstones, marls and lacustrine to marine limestones. Concomitenly to the mini basin formation, compression resumed in mid Miocene time and was responsible for mini basin capsizing and an increase of gypsum emission. The core of our study is focused on several minibasins (10 to 16 km2) separated by vertical allochtonous evaporitic walls and partially covered by remnant of gypsum glacier, in the central part of the basin, near the town of Sivas. The major minibasins have been carefully analyzed through geological field mapping and sampling, fracturation and microtectonic data sorting (stereogram), and aerial and satellite images interpretation. Two of them, Emirhan and Karayün, strongly tilted, present spectacular strongly deformed halokinetic succession along the contact with evaporitic bodies. They exhibit locally completely refolded and overturned sequences associated to several phase of gypsum extrusion. Such geometries have been reproduced in sandbox models and imaged on seismic lines in the Gulf of Mexico

  6. Groundwater Availability Within the Salton Sea Basin Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tompson, A; Demir, Z; Moran, J; Mason, D; Wagoner, J; Kollet, S; Mansoor, K; McKereghan, P

    2008-01-11

    It is widely recognized that increasing demands for water in Southern California are being affected by actions to reduce and redirect the amount of water imported from the Colorado River. In the Imperial Valley region, for example, import reductions will not only affect agricultural users but also could produce significant collateral impacts on the level and quality of water in the Salton Sea, its regional ecology, or even the long term air quality in the greater basin. The notion of using groundwater in the Imperial Valley as an additional source for agricultural or domestic needs, energy production, or Salton Sea restoration efforts, so as to offset reductions in imported water, is not a new concept. Even though it has been discussed recently (e.g., LLNL, 2002), the idea goes back, in part, to several studies performed by the US Department of Interior and other agencies that have indicated that there may be substantial, usable amounts of groundwater in some portions of the Imperial Valley. It has been estimated, for example, that between 1.1 and 3 billion acre-feet (AF) of groundwater lie within the extended, deep basin underlying the valley and Salton Sea region, even though much of it may be unrecoverable or too poor in its quality (Imperial County, 1997). This is a significant volume with respect to the total annual precipitation volume received in California, whose average is close to 200 million (or 0.2 billion) AF per year (DWR, 1998), and especially with respect to the total annual precipitation received in the Salton Sea watershed itself, which we estimate (Appendix A) to be approximately 2.5 million acre feet (MAF) per year. Clearly, a thorough appraisal of the groundwater resources in the Imperial Valley and Salton Sea region--i.e., an assessment of their overall physical availability--will be needed to determine how they can be used and managed to suit new or redirected demands in the region. Development of an improved or updated groundwater assessment

  7. Large panel design for containment air baffle

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard S.

    1992-01-01

    The movable air baffle shield means in accordance with the present invention provides an efficient method of cooling the space surrounding the containment vessel while also providing the capability of being moved away from the containment vessel during inspection. The containment apparatus comprises a generally cylindrical sealed containment vessel for containing at least a portion of a nuclear power generation plant, a disparate shield building surrounding and housing the containment vessel therein and spaced outwardly thereof so as to form an air annulus in the space between the shield building and the containment vessel, a shield baffle means positioned in the air annulus around at least a portion of the sides of the containment vessel providing a coolant path between the baffle means and the containment vessel to permit cooling of the containment vessel by air, the shield baffle means being movable to afford access to the containment vessel.

  8. Large panel design for containment air baffle

    DOEpatents

    Orr, R.S.

    1992-12-08

    The movable air baffle shield means in accordance with the present invention provides an efficient method of cooling the space surrounding the containment vessel while also providing the capability of being moved away from the containment vessel during inspection. The containment apparatus comprises a generally cylindrical sealed containment vessel for containing at least a portion of a nuclear power generation plant, a disparate shield building surrounding and housing the containment vessel therein and spaced outwardly thereof so as to form an air annulus in the space between the shield building and the containment vessel, a shield baffle means positioned in the air annulus around at least a portion of the sides of the containment vessel providing a coolant path between the baffle means and the containment vessel to permit cooling of the containment vessel by air, the shield baffle means being movable to afford access to the containment vessel. 9 figs.

  9. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Submittal - 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Black; Yvonne Townsend

    1999-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) as the site for nuclear weapons testing, now limited to readiness activities and experiments in support of the national Stockpile Stewardship Management Program. It is located in Nye County, Nevada, with the southeast corner about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The NTS covers about 3,500 km2 (1,350 mi2), an area larger than Rhode Island. Its size is about 46 to 56 km (28 to 35 mi) east to west and from 64 to 88 km (40 to 55 mi)north to south. The NTS is surrounded, except on the south side, by public exclusion areas (Nellis Air Force Range) that provide another 24 to 104 km (15 to 65 mi) between the NTS and public lands. The NTS is characterized by desert valley and Great Basin mountain topography, with a climate, flora, and fauna typical of the southwest deserts. Surface waters are scarce on the NTS and there is great depth to slow-moving groundwater.

  10. MEASUREMENT OF VOLATILE CHEMICAL EMISSIONS FROM WASTEWATER BASINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to measure the rate at which selected volatile organic carbon (VOC) compounds are being emitted to air from waste-water treatment basins of the pulp and paper industry. The emission rates of methanol, acetone and acetaldehyde were measured and th...

  11. 8. View, fuel waste tanks and containment basin associated with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View, fuel waste tanks and containment basin associated with Components Test Laboratory (T-27) located uphill to the left, looking northwest. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Components Test Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 4. View, fuel waste tanks and containment basin in foreground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View, fuel waste tanks and containment basin in foreground with Systems Integration Laboratory (T-28) uphill in background, looking southeast. At the extreme right is the Long-Term Oxidizer Silo (T-28B) and the Oxidizer Conditioning Structure (T-28D). - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  13. Evaluation of the impact of the surrounding urban morphology on building energy consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Nyuk Hien; Chen, Yixing; Hajadi, Norwin; Sathyanarayanan, Haripriya; Manickavasagam, Yamini Vidya; Jusuf, Steve Kardinal; Syafii, Nedyomukti Imam

    2011-01-15

    Empirical models of minimum (T{sub min}), average (T{sub avg}) and maximum (T{sub max}) air temperature for Singapore estate have been developed and validated based on a long-tem field measurement. There are three major urban elements, which influence the urban temperature at the local scale. Essentially, they are buildings, greenery and pavement. Other related parameters identified for the study, such as green plot ratio (GnPR), sky view factor (SVF), surrounding building density, the wall surface area, pavement area, albedo are also evaluated to give a better understanding on the likely impact of the modified urban morphology on energy consumption. The objective of this research is to assess and to compare how the air temperature variation of urban condition can affect the building energy consumption in tropical climate of Singapore. In order to achieve this goal, a series of numerical calculation and building simulation are utilized. A total of 32 cases, considering different urban morphologies, are identified and evaluated to give better a understanding on the implication of urban forms, with the reference to the effect of varying density, height and greenery density. The results show that GnPR, which related to the present of greenery, have the most significant impact on the energy consumption by reducing the temperature by up to 2 C. The results also strongly indicate an energy saving of 4.5% if the urban elements are addressed effectively. (author)

  14. Small impact of surrounding oceanic conditions on 2007-2012 Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, B.; Fettweis, X.; van de Berg, W. J.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Erpicum, M.

    2014-03-01

    During recent summers (2007-2012), several surface melt records were broken over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). The extreme summer melt resulted in part from a persistent negative phase of the North-Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), favouring warmer than normal conditions over the GrIS. In addition, it has been suggested that significant anomalies in sea ice cover (SIC) and sea surface temperature (SST) may partially explain recent anomalous GrIS surface melt. To assess the impact of 2007-2012 SIC and SST anomalies on GrIS surface mass balance (SMB), a set of sensitivity experiments was carried out with the regional climate model MAR. These simulations suggest that changes in SST and SIC in the seas surrounding Greenland do not significantly impact GrIS SMB, due to the katabatic winds blocking effect. These winds are strong enough to prevent oceanic near-surface air, influenced by SIC and SST variability, from penetrating far inland. Therefore, the ice sheet SMB response is restricted to coastal regions, where katabatic winds are weaker. However, anomalies in SIC and SST could have indirectly affected the surface melt by changing the general circulation in the North Atlantic region, favouring more frequent warm air advection to the GrIS.

  15. μ-PIV measurements of the ensemble flow fields surrounding a migrating semi-infinite bubble

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Eiichiro; Smith, Bradford J.; Gaver, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Microscale particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) measurements of ensemble flow fields surrounding a steadily-migrating semi-infinite bubble through the novel adaptation of a computer controlled linear motor flow control system. The system was programmed to generate a square wave velocity input in order to produce accurate constant bubble propagation repeatedly and effectively through a fused glass capillary tube. We present a novel technique for re-positioning of the coordinate axis to the bubble tip frame of reference in each instantaneous field through the analysis of the sudden change of standard deviation of centerline velocity profiles across the bubble interface. Ensemble averages were then computed in this bubble tip frame of reference. Combined fluid systems of water/air, glycerol/air, and glycerol/Si-oil were used to investigate flows comparable to computational simulations described in Smith and Gaver (2008) and to past experimental observations of interfacial shape. Fluorescent particle images were also analyzed to measure the residual film thickness trailing behind the bubble. The flow fields and film thickness agree very well with the computational simulations as well as existing experimental and analytical results. Particle accumulation and migration associated with the flow patterns near the bubble tip after long experimental durations are discussed as potential sources of error in the experimental method. PMID:23049158

  16. Cladding modes in photonic crystal fiber: characteristics and sensitivity to surrounding refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiuli; Gu, Zhengtian; Zheng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of cladding modes in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with triangular air-hole lattice in the cladding are numerically analyzed using a finite element method. The transition for LP11 cladding mode to core mode with variation of the normalized wavelength has been shown. The transition of the LP01 cladding mode to the outer silica mode and reorganization of the LP0m cladding modes caused by varying the fiber radius has been investigated. By choosing the optimized fiber radius, which is located in the cladding modes' reorganization region, the sensitivity of the coupled wavelength between the core mode LP01 and cladding mode LP03 to surrounding refractive index is increased by a factor of five and reaches to 2660 nm/refractive index unit over the range of 1.40 to 1.42. The sensitivity is competitive with that of long-period grating in PCF in response to changes in refractive indices of the medium contained in the cladding air channels.

  17. Ground Water in the Southern Lihue Basin, Kauai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izuka, Scot K.; Gingerich, Stephen B.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-phased study of ground-water resources, including well drilling, aquifer tests, analysis of ground-water discharge, and numerical ground-water modeling, indicates that the rocks of the southern Lihue Basin, Kauai, have permeabilities that are much lower than in most other areas of ground-water development in the Hawaiian islands. The regional hydraulic conductivity of the Koloa Volcanics, which dominates fresh ground-water flow in the basin, is about 0.275 foot per day. The Waimea Canyon Basalt which surrounds the basin and underlies the Koloa Volcanics within the basin is intruded by dikes that reduce the bulk hydraulic conductivity of the rocks to about 1.11 feet per day. The low permeabilities result in steeper head gradients compared with other areas in the Hawaiian islands, and a higher proportion of ground-water discharging to streams than to the ocean. Water levels rise from near sea level at the coast to several hundreds of feet above sea level at the center of the basin a few miles inland. The high inland water levels are part of a completely saturated ground-water system. Because of the low regional hydraulic conductivity and high influx of water from recharge in the southern Lihue Basin, the rocks become saturated nearly to the surface and a variably saturated/unsaturated (perched) condition is not likely to exist. Streams incising the upper part of the aquifer drain ground water and keep the water levels just below the surface in most places. Streams thus play an important role in shaping the water table in the southern Lihue Basin. At least 62 percent of the ground water discharging from the aquifer in the southern Lihue Basin seeps to streams; the remainder seeps directly to the ocean or is withdrawn by wells.

  18. Neotectonics and Evolution of the Yenicaga Basin, Bolu - Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arca, M.; Kocyigit, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Yenicaga Basin, located along the North Anatolian Fault System, is interpreted to be a fault-wedge basin with the North Anatolian Fault System's master strand, the Gerede Fault, cutting across the basin itself. The basin and its surroundings contain both paleotectonic rock units and neotectonic rock units. Paleotectonic units, which are deposited or formed during prior tectonic regimes, comprise several formations. The most important of these is the Upper Miocene-Lower Pliocene Eskipazar formation which plays an important role in the understanding of the evolutionary history of the basin. The main Neotectonic unit deposited under control of the present tectonic regime is the Plio-Quaternary Betemurlu formation. The Betemurlu formation unconformably overlies the paleotectonic Eskipazar formation throughout the study area and the unconformity separating these two units corresponds to the time interval during which the paleotectonic stress regime changed into the neotectonic stress regime. Thus, the onset age of the strike-slip neotectonic regime in the study area is Late Pliocene (~ 2.6 Ma). Common basin-margin-bounding faults of the Yenicaga Basin are the Asagi Kuldan fault, the Aksu fault, the Izmirli fault set, the Saraycali fault, the Degirmen fault set and the Hamzabey fault set. These fault systems display well-preserved fault scarps in places. Morphological expressions of these faults and their geometrical relationships with the local stress regime indicate that these faults are mainly strike-slip and oblique-slip faults. Morphotectonic expressions of the faults exposed within the study area indicate that these faults remain active. Most of the population centers within the study area are located on water-saturated, loose basin fill near the active faults. Hence, these population centers are open to future earthquake hazards.

  19. The Lunar Crust: Global Structure and Signature of Major Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Lemoine, Frank G.

    1996-01-01

    New lunar gravity and topography data from the Clementine Mission provide a global Bouguer anomaly map corrected for the gravitational attraction of mare fill in mascon basins. Most of the gravity signal remaining after corrections for the attraction of topography and mare fill can be attributed to variations in depth to the lunar Moho and therefore crustal thickness. The large range of global crustal thickness (approx. 20-120 km) is indicative of major spatial variations in melting of the lunar exterior and/or significant impact-related redistribution. The 6l-km average crustal thickness, constrained by a depth-to-Moho measured during the Apollo 12 and 14 missions, is preferentially distributed toward the farside, accounting for much of the offset in center-of-figure from the center-of-mass. While the average farside thickness is 12 km greater than the nearside, the distribution is nonuniform, with dramatic thinning beneath the farside, South Pole-Aitken basin. With the global crustal thickness map as a constraint, regional inversions of gravity and topography resolve the crustal structure of major mascon basins to half wavelengths of 150 km. In order to yield crustal thickness maps with the maximum horizontal resolution permitted by the data, the downward continuation of the Bouguer gravity is stabilized by a three- dimensional, minimum-slope and curvature algorithm. Both mare and non-mare basins are characterized by a central upwarped moho that is surrounded by rings of thickened crust lying mainly within the basin rims. The inferred relief at this density interface suggests a deep structural component to the surficial features of multiring lunar impact basins. For large (greater than 300 km diameter) basins, moho relief appears uncorrelated with diameter, but is negatively correlated with basin age. In several cases, it appears that the multiring structures were out of isostatic equilibrium prior to mare emplacement, suggesting that the lithosphere was strong

  20. Repository site definition in basalt: Pasco Basin, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, R.V.; Nimick, F.B.; Muller, A.B.

    1982-03-01

    Discussion of the regional setting, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Pasco Basin are included in this report. Pasco basin is a structural and topographic basin of approximately 2000 mi/sup 2/ (5180 km/sup 2/) located within the Yakima Fold Belt Subprovince of the Columbia Plateau. The stratigraphic sequence within the basin consists of an undetermined thickness of lower Miocene and younger flood basalts with interbedded and overlying sedimentary units. This sequence rests upon a basement of probably diverse rock types that may range in age from precambrian through early Tertiary. Although a large amount of information is available on the hydrology of the unconfined aquifer system, ground-water flow within the basin is, in general, poorly understood. Recharge areas for the Mabton interbed and the Saddle Mountains Formation are the highlands surrounding the basin with the flow for these units toward Gable Butte - Gable Mountain and Lake Wallula. Gable Butte - Gable Mountain probably is a ground-water sink, although the vertical flow direction in this zone is uncertain. The amount of upward vertical leakage from the Saddle Mountains Formation into the overlying sediments or to the Columbia River is unknown. Units underlying the Mabton interbed may have a flow scheme similar to those higher units or a flow scheme dominated by interbasin flow. Upward vertical leakage either throughout the basin, dominantly to the Columbia River, or dominantly to Lake Wallula has been proposed for the discharge of the lower units. None of these proposals is verified. The lateral and vertical distribution of major and minor ions in solution, Eh and pH, and ion exchange between basalt and ground-water are not well defined for the basin. Changes in the redox potential from the level of the subsurface facility to the higher stratigraphic levels along with the numerous other factors influencing K/sub d/, result in a poor understanding of the retardation process.

  1. The isostatic state of the lunar Apennines and regional surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, A. J.; Sjogren, W. L.; Phillips, R. J.; Nelson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    High-resolution gravity and topography data taken over the Apennine Mountains have been used to compute their isostatic state. Results show that the Apennines are uncompensated; thus this state implies that the lunar crust and upper mantle have been strong enough over 3.9 b.y. to support the load exerted by this topographic excess. The Apennines produce a maximum shear stress of 60 bars at a depth of 60 km. A lower bound on the lunar crustal viscosity of 10 to the 27th power P is calculated on the basis of the assumption of a 10% relaxation over 3.9 b.y. Studies of a broad negative regional anomaly located between Maria Serenitatis and Imbrium necessitate a locally thicker crust to satisfy the observed data. This anomaly may have been produced by a lateral transport of crustal material from beneath the giant impact basins as a result of rebound at the crust-mantle interface.

  2. A Simplified View of the Geochemical Diversity Surrounding Home Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, A. S.; Morris, R. V.; Clark, B. C.; Gellert, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Home Plate feature (Fig. 1) within the Inner Basin of the Columbia Hills consists of layered rocks and has been interpreted as an accumulation of pyroclastic deposits [1]. Samples analyzed by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer within 25 meters of the eastern margin of Home Plate exhibit a strikingly diverse range of geochemical compositions, including the highest levels of Mg, Si, K, Zn, and Ni measured at Gusev Crater. This wide range of chemical variability across the 40+ samples analyzed on and near Home Plate can be represented by contributions from only six primary components. This reconstruction is not reflected in the M ssbauer mineralogy suggesting that significant alteration of the contributing components has occurred.

  3. Changing carbonate chemistry in ocean waters surrounding coral reefs in the CMIP5 ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricke, K.; Schneider, K.; Cao, L.; Caldeira, K.

    2012-12-01

    abatement, the aragonite saturation threshold is critical to projecting the fate of coral reefs -- under RCP 4.5, less than 5% of reefs are surrounded by waters with Ωa < 3.5 by the end of the century, but nearly half are still surrounded by waters with saturations greater than 3. Our results indicate that only under a very aggressive emissions elimination (and CO2 air-capture) scenario (RCP 2.6) are a majority of coral reefs projected to remain in waters with Ωa > 3.5 at the end of the century. We find that, except for one model that is an outlier, the spread of aragonite saturation states across earth system models in the CMIP5 ensemble is narrow, implying that these ocean chemistry projections are fairly robust.

  4. Observations of Air Quality at the Edge of Kathmandu, Nepal, and the Diurnal Cycle of Air Pollution In and Around the Kathmandu Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, A. K.; Prinn, R. G.; Regmi, R. P.

    2006-12-01

    The Kathmandu Valley is a bowl-shaped basin in the Nepal Himalaya, with a rapidly growing city surrounded by rice fields and steep terraced and forested mountain slopes. The valley's air quality is influenced by urban and rural emissions, nocturnal pooling of cold air, slope winds, and a daily exchange of air through mountain passes. To understand these processes and to inform air pollution policy in Nepal, we have carried out the most comprehensive study of air pollution in Nepal to date. During the 9-month dry season of 2004-2005, we carried out continuous measurements every minute of carbon monoxide, ozone, PM10, wind speed, wind direction, solar radiation, temperature, and humidity on the eastern edge of Kathmandu city, at a site that daily received air from both the city and rural areas. We recorded the diurnal cycle of the vertical temperature structure and stability with temperature loggers on towers and mountains. A sodar measured the mixed layer height and upper-level winds. 24-hour simultaneous bag sampling campaigns on mountain peaks, passes, the rural valley, and within the city provided glimpses of the spatial patterns of the diurnal cycle of CO -- a useful tracer of anthropogenic emissions. We measured winds on mountain passes and ozone on mountain peaks. At our main measurement site we found a daily-recurring pattern of CO and PM10, with an afternoon low showing rural background levels, even though the arriving air had traversed the city. This was followed by an evening peak starting at sunset, a second low late at night, and a morning peak enhanced by re-circulation. Pollutants emitted in the valley only traveled out of the valley between the late morning and sunset. During winter months, rush hour was outside of this period, enhancing the morning and evening peaks. Within the city, ozone dropped to zero at night. At mid-day we observed an ozone peak enhanced by photochemical production when the air mass that had been stagnant over the city swept

  5. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Materials related to air pollution are reviewed for the period January 1987, to October 1988. The topics are pollution monitoring, air pollution, and environmental chemistry. The organization consists of two major analytical divisions: (1) gaseous methods; and (2) aerosol and particulate methods. (MVL)

  6. Air Pollution.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality is affected by many types of pollutants that are emitted from various sources, including stationary and mobile. These sources release both criteria and hazardous air pollutants, which cause health effects, ecological harm, and material damage. They are generally categ...

  7. Impact Crater Particulates: Microscopic Meteoritic Material Surrounding Meteorite Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Toby Russell

    1995-01-01

    The influx of extraterrestrial matter onto the Earth is a ongoing process. Every year 40,000 metric tons of extraterrestrial matter is accreted by the Earth (Love 1993). A small fraction of this material arrives at Earth as objects large enough to survive the passage through atmosphere. Some of this material is completely melted as it passes through the atmosphere and arrives at the surface of the Earth as cosmic spherules. Cosmic spherules formed from metallic cosmic material undergoes changes in its elemental abundance as it passes through the atmosphere. The oxidation of the spherules results in the concentration of more refractory elements like Ni and Co into the metallic phase. Cosmic spherules are also formed by the passage of large meteorites through the atmosphere and their resulting impact onto the Earth. I found that the cosmic spherules from a wide variety of sources show a very similar trend in the elemental abundance patterns of their metallic phases. This trend is most obvious in the spherules recovered from the deep -sea and the spherules imbedded in impactite glass recovered from iron meteorite impact crater sites. The metallic spherules recovered from the soil surrounding impact craters do not show the high degree of elemental fractionation found in the deep-sea and impactite spherules. The composition of these spherules indicate that they are a mixture of meteoritic and target material. Metallic spherules are not the only meteoritic material to be found in the soil surrounding meteorite craters. I found that small fragments of the parent meteorite are an ubiquitous component of the soil surrounding the Odessa and Dalgaranga meteorite craters. These fragments occurred as small (most less than 400 mu m in size) heavily weathered fragments of meteoritic metal. The total calculated mass of these fragments is an order of magnitude larger than the mass of ponderable meteorites recovered from the site but 1 to 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the

  8. Spirit's Surroundings on 'West Spur,' Sol 305 (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    This 360-degree stereo panorama shows the terrain surrounding NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit as of the rover's 305th martian day, or sol, (Nov. 11, 2004). At that point, Spirit was climbing the 'West Spur' of the 'Columbia Hills.' The rover had just finished inspecting a rock called 'Lutefisk' and was heading uphill toward an area called 'Machu Picchu.' Spirit used its navigational camera to take the images combined into this mosaic. The rover's location when the images were taken is catalogued as the mission's site 89, position 205. The stereo-anaglyph view presented here is a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

    Figure 1 is the left-eye view of a stereo pair and Figure 2 is the right-eye view of a stereo pair.

  9. Wave rectification in plasma sheaths surrounding electric field antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, M. H.; Carlson, C. W.; Mcfadden, J. P.; Clemmons, J. H.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.

    1994-01-01

    Combined measurements of Langmuir or broadband whistler wave intensity and lower-frequency electric field waveforms, all at 10-microsecond time resolution, were made on several recent sounding rockets in the auroral ionosphere. It is found that Langmuir and whistler waves are partically rectified in the plasma sheaths surrounding the payload and the spheres used as antennas. This sheath rectification occurs whenever the high frequency (HF) potential across the sheath becomes of the same order as the electron temperature or higher, for wave frequencies near or above the ion plasma frequency. This rectification can introduce false low-frequency waves into measurements of electric field spectra when strong high-frequency waves are present. Second harmonic signals are also generated, although at much lower levels. The effect occurs in many different plasma conditions, primarily producing false waves at frequencies that are low enough for the antenna coupling to the plasma to be resistive.

  10. Percutaneous thermal ablation: how to protect the surrounding organs.

    PubMed

    Tsoumakidou, Georgia; Buy, Xavier; Garnon, Julien; Enescu, Julian; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-09-01

    A variety of thermal ablation techniques have been advocated for percutaneous tumor management. Although the above techniques are considered safe, they can be complicated with unintended thermal injury to the surrounding structures, with disastrous results. In the present article we report a number of different insulation techniques (hydrodissection, gas dissection and balloon interposition, warming/cooling systems) that can be applied. Emphasis is given to the procedure-related details, and we present the advantages and drawbacks of the insulation techniques. We also provide tips on avoiding painful skin burns when treating superficial lesions. Finally, we point out the interest of temperature monitoring and how it can be achieved (use of thermocouples, fiberoptic thermosensors, or direct magnetic resonance imaging temperature mapping). The above thermal insulation and temperature monitoring techniques can be applied alone or in combination. Familiarity with these techniques is essential to avoid major complications and to increase the indications of thermal ablation procedures. PMID:21767784

  11. New magnetic anomaly map of East Antarctica and surrounding regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golynsky, A.; Blankenship, D.; Chiappini, M.; Damaske, D.; Ferraccioli, F.; Finn, C.; Golynsky, D.; Goncharov, A.; Ishihara, T.; Ivanov, S.; Jokat, W.; Kim, H.R.; König, M.; Masolov, V.; Nogi, Y.; Sand, M.; Studing, M.; ADMAP Working Group

    2007-01-01

    community over East Antarctica and surrounding regions, significantly upgrade the Antarctic Digital Magnetic Anomaly Project (ADMAP) compilation and lead to substantial improvements in magnetic anomaly pattern recognition. New data have been matched in one inverse operation by minimizing the data differences for the areas of overlap. The aeromagnetic data show many previously unknown magnetic patterns, lineaments and trends, defining the spatial extent of Ferrar volcanics and plutonic Granite Harbour Intrusives in the Transantarctic Mountains and previously unknown tectonic trends of the East Antarctic craton. Regional aeromagnetic investigations have successfully delineated Early Paleozoic inherited crustal features along the flanks of the West Antarctic Rift System and the southern boundary of the Archean Ruker Terrane in the Prince Charles Mountains. Magnetic records along the East Antarctic continental margin provide new constraints on the breakup of Gondwana.

  12. High Speed Strain Measurements Surrounding Hydraulic Fracture in Brittle Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Will; Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2015-11-01

    Hydraulic fractures of oil and gas shales occur miles underground, below complex, layered rocks, making measurements of their dynamics, extent, or structure difficult to impossible. Rocks are heterogeneous at a wide range of length scales, and investigating how these non-uniformities affect the propagation and extent of fractures is vital to improving both the safety and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing operations. To study these effects we have developed a model system using brittle, heavily cross-linked hydrogels that we can fracture with fluids and observe with a fast camera. By embedding tracer particles within the gel and using laser sheet microscopy, we obtain three dimensional stress and strain maps of the zone surrounding a hydraulic fracture tip. Gels can also be set in layers or interfaces with tunable strengths or with designed heterogeneities, allowing us to understand the fundamental science of hydraulic fractures and investigate the dynamics of controllably complex materials.

  13. Analysis of Ices Surrounding YSOs in Taurus and ρ Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Brunt, Kari A.; Pastorius, M. L.; Gibb, E. L.; Shenoy, S. S.

    2008-05-01

    Recent technological advances have sparked an exciting study of the chemistry in star forming regions. By combining Spitzer IRS and ground based observations, a more sensitive diagnostic of the composition of material surrounding Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) can be performed. Initial studies of the material around YSOs show significant differences in the composition of volatiles in regions with massive YSOs compared to regions containing low mass YSOs. Pontoppidan (2006) found that CO2 and CO abundances were enhanced toward the center of the cold Ophiuchus-F core, and recent results for the CO2 ice feature at 15.3 μm also imply spatial variations within regions of star formation. Analysis of short-lived radioisotopes in meteorites indicates our solar system was seeded with material from a nearby supernova, suggesting our system formed in a region of both high and low mass star formation (Goswami & Vanhala 2000). Here we present preliminary results from data taken with the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope and SpeX at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) located on Mauna Kea, HI. Observations of H2O ice, CO ice, and CO2 ice at 3.0 μm, 4.67 μm, and 15.3 μm, respectively, are presented for the Taurus and ρ Ophiuchi star forming regions. We measured abundances and used laboratory spectra to constrain the polar/apolar composition and the thermal history of the region. In the future, additional YSOs in the Taurus and ρ Ophiuchi regions will be similarly analyzed in order to correlate variations in the volatile composition of the material surrounding YSOs with environmental factors and evolutionary states.

  14. Platelets surrounding primary tumor cells are related to chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Satoko; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Inokuchi, Masafumi; Hayashi, Hironori; Oyama, Katsunobu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hironori; Ninomiya, Itasu; Ahmed, A Karim; Harman, John W; Fushida, Sachio; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Platelets are crucial components of the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor progression and metastasis. In the circulation, the interaction between tumor cells and platelets increases invasiveness, protects tumor cells from shear stress and immune surveillance, and facilitates tumor cell extravasation to distant sites. However, the role and presence of platelets in the primary tumor have not been fully determined. Here, we investigated the presence of platelets around breast cancer primary tumor cells and the associations between these cells. We further investigated the associations among platelets, tumor cells, chemoresistance, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We retrospectively analyzed data from 74 patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)‑negative breast cancer who underwent biopsies before treatment and subsequent neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. In biopsy specimens, we evaluated the expression of platelet-specific markers and EMT markers using immunohistochemistry. The associations among the expression of platelet‑specific markers in biopsy specimens, EMT, response to neo‑adjuvant chemotherapy, and survival were analyzed. The presence of platelets was observed in 44 out of 74 (59%) primary breast cancer biopsy specimens. Platelet‑positive tumor cells showed EMT‑like morphological changes and EMT marker expression. Primary tumor cells associated with platelets were less responsive to neo‑adjuvant chemotherapy (pCR rate: 10 vs. 50%, respectively; p=0.0001). Platelets were an independent predictor of the response to chemotherapy upon multivariable analysis (p<0.0001). In conclusion, there was a significant association between platelets surrounding primary tumor cells in the biopsy specimens and the chemotherapeutic response in breast cancer. Platelets surrounding primary tumor cells may represent novel predictors of chemotherapeutic responses. PMID:27349611

  15. Optical coherence microscopy of mouse cortical vasculature surrounding implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Lozzi, Andrea; Abliz, Erkinay; Greenbaum, Noah; Turner, Kevin P.; Pfefer, T. Joshua; Agrawal, Anant; Krauthamer, Victor; Welle, Cristin G.

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) provides real-time, in-vivo, three-dimensional, isotropic micron-resolution structural and functional characterization of tissue, cells, and other biological targets. Optical coherence angiography (OCA) also provides visualization and quantification of vascular flow via speckle-based or phase-resolved techniques. Performance assessment of neuroprosthetic systems, which allow direct thought control of limb prostheses, may be aided by OCA. In particular, there is a need to examine the underlying mechanisms of chronic functional degradation of implanted electrodes. Angiogenesis, capillary network remodeling, and changes in flow velocity are potential indicators of tissue changes that may be associated with waning electrode performance. The overall goal of this investigation is to quantify longitudinal changes in vascular morphology and capillary flow around neural electrodes chronically implanted in mice. We built a 1315-nm OCM system to image vessels in neocortical tissue in a cohort of mice. An optical window was implanted on the skull over the primary motor cortex above a penetrating shank-style microelectrode array. The mice were imaged bi-weekly to generate vascular maps of the region surrounding the implanted microelectrode array. Acute effects of window and electrode implantation included vessel dilation and profusion of vessels in the superficial layer of the cortex (0-200 μm). In deeper layers surrounding the electrode, no qualitative differences were seen in this early phase. These measurements establish a baseline vascular tissue response from the cortical window preparation and lay the ground work for future longitudinal studies to test the hypothesis that vascular changes will be associated with chronic electrode degradation.

  16. Oxidation Kinetics of K Basin Fuel (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect

    TRIMBLE, D.J.

    2000-09-25

    Oxidation testing of K Basin-stored N Reactor fuel in dry air, moist air, and moist helium provided reaction rate data for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The tests were performed on small samples from two spent nuclear fuel elements retrieved from the closed canisters of the K West Basin. The spent nuclear fuel samples were tested using a thermogravimetric analysis system modified for moist-gas operation to allow testing in moist environments. The tests were run at constant temperature and water vapor pressure. The moist helium tests used 6.5 H a water vapor, producing seventeen data between 75 C and 210 C. Eight of these data were excluded from primary consideration due to testing anomalies and balance drift issues. Regression analysis of the nine acceptable data provided good assurance that the moist-helium results are consistent with literature data within the temperature range of 25 C to 210 C. Concerns about possible oxygen poisoning from air in-leakage and mass transfer limitations on the test data were reviewed. If oxygen poisoning occurred it was not likely to have biased the data sufficiently to change the basic conclusions of comparability to the literature data. Mass transfer limitations did not appear to have had significant effect on the moist-helium data.

  17. Use of GOES, SSM/I, TRMM Satellite Measurements Estimating Water Budget Variations in Gulf of Mexico - Caribbean Sea Basins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents results from a multi-satellite/multi-sensor retrieval system designed to obtain the atmospheric water budget over the open ocean. A combination of 3ourly-sampled monthly datasets derived from the GOES-8 5-channel Imager, the TRMM TMI radiometer, and the DMSP 7-channel passive microwave radiometers (SSM/I) have been acquired for the combined Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean Sea basin. Whereas the methodology has been tested over this basin, the retrieval system is designed for portability to any open-ocean region. Algorithm modules using the different datasets to retrieve individual geophysical parameters needed in the water budget equation are designed in a manner that takes advantage of the high temporal resolution of the GOES-8 measurements, as well as the physical relationships inherent to the TRMM and SSM/I passive microwave measurements in conjunction with water vapor, cloud liquid water, and rainfall. The methodology consists of retrieving the precipitation, surface evaporation, and vapor-cloud water storage terms in the atmospheric water balance equation from satellite techniques, with the water vapor advection term being obtained as the residue needed for balance. Thus, the intent is to develop a purely satellite-based method for obtaining the full set of terms in the atmospheric water budget equation without requiring in situ sounding information on the wind profile. The algorithm is validated by cross-checking all the algorithm components through multiple- algorithm retrieval intercomparisons. A further check on the validation is obtained by directly comparing water vapor transports into the targeted basin diagnosed from the satellite algorithms to those obtained observationally from a network of land-based upper air stations that nearly uniformly surround the basin, although it is fair to say that these checks are more effective m identifying problems in estimating vapor transports from a leaky operational radiosonde network than in verifying

  18. Monthly-Diurnal Water Budget Variability Over Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean Sea Basin from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. A.; Santos, P.

    2006-01-01

    This study presents results from a multi-satellite/multi-sensor retrieval system design d to obtain the atmospheric water budget over the open ocean. A combination of hourly-sampled monthly datasets derived from the GOES-8 5-channel Imager, the TRMM TMI radiometer, and the DMSP 7-channel passive microwave radiometers (SSM/I) have been acquired for the combined Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean Sea basin. Whereas the methodology has been tested over this basin, the retrieval system is designed for portability to any open-ocean region. Algorithm modules using the different datasets to retrieve individual geophysical parameters needed in the water budget equation are designed in a manner that takes advantage of the high temporal resolution of the GOES-8 measurements, as well as the physical relationships inherent to the TRMM and SSM/I passive microwave measurements in conjunction with water vapor, cloud liquid water, and rainfall. The methodology consists of retrieving the precipitation, surface evaporation, and vapor-cloud water storage terms in the atmospheric water balance equation from satellite techniques, with the water vapor advection term being obtained as the residue needed for balance. Thus, the intent is to develop a purely satellite-based method for obtaining the full set of terms in the atmospheric water budget equation without requiring in situ sounding information on the wind profile. The algorithm is validated by cross-checking all the algorithm components through multiple-algorithm retrieval intercomparisons. A further check on the validation is obtained by directly comparing water vapor transports into the targeted basin diagnosed from the satellite algorithms to those obtained observationally from a network of land-based upper air stations that nearly uniformly surround the basin, although it is fair to say that these checks are more effective in identifying problems in estimating vapor transports from a "leaky" operational radiosonde network than in

  19. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  20. Surface ozone in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burley, Joel D.; Theiss, Sandra; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Gertler, Alan; Schilling, Susan; Zielinska, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Surface ozone (O3) concentrations were measured in and around the Lake Tahoe Basin using both active monitors (2010) and passive samplers (2002, 2010). The 2010 data from active monitors indicate average summertime diurnal maxima of approximately 50-55 ppb. Some site-to-site variability is observed within the Basin during the well-mixed hours of 10:00 to 17:00 PST, but large differences between different sites are observed in the late evening and pre-dawn hours. The observed trends correlate most strongly with elevation, topography, and surface vegetation. High elevation sites with steeply sloped topography and drier ground cover experience elevated O3 concentrations throughout the night because they maintain good access to downward mixing of O3-rich air from aloft with smaller losses due to dry deposition. Low elevation sites with flat topography and more dense surface vegetation experience low O3 concentrations in the pre-dawn hours because of greatly reduced downward mixing coupled with enhanced O3 removal via efficient dry deposition. Additionally, very high average O3 concentrations were measured with passive samplers in the middle of the Lake in 2010. This latter result likely reflects diminished dry deposition to the surface of the Lake. High elevation Tahoe Basin sites with exposure to nocturnal O3-rich air from aloft experience daily maxima of 8-h average O3 concentrations that are frequently higher than concurrent maxima from the polluted upwind comparison sites of Sacramento, Folsom, and Placerville. Wind rose analyses of archived NAM 12 km meteorological data for the summer of 2010 suggest that some of the sampling sites situated near the shoreline may have experienced on-shore "lake breezes" during daytime hours and/or off-shore "land breezes" during the night. Back-trajectory analysis with the HYSPLIT model suggests that much of the ozone measured at Lake Tahoe results from the transport of "polluted background" air into the Basin from upwind

  1. SURVEY OF CROSS-BASIN BOAT TRAFFIC, ATCHAFALAYA BASIN, LOUISIANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    For flood control and for the preservation and enhancement of environmental quality of overflow swamp habitats, introduction of sediment from the Atchafalaya Basin Main Channel into backwater areas of the Atchafalaya Basin Floodway should be minimized. This introduction occurs ma...

  2. Surface Ozone in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burley, J. D.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Zielinska, B.; Schilling, S.

    2014-12-01

    Surface ozone (O3) concentrations were measured in and around the Lake Tahoe Basin using both active monitors (12 sites in 2010) and passive samplers (31 sites 2002; 34 sites in 2010). The 2010 data from active monitors indicate average summertime diurnal maxima of approximately 50-55 ppb. Minimal site-to-site variability is observed within the Basin during the well-mixed hours of 10:00 to 17:00 PST, but large differences between different sites are observed in the late evening and pre-dawn hours. The observed trends correlate most strongly with elevation, topography, and surface vegetation. High elevation sites with steeply sloped topography and drier ground cover experience elevated O3 concentrations throughout the night because they maintain good access to downward mixing of ozone-rich air from aloft with minimal losses due to dry deposition. Low elevation sites with flat topography and wetter surface vegetation experience low O3 concentrations in the pre-dawn hours because of greatly reduced downward mixing coupled with enhanced O3 removal via efficient dry deposition. Very high average O3 concentrations (overall seasonal average = 64 ppb) were measured with passive samplers in the middle of the Lake in 2010. This latter finding may reflect high emissions of O3 precursors from vehicular traffic around the Lake, emissions from motorboats, and/or elevated rates of photochemical processes due to high solar radiation and stagnant air masses over the Lake. Tahoe Basin sites with good nocturnal exposure to ozone-rich air from aloft experience average O3 concentrations that are frequently higher than concurrent averages from the polluted upwind comparison sites of Sacramento, Folsom, and Placerville.

  3. River basin management

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.H.; Edwards, A.M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The quality of water is of paramount importance in the management of water resources - including marine waters. A quantitative knowledge of water quality and the factors governing it is required to formulate and implement strategies requiring an inter-disciplinary approach. The overall purpose of this conference was to bring together the latest work on water quality aspects of river basin management. These proceedings are structured on the basis of five themes: problems in international river basins; the contribution of river systems to estuarial and marine pollution; the setting of standards; monitoring; and practical water quality management including use of mathematical models. They are followed by papers from the workshop on advances in the application of mathematical modelling to water quality management, which represent some of the current thinking on the problems and concepts of river basin management.

  4. Multispectral Study of the Schrödinger Impact Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, B.; Osinski, G.; Antonenko, I.; Stooke, P. J.

    2009-05-01

    The Schrödinger impact basin is located on the lunar far side near the south pole (76oS, 134oE) and is one of only two young multiring impact basins on the lunar surface [1]. With a diameter size of 312 km and basin floor 2-3 km deep, Schrödinger is the least modified impact basin of its size. A peak ring structure 150 km in diameter lies on the basin floor, formed by uplift of pre-Schrödinger crustal materials. Ejecta material, smooth in texture, covers the basin walls and extends out onto the surrounding surface up to 100 km in all directions. The first geological map published of Schrödinger was generated using preliminary Clementine data [1]. The map described the geology and geomorphology within the inner basin with smooth and rough plains of shocked material occupying most of the basin floor. The rough plains are identified by presence of hummocks, swales, and low knobs. Smooth plains have no discernable features identifiable. Ghost craters are found along both smooth and rough patches. A volcanic vent in the inner eastern corner of Schrödinger is interpreted as a source for pyroclastic eruptions within the area. Located along the volcanic vent is a north-east trending graben. There are thin patches of impact melt sheets along the basin walls and peak ring. A lobate ridge located near the centre of the inner basin is interpreted as having formed by buckling of the melt sheet. A more recent geologic map using high resolution Clementine UVVIS data and topography data is in agreement with the proposed geology within the Schrödinger basin [2]. Contacts between various units are better outlined in the recent map. Using spectra derived from high resolution Clementine UVVIS images and Lunar Prospector data we determine the composition of impact melt, impact ejecta, and the extent of proposed cryptomare deposits [3]. We also use Fe, Th, and Ti abundance in determining the composition of these units. Our goal is to determine the abundance and distribution of

  5. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de )

    1994-02-07

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  6. Highly Enriched uranium Metal Spheres Surrounded by Various Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jessica Feener; J. Blair Briggs; Leland Montierth

    2007-05-01

    A series of experiments was performed at the Los Alamos critical assembly facility in the early 1950s to determine the critical mass of highly enriched uranium spheres surrounded by thin reflectors of various materials. The objective of these experiments was to obtain a precision graph of the critical mass of highly enriched uranium metal as a function of reflector thickness and to generate transport cross sections for the reflector material. Thirteen configurations are described and evaluated under ICSBEP identifier, HEU-MET-FAST-085; two with 1.98-inch-thick and 4.158-inch-thick copper reflectors, two with 2- and 4-inch-thick cast iron reflectors, one with a 1.945-inch-thick nickel reflector, two with 1.88- and 2.02-inch-thick nickel-copper-zinc alloy reflectors, one with a 1.81-inch-thick thorium reflector, two with 2-inch-thick and 4-inch-thick tungsten alloy reflectors, two with 2-inch-thick and 4.075-inch-thick zinc reflectors, and one with a 2-inch-thick tungsten alloy reflector surrounded by a 2-inch-thick cast iron reflector. All configurations were slightly subcritical with measured multiplications ranging from 20 to 162. Analyses were performed in which uncertainty associated with six different parameters was evaluated; namely, extrapolation to uranium critical mass, uranium density, 235U enrichment, reflector density, reflector thickness, and reflector impurities were considered. Uncertainty in cast-iron alloying elements was also considered when appropriate. In addition to the idealizations made by the experimenters, two simplifications were also made to the benchmark models that resulted in a small bias and additional uncertainty. First of all, since impurities in core and reflector materials are only estimated, they are not included in the benchmark models. Secondly, the room, support structure, and other possible surrounding equipment were not included in the model. Bias values that result from these two simplifications were determined and

  7. Large-scale shear velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath Europe and surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, C. P.; Meier, T. M.; Lebedev, S.; Friederich, W.

    2009-12-01

    The automated multimode waveform inversion technique developed by Lebedev et al. (2005) was applied to available data of broadband stations in Europe and surrounding regions. It performs a fitting of the complete waveform starting from the S-wave onset to the surface wave. Assuming the location and focal mechanism of a considered earthquake as known, the first basic step is to consider each available seismogram separately and to find the 1D-model that can explain the filtered seismogram best. In a second step, each 1D-model serves as a linear constraint in an inversion for a 3D S-wave velocity model of the upper mantle. We collected data for the years from 1990 to 2006 from all permanent stations for which data were available via the data centers of ORFEUS, GEOFON amd IRIS, and from others that build the Virtual European Seismological Network (VEBSN). In addition, we incorporated data from temporary experiments like SVEKALAPKO, TOR and the Eifel plume project as well as permanent stations in France. Just recently we were also able to add the data recorded by the temporary broadband EGELADOS network in the southern Aegean. In this way, a huge data set of about 500000 seismograms came about from which about 60000 1D-models could be constructed. The resulting models exhibit an overwhelming structural detail in relation to the size of the region considered in the inversion. They are to our knowledge the most detailed models of shear wave velocity currently available for the European upper mantle and surroundings. Most prominent features are an extremely sharp demarcation of the East European platform from Western Europe. Narrow high velocity regions follow the Hellenic arc and the Ionian trench toward the north. Whereas high velocities are found beneath the western Alps between about 100 km to 200 km depth, the eastern Alps show a low velocity anomaly at these depths. Low velocity zones are found at depths around 150 km in the Pannonian basin, the back-arc of the

  8. Large-scale shear velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath Europe and surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, Cédric; Meier, Thomas; Lebedev, Sergei; Friederich, Wolfgang; Egelados Working Group

    2010-05-01

    The automated multimode waveform inversion technique developed by Lebedev et al. (2005) was applied to available data of broadband stations in Europe and surrounding regions. It performs a fitting of the complete waveform starting from the S-wave onset to the surface wave. Assuming the location and focal mechanism of a considered earthquake as known, the first basic step is to consider each available seismogram separately and to find the velocity perturbations that can explain the filtered seismogram best. In a second step, each velocity perturbations serves as a linear constraint in an inversion for a 3D S-wave velocity model of the upper mantle. We collected data for the years from 1990 to 2006 from all permanent stations for which data were available via the data centers of ORFEUS, GEOFON and IRIS, and from others that build the Virtual European Seismological Network (VEBSN). In addition, we incorporated data from temporary experiments like SVEKALAPKO, TOR and the Eifel plume project as well as permanent stations in France. Just recently we were also able to add the data recorded by the temporary broadband EGELADOS network in the southern Aegean. In this way, a huge data set of about 500000 seismograms came about from which about 60000 1D-models could be constructed. The resulting models exhibit an overwhelming structural detail in relation to the size of the region considered in the inversion. They are to our knowledge the most detailed models of shear wave velocity currently available for the European upper mantle and surroundings. Most prominent features are an extremely sharp demarcation of the East European platform from Western Europe. Narrow high velocity regions follow the Hellenic arc and the Ionian trench toward the north. Whereas high velocities are found beneath the western Alps between about 100 km to 200 km depth, the eastern Alps show a low velocity anomaly at these depths. Low velocity zones are found at depths around 150 km