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Sample records for air bearing spindle

  1. Mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle on a machine tool

    DOEpatents

    Lunsford, J.S.; Crisp, D.W.; Petrowski, P.L.

    1987-12-07

    The present invention is directed to a mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle utilized on a machine tool such as a lathe. The mounting arrangement of the present invention comprises a housing which is secured to the casing of the air bearing in such a manner that the housing position can be selectively adjusted to provide alignment of the air-bearing drive shaft supported by the housing and the air-bearing spindle. Once this alignment is achieved the air between spindle and the drive arrangement is maintained in permanent alignment so as to overcome misalignment problems encountered in the operation of the machine tool between the air-bearing spindle and the shaft utilized for driving the air-bearing spindle.

  2. Adaptive Spindle Balancing Using Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY,PATRICK S.; LAUFFER,JAMES P.; PETTEYS,REBECCA; REDMOND,JAMES M.; SULLIVAN,WILLIAM N.

    1999-09-20

    A technological break through for supporting rotating shafts is the active magnetic bearing (AMB). Active magnetic bearings offer some important advantages over conventional ball, roller or journal bearings such as reduced frictional drag, no physical contact in the bearing, no need for lubricants, compatibility with high vacuum and ultra-clean environments, and ability to control shaft position within the bearing. The disadvantages of the AMB system are the increased cost and complexity, reduced bearing stiffness and the need for a controller. Still, there are certain applications, such as high speed machining, biomedical devices, and gyroscopes, where the additional cost of an AMB system can be justified. The inherent actuator capabilities of the AMB offer the potential for active balancing of spindles and micro-shaping capabilities for machine tools, The work presented in this paper concentrates on an AMB test program that utilizes the actuator capability to dynamically balance a spindle. In this study, an unbalanced AMB spindle system was enhanced with an LMS (Least Mean Squares) algorithm combined with an existing PID (proportional, integral, differential) control. This enhanced controller significantly improved the concentricity of an intentionally unbalanced shaft. The study included dynamic system analysis, test validation, control design and simulation, as well as experimental implementation using a digital LMS controller.

  3. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  4. Method for vibration response simulation and sensor placement optimization of a machine tool spindle system with a bearing defect.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongrui; Niu, Linkai; He, Zhengjia

    2012-01-01

    Bearing defects are one of the most important mechanical sources for vibration and noise generation in machine tool spindles. In this study, an integrated finite element (FE) model is proposed to predict the vibration responses of a spindle bearing system with localized bearing defects and then the sensor placement for better detection of bearing faults is optimized. A nonlinear bearing model is developed based on Jones' bearing theory, while the drawbar, shaft and housing are modeled as Timoshenko's beam. The bearing model is then integrated into the FE model of drawbar/shaft/housing by assembling equations of motion. The Newmark time integration method is used to solve the vibration responses numerically. The FE model of the spindle-bearing system was verified by conducting dynamic tests. Then, the localized bearing defects were modeled and vibration responses generated by the outer ring defect were simulated as an illustration. The optimization scheme of the sensor placement was carried out on the test spindle. The results proved that, the optimal sensor placement depends on the vibration modes under different boundary conditions and the transfer path between the excitation and the response.

  5. Method for Vibration Response Simulation and Sensor Placement Optimization of a Machine Tool Spindle System with a Bearing Defect

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hongrui; Niu, Linkai; He, Zhengjia

    2012-01-01

    Bearing defects are one of the most important mechanical sources for vibration and noise generation in machine tool spindles. In this study, an integrated finite element (FE) model is proposed to predict the vibration responses of a spindle bearing system with localized bearing defects and then the sensor placement for better detection of bearing faults is optimized. A nonlinear bearing model is developed based on Jones' bearing theory, while the drawbar, shaft and housing are modeled as Timoshenko's beam. The bearing model is then integrated into the FE model of drawbar/shaft/housing by assembling equations of motion. The Newmark time integration method is used to solve the vibration responses numerically. The FE model of the spindle-bearing system was verified by conducting dynamic tests. Then, the localized bearing defects were modeled and vibration responses generated by the outer ring defect were simulated as an illustration. The optimization scheme of the sensor placement was carried out on the test spindle. The results proved that, the optimal sensor placement depends on the vibration modes under different boundary conditions and the transfer path between the excitation and the response. PMID:23012514

  6. Development of a highly efficient hard disk drive spindle motor with a passive magnetic thrust bearing and a hydrodynamic journal bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, G. H.; Park, J. S.

    2005-05-01

    This article presents a highly efficient hard disk drive (HDD) spindle motor with a passive magnetic thrust bearing and a hydrodynamic journal bearing. It eliminates the mechanical friction loss of a thrust bearing which is around 14% of total power consumption of a 3.5 in. HDD spindle motor, by replacing a conventional hydrodynamic thrust bearing with a passive magnetic thrust bearing. The passive magnetic thrust bearing using permanent magnets is inherently unstable in radial direction. However, the radial hydrodynamic force of the hydrodynamic journal bearing counterbalances the radial magnetic force of magnetic thrust bearing to achieve the stability as the motor spins up. Numerical analysis is performed to verify feasibility of the proposed system.

  7. Air-Bearing Table for Machine Shops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrisco, D.

    1986-01-01

    Frequent workpiece repositioning made easier. Air-bearing table facilitates movement of heavy workpiece during machining or between repeated operations at different positions. Table assembly consists of workpiece supporting fixture riding on air bearing. Table especially useful for inertia welding, in which ease of mobility is important.

  8. Bearings Only Air-to-Air Ranging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-25

    sensor, observer and target parameters still remain. In order to reduce the number of cases to a manageable one, while preserving the geometric...perforance of variotu. ulro-air passive ranging tecnique has been examined as a fimn- tiam of uarget location andi motiom, observer motion. and length

  9. Design and Application of a Collocated Capacitance Sensor for Magnetic Bearing Spindle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Dongwon; Liu, Seon-Jung; Kim, Jongwon

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a collocated capacitance sensor for magnetic bearings. The main feature of the sensor is that it is made of a specific compact printed circuit board (PCB). The signal processing unit has been also developed. The results of the experimental performance evaluation on the sensitivity, resolution and frequency response of the sensor are presented. Finally, an application example of the sensor to the active control of a magnetic bearing is described.

  10. Comparison of rotational speeds and torque properties between air-bearing and ball-bearing air-turbine handpieces.

    PubMed

    Taira, M; Wakasa, K; Yamaki, M; Matsui, A

    1989-06-01

    We examined the effects of air pressure on the free-running speed of air-bearing and torque-type ball-bearing air-turbine handpieces. The air pressure for the former should be kept at a certain high level to maintain the stable super-thin air-bearing film and to provide the quasi-constant speed of around 420,000 to 480,000 rpm. On the other hand, the air pressure for the latter could be adjusted to provide some varieties of speeds, ranging from about 150,000 to 320,000 rpm. Subsequently, to compare torque properties and cutting effectiveness between these two handpieces, weight-load cutting tests were conducted, using a glass-ceramic workpiece and a commercial diamond point. It was confirmed that the air-bearing handpiece had the lower torque power but exhibited better cutting effectiveness, compared with its counterpart.

  11. Hydrodynamic air lubricated compliant surface bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine. 1: Journal bearing performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruscitto, D.; Mccormick, J.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    A 38.1 mm (1.5 inch) diameter Hydresil Compliant Surface Air Lubricated Journal Bearing was designed and tested to obtain bearing performance characteristics at both room temperature and 315 C (600 F). Testing was performed at various speeds up to 60,000 rpm with varying loads. Rotating sensors provided an opportunity to examine the film characteristics of the compliant surface bearing. In addition to providing minimum film thickness values and profiles, many other insights into bearing operation were gained such as the influence of bearing fabrication accuracy and the influence of smooth foil deflection between the bumps.

  12. Spherical Air Bearing testbed for nanosatellite attitude control development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustrzycki, Tyler

    Spherical Air Bearing systems have been used as a test bed for attitude control systems for many decades. With the advancements of nanosatellite technologies as a platform for scientific missions, there is an increased demand for comprehensive, pre-launch testing of nanosatellites. Several spherical air bearing systems have been developed for larger satellite applications and add too much parasitic mass to be applicable for nanosatellite applications. This thesis details the design and validation of a Nanosatellite Three Axis Attitude Control Testbed. The testbed consists of the physical design of the system, a complete electronics system, and validation of the testbed using low-cost reaction wheels as actuators. The design of the air bearing platform includes a manual balancing system to align the centre of gravity with the centre of rotation. The electronics system is intended to measure the attitude of the platform and control the actuator system. Validation is achieved through a controlled slew maneuver of the air bearing platform.

  13. A Novel Thermal Management Approach for Radial Foil Air Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Rossum (1). Since their discovery, foil bearings have been commonly used as rotor supports in air cycle machines (ACM’s) that are part of an...engines (6, 7). With air as the lubricant, foil bearings can successfully support high speed rotors in extreme temperature environments without the...low enough, can lead to rotor instability. On the other hand, a heavier preload will create higher start-up torque and lift-off speed requirements

  14. Next generation spindles for micromilling.

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, Jay P.; Payne, Scott W. T.; Gill, David Dennis; Ziegert, John C.; Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.

    2004-12-01

    There exists a wide variety of important applications for micro- and meso-scale mechanical systems in the commercial and defense sectors, which require high-strength materials and complex geometries that cannot be produced using current MEMS fabrication technologies. Micromilling has great potential to fill this void in MEMS technology by adding the capability of free form machining of complex 3D shapes from a wide variety and combination of traditional, well-understood engineering alloys, glasses and ceramics. Inefficiencies in micromilling result from the relationships between a cutting tool's breaking strength, the applied cutting force, and the metal removal rate. Because machining times in mesofeatures scale inversely to the part size, a feature 1/10th as large will take 10 times as long to machine. Also, required chip sizes of 1 m or less are cut with tools having edge radius of 2-3 m, the cutting edge effectively has a highly negative rake angle, cutting forces are increased significantly causing chip loads to be further reduced and the machining takes even longer than predicted above. However, cutting forces do not increase with cutting speed, so faster spindles with reduced tool runout are the path to achieve efficient mesoscale milling. This research explored the development of new ultra-high speed micromilling spindles. A novel air-bearing spindle design is discussed that will run at very high speeds (450,000 rpm) and provide very minimal runout allowing the best use of micromilling cutters and reducing overall machining time drastically. Two generations of this spindle design were completed; one with an air bearing supported tool shaft and one with a novel rolling element bearing supported tool shaft. Both designs utilized friction-drive systems that relied on diameter differences between the drive wheel (operating at speeds up to 90,000 rpm) and the tool shaft to achieve high rotational tool speeds. Runout, stiffness, and machining tests were conducted

  15. Air-bearing spin facility for measuring energy dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The air-bearing spin facility was developed to determine experimentally the effect of energy dissipation upon the motion of spinning spacecraft. The facility consists of an air-bearing spin table, a telemetry system, a command system, and a ground control station. The air-bearing spin table was designed to operate in a vacuum chamber. Tests were run on spacecraft components such as fuel tanks, nutation dampers, reaction wheels, and active nutation damper systems. Each of these items affected the attitude of a spinning spacecraft. An experimental approach to determine these effects was required because the dissipation of these components could not be adequately analyzed. The results of these experiments have been used, with excellent results, to predict spacecraft motion.

  16. Yaw rate control of an air bearing vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walcott, Bruce L.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a 6 week project which focused on the problem of controlling the yaw (rotational) rate the air bearing vehicle used on NASA's flat floor facility are summarized. Contained within is a listing of the equipment available for task completion and an evaluation of the suitability of this equipment. The identification (modeling) process of the air bearing vehicle is detailed as well as the subsequent closed-loop control strategy. The effectiveness of the solution is discussed and further recommendations are included.

  17. Fatigue life and performance testing of hybrid ceramic ball bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Y.P.; Prason, P.K.; Dezzani, M.

    1996-03-01

    Hybrid ceramic ball bearings are finding increased applications in machine tool spindles and aerospace vehicles. Results of three types of testing hybrid ceramic ball bearing are presented and discussed. The first is the classical endurance testing of highly loaded hybrid bearings with good lubrication. The second is the endurance test of hybrid nitrided bearings after running in a contaminated lubricant which caused dented raceways. The third is the high-speed performance testing of spindle bearings lubricated with grease or an oil-air mixture. Recent material development, bearing temperature at high-speed and reliability considerations are discussed. 14 refs., 9 fig., 4 tab.

  18. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In

  19. 2D THD and 3D TEHD analysis of large spindle supported thrust bearings with pins and double layer system used in the three gorges hydroelectric generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, B.; Wu, Z. D.; Wu, J. L.; Wang, L. Q.

    2012-11-01

    A 2D THD model and a 3DTEHD model for large spindle supported thrust bearings were set up and used to analyze the lubrication performance of the Three Gorges test thrust beating withpins and double layer system developed by Alstom Power. The finite difference method was employed to solve the THD model, and the thermal-elasticdeformations in the pad and runner were obtained by the finite element software ANSYS11.0. The data transfer between the THD model and ANSYS11.0 was carried out automatically by an interface program.A detailed comparison between the experimental results and numerical predictions by the two different modelsset up in this paper was carried out. Poor agreement has been found between the theoretical results obtained by 2D THD model and experimental data, while 3D TEHD provides fairly good agreement, confirming the importance of thermal effects and thermal-elastic deformations in both pad and runner.

  20. Spindle position control by embedded electromagnetic poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, N.-C.; Lee, R.-M.

    2010-10-01

    A novel embedded cylindrical-array magnetic actuator (ECAMA) is proposed and verified by experiments to provide sufficient magnetic force for spindle deviation regulation of high-speed milling process. Four I-shape silicon steel columns enclosing the spindle constitute the backbone of the ECAMA. The shape of modified concave-type yokes is designed to reduce the average air gap between magnetic poles and the spindle. In contrast to the conventional AMB (active magnetic bearing) design for which coils are usually wound on the yokes, the copper wire is wound on the I-shape silicon steel columns. As a result, the overall wound coil turns can be much increased. In other words, stronger magnetic force can be induced by ECAMA. On the other hand, to reduce the cost of ECAMA, two pairs of self-sensing modules are employed to replace the gap sensors for measurement of spindle position deviation. In order to verify the efficacy of the proposed ECAMA and the self-sensing module, high-speed milling tests are undertaken. By inspection on the precision and quality of the finish surface of workpiece, the superiority of ECAMA and the self-sensing module are assured.

  1. Air bearing provides friction-free support for shaker system slip table

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoff, R. W.

    1966-01-01

    Air bearing system supports a shaker system slip table with minimum friction. At each corner of a square of grooves made on the table, a hole is drilled through the table and fitted with air connections. Air pressure is simultaneously fed to the four fittings forming an air bearing.

  2. Nanoscale air bearing modeling via lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo Tae; Jhon, Myung S.; Zhou, Yong; Staroselsky, Ilya; Chen, Hudong

    2005-05-01

    As spacing between the two solid surfaces in operating condition becomes much smaller than the mean free path of the air, continuum-based Navier-Stokes equation is no longer valid and one has to use a modified Reynolds equation (MRE) in simulating high Knudsen number air bearing. This MRE, which stems from the linearized Boltzmann transport equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approximation via the appropriate choice of the boundary condition, has the advantages of calculating the pressure distribution in a nanoscale confined gaseous system. In this paper, we provide a methodology based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which could enhance the computational capability of nanoscale confined gaseous system by calculating both velocity and pressure fields simultaneously. The advantage of transient and parallel nature makes this LBM an attractive tool for the next generation air bearing design. Furthermore, LBM is suitable for hybridization with lubricant morphology as well as multiscale modeling including entire disk flow analysis. We demonstrate the feasibility of this LBM by using first-order slip model as a case study. Hybridization with database established by Kang et al. [S.-C. Kang, R. M. Crone, and M. S. Jhon, J. Appl. Phys. 85, 5594 (1999)] can be performed via the similar procedure reported here to develop the state-of-the-art slider design software.

  3. Low-friction coatings for air bearings in fuel cell air compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G. R.; Erdemir, A.; Woodford, J.; Sitts, J.; Elshot, K.; Griffey, K.

    2000-01-06

    In an effort to reduce fuel consumption and emissions, hybrid vehicles incorporating fuel cell systems are being developed by automotive manufacturers, their suppliers, federal agencies (specifically, the US Department of Energy) and national laboratories. The fuel cell system will require an air management subsystem that includes a compressor/expander. Certain components in the compressor will require innovative lubrication technology in order to reduce parasitic energy losses and improve their reliability and durability. One such component is the air bearing for air turbocompressors designed and fabricated by Meruit, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory recently developed a carbon-based coating with low friction and wear attributes; this near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coating is a potential candidate for use in turbocompressor air bearings. The authors present here an evaluation of the Argonne coating for air compressor thrust bearings. With two parallel 440C stainless steel discs in unidirectional sliding contact, the NFC reduced the frictional force four times and the wear rate by more than two orders of magnitude. Wear mechanism on the uncoated surface involved oxidation and production of iron oxide debris. Wear occurred on the coated surfaces primarily by a polishing mechanism.

  4. Air bearing center cross gap of neutron stress spectrometer sample table support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Wu, Yunxin; Gong, Hai; Feng, Xiaolei

    2016-12-01

    A support system is the main load-bearing component of sample table for neutron stress spectrometer, and air bearing is an important element of a support system. The neutron stress spectrometer sample table was introduced, and the scheme for air bearing combination was selected. To study the performance of air bearing center cross gap, finite element models (FEMs) were established based on air motion and Reynolds equations, effects of air supply pressure, and gap parameters on the overturning moment and bearing capacity of air bearing center cross gap were analyzed. Results indicate that the width, depth, and height differences of the marble floor gap played important roles in the performance of the air bearing. When gap width is lesser than 1 mm and gap depth is lower than 0.4 mm, bearing capacity and overturning moment would vary rapidly with the variation of the width and depth. A gap height difference results in the bearing capacity dropping rapidly. The FEM results agree well with experimental results. Further, findings of the study could guide the design of the support system and marble floor.

  5. The Role of Radial Clearance on the Performance of Foil Air Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin; Howard, Samuel; Dykas, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Load capacity tests were conducted to determine how radial clearance variations affect the load capacity coefficient of foil air bearings. Two Generation III foil air bearings with the same design but possessing different initial radial clearances were tested at room temperature against an as-ground PS304 coated journal operating at 30,000 rpm. Increases in radial clearance were accomplished by reducing the journal's outside diameter via an in-place grinding system. From each load capacity test the bearing load capacity coefficient was calculated from the rule-of-thumb (ROT) model developed for foil air bearings. The test results indicate that, in terms of the load capacity coefficient, radial clearance has a direct impact on the performance of the foil air bearing. Each test bearing exhibited an optimum radial clearance that resulted in a maximum load capacity coefficient. Relative to this optimum value are two separate operating regimes that are governed by different modes of failure. Bearings operating with radial clearances less than the optimum exhibit load capacity coefficients that are a strong function of radial clearance and are prone to a thermal runaway failure mechanism and bearing seizure. Conversely, a bearing operating with a radial clearance twice the optimum suffered only a 20 percent decline in its maximum load capacity coefficient and did not experience any thermal management problems. However, it is unknown to what degree these changes in radial clearance had on other performance parameters, such as the stiffness and damping properties of the bearings.

  6. Parameter estimation of an air-bearing suspended test table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhenxian; Lin, Yurong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xinglin; Chen, Fang

    2015-02-01

    A parameter estimation approach is proposed for parameter determination of a 3-axis air-bearing suspended test table. The table is to provide a balanced and frictionless environment for spacecraft ground test. To balance the suspension, the mechanical parameters of the table, including its angular inertias and centroid deviation from its rotating center, have to be determined first. Then sliding masses on the table can be adjusted by stepper motors to relocate the centroid of the table to its rotating center. Using the angular momentum theorem and the coriolis theorem, dynamic equations are derived describing the rotation of the table under the influence of gravity imbalance torque and activating torques. To generate the actuating torques, use of momentum wheels is proposed, whose virtue is that no active control is required to the momentum wheels, which merely have to spin at constant rates, thus avoiding the singularity problem and the difficulty of precisely adjusting the output torques, issues associated with control moment gyros. The gyroscopic torques generated by the momentum wheels, as they are forced by the table to precess, are sufficient to activate the table for parameter estimation. Then least-square estimation is be employed to calculate the desired parameters. The effectiveness of the method is validated by simulation.

  7. Development of a large support surface for an air-bearing type zero-gravity simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, K. E.

    1976-01-01

    The methods used in producing a large, flat surface to serve as the supporting surface for an air-bearing type zero-gravity simulator using low clearance, thrust-pad type air bearings are described. Major problems encountered in the use of self-leveled epoxy coatings in this surface are discussed and techniques are recommended which proved effective in overcoming these problems. Performance requirements of the zero-gravity simulator vehicle which were pertinent to the specification of the air-bearing support surface are also discussed.

  8. Load Capacity Estimation of Foil Air Journal Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper introduces a simple "Rule of Thumb" (ROT) method to estimate the load capacity of foil air journal bearings, which are self-acting compliant-surface hydrodynamic bearings being considered for Oil-Free turbo-machinery applications such as gas turbine engines. The ROT is based on first principles and data available in the literature and it relates bearing load capacity to the bearing size and speed through an empirically based load capacity coefficient, D. It is shown that load capacity is a linear function of bearing surface velocity and bearing projected area. Furthermore, it was found that the load capacity coefficient, D, is related to the design features of the bearing compliant members and operating conditions (speed and ambient temperature). Early bearing designs with basic or "first generation" compliant support elements have relatively low load capacity. More advanced bearings, in which the compliance of the support structure is tailored, have load capacities up to five times those of simpler designs. The ROT enables simplified load capacity estimation for foil air journal bearings and can guide development of new Oil-Free turbomachinery systems.

  9. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    Air foil bearings use ambient air as a lubricant allowing environment-friendly operation. When they are designed, installed, and operated properly, air foil bearings are very cost effective and reliable solution to oil-free turbomachinery. Because air is used as a lubricant, there are no mechanical contacts between the rotor and bearings and when the rotor is lifted off the bearing, near frictionless quiet operation is possible. However, due to the high speed operation, thermal management is one of the very important design factors to consider. Most widely accepted practice of the cooling method is axial cooling, which uses cooling air passing through heat exchange channels formed underneath the bearing pad. Advantage is no hardware modification to implement the axial cooling because elastic foundation structure of foil bearing serves as a heat exchange channels. Disadvantage is axial temperature gradient on the journal shaft and bearing. This work presents the experimental feasibility study of alternative cooling method using radial injection of cooling air directly on the rotor shaft. The injection speeds, number of nozzles, location of nozzles, total air flow rate are important factors determining the effectiveness of the radial injection cooling method. Effectiveness of the radial injection cooling was compared with traditional axial cooling method. A previously constructed test rig was modified to accommodate a new motor with higher torque and radial injection cooling. The radial injection cooling utilizes the direct air injection to the inlet region of air film from three locations at 120° from one another with each location having three axially separated holes. In axial cooling, a certain axial pressure gradient is applied across the bearing to induce axial cooling air through bump foil channels. For the comparison of the two methods, the same amount of cooling air flow rate was used for both axial cooling and radial injection. Cooling air flow rate was

  10. Changes in Hardware in Order to Accommodate Compliant Foil Air Bearings of a Larger Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeszotek, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Compliant foil air bearings are at the forefront of the Oil-Free turbomachinery revolution of supporting gas turbine engines with air lubricated hydrodynamic bearings. Foil air bearings have existed for almost fifty years, yet their commercialization has been confined to relatively small, high-speed systems characterized by low temperatures and loads, such as in air cycle machines, turbocompressors and micro-turbines. Recent breakthroughs in foil air bearing design and solid lubricant coating technology, have caused a resurgence of research towards applying Oil-Free technology to more demanding applications on the scale of small and mid range aircraft gas turbine engines. In order to foster the transition of Oil-Free technology into gas turbine engines, in-house experiments need to be performed on foil air bearings to further the understanding of their complex operating principles. During my internship at NASA Glenn in the summer of 2003, a series of tests were performed to determine the internal temperature profile in a compliant bump- type foil journal air bearing operating at room temperature under various speeds and load conditions. From these tests, a temperature profile was compiled, indicating that the circumferential thermal gradients were negligible. The tests further indicated that both journal rotational speed and radial load are responsible for heat generation with speed playing a more significant role in the magnitude of the temperatures. As a result of the findings from the tests done during the summer of 2003, it was decided that further testing would need to be done, but with a bearing of a larger diameter. The bearing diameter would now be increased from two inches to three inches. All of the currently used testing apparatus was designed specifically for a bearing that was two inches in diameter. Thus, my project for the summer of 2004 was to focus specifically on the scatter shield put around the testing rig while running the bearings. Essentially

  11. Radial Clearance Found To Play a Key Role in the Performance of Compliant Foil Air Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.

    2003-01-01

    Compliant foil air bearings are at the forefront of the Oil-Free turbomachinery revolution, which supports gas turbine engines with hydrodynamic bearings that use air instead of oil as the working fluid. These types of bearings have been around for almost 50 years and have found a home in several commercial applications, such as in air cycle machines, turbocompressors, and microturbines, but are now being aggressively pursued for use in small and midrange aircraft gas turbine engines. Benefits include higher operating speeds and temperatures, lower maintenance costs, and greater reliability. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery team at the NASA Glenn Research Center is working to foster the transition of Oil-Free technology into gas turbine engines by performing in-house experiments on foil air bearings in order to gain a greater insight into their complex operating principles. A research program recently undertaken at Glenn focused on the concept of radial clearance and its influence on bearing performance. The tests were conducted on foil bearings with different radial clearances. As defined for a foil bearing, radial clearance is a measure of the small amount of shaft radial motion that is present from play that exists in the elastic support structure, such as between the top and bump foils and the bump foils and bearing shell (see the drawing). With an insufficient amount of radial clearance, the bearing imparts a high preload on the shaft, which when excessive, can reduce the loadcarrying capability of the bearing. On the other hand, systems using foil bearings with excessive radial clearance may experience rotordynamic instabilities because of low bearing preload. Therefore, without a more thorough understanding of radial clearance, it is difficult to accurately predict the performance of a given bearing design. The test program demonstrated that there is a direct correlation between radial clearance and the performance of foil air bearings. As shown in the graph, an

  12. Environmental Assessment: Maintenance of the Bear Lake Storm Water Retention Pond Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    hazardous materials and waste . The proposed action includes performing needed maintenance on the Bear Lake Storm Water Retention Pond. The EA...biological resources, water resources, air quality, safety, and hazardous materials and waste . The proposed action includes performing needed...traffic, noise, hazardous materials and wastes , water resources, biological resources, air quality, socioeconomics, and safety. This EA also considers

  13. Combination spindle-drive system for high precision machining

    DOEpatents

    Gerth, Howard L.

    1977-07-26

    A combination spindle-drive is provided for fabrication of optical quality surface finishes. Both the spindle-and-drive utilize the spindle bearings for support, thereby removing the conventional drive-means bearings as a source of vibration. An airbearing spindle is modified to carry at the drive end a highly conductive cup-shaped rotor which is aligned with a stationary stator to produce torque in the cup-shaped rotor through the reaction of eddy currents induced in the rotor. This arrangement eliminates magnetic attraction forces and all force is in the form of torque on the cup-shaped rotor.

  14. Verification of Spin Magnetic Attitude Control System using air-bearing-based attitude control simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousaloo, H. S.; Nodeh, M. T.; Mehrabian, R.

    2016-09-01

    This paper accomplishes one goal and it was to verify and to validate a Spin Magnetic Attitude Control System (SMACS) program and to perform Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) air-bearing experiments. A study of a closed-loop magnetic spin controller is presented using only magnetic rods as actuators. The magnetic spin rate control approach is able to perform spin rate control and it is verified with an Attitude Control System (ACS) air-bearing MATLAB® SIMULINK® model and a hardware-embedded LABVIEW® algorithm that controls the spin rate of the test platform on a spherical air bearing table. The SIMULINK® model includes dynamic model of air-bearing, its disturbances, actuator emulation and the time delays caused by on-board calculations. The air-bearing simulator is employed to develop, improve, and carry out objective tests of magnetic torque rods and spin rate control algorithm in the experimental framework and to provide a more realistic demonstration of expected performance of attitude control as compared with software-based architectures. Six sets of two torque rods are used as actuators for the SMACS. It is implemented and simulated to fulfill mission requirement including spin the satellite up to 12 degs-1 around the z-axis. These techniques are documented for the full nonlinear equations of motion of the system and the performances of these techniques are compared in several simulations.

  15. Force versus current and air gap calibration of a double acting magnetic thrust bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Baun, D.O.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Force versus current and air gap measurements were obtained for a double acting thrust bearing. Static force measurements were made for various air gap settings and bearing current combinations. The resulting data was reduced and an optimized expression representing the force versus current and air gap relationship of the bearing was found. In addition, a theoretical force model was developed using simple magnetic circuit theory and magnetic properties obtained from standard magnetic material tests. The theoretical and the experimentally derived force models were compared. Hysteresis tests were conducted with the thrust disk in the centered position for various current perturbation amplitudes about the design bias current. Hysteresis effects were shown to cause a difference between the measured force as the current was increasing as compared to when the current was decreasing. A second order polynomial expression was developed to express the coercive force as a function of the perturbation current amplitude. The bearing frequency response was examined by injecting sinusoidal currents of varying frequencies into the bearing. A maximum actuator bandwidth of approximately 700 Hz was determined. Above 700 Hz the bearing frequency response could not be distinguished from the test fixture frequency response.

  16. A Systems Approach to the Solid Lubrication of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Zaldana, Antonio R.; Radil, Kevin C.

    2002-01-01

    Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings which rely upon solid lubricants to reduce friction and minimize wear during sliding which occurs at start-up and shut-down when surface speeds are too low to allow the formation of a hydrodynamic air film. This solid lubrication is typically accomplished by coating the non-moving foil surface with a thin, soft polymeric film. The following paper introduces a systems approach in which the solid lubrication is provided by a combination of self lubricating shaft coatings coupled with various wear resistant and lubricating foil coatings. The use of multiple materials, each providing different functions is modeled after oil-lubricated hydrodynamic sleeve bearing technology which utilizes various coatings and surface treatments in conjunction with oil lubricants to achieve optimum performance. In this study, room temperature load capacity tests are performed on journal foil air bearings operating at 14,000 rpm. Different shaft and foil coating technologies such as plasma sprayed composites, ceramic, polymer and inorganic lubricant coatings are evaluated as foil bearing lubricants. The results indicate that bearing performance is improved through the individual use of the lubricants and treatments tested. Further, combining several solid lubricants together yielded synergistically better results than any material alone.

  17. An Experimental Investigation Into the Temperature Profile of a Compliant Foil Air Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin; Zeszotek, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    A series of tests was performed to determine the internal temperature profile in a compliant bump-type foil journal air bearing operating at room temperature under various speeds and load conditions. The temperature profile was collected by instrumenting a foil bearing with nine, type K thermocouples arranged in the center and along the bearing s edges in order to measure local temperatures and estimate thermal gradients in the axial and circumferential directions. To facilitate the measurement of maximum temperatures from viscous shearing in the air film, the thermocouples were tack welded to the backside of the bumps that were in direct contact with the top foil. The mating journal was coated with a high temperature solid lubricant that, together with the bearing, underwent high temperature start-stop cycles to produce a smooth, steady-state run-in surface. Tests were conducted at speeds from 20 to 50 krpm and loads ranging from 9 to 222 N. The results indicate that, over the conditions tested, both journal rotational speed and radial load are responsible for heat generation with speed playing a more significant role in the magnitude of the temperatures. The temperature distribution was nearly symmetric about the bearing center at 20 and 30 krpm but became slightly skewed toward one side at 40 and 50 krpm. Surprisingly, the maximum temperatures did not occur at the bearing edge where the minimum film thickness is expected but rather in the middle of the bearing where analytical investigations have predicted the air film to be much thicker. Thermal gradients were common during testing and were strongest in the axial direction from the middle of the bearing to its edges, reaching 3.78 8C/mm. The temperature profile indicated the circumferential thermal gradients were negligible.

  18. An air bearing fan for EVA suit ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murry, Roger P.

    1990-01-01

    The portable life-support system (PLSS) ventilation requirements are outlined, along with the application of a high-speed axial fan technology for extravehicular-activity (EVA) space-suit ventilation. Focus is placed on a mechanical design employing high-speed gas bearings, permanent magnet rotor, and current-fed chopper/inverter electronics. The operational characteristics of the fan unit and its applicability for use in a pure-oxygen environment are discussed. It delivers a nominal 0.17 cu m/min at 1.24 kPa pressure rise using 13.8 w of input power. It is shown that the overall selection of materials for all major component meets the NASA requirements.

  19. Magnetic bearings for a high-performance optical disk buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hockney, Richard; Hawkey, Timothy

    1993-01-01

    An optical disk buffer concept can provide gigabit-per-second data rates and terabit capacity through the use of arrays of solid state lasers applied to a stack of erasable/reusable optical disks. The RCA optical disk buffer has evoked interest by NASA for space applications. The porous graphite air bearings in the rotary spindle as well as those used in the linear translation of the read/write head would be replaced by magnetic bearings or mechanical (ball or roller) bearings. Based upon past experience, roller or ball bearings for the translation stages are not feasible. Unsatisfactory, although limited experience exists with ball bearing spindles also. Magnetic bearings, however, appear ideally suited for both applications. The use of magnetic bearings is advantageous in the optical disk buffer because of the absence of physical contact between the rotating and stationary members. This frictionless operation leads to extended life and reduced drag. The manufacturing tolerances that are required to fabricate magnetic bearings would also be relaxed from those required for precision ball and gas bearings. Since magnetic bearings require no lubricant, they are inherently compatible with a space (vacuum) environment. Magnetic bearings also allow the dynamics of the rotor/bearing system to be altered through the use of active control. This provides the potential for reduced vibration, extended regions of stable operation, and more precise control of position.

  20. An Experimental Investigation of Skin Friction on Smooth Surfaces Supporting Air Bearing Channels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF SKIN FRICTION ON SMOOTH SURFACES SUPPORTING AIR BEARING CHANNELS ETUDE EXPERIMENTALE DU FROTTEMENT PELLICULAIRE SUR DES SURFACES...LISSES PORTEUSES DE CANAUX ANTI- FROTTEMENT by/par M. Khalid National Aeronautical Establishment AERONAUTICAL NOTE OTTAWA NAE-AN-39 JULY 1986 NRC NO...installant sur la surface des canaux qui agissent comme des valiers d’air. Les mesures ont &t prises A l’aide d’une balance de mesure du frottement

  1. A New Foil Air Bearing Test Rig for Use to 700 C and 70,000 rpm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Chris

    1997-01-01

    A new test rig has been developed for evaluating foil air bearings at high temperatures and speeds. These bearings are self acting hydrodynamic air bearings which have been successfully applied to a variety of turbomachinery operating up to 650 C. This unique test rig is capable of measuring bearing torque during start-up, shut-down and high speed operation. Load capacity and general performance characteristics, such as durability, can be measured at temperatures to 700 C and speeds to 70,000 rpm. This paper describes the new test rig and demonstrates its capabilities through the preliminary characterization of several bearings. The bearing performance data from this facility can be used to develop advanced turbomachinery incorporating high temperature oil-free air bearing technology.

  2. STS-61 air-bearing floor training in bldg 9N with Astronaut Jeff Hoffman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Making use of the air-bearing floor in JSC's Shuttle mockup and integration laboratory, Astronaut Jeffrey A. Hoffman practices working with the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field/Planetary Camera (WF/PC). Changing out the large camera is one of several jobs to be performed by STS-61.

  3. Planar air-bearing microgravity simulators: Review of applications, existing solutions and design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybus, Tomasz; Seweryn, Karol

    2016-03-01

    All devices designed to be used in space must be thoroughly tested in relevant conditions. For several classes of devices the reduced gravity conditions are the key factor. In early stages of development and later due to financial reasons, the tests need to be done on Earth. However, in Earth conditions it is impossible to obtain a different gravity field independent on all linear and rotational spatial coordinates. Therefore, various test-bed systems are used, with their design driven by the device's specific needs. One of such test-beds are planar air-bearing microgravity simulators. In such an approach, the tested objects (e.g., manipulators intended for on-orbit operations or vehicles simulating satellites in a close formation flight) are mounted on planar air-bearings that allow almost frictionless motion on a flat surface, thus simulating microgravity conditions in two dimensions. In this paper we present a comprehensive review of research activities related to planar air-bearing microgravity simulators, demonstrating achievements of the most active research groups and describing newest trends and ideas, such as tests of landing gears for low-g bodies. Major design parameters of air-bearing test-beds are also reviewed and a list of notable existing test-beds is presented.

  4. System Being Developed to Measure the Rotordynamic Characteristics of Air Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    Because of the many possible advantages of oil-free engine operation, interest in using air lubricated foil-bearing technology in advanced oil-free engine concepts has recently increased. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has partially driven this recent push for oil-free technology. The program's goal of developing an innovative, practical, oil-free gas turbine engine for aeropropulsion began with the development of NASA's high-temperature solid-lubricant coating, PS304. This coating virtually eliminates the life-limiting wear that occurs during the startup and shutdown of the bearings. With practically unlimited life, foil air bearings are now very attractive to rotating machinery designers for use in turbomachinery. Unfortunately, the current knowledge base of these types of bearings is limited. In particular, the understanding of how these types of bearings contribute to the rotordynamic stability of turbomachinery is insufficient for designers to design with confidence. Recent work in oil-free turbomachinery has concentrated on advancing the understanding of foil bearings. A high-temperature fiber-optic displacement probe system and measurement method were developed to study the effects of speed, load, temperature, and other environmental issues on the stiffness characteristics of air foil bearings. Since high temperature data are to be collected in future testing, the testing method was intentionally simplified to minimize the need for expensive test hardware. The method measures the displacement induced upon a bearing in response to an applied perturbation load. The early results of these studies, which are shown in the accompanying figure, indicate trends in steady state stiffness that suggest stiffness increases with load and decreases with speed. It can be seen, even from these data, that stiffness is not expected to change by orders of magnitude over the normal operating range of most turbomachinery; a

  5. Performance and Durability of High Temperature Foil Air Bearing for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Valco, M. J.; Radil, K. C.; Heshmat, H.

    1999-01-01

    The performance and durability of advanced, high temperature foil air bearings are evaluated under a wide range (10-50 kPa) of loads at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The bearings are made from uncoated nickel based superalloy foils. The foil surface experiences sliding contact with the shaft during initial start/stop operation. To reduce friction and wear, the solid lubricant coating, PS304, is applied to the shaft by plasma spraying. PS304, is a NiCr based Cr2O3 coating with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride solid lubricant additions. The results show that the bearings provide lives well in excess of 30,000 cycles under all of the conditions tested. Several bearings exhibited lives in excess of 100,000 cycles. Wear is a linear function of the bearing load. The excellent performance measured in this study suggests that these bearings and the PS304 coating are well suited for advanced high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

  6. Performance and Durability of High Temperature Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V.; Valco, M. J.; Radil, K. C.; Heshmat, H.

    2000-01-01

    The performance and durability of advanced, high temperature foil air bearings are evaluated under a wide range (10-50 kPa) of loads at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The bearings are made from uncoated nickel based superalloy foils. The foil surface experiences sliding contact with the shaft during initial start/stop operation. To reduce friction and wear, the solid lubricant coating, PS304, is applied to the shaft by plasma spraying. PS304 is a NiCr based Cr2O3 coating with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride solid lubricant additions. The results show that the bearings provide lives well in excess of 30,000 cycles under all of the conditions tested. Several bearings exhibited lives in excess of 100,000 cycles. Wear is a linear function of the bearing load. The excellent performance measured in this study suggests that these bearings and the PS304 coating are well suited for advanced high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

  7. Turbo test rig with hydroinertia air bearings for a palmtop gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuji; Isomura, Kousuke; Togo, Shin-ichi; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes a turbo test rig to test the compressor of a palmtop gas turbine generator at low temperature (<100 °C). Impellers are 10 mm in diameter and have three-dimensional blades machined using a five-axis NC milling machine. Hydroinertia bearings are employed in both radial and axial directions. The performance of the compressor was measured at 50% (435 000 rpm) and 60% (530 000 rpm) of the rated rotational speed (870 000 rpm) by driving a turbine using compressed air at room temperature. The measured pressure ratio is lower than the predicted value. This could be mainly because impeller tip clearance was larger than the designed value. The measured adiabatic efficiency is unrealistically high due to heat dissipation from compressed air. During acceleration toward the rated rotational speed, a shaft crashed to the bearing at 566 000 rpm due to whirl. At that time, the whirl ratio was 8.

  8. Development of an air-bearing fan for space extravehicular activity (EVA) suit ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumoto, Paul; Allen, Norman; Stonesifer, Greg

    1992-01-01

    A high-speed/variable flow fan has been developed for EVA suit ventilation which combines air bearings with a two-pole, toothless permanent-magnet motor. The fan has demonstrated quiet and vibration-free operation and a 2:1 range in flow rate variation. System weight is 0.9 kg, and input powers range from 12.4 to 42 W.

  9. The system integration and verification testing of an orbital maneuvering vehicle for an air bearing floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, N. L., Jr.; Martin, M. F.; Paulukaitis, K. R.; Haslam, J. W., Jr.; Henderson, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The teleoperator and Robotics Evaluation Facility (TOREF) is composed of a 4,000 square foot precision air bearing floor, the Teleoperator Motion Base, the Target Motion and Support Simulator, the mock-ups of the Hubble Space Telescope, Multi-mission Modular Spacecraft, and the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The TOREF and its general capabilities to support the OMV and other remote system simulations; the facility operating procedures and requirements; and the results of generic OMV investigations are summarized.

  10. Start-stop testing of two self-acting air-lubricated spiral groove thrust bearing coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunfee, J. D.; Shapiro, W.

    1974-01-01

    Start-stop tests were conducted on air-lubricated spiral-groove thrust bearings. Application of a matrix-bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) coating over a porous chrome oxide coating resulted in significantly lower friction, compared to bearings coated with chrome oxide only. The MoS2 coated bearing sustained 15,000 start-stop cycles at a maximum of 3600 rpm. Each cycle was 15 seconds on, 30 seconds off. The chrome oxide coated bearing failed by local welding after 2030 cycles. Both types of coatings exhibited early failures under higher thrust loads when operating films were insufficient to sustain the load without overheating.

  11. The Effect of Journal Roughness and Foil Coatings on the Performance of Heavily Loaded Foil Air Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Foil air bearing load capacity tests were conducted to investigate if a solid lubricant coating applied to the surface of the bearing's top foil can function as a break-in coating. Two foil coating materials, a conventional soft polymer film (polyimide) and a hard ceramic (alumina), were independently evaluated against as-ground and worn (run-in) journals coated with NASA PS304, a high-temperature solid lubricant composite coating. The foil coatings were evaluated at journal rotational speeds of 30,000 rpm and at 25 C. Tests were also performed on a foil bearing with a bare (uncoated) nickel-based superalloy top foil to establish a baseline for comparison. The test results indicate that the presence of a top foil solid lubricant coating is effective at increasing the load capacity performance of the foil bearing. Compared to the uncoated baseline, the addition of the soft polymer coating on the top foil increased the bearing load coefficient by 120% when operating against an as-ground journal surface and 85 percent against a run-in journal surface. The alumina coating increased the load coefficient by 40% against the as-ground journal but did not have any affect when the bearing was operated with the run-in journal. The results suggest that the addition of solid lubricant films provide added lubrication when the air film is marginal indicating that as the load capacity is approached foil air bearings transition from hydrodynamic to mixed and boundary lubrication.

  12. Behavior of spindles and spindle plaques in the cell cycle and conjugation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Byers, B; Goetsch, L

    1975-01-01

    The interdependence of spindle plaque with other aspects of cell division and conjugation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been investigated. Three forms of the spindle plaque appear sequentially before the formation of the complete, intranuclear spindle. The single plaque is present initially in the mitotic cycle; it becomes transformed into a satellite-bearing single plaque during the latter part of G1. Subsequently, plaque duplication yields the double plaque characteristic of the early phase of budding, which coincides with the period of chromosome replication (S). The eventual separation of these plaques to form a complete spindle, with a single plaque at each pole, is nearly coincident with the completion of S. The form of the plaque differs in two independent cases of G1 arrest: the single plaque is found in a cell in stationary arrest of growth, whereas a cell arrested by mating factors in preparation for conjugation contains a satellite-bearing single plaque. The latter form is retained during zygote formation, where it serves as the initial site of fusion of each prezygotic nuceus with the other. This fusion results in the formation of a single zygotic nucleus with a satellite-bearing single plaque, which is subsequently transformed into a double plaque as the zygote buds. The double plaque is situated adjacent to the site of bud emergence in both vegetative cells and zygotes. Images PMID:1100612

  13. Tilted wheel satellite attitude control with air-bearing table experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inumoh, Lawrence O.; Forshaw, Jason L.; Horri, Nadjim M.

    2015-12-01

    Gyroscopic actuators for satellite control have attracted significant research interest over the years, but their viability for the control of small satellites has only recently started to become clear. Research on variable speed gyroscopic actuators has long been focused on single gimbal actuators; double gimbal actuators typically operate at constant wheel spin rate and allow tilt angle ranges far larger than the ranges needed to operate most satellite missions. This research examines a tilted wheel, a newly proposed type of inertial actuator that can generate torques in all three principal axes of a rigid satellite using a spinning wheel and a double tilt mechanism. The tilt mechanism tilts the angular momentum vector about two axes providing two degree of freedom control, while variation of the wheel speed provides the third. The equations of motion of the system lead to a singularity-free system during nominal operation avoiding the need for complex steering logic. This paper describes the hardware design of the tilted wheel and the experimental setup behind both standalone and spherical air-bearing tables used to test it. Experimental results from the air bearing table are provided with the results depicting the high performance capabilities of the proposed actuator in torque generation.

  14. Tracking Phragmites Australis Expansion in Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge using AggieAir Aircraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, B.; McKee, M.

    2010-12-01

    This research examines the use of unmanned air vehicles (UAV), a cutting edge technology developed at the Utah Water research lab for acquiring airborne imagery using drones for the assessment of abundance of an invasive species Phragmites australis in a wetland vegetation setup. These UAV’s acquire multispectral data in the visible and near-infrared bands with a spatial resolution of 0.5 meters. The study area is the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge (MBR) which lies in northern Utah, where the Bear River flows into the northeast arm of the Great Salt Lake. The Refuge protects the marshes found at the mouth of the Bear River; these marshes are the largest freshwater component of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. A common reed, Phragmites australis, is a tall (1.5-4.0 m) coarse perennial grass found primarily in brackish and freshwater wetlands, growing at or above mean high water. The methodology is to build Bayesian statistical supervised classification model using relevance vector machine (RVM) employing the inexpensive and readily available UAV data. The UAV images of the bird refuge are processed to obtain calibrated reflectance imagery. Thereafter, the isodata clustering algorithm is applied to classify the multispectral imagery into different classes. Using ground sampling of the species, pixels containing the Phragmites australis are deduced. The training set for the supervised RVM classification model is prepared using the deduced pixel values. A separate set of ground sampling points containing the Phragmites australis are kept aside for validation. The distribution of Phragmites australis in the study area as obtained from RVM classification model is compared to the validation set. The RVM model results for tracking of Phragmites are encouraging and the new technique has promising real-time implementation for similar applications.

  15. Precision instrumentation for rolling element bearing characterization.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Eric R; Vigliano, Vincent C; Weiss, Jeffrey R; Moerlein, Alex W; Vallance, R Ryan

    2007-03-01

    This article describes an instrument to measure the error motion of rolling element bearings. This challenge is met by simultaneously satisfying four requirements. First, an axial preload must be applied to seat the rolling elements in the bearing races. Second, one of the races must spin under the influence of an applied torque. Third, rotation of the remaining race must be prevented in a way that leaves the radial, axial/face, and tilt displacements free to move. Finally, the bearing must be fixtured and measured without introducing off-axis loading or other distorting influences. In the design presented here, an air bearing reference spindle with error motion of less than 10 nm rotates the inner race of the bearing under test. Noninfluencing couplings are used to prevent rotation of the bearing outer race and apply an axial preload without distorting the bearing or influencing the measurement. Capacitive displacement sensors with 2 nm resolution target the nonrotating outer race. The error motion measurement repeatability is shown to be less than 25 nm. The article closes with a discussion of how the instrument may be used to gather data with sufficient resolution to accurately estimate the contact angle of deep groove ball bearings.

  16. Precision instrumentation for rolling element bearing characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, Eric R.; Vigliano, Vincent C.; Weiss, Jeffrey R.; Moerlein, Alex W.; Vallance, R. Ryan

    2007-03-15

    This article describes an instrument to measure the error motion of rolling element bearings. This challenge is met by simultaneously satisfying four requirements. First, an axial preload must be applied to seat the rolling elements in the bearing races. Second, one of the races must spin under the influence of an applied torque. Third, rotation of the remaining race must be prevented in a way that leaves the radial, axial/face, and tilt displacements free to move. Finally, the bearing must be fixtured and measured without introducing off-axis loading or other distorting influences. In the design presented here, an air bearing reference spindle with error motion of less than 10 nm rotates the inner race of the bearing under test. Noninfluencing couplings are used to prevent rotation of the bearing outer race and apply an axial preload without distorting the bearing or influencing the measurement. Capacitive displacement sensors with 2 nm resolution target the nonrotating outer race. The error motion measurement repeatability is shown to be less than 25 nm. The article closes with a discussion of how the instrument may be used to gather data with sufficient resolution to accurately estimate the contact angle of deep groove ball bearings.

  17. Stability of rigid rotors supported by air foil bearings: Comparison of two fundamental approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jon S.; Santos, Ilmar F.; von Osmanski, Sebastian

    2016-10-01

    High speed direct drive motors enable the use of Air Foil Bearings (AFB) in a wide range of applications due to the elimination of gear forces. Unfortunately, AFB supported rotors are lightly damped, and an accurate prediction of their Onset Speed of Instability (OSI) is therefore important. This paper compares two fundamental methods for predicting the OSI. One is based on a nonlinear time domain simulation and another is based on a linearised frequency domain method and a perturbation of the Reynolds equation. Both methods are based on equivalent models and should predict similar results. Significant discrepancies are observed leading to the question, is the classical frequency domain method sufficiently accurate? The discrepancies and possible explanations are discussed in detail.

  18. Dynamic Stiffness and Damping Characteristics of a High-Temperature Air Foil Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Heshmat, Hooshang

    2001-01-01

    Using a high-temperature optically based displacement measurement system, a foil air bearing's stiffness and damping characteristics were experimentally determined. Results were obtained over a range of modified Sommerfeld Number from 1.5E6 to 1.5E7, and at temperatures from 25 to 538 C. An Experimental procedure was developed comparing the error in two curve fitting functions to reveal different modes of physical behavior throughout the operating domain. The maximum change in dimensionless stiffness was 3.0E-2 to 6.5E-2 over the Sommerfeld Number range tested. Stiffness decreased with temperature by as much as a factor of two from 25 to 538 C. Dimensionless damping was a stronger function of Sommerfeld Number ranging from 20 to 300. The temperature effect on damping being more qualitative, showed the damping mechanism shifted from viscous type damping to frictional type as temperature increased.

  19. Anthrax receptors position the spindle.

    PubMed

    Minc, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    Spindle orientation plays a pivotal role in tissue morphogenesis. An asymmetric anthrax receptor cap is revealed to promote activation of a formin to orient the spindle along the planar cell polarity (PCP) axis in zebrafish dorsal epiblast cells.

  20. Air-bearing-based satellite attitude dynamics simulator for control software research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Brij N.; Rasmussen, Richard E.

    2001-08-01

    A Satellite Attitude Dynamics Simulator (SADS) has been developed to facilitate the research and development of spacecraft flight attitude control software at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA. The simulator provides a real-time 3 degree of freedom (3DOF) synthetic spacecraft hardware-in-the-loop environment, that includes realistic angular motions, sensor-effector delays, and control torque profiles. Control software, entered into a notebook PC mounted on the equipment platform, is input as high level object oriented code, allowing rapid code development and thorough post-test analysis. Three flight-like reaction wheels and eight cold-gas thrusters that are mounted to the SADS equipment platform provide motion simulation torque. The equipment platform is suspended in air by a spherical segment air bearing. This virtually frictionless suspension allows free rotation of the equipment platform about any rotation axis. Three separate sets of sensors, three single-axis rate gyros, a three-axis magnetometer, and a two-axis sun sensor monitor SADS platform motion. This paper discusses the SADS design, and the practical uses of this simulator for satellite attitude control system software research and development.

  1. The efficient computation of the nonlinear dynamic response of a foil-air bearing rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonello, P.; Pham, H. M.

    2014-07-01

    The foil-air bearing (FAB) enables the emergence of oil-free turbomachinery. However, its potential to introduce undesirable nonlinear effects necessitates a reliable means for calculating the dynamic response. The computational burden has hitherto been alleviated by simplifications that compromised the true nature of the dynamic interaction between the rotor, air film and foil structure, introducing the potential for significant error. The overall novel contribution of this research is the development of efficient algorithms for the simultaneous solution of the state equations. The equations are extracted using two alternative transformations: (i) Finite Difference (FD); and (ii) a novel arbitrary-order Galerkin Reduction (GR) which does not use a grid, considerably reducing the number of state variables. A vectorized formulation facilitates the solution in two alternative ways: (i) in the time domain for arbitrary response via implicit integration using readily available routines; and (ii) in the frequency domain for the direct computation of self-excited periodic response via a novel Harmonic Balance (HB) method. GR and FD are cross-verified by time domain simulations which confirm that GR significantly reduces the computation time. Simulations also cross-verify the time and frequency domain solutions applied to the reference FD model and demonstrate the unique ability of HB to correctly accommodate structural damping.

  2. Metaphase Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Tarun M.

    2017-01-01

    A microtubule-based bipolar spindle is required for error-free chromosome segregation during cell division. In this review I discuss the molecular mechanisms required for the assembly of this dynamic micrometer-scale structure in animal cells. PMID:28165376

  3. Mechanisms of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Life depends on cell proliferation and the accurate segregation of chromosomes, which are mediated by the microtubule (MT)-based mitotic spindle and ~200 essential MT-associated proteins. Yet, a mechanistic understanding of how the mitotic spindle is assembled and achieves chromosome segregation is still missing. This is mostly due to the density of MTs in the spindle, which presumably precludes their direct observation. Recent insight has been gained into the molecular building plan of the metaphase spindle using bulk and single-molecule measurements combined with computational modeling. MT nucleation was uncovered as a key principle of spindle assembly, and mechanistic details about MT nucleation pathways and their coordination are starting to be revealed. Lastly, advances in studying spindle assembly can be applied to address the molecular mechanisms of how the spindle segregates chromosomes. PMID:27145846

  4. Contact sheet recording with a self-acting negative air bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muftu , Sinan (Inventor); Hinteregger, Hans F (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A flat head and a tape transport arrangement impart a wrap angle to the tape at the upstream corner of the head. The wrap angle, corner sharpness and tape stiffness are sufficient to cause a moving tape to form a hollow bump at the upstream corner, thereby creating a hollow into which entrained air can expand, causing a subambient pressure within and downstream of the bump. This pressure keeps the tape in contact with the head. It is created without the need for a groove or complex pressure relief slot(s). No contact pressure arises at the signal exchange site due to media wrap. The highest contact pressures are developed at a wrapped upstream corner. For a tape drive, traveling in both forward and reverse, the wrap can be at both the upstream and downstream (which is the reverse upstream) corners. Heads that are not flat can also be used, if the wrap angle relative to a main surface is sufficient and not too large. The wrapped head can also be used with rotating media, such as disks (floppy and hard) and rotating heads, such as helical wound heads for video recording. Multiple flat tape bearing surfaces can be separated by grooves and/or angles. Each flat can carry heads along one or more gap lines. Multiple adjacent narrow tracks can thus be written for extreme high track density recording.

  5. Hydrodynamic air lubricated compliant surface bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine. 2: Materials and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.; Ruscitto, D.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    Material coatings for an air-lubricated, compliant journal bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine were exposed to service test temperatures of 540 C or 650 C for 300 hours, and to 10 temperature cycles from room temperatures to the service test temperatures. Selected coatings were then put on journal and partial-arc foils and tested in start-stop cycle tests at 14 kPa (2 psi) loading for 2000 cycles. Half of the test cycles were performed at a test chamber service temperature of 540 C (1000 F) or 650 C (1200 F); the other half were performed at room temperature. Based on test results, the following combinations and their service temperature limitations are recommended: HL-800 TM (CdO and graphite) on foil versus chrome carbide on journal up to 370 C (700 F); NASA PS 120 (Tribaloy 400, silver and CaF2 on journal versus uncoated foil up to 540 C (1000 F); and Kaman DES on journal and foil up to 640 C (1200 F). Kaman DES coating system was further tested successfully at 35 kPa (5 psi) loading for 2000 start-stop cycles.

  6. Helical scan recording with a self-acting negative air bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muftu , Sinan (Inventor); Hinteregger, Hans F (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A flat head and a tape transport arrangement impart a wrap angle to the tape at the upstream corner of the head. The wrap angle, corner sharpness and tape stiffness are sufficient to cause a moving tape to form a hollow bump at the upstream corner, thereby creating a hollow into which entrained air can expand, causing a subambient pressure within and downstream of the bump. This pressure keeps the tape in contact with the head. It is created without the need for a groove or complex pressure relief slot(s). No contact pressure arises at the signal exchange site due to media wrap. The highest contact pressures are developed at a wrapped upstream corner. For a tape drive, traveling in both forward and reverse, the wrap can be at both the upstream and downstream (which is the reverse upstream) corners. Heads that are not flat can also be used, if the wrap angle relative to a main surface is sufficient and not too large. The wrapped head can also be used with rotating media, such as disks (floppy and hard) and rotating heads, such as helical wound heads for video recording. Multiple flat tape bearing surfaces can be separated by grooves and/or angles. Each flat can carry heads along one or more gap lines. Multiple adjacent narrow tracks can thus be written for extreme high track density recording.

  7. Monitoring spindle orientation: Spindle position checkpoint in charge.

    PubMed

    Caydasi, Ayse K; Ibrahim, Bashar; Pereira, Gislene

    2010-12-11

    Every cell division in budding yeast is inherently asymmetric and counts on the correct positioning of the mitotic spindle along the mother-daughter polarity axis for faithful chromosome segregation. A surveillance mechanism named the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC), monitors the orientation of the mitotic spindle and prevents cells from exiting mitosis when the spindle fails to align along the mother-daughter axis. SPOC is essential for maintenance of ploidy in budding yeast and similar mechanisms might exist in higher eukaryotes to ensure faithful asymmetric cell division. Here, we review the current model of SPOC activation and highlight the importance of protein localization and phosphorylation for SPOC function.

  8. [Electrophysiological characteristics of the isolated muscle spindle in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Hong; Fan, Xiao-Li; Song, Xin-Ai; Shi, Lei

    2011-06-25

    The aim of this study was to observe the electrophysiological characteristics of the isolated rat muscle spindle. The muscle spindle was isolated from rat soleus and the afferent discharge of the isolated muscle spindle was recorded by air-gap technique. In the basic physiological salt solution, the spontaneous impulses of muscle spindle were at a lower level with irregular intervals. The mean frequency of afferents was (51.78 ± 25.63) impulses/1 000 s (n = 13). The muscle spindle afferents were significantly increased and maintained over time by the addition of certain amino acids during the observation. The number of the action potential recorded per 1 000 s was 200-1 000 [mean: (687.62 ± 312.56) impulses/1 000 s, n = 17]. In addition to the typical propagated action potential, a large number of abortive spikes were observed. The results indicate that the activities of isolated muscle spindles in rats can be well maintained by the addition of certain amino acids. The results initially establish and provide the possibility for further research conducted in isolated rat muscle spindles.

  9. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT– bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14036.001 PMID:27166637

  10. Human muscle spindle sensitivity reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Dimitriou, Michael

    2014-10-08

    Muscle spindles are commonly considered as stretch receptors encoding movement, but the functional consequence of their efferent control has remained unclear. The "α-γ coactivation" hypothesis states that activity in a muscle is positively related to the output of its spindle afferents. However, in addition to the above, possible reciprocal inhibition of spindle controllers entails a negative relationship between contractile activity in one muscle and spindle afferent output from its antagonist. By recording spindle afferent responses from alert humans using microneurography, I show that spindle output does reflect antagonistic muscle balance. Specifically, regardless of identical kinematic profiles across active finger movements, stretch of the loaded antagonist muscle (i.e., extensor) was accompanied by increased afferent firing rates from this muscle compared with the baseline case of no constant external load. In contrast, spindle firing rates from the stretching antagonist were lowest when the agonist muscle powering movement (i.e., flexor) acted against an additional resistive load. Stepwise regressions confirmed that instantaneous velocity, extensor, and flexor muscle activity had a significant effect on spindle afferent responses, with flexor activity having a negative effect. Therefore, the results indicate that, as consequence of their efferent control, spindle sensitivity (gain) to muscle stretch reflects the balance of activity between antagonistic muscles rather than only the activity of the spindle-bearing muscle.

  11. Transient Lift-Off Test Results for an Experimental Hybrid Bearing in Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    ABSTRACT Turbo- pump applications that use ball bearings in cryogenic fluids can experience rapid wear when the pump is at full power, limiting the...life of the bearing. Hybrid bearings have been proposed for use in next-generation turbo- pumps because of their Diameter X Speed (DN) life, low...application ideal [1]. The cryogenic applications proposed for the next-generation of turbo- pumps utilize the pump -discharge fluid as the external

  12. A flexible tactile sensor calibration method based on an air-bearing six-dimensional force measurement platform.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin

    2015-07-01

    A number of common issues related to the process of flexible tactile sensor calibration are discussed in this paper, and an estimate of the accuracy of classical calibration methods, as represented by a weight-pulley device, is presented. A flexible tactile sensor calibration method that is based on a six-dimensional force measurement is proposed on the basis of a theoretical analysis. A high-accuracy flexible tactile sensor calibration bench based on the air-bearing six-dimensional force measurement principle was developed to achieve a technically challenging measurement accuracy of 2% full scale (FS) for three-dimensional (3D) flexible tactile sensor calibration. The experimental results demonstrate that the accuracy of the air-bearing six-dimensional force measurement platform can reach 0.2% FS. Thus, the system satisfies the 3D flexible tactile sensor calibration requirement of 2% FS.

  13. Development of magnetically preloaded air bearings for a linear slide: active compensation of three degrees of freedom motion errors.

    PubMed

    Ro, Seung-Kook; Kim, Soohyun; Kwak, Yoonkeun; Park, Chun-Hong

    2008-03-01

    This article describes a linear air-bearing stage that uses active control to compensate for its motion errors. The active control is based on preloads generated by magnetic actuators, which were designed to generate nominal preloads for the air bearings using permanent magnets to maintain the desired stiffness while changing the air-bearing clearance by varying the magnetic flux generated by the current in electromagnetic coils. A single-axis linear stage with a linear motor and 240 mm of travel range was built to verify this design concept and used to test its performance. The motion of the table in three directions was controlled with four magnetic actuators driven by current amplifiers and a DSP (Digital Signal Processor)-based digital controller. The motion errors were measured using a laser interferometer combined with a two-probe method, and had 0.085 microm of repeatability for the straightness error. As a result of feed-forward active compensation, the errors were reduced from 1.09 to 0.11 microm for the vertical motion, from 9.42 to 0.18 arcsec for the pitch motion, and from 2.42 to 0.18 arcsec for the roll motion.

  14. Active Control of Magnetically Levitated Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    BARNEY, PATRICK S.; LAUFFER, JAMES P.; REDMOND, JAMES M.; SULLIVAN, WILLIAM N.

    2001-03-01

    This report summarizes experimental and test results from a two year LDRD project entitled Real Time Error Correction Using Electromagnetic Bearing Spindles. This project was designed to explore various control schemes for levitating magnetic bearings with the goal of obtaining high precision location of the spindle and exceptionally high rotational speeds. As part of this work, several adaptive control schemes were devised, analyzed, and implemented on an experimental magnetic bearing system. Measured results, which indicated precision positional control of the spindle was possible, agreed reasonably well with simulations. Testing also indicated that the magnetic bearing systems were capable of very high rotational speeds but were still not immune to traditional structural dynamic limitations caused by spindle flexibility effects.

  15. A testing machine for dental air-turbine handpiece characteristics: free-running speed, stall torque, bearing resistance.

    PubMed

    Darvell, Brain W; Dyson, J E

    2005-01-01

    The measurement of performance characteristics of dental air turbine handpieces is of interest with respect to product comparisons, standards specifications and monitoring of bearing longevity in clinical service. Previously, however, bulky and expensive laboratory equipment was required. A portable test machine is described for determining three key characteristics of dental air-turbine handpieces: free-running speed, stall torque and bearing resistance. It relies on a special circuit design for performing a hardware integration of a force signal with respect to rotational position, independent of the rate at which the turbine is allowed to turn during both stall torque and bearing resistance measurements. Free-running speed without the introduction of any imbalance can be readily monitored. From the essential linear relationship between torque and speed, dynamic torque and, hence, power, can then be calculated. In order for these measurements to be performed routinely with the necessary precision of location on the test stage, a detailed procedure for ensuring proper gripping of the handpiece is described. The machine may be used to verify performance claims, standard compliance checks should this be established as appropriate, monitor deterioration with time and usage in the clinical environment and for laboratory investigation of design development.

  16. Statistical analysis of sleep spindle occurrences.

    PubMed

    Panas, Dagmara; Malinowska, Urszula; Piotrowski, Tadeusz; Żygierewicz, Jarosław; Suffczyński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Spindles - a hallmark of stage II sleep - are a transient oscillatory phenomenon in the EEG believed to reflect thalamocortical activity contributing to unresponsiveness during sleep. Currently spindles are often classified into two classes: fast spindles, with a frequency of around 14 Hz, occurring in the centro-parietal region; and slow spindles, with a frequency of around 12 Hz, prevalent in the frontal region. Here we aim to establish whether the spindle generation process also exhibits spatial heterogeneity. Electroencephalographic recordings from 20 subjects were automatically scanned to detect spindles and the time occurrences of spindles were used for statistical analysis. Gamma distribution parameters were fit to each inter-spindle interval distribution, and a modified Wald-Wolfowitz lag-1 correlation test was applied. Results indicate that not all spindles are generated by the same statistical process, but this dissociation is not spindle-type specific. Although this dissociation is not topographically specific, a single generator for all spindle types appears unlikely.

  17. Testing a Low-Influence Spindle Drive Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L; Wulff, T; Sedgewick, J

    2003-11-05

    Precision spindles used for diamond turning and other applications requiring low error motion generally require a drive system that ideally applies a pure torque to the rotating spindle. Frequently a frameless motor, that is, one without its own bearings, is directly coupled to the spindle to make a compact and simple system having high resonant frequencies. Although in addition to delivering drive torque, asymmetries in the motor cause it to generate disturbance loads (forces and moments) which influence the spindle error motion of the directly coupled system. This paper describes the tests and results for a particular frameless, brushless DC motor that was originally developed for military and space applications requiring very low torque ripple. Because the construction of the motor should also lead to very low disturbance loads, it was selected for use on a new diamond turning and grinding machine under developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The level of influence for this motor-spindle combination is expected to be of order one nanometer for radial and axial error motion.

  18. Preliminary Investigation of Molybdenum Disulfide-air-mist Lubrication for Roller Bearings Operating to DN Values of 1 x 10(exp 6) and Ball Bearings Operating to Temperatures of 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macks, E F; Nemeth, Z N; Anderson, W J

    1951-01-01

    The effectiveness of molybdenum disulfide MoS2 as a bearing lubricant was determined at high temperature and at high speeds. A 1-inch-bore ball bearing operated at temperatures to 1000 F, a speed of 1725 rpm, and a thrust load of 20 pounds when lubricated only with MoS2-air mist. A 75-millimeter-bore cageless roller bearing, provided with a MoS2-syrup coating before operation, operated at DN values to 1 x 10(exp 6) with a load of 368 pounds.

  19. Mystery of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-free Turbomachinery Unlocked: Load Capacity Rule-of-thumb Allows Simple Estimation of Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2002-01-01

    The Oil-Free Turbomachinery team at the NASA Glenn Research Center has unlocked one of the mysteries surrounding foil air bearing performance. Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings that use ambient air, or any fluid, as their lubricant. In operation, the motion of the shaft's surface drags fluid into the bearing by viscous action, creating a pressurized lubricant film. This lubricating film separates the stationary foil bearing surface from the moving shaft and supports load. Foil bearings have been around for decades and are widely employed in the air cycle machines used for cabin pressurization and cooling aboard commercial jetliners. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery team is fostering the maturation of this technology for integration into advanced Oil-Free aircraft engines. Elimination of the engine oil system can significantly reduce weight and cost and could enable revolutionary new engine designs. Foil bearings, however, have complex elastic support structures (spring packs) that make the prediction of bearing performance, such as load capacity, difficult if not impossible. Researchers at Glenn recently found a link between foil bearing design and load capacity performance. The results have led to a simple rule-of-thumb that relates a bearing's size, speed, and design to its load capacity. Early simple designs (Generation I) had simple elastic (spring) support elements, and performance was limited. More advanced bearings (Generation III) with elastic supports, in which the stiffness is varied locally to optimize gas film pressures, exhibit load capacities that are more than double those of the best previous designs. This is shown graphically in the figure. These more advanced bearings have enabled industry to introduce commercial Oil-Free gas-turbine-based electrical generators and are allowing the aeropropulsion industry to incorporate the technology into aircraft engines. The rule-of-thumb enables engine and bearing designers to easily size and

  20. Nano-level instrumentation for analyzing the dynamic accuracy of a rolling element bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Hong, J.; Zhang, J.; Wang, M. Y.; Zhu, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The rotational performance of high-precision rolling bearings is fundamental to the overall accuracy of complex mechanical systems. A nano-level instrument to analyze rotational accuracy of high-precision bearings of machine tools under working conditions was developed. In this instrument, a high-precision (error motion < 0.15 μm) and high-stiffness (2600 N axial loading capacity) aerostatic spindle was applied to spin the test bearing. Operating conditions could be simulated effectively because of the large axial loading capacity. An air-cylinder, controlled by a proportional pressure regulator, was applied to drive an air-bearing subjected to non-contact and precise loaded axial forces. The measurement results on axial loading and rotation constraint with five remaining degrees of freedom were completely unconstrained and uninfluenced by the instrument's structure. Dual capacity displacement sensors with 10 nm resolution were applied to measure the error motion of the spindle using a double-probe error separation method. This enabled the separation of the spindle's error motion from the measurement results of the test bearing which were measured using two orthogonal laser displacement sensors with 5 nm resolution. Finally, a Lissajous figure was used to evaluate the non-repetitive run-out (NRRO) of the bearing at different axial forces and speeds. The measurement results at various axial loadings and speeds showed the standard deviations of the measurements' repeatability and accuracy were less than 1% and 2%. Future studies will analyze the relationship between geometrical errors and NRRO, such as the ball diameter differences of and the geometrical errors in the grooves of rings.

  1. Biophysical Aspects of Spindle Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadifar, Reza; Baer, Charlie; Needleman, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    The continual propagation of genetic material from one generation to the next is one of the most basic characteristics of all organisms. In eukaryotes, DNA is segregated into the two daughter cells by a highly dynamic, self-organizing structure called the mitotic spindle. Mitotic spindles can show remarkable variability between tissues and organisms, but there is currently little understanding of the biophysical and evolutionary basis of this diversity. We are studying how spontaneous mutations modify cell division during nematode development. By comparing the mutational variation - the raw material of evolution - with the variation present in nature, we are investigating how the mitotic spindle is shaped over the course of evolution. This combination of quantitative genetics and cellular biophysics gives insight into how the structure and dynamics of the spindle is formed through selection, drift, and biophysical constraints.

  2. [Studies on the performance of the dental air turbine handpieces. (Part 1). Air pressure and bur length to be influenced over the rotational performance of the air bearing type handpieces (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Miyairi, H; Muramatsu, A

    1979-07-01

    Air turbine handpieces are used as the dental cutting instruments for the clinical use and many appliances. But, there are no studies on the performance of air turbine handpieces. So, this paper shows the rotational performance of air turbine handpieces which are influenced over the supplying air pressure and cutting bur length. Experimentally used air turbine handpieces is air bearing type and it's set up air pressure to be supplied is 3.5 kg/cm2. So, in this experiments, the range of air pressure is 1.8 approximately 3.5 kg/cm2, which is established five stages. And the bur length of the rotational parts is 5 approximately 9 mm with five steps. As the results, the rotational performance of air handpieces are influenced over these factors of the air pressure and the bur length. And air pressure to be supplied are influenced to be not only over the rotational speed but the load for the putting a stop to the revolutions.

  3. Design for H type co-planar precision stage based on closed air bearing guideway with vacuum attraction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Shi, Zhaoyao; Lin, Jiachun; Zhang, Hua

    2011-12-01

    The accuracy of traditional two-dimensional precision stage is limited not only by the accuracy of each guideway but also by the configuration of the stage. It is not easy to calculate and compensate the total accuracy of the stage due to the complicated influence caused by the different position of the slides. An air bearing guideways with vacuum attraction forces has been designed with closed slide structure to enhance the stiffness and avoid the deformation caused by the weight of slide and workpieces. An H style two-dimension ultra-precision stage with co-planar structure has been developed based on the air bearing guideways to avoid the multi-influence by the axes. Driven by linear motors, the position of the workpiece is encoded by length scales with resolution of 50nm and thermal expansion of 0.6 μm/m/°C (0 °C to 30 °C). The travel span of the stage is 320x320mm, during which each axis has a positioning accuracy of +/-1μm, a repeatability of +/-0.3μm and a straightness of +/-0.5μm. The stage can be applied in precision manufacturing and measurement.

  4. Environmental Assessment: 49th Materiel Maintenance Group BEAR Base Improvements Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    buildings would provide 214,000 square feet of modular office and storage space. Construction of newT-storage units would provide an additional58,000...square ft of temporary storage for deployable assets. Additional area improvements would provide 1.2 million square feet of storage space, roads...jurisdictional wetland south ofBEAR Base, and Lake Stinky are noteworthy Waters of the US in the project area that receive Holloman AFB storm water

  5. Evaluation of Advanced Solid Lubricant Coatings for Foil Air Bearings Operating at 25 and 500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Fellenstein, James A.; Benoy, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The tribological properties of one chrome oxide and one chrome carbide based solid lubricant coating were evaluated in a partial-arc foil bearing at 25 and 500 C. Start/stop bearing operation up to 20,000 cycles were run under 10 kPa (1.5 psi) static deadweight load. Bearing friction (torque) was measured during the test. Specimen wear and SEM/EDS surface analyses were conducted after testing to understand and elucidate the tribological characteristics observed. The chrome oxide coating which contains both (Ag) and (BaF2/CaF2) for low and high temperature lubrication, exhibited low friction in sliding against Al2O3 coated foils at 25 and 500 C. The chrome carbide coating, which lacked a low temperature lubricant but contained BaF2/CaF2 as a high temperature lubricant, exhibited high friction at 25 C and low friction at 500 C against both bare and Al2O3 coated superalloy foil surfaces. Post test surface analyses suggest that improved tribological performance is exhibited when a lubricant film from the coating transfers to the foil surface.

  6. Development of a Revolutionary High Speed Spindle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agba, Emmanuel I.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the development of a hydraulic motor driven spindle system to be employed for high speed machining of composite materials and metals. The spindle system is conceived to be easily retrofitted into conventional milling machines. The need for the hydraulic spindle arises because of the limitations placed on conventional electric motor driven spindles by the low cutting power and the presence of vibrational phenomena associated with voltage frequency at high rotational speeds. Also, the electric motors are usually large and expensive when power requirements are moderately high. In contrast, hydraulic motor driven spindles promise a distinct increase in spindle life over the conventional electric motor driven spindles. In this report, existing technologies applicable to spindle holder for severe operating conditions were reviewed, conceptual designs of spindle holder system were developed and evaluated, and a detailed design of an acceptable concept was conducted. Finally, a rapid prototype of the design was produced for design evaluation.

  7. Spindle assembly on immobilized chromatin micropatterns.

    PubMed

    Pugieux, Céline; Dmitrieff, Serge; Tarnawska, Katarzyna; Nédélec, François

    2014-01-01

    We describe a method to assemble meiotic spindles on immobilized micropatterns of chromatin built on a first layer of biotinylated BSA deposited by microcontact printing. Such chromatin patterns routinely produce bipolar spindles with a yield of 60%, and offer the possibility to follow spindle assembly dynamics, from the onset of nucleation to the establishment of a quasi steady state. Hundreds of spindles can be recorded in parallel for different experimental conditions. We also describe the semi-automated image analysis pipeline, which is used to analyze the assembly kinetics of spindle arrays, or the final morphological diversity of the spindles.

  8. Chromatin shapes the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Dinarina, Ana; Pugieux, Céline; Corral, Maria Mora; Loose, Martin; Spatz, Joachim; Karsenti, Eric; Nédélec, François

    2009-08-07

    In animal and plant cells, mitotic chromatin locally generates microtubules that self-organize into a mitotic spindle, and its dimensions and bipolar symmetry are essential for accurate chromosome segregation. By immobilizing microscopic chromatin-coated beads on slide surfaces using a microprinting technique, we have examined the effect of chromatin on the dimensions and symmetry of spindles in Xenopus laevis cytoplasmic extracts. While circular spots with diameters around 14-18 microm trigger bipolar spindle formation, larger spots generate an incorrect number of poles. We also examined lines of chromatin with various dimensions. Their length determined the number of poles that formed, with a 6 x 18 microm rectangular patch generating normal spindle morphology. Around longer lines, multiple poles formed and the structures were disorganized. While lines thinner than 10 mum generated symmetric structures, thicker lines induced the formation of asymmetric structures where all microtubules are on the same side of the line. Our results show that chromatin defines spindle shape and orientation. For a video summary of this article, see the PaperFlick file available with the online Supplemental Data.

  9. Force and the spindle: Mechanical cues in mitotic spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Nestor-Bergmann, Alexander; Goddard, Georgina; Woolner, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical environment of a cell has a profound effect on its behaviour, from dictating cell shape to driving the transcription of specific genes. Recent studies have demonstrated that mechanical forces play a key role in orienting the mitotic spindle, and therefore cell division, in both single cells and tissues. Whilst the molecular machinery that mediates the link between external force and the mitotic spindle remains largely unknown, it is becoming increasingly clear that this is a widely used mechanism which could prove vital for coordinating cell division orientation across tissues in a variety of contexts. PMID:25080021

  10. Evaluation of rotor-bearing system dynamic response to unbalance. [air conditioning equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, R. E.; Ozimek, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    The vibration environment within air conditioner rotating machinery referred to as an air cycle machine (ACM) was investigated to effectively increase ACM reliability. To assist in the selection of design changes which would result in improved ACM performance, various design modifications were incorporated into a baseline ACM configuration. For each design change, testing was conducted with the best balance achieveable (baseline) and with various degrees of unbalance. Relationships between unbalance (within the context of design changes) and the parameters associated with design goals were established. The results of rotor dynamics tests used to establish these relationships are presented.

  11. Spindle cell carcinoma in maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Soumi; Sreelatha, S V; Hegde, Nidarsh; Nair, Preeti P

    2013-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinomas (sarcomatoid carcinomas) are rare tumours. It is a variant of squamous cell carcinoma which has spindled tumour cells, which simulate a true sarcoma, but are epithelial in origin. They are extremely uncommon in the head and neck region. Only five cases with maxillary origin have been discussed in the literature. As compared to squamous cell carcinoma of maxilla, this variant is associated with poor diagnosis and advanced disease at presentation, as is demonstrated in the case presented. There are no standard recommendations for management owing to the rarity of this histology. Surgery and radiotherapy form the mainstays of treatment. We report a rare case of spindle cell carcinoma involving the maxilla. PMID:23632620

  12. Reflex changes in muscle spindle discharge during a voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Aniss, A M; Gandevia, S C; Burke, D

    1988-03-01

    1. This study was undertaken to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from mechanoreceptors in the foot reflexly affect fusimotor neurons innervating the plantar and dorsiflexors of the ankle during voluntary contractions. 2. Recordings were made from 29 identified muscle spindle afferents innervating triceps surae and the pretibial flexors. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 impulses per second) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity: 2-4 times sensory threshold) and to the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity: 1.5-3 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). The stimuli were delivered while the subject maintained an isometric voluntary contraction of the receptor-bearing muscle, sufficient to accelerate the discharge of each spindle ending. This ensured that the fusimotor neurons directed to the ending were active and influencing the spindle discharge. The effects of these stimuli on muscle spindle discharge were assessed using raster displays, frequencygrams, poststimulus time histograms (PSTHs) and cumulative sums ("CUSUMs") of the PSTHs. Reflex effects onto alpha-motoneurons were determined from poststimulus changes in the averaged rectified electromyogram (EMG). Reflex effects of these stimuli onto single-motor units were assessed in separate experiments using PSTHs and CUSUMs. 3. Electrical stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves at nonnoxious levels had no significant effect on the discharge of the 14 spindle endings in the pretibial flexor muscles. The electrical stimuli also produced no significant change in discharge of 11 of 15 spindle endings in triceps surae. With the remaining four endings in triceps surae, the overall change in discharge appeared to be an increase for two endings (at latencies of 60 and 68 ms) and a decrease for two endings (at latencies of 110 and 150 ms). The difference in the incidence of the responses of spindle endings in tibialis

  13. Performance testing of a magnetically suspended double gimbal control moment gyro based on the single axis air bearing table.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peiling; Zhang, Huijuan; Yan, Ning; Fang, Jiancheng

    2012-01-01

    Integrating the advantage of magnetic bearings with a double gimble control moment gyroscope (DGCMG), a magnetically suspended DGCMG (MSDGCMG) is an ideal actuator in high-precision, long life, and rapid maneuver attitude control systems. The work presented here mainly focuses on performance testing of a MSDGCMG independently developed by Beihang University, based on the single axis air bearing table. In this paper, taking into sufficient consideration to the moving-gimbal effects and the response bandwidth limit of the gimbal, a special MSDGCMG steering law is proposed subject to the limits of gimbal angle rate and angle acceleration. Finally, multiple experiments are carried out, with different MSDGCMG angular momenta as well as different desired attitude angles. The experimental results indicate that the MSDGCMG has a good gimbal angle rate and output torque tracking capabilities, and that the attitude stability with MSDGCMG as actuator is superior to 10(-3)°/s. The MSDGCMG performance testing in this paper, carried out under moving-base condition, will offer a technique base for the future research and application of MSDGCMGs.

  14. Quantifying chirp in sleep spindles.

    PubMed

    Schönwald, Suzana V; Carvalho, Diego Z; Dellagustin, Guilherme; de Santa-Helena, Emerson L; Gerhardt, Günther J L

    2011-04-15

    Sleep spindles are considered as a marker of integrity for thalamo-cortical circuits. Recently, attention has been given to internal frequency variation in sleep spindles. In this study, a procedure based on matching pursuit with a Gabor-chirplet dictionary was applied in order to measure chirp rate in atoms representing sleep spindles, also categorized into negative, positive or zero chirp types. The sample comprised 707 EEG segments containing visual sleep spindles, labeled TP, obtained from nine healthy male volunteers (aged 20-34, average 24.6 y). Control datasets were 333 non-REM (NREM) sleep background segments and 287 REM sleep intervals, each with 16s duration. Analyses were carried out on the C3-A2 EEG channel. In TP and NREM groups, the proportion of non-null chirp types was non-random and total chirp distribution was asymmetrical towards negative values, in contrast to REM. Median negative chirp rate in the TP and NREM groups was significantly lower than in REM (-0.4 Hz/s vs -0.3 Hz/s, P < 0.05). Negative chirp atoms outnumbered positives by 50% in TP, while in NREM and REM, they were, respectively, only 22% and 12% more prevalent. TP negative chirp atoms were significantly higher in amplitude compared to positive or zero types. Considering individual subjects, 88.9% had a TP negative/positive chirp ratio above 1 (mean ± sd=1.64 ± 0.65). We propose there is increasing evidence, corroborated by the present study, favoring systematic measurement of sleep spindle chirp rate or internal frequency variation. Preferential occurrence of negatively chirping spindles is consistent with the hypothesis of electrophysiological modulation of neocortical memory consolidation.

  15. Autoassociative MLP in sleep spindle detection.

    PubMed

    Huupponen, E; Värri, A; Himanen, S L; Hasan, J; Lehtokangas, M; Saarinen, J

    2000-06-01

    Spindles are one of the most important short-lasting waveforms in sleep EEG. They are the hallmarks of the so-called Stage 2 sleep. Visual spindle scoring is a tedious workload, since there are often a thousand spindles in one all-night recording of some 8 hr. Automated methods for spindle detection typically use some form of fixed spindle amplitude threshold, which is poor with respect to inter-subject variability. In this work a spindle detection system allowing spindle detection without an amplitude threshold was developed. This system can be used for automatic decision making of whether or not a sleep spindle is present in the EEG at a certain point of time. An Autoassociative Multilayer Perceptron (A-MLP) network was employed for the decision making. A novel training procedure was developed to remove inconsistencies from the training data, which was found to improve the system performance significantly.

  16. Spindle diameter effects for cotton pickers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is concern that changes to the operating speed and size of spindles on cotton picker harvesters over the years have resulted in a general decrease in cotton fiber quality, especially spindle twists, preparation, and neps. Previous research showed that spindle speeds of 3000 and 4000 rpm had m...

  17. Nap sleep spindle correlates of intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ujma, Péter P; Bódizs, Róbert; Gombos, Ferenc; Stintzing, Johannes; Konrad, Boris N; Genzel, Lisa; Steiger, Axel; Dresler, Martin

    2015-11-26

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, that play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Several studies with full-night sleep recordings have reported a positive association between sleep spindles and fluid intelligence scores, however more recently it has been shown that only few sleep spindle measures correlate with intelligence in females, and none in males. Sleep spindle regulation underlies a circadian rhythm, however the association between spindles and intelligence has not been investigated in daytime nap sleep so far. In a sample of 86 healthy male human subjects, we investigated the correlation between fluid intelligence and sleep spindle parameters in an afternoon nap of 100 minutes. Mean sleep spindle length, amplitude and density were computed for each subject and for each derivation for both slow and fast spindles. A positive association was found between intelligence and slow spindle duration, but not any other sleep spindle parameter. As a positive correlation between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in full-night polysomnography has only been reported in females but not males, our results suggest that the association between intelligence and sleep spindles is more complex than previously assumed.

  18. A comparison between the dimensions of positive transtibial residual limb molds prepared by air pressure casting and weight-bearing casting methods

    PubMed Central

    Hajiaghaei, Behnam; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Saeedi, Hassan; Jalali, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Creating a socket with proper fit is an important factor to ensure the comfort and control of prosthetic devices. Several techniques are commonly used to cast transtibial stumps but their effect on stump shape deformation is not well understood. This study compares the dimensions, circumferences and volumes of the positive casts and also the socket comfort between two casting methods. Our hypothesis was that the casts prepared by air pressure method have less volume and are more comfortable than those prepared by weight bearing method. Methods: Fifteen transtibial unilateral amputees participated in the study. Two weight bearing and air pressure casting methods were utilized for their residual limbs. The diameters and circumferences of various areas of the residual limbs and positive casts were compared. The volumes of two types of casts were measured by a volumeter and compared. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to measure the sockets fit comfort. Results: Circumferences at 10 and 15 cm below the patella on the casts were significantly smaller in air pressure casting method compared to the weight bearing method (p=0.00 and 0.01 respectively). The volume of the cast in air pressure method was lower than that of the weight bearing method (p=0.006). The amputees found the fit of the sockets prepared by air pressure method more comfortable than the weight bearing sockets (p=0.015). Conclusion: The air pressure casting reduced the circumferences of the distal portion of residual limbs which has more soft tissue and because of its snug fit it provided more comfort for amputees, according to the VAS measurements. PMID:27390711

  19. Theory of meiotic spindle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furthauer, Sebastian; Foster, Peter; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The meiotic spindle is a biological structure that self assembles from the intracellular medium to separate chromosomes during meiosis. It consists of filamentous microtubule (MT) proteins that interact through the fluid in which they are suspended and via the associated molecules that orchestrate their behavior. We aim to understand how the interplay between fluid medium, MTs, and regulatory proteins allows this material to self-organize into the spindle's highly stereotyped shape. To this end we develop a continuum model that treats the spindle as an active liquid crystal with MT turnover. In this active material, molecular motors, such as dyneins which collect MT minus ends and kinesins which slide MTs past each other, generate active fluid and material stresses. Moreover nucleator proteins that are advected with and transported along MTs control the nucleation and depolymerization of MTs. This theory captures the growth process of meiotic spindles, their shapes, and the essential features of many perturbation experiments. It thus provides a framework to think about the physics of this complex biological suspension.

  20. Left supraclavicular spindle cell lipoma.

    PubMed

    Olaleye, Oladejo; Fu, Bertram; Moorthy, Ram; Lawson, Charles; Black, Myles; Mitchell, David

    2010-01-01

    Background. Spindle cell lipoma (SCL) is a benign lipomatous tumour, typically occurring in the posterior neck, shoulder or upper back of elderly males. They compose of fat, CD34 positive spindle cells, and ropey collagen on a myxoid matrix. This case highlights a rare presentation of SCL and the need for pre-operative diagnosis. Case Report. A 63-year-old gentleman presented with a pre-existing left supraclavicular mass that had recently increased in size. FNA and CT Scans were performed and results discussed in the mutidisciplinary team meeting. Excisional biopsy was recommended. Radiology. CT neck showed a left supraclavicular mass of fatty density with fine internal septations. A low-grade liposarcoma could not be excluded. Histopathology. FNA was indeterminate. Histology of specimen showed bland spindle cells with no evidence of malignancy. Immuno-histochemistry showed SCL with CD34 positivity and negative staining on CDK4 and p16. Management. Excision biopsy of the mass was performed which was technically difficult as the mass invaginated around the brachial plexus. The patient recovered well post-operatively with no neurological deficits. Conclusion. Spindle cell lipoma is a rare benign tumour and a pre-operative diagnosis based on the clinical context, imaging and immuno-histochemistry is crucial to management.

  1. Samurai sword sets spindle size.

    PubMed

    Reber, Simone; Hyman, Anthony A

    2011-12-09

    Although the parts list is nearly complete for many cellular structures, mechanisms that control their size remain poorly understood. Loughlin and colleagues now show that phosphorylation of a single residue of katanin, a microtubule-severing protein, largely accounts for the difference in spindle length between two closely related frogs.

  2. Modal identification of spindle-tool unit in high-speed machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnol, Vincent; Le, Thien-Phu; Ray, Pascal

    2011-10-01

    The accurate knowledge of high-speed motorised spindle dynamic behaviour during machining is important in order to ensure the reliability of machine tools in service and the quality of machined parts. More specifically, the prediction of stable cutting regions, which is a critical requirement for high-speed milling operations, requires the accurate estimation of tool/holder/spindle set dynamic modal parameters. These estimations are generally obtained through Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements of the non-rotating spindle. However, significant changes in modal parameters are expected to occur during operation, due to high-speed spindle rotation. The spindle's modal variations are highlighted through an integrated finite element model of the dynamic high-speed spindle-bearing system, taking into account rotor dynamics effects. The dependency of dynamic behaviour on speed range is then investigated and determined with accuracy. The objective of the proposed paper is to validate these numerical results through an experiment-based approach. Hence, an experimental setup is elaborated to measure rotating tool vibration during the machining operation in order to determine the spindle's modal frequency variation with respect to spindle speed in an industrial environment. The identification of natural frequencies of the spindle under rotating conditions is challenging, due to the low number of sensors and the presence of many harmonics in the measured signals. In order to overcome these issues and to extract the characteristics of the system, the spindle modes are determined through a 3-step procedure. First, spindle modes are highlighted using the Frequency Domain Decomposition (FDD) technique, with a new formulation at the considered rotating speed. These extracted modes are then analysed through the value of their respective damping ratios in order to separate the harmonics component from structural spindle natural frequencies. Finally, the stochastic

  3. Synchronization and Propagation of Global Sleep Spindles

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Rafael Toledo Fernandes; Gerhardt, Günther Johannes Lewczuk; Schönwald, Suzana Veiga; Rybarczyk-Filho, José Luiz; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles occur thousands of times during normal sleep and can be easily detected by visual inspection of EEG signals. These characteristics make spindles one of the most studied EEG structures in mammalian sleep. In this work we considered global spindles, which are spindles that are observed simultaneously in all EEG channels. We propose a methodology that investigates both the signal envelope and phase/frequency of each global spindle. By analysing the global spindle phase we showed that 90% of spindles synchronize with an average latency time of 0.1 s. We also measured the frequency modulation (chirp) of global spindles and found that global spindle chirp and synchronization are not correlated. By investigating the signal envelopes and implementing a homogeneous and isotropic propagation model, we could estimate both the signal origin and velocity in global spindles. Our results indicate that this simple and non-invasive approach could determine with reasonable precision the spindle origin, and allowed us to estimate a signal speed of 0.12 m/s. Finally, we consider whether synchronization might be useful as a non-invasive diagnostic tool. PMID:26963102

  4. Statistical Analysis of Sleep Spindle Occurrences

    PubMed Central

    Panas, Dagmara; Malinowska, Urszula; Piotrowski, Tadeusz; Żygierewicz, Jarosław; Suffczyński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Spindles - a hallmark of stage II sleep - are a transient oscillatory phenomenon in the EEG believed to reflect thalamocortical activity contributing to unresponsiveness during sleep. Currently spindles are often classified into two classes: fast spindles, with a frequency of around 14 Hz, occurring in the centro-parietal region; and slow spindles, with a frequency of around 12 Hz, prevalent in the frontal region. Here we aim to establish whether the spindle generation process also exhibits spatial heterogeneity. Electroencephalographic recordings from 20 subjects were automatically scanned to detect spindles and the time occurrences of spindles were used for statistical analysis. Gamma distribution parameters were fit to each inter-spindle interval distribution, and a modified Wald-Wolfowitz lag-1 correlation test was applied. Results indicate that not all spindles are generated by the same statistical process, but this dissociation is not spindle-type specific. Although this dissociation is not topographically specific, a single generator for all spindle types appears unlikely. PMID:23560045

  5. Sympathetic innervation of human muscle spindles

    PubMed Central

    Radovanovic, Dina; Peikert, Kevin; Lindström, Mona; Domellöf, Fatima Pedrosa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of sympathetic innervation in human muscle spindles, using antibodies against neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). A total of 232 muscle spindles were immunohistochemically examined. NPY and NPY receptors were found on the intrafusal fibers, on the blood vessels supplying muscle spindles and on free nerve endings in the periaxial space. TH-immunoreactivity was present mainly in the spindle nerve and vessel. This is, to our knowledge, the first morphological study concerning the sympathetic innervation of the human muscle spindles. The results provide anatomical evidence for direct sympathetic innervation of the intrafusal fibers and show that sympathetic innervation is not restricted to the blood vessels supplying spindles. Knowledge about direct sympathetic innervation of the muscle spindle might expand our understanding of motor and proprioceptive dysfunction under stress conditions, for example, chronic muscle pain syndromes. PMID:25994126

  6. Sympathetic innervation of human muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Radovanovic, Dina; Peikert, Kevin; Lindström, Mona; Domellöf, Fatima Pedrosa

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of sympathetic innervation in human muscle spindles, using antibodies against neuropeptide Y (NPY), NPY receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). A total of 232 muscle spindles were immunohistochemically examined. NPY and NPY receptors were found on the intrafusal fibers, on the blood vessels supplying muscle spindles and on free nerve endings in the periaxial space. TH-immunoreactivity was present mainly in the spindle nerve and vessel. This is, to our knowledge, the first morphological study concerning the sympathetic innervation of the human muscle spindles. The results provide anatomical evidence for direct sympathetic innervation of the intrafusal fibers and show that sympathetic innervation is not restricted to the blood vessels supplying spindles. Knowledge about direct sympathetic innervation of the muscle spindle might expand our understanding of motor and proprioceptive dysfunction under stress conditions, for example, chronic muscle pain syndromes.

  7. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  8. Foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-11-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  9. Phase Transitions of Spindle-Associated Protein Regulate Spindle Apparatus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Shusheng; Huang, Yuejia; He, Xiaonan; Cui, Honggang; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Spindle assembly required during mitosis depends on microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved low-complexity protein, BuGZ, undergoes phase transition or coacervation to promote assembly of both spindles and their associated components. BuGZ forms temperature-dependent liquid droplets alone or on microtubules in physiological buffers. Coacervation in vitro or in spindle and spindle matrix depends on hydrophobic residues in BuGZ. BuGZ coacervation and its binding to microtubules and tubulin are required to promote assembly of spindle and spindle matrix in Xenopus egg extract and in mammalian cells. Since several previously identified spindle-associated components also contain low complexity regions, we propose that coacervating proteins may be a hallmark of proteins that comprise a spindle matrix that functions to promote assembly of spindles by concentrating its building blocks. PMID:26388440

  10. Development of surface coatings for air-lubricated, compliant journal bearings to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    Surface coatings for an air-lubricated, compliant journal for an automotive gas turbine engine were tested to find those capable of withstanding temperatures of either 540 C (1000 F) or 650 C (1200 F). Also, the coatings have to be capable of surviving the start-stop sliding contact cycles prior to rotor lift-off and at touchdown. Selected coating combinations were tested in start-stop tests at 14 kPa (2 psi) loading for 2000 cycles at room and maximum temperatures. Specific coating recommendations are: Cdo and graphite on foil versus chrome carbide on journal up to 370 C (700 F); NASA PS-120 (Tribaloy 400, silver, and CaF2) on journal versus uncoated foil up to 540 C (1000 F); and chemically adherent Cr2O3 on journal and foil up to 650 C (1200 F). The chemically adherent Cr2O3 coating system was further tested successfully at 35 kPa (5 psi) loading for 2000 start-stop cycles.

  11. Dynamic behavior of air lubricated pivoted-pad journal-bearing, rotor system. 2: Pivot consideration and pad mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1972-01-01

    Rotor bearing dynamic tests were conducted with tilting-pad journal bearings having three different pad masses and two different pivot geometries. The rotor was vertically mounted and supported by two three-pad tilting-pad gas journal bearings and a simple externally pressurized thrust bearing. The bearing pads were 5.1 cm (2.02 in.) in diameter and 2.8 cm (1.5 in.) long. The length to diameter ratio was 0.75. One pad was mounted on a flexible diaphragm. The bearing supply pressure ranged from 0 to 690 kilonewtons per square meter (0 to 100 psig), and speeds ranged to 38,500 rpm. Heavy mass pad tilting-pad assemblies produced three rotor-bearing resonances above the first two rotor critical speeds. Lower supply pressure eliminated the resonances. The resonances were oriented primarily in the direction normal to the diaphragm.

  12. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    PubMed Central

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  13. Design, development and evaluation of a precision air bearing rotary table with large diameter through-hole

    SciTech Connect

    Accatino, M.R.

    1991-11-01

    A large diameter precision air bearing rotary table with a 16.0 inch diameter through-hole was designed, fabricated and tested in the course of this research. The rotary table will be used in conjunction with a specialized, computer controlled precision inspection machine being designed for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The design process included a complete engineering analysis to predict the final performance of the rotary table, and to ensure that the rotary table meets the required accuracy of 4.0 microinches of total radial (3.5 microinches average radial) and 4.0 microinches total axial (3.5 microinches average axial) errors. The engineering analysis included structural deformation, thermal sensitivity and dynamic analyses using finite element methods in some cases, as well as other analytic solutions. Comparisons are made between predicted and tested values, which are listed in the rotary table error budget. The rotary table performed as predicted with measured axial and radial stiffnesses of 1.1E06 lbf/inch and 2.9E06 lbf/inch, respectively, as well as average radial, axial and tilt errors of 2.5 microinches, 1.5 microinches, and less than 0.05 arcseconds, respectively.

  14. Mechanical design principles of a mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jonathan J; Roque, Hélio; Antony, Claude; Nédélec, François

    2014-12-18

    An organised spindle is crucial to the fidelity of chromosome segregation, but the relationship between spindle structure and function is not well understood in any cell type. The anaphase B spindle in fission yeast has a slender morphology and must elongate against compressive forces. This 'pushing' mode of chromosome transport renders the spindle susceptible to breakage, as observed in cells with a variety of defects. Here we perform electron tomographic analyses of the spindle, which suggest that it organises a limited supply of structural components to increase its compressive strength. Structural integrity is maintained throughout the spindle's fourfold elongation by organising microtubules into a rigid transverse array, preserving correct microtubule number and dynamically rescaling microtubule length.

  15. Mechanical design principles of a mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jonathan J; Roque, Hélio; Antony, Claude; Nédélec, François

    2014-01-01

    An organised spindle is crucial to the fidelity of chromosome segregation, but the relationship between spindle structure and function is not well understood in any cell type. The anaphase B spindle in fission yeast has a slender morphology and must elongate against compressive forces. This ‘pushing’ mode of chromosome transport renders the spindle susceptible to breakage, as observed in cells with a variety of defects. Here we perform electron tomographic analyses of the spindle, which suggest that it organises a limited supply of structural components to increase its compressive strength. Structural integrity is maintained throughout the spindle's fourfold elongation by organising microtubules into a rigid transverse array, preserving correct microtubule number and dynamically rescaling microtubule length. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03398.001 PMID:25521247

  16. The Spindle Cell Neoplasms of the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Thorakkal

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell neoplasms are defined as neoplasms that consist of spindle-shaped cells in the histopathology. Spindle cell neoplasms can affect the oral cavity. In the oral cavity, the origin of the spindle cell neoplasms may be traced to epithelial, mesenchymal and odontogenic components. This article aims to review the spindle cell neoplasms of the oral cavity with emphasis on histopathology. PMID:26351482

  17. Gas bearing operates in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    Bearing has restrictions to reduce air leaks and is connected to external pumpout facility which removes exhausted air. Token amount of air which is lost to vacuum is easily removed by conventional vacuum pump.

  18. Dynamic Positioning of Mitotic Spindles in Yeast:

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Elaine; Yang, Charlie; Chin, Elaine; Maddox, Paul; Salmon, E. D.; Lew, Daniel J.; Bloom, Kerry

    2000-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, movement of the mitotic spindle to a predetermined cleavage plane at the bud neck is essential for partitioning chromosomes into the mother and daughter cells. Astral microtubule dynamics are critical to the mechanism that ensures nuclear migration to the bud neck. The nucleus moves in the opposite direction of astral microtubule growth in the mother cell, apparently being “pushed” by microtubule contacts at the cortex. In contrast, microtubules growing toward the neck and within the bud promote nuclear movement in the same direction of microtubule growth, thus “pulling” the nucleus toward the bud neck. Failure of “pulling” is evident in cells lacking Bud6p, Bni1p, Kar9p, or the kinesin homolog, Kip3p. As a consequence, there is a loss of asymmetry in spindle pole body segregation into the bud. The cytoplasmic motor protein, dynein, is not required for nuclear movement to the neck; rather, it has been postulated to contribute to spindle elongation through the neck. In the absence of KAR9, dynein-dependent spindle oscillations are evident before anaphase onset, as are postanaphase dynein-dependent pulling forces that exceed the velocity of wild-type spindle elongation threefold. In addition, dynein-mediated forces on astral microtubules are sufficient to segregate a 2N chromosome set through the neck in the absence of spindle elongation, but cytoplasmic kinesins are not. These observations support a model in which spindle polarity determinants (BUD6, BNI1, KAR9) and cytoplasmic kinesin (KIP3) provide directional cues for spindle orientation to the bud while restraining the spindle to the neck. Cytoplasmic dynein is attenuated by these spindle polarity determinants and kinesin until anaphase onset, when dynein directs spindle elongation to distal points in the mother and bud. PMID:11071919

  19. Mechanotransduction in the muscle spindle.

    PubMed

    Bewick, Guy S; Banks, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this review is on the principal sensory ending of the mammalian muscle spindle, known as the primary ending. The process of mechanosensory transduction in the primary ending is examined under five headings: (i) action potential responses to defined mechanical stimuli-representing the ending's input-output properties; (ii) the receptor potential-including the currents giving rise to it; (iii) sensory-terminal deformation-measurable changes in the shape of the primary-ending terminals correlated with intrafusal sarcomere length, and what may cause them; (iv) putative stretch-sensitive channels-pharmacological and immunocytochemical clues to their identity; and (v) synaptic-like vesicles-the physiology and pharmacology of an intrinsic glutamatergic system in the primary and other mechanosensory endings, with some thoughts on the possible role of the system. Thus, the review highlights spindle stretch-evoked output is the product of multi-ionic receptor currents plus complex and sophisticated regulatory gain controls, both positive and negative in nature, as befits its status as the most complex sensory organ after the special senses.

  20. S-100 protein expressing spindle cells in spindle cell lipoma: a diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Mentzel, T; Rütten, A; Hantschke, M; Hornick, J L; Brenn, T

    2016-10-01

    Spindle cell lipoma represents a distinct clinicopathological entity and is related to cellular angiofibroma and mammary-type myofibroblastoma. Spindle cell lipomas are composed of mature lipogenic cells and a variable number of CD34-positive spindle cells that show loss of retinoblastoma protein expression. Spindle cell lipomas occasionally express S-100 protein. We studied one case of purely dermal spindle cell lipoma and four cases of classical subcutaneous spindle cell lipoma arising in one female and four male patients (age ranged from 55 to 69 years). The neoplasms arose on the nose, the chin, the neck, the forehead and retroauricular, and all lesions had been marginally or incompletely excised. The studied cases showed classical histological and immunohistochemical features of spindle cell lipoma and, in addition, strong expression of S-100 protein by spindle-shaped tumour cells. S-100-expression in spindle cell lipoma may cause problems in the differential diagnosis with neural and melanocytic neoplasms and emphasizes the plasticity of the spindle cells in spindle cell lipoma.

  1. Chromosome- and spindle-pole-derived signals generate an intrinsic code for spindle position and orientation.

    PubMed

    Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2012-02-12

    Mitotic spindle positioning by cortical pulling forces defines the cell division axis and location, which is critical for proper cell division and development. Although recent work has identified developmental and extrinsic cues that regulate spindle orientation, the contribution of intrinsic signals to spindle positioning and orientation remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that cortical force generation in human cells is controlled by distinct spindle-pole- and chromosome-derived signals that regulate cytoplasmic dynein localization. First, dynein exhibits a dynamic asymmetric cortical localization that is negatively regulated by spindle-pole proximity, resulting in spindle oscillations to centre the spindle within the cell. We find that this signal comprises the spindle-pole-localized polo-like kinase (Plk1), which regulates dynein localization by controlling the interaction between dynein-dynactin and its upstream cortical targeting factors NuMA and LGN. Second, a chromosome-derived RanGTP gradient restricts the localization of NuMA-LGN to the lateral cell cortex to define and maintain the spindle orientation axis. RanGTP acts in part through the nuclear localization sequence of NuMA to locally alter the ability of NuMA-LGN to associate with the cell cortex in the vicinity of chromosomes. We propose that these chromosome- and spindle-pole-derived gradients generate an intrinsic code to control spindle position and orientation.

  2. Identification of water-bearing fractures by the use of geophysical logs, May to July 1998, former Naval Air Warfare Center, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.; Bird, Philip H.

    1999-01-01

    Between May and July 1998, 10 monitor wells were drilled near the site of the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Warminster, Bucks County, Pa., to monitor water levels and sample ground water in shallow and intermediate water-bearing fractures. The sampling will determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of contaminated ground water migrating from known or suspected sources. Three boreholes were drilled on the property at 960 Jacksonville Road, at the northwestern side of NAWC, along strike from Area A; seven boreholes were drilled in Area B in the southeastern corner of NAWC. Depths range from 40.5 to 150 feet below land surface. Borehole geophysical logging and video surveys were used to identify water-bearing fractures so that appropriate intervals could be screened in each monitor well. Geophysical logs were obtained at the 10 monitor wells. Video surveys were obtained at three monitor wells in the southeastern corner of the NAWC property. Caliper logs and video surveys were used to locate fractures. Inflections on fluid-temperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-bearing fractures. Heatpulse-flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, video surveys, and driller?s logs, all wells were screened such that water-level fluctuations could be monitored and water samples collected from discrete water-bearing fractures in each monitor well.

  3. Bending fatigue of electron-beam-welded foils. Application to a hydrodynamic air bearing in the Chrysler/DOE upgraded automotive gas tubine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrodynamic air bearing with a compliment surface is used in the gas generator of an upgraded automotive gas turbine engine. In the prototype design, the compliant surface is a thin foil spot welded at one end to the bearing cartridge. During operation, the foil failed along the line of spot welds which acted as a series of stress concentrators. Because of its higher degree of geometric uniformity, electron beam welding of the foil was selected as an alternative to spot welding. Room temperature bending fatigue tests were conducted to determine the fatigue resistance of the electron beam welded foils. Equations were determined relating cycles to crack initiation and cycles to failure to nominal total strain range. A scaling procedure is presented for estimating the reduction in cyclic life when the foil is at its normal operating temperature of 260 C (500 F).

  4. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  5. Muscle spindle responses in man to changes in load during accurate position maintenance.

    PubMed

    Burke, D; Hagbarth, K E; Löfstedt, L

    1978-03-01

    1. Single unit and multi-unit recordings of muscle spindle activity were made from the peroneal nerves of human subjects. While the subjects attempted to maintain a constant ankle joint position, an external load on the receptor-bearing muscle was altered unexpectedly. 2. The spindle discharge produced by a sudden increase in load was of similar strength when the receptor-bearing muscle was relaxed as when it was contracting at the moment of the impact. A motor response at a latency consistent with a spinal reflex mechanism occurred only when the muscle was contracting. It is concluded that the potentiation of the reflex mechanism during contraction was not due primarily to a fusimotor action. 3. Sudden decrease in load produced a pause in spindle discharge followed by a pause in on-going e.m.g. activity at a latency consistent with spinal reflex mechanisms. 4. Slow changes in load produced parallel changes in e.m.g. and spindle discharge. It is suggested that the voluntary effort involved in maintaining joint position in the face of gradually changing loads results in corticospinal activity adjusted in strength to the opposing torque and operating on alpha and gamma motoneurones in parallel.

  6. Intramedullary spindle cell hemangioma: case report.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Rani; Ashayeri, Kimberly; Legatt, Alan D; Houten, John K

    2016-09-01

    The authors describe the case of a 48-year-old man found to have the first reported intramedullary spinal cord spindle cell hemangioma. Previous research indicates that spindle cell hemangiomas are rarely found in the spine. Only 3 previous cases exist, all in the intradural, extramedullary space. In the present case, gross-total resection of the tumor was possible with no loss of function from baseline. This report presents the successful resection of the first reported intramedullary spindle cell hemangioma and reports 4-month follow-up, demonstrating the biological behavior of this rare tumor.

  7. Rotordynamic Influence on Rolling ELement Bearing Selection and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queitzsch, Gilbert K., Jr.; Fleming, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Three case studies are presented that illustrate the importance of dynamic considerations in the design of machinery supported by rolling element bearings. The first case concerns a milling spindle that experienced internal rubs and high bearing loads, and required retrofit of an additional . damped bearing. The second case deals with a small high-speed generator that suffered high vibration due to flexible mounting. The third case is a propulsion fan simulator rig whose bearings failed catastrophically due to improper bearing installation (which resulted in inadequate dynamic bearing stiffness) and lack of health monitoring instrumentation.

  8. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    PubMed

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-04-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres in mammalian muscle spindles.

  9. Mitotic spindle studied using picosecond laser scissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. M.; Botvinick, E. L.; Shi, Linda; Berns, M. B.; Wu, George

    2006-08-01

    In previous studies we have shown that the second harmonic 532 nm, from a picosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, can cleanly and selectively disrupt spindle fiber microtubules in live cells (Botvinick et al 2004, Biophys. J. 87:4303-4212). In the present study we have ablated different locations and amounts of the metaphase mitotic spindle, and followed the cells in order to observe the fate of the irradiated spindle and the ability of the cell to continue through mitosis. Cells of the rat kangaroo line (PTK2) were stably transfected by ECFP-tubulin and, using fluorescent microscopy and the automated RoboLase microscope, (Botvinick and Berns, 2005, Micros. Res. Tech. 68:65-74) brightly fluorescent individual cells in metaphase were irradiated with 0.2447 nJ/micropulse corresponding to an irradiance of 1.4496*10^7 J/(ps*cm^2) . Upon irradiation the exposed part of the mitotic spindle immediately lost fluorescence and the following events were observed in the cells over time: (1) immediate contraction of the spindle pole towards the cut, (2) recovery of connection between pole and cut microtubule, (3) completion of mitosis. This system should be very useful in studying internal cellular dynamics of the mitotic spindle.

  10. Mechanical stability of bipolar spindle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2016-07-01

    Assembly and stability of mitotic spindle are governed by the interplay of various intra-cellular forces, e.g. the forces generated by motor proteins by sliding overlapping anti-parallel microtubules (MTs) polymerized from the opposite centrosomes, the interaction of kinetochores with MTs, and the interaction of MTs with the chromosome arms. We study the mechanical behavior and stability of spindle assembly within the framework of a minimal model which includes all these effects. For this model, we derive a closed-form analytical expression for the force acting between the centrosomes as a function of their separation distance and we show that an effective potential can be associated with the interactions at play. We obtain the stability diagram of spindle formation in terms of parameters characterizing the strength of motor sliding, repulsive forces generated by polymerizing MTs, and the forces arising out of the interaction of MTs with kinetochores. The stability diagram helps in quantifying the relative effects of the different interactions and elucidates the role of motor proteins in formation and inhibition of spindle structures during mitotic cell division. We also predict a regime of bistability for a certain parameter range, wherein the spindle structure can be stable for two different finite separation distances between centrosomes. This occurrence of bistability also suggests the mechanical versatility of such self-assembled spindle structures.

  11. Influence of centriole number on mitotic spindle length and symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Lani C.; Wemmer, Kimberly A.; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2010-01-01

    The functional role of centrioles or basal bodies in mitotic spindle assembly and function is currently unclear. Although supernumerary centrioles have been associated with multipolar spindles in cancer cells, suggesting centriole number might dictate spindle polarity, bipolar spindles are able to assembly in the complete absence of centrioles, suggesting a level of centriole-independence in the spindle assembly pathway. In this report we perturb centriole number using mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and measure the response of the mitotic spindle to these perturbations in centriole number. Although altered centriole number increased the frequency of monopolar and multipolar spindles, the majority of spindles remained bipolar regardless of the centriole number. But even when spindles were bipolar, abnormal centriole numbers led to asymmetries in tubulin distribution, half-spindle length and spindle pole focus. Half spindle length correlated directly with number of centrioles at a pole, such that an imbalance in centriole number between the two poles of a bipolar spindle correlated with increased asymmetry between half spindle lengths. These results are consistent with centrioles playing an active role in regulating mitotic spindle length. Mutants with centriole number alteration also show increased cytokinesis defects, but these do not correlate with centriole number in the dividing cell and may therefore reflect downstream consequences of defects in preceding cell divisions. PMID:20540087

  12. Anaphase A: Disassembling Microtubules Move Chromosomes toward Spindle Poles

    PubMed Central

    Asbury, Charles L.

    2017-01-01

    The separation of sister chromatids during anaphase is the culmination of mitosis and one of the most strikingly beautiful examples of cellular movement. It consists of two distinct processes: Anaphase A, the movement of chromosomes toward spindle poles via shortening of the connecting fibers, and anaphase B, separation of the two poles from one another via spindle elongation. I focus here on anaphase A chromosome-to-pole movement. The chapter begins by summarizing classical observations of chromosome movements, which support the current understanding of anaphase mechanisms. Live cell fluorescence microscopy studies showed that poleward chromosome movement is associated with disassembly of the kinetochore-attached microtubule fibers that link chromosomes to poles. Microtubule-marking techniques established that kinetochore-fiber disassembly often occurs through loss of tubulin subunits from the kinetochore-attached plus ends. In addition, kinetochore-fiber disassembly in many cells occurs partly through ‘flux’, where the microtubules flow continuously toward the poles and tubulin subunits are lost from minus ends. Molecular mechanistic models for how load-bearing attachments are maintained to disassembling microtubule ends, and how the forces are generated to drive these disassembly-coupled movements, are discussed. PMID:28218660

  13. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  14. The development of a monitoring system using a Wireless and Powerless Sensing Node deployed inside a spindle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liang-Cheng; Lee, Da-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Installation of a Wireless and Powerless Sensing Node (WPSN) inside a spindle enables the direct transmission of monitoring signals through a metal case of a certain thickness instead of the traditional method of using connecting cables. Thus, the node can be conveniently installed inside motors to measure various operational parameters. This study extends this earlier finding by applying this advantage to the monitoring of spindle systems. After over 2 years of system observation and optimization, the system has been verified to be superior to traditional methods. The innovation of fault diagnosis in this study includes the unmatched assembly dimensions of the spindle system, the unbalanced system, and bearing damage. The results of the experiment demonstrate that the WPSN provides a desirable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in all three of the simulated faults, with the difference of SNR reaching a maximum of 8.6 dB. Following multiple repetitions of the three experiment types, 80% of the faults were diagnosed when the spindle revolved at 4,000 rpm, significantly higher than the 30% fault recognition rate of traditional methods. The experimental results of monitoring of the spindle production line indicated that monitoring using the WPSN encounters less interference from noise compared to that of traditional methods. Therefore, this study has successfully developed a prototype concept into a well-developed monitoring system, and the monitoring can be implemented in a spindle production line or real-time monitoring of machine tools.

  15. Lte1 promotes mitotic exit by controlling the localization of the spindle position checkpoint kinase Kin4

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Jill E.; Chan, Leon Y.; Amon, Angelika

    2011-01-01

    For a daughter cell to receive a complete genomic complement, it is essential that the mitotic spindle be positioned accurately within the cell. In budding yeast, a signaling system known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) monitors spindle position and regulates the activity of the mitotic exit network (MEN), a GTPase signaling pathway that promotes exit from mitosis. The protein kinase Kin4 is a central component of the spindle position checkpoint. Kin4 primarily localizes to the mother cell and associates with spindle pole bodies (SPBs) located in the mother cell to inhibit MEN signaling. In contrast, the kinase does not associate with the SPB in the bud. Thus, only when a MEN bearing SPB leaves the mother cell and the spindle is accurately positioned along the mother–bud axis can MEN signaling occur and cell division proceed. Here, we describe a mechanism ensuring that Kin4 only associates with mother cell-located SPBs. The bud-localized MEN regulator Lte1, whose molecular function has long been unclear, prevents Kin4 that escapes into the bud from associating with SPBs in the daughter cell. PMID:21709215

  16. Lte1 promotes mitotic exit by controlling the localization of the spindle position checkpoint kinase Kin4.

    PubMed

    Falk, Jill E; Chan, Leon Y; Amon, Angelika

    2011-08-02

    For a daughter cell to receive a complete genomic complement, it is essential that the mitotic spindle be positioned accurately within the cell. In budding yeast, a signaling system known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) monitors spindle position and regulates the activity of the mitotic exit network (MEN), a GTPase signaling pathway that promotes exit from mitosis. The protein kinase Kin4 is a central component of the spindle position checkpoint. Kin4 primarily localizes to the mother cell and associates with spindle pole bodies (SPBs) located in the mother cell to inhibit MEN signaling. In contrast, the kinase does not associate with the SPB in the bud. Thus, only when a MEN bearing SPB leaves the mother cell and the spindle is accurately positioned along the mother-bud axis can MEN signaling occur and cell division proceed. Here, we describe a mechanism ensuring that Kin4 only associates with mother cell-located SPBs. The bud-localized MEN regulator Lte1, whose molecular function has long been unclear, prevents Kin4 that escapes into the bud from associating with SPBs in the daughter cell.

  17. A defect-driven diagnostic method for machine tool spindles.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Gregory W; Donmez, M Alkan

    2015-01-01

    Simple vibration-based metrics are, in many cases, insufficient to diagnose machine tool spindle condition. These metrics couple defect-based motion with spindle dynamics; diagnostics should be defect-driven. A new method and spindle condition estimation device (SCED) were developed to acquire data and to separate system dynamics from defect geometry. Based on this method, a spindle condition metric relying only on defect geometry is proposed. Application of the SCED on various milling and turning spindles shows that the new approach is robust for diagnosing the machine tool spindle condition.

  18. A defect-driven diagnostic method for machine tool spindles

    PubMed Central

    Vogl, Gregory W.; Donmez, M. Alkan

    2016-01-01

    Simple vibration-based metrics are, in many cases, insufficient to diagnose machine tool spindle condition. These metrics couple defect-based motion with spindle dynamics; diagnostics should be defect-driven. A new method and spindle condition estimation device (SCED) were developed to acquire data and to separate system dynamics from defect geometry. Based on this method, a spindle condition metric relying only on defect geometry is proposed. Application of the SCED on various milling and turning spindles shows that the new approach is robust for diagnosing the machine tool spindle condition. PMID:28065985

  19. Sleep Spindles as Facilitators of Memory Formation and Learning.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades important progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of sleep spindle generation. At the same time a physiological role of sleep spindles is starting to be revealed. Behavioural studies in humans and animals have found significant correlations between the recall performance in different learning tasks and the amount of sleep spindles in the intervening sleep. Concomitant neurophysiological experiments showed a close relationship between sleep spindles and other sleep related EEG rhythms as well as a relationship between sleep spindles and synaptic plasticity. Together, there is growing evidence from several disciplines in neuroscience for a participation of sleep spindles in memory formation and learning.

  20. Corticothalamic Feedback Controls Sleep Spindle Duration In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonjean, Maxime; Baker, Tanya; Lemieux, Maxime; Timofeev, Igor; Sejnowski, Terrence; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2011-01-01

    Spindle oscillations are commonly observed during stage two of non-REM sleep. During sleep spindles, the cerebral cortex and thalamus interact through feedback connections. Both initiation and termination of spindle oscillations are thought to originate in the thalamus, based on thalamic recordings and computational models, although some in vivo results suggest otherwise. Here, we have used computer modeling and in vivo multisite recordings from the cortex and the thalamus in cats to examine the involvement of the cortex in spindle oscillations. We found that although the propagation of spindles depended on synaptic interaction within the thalamus, the initiation and termination of spindle sequences critically involved corticothalamic influences. PMID:21697364

  1. Muscle spindle and fusimotor activity in locomotion.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Peter H; Taylor, Anthony; Durbaba, Rade

    2015-08-01

    Mammals may exhibit different forms of locomotion even within a species. A particular form of locomotion (e.g. walk, run, bound) appears to be selected by supraspinal commands, but the precise pattern, i.e. phasing of limbs and muscles, is generated within the spinal cord by so-called central pattern generators. Peripheral sense organs, particularly the muscle spindle, play a crucial role in modulating the central pattern generator output. In turn, the feedback from muscle spindles is itself modulated by static and dynamic fusimotor (gamma) neurons. The activity of muscle spindle afferents and fusimotor neurons during locomotion in the cat is reviewed here. There is evidence for some alpha-gamma co-activation during locomotion involving static gamma motoneurons. However, both static and dynamic gamma motoneurons show patterns of modulation that are distinct from alpha motoneuron activity. It has been proposed that static gamma activity may drive muscle spindle secondary endings to signal the intended movement to the central nervous system. Dynamic gamma motoneuron drive appears to prime muscle spindle primary endings to signal transitions in phase of the locomotor cycle. These findings come largely from reduced animal preparations (decerebrate) and require confirmation in freely moving intact animals.

  2. Contribution of (222)Rn-bearing water to indoor radon and indoor air quality assessment in hot spring hotels of Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Gang; Wang, Xinming; Chen, Diyun; Chen, Yongheng

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates the contribution of radon ((222)Rn)-bearing water to indoor (222)Rn in thermal baths. The (222)Rn concentrations in air were monitored in the bathroom and the bedroom. Particulate matter (PM, both PM(10) and PM(2.5)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) were also monitored with portable analyzers. The bathrooms were supplied with hot spring water containing 66-260 kBq m(-3) of (222)Rn. The results show that the spray of hot spring water from the bath spouts is the dominant mechanism by which (222)Rn is released into the air of the bathroom, and then it diffuses into the bedroom. Average (222)Rn level was 110-410% higher in the bedrooms and 510-1200% higher in the bathrooms compared to the corresponding average levels when there was no use of hot spring water. The indoor (222)Rn levels were influenced by the (222)Rn concentrations in the hot spring water and the bathing times. The average (222)Rn transfer coefficients from water to air were 6.2 × 10(-4)-4.1 × 10(-3). The 24-h average levels of CO(2) and PM(10) in the hotel rooms were 89% and 22% higher than the present Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) standard of China. The main particle pollutant in the hotel rooms was PM(2.5). Radon and PM(10) levels in some hotel rooms were at much higher concentrations than guideline levels, and thus the potential health risks to tourists and especially to the hotel workers should be of great concern, and measures should be taken to lower inhalation exposure to these air pollutants.

  3. Rare Case of Spindle Cell Haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Chavva, Sunanda; Garlapati, Komali; Reddy, G. Siva Prasad; Gannepalli, Ashalata

    2015-01-01

    Spindle cell haemangioma (SCH) is a benign vascular lesion which usually occurs on distal extremities. It was previously regarded as haemangioendothelioma and was initially perceived to be low grade angiosarcoma.They are characterized by cavernous blood vessels and spindle cell proliferation. It is now considered as a reactive lesion and conservative surgical excision is preferred treatment. Intraoral occurrence is rare; hence we present a case of SCH in a 33-year-old male that presented as a swelling below the tongue. Histopathology showed well circumscribed proliferating spindle cells attached to vessel walls, dilated vascular spaces. The lesion was positive for CD31 and CD34 markers suggesting it to be of endothelial cell origin. PMID:26266229

  4. Left heart assistance with the spindle pump.

    PubMed

    Hager, J; Brandstaetter, F; Koller, I; Unger, F

    1988-11-01

    The spindle pump--a new attempt at assisted circulation--was developed to prevent the main problems of nonpulsatile blood pumps, i.e. traumatic hemolysis, thrombus formation and sealing. It was essential to achieve adequate output with the lowest possible speed in order to minimize traumatic hemolysis. The result was a spindle pump with three windings in a U-shaped housing driven by an electric motor. Many tests were necessary to establish a prototype. The spindle was completely redesigned several times to reach an acceptable volume output and corresponding pressure output. In animal experiments this final prototype working as a LVAD, with a speed of 5400 RPM circulates 4 liters/min against BP of 110 mmHg. The hemolysis rate has been low in acute and survival experiments (27 hours up to now), and is between 25 and 30 mg/100 ml of free hemoglobin, thus within the normal range.

  5. Cytoplasmic Volume Modulates Spindle Size During Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Good, Matthew C.; Vahey, Michael D.; Skandarajah, Arunan; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Heald, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Rapid and reductive cell divisions during embryogenesis require that intracellular structures adapt to a wide range of cell sizes. The mitotic spindle presents a central example of this flexibility, scaling with the dimensions of the cell to mediate accurate chromosome segregation. To determine whether spindle size regulation is achieved through a developmental program or is intrinsically specified by cell size or shape, we developed a system to encapsulate cytoplasm from Xenopus eggs and embryos inside cell-like compartments of defined sizes. Spindle size was observed to shrink with decreasing compartment size, similar to what occurs during early embryogenesis, and this scaling trend depended on compartment volume rather than shape. Thus, the amount of cytoplasmic material provides a mechanism for regulating the size of intracellular structures. PMID:24233724

  6. Spindle pole mechanics studied in mitotic asters: dynamic distribution of spindle forces through compliant linkages.

    PubMed

    Charlebois, Blake D; Kollu, Swapna; Schek, Henry T; Compton, Duane A; Hunt, Alan J

    2011-04-06

    During cell division, chromosomes must faithfully segregate to maintain genome integrity, and this dynamic mechanical process is driven by the macromolecular machinery of the mitotic spindle. However, little is known about spindle mechanics. For example, spindle microtubules are organized by numerous cross-linking proteins yet the mechanical properties of those cross-links remain unexplored. To examine the mechanical properties of microtubule cross-links we applied optical trapping to mitotic asters that form in mammalian mitotic extracts. These asters are foci of microtubules, motors, and microtubule-associated proteins that reflect many of the functional properties of spindle poles and represent centrosome-independent spindle-pole analogs. We observed bidirectional motor-driven microtubule movements, showing that microtubule linkages within asters are remarkably compliant (mean stiffness 0.025 pN/nm) and mediated by only a handful of cross-links. Depleting the motor Eg5 reduced this stiffness, indicating that Eg5 contributes to the mechanical properties of microtubule asters in a manner consistent with its localization to spindle poles in cells. We propose that compliant linkages among microtubules provide a mechanical architecture capable of accommodating microtubule movements and distributing force among microtubules without loss of pole integrity-a mechanical paradigm that may be important throughout the spindle.

  7. Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation Requires Central Spindle Proteins in Drosophila Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Arunika; Shah, Shital J.; Fan, Bensen; Paik, Daniel; DiSanto, Daniel J.; Hinman, Anna Maria; Cesario, Jeffry M.; Battaglia, Rachel A.; Demos, Nicole; McKim, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    Oocytes segregate chromosomes in the absence of centrosomes. In this situation, the chromosomes direct spindle assembly. It is still unclear in this system which factors are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation and spindle assembly. The Drosophila kinesin-6 protein Subito, although nonessential for mitotic spindle assembly, is required to organize a bipolar meiotic spindle and chromosome bi-orientation in oocytes. Along with the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), Subito is an important part of the metaphase I central spindle. In this study we have conducted genetic screens to identify genes that interact with subito or the CPC component Incenp. In addition, the meiotic mutant phenotype for some of the genes identified in these screens were characterized. We show, in part through the use of a heat-shock-inducible system, that the Centralspindlin component RacGAP50C and downstream regulators of cytokinesis Rho1, Sticky, and RhoGEF2 are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation in metaphase I oocytes. This suggests a novel function for proteins normally involved in mitotic cell division in the regulation of microtubule–chromosome interactions. We also show that the kinetochore protein, Polo kinase, is required for maintaining chromosome alignment and spindle organization in metaphase I oocytes. In combination our results support a model where the meiotic central spindle and associated proteins are essential for acentrosomal chromosome segregation. PMID:26564158

  8. The spindle protein CHICA mediates localization of the chromokinesin Kid to the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, Anna; Nagel, Susanna; Sillje, Herman H W; Nigg, Erich A

    2008-05-20

    Microtubule-based motor proteins provide essential forces for bipolar organization of spindle microtubules and chromosome movement, prerequisites of chromosome segregation during the cell cycle. Here, we describe the functional characterization of a novel spindle protein, termed "CHICA," that was originally identified in a proteomic survey of the human spindle apparatus [1]. We show that CHICA localizes to the mitotic spindle and is both upregulated and phosphorylated during mitosis. CHICA-depleted cells form shorter spindles and fail to organize a proper metaphase plate, highly reminiscent of the phenotype observed upon depletion of the chromokinesin Kid, a key mediator of polar ejection forces [2-6]. We further show that CHICA coimmunoprecipitates with Kid and is required for the spindle localization of Kid without affecting its chromosome association. Moreover, upon depletion of either CHICA or Kid (or both proteins simultaneously), chromosomes collapse onto the poles of monastrol-induced monopolar spindles. We conclude that CHICA represents a novel interaction partner of the chromokinesin Kid that is required for the generation of polar ejection forces and chromosome congression.

  9. Compressor ported shroud for foil bearing cooling

    DOEpatents

    Elpern, David G.; McCabe, Niall; Gee, Mark

    2011-08-02

    A compressor ported shroud takes compressed air from the shroud of the compressor before it is completely compressed and delivers it to foil bearings. The compressed air has a lower pressure and temperature than compressed outlet air. The lower temperature of the air means that less air needs to be bled off from the compressor to cool the foil bearings. This increases the overall system efficiency due to the reduced mass flow requirements of the lower temperature air. By taking the air at a lower pressure, less work is lost compressing the bearing cooling air.

  10. A new method for measuring the rotational accuracy of rolling element bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Zhao, Xiangsong; Gao, Weiguo; Hu, Gaofeng; Zhang, Shizhen; Zhang, Dawei

    2016-12-01

    The rotational accuracy of a machine tool spindle has critical influence upon the geometric shape and surface roughness of finished workpiece. The rotational performance of the rolling element bearings is a main factor which affects the spindle accuracy, especially in the ultra-precision machining. In this paper, a new method is developed to measure the rotational accuracy of rolling element bearings of machine tool spindles. Variable and measurable axial preload is applied to seat the rolling elements in the bearing races, which is used to simulate the operating conditions. A high-precision (radial error is less than 300 nm) and high-stiffness (radial stiffness is 600 N/μm) hydrostatic reference spindle is adopted to rotate the inner race of the test bearing. To prevent the outer race from rotating, a 2-degrees of freedom flexure hinge mechanism (2-DOF FHM) is designed. Correction factors by using stiffness analysis are adopted to eliminate the influences of 2-DOF FHM in the radial direction. Two capacitive displacement sensors with nano-resolution (the highest resolution is 9 nm) are used to measure the radial error motion of the rolling element bearing, without separating the profile error as the traditional rotational accuracy metrology of the spindle. Finally, experimental measurements are performed at different spindle speeds (100-4000 rpm) and axial preloads (75-780 N). Synchronous and asynchronous error motion values are evaluated to demonstrate the feasibility and repeatability of the developed method and instrument.

  11. The mitotic spindle and actin tails.

    PubMed

    Karsenti, Eric; Nédélec, François

    2004-04-01

    To segregate their chromosomes, eukaryotic cells rely on a dynamic structure made of microtubules: the mitotic spindle. This structure can form in cells lacking centrosomes, because their chromosomes also nucleate microtubules. This second assembly pathway is observed even in some cells that naturally have centrosomes, for example when the centrosomes are ablated by laser surgery. Recent results have started to address the complementary question of whether centrosome-nucleated microtubules alone could sustain the formation of a functional mitotic spindle. We wonder in this respect whether lower eukaryotes such as yeasts are different from higher eukaryotes such as vertebrates.

  12. High temperature self-lubricating coatings for air lubricated foil bearings for the automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.

    1980-01-01

    coating combinations were developed for compliant surface bearings and journals to be used in an automotive gas turbine engine. The coatings were able to withstand the sliding start/stops during rotor liftoff and touchdown and occasional short time, high speed rubs under representative loading of the engine. Some dozen coating variations of CdO-graphite, Cr2O3 (by sputtering) and CaF2 (plasma sprayed) were identified. The coatings were optimized and they were examined for stoichiometry, metallurgical condition, and adhesion. Sputtered Cr2O3 was most adherent when optimum parameters were used and it was applied on an annealed (soft) substrate. Metallic binders and interlayers were used to improve the ductility and the adherence.

  13. Dynactin-dependent cortical dynein and spherical spindle shape correlate temporally with meiotic spindle rotation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Marina E.; Flynn, Jonathan R.; McNally, Karen P.; Cortes, Daniel B.; Price, Kari L.; Kuehnert, Paul A.; Panzica, Michelle T.; Andaya, Armann; Leary, Julie A.; McNally, Francis J.

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte meiotic spindles orient with one pole juxtaposed to the cortex to facilitate extrusion of chromosomes into polar bodies. In Caenorhabditis elegans, these acentriolar spindles initially orient parallel to the cortex and then rotate to the perpendicular orientation. To understand the mechanism of spindle rotation, we characterized events that correlated temporally with rotation, including shortening of the spindle in the pole-to pole axis, which resulted in a nearly spherical spindle at rotation. By analyzing large spindles of polyploid C. elegans and a related nematode species, we found that spindle rotation initiated at a defined spherical shape rather than at a defined spindle length. In addition, dynein accumulated on the cortex just before rotation, and microtubules grew from the spindle with plus ends outward during rotation. Dynactin depletion prevented accumulation of dynein on the cortex and prevented spindle rotation independently of effects on spindle shape. These results support a cortical pulling model in which spindle shape might facilitate rotation because a sphere can rotate without deforming the adjacent elastic cytoplasm. We also present evidence that activation of spindle rotation is promoted by dephosphorylation of the basic domain of p150 dynactin. PMID:26133383

  14. Spinning Wool with a Hand Spindle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kren, Margo

    1982-01-01

    Describes an eight-week program in which 8- to 14-year-olds learned to spin raw wool into yarn. Students observed wool shearing at a sheep farm, learned to prepare wool for spinning, and spun their own yarn. Detail directions for carding and use of hand spindles are included. (AM)

  15. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  16. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  17. UV microbeam irradiations of the mitotic spindle. II. Spindle fiber dynamics and force production

    SciTech Connect

    Spurck, T.P.; Stonington, O.G.; Snyder, J.A.; Pickett-Heaps, J.D.; Bajer, A.; Mole-Bajer, J. )

    1990-10-01

    Metaphase and anaphase spindles in cultured newt and PtK1 cells were irradiated with a UV microbeam (285 nM), creating areas of reduced birefringence (ARBs) in 3 s that selectively either severed a few fibers or cut across the half spindle. In either case, the birefringence at the polewards edge of the ARB rapidly faded polewards, while it remained fairly constant at the other, kinetochore edge. Shorter astral fibers, however, remained present in the enlarged ARB; presumably these had not been cut by the irradiation. After this enlargement of the ARB, metaphase spindles recovered rapidly as the detached pole moved back towards the chromosomes, reestablishing spindle fibers as the ARB closed; this happened when the ARB cut a few fibers or across the entire half spindle. We never detected elongation of the cut kinetochore fibers. Rather, astral fibers growing from the pole appeared to bridge and then close the ARB, just before the movement of the pole toward the chromosomes. When a second irradiation was directed into the closing ARB, the polewards movement again stopped before it restarted. In all metaphase cells, once the pole had reestablished connection with the chromosomes, the unirradiated half spindle then also shortened to create a smaller symmetrical spindle capable of normal anaphase later. Anaphase cells did not recover this way; the severed pole remained detached but the chromosomes continued a modified form of movement, clumping into a telophase-like group. The results are discussed in terms of controls operating on spindle microtubule stability and mechanisms of mitotic force generation.

  18. Gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission.

  19. Physiological evidence for involvement of a kinesin-related protein during anaphase spindle elongation in diatom central spindles

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a new model system for studying spindle elongation in vitro using the pennate, marine diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. C. fusiformis can be grown in bulk to high densities while in log phase growth and synchronized by a simple light/dark regime. Isolated spindles can be attained in quantities sufficient for biochemical analysis and spindle tubulin is approximately 5% of the total protein present. The spindle isolation procedure results in a 10-fold enrichment of diatom tubulin and a calculated 40-fold increase in spindle protein. Isolated spindles or spindles in permeabilized cells can elongate in vitro by the same mechanism and with the same pharmacological sensitivities as described for other anaphase B models (Cande and McDonald, 1986; Masuda et al., 1990). Using this model, in vitro spindle elongation rate profiles were developed for a battery of nucleotide triphosphates and ATP analogs. The relative rates of spindle elongation produced by various nucleotide triphosphates parallel relative rates seen for kinesin-based motility in microtubule gliding assays. Likewise ATP analogs that allow discrimination between myosin-, dynein-, and kinesin-mediated motility produce relative spindle elongation rates characteristic of kinesin motility. Also, isolated spindle fractions are enriched for a kinesin related protein as identified by a peptide antibody against a conserved region of the kinesin superfamily. These data suggest that kinesin-like motility contributes to spindle elongation during anaphase B of mitosis. PMID:1447302

  20. Microtubule-sliding activity of a kinesin-8 promotes spindle assembly and spindle-length control.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaolei; Arellano-Santoyo, Hugo; Portran, Didier; Gaillard, Jeremie; Vantard, Marylin; Thery, Manuel; Pellman, David

    2013-08-01

    Molecular motors play critical roles in the formation of mitotic spindles, either through controlling the stability of individual microtubules, or by crosslinking and sliding microtubule arrays. Kinesin-8 motors are best known for their regulatory roles in controlling microtubule dynamics. They contain microtubule-destabilizing activities, and restrict spindle length in a wide variety of cell types and organisms. Here, we report an antiparallel microtubule-sliding activity of the budding yeast kinesin-8, Kip3. The in vivo importance of this sliding activity was established through the identification of complementary Kip3 mutants that separate the sliding activity and microtubule-destabilizing activity. In conjunction with Cin8, a kinesin-5 family member, the sliding activity of Kip3 promotes bipolar spindle assembly and the maintenance of genome stability. We propose a slide-disassemble model where the sliding and destabilizing activity of Kip3 balance during pre-anaphase. This facilitates normal spindle assembly. However, the destabilizing activity of Kip3 dominates in late anaphase, inhibiting spindle elongation and ultimately promoting spindle disassembly.

  1. A Functional Mitotic Spindle Prepared from Mammalian Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cande, W. Zacheus; Snyder, Judith; Smith, Diana; Summers, Keith; McIntosh, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Mitotic cells lysed into solutions of polymerizable microtubule protein contain a spindle which is similar to the living spindle in two respects: it will lose and gain birefringence when cooled and warmed, and it will move anaphase chromosomes to the opposite ends of the cell. Early anaphase cells lysed into buffers containing high molecular weight polyethylene glycol and nucleotide triphosphates will continue chromosome motion and spindle elongation in the absence of exogenous spindle subunits. These results suggest that while spindle growth requires microtubule polymerization, anaphase motions do not. Images PMID:4524659

  2. Journal bearing

    DOEpatents

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  3. The spindle position checkpoint: how to deal with spindle misalignment during asymmetric cell division in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Fraschini, Roberta; Venturetti, Marianna; Chiroli, Elena; Piatti, Simonetta

    2008-06-01

    During asymmetric cell division, spindle positioning is critical to ensure the unequal segregation of polarity factors and generate daughter cells with different sizes or fates. In budding yeast the boundary between mother and daughter cell resides at the bud neck, where cytokinesis takes place at the end of the cell cycle. Since budding and bud neck formation occur much earlier than bipolar spindle formation, spindle positioning is a finely regulated process. A surveillance device called the SPOC (spindle position checkpoint) oversees this process and delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the spindle is properly oriented along the division axis, thus ensuring genome stability.

  4. Mitotic Spindle Positioning in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Tirnauer, Jennifer S. M.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Email: tirnauer@uchc.edu 5e. TASK...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project was to determine whether mitotic spindle position differs in benign versus malignant...postdoc working on the project has left, I want to re-visit the experiments with MCF-10A cells using serum free media. 15. SUBJECT TERMS breast

  5. Spindle alignment regulates the dynamic association of checkpoint proteins with yeast spindle pole bodies.

    PubMed

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Pereira, Gislene

    2009-01-01

    In many polarized cells, the accuracy of chromosome segregation depends on the correct positioning of the mitotic spindle. In budding yeast, the spindle positioning checkpoint (SPOC) delays mitotic exit when the anaphase spindle fails to extend toward the mother-daughter axis. However it remains to be established how spindle orientation is translated to SPOC components at the yeast spindle pole bodies (SPB). Here, we used photobleaching techniques to show that the dynamics with which Bub2-Bfa1 turned over at SPBs significantly increased upon SPOC activation. A version of Bfa1 that was stably associated with SPBs rendered the cells SPOC deficient without affecting other Bub2-Bfa1 functions, demonstrating the functional importance of regulating the dynamics of Bfa1 SPB association. In addition, we established that the SPOC kinase Kin4 is the major regulator of Bfa1 residence time at SPBs. We suggest that upon SPOC activation Bfa1-Bub2 spreads throughout the cytoplasm, thereby inhibiting mitotic exit.

  6. A Balance between Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Volumes Controls Spindle Length

    PubMed Central

    Novakova, Lucia; Kovacovicova, Kristina; Dang-Nguyen, Thanh Quang; Sodek, Martin; Skultety, Michal; Anger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Proper assembly of the spindle apparatus is crucially important for faithful chromosome segregation during anaphase. Thanks to the effort over the last decades, we have very detailed information about many events leading to spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, however we still do not understand certain aspects, including, for example, spindle length control. When tight regulation of spindle size is lost, chromosome segregation errors emerge. Currently, there are several hypotheses trying to explain the molecular mechanism of spindle length control. The number of kinetochores, activity of molecular rulers, intracellular gradients, cell size, limiting spindle components, and the balance of the spindle forces seem to contribute to spindle size regulation, however some of these mechanisms are likely specific to a particular cell type. In search for a general regulatory mechanism, in our study we focused on the role of cell size and nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio in this process. To this end, we used relatively large cells isolated from 2-cell mouse embryos. Our results showed that the spindle size upper limit is not reached in these cells and suggest that accurate control of spindle length requires balanced ratio between nuclear and cytoplasmic volumes. PMID:26886125

  7. Physical Description of Mitotic Spindle Orientation During Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Théry, Manuel; Racine, Victor; Bornens, Michel; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-03-01

    During cell division, the duplicated chromosomes are physically separated by the action of the mitotic spindle. The spindle is a dynamic structure of the cytoskeleton, which consists of two microtubule asters. Its orientation defines the axis along which the cell divides. Recent experiments show that the spindle orientation depends on the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites. Here we show that the experimentally observed spindle orientation can be understood as the result of the action of cortical force generators acting on the spindle. We assume that the local activity of force generators is controlled by the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites determined by the particular geometry of the adhesive substrate. We develop a simple physical description of the spindle mechanics, which allows us to calculate the torque acting on the spindle, as well as the energy profile and the angular distribution of spindle orientation. Our model accounts for the preferred spindle orientation, as well as the full shape of the angular distributions of spindle orientation observed in a large variety of pattern geometries. M. Th'ery, A. Jim'enez-Dalmaroni, et al., Nature 447, 493 (2007).

  8. Sleep spindles and intelligence: evidence for a sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Ujma, Péter P; Konrad, Boris Nikolai; Genzel, Lisa; Bleifuss, Annabell; Simor, Péter; Pótári, Adrián; Körmendi, János; Gombos, Ferenc; Steiger, Axel; Bódizs, Róbert; Dresler, Martin

    2014-12-03

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in nonrapid eye movement sleep, which play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Sleep spindle features are stable within and vary between individuals, with, for example, females having a higher number of spindles and higher spindle density than males. Sleep spindles have been associated with learning potential and intelligence; however, the details of this relationship have not been fully clarified yet. In a sample of 160 adult human subjects with a broad IQ range, we investigated the relationship between sleep spindle parameters and intelligence. In females, we found a positive age-corrected association between intelligence and fast sleep spindle amplitude in central and frontal derivations and a positive association between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in all except one derivation. In males, a negative association between intelligence and fast spindle density in posterior regions was found. Effects were continuous over the entire IQ range. Our results demonstrate that, although there is an association between sleep spindle parameters and intellectual performance, these effects are more modest than previously reported and mainly present in females. This supports the view that intelligence does not rely on a single neural framework, and stronger neural connectivity manifesting in increased thalamocortical oscillations in sleep is one particular mechanism typical for females but not males.

  9. GAS BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1960-09-01

    A gas lubricated bearing for a rotating shaft is described. The assembly comprises a stationary collar having an annular member resiliently supported thereon. The collar and annular member are provided with cooperating gas passages arranged for admission of pressurized gas which supports and lubricates a bearing block fixed to the rotatable shaft. The resilient means for the annular member support the latter against movement away from the bearing block when the assembly is in operation.

  10. Equilibrium stellar systems with spindle singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Stuart L.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    1992-01-01

    Equilibrium sequences of axisymmetric Newtonian clusters that tend toward singular states are constructed. The distribution functions are chosen to be of the form f = f(E, Jz). The numerical method then determines the density and gravitational potential self-consistently to satisfy Poisson's equation. For the prolate models, spindle singularities arise from the depletion of angular momentum near the symmetry axis. While the resulting density enhancement is confined to the region near the axis, the influence of the spindle extends much further out through its tidal gravitational field. Centrally condensed prolate clusters may contain strong-field regions even though the spindle mass is small and the mean cluster eccentricity is not extreme. While the calculations performed here are entirely Newtonian, the issue of singularities is an important topic in general relativity. Equilibrium solutions for relativistic star clusters can provide a testing ground for exploring this issue. The methods used in this paper for building nonspherical clusters can be extended to relativistic systems.

  11. Simplified Dynamic Analysis of Grinders Spindle Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demec, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The contribution deals with the simplified dynamic analysis of surface grinding machine spindle node. Dynamic analysis is based on the use of the transfer matrix method, which is essentially a matrix form of method of initial parameters. The advantage of the described method, despite the seemingly complex mathematical apparatus, is primarily, that it does not require for solve the problem of costly commercial software using finite element method. All calculations can be made for example in MS Excel, which is advantageous especially in the initial stages of constructing of spindle node for the rapid assessment of the suitability its design. After detailing the entire structure of spindle node is then also necessary to perform the refined dynamic analysis in the environment of FEM, which it requires the necessary skills and experience and it is therefore economically difficult. This work was developed within grant project KEGA No. 023TUKE-4/2012 Creation of a comprehensive educational - teaching material for the article Production technique using a combination of traditional and modern information technology and e-learning.

  12. Structural finite-element modeling strategies for conformal load-bearing antenna structure (CLAS) (Air Force contract F33615-C-93-3200)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockyer, Allen J.; Alt, Kevin H.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Kinslow, Robert W.; Goetz, Allan C.

    1997-06-01

    As the Wright Lab Air Force military contrast `Smart Skin Structures Technology Demonstration' (S3TD) Contract No. F33615-C-93-3200 draws toward conclusion, pertinent features of the program finite element modeling are presented. Analysis was performed to predict the structural performance of a complex multilayered composite panel that will be tested structurally (and electrically) for the final program deliverable. Application of finite element modeling to predict component load path and strain distribution in sandwich panel construction has been reported elsewhere in the literature for more standard applications. However, the unauthordox sandwich configuration lay-up posed by the quite revolutionary S3TD CLAS aircraft fuselage panel demonstration article merits further discussion. Difficulties with material selection, the stumbling block for many programs, are further exacerbated by conflicting material properties required to support simultaneous electrical and structural performance roles. The structural analysis challenge derives from S3TD's unique program goal, namely, to investigate load bearing antennas structural configurations, rather than conventional structurally inefficient `bolt in' installations, that have been the modus operandi for tactical aircraft antenna installations to date. Discussed below is a cost saving strategy where use of linear finite element analysis has been employed in the prediction of key structural parameters, and validated with risk reduction sub panel measurements, before proceeding to the final fabrication of a full scale 36 by 36 inch CLAS panel demonstration article.

  13. Grizzly bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.; Feldhamer, G.; Thompson, B.; Chapman, J.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  14. Mitotic Spindle Assembly in Land Plants: Molecules and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Moé; Goshima, Gohta

    2017-01-01

    In textbooks, the mitotic spindles of plants are often described separately from those of animals. How do they differ at the molecular and mechanistic levels? In this chapter, we first outline the process of mitotic spindle assembly in animals and land plants. We next discuss the conservation of spindle assembly factors based on database searches. Searches of >100 animal spindle assembly factors showed that the genes involved in this process are well conserved in plants, with the exception of two major missing elements: centrosomal components and subunits/regulators of the cytoplasmic dynein complex. We then describe the spindle and phragmoplast assembly mechanisms based on the data obtained from robust gene loss-of-function analyses using RNA interference (RNAi) or mutant plants. Finally, we discuss future research prospects of plant spindles. PMID:28125061

  15. The muscle spindle as a feedback element in muscle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. T.; Iannone, A. M.; Ewing, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The muscle spindle, the feedback element in the myotatic (stretch) reflex, is a major contributor to muscular control. Therefore, an accurate description of behavior of the muscle spindle during active contraction of the muscle, as well as during passive stretch, is essential to the understanding of muscle control. Animal experiments were performed in order to obtain the data necessary to model the muscle spindle. Spectral density functions were used to identify a linear approximation of the two types of nerve endings from the spindle. A model reference adaptive control system was used on a hybrid computer to optimize the anatomically defined lumped parameter estimate of the spindle. The derived nonlinear model accurately predicts the behavior of the muscle spindle both during active discharge and during its silent period. This model is used to determine the mechanism employed to control muscle movement.

  16. Brownian dynamics simulation of fission yeast mitotic spindle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmaier, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The mitotic spindle segregates chromosomes during mitosis. The dynamics that establish bipolar spindle formation are not well understood. We have developed a computational model of fission-yeast mitotic spindle formation using Brownian dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Our model includes rigid, dynamic microtubules, a spherical nuclear envelope, spindle pole bodies anchored in the nuclear envelope, and crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins. Crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins attach and detach in a grand canonical ensemble, and exert forces and torques on the attached microtubules. We have modeled increased affinity for crosslinking motor attachment to antiparallel microtubule pairs, and stabilization of microtubules in the interpolar bundle. We study parameters controlling the stability of the interpolar bundle and assembly of a bipolar spindle from initially adjacent spindle-pole bodies.

  17. The spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Gorbsky, Gary J

    2015-07-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Its function is to prevent precocious anaphase onset before chromosomes have achieved bipolar attachment to the spindle. The spindle checkpoint comprises a complex set of signaling pathways that integrate microtubule dynamics, biomechanical forces at the kinetochores, and intricate regulation of protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Historically, many key observations that gave rise to the initial concepts of the spindle checkpoint were made in meiotic systems. In contrast with mitosis, the two distinct chromosome segregation events of meiosis present a special challenge for the regulation of checkpoint signaling. Preservation of fidelity in chromosome segregation in meiosis, controlled by the spindle checkpoint, also has a significant impact in human health. This review highlights the contributions from meiotic systems in understanding the spindle checkpoint as well as the role of checkpoint signaling in controlling the complex divisions of meiosis.

  18. A computational model predicts Xenopus meiotic spindle organization.

    PubMed

    Loughlin, Rose; Heald, Rebecca; Nédélec, François

    2010-12-27

    The metaphase spindle is a dynamic bipolar structure crucial for proper chromosome segregation, but how microtubules (MTs) are organized within the bipolar architecture remains controversial. To explore MT organization along the pole-to-pole axis, we simulated meiotic spindle assembly in two dimensions using dynamic MTs, a MT cross-linking force, and a kinesin-5-like motor. The bipolar structures that form consist of antiparallel fluxing MTs, but spindle pole formation requires the addition of a NuMA-like minus-end cross-linker and directed transport of MT depolymerization activity toward minus ends. Dynamic instability and minus-end depolymerization generate realistic MT lifetimes and a truncated exponential MT length distribution. Keeping the number of MTs in the simulation constant, we explored the influence of two different MT nucleation pathways on spindle organization. When nucleation occurs throughout the spindle, the simulation quantitatively reproduces features of meiotic spindles assembled in Xenopus egg extracts.

  19. Forces positioning the mitotic spindle: Theories, and now experiments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai-Yin; Nazockdast, Ehssan; Shelley, Michael J; Needleman, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    The position of the spindle determines the position of the cleavage plane, and is thus crucial for cell division. Although spindle positioning has been extensively studied, the underlying forces ultimately responsible for moving the spindle remain poorly understood. A recent pioneering study by Garzon-Coral et al. uses magnetic tweezers to perform the first direct measurements of the forces involved in positioning the mitotic spindle. Combining this with molecular perturbations and geometrical effects, they use their data to argue that the forces that keep the spindle in its proper position for cell division arise from astral microtubules growing and pushing against the cell's cortex. Here, we review these ground-breaking experiments, the various biomechanical models for spindle positioning that they seek to differentiate, and discuss new questions raised by these measurements.

  20. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  1. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing for passively suspending a rotatable element subjected to axial and radial thrust forces is disclosed. The magnetic bearing employs a taut wire stretched along the longitudinal axis of the bearing between opposed end pieces and an intermediate magnetic section. The intermediate section is segmented to provide oppositely directed magnetic flux paths between the end pieces and may include either an axially polarized magnets interposed between the segments. The end pieces, separated from the intermediate section by air gaps, control distribution of magnetic flux between the intermediate section segments. Coaxial alignment of the end pieces with the intermediate section minimizes magnetic reluctance in the flux paths endowing the bearing with self-centering characteristics when subjected to radial loads. In an alternative embodiment, pairs of oppositely wound armature coils are concentrically interposed between segments of the intermediate section in concentric arcs adjacent to radially polarized magnets to equip a magnetic bearing as a torsion drive motor. The magnetic suspension bearing disclosed provides long term reliability without maintenance with application to long term space missions such as the VISSR/VAS scanning mirror instrument in the GOES program.

  2. Rapid measurement of mitotic spindle orientation in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Decarreau, Justin; Driver, Jonathan; Asbury, Charles; Wordeman, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Factors that influence the orientation of the mitotic spindle are important for the maintenance of stem cell populations and in cancer development. However, screening for these factors requires rapid quantification of alterations of the angle of the mitotic spindle in cultured cell lines. Here we describe a method to image mitotic cells and rapidly score the angle of the mitotic spindle using a simple MATLAB application to analyze a stack of Z-images. PMID:24633791

  3. Form and Function of Sleep Spindles across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, Brittany C.; Durkin, Jaclyn; Aton, Sara J.

    2016-01-01

    Since the advent of EEG recordings, sleep spindles have been identified as hallmarks of non-REM sleep. Despite a broad general understanding of mechanisms of spindle generation gleaned from animal studies, the mechanisms underlying certain features of spindles in the human brain, such as “global” versus “local” spindles, are largely unknown. Neither the topography nor the morphology of sleep spindles remains constant throughout the lifespan. It is likely that changes in spindle phenomenology during development and aging are the result of dramatic changes in brain structure and function. Across various developmental windows, spindle activity is correlated with general cognitive aptitude, learning, and memory; however, these correlations vary in strength, and even direction, depending on age and metrics used. Understanding these differences across the lifespan should further clarify how these oscillations are generated and their function under a variety of circumstances. We discuss these issues, and their translational implications for human cognitive function. Because sleep spindles are similarly affected in disorders of neurodevelopment (such as schizophrenia) and during aging (such as neurodegenerative conditions), both types of disorders may benefit from therapies based on a better understanding of spindle function. PMID:27190654

  4. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  6. High Performance Magnetic Bearings for Aero Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Knospe, C. R.; Williams, R. D.; Lewis, D. W.; Barrett, L. E.; Maslen, E. H.; Humphris, R. R.

    1997-01-01

    Several previous annual reports were written and numerous papers published on the topics for this grant. That work is not repeated here in this final report. Only the work completed in the final year of the grant is presented in this final report. This final year effort concentrated on power loss measurements in magnetic bearing rotors. The effect of rotor power losses in magnetic bearings are very important for many applications. In some cases, these losses must be minimized to maximize the length of time the rotating machine can operate on a fixed energy or power supply. Examples include aircraft gas turbine engines, space devices, or energy storage flywheels. In other applications, the heating caused by the magnetic bearing must be removed. Excessive heating can be a significant problem in machines as diverse as large compressors, electric motors, textile spindles, and artificial heart pumps.

  7. Correlations between adolescent processing speed and specific spindle frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Rebecca S.; Smith, Carlyle T.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are waxing and waning thalamocortical oscillations with accepted frequencies of between 11 and 16 Hz and a minimum duration of 0.5 s. Our research has suggested that there is spindle activity in all of the sleep stages, and thus for the present analysis we examined the link between spindle activity (Stage 2, rapid eye movement (REM) and slow wave sleep (SWS)) and waking cognitive abilities in 32 healthy adolescents. After software was used to filter frequencies outside the desired range, slow spindles (11.00–13.50 Hz), fast spindles (13.51–16.00 Hz) and spindle-like activity (16.01–18.50 Hz) were observed in Stage 2, SWS and REM sleep. Our analysis suggests that these specific EEG frequencies were significantly related to processing speed, which is one of the subscales of the intelligence score, in adolescents. The relationship was prominent in SWS and REM sleep. Further, the spindle-like activity (16.01–18.50 Hz) that occurred during SWS was strongly related to processing speed. Results suggest that the ability of adolescents to respond to tasks in an accurate, efficient and timely manner is related to their sleep quality. These findings support earlier research reporting relationships between learning, learning potential and sleep spindle activity in adults and adolescents. PMID:25709575

  8. Monitoring Method of Cutting Force by Using Additional Spindle Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhan, Ahmed Aly Diaa; Matsubara, Atsushi; Sugihara, Motoyuki; Saraie, Hidenori; Ibaraki, Soichi; Kakino, Yoshiaki

    This paper describes a monitoring method of cutting forces for end milling process by using displacement sensors. Four eddy-current displacement sensors are installed on the spindle housing of a machining center so that they can detect the radial motion of the rotating spindle. Thermocouples are also attached to the spindle structure in order to examine the thermal effect in the displacement sensing. The change in the spindle stiffness due to the spindle temperature and the speed is investigated as well. Finally, the estimation performance of cutting forces using the spindle displacement sensors is experimentally investigated by machining tests on carbon steel in end milling operations under different cutting conditions. It is found that the monitoring errors are attributable to the thermal displacement of the spindle, the time lag of the sensing system, and the modeling error of the spindle stiffness. It is also shown that the root mean square errors between estimated and measured amplitudes of cutting forces are reduced to be less than 20N with proper selection of the linear stiffness.

  9. Infiltrating intramuscular spindle cell lipoma of the face.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rajni V; Duncan, Lyn M; Austen, William G; Nielsen, G Petur

    2009-10-01

    Spindle cell lipoma is a benign lipomatous tumor, which usually arises on the back of the neck, shoulder or upper back of males in the third to seventh decade of life. We report herein an unusual infiltrating intramuscular spindle cell lipoma arising in the nose of a 53-year-old man. The patient presented with a 0.5-cm 'cyst' of the nose, just above the right alar crease, which was removed. Four years later, the lesion recurred and was re-excised. Histologically, a proliferation of mature adipocytes, ropey collagen fibers and spindle cells within a myxoid stroma was present in the subcutaneous tissue and infiltrated between skeletal muscle fibers. Nine cases of intramuscular spindle cell lipoma with histological examination have previously been reported and have involved the oral cavity and muscles of the extremities. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an infiltrating intramuscular spindle cell lipoma arising on the face.

  10. A new design for a high speed spindle

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, M.; Fischer, S.; Holster, P.; Carlisle, K.; Chen, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Precision grinding and micromachining both impose high demands on the machine behavior, since the achievable workpiece accuracy is determined not only by the technological parameters but also by the characteristics of the applicated machine components. Ultraprecision surface quality and the mechanical fabrication of structures in the micron range can only be achieved by using machine tools which have appropriate spindles. Structures cannot be manufactured using spindle types of which the radial error motion is greater than the level of contour accuracy or surface roughness required. In addition, the spindle speed is an important value. Not only a certain cutting speed is needed from the technological point of view, but also the machining time required for microstructuring surfaces is reduced by deploying a high frequency spindle, thereby increasing the economic efficiency of the technique. Hence, the main purpose of the project was to develop a high speed spindle with properties concerning accuracy, speed and stiffness beyond commercially available ones.

  11. Atypical spindle cell lipoma: a clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular study emphasizing its relationship to classical spindle cell lipoma.

    PubMed

    Creytens, David; van Gorp, Joost; Savola, Suvi; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Mentzel, Thomas; Libbrecht, Louis

    2014-07-01

    We studied a series of spindle cell lipomas arising in atypical sites and showing unusual morphologic features (which we called atypical spindle cell lipoma) to assess if these lesions have the same chromosomal alterations as classical spindle cell lipoma but different from those found in atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. We investigated alterations of different genes in the 13q14 region and the amplification status of the MDM2 and CDK4 genes at 12q14-15 by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. In the atypical spindle cell lipomas, MLPA revealed deletions in the two nearest flanking genes of RB1 (ITM2B and RCBTB2) and in multiple important exons of RB1. In contrast, in classical spindle cell lipomas, a less complex loss of RB1 exons was found but no deletion of ITM2B and RCBTB2. Moreover, MLPA identified a deletion of the DLEU1 gene, a finding which has not been reported earlier. We propose an immunohistochemical panel for lipomatous tumors which comprises of MDM2, CDK4, p16, Rb, which we have found useful in discriminating between atypical or classical spindle cell lipomas and other adipocytic neoplasms, especially atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma. Our findings strengthen the link between atypical spindle cell lipoma and classical spindle cell lipoma, and differentiate them from atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma.

  12. Identification of water-bearing zones by the use of geophysical logs and borehole television surveys, collected February to September 1997, at the Former Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.

    1998-01-01

    Between February 1997 and September 1997, 10 monitor wells were drilled near the site of the former Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, Bucks County, Pa., to monitor water levels and sample ground-water contaminants in the shallow, intermediate, and deep water-bearing zones. The sampling will determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of contaminated ground water migrating from known or suspected contaminant sources. Four wells were drilled north of the property adjacent to Area A, three wells along strike located on Lewis Drive, and three wells directly down dip on Ivyland Road. Well depths range from 69 feet to 300 feet below land surface. Borehole-geophysical logging and television surveys were used to identify water-bearing zones so that appropriate intervals could be screened in each monitor well. Geophysical logs were obtained at the 10 monitor wells. Borehole television surveys were obtained at the four monitor wells adjacent to Area A. Caliper and borehole television surveys were used to locate fractures, inflections on fluidtemperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-bearing fractures, and heatpulse- flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, borehole television surveys, and driller?s logs, all wells were screened such that water-level fluctuations could be monitored and water samples collected from discrete water-bearing zones in each borehole.

  13. Polycystic kidney disease protein fibrocystin localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates spindle bipolarity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Wu, Maoqing; Wang, Shixuan; Shah, Jagesh V; Wilson, Patricia D; Zhou, Jing

    2010-09-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a significant hereditary renal disease occurring in infancy and childhood, which presents with greatly enlarged echogenic kidneys, ultimately leading to renal insufficiency and end-stage renal disease. ARPKD is caused by mutations in a single gene PKHD1, which encodes fibrocystin/polyductin (FPC), a large single transmembrane protein generally known to be on the primary cilium, basal body and plasma membrane. Here, using our newly generated antibody raised against the entire C-terminal intracellular cytoplasmic domain (ICD) of FPC, as well as our previously well-characterized antibody against a peptide of ICD, we report for the first time that at least one isoform of FPC is localized to the centrosome and mitotic spindle of dividing cells in multiple cell lines, including MDCK, mIMCD3, LLC-PK1, HEK293, RCTEC and HFCT cells. Using short-hairpin-mediated RNA interference, we show that the inhibition of FPC function in MDCK and mIMCD3 cells leads to centrosome amplification, chromosome lagging and multipolar spindle formation. Consistent with our in vitro findings, we also observed centrosome amplification in the kidneys from human ARPKD patients. These findings demonstrate a novel function of FPC in centrosome duplication and mitotic spindle assembly during cell division. We propose that mitotic defects due to FPC dysfunction contribute to cystogenesis in ARPKD.

  14. Carbofuran alters centrosome and spindle organization, and delays cell division in oocytes and mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Ozgur; Semiz, Olcay; Can, Alp

    2015-04-01

    Although many countries banned of its usage, carbofuran (CF) is still one of the most commonly used carbamate derivative insecticides against insects and nematodes in agriculture and household, threatening the human and animal health by contaminating air, water, and food. Our goal was to evaluate the potential toxic effects of CF on mammalian oocytes besides mitotic cells. Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway was assessed by immunofluorescence and western blot techniques. Alterations in the meiotic spindle formation after CF exposure throughout the in vitro maturation of mice oocyte-cumulus complexes (COCs) were analyzed by using a 3D confocal laser microscope. Maturation efficiency and kinetics were assessed by direct observation of the COCs. Results indicated that the number of TUNEL-positive cells increased in CF-exposed groups, particularly higher doses (>250 µM) in a dose-dependent fashion. The ratio of anticleaved caspase-3 labeled cells in those groups positively correlated with TUNEL-positivity. Western blot analysis confirmed a significant increase in active caspase-3 activity. CF caused a dose-dependent accumulation of oocytes at prometaphase-I (PM-I) of meiosis. Partial loss of spindle microtubules (MTs) was noted, which consequently gave rise to a diamond shape spindle. Aberrant pericentrin foci were noted particularly in PM-I and metaphase-I (M-I) stages. Conclusively, CF (1) induces programmed cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and (2) alters spindle morphology most likely through a mechanism that interacts with MT assembly and/or disorientation of pericentriolar proteins. Overall, data suggest that CF could give rise to aneuploidy or cell death in higher doses, therefore reduce fertilization and implantation rates.

  15. Spindle function in Xenopus oocytes involves possible nanodomain calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruizhen; Leblanc, Julie; He, Kevin; Liu, X. Johné

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular calcium transients are a universal phenomenon at fertilization and are required for egg activation, but the exact role of Ca2+ in second-polar-body emission remains unknown. On the other hand, similar calcium transients have not been demonstrated during oocyte maturation, and yet, manipulating intracellular calcium levels interferes with first-polar-body emission in mice and frogs. To determine the precise role of calcium signaling in polar body formation, we used live-cell imaging coupled with temporally precise intracellular calcium buffering. We found that BAPTA-based calcium chelators cause immediate depolymerization of spindle microtubules in meiosis I and meiosis II. Surprisingly, EGTA at similar or higher intracellular concentrations had no effect on spindle function or polar body emission. Using two calcium probes containing permutated GFP and the calcium sensor calmodulin (Lck-GCaMP3 and GCaMP3), we demonstrated enrichment of the probes at the spindle but failed to detect calcium increase during oocyte maturation at the spindle or elsewhere. Finally, endogenous calmodulin was found to colocalize with spindle microtubules throughout all stages of meiosis. Our results—most important, the different sensitivities of the spindle to BAPTA and EGTA—suggest that meiotic spindle function in frog oocytes requires highly localized, or nanodomain, calcium signaling. PMID:27582389

  16. Distinct Kinesin-14 mitotic mechanisms in spindle bipolarity.

    PubMed

    Simeonov, Dimitre R; Kenny, Katelyn; Seo, Lan; Moyer, Amanda; Allen, Jessica; Paluh, Janet L

    2009-11-01

    Kinesin-like proteins are integral to formation and function of a conserved mitotic spindle apparatus that directs chromosome segregation and precedes cell division. Ubiquitous to the mechanism of spindle assembly and stability are balanced Kinesin-5 promoting and Kinesin-14 opposing forces. Distinct Kinesin-14 roles in bipolarity in eukaryotes have not been shown, but are suggested by gamma-tubulin-based pole interactions that affect establishment and by microtubule cross-linking and sliding that maintain bipolarity and spindle length. Distinct roles also imply specialized functional domains. By cross-species analysis of compatible mechanisms in establishing mitotic bipolarity we demonstrate that Kinesin-14 human HSET (HsHSET) functionally replaces Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pkl1 and its action is similarly blocked by mutation in a Kinesin-14 binding site on gamma-tubulin. Drosophila DmNcd localizes preferentially to bundled interpolar microtubules in fission yeast and does not replace SpPkl1. Analysis of twenty-six Kinesin-14 derivatives, including Tail, Stalk or Neck-Motor chimeras, for spindle localization, spindle assembly and mitotic progression defined critical domains. The Tail of SpPkl1 contains functional elements enabling its role in spindle assembly that are distinct from but transferable to DmNcd, whereas HsHSET function utilizes both Tail and Stalk features. Our analysis is the first to demonstrate distinct mechanisms between SpPkl1 and DmNcd, and reveal that HsHSET shares functional overlap in spindle pole mechanisms.

  17. Mechanical properties of spindle poles are symmetrically balanced

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Itabashi, Takeshi; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi

    2017-01-01

    The metaphase spindle is organized for accurate chromosome segregation. One of the fundamental features of the spindle across the species is its symmetrical shape; the spindle consists of two polar arrays of microtubules at both ends. Although it has been suggested that the formation of the bipolar shape requires force balance coordination by molecular motors, i.e., kinesins and dyneins, quantitative analysis for the pole mechanics has not been conducted. Here, we demonstrate that it is not only the shape but also the stiffness and microtubule density of the pairs of pole regions are symmetrically balanced in single spindles self-assembled in Xenopus egg extracts. We found that the inhibition of dynein functions dramatically reduced the stiffness and microtubule density in the pole region. By contrast, the inhibition of one of the kinesins, Eg5, which is the antagonistic motor protein of dynein, increased the value of these parameters. Moreover, the inhibition of both dynein and Eg5 recovered these parameter values to those of non-treated spindle poles. We also found that, when one pole structure was held widened with the use of two glass microneedles, the opposite pole structure spontaneously widened, resulting in the formation of the barrel-like shaped spindle. The values of stiffness and microtubule density in the manipulated pole region decreased, following the spontaneous decrement of those in the paired unmanipulated pole region. These results suggest that the spindle possesses a mechanism to dynamically maintain its symmetry in mechanical properties.

  18. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  19. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  20. Optical sensor for precision in-situ spindle health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui

    An optical sensor which can record in-situ measurements of the dynamic runout of a precision miniature spindle system in a simple and low-cost manner is proposed in this dissertation. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the miniature spindle with non-contact sensors, typically capacitive sensors which are calibrated with a flat target surface not a curved target surface. Due to the different behavior of an electric field between a flat plate and a curved surface and an electric field between two flat plates, capacitive sensors is not suitable for measuring target surfaces smaller than its effective sensing area. The proposed sensor utilizes curved-edge diffraction (CED), which uses the effect of cylindrical surface curvature on the diffraction phenomenon in the transition regions adjacent to shadow, transmission, and reflection boundaries. The laser diodes light incident on the cylindrical surface of precision spindle and photodetectors collect the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. Laser diode in the different two direction are incident to the spindle shaft edges along the X and Y axes, four photodetectors collect the total fields produced by interference of multiple waves due to CED around the spindle shaft edges. The X and Y displacement can be obtained from the total fields using two differential amplifier configurations, respectively. Precision miniature spindle (shaft φ5.0mm) runout was measured, and the proposed sensor can perform curve at the different speed of rotation from 1500rpm to 8000rpm in the X and Y axes, respectively. On the other hand, CED also show changes for different running time and temperature of spindle. These results indicate that the proposed sensor promises to be effective for in-situ monitoring of the miniature spindle's health with high resolution, wide bandwidth, and low-cost.

  1. Wave Journal Bearing. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1995-01-01

    A wave journal bearing concept features a waved inner bearing diameter of the non-rotating bearing side and it is an alternative to the plain journal bearing. The wave journal bearing has a significantly increased load capacity in comparison to the plain journal bearing operating at the same eccentricity. It also offers greater stability than the plain circular bearing under all operating conditions. The wave bearing's design is relatively simple and allows the shaft to rotate in either direction. Three wave bearings are sensitive to the direction of an applied stationary side load. Increasing the number of waves reduces the wave bearing's sensitivity to the direction of the applied load relative to the wave. However, the range in which the bearing performance can be varied decreases as the number of waves increases. Therefore, both the number and the amplitude of the waves must be properly selected to optimize the wave bearing design for a specific application. It is concluded that the stiffness of an air journal bearing, due to hydrodynamic effect, could be doubled and made to run stably by using a six or eight wave geometry with a wave amplitude approximately half of the bearing radial clearance.

  2. X-43A Rudder Spindle Fatigue Life Estimate and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Dawicke, David S.; Johnston, William M.; James, Mark A.; Simonsen, Micah; Mason, Brian H.

    2005-01-01

    Fatigue life analyses were performed using a standard strain-life approach and a linear cumulative damage parameter to assess the effect of a single accidental overload on the fatigue life of the Haynes 230 nickel-base superalloy X-43A rudder spindle. Because of a limited amount of information available about the Haynes 230 material, a series of tests were conducted to replicate the overload and in-service conditions for the spindle and corroborate the analysis. Both the analytical and experimental results suggest that the spindle will survive the anticipated flight loads.

  3. Kinetochore flexibility: creating a dynamic chromosome-spindle interface

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Christopher B.; Khodjakov, Alexey; McEwen, Bruce F.

    2012-01-01

    Kinetochores are complex macromolecular assemblies that link chromosomes to the mitotic spindle, mediate forces for chromosome motion, and generate the checkpoint signal delaying anaphase onset until all chromosomes are incorporated into the spindle. Proper execution of these functions depends on precise interactions between kinetochores and microtubules. While the molecular composition of the kinetochore is well described, structural organization of this organelle at the molecular and atomic levels is just beginning to emerge. Recent structural studies across scales suggest that kinetochores should not be viewed as rigid static scaffolds. Instead, these organelles exhibit a surprising degree of flexibility that enables rapid adaptations to various types of interactions with the mitotic spindle. PMID:22221609

  4. Spindle cell lipoma in a 14-month-old girl.

    PubMed

    Diau, G Y; Chu, C C; Chou, G S; Tsao, T Y

    1995-11-01

    This case report concerns a girl with spindle cell lipoma of the neck. Spindle cell lipoma is a variant of lipomas and was first described by Enzinger and Harvey in 1975. It occurs chiefly in males between 40 and 70 years of age. It is a benign lesion that can be cured by excision, and local recurrence is rare. Spindle cell lipoma is composed of adipocytes and non-fat-storing immature mesenchymal cells. The condition is uncommon in adults and had not been reported to occur in children.

  5. Camshaft bearing arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Aoi, K.; Ozawa, T.

    1986-06-10

    A bearing arrangement is described for the camshaft of an internal combustion engine or the like which camshaft is formed along its length in axial order with a first bearing surface, a first cam lobe, a second bearing surface, a second cam lobe, a third bearing surface, a third cam lobe and a fourth bearing surface, the improvement comprising first bearing means extending around substantially the full circumference of the first bearing surface and journaling the first bearing surface, second bearing means extending around substantially less than the circumference of the second bearing surface and journaling the second bearing surface, third bearing means extending around substantially less than the circumference of the third bearing surface and journaling the third bearing surface, and fourth bearing means extending around substantially the full circumference of the fourth bearing surface and journaling the first bearing surface.

  6. CUSHIONED BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping device effective to dampen vibrations occurring at the several critical speeds encountered in the operation of a high-speed centrifuge is described. A self-centering bearing mechanism is used to protect both the centrifuge shaft and the damping mechanism. The damping mechanism comprises spaced-apant, movable, and stationary sleeve members arranged concentrically of a rotating shaft with a fluid maintained between the members. The movable sleeve member is connected to the shaft for radial movement therewith.

  7. Detail of post, brackets, railing, and spindle work frieze; camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of post, brackets, railing, and spindle work frieze; camera facing northeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Bandstand, Eighth Street, south side between Railroad Avenue & Walnut Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  8. Spindle extraction method for ISAR image based on Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xia; Zheng, Sheng; Zeng, Xiangyun; Zhu, Daoyuan; Xu, Gaogui

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a method of spindle extraction of target in inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) image is proposed which depends on Radon Transform. Firstly, utilizing Radon Transform to detect all straight lines which are collinear with these line segments in image. Then, using Sobel operator to detect image contour. Finally, finding all intersections of each straight line and image contour, the two intersections which have maximum distance between them is the two ends of this line segment and the longest line segment of all line segments is spindle of target. According to the proposed spindle extraction method, one hundred simulated ISAR images which are respectively rotated 0 degrees, 10 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees and 40 degrees in counterclockwise are used to do experiment and the proposed method and the detection results are more close to the real spindle of target than the method based on Hough Transform .

  9. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing assembly (10) has an intermediate rotatable section (33) having an outer cylindrical member (30) coaxially suspended by a torsion wire (72) around an axially polarized cylindrical magnet (32). Axial alignment between the pole faces (40-43) of the intermediate section (33) and end surfaces (50-53) of opposed end bells (20, 22) provides a path of least reluctance across intervening air gaps (60-63) for the magnetic flux emanating from magnet (32). Radial dislocation increases the reluctance and creates a radial restoring force. Substitution of radially polarized magnets 107 fixed to a magnetically permeable cylinder (32') and insertion of pairs of armature coil windings (109-112) between the cylinder pair (33') provides an integral magnetic bearing and torsion motor (100) able to provide arcuately limited rotational drive.

  10. Tooling Converts Stock Bearings To Custom Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleenor, E. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for reworking stock bearings saves time and produces helicopter-rotor bearings ground more precisely. Split tapered ring at one end of threaded bolt expands to hold inside of inner race bearing assembly; nut, at other end of bolt, adjusts amount of spring tension. Piece of hardware grasps bearing firmly without interfering with grinding operation. Operation produces bearing of higher quality than commercially available bearings.

  11. Aurora B regulates spindle bipolarity in meiosis in vertebrate oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hua; Ma, Chunqi; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Ruizhen; Miller, Ann L; Bement, William M; Liu, X Johné

    2012-07-15

    Aurora B (Aur-B) plays multiple roles in mitosis, of which the best known are to ensure bi-orientation of sister chromatids by destabilizing incorrectly attached kinetochore microtubules and to participate in cytokinesis. Studies in Xenopus egg extracts, however, have indicated that Aur-B and the chromosome passenger complex play an important role in stabilizing chromosome-associated spindle microtubules. Aur-B stabilizes spindle microtubules in the egg extracts by inhibiting the catastrophe kinesin MCAK. Whether or not Aur-B plays a similar role in intact oocytes remains unknown. Here we have employed a dominant-negative Aur-B mutant (Aur-B122R, in which the ATP-binding lysine(122) is replaced with arginine) to investigate the function of Aur-B in spindle assembly in Xenopus oocytes undergoing meiosis. Overexpression of Aur-B122R results in short bipolar spindles or monopolar spindles, with higher concentrations of Aur-B122R producing mostly the latter. Simultaneous inhibition of MCAK translation in oocytes overexpressing Aur-B122R results in suppression of monopolar phenotype, suggesting that Aur-B regulates spindle bipolarity by inhibiting MCAK. Furthermore, recombinant MCAK-4A protein, which lacks all four Aur-B phosphoryaltion sites and is therefore insensitive to Aur-B inhibition but not wild-type MCAK, recapitulated the monopolar phenotype in the oocytes. These results suggest that in vertebrate oocytes that lack centrosomes, one major function of Aur-B is to stabilize chromosome-associated spindle microtubules to ensure spindle bipolarity.

  12. The influence of pain on masseter spindle afferent discharge.

    PubMed

    Capra, Norman F; Hisley, Calvin K; Masri, Radi M

    2007-04-01

    Muscle spindles provide proprioceptive feedback supporting normal patterns of motor activity and kinesthetic sensibility. During mastication, jaw muscle spindles play an important role in monitoring and regulating the chewing cycle and the bite forces generated during mastication. Both acute and chronic orofacial pain disorders are associated with changes in proprioceptive feedback and motor function. Experimental jaw muscle pain also alters the normal response of masseter spindle afferents to ramp and hold jaw movements. It has been proposed that altered motor function and proprioceptive input results from group III muscle afferent modulation of the fusimotor system which alters spindle afferent sensitivity in limb muscles. The response to nociceptive stimuli may enhance or reduce the response of spindle afferents to proprioceptive stimuli. Several experimental observations suggesting the possibility that a similar mechanism also functions in jaw muscles are presented in this report. First, evidence is provided to show that nociceptive stimulation of the masseter muscle primarily influences the amplitude sensitivity of spindle afferents with relatively little effect on the dynamic sensitivity. Second, reversible inactivation of the caudal trigeminal nuclei attenuates the nociceptive modulation of spindle afferents. Finally, functionally identified gamma-motoneurons in the trigeminal motor nucleus are modulated by intramuscular injection with algesic substances. Taken together, these results suggest that pain-induced modulation of spindle afferent responses are mediated by small diameter muscle afferents and that this modulation is dependent, in part, on the relay of muscle nociceptive information from trigeminal subnucleus caudalis onto trigeminal gamma-motoneurons. The implication of these results will be considered in light of current theories on the relationship between jaw muscle pain and oral motor function.

  13. Measurement of Spindle Rigidity by using a Magnet Loader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Taku; Matsubara, Atsushi; Fujita, Tomoya; Muraki, Toshiyuki; Asano, Kohei; Kawashima, Kazuyuki

    The static rigidity of a rotating spindle in the radial direction is investigated in this research. A magnetic loading device (magnet loader) has been developed for the measurement. The magnet loader, which has coils and iron cores, generates the electromagnetic force and attracts a dummy tool attached to the spindle. However, the eddy current is generated in the dummy tool with the spindle rotation and reduces the attractive force at high spindle speed. In order to understand the magnetic flux and eddy current in the dummy tool, the electromagnetic field analysis by FEM was carried out. Grooves on the attraction surface of the dummy tool were designed to cut the eddy current flow. The dimension of the groove were decided based on the FEM analysis, and the designed tool were manufactured and tested. The test result shows that the designed tool successfully reduces the eddy current and recovers the attractive force. By using the magnet loader and the grooved tool, the spindle rigidity can be measured when the spindle rotates with a speed up to 10,000 min-1.

  14. Selective detection of Escherichia coli DNA using fluorescent carbon spindles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anurag; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the interaction of hydrophilic blue emitting carbon spindles with various deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) having different base pair compositions, such as Herring testes (HT), calf thymus (CT), Escherichia coli (EC) and Micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) DNA, to understand the mode of interaction. Interestingly, the fluorescent carbon spindles selectively interacted with E. coli DNA resulting in enhanced fluorescence of the former. Interaction of the same carbon with other DNAs exhibited insignificant changes in fluorescence. In addition, in the presence of EC DNA, the D band in the Raman spectrum attributed to the defect state completely disappeared, resulting in enhanced crystallinity. Microscopy images confirmed the wrapping of DNA on the carbon spindles leading to the assembly of spindles in the form of flowers. Dissociation of double-stranded DNA occurred upon interaction with carbon spindles, resulting in selective E. coli DNA interaction. The carbon spindles also exhibited a similar fluorescence enhancement upon treating with E. coli bacteria. These results confirm the possibility of E. coli detection in water and other liquid foods using such fluorescent carbon.

  15. Advances In Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    1994-01-01

    NASA technical memorandum reviews state of technology of magnetic bearings, focusing mainly on attractive bearings rather than repulsive, eddy-current, or Lorentz bearings. Attractive bearings offer greater load capacities and preferred for aerospace machinery.

  16. Condensin and the spindle midzone prevent cytokinesis failure induced by chromatin bridges in C. elegans embryos

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Joshua N.; Verbrugghe, Koen J.C.; Khanikar, Jayshree; Csankovszki, Györgyi; Chan, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background During cell division, chromosomes must clear the path of the cleavage furrow before the onset of cytokinesis. The abscission checkpoint in mammalian cells stabilizes the cleavage furrow in the presence of a chromatin obstruction. This provides time to resolve the obstruction before the cleavage furrow regresses or breaks the chromosomes, preventing aneuploidy or DNA damage. Two unanswered questions in the proposed mechanistic pathway of the abscission checkpoint concern factors involved in 1) resolving the obstructions, and 2) coordinating obstruction resolution with the delay in cytokinesis. Results We found that the 1-cell and 2-cell C. elegans embryos suppress furrow regression following depletion of essential chromosome segregation factors: topoisomerase IITOP-2, CENP-AHCP-3, cohesin, and to a lesser degree, condensin. Chromatin obstructions activated Aurora BAIR-2 at the spindle midzone, which is needed for the abscission checkpoint in other systems. Condensin I, but not condensin II, localizes to the spindle midzone in anaphase and to the midbody during normal cytokinesis. Interestingly, condensin I is enriched on chromatin bridges and near the midzone/midbody in an AIR-2 dependent manner. Disruption of AIR-2, the spindle midzone or condensin leads to cytokinesis failure in a chromatin-obstruction-dependent manner. Examination of the condensin-deficient embryos uncovered defects in both the resolution of the chromatin obstructions and the maintenance of the stable cleavage furrow. Conclusions We postulate that condensin I is recruited by Aurora BAIR-2 to aid in the resolution of chromatin obstructions and also helps generate a signal to maintain the delay in cytokinesis. PMID:23684975

  17. Microcephaly protein Asp focuses the minus ends of spindle microtubules at the pole and within the spindle.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ami; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-12-07

    Depletion of Drosophila melanogaster Asp, an orthologue of microcephaly protein ASPM, causes spindle pole unfocusing during mitosis. However, it remains unclear how Asp contributes to pole focusing, a process that also requires the kinesin-14 motor Ncd. We show that Asp localizes to the minus ends of spindle microtubule (MT) bundles and focuses them to make the pole independent of Ncd. We identified a critical domain in Asp exhibiting MT cross-linking activity in vitro. Asp was also localized to, and focuses the minus ends of, intraspindle MTs that were nucleated in an augmin-dependent manner and translocated toward the poles by spindle MT flux. Ncd, in contrast, functioned as a global spindle coalescence factor not limited to MT ends. We propose a revised molecular model for spindle pole focusing in which Asp at the minus ends cross-links MTs at the pole and within the spindle. Additionally, this study provides new insight into the dynamics of intraspindle MTs by using Asp as a minus end marker.

  18. A Passive Magnetic Bearing Flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark; Ebihara, Ben; Jansen, Ralph; Fusaro, Robert L.; Morales, Wilfredo; Kascak, Albert; Kenny, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A 100 percent passive magnetic bearing flywheel rig employing no active control components was designed, constructed, and tested. The suspension clothe rotor was provided by two sets of radial permanent magnetic bearings operating in the repulsive mode. The axial support was provided by jewel bearings on both ends of the rotor. The rig was successfully operated to speeds of 5500 rpm, which is 65 percent above the first critical speed of 3336 rpm. Operation was not continued beyond this point because of the excessive noise generated by the air impeller and because of inadequate containment in case of failure. Radial and axial stiffnesses of the permanent magnetic bearings were experimentally measured and then compared to finite element results. The natural damping of the rotor was measured and a damping coefficient was calculated.

  19. Microfog lubrication for aircraft engine bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenlieb, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis and system study was performed to provide design information regarding lubricant and coolant flow rates and flow paths for effective utilization of the lubricant and coolant in a once through bearing oil mist (microfog) and coolant air system. Both static and dynamic tests were performed. Static tests were executed to evaluate and calibrate the mist supply system. A total of thirteen dynamic step speed bearing tests were performed using four different lubricants and several different mist and air supply configurations. The most effective configuration consisted of supplying the mist and the major portion of the cooling air axially through the bearing. The results of these tests have shown the feasibility of using a once through oil mist and cooling air system to lubricate and cool a high speed, high temperature aircraft engine mainshaft bearing.

  20. Turbocharger bearing retention and lubrication system

    SciTech Connect

    Gutknecht, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    This patent describes exhausts gas driven turbocharger. It comprises a housing, a shaft within the housing having a longitudinal axis of rotation and a pair of ends, a compressor wheel mounted within the housing on one end of the shaft for rotation therewith, a turbine wheel mounted within the housing on the other end of the shaft for rotation therewith, means for communicating air to the compressor wheel, means for communicating exhaust gas to the turbine wheel to cause the latter to rotate the shaft and the compressor wheel mounted thereon to compress the air communicated to the compressor wheel, and bearing means mounting the shaft for rotation relative to the housing, the bearing means including a bearing outer ring, a bearing inner ring, and ball bearing elements supporting the bearing outer ring on the bearing inner ring, a bearing locating aperture in the bearing outer ring, and an elongated bearing location pin having a longitudinal axis of symmetry extending transversely to the longitudinal axis of the shaft.

  1. Human impacts on bear habitat use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, David J.

    1990-01-01

    : Human effects on bear habitat use are mediated through food biomass changes, bear tolerance of humans and their impacts, and human tolerance of bears. Large-scale changes in bear food biomass have been caused by conversion of wildlands and waterways to intensive human use, and by the introduction of exotic pathogens. Bears consume virtually all human foods that have been established in former wildlands, but bear use has been limited by access. Air pollution has also affected bear food biomass on a small scale and is likely to have major future impacts on bear habitat through climatic warming. Major changes in disturbance cycles and landscape mosaics wrought by humans have further altered temporal and spatial pulses of bear food production. These changes have brought short-term benefits in places, but have also added long-term stresses to most bear populations. Although bears tend to avoid humans, they will also use exotic and native foods in close proximity to humans. Subadult males and adult females are more often impelled to forage closer to humans because of their energetic predicament and because more secure sites are often preempted by adult males. Although male bears are typically responsible for most livestock predation, adult females and subadult males are more likely to be habituated to humans because they tend to forage closer to humans. Elimination of human-habituated bears predictably reduces effective carrying capacity and is more likely to be a factor in preserving bear populations where humans are present in moderate-to-high densities. If humans desire to preserve viable bear populations, they will either have to accept increased risk of injury associated with preserving habituated animals, or continue to crop habituated bears while at the same time preserving large tracts of wildlands free from significant human intrusion.

  2. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  3. Regulation of Aurora-A kinase on the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Kufer, Thomas A; Nigg, Erich A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2003-12-01

    The error-free segregation of duplicated chromosomes during cell division is essential for the maintenance of an intact genome. This process is brought about by a highly dynamic bipolar array of microtubules, the mitotic spindle. The formation and function of the mitotic spindle during M-phase of the cell cycle is regulated by protein phosphorylation, involving multiple protein kinases and phosphatases. Prominent among the enzymes implicated in spindle assembly is the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase Aurora-A. In several common human tumors, Aurora-A is overexpressed, and deregulation of this kinase was shown to result in mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Moreover, recent genetic evidence directly links the human Aurora-A gene to cancer susceptibility. Several of the physiological substrates of Aurora-A presumably await identification, but recent studies are beginning to shed light on the regulation of this critical mitotic kinase. Here, we review these findings with particular emphasis on the role of TPX2, a prominent spindle component implicated in a Ran-GTP-mediated spindle assembly pathway.

  4. Poleward microtubule flux mitotic spindles assembled in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    In the preceding paper we described pathways of mitotic spindle assembly in cell-free extracts prepared from eggs of Xenopus laevis. Here we demonstrate the poleward flux of microtubules in spindles assembled in vitro, using a photoactivatable fluorescein covalently coupled to tubulin and multi-channel fluorescence videomicroscopy. After local photoactivation of fluorescence by UV microbeam, we observed poleward movement of fluorescein-marked microtubules at a rate of 3 microns/min, similar to rates of chromosome movement and spindle elongation during prometaphase and anaphase. This movement could be blocked by the addition of millimolar AMP-PNP but was not affected by concentrations of vanadate up to 150 microM, suggesting that poleward flux may be driven by a microtubule motor similar to kinesin. In contrast to previous results obtained in vivo (Mitchison, T. J. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:637-652), poleward flux in vitro appears to occur independently of kinetochores or kinetochore microtubules, and therefore may be a general property of relatively stable microtubules within the spindle. We find that microtubules moving towards poles are dynamic structures, and we have estimated the average half-life of fluxing microtubules in vitro to be between approximately 75 and 100 s. We discuss these results with regard to the function of poleward flux in spindle movements in anaphase and prometaphase. PMID:1999464

  5. Spindle Activity Orchestrates Plasticity during Development and Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Christoph; Ahlbeck, Joachim; Bitzenhofer, Sebastian H.; Hanganu-Opatz, Ileana L.

    2016-01-01

    Spindle oscillations have been described during early brain development and in the adult brain. Besides similarities in temporal patterns and involved brain areas, neonatal spindle bursts (NSBs) and adult sleep spindles (ASSs) show differences in their occurrence, spatial distribution, and underlying mechanisms. While NSBs have been proposed to coordinate the refinement of the maturating neuronal network, ASSs are associated with the implementation of acquired information within existing networks. Along with these functional differences, separate synaptic plasticity mechanisms seem to be recruited. Here, we review the generation of spindle oscillations in the developing and adult brain and discuss possible implications of their differences for synaptic plasticity. The first part of the review is dedicated to the generation and function of ASSs with a particular focus on their role in healthy and impaired neuronal networks. The second part overviews the present knowledge of spindle activity during development and the ability of NSBs to organize immature circuits. Studies linking abnormal maturation of brain wiring with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders highlight the importance to better elucidate neonatal plasticity rules in future research. PMID:27293903

  6. Centrophilin: a novel mitotic spindle protein involved in microtubule nucleation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    A novel protein has been identified which may serve a key function in nucleating spindle microtubule growth in mitosis. This protein, called centrophilin, is sequentially relocated from the centromeres to the centrosomes to the midbody in a manner dependent on the mitotic phase. Centrophilin was initially detected by immunofluorescence with a monoclonal, primate-specific antibody (2D3) raised against kinetochore- enriched chromosome extract from HeLa cells (Valdivia, M. M., and B. R. Brinkley. 1985. J. Cell Biol. 101:1124-1134). Centrophilin forms prominent crescents at the poles of the metaphase spindle, gradually diminishes during anaphase, and bands the equatorial ends of midbody microtubules in telophase. The formation and breakdown of the spindle and midbody correlates in time and space with the aggregation and disaggregation of centrophilin foci. Immunogold EM reveals that centrophilin is a major component of pericentriolar material in metaphase. During recovery from microtubule inhibition, centrophilin foci act as nucleation sites for the assembly of spindle tubules. The 2D3 probe recognizes two high molecular mass polypeptides, 180 and 210 kD, on immunoblots of whole HeLa cell extract. Taken together, these data and the available literature on microtubule dynamics point inevitably to a singular model for control of spindle tubule turnover. PMID:1991791

  7. Spindle neurons of the human anterior cingulate cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimchinsky, E. A.; Vogt, B. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Hof, P. R.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The human anterior cingulate cortex is distinguished by the presence of an unusual cell type, a large spindle neuron in layer Vb. This cell has been noted numerous times in the historical literature but has not been studied with modern neuroanatomic techniques. For instance, details regarding the neuronal class to which these cells belong and regarding their precise distribution along both ventrodorsal and anteroposterior axes of the cingulate gyrus are still lacking. In the present study, morphological features and the anatomic distribution of this cell type were studied using computer-assisted mapping and immunocytochemical techniques. Spindle neurons are restricted to the subfields of the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's area 24), exhibiting a greater density in anterior portions of this area than in posterior portions, and tapering off in the transition zone between anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, a majority of the spindle cells at any level is located in subarea 24b on the gyral surface. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the neurofilament protein triple was present in a large percentage of these neurons and that they did not contain calcium-binding proteins. Injections of the carbocyanine dye DiI into the cingulum bundle revealed that these cells are projection neurons. Finally, spindle cells were consistently affected in Alzheimer's disease cases, with an overall loss of about 60%. Taken together, these observations indicate that the spindle cells of the human cingulate cortex represent a morphological subpopulation of pyramidal neurons whose restricted distribution may be associated with functionally distinct areas.

  8. Improved lithium-ion battery anode capacity with a network of easily fabricated spindle-like carbon nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengting; Xie, Wenhe; Gu, Lili; Qin, Tianfeng; Hou, Xiaoyi

    2016-01-01

    Summary A novel network of spindle-like carbon nanofibers was fabricated via a simplified synthesis involving electrospinning followed by preoxidation in air and postcarbonization in Ar. Not only was the as-obtained carbon network comprised of beads of spindle-like nanofibers but the cubic MnO phase and N elements were successfully anchored into the amorphous carbon matrix. When directly used as a binder-free anode for lithium-ion batteries, the network showed excellent electrochemical performance with high capacity, good rate capacity and reliable cycling stability. Under a current density of 0.2 A g−1, it delivered a high reversible capacity of 875.5 mAh g−1 after 200 cycles and 1005.5 mAh g−1 after 250 cycles with a significant coulombic efficiency of 99.5%. PMID:27826503

  9. Technical Development Path for Gas Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are in widespread commercial use in air cycle machines, turbocompressors and microturbine generators and are emerging in more challenging applications such as turbochargers, auxiliary power units and propulsion gas turbines. Though not well known, foil bearing technology is well over fifty years old. Recent technological developments indicate that their full potential has yet to be realized. This paper investigates the key technological developments that have characterized foil bearing advances. It is expected that a better understanding of foil gas bearing development path will aid in future development and progress towards more advanced applications.

  10. Permanent Magnetic Bearing for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Winfredo; Fusaro, Robert; Kascak, Albert

    2008-01-01

    A permanent, totally passive magnetic bearing rig was designed, constructed, and tested. The suspension of the rotor was provided by two sets of radial permanent magnetic bearings operating in the repulsive mode. The axial support was provided by jewel bearings on both ends of the rotor. The rig was successfully operated to speeds of 5500 rpm using an air impeller. Radial and axial stiffnesses of the permanent magnetic bearings were experimentally measured and then compared to finite element results. The natural damping of the rotor was measured and a damping coefficient was calculated.

  11. Technical Development Path for Foil Gas Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are in widespread commercial use in air cycle machines, turbocompressors and microturbine generators and are emerging in more challenging applications such as turbochargers, auxiliary power units and propulsion gas turbines. Though not well known, foil bearing technology is well over fifty years old. Recent technological developments indicate that their full potential has yet to be realized. This paper investigates the key technological developments that have characterized foil bearing advances. It is expected that a better understanding of foil gas bearing development path will aid in future development and progress towards more advanced applications.

  12. Xenopus oocyte meiosis lacks spindle assembly checkpoint control

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hua; Ma, Chunqi; Chen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) functions as a surveillance mechanism to detect chromosome misalignment and to delay anaphase until the errors are corrected. The SAC is thought to control mitosis and meiosis, including meiosis in mammalian eggs. However, it remains unknown if meiosis in the eggs of nonmammalian vertebrate species is also regulated by SAC. Using a novel karyotyping technique, we demonstrate that complete disruption of spindle microtubules in Xenopus laevis oocytes did not affect the bivalent-to-dyad transition at the time oocytes are undergoing anaphase I. These oocytes also acquired the ability to respond to parthenogenetic activation, which indicates proper metaphase II arrest. Similarly, oocytes exhibiting monopolar spindles, via inhibition of aurora B or Eg5 kinesin, underwent monopolar anaphase on time and without additional intervention. Therefore, the metaphase-to-anaphase transition in frog oocytes is not regulated by SAC. PMID:23569212

  13. Nucleosome functions in spindle assembly and nuclear envelope formation

    PubMed Central

    Zierhut, Christian; Funabiki, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    Summary Chromosomes are not only carriers of the genetic material, but also actively regulate the assembly of complex intracellular architectures. During mitosis, chromosome-induced microtubule polymerisation ensures spindle assembly in cells without centrosomes and plays a supportive role in centrosome-containing cells. Chromosomal signals also mediate post-mitotic nuclear envelope (NE) re-formation. Recent studies using novel approaches to manipulate histones in oocytes, where functions can be analysed in the absence of transcription, have established that nucleosomes, but not DNA alone, mediate the chromosomal regulation of spindle assembly and NE formation. Both processes require the generation of RanGTP by RCC1 recruited to nucleosomes but nucleosomes also acquire cell cycle stage specific regulators, Aurora B in mitosis and ELYS, the initiator of nuclear pore complex assembly, at mitotic exit. Here, we review the mechanisms by which nucleosomes control assembly and functions of the spindle and the NE, and discuss their implications for genome maintenance. PMID:26222742

  14. Plk2 regulates mitotic spindle orientation and mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Elizabeth; Kabotyanski, Elena B; Shore, Amy N; Creighton, Chad J; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rosen, Jeffrey M

    2014-04-01

    Disruptions in polarity and mitotic spindle orientation contribute to the progression and evolution of tumorigenesis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating these processes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that Polo-like kinase 2 (Plk2) regulates mitotic spindle orientation in the mammary gland and that this might account for its suggested role as a tumor suppressor. Plk2 is highly expressed in the mammary gland and is required for proper mammary gland development. Loss of Plk2 leads to increased mammary epithelial cell proliferation and ductal hyperbranching. Additionally, a novel role for Plk2 in regulating the orientation of the mitotic spindle and maintaining proper cell polarity in the ductal epithelium was discovered. In support of a tumor suppressor function for Plk2, loss of Plk2 increased the formation of lesions in multiparous glands. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel role for Plk2 in regulating mammary gland development.

  15. Pattern formation in stochastic systems: Magnetized billiards and mitotic spindles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, Stuart C.

    Physical systems that exhibit chaotic behavior or are subject to thermal noise are treated as random processes, especially if the state of the system cannot be measured precisely. Here we examine two such systems. The first is a single electron confined to a wedge-shaped section of a disk, called a billiard, in the presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field. The system exhibits a mixture of chaotic and nonchaotic behavior at different values of the magnetic field strength. If the size of the billiard is on the order of micrometers, as in a quantum dot, both quantum and classical analyses are necessary. The second system is a collection of stiff fibers, called microtubules, suspended in a fluid called the cytoplasm, and lying over chromosomes in a cell. The cytoplasm supplies molecular motors and fuel for the motors. The chromosomes supply motor attachment points. The combination causes the microtubules to self-assemble into a coherent structure called the mitotic spindle. This structure is vital to cell division in plants and animals. Elements of the mitotic spindle have sizes ranging from nanometers to micrometers, and all are subject to considerable thermal agitation. Mitotic spindle self-assembly occurs despite the randomizing effect of this thermal motion. We studied both systems by constructing physical models described by mathematical equations. From these we were able to perform computer simulations. For the billiard problem, we made innovative use of geometric symmetries. These symmetries allowed us to construct efficient representations of both classical and quantum systems. We found a new region of integrable trajectories for a magnetic field above that required to produce completely chaotic orbits. For the mitotic spindle, we were the first to demonstrate spindle self-assembly in a model that matches conditions reported by experimental biologists. Our simulations have shed significant light on which of the many elements in this complex system are

  16. Fallacious Carcinoma- Spindle Cell Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M; Govinda, Girish; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Venugopal, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a unique, rare and peculiar biphasic tumour of head and neck which is not frequently observed in the oral cavity. This variant of squamous cell carcinoma although of monophasic epithelial origin, simulates a sarcoma and is an aggressive carcinoma with high frequency of recurrence and metastasis. A correct and timely diagnosis is of paramount importance. Most of the tumours require an Immunohistochemistry (IHC) panel for confirmation or diagnosis. We report a case of spindle cell carcinoma with varied histopathological morphology and clinical presentation in a middle aged female with a brief review of literature. PMID:27630965

  17. The innervation of the muscle spindle: a personal history.

    PubMed

    Banks, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    I present a brief review of current understanding of the innervation of the mammalian muscle spindle, from a personal historical perspective. The review begins with comparative studies on the numbers of spindle afferents and considers how their relative abundance may best be assessed. This is followed by an examination of the distribution and some functional properties of the motor innervation. The primary ending is the subject of the final section, in particular, I look at what can be learned from serial sectioning and volumetric reconstruction, and present new results on a model and simulations concerning sensory terminal deformation during stretch.

  18. Acentrosomal spindle assembly and chromosome segregation during oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Julien; Desai, Arshad

    2012-05-01

    The ability to reproduce relies in most eukaryotes on specialized cells called gametes. Gametes are formed by the process of meiosis in which, after a single round of replication, two successive cell divisions reduce the ploidy of the genome. Fusion of gametes at fertilization reconstitutes diploidy. In most animal species, chromosome segregation during female meiosis occurs on spindles assembled in the absence of the major microtubule-organizing center, the centrosome. In mammals, oocyte meiosis is error prone and underlies most birth aneuploidies. Here, we review recent work on acentrosomal spindle formation and chromosome alignment/separation during oocyte meiosis in different animal models.

  19. PTEN regulates EG5 to control spindle architecture and chromosome congression during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinxue; Zhang, Zhong; Ouyang, Meng; Yang, Fan; Hao, Hongbo; Lamb, Kristy L.; Yang, Jingyi; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2016-01-01

    Architectural integrity of the mitotic spindle is required for efficient chromosome congression and accurate chromosome segregation to ensure mitotic fidelity. Tumour suppressor PTEN has multiple functions in maintaining genome stability. Here we report an essential role of PTEN in mitosis through regulation of the mitotic kinesin motor EG5 for proper spindle architecture and chromosome congression. PTEN depletion results in chromosome misalignment in metaphase, often leading to catastrophic mitotic failure. In addition, metaphase cells lacking PTEN exhibit defects of spindle geometry, manifested prominently by shorter spindles. PTEN is associated and co-localized with EG5 during mitosis. PTEN deficiency induces aberrant EG5 phosphorylation and abrogates EG5 recruitment to the mitotic spindle apparatus, leading to spindle disorganization. These data demonstrate the functional interplay between PTEN and EG5 in controlling mitotic spindle structure and chromosome behaviour during mitosis. We propose that PTEN functions to equilibrate mitotic phosphorylation for proper spindle formation and faithful genomic transmission. PMID:27492783

  20. Direct interaction between centralspindlin and PRC1 reinforces mechanical resilience of the central spindle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kian-Yong; Esmaeili, Behrooz; Zealley, Ben; Mishima, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    During animal cell division, the central spindle, an anti-parallel microtubule bundle structure formed between segregating chromosomes during anaphase, cooperates with astral microtubules to position the cleavage furrow. Because the central spindle is the only structure linking the two halves of the mitotic spindle, it is under mechanical tension from dynein-generated cortical pulling forces, which determine spindle positioning and drive chromosome segregation through spindle elongation. The central spindle should be flexible enough for efficient chromosome segregation while maintaining its structural integrity for reliable cytokinesis. How the cell balances these potentially conflicting requirements is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the central spindle in C. elegans embryos has a resilient mechanism for recovery from perturbations by excess tension derived from cortical pulling forces. This mechanism involves the direct interaction of two different types of conserved microtubule bundlers that are crucial for central spindle formation, PRC1 and centralspindlin. PMID:26088160

  1. Direct interaction between centralspindlin and PRC1 reinforces mechanical resilience of the central spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kian-Yong; Esmaeili, Behrooz; Zealley, Ben; Mishima, Masanori

    2015-06-01

    During animal cell division, the central spindle, an anti-parallel microtubule bundle structure formed between segregating chromosomes during anaphase, cooperates with astral microtubules to position the cleavage furrow. Because the central spindle is the only structure linking the two halves of the mitotic spindle, it is under mechanical tension from dynein-generated cortical pulling forces, which determine spindle positioning and drive chromosome segregation through spindle elongation. The central spindle should be flexible enough for efficient chromosome segregation while maintaining its structural integrity for reliable cytokinesis. How the cell balances these potentially conflicting requirements is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the central spindle in C. elegans embryos has a resilient mechanism for recovery from perturbations by excess tension derived from cortical pulling forces. This mechanism involves the direct interaction of two different types of conserved microtubule bundlers that are crucial for central spindle formation, PRC1 and centralspindlin.

  2. An automatic sleep spindle detector based on wavelets and the teager energy operator.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Beena; Redissi, Amira; Tafreshi, Reza

    2009-01-01

    Sleep spindles are one of the most important short-lasting rhythmic events occurring in the EEG during Non-Rapid Eye Movement sleep. Their accurate identification in a polysomnographic signal is essential for sleep professionals to help them mark Stage 2 sleep. Visual spindle scoring however is a tedious workload, as there are often a thousand spindles in an all-night recording. In this paper a novel approach for the automatic detection of sleep spindles based upon the Teager Energy Operator and wavelet packets has been presented. The Teager operator was found to accurately enhance periodic activity in epochs of the EEG containing spindles. The wavelet packet transform proved effective in accurately locating spindles in the time-frequency domain. The autocorrelation function of the resultant Teager signal and the wavelet packet energy ratio were used to identify epochs with spindles. These two features were integrated into a spindle detection algorithm which achieved an accuracy of 93.7%.

  3. Wave Journal Bearing. Part 2: Experimental Pressure Measurements and Fractional Frequency Whirl Threshold for Wave and Plain Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James F.; Dimofte, Florin; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A new hydrodynamic bearing concept, the wave journal bearing, is being developed because it has better stability characteristics than plain journal bearings while maintaining similar load capacity. An analysis code to predict the steady state and dynamic performance of the wave journal bearing is also part of the development. To verify numerical predictions and contrast the wave journal bearing's stability characteristics to a plain journal bearing, tests were conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center using an air bearing test rig. Bearing film pressures were measured at 16 ports located around the bearing circumference at the middle of the bearing length. The pressure measurements for both a plain journal bearing and a wave journal bearing compared favorably with numerical predictions. Both bearings were tested with no radial load to determine the speed threshold for self-excited fractional frequency whirl. The plain journal bearing started to whirl immediately upon shaft start-up. The wave journal did not incur self-excited whirl until 800 to 900 rpm as predicted by the analysis. Furthermore, the wave bearing's geometry limited the whirl orbit to less than the bearing's clearance. In contrast, the plain journal bearing did not limit the whirl orbit, causing it to rub.

  4. Two High-Temperature Foil Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2006-01-01

    An enlarged, high-temperature-compliant foil bearing has been built and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of such bearings for use in aircraft gas turbine engines. Foil bearings are attractive for use in some machines in which (1) speeds of rotation, temperatures, or both exceed maximum allowable values for rolling-element bearings; (2) conventional lubricants decompose at high operating temperatures; and/or (3) it is necessary or desirable not to rely on conventional lubrication systems. In a foil bearing, the lubricant is the working fluid (e.g., air or a mixture of combustion gases) in the space between the journal and the shaft in the machine in which the bearing is installed.

  5. Chromosome passenger complexes control anaphase duration and spindle elongation via a kinesin-5 brake

    PubMed Central

    Rozelle, Daniel K.; Hansen, Scott D.

    2011-01-01

    During mitosis, chromosome passenger complexes (CPCs) exhibit a well-conserved association with the anaphase spindle and have been implicated in spindle stability. However, their precise effect on the spindle is not clear. In this paper, we show, in budding yeast, that a CPC consisting of CBF3, Bir1, and Sli15, but not Ipl1, is required for normal spindle elongation. CPC mutants slow spindle elongation through the action of the bipolar kinesins Cin8 and Kip1. The same CPC mutants that slow spindle elongation also result in the enrichment of Cin8 and Kip1 at the spindle midzone. Together, these findings argue that CPCs function to organize the spindle midzone and potentially switch motors between force generators and molecular brakes. We also find that slowing spindle elongation delays the mitotic exit network (MEN)–dependent release of Cdc14, thus delaying spindle breakdown until a minimal spindle size is reached. We propose that these CPC- and MEN-dependent mechanisms are important for coordinating chromosome segregation with spindle breakdown and mitotic exit. PMID:21482719

  6. Sleep Spindles and Intelligence in Early Childhood--Developmental and Trait-Dependent Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ujma, Péter P.; Sándor, Piroska; Szakadát, Sára; Gombos, Ferenc; Bódizs, Róbert

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles act as a powerful marker of individual differences in cognitive ability. Sleep spindle parameters correlate with both age-related changes in cognitive abilities and with the age-independent concept of IQ. While some studies have specifically demonstrated the relationship between sleep spindles and intelligence in young children, our…

  7. Parietal Fast Sleep Spindle Density Decrease in Alzheimer's Disease and Amnesic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gorgoni, Maurizio; Lauri, Giulia; Truglia, Ilaria; Cordone, Susanna; Sarasso, Simone; Scarpelli, Serena; Mangiaruga, Anastasia; D'Atri, Aurora; Tempesta, Daniela; Ferrara, Michele; Marra, Camillo; Rossini, Paolo Maria; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have identified two types of sleep spindles: fast (13–15 Hz) centroparietal and slow (11–13 Hz) frontal spindles. Alterations in spindle activity have been observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Only few studies have separately assessed fast and slow spindles in these patients showing a reduction of fast spindle count, but the possible local specificity of this phenomenon and its relation to cognitive decline severity are not clear. Moreover, fast and slow spindle density have never been assessed in AD/MCI. We have assessed fast and slow spindles in 15 AD patients, 15 amnesic MCI patients, and 15 healthy elderly controls (HC). Participants underwent baseline polysomnographic recording (19 cortical derivations). Spindles during nonrapid eye movements sleep were automatically detected, and spindle densities of the three groups were compared in the derivations where fast and slow spindles exhibited their maximum expression (parietal and frontal, resp.). AD and MCI patients showed a significant parietal fast spindle density decrease, positively correlated with Minimental State Examination scores. Our results suggest that AD-related changes in spindle density are specific for frequency and location, are related to cognitive decline severity, and may have an early onset in the pathology development. PMID:27066274

  8. Involvement of Spindles in Memory Consolidation Is Slow Wave Sleep-Specific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Roy; Hofman, Winni F.; Talamini, Lucia M.

    2012-01-01

    Both sleep spindles and slow oscillations have been implicated in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Whereas spindles occur during both light and deep sleep, slow oscillations are restricted to deep sleep, raising the possibility of greater consolidation-related spindle involvement during deep sleep. We assessed declarative memory retention…

  9. Three-dimensional ultrastructural analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The three dimensional organization of microtubules in mitotic spindles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been determined by computer- aided reconstruction from electron micrographs of serially cross- sectioned spindles. Fifteen spindles ranging in length from 0.6-9.4 microns have been analyzed. Ordered microtubule packing is absent in spindles up to 0.8 micron, but the total number of microtubules is sufficient to allow one microtubule per kinetochore with a few additional microtubules that may form an interpolar spindle. An obvious bundle of about eight interpolar microtubules was found in spindles 1.3- 1.6 microns long, and we suggest that the approximately 32 remaining microtubules act as kinetochore fibers. The relative lengths of the microtubules in these spindles suggest that they may be in an early stage of anaphase, even though these spindles are all situated in the mother cell, not in the isthmus between mother and bud. None of the reconstructed spindles exhibited the uniform populations of kinetochore microtubules characteristic of metaphase. Long spindles (2.7-9.4 microns), presumably in anaphase B, contained short remnants of a few presumed kinetochore microtubules clustered near the poles and a few long microtubules extending from each pole toward the spindle midplane, where they interdigitated with their counterparts from the other pole. Interpretation of these reconstructed spindles offers some insights into the mechanisms of mitosis in this yeast. PMID:7790357

  10. Distinct roles for antiparallel microtubule pairing and overlap during early spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Nazarova, Elena; O'Toole, Eileen; Kaitna, Susi; Francois, Paul; Winey, Mark; Vogel, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    During spindle assembly, microtubules may attach to kinetochores or pair to form antiparallel pairs or interpolar microtubules, which span the two spindle poles and contribute to mitotic pole separation and chromosome segregation. Events in the specification of the interpolar microtubules are poorly understood. Using three-dimensional electron tomography and analysis of spindle dynamical behavior in living cells, we investigated the process of spindle assembly. Unexpectedly, we found that the phosphorylation state of an evolutionarily conserved Cdk1 site (S360) in γ-tubulin is correlated with the number and organization of interpolar microtubules. Mimicking S360 phosphorylation (S360D) results in bipolar spindles with a normal number of microtubules but lacking interpolar microtubules. Inhibiting S360 phosphorylation (S360A) results in spindles with interpolar microtubules and high-angle, antiparallel microtubule pairs. The latter are also detected in wild-type spindles <1 μm in length, suggesting that high-angle microtubule pairing represents an intermediate step in interpolar microtubule formation. Correlation of spindle architecture with dynamical behavior suggests that microtubule pairing is sufficient to separate the spindle poles, whereas interpolar microtubules maintain the velocity of pole displacement during early spindle assembly. Our findings suggest that the number of interpolar microtubules formed during spindle assembly is controlled in part through activities at the spindle poles. PMID:23966467

  11. Cell shape impacts on the positioning of the mitotic spindle with respect to the substratum

    PubMed Central

    Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Müsch, Anne

    2015-01-01

    All known mechanisms of mitotic spindle orientation rely on astral microtubules. We report that even in the absence of astral microtubules, metaphase spindles in MDCK and HeLa cells are not randomly positioned along their x-z dimension, but preferentially adopt shallow β angles between spindle pole axis and substratum. The nonrandom spindle positioning is due to constraints imposed by the cell cortex in flat cells that drive spindles that are longer and/or wider than the cell's height into a tilted, quasidiagonal x-z position. In rounder cells, which are taller, fewer cortical constraints make the x-z spindle position more random. Reestablishment of astral microtubule–mediated forces align the spindle poles with cortical cues parallel to the substratum in all cells. However, in flat cells, they frequently cause spindle deformations. Similar deformations are apparent when confined spindles rotate from tilted to parallel positions while MDCK cells progress from prometaphase to metaphase. The spindle disruptions cause the engagement of the spindle assembly checkpoint. We propose that cell rounding serves to maintain spindle integrity during its positioning. PMID:25657320

  12. Development of a Spindle Thermal Error Characterization and Compensation Sensor System for Machining Center Accuracy Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    vertical spindle CNC machining center, "* a Sundstrand series 20 Omnimill horizontal spindle CNC machining center, * a Producto A-1738 vertical spindle CNC...hardware and software developed during this program have been successfully commercialized by API. Currently API is marketing this system under the trade name

  13. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  14. Developmental Changes in Sleep Spindle Characteristics and Sigma Power across Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Ian J.; Lustenberger, Caroline; Achermann, Peter; Lassonde, Jonathan M.; Kurth, Salome; LeBourgeois, Monique K.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles, a prominent feature of the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG), are linked to cognitive abilities. Early childhood is a time of rapid cognitive and neurophysiological maturation; however, little is known about developmental changes in sleep spindles. In this study, we longitudinally examined trajectories of multiple sleep spindle characteristics (i.e., spindle duration, frequency, integrated spindle amplitude, and density) and power in the sigma frequency range (10–16 Hz) across ages 2, 3, and 5 years (n = 8; 3 males). At each time point, nocturnal sleep EEG was recorded in-home after 13-h of prior wakefulness. Spindle duration, integrated spindle amplitude, and sigma power increased with age across all EEG derivations (C3A2, C4A1, O2A1, and O1A2; all ps < 0.05). We also found a developmental decrease in mean spindle frequency (p < 0.05) but no change in spindle density with increasing age. Thus, sleep spindles increased in duration and amplitude but decreased in frequency across early childhood. Our data characterize early developmental changes in sleep spindles, which may advance understanding of thalamocortical brain connectivity and associated lifelong disease processes. These findings also provide unique insights into spindle ontogenesis in early childhood and may help identify electrophysiological features related to healthy and aberrant brain maturation. PMID:27110405

  15. A quantitative systems view of the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Ciliberto, Andrea; Shah, Jagesh V

    2009-01-01

    The idle assembly checkpoint acts to delay chromosome segregation until all duplicated sister chromatids are captured by the mitotic spindle. This pathway ensures that each daughter cell receives a complete copy of the genome. The high fidelity and robustness of this process have made it a subject of intense study in both the experimental and computational realms. A significant number of checkpoint proteins have been identified but how they orchestrate the communication between local spindle attachment and global cytoplasmic signalling to delay segregation is not yet understood. Here, we propose a systems view of the spindle assembly checkpoint to focus attention on the key regulators of the dynamics of this pathway. These regulators in turn have been the subject of detailed cellular measurements and computational modelling to connect molecular function to the dynamics of spindle assembly checkpoint signalling. A review of these efforts reveals the insights provided by such approaches and underscores the need for further interdisciplinary studies to reveal in full the quantitative underpinnings of this cellular control pathway. PMID:19629044

  16. Teaching Reading--Vision vs. the Muscle Spindles (The Proprioceptors).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caukins, Sivan Eugene, Jr.

    Literature is reviewed which discusses the role of proprioceptors in basic perceptual and motoric functions. The author cites research on the functions of the muscle spindles in controlling muscles which in turn provide energy, stimulation, and activation of the central nervous system. Research on the relation of motor functions to language…

  17. Modelling muscle spindle dynamics for a proprioceptive prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ian; Constandinou, Timothy G

    2013-01-01

    Muscle spindles are found throughout our skeletal muscle tissue and continuously provide us with a sense of our limbs' position and motion (proprioception). This paper advances a model for generating artificial muscle spindle signals for a prosthetic limb, with the aim of one day providing amputees with a sense of feeling in their artificial limb. By utilising the Opensim biomechanical modelling package the relationship between a joint's angle and the length of surrounding muscles is estimated for a prosthetic limb. This is then applied to the established Mileusnic model to determine the associated muscle spindle firing pattern. This complete system model is then reduced to allow for a computationally efficient hardware implementation. This reduction is achieved with minimal impact on accuracy by selecting key mono-articular muscles and fitting equations to relate joint angle to muscle length. Parameter values fitting the Mileusnic model to human spindles are then proposed and validated against previously published human neural recordings. Finally, a model for fusimotor signals is also proposed based on data previously recorded from reduced animal experiments.

  18. Spindle Oscillations in Sleep Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Oren M.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of sleep microarchitecture and neural oscillations is an increasingly popular technique for quantifying EEG sleep activity. Many studies have examined sleep spindle oscillations in sleep-disordered adults; however reviews of this literature are scarce. As such, our overarching aim was to critically review experimental studies examining sleep spindle activity between adults with and without different sleep disorders. Articles were obtained using a systematic methodology with a priori criteria. Thirty-seven studies meeting final inclusion criteria were reviewed, with studies grouped across three categories: insomnia, hypersomnias, and sleep-related movement disorders (including parasomnias). Studies of patients with insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing were more abundant relative to other diagnoses. All studies were cross-sectional. Studies were largely inconsistent regarding spindle activity differences between clinical and nonclinical groups, with some reporting greater or less activity, while many others reported no group differences. Stark inconsistencies in sample characteristics (e.g., age range and diagnostic criteria) and methods of analysis (e.g., spindle bandwidth selection, visual detection versus digital filtering, absolute versus relative spectral power, and NREM2 versus NREM3) suggest a need for greater use of event-based detection methods and increased research standardization. Hypotheses regarding the clinical and empirical implications of these findings, and suggestions for potential future studies, are also discussed. PMID:27034850

  19. Kinetochore localization of spindle checkpoint proteins: who controls whom?

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Suzanne; Prieto, Susana; Bernis, Cyril; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Castro, Anna; Lorca, Thierry

    2004-10-01

    The spindle checkpoint prevents anaphase onset until all the chromosomes have successfully attached to the spindle microtubules. The mechanisms by which unattached kinetochores trigger and transmit a primary signal are poorly understood, although it seems to be dependent at least in part, on the kinetochore localization of the different checkpoint components. By using protein immunodepletion and mRNA translation in Xenopus egg extracts, we have studied the hierarchic sequence and the interdependent network that governs protein recruitment at the kinetochore in the spindle checkpoint pathway. Our results show that the first regulatory step of this cascade is defined by Aurora B/INCENP complex. Aurora B/INCENP controls the activation of a second regulatory level by inducing at the kinetochore the localization of Mps1, Bub1, Bub3, and CENP-E. This localization, in turn, promotes the recruitment to the kinetochore of Mad1/Mad2, Cdc20, and the anaphase promoting complex (APC). Unlike Aurora B/INCENP, Mps1, Bub1, and CENP-E, the downstream checkpoint protein Mad1 does not regulate the kinetochore localization of either Cdc20 or APC. Similarly, Cdc20 and APC do not require each other to be localized at these chromosome structures. Thus, at the last step of the spindle checkpoint cascade, Mad1/Mad2, Cdc20, and APC are recruited at the kinetochores independently from each other.

  20. Potato spindle tuber viroid: the simplicity paradox resolved?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Taxonomy: Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) is the type species of the genus Posipiviroid, family Pospiviroidae. An absence of hammerhead ribozymes and the presence of a 'central conserved region' distinguish PSTVd and related viroids from members of a second viroid family, the Avsunviroidae. ...

  1. Screening tomato germplasm for resistance to potato spindle tuber viroid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, several outbreaks of a potentially devastating viroid disease on tomato in North America have caused serious concerns to tomato growers and vegetable seed industry. Several closely related viroids in the genus Pospiviroid have been identified on tomato. Among them, Potato spindle t...

  2. Spindle Oscillations in Sleep Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Oren M; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of sleep microarchitecture and neural oscillations is an increasingly popular technique for quantifying EEG sleep activity. Many studies have examined sleep spindle oscillations in sleep-disordered adults; however reviews of this literature are scarce. As such, our overarching aim was to critically review experimental studies examining sleep spindle activity between adults with and without different sleep disorders. Articles were obtained using a systematic methodology with a priori criteria. Thirty-seven studies meeting final inclusion criteria were reviewed, with studies grouped across three categories: insomnia, hypersomnias, and sleep-related movement disorders (including parasomnias). Studies of patients with insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing were more abundant relative to other diagnoses. All studies were cross-sectional. Studies were largely inconsistent regarding spindle activity differences between clinical and nonclinical groups, with some reporting greater or less activity, while many others reported no group differences. Stark inconsistencies in sample characteristics (e.g., age range and diagnostic criteria) and methods of analysis (e.g., spindle bandwidth selection, visual detection versus digital filtering, absolute versus relative spectral power, and NREM2 versus NREM3) suggest a need for greater use of event-based detection methods and increased research standardization. Hypotheses regarding the clinical and empirical implications of these findings, and suggestions for potential future studies, are also discussed.

  3. A dynamical model of the spindle position checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Lohel, Maiko; Grünert, Gerd; Dittrich, Peter; Pereira, Gislene; Ibrahim, Bashar

    2012-05-08

    The orientation of the mitotic spindle with respect to the polarity axis is crucial for the accuracy of asymmetric cell division. In budding yeast, a surveillance mechanism called the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) prevents exit from mitosis when the mitotic spindle fails to align along the mother-to-daughter polarity axis. SPOC arrest relies upon inhibition of the GTPase Tem1 by the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) complex Bfa1-Bub2. Importantly, reactions signaling mitotic exit take place at yeast centrosomes (named spindle pole bodies, SPBs) and the GAP complex also promotes SPB localization of Tem1. Yet, whether the regulation of Tem1 by Bfa1-Bub2 takes place only at the SPBs remains elusive. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of Bfa1-Bub2 and Tem1 localization at the SPBs. Based on the measured SPB-bound protein levels, we introduce a dynamical model of the SPOC that describes the regulation of Bfa1 and Tem1. Our model suggests that Bfa1 interacts with Tem1 in the cytoplasm as well as at the SPBs to provide efficient Tem1 inhibition.

  4. Physical limits on kinesin-5–mediated chromosome congression in the smallest mitotic spindles

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Kelsey M.; Tubman, Emily S.; Claas, Allison; Tank, Damien; Clancy, Shelly Applen; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Berman, Judith; Odde, David J.

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of mitotic spindles is the congression of chromosomes near the spindle equator, a process mediated by dynamic kinetochore microtubules. A major challenge is to understand how precise, submicrometer-scale control of kinetochore micro­tubule dynamics is achieved in the smallest mitotic spindles, where the noisiness of microtubule assembly/disassembly will potentially act to overwhelm the spatial information that controls microtubule plus end–tip positioning to mediate congression. To better understand this fundamental limit, we conducted an integrated live fluorescence, electron microscopy, and modeling analysis of the polymorphic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which contains one of the smallest known mitotic spindles (<1 μm). Previously, ScCin8p (kinesin-5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was shown to mediate chromosome congression by promoting catastrophe of long kinetochore microtubules (kMTs). Using C. albicans yeast and hyphal kinesin-5 (Kip1p) heterozygotes (KIP1/kip1∆), we found that mutant spindles have longer kMTs than wild-type spindles, consistent with a less-organized spindle. By contrast, kinesin-8 heterozygous mutant (KIP3/kip3∆) spindles exhibited the same spindle organization as wild type. Of interest, spindle organization in the yeast and hyphal states was indistinguishable, even though yeast and hyphal cell lengths differ by two- to fivefold, demonstrating that spindle length regulation and chromosome congression are intrinsic to the spindle and largely independent of cell size. Together these results are consistent with a kinesin-5–mediated, length-dependent depolymerase activity that organizes chromosomes at the spindle equator in C. albicans to overcome fundamental noisiness in microtubule self-assembly. More generally, we define a dimensionless number that sets a fundamental physical limit for maintaining congression in small spindles in the face of assembly noise and find that C. albicans operates very close to

  5. Membrane Bistability in Thalamic Reticular Neurons During Spindle Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Steriade, Mircea

    2010-01-01

    The thalamic reticular (RE) nucleus is a major source of inhibition in the thalamus. It plays a crucial role in regulating the excitability of thalamocortical networks and in generating some sleep rhythms. Current-clamp intracellular recordings of RE neurons in cats under barbiturate anesthesia revealed the presence of membrane bistability in ~20% of neurons. Bistability consisted of two alternate membrane potentials, separated by ~17–20 mV. While non-bistable (common) RE neurons fired rhythmic spike-bursts during spindles, bistable RE neurons fired tonically, with burst modulation, throughout spindle sequences. Bistability was strongly voltage dependent and only expressed under resting conditions (i.e. no current injection). The transition from the silent to the active state was a regenerative event that could be activated by brief depolarization, whereas brief hyperpolarizations could switch the membrane potential from the active to the silent state. These effects outlasted the current pulses. Corticothalamic stimulation could also switch the membrane potential from silent to active states. Addition of QX-314 in the recording micropipette either abolished or disrupted membrane bistability, suggesting INa(p) to be responsible for its generation. Thalamocortical cells presented various patterns of spindling that reflected the membrane bistability in RE neurons. Finally, experimental data and computer simulations predicted a role for RE neurons’ membrane bistability in inducing various patterns of spindling in target thalamocortical cells. We conclude that membrane bistability of RE neurons is an intrinsic property, likely generated by INa(p) and modulated by cortical influences, as well as a factor that determines different patterns of spindle rhythms in thalamocortical neurons. PMID:15331618

  6. Mitotic spindle assembly on chromatin patterns made with deep UV photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tarnawska, Katarzyna; Pugieux, Céline; Nédélec, François

    2014-01-01

    We provide a detailed method to generate arrays of mitotic spindles in vitro. Spindles are formed in extract prepared from unfertilized Xenopus laevis eggs, which contain all the molecular ingredients of mitotic spindles. The method is based on using deep UV photochemistry to attach chromatin-coated beads on a glass surface according to a pattern of interest. The immobilized beads act as artificial chromosomes, and induce the formation of mitotic spindles in their immediate vicinity. To perform the experiment, a chamber is assembled over the chromatin pattern, Xenopus egg extract is flowed in and after incubation the spindles are imaged with a confocal microscope.

  7. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, David M.; Nannas, Natalie J.; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation. PMID:27610117

  8. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F [Walnut Creek, CA

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  9. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  10. Cryogenic foil bearing turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, Alston L.

    1993-01-01

    Cryogenic foil bearing turbopumps offer high reliability and low cost. The fundamental cryogenic foil bearing technology has been validated in both liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. High load capacity, excellent rotor dynamics, and negligible bearing wear after over 100 starts and stops, and over many hours of testing, were observed in both fluids. An experimental liquid hydrogen foil bearing turbopump was also successfully demonstrated. The results indicate excellent stability, high reliability, wide throttle-ability, low bearing cooling flow, and two-phase bearing operability. A liquid oxygen foil bearing turbopump has been built and is being tested at NASA MSFC.

  11. Control concepts for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwart, Roland; Vischer, D.; Larsonneur, R.; Herzog, R.; Traxler, Alfons; Bleuler, H.; Schweitzer, G.

    1992-01-01

    Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) are becoming increasingly significant for various industrial applications. Examples are turbo-compressors, centrifuges, high speed milling and grinding spindles, vibration isolation, linear guides, magnetically levitated trains, vacuum and space applications. Thanks to the rapid progress and drastic cost reduction in power- and micro-electronics, the number of AMB applications is growing very rapidly. Industrial uses of AMBs leads to new requirements for AMB-actuators, sensor systems, and rotor dynamics. Especially desirable are new and better control concepts to meet demand such as low cost AMB, high stiffness, high performance, high robustness, high damping up to several kHz, vibration isolation, force-free rotation, and unbalance cancellation. This paper surveys various control concepts for AMBs and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Theoretical and experimental results are presented.

  12. The kinesin-8 Kip3 scales anaphase spindle length by suppression of midzone microtubule polymerization.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Rania S; Discipio, Katherine A; Proudfoot, Kathleen G; Gupta, Mohan L

    2014-03-17

    Mitotic spindle function is critical for cell division and genomic stability. During anaphase, the elongating spindle physically segregates the sister chromatids. However, the molecular mechanisms that determine the extent of anaphase spindle elongation remain largely unclear. In a screen of yeast mutants with altered spindle length, we identified the kinesin-8 Kip3 as essential to scale spindle length with cell size. Kip3 is a multifunctional motor protein with microtubule depolymerase, plus-end motility, and antiparallel sliding activities. Here we demonstrate that the depolymerase activity is indispensable to control spindle length, whereas the motility and sliding activities are not sufficient. Furthermore, the microtubule-destabilizing activity is required to counteract Stu2/XMAP215-mediated microtubule polymerization so that spindle elongation terminates once spindles reach the appropriate final length. Our data support a model where Kip3 directly suppresses spindle microtubule polymerization, limiting midzone length. As a result, sliding forces within the midzone cannot buckle spindle microtubules, which allows the cell boundary to define the extent of spindle elongation.

  13. Physical determinants of bipolar mitotic spindle assembly and stability in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Sweezy-Schindler, Oliver; Lamson, Adam; Gergely, Zachary R.; O’Toole, Eileen; Crapo, Ammon; Hough, Loren E.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic spindles use an elegant bipolar architecture to segregate duplicated chromosomes with high fidelity. Bipolar spindles form from a monopolar initial condition; this is the most fundamental construction problem that the spindle must solve. Microtubules, motors, and cross-linkers are important for bipolarity, but the mechanisms necessary and sufficient for spindle assembly remain unknown. We describe a physical model that exhibits de novo bipolar spindle formation. We began with physical properties of fission-yeast spindle pole body size and microtubule number, kinesin-5 motors, kinesin-14 motors, and passive cross-linkers. Our model results agree quantitatively with our experiments in fission yeast, thereby establishing a minimal system with which to interrogate collective self-assembly. By varying the features of our model, we identify a set of functions essential for the generation and stability of spindle bipolarity. When kinesin-5 motors are present, their bidirectionality is essential, but spindles can form in the presence of passive cross-linkers alone. We also identify characteristic failed states of spindle assembly—the persistent monopole, X spindle, separated asters, and short spindle, which are avoided by the creation and maintenance of antiparallel microtubule overlaps. Our model can guide the identification of new, multifaceted strategies to induce mitotic catastrophes; these would constitute novel strategies for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28116355

  14. Fission yeast cells undergo nuclear division in the absence of spindle microtubules.

    PubMed

    Castagnetti, Stefania; Oliferenko, Snezhana; Nurse, Paul

    2010-10-12

    Mitosis in eukaryotic cells employs spindle microtubules to drive accurate chromosome segregation at cell division. Cells lacking spindle microtubules arrest in mitosis due to a spindle checkpoint that delays mitotic progression until all chromosomes have achieved stable bipolar attachment to spindle microtubules. In fission yeast, mitosis occurs within an intact nuclear membrane with the mitotic spindle elongating between the spindle pole bodies. We show here that in fission yeast interference with mitotic spindle formation delays mitosis only briefly and cells proceed to an unusual nuclear division process we term nuclear fission, during which cells perform some chromosome segregation and efficiently enter S-phase of the next cell cycle. Nuclear fission is blocked if spindle pole body maturation or sister chromatid separation cannot take place or if actin polymerization is inhibited. We suggest that this process exhibits vestiges of a primitive nuclear division process independent of spindle microtubules, possibly reflecting an evolutionary intermediate state between bacterial and Archeal chromosome segregation where the nucleoid divides without a spindle and a microtubule spindle-based eukaryotic mitosis.

  15. Augmin promotes meiotic spindle formation and bipolarity in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Petry, Sabine; Pugieux, Céline; Nédélec, François J; Vale, Ronald D

    2011-08-30

    Female meiotic spindles in many organisms form in the absence of centrosomes, the organelle typically associated with microtubule (MT) nucleation. Previous studies have proposed that these meiotic spindles arise from RanGTP-mediated MT nucleation in the vicinity of chromatin; however, whether this process is sufficient for spindle formation is unknown. Here, we investigated whether a recently proposed spindle-based MT nucleation pathway that involves augmin, an 8-subunit protein complex, also contributes to spindle morphogenesis. We used an assay system in which hundreds of meiotic spindles can be observed forming around chromatin-coated beads after introduction of Xenopus egg extracts. Spindles forming in augmin-depleted extracts showed reduced rates of MT formation and were predominantly multipolar, revealing a function of augmin in stabilizing the bipolar shape of the acentrosomal meiotic spindle. Our studies also have uncovered an apparent augmin-independent MT nucleation process from acentrosomal poles, which becomes increasingly active over time and appears to partially rescue the spindle defects that arise from augmin depletion. Our studies reveal that spatially and temporally distinct MT generation pathways from chromatin, spindle MTs, and acentrosomal poles all contribute to robust bipolar spindle formation in meiotic extracts.

  16. CPAP Treatment Partly Normalizes Sleep Spindle Features in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Saunamäki, Tiia; Huupponen, Eero; Loponen, Juho

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) decreases sleep spindle density and frequency. We evaluated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on different features of sleep spindles. Methods. Twenty OSA patients underwent two night polysomnographies in a diagnostic phase and one night polysomnography after 6 months of CPAP treatment. The control group comprised 20 healthy controls. Sleep spindles were analyzed by a previously developed automated method. Unilateral and bilateral spindles were identified in central and frontopolar brain locations. Spindle density and frequency were determined for the first and last half of the NREM time. Results. The density of bilateral central spindles, which did not change in the untreated OSA patients, increased towards the morning hours during CPAP treatment and in the controls. Central spindles did not become faster with sleep in OSA patients and the central spindles remained slow in the left hemisphere even with CPAP. Conclusion. CPAP treatment normalized spindle features only partially. The changes may be associated with deficits in thalamocortical spindle generating loops. Significance. This study shows that some sleep spindle changes persist after CPAP treatment in OSA patients. The association of these changes to daytime symptoms in OSA patients needs to be further evaluated. PMID:28261503

  17. The dynamics of spindles and EEG slow-wave activity in NREM sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Vyazovskiy, V V; Achermann, P; Borbély, A A; Tobler, I

    2004-07-01

    A quantitative analysis of spindles and spindle-related EEG activity was performed in C57BL/6 mice. The hypothesis that spindles are involved in sleep regulatory mechanisms was tested by investigating their occurrence during 24 h and after 6 h sleep deprivation (SD; n = 7). In the frontal derivation distinct spindle events were characterized as EEG oscillations with a dominant frequency approximately at 11 Hz. Spindles were most prominent during NREM sleep and increased before NREM-REM sleep transitions. Whereas spindles increased concomitantly with slow wave activity (SWA, EEG power between 0.5 and 4.0 Hz) at the beginning of the NREM sleep episode, these measures showed an opposite evolution prior to the transition to REM sleep. The 24-h time course of spindles showed a maximum at the end of the 12-h light period, and was a mirror image of SWA in NREM sleep. After 6 h SD the spindles in NREM sleep were initially suppressed, and showed a delayed rebound. In contrast, spindles occurring immediately before the transition to REM sleep were enhanced during the first 2 h of recovery. The data suggest that spindles in NREM sleep may be involved in sleep maintenance, while spindles heralding the transition to REM sleep may be related to mechanisms of REM sleep initiation.

  18. Introduction to ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of a ball bearing is to provide a relative positioning and rotational freedom while transmitting a load between two structures, usually a shaft and a housing. For high rotational speeds (e.g., in gyroscope ball bearings) the purpose can be expanded to include rotational freedom with practically no wear in the bearing. This condition can be achieved by separating the bearing parts with a coherent film of fluid known as an elastohydrodynamic film. This film can be maintained not only when the bearing carries the load on a shaft, but also when the bearing is preloaded to position the shaft to within micro- or nano-inch accuracy and stability. Background information on ball bearings is provided, different types of ball bearings and their geometry and kinematics are defined, bearing materials, manufacturing processes, and separators are discussed. It is assumed, for the purposes of analysis, that the bearing carries no load.

  19. Nucleocytoplasmic transport in the midzone membrane domain controls yeast mitotic spindle disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Lucena, Rafael; Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steve P.; Kellogg, Douglas R.; Tallada, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    During each cell cycle, the mitotic spindle is efficiently assembled to achieve chromosome segregation and then rapidly disassembled as cells enter cytokinesis. Although much has been learned about assembly, how spindles disassemble at the end of mitosis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that nucleocytoplasmic transport at the membrane domain surrounding the mitotic spindle midzone, here named the midzone membrane domain (MMD), is essential for spindle disassembly in Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. We show that, during anaphase B, Imp1-mediated transport of the AAA-ATPase Cdc48 protein at the MMD allows this disassembly factor to localize at the spindle midzone, thereby promoting spindle midzone dissolution. Our findings illustrate how a separate membrane compartment supports spindle disassembly in the closed mitosis of fission yeast. PMID:25963819

  20. Spindle cell variant of ameloblastic carcinoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yuki; Fujita, Shuichi; Yanamoto, Souichi; Yamada, Shin-ichi; Rokutanda, Satoshi; Yamashita, Kentaro; Ikeda, Tohru; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Spindle cell variant of ameloblastic carcinoma is an extremely rare tumor. Severe dedifferentiated spindle cell variants are diagnostically challenging, particularly in small biopsy specimens. Here, we report a case of spindle cell variant of ameloblastic carcinoma in the mandible of a 69-year-old male patient and review the available literature. The tumor was surgically resected under general anesthesia. Histopathologic diagnosis of spindle cell carcinoma was made on incisional biopsy, and the final diagnosis was confirmed as spindle cell variant of ameloblastic carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry using cytokeratin and CK19 is helpful in determining the origin of spindle cell variant of ameloblastic carcinoma, particularly CK19 indicated that sarcomatoid spindle cells are derived from odontogenic epithelium. A review demonstrated higher mean age of patients compared with that of other types of ameloblastic carcinoma. The rates of mortality and local recurrence were concurrently 30%. No recurrence or metastasis was seen in the 23-month follow-up period in the present case.

  1. Kinesin-5 Contributes to Spindle-length Scaling in the Evolution of Cancer toward Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ching-Feng; Tsai, Wan-Yu; Chen, Wei-An; Liang, Kai-Wen; Pan, Cheng-Ju; Lai, Pei-Lun; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Huang, Hsiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    During natural evolution, the spindles often scale with cell sizes to orchestrate accurate chromosome segregation. Whether in cancer evolution, when the constraints on genome integrity are relaxed, cancer cells may evolve the spindle to confer other advantages has not been investigated. Using invasion as a selective pressure in vitro, we found that a highly metastatic cancer clone displays a lengthened metaphase spindle, with faster spindle elongation that correlates with transiently elevated speed of cell migration. We found that kinesin-5 is upregulated in this malignant clone, and weak inhibition of kinesin-5 activity could revert the spindle to a smaller aspect ratio, decrease the speed of spindle pole separation, and suppress post-mitotic cell migration. A correlation was found between high aspect ratio and strong metastatic potential in cancers that evolved and were selected in vivo, implicating that the spindle aspect ratio could serve as a promising cellular biomarker for metastatic cancer clones. PMID:27767194

  2. Chromosomal attachments set length and microtubule number in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Nannas, Natalie J; O'Toole, Eileen T; Winey, Mark; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-12-15

    The length of the mitotic spindle varies among different cell types. A simple model for spindle length regulation requires balancing two forces: pulling, due to micro-tubules that attach to the chromosomes at their kinetochores, and pushing, due to interactions between microtubules that emanate from opposite spindle poles. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that spindle length scales with kinetochore number, increasing when kinetochores are inactivated and shortening on addition of synthetic or natural kinetochores, showing that kinetochore-microtubule interactions generate an inward force to balance forces that elongate the spindle. Electron microscopy shows that manipulating kinetochore number alters the number of spindle microtubules: adding extra kinetochores increases the number of spindle microtubules, suggesting kinetochore-based regulation of microtubule number.

  3. Sleep Spindles as an Electrographic Element: Description and Automatic Detection Methods

    PubMed Central

    Maquet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindle is a peculiar oscillatory brain pattern which has been associated with a number of sleep (isolation from exteroceptive stimuli, memory consolidation) and individual characteristics (intellectual quotient). Oddly enough, the definition of a spindle is both incomplete and restrictive. In consequence, there is no consensus about how to detect spindles. Visual scoring is cumbersome and user dependent. To analyze spindle activity in a more robust way, automatic sleep spindle detection methods are essential. Various algorithms were developed, depending on individual research interest, which hampers direct comparisons and meta-analyses. In this review, sleep spindle is first defined physically and topographically. From this general description, we tentatively extract the main characteristics to be detected and analyzed. A nonexhaustive list of automatic spindle detection methods is provided along with a description of their main processing principles. Finally, we propose a technique to assess the detection methods in a robust and comparable way. PMID:27478649

  4. Chromosomal attachments set length and microtubule number in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitotic spindle

    PubMed Central

    Nannas, Natalie J.; O’Toole, Eileen T.; Winey, Mark; Murray, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    The length of the mitotic spindle varies among different cell types. A simple model for spindle length regulation requires balancing two forces: pulling, due to micro­tubules that attach to the chromosomes at their kinetochores, and pushing, due to interactions between microtubules that emanate from opposite spindle poles. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that spindle length scales with kinetochore number, increasing when kinetochores are inactivated and shortening on addition of synthetic or natural kinetochores, showing that kinetochore–microtubule interactions generate an inward force to balance forces that elongate the spindle. Electron microscopy shows that manipulating kinetochore number alters the number of spindle microtubules: adding extra kinetochores increases the number of spindle microtubules, suggesting kinetochore-based regulation of microtubule number. PMID:25318669

  5. Turbocharger with improved roller bearing shaft support

    SciTech Connect

    Gutknecht, D.A.

    1991-10-08

    This paper describes an exhaust gas driven turbocharger. It comprises: a housing, a shaft within the housing having a pair of ends, a compressor wheel mounted within the housing on one end of the shaft for rotation therewith, a turbine wheel mounted within the housing on the other end of the shaft for rotation therewith, means for communicating air through the compressor wheel, means for communicating exhaust gas through the turbine wheel to cause the latter to rotate the shaft and the compressor wheel mounted thereon to compress the air communicated through the compressor wheel, and bearing means mounting the shaft for rotation relative to the housing, the bearing means including a bearing outer ring, a bearing inner ring, and ball bearing elements supporting the bearing outer ring on the bearing inner ring, the ball bearing elements includes a first set of the elements and a second set of the elements spaced axially from the first set, the bearing outer ring being a rigid, uninterrupted member providing an uninterrupted structural link between the first and second sets to establish the axial spacing between the sets, a pair of axially spaced faying surfaces on the inner ring engaging corresponding faying surfaces on the shaft to support the inner ring on the shaft, the shaft defining a circumferentially extending surface between the faying surfaces on the inner ring cooperating with the shaft to define an air gap therebetween, one of the faying surfaces on the inner ring having a diameter greater than the diameter of the other of the faying surfaces on the inner ring.

  6. Regulation of mitotic spindle orientation during epidermal stratification.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Zhou, Jun

    2016-12-20

    The epidermis is a stratified epithelium that serves as a barrier to infection from environmental pathogens and prevents water loss. Epidermal stratification is tightly controlled during embryogenesis. Progenitor cells in the developing epidermis undergo both symmetric and asymmetric cell divisions to balance the growth of the skin surface area against the generation of differentiated cell layers. Therefore, understanding the relationship between oriented divisions of progenitor cells and the development and stratification of the epidermis is of paramount importance in the field of skin biology and pathology. We provide here an integrated view of recent studies implicating that improper orientation of the mitotic spindle contributes to disorders associated with abnormal epidermal stratification and suggesting that spindle orientation could serve as a potential therapeutic target in skin diseases.

  7. Cortical microtubule contacts position the spindle in C. elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Cleopatra; Srayko, Martin; Nedelec, Francois

    2007-05-04

    Interactions between microtubules and the cell cortex play a critical role in positioning organelles in a variety of biological contexts. Here we used Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system to study how cortex-microtubule interactions position the mitotic spindle in response to polarity cues. Imaging EBP-2::GFP and YFP::alpha-tubulin revealed that microtubules shrink soon after cortical contact, from which we propose that cortical adaptors mediate microtubule depolymerization energy into pulling forces. We also observe association of dynamic microtubules to form astral fibers that persist, despite the catastrophe events of individual microtubules. Computer simulations show that these effects, which are crucially determined by microtubule dynamics, can explain anaphase spindle oscillations and posterior displacement in 3D.

  8. Coordinated Spindle Assembly and Orientation Requires Clb5p-Dependent Kinase in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Marisa; Clarke, Duncan J.; Maddox, Paul; Salmon, E.D.; Bloom, Kerry; Reed, Steven I.

    2000-01-01

    The orientation of the mitotic spindle along a polarity axis is critical in asymmetric cell divisions. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, loss of the S-phase B-type cyclin Clb5p under conditions of limited cyclin-dependent kinase activity (cdc28-4 clb5Δ cells) causes a spindle positioning defect that results in an undivided nucleus entering the bud. Based on time-lapse digital imaging microscopy of microtubules labeled with green fluorescent protein fusions to either tubulin or dynein, we observed that the asymmetric behavior of the spindle pole bodies during spindle assembly was lost in the cdc28-4 clb5Δ cells. As soon as a spindle formed, both poles were equally likely to interact with the bud cell cortex. Persistent dynamic interactions with the bud ultimately led to spindle translocation across the bud neck. Thus, the mutant failed to assign one spindle pole body the task of organizing astral microtubules towards the mother cell. Our data suggest that Clb5p-associated kinase is required to confer mother-bound behavior to one pole in order to establish correct spindle polarity. In contrast, B-type cyclins, Clb3p and Clb4p, though partially redundant with Clb5p for an early role in spindle morphogenesis, preferentially promote spindle assembly. PMID:10662771

  9. Investigating Science through Bears (and Teddy Bears).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karlene Ray

    1997-01-01

    Presents cooperative classroom projects using science as the initial basis for the study of bears. These projects may also involve other areas of the curriculum such as mathematics, art, and music. "Black Bear" activities include following a park ranger to study our National Parks and researching and building a full-sized brown bear…

  10. Adaptive changes in the kinetochore architecture facilitate proper spindle assembly

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Valentin; Paul, Raja; Yang, Nachen; Ault, Jeffrey G.; O’Connell, Christopher B.; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F.; Mogilner, Alex; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic spindle formation relies on the stochastic capture of microtubules at kinetochores. Kinetochore architecture affects the efficiency and fidelity of this process with large kinetochores expected to accelerate assembly at the expense of accuracy, and smaller kinetochores to suppress errors at the expense of efficiency. We demonstrate that upon mitotic entry, kinetochores in cultured human cells form large crescents that subsequently compact into discrete structures on opposite sides of the centromere. This compaction occurs only after the formation of end-on microtubule attachments. Live-cell microscopy reveals that centromere rotation mediated by lateral kinetochore-microtubule interactions precedes formation of end-on attachments and kinetochore compaction. Computational analyses of kinetochore expansion-compaction in the context of lateral interactions correctly predict experimentally-observed spindle assembly times with reasonable error rates. The computational model suggests that larger kinetochores reduce both errors and assembly times, which can explain the robustness of spindle assembly and the functional significance of enlarged kinetochores. PMID:26258631

  11. Spindle assembly checkpoint and its regulators in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shao-Chen; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Meiosis is a unique form of cell division in which cells divide twice but DNA is duplicated only once. Errors in chromosome segregation during meiosis will result in aneuploidy, followed by loss of the conceptus during pregnancy or birth defects. During mitosis, cells utilize a mechanism called the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. A similar mechanism has been uncovered for meiosis in the last decade, especially in the past several years. METHODS For this review, we included data and relevant information obtained through a PubMed database search for all articles published in English from 1991 through 2011 which included the term 'meiosis', 'spindle assembly checkpoint', or 'SAC'. RESULTS There are 91 studies included. Evidence for the existence of SAC functions in meiosis is provided by studies on the SAC proteins mitotic-arrest deficient-1 (Mad1), Mad2, budding uninhibited by benzimidazole-1 (Bub1), Bub3, BubR1 and Mps1; microtubule-kinetochore attachment regulators Ndc80 complex, chromosomal passenger complex, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK), kinetochore null 1 (KNL1) and Mis12 complex and spindle stability regulators. CONCLUSIONS SAC and its regulators exist and function in meiosis, and their malfunctions may cause germ cell aneuploidy. However, species and sexual differences exist. Moreover, interaction of SAC components with other regulators is still poorly understood, which needs further study.

  12. The Prp19 complex directly functions in mitotic spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Jennifer C; Tegha-Dunghu, Justus; Dräger, Stefanie; Will, Cindy L; Lührmann, Reinhard; Gruss, Oliver J

    2013-01-01

    The conserved Prp19 (pre-RNA processing 19) complex is required for pre-mRNA splicing in eukaryotic nuclei. Recent RNAi screens indicated that knockdown of Prp19 complex subunits strongly delays cell proliferation. Here we show that knockdown of the smallest subunit, BCAS2/Spf27, destabilizes the entire complex and leads to specific mitotic defects in human cells. These could result from splicing failures in interphase or reflect a direct function of the complex in open mitosis. Using Xenopus extracts, in which cell cycle progression and spindle formation can be reconstituted in vitro, we tested Prp19 complex functions during a complete cell cycle and directly in open mitosis. Strikingly, immunodepletion of the complex either before or after interphase significantly reduces the number of intact spindles, and increases the percentage of spindles with lower microtubule density and impaired metaphase alignment of chromosomes. Our data identify the Prp19 complex as the first spliceosome subcomplex that directly contributes to mitosis in vertebrates independently of its function in interphase.

  13. Spatiotemporal Organization and Cross-Frequency Coupling of Sleep Spindles in Primate Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Saori; Murai, Rie; Shimazu, Hideki; Isomura, Yoshikazu; Mima, Tatsuya; Tsujimoto, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The sleep spindle has been implicated in thalamic sensory gating, cortical development, and memory consolidation. These multiple functions may depend on specific spatiotemporal emergence and interactions with other spindles and other forms of brain activity. Therefore, we measured sleep spindle cortical distribution, regional heterogeneity, synchronization, and phase relationships with other electroencephalographic components in freely moving primates. Methods: Transcortical field potentials were recorded from Japanese monkeys via telemetry and were analyzed using the Hilbert-Huang transform. Results: Spindle (12–20 Hz) current sources were identified over a wide region of the frontoparietal cortex. Most spindles occurred independently in their own frequency, but some appeared concordant between cortical areas with frequency interdependence, particularly in nearby regions and bilaterally symmetrical regions. Spindles in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex appeared around the surface-positive and depth-negative phase of transcortically recorded slow oscillations (< 1 Hz), whereas centroparietal spindles emerged around the opposite phase. The slow-oscillation phase reversed between the prefrontal and central regions. Gamma activities increased before spindle onset. Several regional heterogeneities in properties of human spindles were replicated in the monkeys, including frequency, density, and inter-cortical time lags, although their topographic patterns were different from those of humans. The phase-amplitude coupling between spindle and gamma activity was also replicated. Conclusions: Spindles in widespread cortical regions are possibly driven by independent rhythm generators, but are temporally associated to spindles in other regions and to slow and gamma oscillations by corticocortical and thalamocortical pathways. Citation: Takeuchi S, Murai R, Shimazu H, Isomura Y, Mima T, Tsujimoto T. Spatiotemporal organization and cross-frequency coupling

  14. Asymmetry of the budding yeast Tem1 GTPase at spindle poles is required for spindle positioning but not for mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Venturetti, Marianna; Hotz, Manuel; Lengefeld, Jette; Barral, Yves; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-02-01

    The asymmetrically dividing yeast S. cerevisiae assembles a bipolar spindle well after establishing the future site of cell division (i.e., the bud neck) and the division axis (i.e., the mother-bud axis). A surveillance mechanism called spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the spindle is properly positioned relative to the mother-bud axis, thereby ensuring the correct ploidy of the progeny. SPOC relies on the heterodimeric GTPase-activating protein Bub2/Bfa1 that inhibits the small GTPase Tem1, in turn essential for activating the mitotic exit network (MEN) kinase cascade and cytokinesis. The Bub2/Bfa1 GAP and the Tem1 GTPase form a complex at spindle poles that undergoes a remarkable asymmetry during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned, with the complex accumulating on the bud-directed old spindle pole. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. The mechanism driving asymmetry of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 in mitosis is unclear. Furthermore, whether asymmetry is involved in timely mitotic exit is controversial. We investigated the mechanism by which the GAP Bub2/Bfa1 controls GTP hydrolysis on Tem1 and generated a series of mutants leading to constitutive Tem1 activation. These mutants are SPOC-defective and invariably lead to symmetrical localization of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 at spindle poles, indicating that GTP hydrolysis is essential for asymmetry. Constitutive tethering of Bub2 or Bfa1 to both spindle poles impairs SPOC response but does not impair mitotic exit. Rather, it facilitates mitotic exit of MEN mutants, likely by increasing the residence time of Tem1 at spindle poles where it gets active. Surprisingly, all mutant or chimeric proteins leading to symmetrical localization of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 lead to increased symmetry at spindle poles of the Kar9 protein that mediates spindle positioning and cause spindle misalignment. Thus, asymmetry of the Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 complex is

  15. Asymmetry of the Budding Yeast Tem1 GTPase at Spindle Poles Is Required for Spindle Positioning But Not for Mitotic Exit

    PubMed Central

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Venturetti, Marianna; Hotz, Manuel; Lengefeld, Jette; Barral, Yves; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetrically dividing yeast S. cerevisiae assembles a bipolar spindle well after establishing the future site of cell division (i.e., the bud neck) and the division axis (i.e., the mother-bud axis). A surveillance mechanism called spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the spindle is properly positioned relative to the mother-bud axis, thereby ensuring the correct ploidy of the progeny. SPOC relies on the heterodimeric GTPase-activating protein Bub2/Bfa1 that inhibits the small GTPase Tem1, in turn essential for activating the mitotic exit network (MEN) kinase cascade and cytokinesis. The Bub2/Bfa1 GAP and the Tem1 GTPase form a complex at spindle poles that undergoes a remarkable asymmetry during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned, with the complex accumulating on the bud-directed old spindle pole. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. The mechanism driving asymmetry of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 in mitosis is unclear. Furthermore, whether asymmetry is involved in timely mitotic exit is controversial. We investigated the mechanism by which the GAP Bub2/Bfa1 controls GTP hydrolysis on Tem1 and generated a series of mutants leading to constitutive Tem1 activation. These mutants are SPOC-defective and invariably lead to symmetrical localization of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 at spindle poles, indicating that GTP hydrolysis is essential for asymmetry. Constitutive tethering of Bub2 or Bfa1 to both spindle poles impairs SPOC response but does not impair mitotic exit. Rather, it facilitates mitotic exit of MEN mutants, likely by increasing the residence time of Tem1 at spindle poles where it gets active. Surprisingly, all mutant or chimeric proteins leading to symmetrical localization of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 lead to increased symmetry at spindle poles of the Kar9 protein that mediates spindle positioning and cause spindle misalignment. Thus, asymmetry of the Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 complex is

  16. Reeling in chromosomes to spindle poles: The roles of microtubule-destabilizing enzymes in mitotic spindle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, David

    2004-03-01

    The central purpose of mitosis is achieved during anaphase when sister chromatids disjoin and translocate towards opposite poles of a microtubule-based machine termed mitotic spindle. We have identified two functionally distinct microtubule-destabilizing Kin I kinesin enzymes that are responsible for normal chromatid-to-pole motion during anaphase in Drosophila. One of them, KLP59C, is required to depolymerize MTs specifically at their kinetochore-associated "plus-ends" such that chromosomes 'chew' their way poleward. The second, KLP10A, is required to depolymerize MTs specifically at their pole-associated "minus-ends" thereby 'reeling' chromosomes into spindle poles. These findings provide the first description of the protein machinery that drives anaphase chromatid segregation by actively depolymerizing kinetochore MTs at both ends.

  17. Mechanical spin bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spin bearing assembly including, a pair of mutually opposing complementary bearing support members having mutually spaced apart bearing support surfaces which may be, for example, bearing races and a set of spin bearings located therebetween. Each spin bearing includes a pair of end faces, a central rotational axis passing through the end faces, a waist region substantially mid-way between the end faces and having a first thickness dimension, and discrete side surface regions located between the waist region and the end faces and having a second thickness dimension different from the first thickness dimension of the waist region and wherein the side surface regions further have respective curvilinear contact surfaces adapted to provide a plurality of bearing contact points on the bearing support members.

  18. Tem1 localization to the spindle pole bodies is essential for mitotic exit and impairs spindle checkpoint function

    PubMed Central

    Valerio-Santiago, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    The mitotic exit network (MEN) is a signaling cascade that triggers inactivation of the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases and exit from mitosis. The GTPase Tem1 localizes on the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and initiates MEN signaling. Tem1 activity is inhibited until anaphase by Bfa1-Bub2. These proteins are also part of the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC), a surveillance mechanism that restrains mitotic exit until the spindle is correctly positioned. Here, we show that regulation of Tem1 localization is essential for the proper function of the MEN and the SPOC. We demonstrate that the dynamics of Tem1 loading onto SPBs determine the recruitment of other MEN components to this structure, and reevaluate the interdependence in the localization of Tem1, Bfa1, and Bub2. We also find that removal of Tem1 from the SPBs is critical for the SPOC to impede cell cycle progression. Finally, we demonstrate for the first time that localization of Tem1 to the SPBs is a requirement for mitotic exit. PMID:21321099

  19. Tem1 localization to the spindle pole bodies is essential for mitotic exit and impairs spindle checkpoint function.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Santiago, Mauricio; Monje-Casas, Fernando

    2011-02-21

    The mitotic exit network (MEN) is a signaling cascade that triggers inactivation of the mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases and exit from mitosis. The GTPase Tem1 localizes on the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and initiates MEN signaling. Tem1 activity is inhibited until anaphase by Bfa1-Bub2. These proteins are also part of the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC), a surveillance mechanism that restrains mitotic exit until the spindle is correctly positioned. Here, we show that regulation of Tem1 localization is essential for the proper function of the MEN and the SPOC. We demonstrate that the dynamics of Tem1 loading onto SPBs determine the recruitment of other MEN components to this structure, and reevaluate the interdependence in the localization of Tem1, Bfa1, and Bub2. We also find that removal of Tem1 from the SPBs is critical for the SPOC to impede cell cycle progression. Finally, we demonstrate for the first time that localization of Tem1 to the SPBs is a requirement for mitotic exit.

  20. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  1. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  2. Dual detection of chromosomes and microtubules by the chromosomal passenger complex drives spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Boo Shan; Tan, Lei; Kapoor, Tarun M; Funabiki, Hironori

    2010-06-15

    Chromosome-dependent spindle assembly requires the chromosomal recruitment and activation of Aurora B, the kinase subunit of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). It remains unclear how the chromosome-activated kinase spatially transmits signals to organize the micron-scale spindle. Here we reveal that the CPC must detect two structures, chromosomes and microtubules, to support spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. While Aurora B is enriched on chromosomes in metaphase, we establish that a fraction of Aurora B is targeted to the metaphase spindle and phosphorylates microtubule-bound substrates. We demonstrate that chromosomally activated Aurora B must be targeted to microtubules to drive spindle assembly. Moreover, although the CPC-microtubule interaction can activate Aurora B, which further promotes microtubule assembly, this positive feedback is not initiated without chromosomes. We propose that the dual detection of chromosomes and microtubules by the CPC is a critical step in assembling spindles around and only around chromosomes.

  3. Network mechanisms of spindle-burst oscillations in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Minlebaev, Marat; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2007-01-01

    Early in development, cortical networks generate particular patterns of activity that participate in cortical development. The dominant pattern of electrical activity in the neonatal rat neocortex in vivo is a spatially confined spindle-burst. Here, we studied network mechanisms of generation of spindle-bursts in the barrel cortex of neonatal rats using a superfused cortex preparation in vivo. Both spontaneous and sensory-evoked spindle-bursts were present in the superfused barrel cortex. Pharmacological analysis revealed that spindle-bursts are driven by glutamatergic synapses with a major contribution of AMPA/kainate receptors, but slight participation of NMDA receptors and gap junctions. Although GABAergic synapses contributed minimally to the pacing the rhythm of spindle-burst oscillations, surround GABAergic inhibition appeared to be crucial for their compartmentalization. We propose that local spindle-burst oscillations, driven by glutamatergic synapses and spatially confined by GABAergic synapses, contribute to the development of barrel cortex during the critical period of developmental plasticity.

  4. Elm1 kinase activates the spindle position checkpoint kinase Kin4

    PubMed Central

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Orrico, Maria I.L.; Hofmann, Astrid; Ibrahim, Bashar

    2010-01-01

    Budding yeast asymmetric cell division relies upon the precise coordination of spindle orientation and cell cycle progression. The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is a surveillance mechanism that prevents cells with misoriented spindles from exiting mitosis. The cortical kinase Kin4 acts near the top of this network. How Kin4 kinase activity is regulated and maintained in respect to spindle positional cues remains to be established. Here, we show that the bud neck–associated kinase Elm1 participates in Kin4 activation and SPOC signaling by phosphorylating a conserved residue within the activation loop of Kin4. Blocking Elm1 function abolishes Kin4 kinase activity in vivo and eliminates the SPOC response to spindle misalignment. These findings establish a novel function for Elm1 in the coordination of spindle positioning with cell cycle progression via its control of Kin4. PMID:20855503

  5. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutradhar, S.; Basu, S.; Paul, R.

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed.

  6. Microtubule organization within mitotic spindles revealed by serial block face scanning EM and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Faye M; Honnor, Thomas R; Clarke, Nicholas I; Starling, Georgina P; Beckett, Alison J; Johansen, Adam M; Brettschneider, Julia A; Prior, Ian A; Royle, Stephen J

    2017-04-07

    Serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) is a powerful method to analyze cells in 3D. Here, working at the resolution limit of the method, we describe a correlative light-SBF-SEM workflow to resolve microtubules of the mitotic spindle in human cells. We present four examples of uses for this workflow which are not practical by light microscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy. First, distinguishing closely associated microtubules within K-fibers; second, resolving bridging fibers in the mitotic spindle; third, visualizing membranes in mitotic cells, relative to the spindle apparatus; fourth, volumetric analysis of kinetochores. Our workflow also includes new computational tools for exploring the spatial arrangement of MTs within the mitotic spindle. We use these tools to show that microtubule order in mitotic spindles is sensitive to the level of TACC3 on the spindle.

  7. Mitotic spindle assembly around RCC1-coated beads in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Halpin, David; Kalab, Petr; Wang, Jay; Weis, Karsten; Heald, Rebecca

    2011-12-01

    During cell division the genetic material on chromosomes is distributed to daughter cells by a dynamic microtubule structure called the mitotic spindle. Here we establish a reconstitution system to assess the contribution of individual chromosome proteins to mitotic spindle formation around single 10 µm diameter porous glass beads in Xenopus egg extracts. We find that Regulator of Chromosome Condensation 1 (RCC1), the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) for the small GTPase Ran, can induce bipolar spindle formation. Remarkably, RCC1 beads oscillate within spindles from pole to pole, a behavior that could be converted to a more typical, stable association by the addition of a kinesin together with RCC1. These results identify two activities sufficient to mimic chromatin-mediated spindle assembly, and establish a foundation for future experiments to reconstitute spindle assembly entirely from purified components.

  8. Elm1 kinase activates the spindle position checkpoint kinase Kin4.

    PubMed

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Orrico, Maria I L; Hofmann, Astrid; Ibrahim, Bashar; Pereira, Gislene

    2010-09-20

    Budding yeast asymmetric cell division relies upon the precise coordination of spindle orientation and cell cycle progression. The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is a surveillance mechanism that prevents cells with misoriented spindles from exiting mitosis. The cortical kinase Kin4 acts near the top of this network. How Kin4 kinase activity is regulated and maintained in respect to spindle positional cues remains to be established. Here, we show that the bud neck-associated kinase Elm1 participates in Kin4 activation and SPOC signaling by phosphorylating a conserved residue within the activation loop of Kin4. Blocking Elm1 function abolishes Kin4 kinase activity in vivo and eliminates the SPOC response to spindle misalignment. These findings establish a novel function for Elm1 in the coordination of spindle positioning with cell cycle progression via its control of Kin4.

  9. Live imaging of spindle pole disorganization in docetaxel-treated multicolor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaushi, Shinji . E-mail: ssaka@biochem.osakafu-u.ac.jp; Nishida, Kumi; Minamikawa, Harumi; Fukada, Takashi; Oka, Shigenori; Sugimoto, Kenji

    2007-06-08

    Treatment of cells with docetaxel at low concentrations induces aberrant bipolar spindles of which two centrosomes stay at only one pole, and also induces multipolar spindles. To gain insight into the relations between centrosome impairment and structural defects of the spindle, live-cell imaging was performed on a human MDA Auro/imp/H3 cell line in which centrosomes/mitotic spindles, nuclear membrane and chromatin were simultaneously visualized by fluorescent proteins. In the presence of docetaxel at IC{sub 50} concentration, the centrosomes did not segregate, and multiple aster-like structures ectopically arose around the disappearing nuclear membrane. Those ectopic structures formed an acentrosomal pole opposing to the two-centrosomes-containing pole. In late metaphase, one pole often fragmented into multiple spindle poles, leading multipolar division. These results suggest that spindle pole fragility may be induced by centrosome impairment, and collapse of the pole may contribute to induction of aneuploid daughter cells.

  10. Effects of electrical and natural stimulation of skin afferents on the gamma-spindle system of the triceps surae muscle.

    PubMed

    Johansson, H; Sjölander, P; Sojka, P; Wadell, I

    1989-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the extent to which skin receptors might influence the responses of primary muscle spindle afferents via reflex actions on the fusimotor system. The experiments were performed on 43 cats anaesthetized with alpha-chloralose. The alterations in fusimotor activity were assessed from changes in the responses of the muscle spindle afferents to sinusoidal stretching of their parent muscles (triceps surae and plantaris). The mean rate of firing and the modulation of the afferent response were determined. Control measurements were made in absence of any cutaneous stimulation. Tests were made (a) during physiological stimulation of skin afferents of the ipsilateral pad or of the contralateral hindlimb, or (b) during repetitive electrical stimulation of the sural nerve in the ipsilateral hindlimb, or of sural or superficial peroneal nerve in the contralateral hindlimb. Of the total number of 113 units tested with repetitive electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral sural nerve (at 20 Hz), 24.8% exhibited predominantly dynamic fusimotor reflexes, 5.3% mixed or predominantly static fusimotor reflexes. One unit studied in a preparation with intact spinal cord exhibited static reflexes at low stimulation intensities and dynamic ones at higher stimulation strengths. The remaining units (69%) were uninfluenced. When the receptor-bearing muscle was held at constant length and a train of stimuli (at 20 Hz) was applied to the ipsilateral sural nerve, the action potentials in the primary muscle spindle afferent could be stimulus-locked to the 3rd or 4th pulse in the train (and to the pulses following thereafter), with a latency of about 24 ms from the effective pulse. This 1:1 pattern of driving seemed to be mediated via static and/or dynamic fusimotor neurons. Natural stimulation influenced comparatively few units (3 of 65 units tested from the ipsilateral pad and 10 of 98 tested from the contralateral hindlimb), but when the effects

  11. Large Tailed Spindle Viruses of Archaea: a New Way of Doing Viral Business.

    PubMed

    Hochstein, Rebecca; Bollschweiler, Daniel; Engelhardt, Harald; Lawrence, C Martin; Young, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Viruses of Archaea continue to surprise us. Archaeal viruses have revealed new morphologies, protein folds, and gene content. This is especially true for large spindle viruses, which infect only Archaea. We present a comparison of particle morphologies, major coat protein structures, and gene content among the five characterized large spindle viruses to elucidate defining characteristics. Structural similarities and a core set of genes support the grouping of the large spindle viruses into a new superfamily.

  12. Muscle spindle composition and distribution in human young masseter and biceps brachii muscles reveal early growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Osterlund, Catharina; Liu, Jing-Xia; Thornell, Lars-Eric; Eriksson, Per-Olof

    2011-04-01

    Significant changes in extrafusal fiber type composition take place in the human masseter muscle from young age, 3-7 years, to adulthood, in parallel with jaw-face skeleton growth, changes of dentitions and improvement of jaw functions. As motor and sensory control systems of muscles are interlinked, also the intrafusal fiber population, that is, muscle spindles, should undergo age-related changes in fiber type appearance. To test this hypothesis, we examined muscle spindles in the young masseter muscle and compared the result with previous data on adult masseter spindles. Also muscle spindles in the young biceps brachii muscle were examined. The result showed that muscle spindle composition and distribution were alike in young and adult masseter. As for the adult masseter, young masseter contained exceptionally large muscle spindles, and with the highest spindle density and most complex spindles found in the deep masseter portion. Hence, contrary to our hypothesis, masseter spindles do not undergo major morphological changes between young age and adulthood. Also in the biceps, young spindles were alike adult spindles. Taken together, the results showed that human masseter and biceps muscle spindles are morphologically mature already at young age. We conclude that muscle spindles in the human young masseter and biceps precede the extrafusal fiber population in growth and maturation. This in turn suggests early reflex control and proprioceptive demands in learning and maturation of jaw motor skills. Similarly, well-developed muscle spindles in young biceps reflect early need of reflex control in learning and performing arm motor behavior.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Superconducting bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, John R.

    2000-02-01

    The physics and technology of superconducting bearings is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the use of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in rotating bearings. The basic phenomenology of levitational forces is presented, followed by a brief discussion of the theoretical models that can be used for conceptual understanding and calculations. The merits of various HTS bearing designs are presented, and the behaviour of HTS bearings in typical situations is discussed. The article concludes with a brief survey of various proposed applications for HTS bearings.

  14. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  15. A microtubule-destabilizing kinesin motor regulates spindle length and anchoring in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianwei; Hallen, Mark A; Yankel, Christine D; Endow, Sharyn A

    2008-02-11

    The kinesin-13 motor, KLP10A, destabilizes microtubules at their minus ends in mitosis and binds to polymerizing plus ends in interphase, regulating spindle and microtubule dynamics. Little is known about kinesin-13 motors in meiosis. In this study, we report that KLP10A localizes to the unusual pole bodies of anastral Drosophila melanogaster oocyte meiosis I spindles as well as spindle fibers, centromeres, and cortical microtubules. We frequently observe the pole bodies attached to cortical microtubules, indicating that KLP10A could mediate spindle anchoring to the cortex via cortical microtubules. Oocytes treated with drugs that suppress microtubule dynamics exhibit spindles that are reoriented more vertically to the cortex than untreated controls. A dominant-negative klp10A mutant shows both reoriented and shorter oocyte spindles, implying that, unexpectedly, KLP10A may stabilize rather than destabilize microtubules, regulating spindle length and positioning the oocyte spindle. By altering microtubule dynamics, KLP10A could promote spindle reorientation upon oocyte activation.

  16. Requirement for Nudel and dynein for assembly of the lamin B spindle matrix.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Tsai, Ming-Ying; Wang, Shusheng; Lu, Bingwen; Chen, Rong; Iii, John R Yates; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2009-03-01

    The small guanosine triphosphatase Ran loaded with GTP (RanGTP) can stimulate assembly of the type V intermediate filament protein lamin B into a membranous lamin B spindle matrix, which is required for proper microtubule organization during spindle assembly. Microtubules in turn enhance assembly of the matrix. Here we report that the isolated matrix contains known spindle assembly factors such as dynein and Nudel. Using spindle assembly assays in Xenopus egg extracts, we show that Nudel regulates microtubule organization during spindle assembly independently of its function at kinetochores. Importantly, Nudel interacts directly with lamin B to facilitate the accumulation and assembly of lamin-B-containing matrix on microtubules in a dynein-dependent manner. Perturbing either Nudel or dynein inhibited the assembly of lamin B matrix. However, depleting lamin B still allowed the formation of matrices containing dynein and Nudel. Therefore, dynein and Nudel regulate assembly of the lamin B matrix. Interestingly, we found that whereas depleting lamin B resulted in disorganized spindle and spindle poles, disrupting the function of Nudel or dynein caused a complete lack of spindle pole focusing. We suggest that Nudel regulates microtubule organization in part by facilitating assembly of the lamin B spindle matrix in a dynein-dependent manner.

  17. The role of Hklp2 in the stabilization and maintenance of spindle bipolarity.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, David; Takagi, Masatoshi; Imamoto, Naoko; Vernos, Isabelle

    2009-11-03

    Spindle bipolarity relies on a fine balance of forces exerted by various molecular motors [1-4]. In most animal cells, spindle bipolarity requires sustained outward forces to push the spindle poles apart, an activity that is provided by Eg5, a conserved homotetrameric plus-end-directed kinesin that crosslinks and slides antiparallel microtubules apart [5]. These pushing forces are balanced by inward minus-end-directed forces. Impairing both Eg5 and dynein restores the formation of functional bipolar spindles [4], although the mechanism at play is far from clear. The current model also fails to explain why in some systems Eg5 inhibition does not promote bipolar spindle collapse [6, 7] or why increasing Eg5 levels does not interfere with bipolar spindle assembly [8]. Moreover, the C. elegans Eg5 ortholog is not required for bipolar spindle formation [9]. We show here that the kinesin Hklp2 participates in the assembly and stabilization of the bipolar spindle. Hklp2 localizes to the mitotic microtubules in a TPX2-dependent manner and to the chromosomes through Ki67. Our data indicate that its mechanism of action is clearly distinct from and complementary to that of Eg5, providing an additional understanding of the mechanism driving the formation and maintenance of the bipolar spindle.

  18. Influence of 14-day hind limb unloading on isolated muscle spindle activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Hong; Fan, Xiao Li; Song, Xin Ai; Wu, Su Di; Ren, Jun Chan; Chen, Ming Xia

    2010-09-01

    During hind limb unloading (HU), the soleus is often in a shortened position and the natural physiological stimulus of muscle spindles is altered, such that muscle spindle activity also changes. Using isolated spindle conditions, the present study investigates the electrophysiological activity and ultrastructure of muscle spindles following HU. Results show that muscle spindle discharges fall into either of two main patterns, single spikes or spike clusters in shortened positions, with a steady frequency of 18-38 spikes/s (mean 29.08 +/- 2.45) in an extended position. Following 14-day HU, afferent discharge activity was significantly altered in soleus muscle spindles. Duration of individual spikes was significantly prolonged, from 0.54 +/- 0.05 ms for control rats to 1.53 +/- 0.25 ms for rats in the HU group. In a shortened position, regular rhythm afferent discharges were obviously depressed, and the majority of muscle spindles became silent, while in an extended position, the discharges remained continuous but with decreased frequency. Results also show that the ultrastructure of muscle spindles experience degenerative changes during HU. Altered muscle spindle afference could possibly modify the activity of motor neurons and further affect the activity of extrafusal fibers.

  19. Noninvasive three-dimensional live imaging methodology for the spindles at meiosis and mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jing-gao; Huo, Tiancheng; Tian, Ning; Chen, Tianyuan; Wang, Chengming; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Fengying; Lu, Danyu; Chen, Dieyan; Ma, Wanyun; Sun, Jia-lin; Xue, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The spindle plays a crucial role in normal chromosome alignment and segregation during meiosis and mitosis. Studying spindles in living cells noninvasively is of great value in assisted reproduction technology (ART). Here, we present a novel spindle imaging methodology, full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). Without any dye labeling and fixation, we demonstrate the first successful application of FF-OCT to noninvasive three-dimensional (3-D) live imaging of the meiotic spindles within the mouse living oocytes at metaphase II as well as the mitotic spindles in the living zygotes at metaphase and telophase. By post-processing of the 3-D dataset obtained with FF-OCT, the important morphological and spatial parameters of the spindles, such as short and long axes, spatial localization, and the angle of meiotic spindle deviation from the first polar body in the oocyte were precisely measured with the spatial resolution of 0.7 μm. Our results reveal the potential of FF-OCT as an imaging tool capable of noninvasive 3-D live morphological analysis for spindles, which might be useful to ART related procedures and many other spindle related studies.

  20. Live-Cell Analysis of Mitotic Spindle Formation in Taxol-Treated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hornick, Jessica E.; Bader, Jason R.; Tribble, Emily K.; Trimble, Kayleigh; Breunig, J. Scott; Halpin, Elizabeth S.; Vaughan, Kevin T.; Hinchcliffe, Edward H.

    2009-01-01

    Taxol functions to suppress the dynamic behavior of individual microtubules, and induces multipolar mitotic spindles. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which taxol disrupts normal bipolar spindle assembly in vivo. Using live imaging of GFP-α tubulin expressing cells, we examined spindle assembly after taxol treatment. We find that as taxol-treated cells enter mitosis, there is a dramatic redistribution of the microtubule network from the centrosomes to the cell cortex. As they align there, the cortical microtubules recruit NuMA to their embedded ends, followed by the kinesin motor HSET. These cortical microtubules then bud off to form cytasters, which fuse into multipolar spindles. Cytoplasmic dynein and dynactin do not re-localize to cortical microtubules, and disruption of dynein/dynactin interactions by over-expression of p50 “dynamitin” does not prevent cytaster formation. Taxol added well before spindle poles begin to form induces multipolarity, but taxol added after nascent spindle poles are visible—but before NEB is complete—results in bipolar spindles. Our results suggest that taxol prevents rapid transport of key components, such as NuMA, to the nascent spindle poles. The net result is loss of mitotic spindle pole cohesion, microtubule re-distribution, and cytaster formation. PMID:18481305

  1. REM sleep behaviour disorder is associated with lower fast and higher slow sleep spindle densities.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Christian; Godin, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences in sleep spindle properties and scalp topography between patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and healthy controls, whole-night polysomnograms of 35 patients diagnosed with RBD and 35 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex were compared. Recordings included a 19-lead 10-20 electroencephalogram montage and standard electromyogram, electrooculogram, electrocardiogram and respiratory leads. Sleep spindles were automatically detected using a standard algorithm, and their characteristics (amplitude, duration, density, frequency and frequency slope) compared between groups. Topological analyses of group-discriminative features were conducted. Sleep spindles occurred at a significantly (e.g. t34 = -4.49; P = 0.00008 for C3) lower density (spindles ∙ min(-1) ) for RBD (mean ± SD: 1.61 ± 0.56 for C3) than for control (2.19 ± 0.61 for C3) participants. However, when distinguishing slow and fast spindles using thresholds individually adapted to the electroencephalogram spectrum of each participant, densities smaller (31-96%) for fast but larger (20-120%) for slow spindles were observed in RBD in all derivations. Maximal differences were in more posterior regions for slow spindles, but over the entire scalp for fast spindles. Results suggest that the density of sleep spindles is altered in patients with RBD and should therefore be investigated as a potential marker of future neurodegeneration in these patients.

  2. Aurora A phosphorylation of WD40-repeat protein 62 in mitotic spindle regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Nicholas R.; Yeap, Yvonne Y. C.; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A.; Bogoyevitch, Marie A.; Quinn, Leonie M.; Ng, Dominic C. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitotic spindle organization is regulated by centrosomal kinases that potentiate recruitment of spindle-associated proteins required for normal mitotic progress including the microcephaly protein WD40-repeat protein 62 (WDR62). WDR62 functions underlie normal brain development as autosomal recessive mutations and wdr62 loss cause microcephaly. Here we investigate the signaling interactions between WDR62 and the mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA) that has been recently shown to cooperate to control brain size in mice. The spindle recruitment of WDR62 is closely correlated with increased levels of AURKA following mitotic entry. We showed that depletion of TPX2 attenuated WDR62 localization at spindle poles indicating that TPX2 co-activation of AURKA is required to recruit WDR62 to the spindle. We demonstrated that AURKA activity contributed to the mitotic phosphorylation of WDR62 residues Ser49 and Thr50 and phosphorylation of WDR62 N-terminal residues was required for spindle organization and metaphase chromosome alignment. Our analysis of several MCPH-associated WDR62 mutants (V65M, R438H and V1314RfsX18) that are mislocalized in mitosis revealed that their interactions and phosphorylation by AURKA was substantially reduced consistent with the notion that AURKA is a key determinant of WDR62 spindle recruitment. Thus, our study highlights the role of AURKA signaling in the spatiotemporal control of WDR62 at spindle poles where it maintains spindle organization. PMID:26713495

  3. Ongoing network state controls the length of sleep spindles via inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Barthó, Péter; Slézia, Andrea; Mátyás, Ferenc; Faradzs-Zade, Lejla; Ulbert, István; Harris, Kenneth D; Acsády, László

    2014-06-18

    Sleep spindles are major transient oscillations of the mammalian brain. Spindles are generated in the thalamus; however, what determines their duration is presently unclear. Here, we measured somatic activity of excitatory thalamocortical (TC) cells together with axonal activity of reciprocally coupled inhibitory reticular thalamic cells (nRTs) and quantified cycle-by-cycle alterations in their firing in vivo. We found that spindles with different durations were paralleled by distinct nRT activity, and nRT firing sharply dropped before the termination of all spindles. Both initial nRT and TC activity was correlated with spindle length, but nRT correlation was more robust. Analysis of spindles evoked by optogenetic activation of nRT showed that spindle probability, but not spindle length, was determined by the strength of the light stimulus. Our data indicate that during natural sleep a dynamically fluctuating thalamocortical network controls the duration of sleep spindles via the major inhibitory element of the circuits, the nRT.

  4. Disseminated pleomorphic myofibrosarcoma in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    PubMed

    Mete, A; Woods, L; Famini, D; Anderson, M

    2012-01-01

    The pathological and diagnostic features of a widely disseminated pleomorphic high-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma are described in a 23-year-old male brown bear (Ursus arctos horribilis). Firm, solid, white to tan neoplastic nodules, often with cavitated or soft grey-red necrotic centres, were observed throughout most internal organs, subcutaneous tissues and skeletal muscles on gross examination. Microscopically, the tumour consisted of pleomorphic spindle cells forming interlacing fascicles with a focal storiform pattern with large numbers of bizarre polygonal multinucleate cells, frequently within a collagenous stroma. Immunohistochemistry, Masson's trichrome stain and transmission electron microscopy designated the myofibroblast as the cell of origin. This is the first case of a high-grade myofibrosarcoma in a grizzly bear.

  5. Optimized Flight Path for Localization Using Line of Bearing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    OPTIMIZED FLIGHT PATH FOR LOCALIZATION USING LINE OF BEARING THESIS Namkyu Kim, Captain, Republic of Korea AFIT-ENY-MS-15-M-246 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR...limitations. AFIT-ENY-MS-15-M-246 OPTIMIZED FLIGHT PATH FOR LOCALIZATION USING LINE OF BEARING THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics...LINE OF BEARING THESIS Namkyu Kim, BS Captain, Republic of Korea Committee Membership: Richard G. Cobb, PhD Chair David R. Jacques, PhD Member Matthew

  6. [Receptor adaptation of muscle spindles treated in different ways].

    PubMed

    Zalkind, V I; Rokotova, N A

    1978-11-01

    Comparison of the grades of 60 sensitive muscle spindle terminals on two actions: gradual stretch of the muscle and short intensive tetanization of the muscle nerve, showed that, irrespective of the mode of action, the character of adaptation remains the smae in majority of units. The speed of receptors adaptation depends not on the specific of testing precedures, but, apparently, on the means of connection of the sensitive terminals with different types of intrafusal muscle fibers with different elasticviscous properties. The possible reason for speedy adaptation of muscle receptors of elementary dynamic type, is discussed.

  7. Cdh1 is an antagonist of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Masayoshi; Ushimaru, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors unsatisfied connections of microtubules to kinetochores and prevents anaphase onset by inhibition of the ubiquitin ligase E3 anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) in association with the activator Cdc20. Another APC/C activator, Cdh1, exists permanently throughout the cell cycle but it becomes active from telophase to G1. Here, we show that Cdh1 is partially active and mediates securin degradation even in SAC-active metaphase cells. Additionally, Cdh1 mediates Cdc20 degradation in metaphase, promoting formation of the APC/C-Cdh1. These results indicate that Cdh1 opposes the SAC and promotes anaphase transition.

  8. A high-precision instrument for analyzing nonlinear dynamic behavior of bearing cage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Chen, H; Yu, T; Li, B

    2016-08-01

    The high-precision ball bearing is fundamental to the performance of complex mechanical systems. As the speed increases, the cage behavior becomes a key factor in influencing the bearing performance, especially life and reliability. This paper develops a high-precision instrument for analyzing nonlinear dynamic behavior of the bearing cage. The trajectory of the rotational center and non-repetitive run-out (NRRO) of the cage are used to evaluate the instability of cage motion. This instrument applied an aerostatic spindle to support and spin test the bearing to decrease the influence of system error. Then, a high-speed camera is used to capture images when the bearing works at high speeds. A 3D trajectory tracking software tema Motion is used to track the spot which marked the cage surface. Finally, by developing the matlab program, a Lissajous' figure was used to evaluate the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the cage with different speeds. The trajectory of rotational center and NRRO of the cage with various speeds are analyzed. The results can be used to predict the initial failure and optimize cage structural parameters. In addition, the repeatability precision of instrument is also validated. In the future, the motorized spindle will be applied to increase testing speed and image processing algorithms will be developed to analyze the trajectory of the cage.

  9. A high-precision instrument for analyzing nonlinear dynamic behavior of bearing cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Chen, H.; Yu, T.; Li, B.

    2016-08-01

    The high-precision ball bearing is fundamental to the performance of complex mechanical systems. As the speed increases, the cage behavior becomes a key factor in influencing the bearing performance, especially life and reliability. This paper develops a high-precision instrument for analyzing nonlinear dynamic behavior of the bearing cage. The trajectory of the rotational center and non-repetitive run-out (NRRO) of the cage are used to evaluate the instability of cage motion. This instrument applied an aerostatic spindle to support and spin test the bearing to decrease the influence of system error. Then, a high-speed camera is used to capture images when the bearing works at high speeds. A 3D trajectory tracking software tema Motion is used to track the spot which marked the cage surface. Finally, by developing the matlab program, a Lissajous' figure was used to evaluate the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the cage with different speeds. The trajectory of rotational center and NRRO of the cage with various speeds are analyzed. The results can be used to predict the initial failure and optimize cage structural parameters. In addition, the repeatability precision of instrument is also validated. In the future, the motorized spindle will be applied to increase testing speed and image processing algorithms will be developed to analyze the trajectory of the cage.

  10. Structure, distribution and innervation of muscle spindles in avian fast and slow skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ovalle, W K; Dow, P R; Nahirney, P C

    1999-04-01

    Muscle spindles in 2 synergistic avian skeletal muscles, the anterior (ALD) and posterior (PLD) latissimus dorsi, were studied by light and electron microscopy to determine whether morphological or quantitative differences existed between these sensory receptors. Differences were found in the density, distribution and location of muscle spindles in the 2 muscles. They also differed with respect to the morphology of their capsules and intracapsular components. The slow ALD possessed muscle spindles which were evenly distributed throughout the muscle, whereas in the fast PLD they were mainly concentrated around the single nerve entry point into the muscle. The muscle spindle index (number of spindles per gram wet muscle weight) in the ALD was more than double that of its fast-twitch PLD counterpart (130.5+/-2.0 vs 55.4+/-2.0 respectively, n = 6). The number of intrafusal fibres per spindle ranged from 1 to 8 in the ALD and 2 to 9 in the PLD, and their diameters varied from 5.0 to 16.0 microm and 4.5 to 18.5 microm, respectively. Large diameter intrafusal fibres were more frequently encountered in spindles of the PLD. Unique to the ALD was the presence of monofibre muscle spindles (12.7% of total spindles observed in ALD) which contained a solitary intrafusal fibre. In muscle spindles of both the ALD and PLD, sensory nerve endings terminated in a spiral fashion on the intrafusal fibres in their equatorial regions. Motor innervation was restricted to either juxtaequatorial or polar regions of the intrafusal fibres. Outer capsule components were extensive in polar and juxtaequatorial regions of ALD spindles, whereas inner capsule cells of PLD spindles were more numerous in juxtaequatorial and equatorial regions. Overall, muscle spindles of the PLD exhibited greater complexity with respect to the number of intrafusal fibres per spindle, range of intrafusal fibre diameters and development of their inner capsules. It is postulated that the differences in muscle spindle

  11. Muscle spindles in human tibialis anterior encode muscle fascicle length changes.

    PubMed

    Day, James; Bent, Leah R; Birznieks, Ingvars; Macefield, Vaughan G; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2017-04-01

    Muscle spindles provide exquisitely sensitive proprioceptive information regarding joint position and movement. Through passively driven length changes in the muscle-tendon unit (MTU), muscle spindles detect joint rotations because of their in-parallel mechanical linkage to muscle fascicles. In human microneurography studies, muscle fascicles are assumed to follow the MTU and, as such, fascicle length is not measured in such studies. However, under certain mechanical conditions, compliant structures can act to decouple the fascicles, and, therefore, the spindles, from the MTU. Such decoupling may reduce the fidelity by which muscle spindles encode joint position and movement. The aim of the present study was to measure, for the first time, both the changes in firing of single muscle spindle afferents and changes in muscle fascicle length in vivo from the tibialis anterior muscle (TA) during passive rotations about the ankle. Unitary recordings were made from 15 muscle spindle afferents supplying TA via a microelectrode inserted into the common peroneal nerve. Ultrasonography was used to measure the length of an individual fascicle of TA. We saw a strong correlation between fascicle length and firing rate during passive ankle rotations of varying rates (0.1-0.5 Hz) and amplitudes (1-9°). In particular, we saw responses observed at relatively small changes in muscle length that highlight the sensitivity of the TA muscle to small length changes. This study is the first to measure spindle firing and fascicle dynamics in vivo and provides an experimental basis for further understanding the link between fascicle length, MTU length, and spindle firing patterns.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Muscle spindles are exquisitely sensitive to changes in muscle length, but recordings from human muscle spindle afferents are usually correlated with joint angle rather than muscle fascicle length. In this study, we monitored both muscle fascicle length and spindle firing from the human tibialis

  12. Comparison of predicted and experimental thermal performance of angular-contact ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Predicted bearing heat generation and bearing temperature were verified by experimental data for ball bearings over a range of sizes, shaft speeds, and lubricant flow rates. The computer program Shaberth requires, as input, a factor which describes the air-oil mixture in the bearing cavity for calculation of the ball drag contribution to bearing heat generation. An equation for this lubricant percent volume in the bearing cavity was derived and appears to be valid over the range of test conditions including bearing bore sizes from 35 to 167 mm and shaft speeds from 1.0 to 3.0 million DN.

  13. Bearings: Technology and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A brief status report on bearing technology and present and near-term future problems that warrant research support is presented. For rolling element bearings a material with improved fracture toughness, life data in the low Lambda region, a comprehensive failure theory verified by life data and incorporated into dynamic analyses, and an improved corrosion resistant alloy are perceived as important needs. For hydrodynamic bearings better definition of cavitation boundaries and pressure distributions for squeeze film dampers, and geometry optimization for minimum power loss in turbulent film bearings are needed. For gas film bearings, foil bearing geometries that form more nearly optimum film shapes for maximum load capacity, and more effective surface protective coatings for high temperature operation are needed.

  14. Kinesin spindle protein SiRNA slows tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Marra, Emanuele; Palombo, Fabio; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Aurisicchio, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a member of the kinesin superfamily of microtubule-based motors, plays a critical role in mitosis as it mediates centrosome separation and bipolar spindle assembly and maintenance. Inhibition of KSP function leads to cell cycle arrest at mitosis with the formation of monoastral microtubule arrays, and ultimately, to cell death. Several KSP inhibitors are currently being studied in clinical trials and provide new opportunities for the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. RNA interference (RNAi) may represent a powerful strategy to interfere with key molecular pathways involved in cancer. In this study, we have established an efficient method for intratumoral delivery of siRNA. We evaluated short interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes targeting luciferase as surrogate marker or KSP sequence. To examine the potential feasibility of RNAi therapy, the siRNA was transfected into pre-established lesions by means of intratumor electro-transfer of RNA therapeutics (IERT). This technology allowed cell permeation of the nucleic acids and to efficiently knock down gene expression, albeit transiently. The KSP-specific siRNA drastically reduced outgrowth of subcutaneous melanoma and ovarian cancer lesions. Our results show that intratumoral electro-transfer of siRNA is feasible and KSP-specific siRNA may provide a novel strategy for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Expression of basement membrane antigens in spindle cell melanoma.

    PubMed

    Prieto, V G; Woodruff, J M

    1998-07-01

    Spindle cell melanoma (SCM) is an uncommon form of melanoma that may be confused histologically with other tumors, including malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). Tumors with neural differentiation and melanocytic nevi may both show basement membrane immunohistochemically and at the ultrastructural level. However, most ultrastructural studies of melanoma have failed to demonstrate well formed basement membrane around tumor cells. The presence of basement membrane has been used by some authors as evidence favoring MPNST, as opposed to SCM. To evaluate this distinction immunohistochemically, 22 primary and metastatic cutaneous melanomas having a spindle cell component (SCM) were studied using monoclonal antibodies against laminin and Type IV collagen. S100 protein and HMB45 antigen expression were also studied. All but one of the SCM were reactive for S100 protein in at least 25% of the cells. Thirteen of 20 tumors (65%) were focally reactive with HMB45. Laminin was expressed in 42% of the tumors (only membranous pattern in 3; cytoplasmic and membranous in 5). Seventeen tumors (77%) expressed type IV collagen (only membranous pattern in 7; cytoplasmic and membranous pattern in 10). Laminin and type IV collagen, known components of basement membrane, are often found in SCM. Therefore, their detection cannot be used to distinguish SCM from MPNST.

  16. Topological defects in confined populations of spindle-shaped cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Most spindle-shaped cells (including smooth muscles and sarcomas) organize in vivo into well-aligned `nematic’ domains, creating intrinsic topological defects that may be used to probe the behaviour of these active nematic systems. Active non-cellular nematics have been shown to be dominated by activity, yielding complex chaotic flows. However, the regime in which live spindle-shaped cells operate, and the importance of cell-substrate friction in particular, remains largely unexplored. Using in vitro experiments, we show that these active cellular nematics operate in a regime in which activity is effectively damped by friction, and that the interaction between defects is controlled by the system’s elastic nematic energy. Due to the activity of the cells, these defects behave as self-propelled particles and pairwise annihilate until all displacements freeze as cell crowding increases. When confined in mesoscopic circular domains, the system evolves towards two identical +1/2 disclinations facing each other. The most likely reduced positions of these defects are independent of the size of the disk, the cells’ activity or even the cell type, but are well described by equilibrium liquid crystal theory. These cell-based systems thus operate in a regime more stable than other active nematics, which may be necessary for their biological function.

  17. Bear Spray Safety Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  18. Sustaining sleep spindles through enhanced SK2-channel activity consolidates sleep and elevates arousal threshold.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Ralf D; Astori, Simone; Bond, Chris T; Rovó, Zita; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Adelman, John P; Franken, Paul; Lüthi, Anita

    2012-10-03

    Sleep spindles are synchronized 11-15 Hz electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations predominant during nonrapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS). Rhythmic bursting in the reticular thalamic nucleus (nRt), arising from interplay between Ca(v)3.3-type Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+)-dependent small-conductance-type 2 (SK2) K(+) channels, underlies spindle generation. Correlative evidence indicates that spindles contribute to memory consolidation and protection against environmental noise in human NREMS. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism through which spindle power is selectively extended and we probed the actions of intensified spindling in the naturally sleeping mouse. Using electrophysiological recordings in acute brain slices from SK2 channel-overexpressing (SK2-OE) mice, we found that nRt bursting was potentiated and thalamic circuit oscillations were prolonged. Moreover, nRt cells showed greater resilience to transit from burst to tonic discharge in response to gradual depolarization, mimicking transitions out of NREMS. Compared with wild-type littermates, chronic EEG recordings of SK2-OE mice contained less fragmented NREMS, while the NREMS EEG power spectrum was conserved. Furthermore, EEG spindle activity was prolonged at NREMS exit. Finally, when exposed to white noise, SK2-OE mice needed stronger stimuli to arouse. Increased nRt bursting thus strengthens spindles and improves sleep quality through mechanisms independent of EEG slow waves (<4 Hz), suggesting SK2 signaling as a new potential therapeutic target for sleep disorders and for neuropsychiatric diseases accompanied by weakened sleep spindles.

  19. Sustaining sleep spindles through enhanced SK2 channel activity consolidates sleep and elevates arousal threshold

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Ralf D.; Astori, Simone; Bond, Chris T.; Rovó, Zita; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Adelman, John P.; Franken, Paul; Lüthi, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Sleep spindles are synchronized 11–15 Hz electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations predominant during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS). Rhythmic bursting in the reticular thalamic nucleus (nRt), arising from interplay between Cav3.3-type Ca2+ channels and Ca2+-dependent small-conductance-type 2 (SK2) K+ channels, underlies spindle generation. Correlative evidence indicates that spindles contribute to memory consolidation and protection against environmental noise in human NREMS. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism through which spindle power is selectively extended and we probed the actions of intensified spindling in the naturally sleeping mouse. Using electrophysiological recordings in acute brain slices from SK2 channel-over-expressing (SK2-OE) mice, we found that nRt bursting was potentiated and thalamic circuit oscillations were prolonged. Moreover, nRt cells showed greater resilience to transit from burst to tonic discharge in response to gradual depolarization, mimicking transitions out of NREMS. Compared to wild-type littermates, chronic EEG recordings of SK2-OE mice contained less fragmented NREMS, while the NREMS EEG power spectrum was conserved. Furthermore, EEG spindle activity was prolonged at NREMS exit. Finally, when exposed to white noise, SK2-OE mice needed stronger stimuli to arouse. Increased nRt bursting thus strengthens spindles and improves sleep quality through mechanisms independent of EEG slow-waves (< 4 Hz), suggesting SK2 signaling as a new potential therapeutic target for sleep disorders and for neuropsychiatric diseases accompanied by weakened sleep spindles. PMID:23035101

  20. An organelle-exclusion envelope assists mitosis and underlies distinct molecular crowding in the spindle region.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Nina; Pawar, Nisha; Weiss, Matthias; Maiato, Helder

    2015-08-31

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubular assembly required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Additionally, a spindle matrix has long been proposed to assist this process, but its nature has remained elusive. By combining live-cell imaging with laser microsurgery, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we uncovered a microtubule-independent mechanism that underlies the accumulation of molecules in the spindle region. This mechanism relies on a membranous system surrounding the mitotic spindle that defines an organelle-exclusion zone that is conserved in human cells. Supported by mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that organelle exclusion by a membrane system causes spatio-temporal differences in molecular crowding states that are sufficient to drive accumulation of mitotic regulators, such as Mad2 and Megator/Tpr, as well as soluble tubulin, in the spindle region. This membranous "spindle envelope" confined spindle assembly, and its mechanical disruption compromised faithful chromosome segregation. Thus, cytoplasmic compartmentalization persists during early mitosis to promote spindle assembly and function.

  1. Timely Endocytosis of Cytokinetic Enzymes Prevents Premature Spindle Breakage during Mitotic Exit

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Yeong, Foong May

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis requires the spatio-temporal coordination of membrane deposition and primary septum (PS) formation at the division site to drive acto-myosin ring (AMR) constriction. It has been demonstrated that AMR constriction invariably occurs only after the mitotic spindle disassembly. It has also been established that Chitin Synthase II (Chs2p) neck localization precedes mitotic spindle disassembly during mitotic exit. As AMR constriction depends upon PS formation, the question arises as to how chitin deposition is regulated so as to prevent premature AMR constriction and mitotic spindle breakage. In this study, we propose that cells regulate the coordination between spindle disassembly and AMR constriction via timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes, Chs2p, Chs3p, and Fks1p. Inhibition of endocytosis leads to over accumulation of cytokinetic enzymes during mitotic exit, which accelerates the constriction of the AMR, and causes spindle breakage that eventually could contribute to monopolar spindle formation in the subsequent round of cell division. Intriguingly, the mitotic spindle breakage observed in endocytosis mutants can be rescued either by deleting or inhibiting the activities of, CHS2, CHS3 and FKS1, which are involved in septum formation. The findings from our study highlight the importance of timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes at the division site in safeguarding mitotic spindle integrity during mitotic exit. PMID:27447488

  2. The Plk1 target Kizuna stabilizes mitotic centrosomes to ensure spindle bipolarity.

    PubMed

    Oshimori, Naoki; Ohsugi, Miho; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2006-10-01

    Formation of a bipolar spindle is essential for faithful chromosome segregation at mitosis. Because centrosomes define spindle poles, defects in centrosome number and structural organization can lead to a loss of bipolarity. In addition, microtubule-mediated pulling and pushing forces acting on centrosomes and chromosomes are also important for bipolar spindle formation. Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a highly conserved Ser/Thr kinase that has essential roles in the formation of a bipolar spindle with focused poles. However, the mechanism by which Plk1 regulates spindle-pole formation is poorly understood. Here, we identify a novel centrosomal substrate of Plk1, Kizuna (Kiz), depletion of which causes fragmentation and dissociation of the pericentriolar material from centrioles at prometaphase, resulting in multipolar spindles. We demonstrate that Kiz is critical for establishing a robust mitotic centrosome architecture that can endure the forces that converge on the centrosomes during spindle formation, and suggest that Plk1 maintains the integrity of the spindle poles by phosphorylating Kiz.

  3. An allometric analysis of the number of muscle spindles in mammalian skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Banks, R W

    2006-06-01

    An allometric analysis of the number of muscle spindles in relation to muscle mass in mammalian (mouse, rat, guinea-pig, cat, human) skeletal muscles is presented. It is shown that the trend to increasing number as muscle mass increases follows an isometric (length) relationship between species, whereas within a species, at least for the only essentially complete sample (human), the number of spindles scales, on average, with the square root rather than the cube root of muscle mass. An attempt is made to reconcile these apparently discrepant relationships. Use of the widely accepted spindle density (number of spindles g(-1) of muscle) as a measure of relative abundance of spindles in different muscles is shown to be grossly misleading. It is replaced with the residuals of the linear regression of ln spindle number against ln muscle mass. Significant differences in relative spindle abundance as measured by residuals were found between regional groups of muscles: the greatest abundance is in axial muscles, including those concerned with head position, whereas the least is in muscles of the shoulder girdle. No differences were found between large and small muscles operating in parallel, or between antigravity and non-antigravity muscles. For proximal vs. distal muscles, spindles were significantly less abundant in the hand than the arm, but there was no difference between the foot and the leg.

  4. Sleep Spindles Characteristics in Insomnia Sufferers and Their Relationship with Sleep Misperception

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cortical hyperarousal is higher in insomnia sufferers (INS) than in good sleepers (GS) and could be related to an alteration in sleep protection mechanisms, like reduced density or altered characteristics in sleep spindles. The deficient sleep protection mechanisms might in turn enhance underestimation of sleep. This study's objective was to document sleep spindles characteristics in INS compared with GS and to investigate their potential role in sleep consolidation and misperception. Seventeen individuals with paradoxical insomnia (PARA-I), 24 individuals with psychophysiological insomnia (PSY-I), and 29 GS completed four consecutive polysomnographic nights in laboratory. Sleep spindles were detected automatically during stage 2 and SWS (3-4) on night 3. Number, density, duration, frequency, and amplitude of sleep spindles were calculated. A misperception index was used to determine the degree of discrepancy between subjective and objective total sleep times. Kruskal-Wallis H tests and post hoc tests revealed that PARA-I had significantly shorter sleep spindles than GS but that PSY-I and GS did not differ on spindles length. A standard multiple regression model revealed that neither sleep spindles characteristics nor objective sleep measures were predictive of sleep misperception. A longer duration of spindles could reflect a higher gating process but this hypothesis still needs to be confirmed in replication studies. PMID:27478648

  5. Spindle-shaped Microstructures: Potential Models for Planktonic Life Forms on Other Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Walsh, Maud M.; Sugitani, Kenichiro; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Spindle-shaped, organic microstructures ("spindles") are now known from Archean cherts in three localities (Figs. 1-4): The 3 Ga Farrel Quartzite from the Pilbara of Australia [1]; the older, 3.3-3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation, also from the Pilbara of Australia [2]; and the 3.4 Ga Kromberg Formation of the Barberton Mountain Land of South Africa [3]. Though the spindles were previously speculated to be pseudofossils or epigenetic organic contaminants, a growing body of data suggests that these structures are bona fide microfossils and further, that they are syngenetic with the Archean cherts in which they occur [1-2, 4-10]. As such, the spindles are among some of the oldest-known organically preserved microfossils on Earth. Moreover, recent delta C-13 study of individual spindles from the Farrel Quartzite (using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry [SIMS]) suggests that the spindles may have been planktonic (living in open water), as opposed to benthic (living as bottom dwellers in contact with muds or sediments) [9]. Since most Precambrian microbiotas have been described from benthic, matforming communities, a planktonic lifestyle for the spindles suggests that these structures could represent a segment of the Archean biosphere that is poorly known. Here we synthesize the recent work on the spindles, and we add new observations regarding their geographic distribution, robustness, planktonic habit, and long-lived success. We then discuss their potential evolutionary and astrobiological significance.

  6. Spindle error motion measurement using concentric circle grating and sinusoidal frequency-modulated semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Masato; Vu, Thanh-Tung; Aketagawa, Masato

    2016-11-01

    The conventional method of measuring the radial, axial and angular spindle motion is complicated and needs large spaces. Smaller instrument is better in terms of accurate and practical measurement. A method of measuring spindle error motion using a sinusoidal phase modulation and a concentric circle grating was described in the past. In the method, the concentric circle grating with fine pitch is attached to the spindle. Three optical sensors are fixed under grating and observe appropriate position of grating. The each optical sensor consists of a sinusoidal frequency modulated semiconductor laser as the light source, and two interferometers. One interferometer measures an axial spindle motion by detecting the interference fringe between reflected beam from fixed mirror and 0th-order diffracted beam. Another interferometer measures a radial spindle motion by detecting the interference fringe between ±2nd-order diffracted beams. With these optical sensor, 3 axial and 3 radial displacement of grating can be measured. From these measured displacements, axial, radial and angular spindle motion is calculated concurrently. In the previous experiment, concurrent measurement of the one axial and one radial spindle displacement at 4rpm was described. In this paper, the sinusoidal frequency modulation realized by modulating injection current is used instead of the sinusoidal phase modulation, which contributes simplicity of the instrument. Furthermore, concurrent measurement of the 5 axis (1 axial, 2 radial and 2 angular displacements) spindle motion at 4000rpm may be described.

  7. A comparison of the spindles in two different muscles of the frog.

    PubMed

    Brown, M C

    1971-08-01

    1. The responses of spindles in the iliofibularis muscle of frogs to stretch during either small motor nerve fibre stimulation or the application of suxamethonium were compared.2. All spindles which were excited by small motor nerve fibre stimulation were also excited by suxamethonium, and their responses to these two methods of excitation were very similar. The drug dose was usually 5-10 mug/ml. but smaller and larger doses were effective. Large doses (> 100 mug/ml.) could sometimes lead to a reversible partial block of the spindle response to stretch.3. Suxamethonium also caused a prolonged contraction in extrafusal slow muscle fibres. This contraction was not responsible for the effect on the spindle, because the time course of its action on the muscle tension and on the spindle afferent was different.4. It was concluded that suxamethonium stimulated prolonged contraction in the small intrafusal muscle fibres, which are known to be innervated by the small motor nerve fibres.5. Only about half of the spindles in the iliofibularis muscle were excited by suxamethonium.6. In the sartorius muscle which has no slow extrafusal muscle fibres, no spindles were found to be excited by suxamethonium in the way characteristic of that due to small intrafusal muscle fibre contraction.7. It is concluded that, in frog muscles which have no slow extrafusal fibres, the muscle spindles do not have small intrafusal muscle fibres of the kind found in the iliofibularis muscle.

  8. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  9. Linear magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A linear magnetic bearing system having electromagnetic vernier flux paths in shunt relation with permanent magnets, so that the vernier flux does not traverse the permanent magnet, is described. Novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing having electromagnetic flux paths that bypass high reluctance permanent magnets. Particular novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing with a pair of axially spaced elements having electromagnets for establishing vernier x and y axis control. The magnetic bearing system has possible use in connection with a long life reciprocating cryogenic refrigerator that may be used on the space shuttle.

  10. The 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride is not associated with alterations in sleep spindles in men referred for polysomnography

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Michael R.; Cook, Jesse D.; Plante, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endogenous neurosteroids that potentiate the GABAA receptor are thought to enhance the generation of sleep spindles. This study tested the hypothesis that the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride, an agent associated with reductions in neurosteroids, would be associated with reduced sleep spindles in men referred for polysomnography. Methods Spectral analysis and spindle waveform detection were performed on electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep data in the 11–16Hz sigma band, as well as several subranges, from 27 men taking finasteride and 27 matched comparison patients (ages 18 to 81 years). Results No significant differences between groups were observed for spectral power or sleep spindle morphology measures, including spindle density, amplitude, duration, and integrated spindle activity. Conclusions Contrary to our hypothesis, these findings demonstrate that finasteride is not associated with alterations in sleep spindle range activity or spindle morphology parameters. PMID:26494125

  11. Evaluation of the Dynamicity of Mitotic Exit Network and Spindle Position Checkpoint Components on Spindle Pole Bodies by Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP).

    PubMed

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is a powerful technique to study in vivo binding and diffusion dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins. In this chapter, we describe how to determine spindle pole body (SPB) binding dynamics of mitotic exit network (MEN) and spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) proteins using FRAP microscopy. Procedures presented here include the growth of the yeast cultures, sample preparation, image acquisition and analysis.

  12. Functionally reduced sensorimotor connections form with normal specificity despite abnormal muscle spindle development: the role of spindle-derived neurotrophin 3.

    PubMed

    Shneider, Neil A; Mentis, George Z; Schustak, Joshua; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2009-04-15

    The mechanisms controlling the formation of synaptic connections between muscle spindle afferents and spinal motor neurons are believed to be regulated by factors originating from muscle spindles. Here, we find that the connections form with appropriate specificity in mice with abnormal spindle development caused by the conditional elimination of the neuregulin 1 receptor ErbB2 from muscle precursors. However, despite a modest ( approximately 30%) decrease in the number of afferent terminals on motor neuron somata, the amplitude of afferent-evoked synaptic potentials recorded in motor neurons was reduced by approximately 80%, suggesting that many of the connections that form are functionally silent. The selective elimination of neurotrophin 3 (NT3) from muscle spindles had no effect on the amplitude of afferent-evoked ventral root potentials until the second postnatal week, revealing a late role for spindle-derived NT3 in the functional maintenance of the connections. These findings indicate that spindle-derived factors regulate the strength of the connections but not their initial formation or their specificity.

  13. Effects of in-vitro or in-vivo matured ooplasm and spindle-chromosome complex on the development of spindle-transferred oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chenhui; Li, Tao; Zeng, Yanhong; Hong, Pingping; Xu, Yanwen; Zhou, Canquan

    2014-12-01

    To study the effects of in-vitro matured ooplasm and spindle-chromosome complex (SCC) on the development of spindle-transferred oocytes, reciprocal spindle transfer was conducted between in-vivo and in-vitro matured oocytes. The reconstructed oocytes were divided into four groups according to their different ooplasm sources and SCC, artificially activated and cultured to the blastocyst stage. Oocyte survival, activation and embryo development after spindle transfer manipulation were compared between groups. Survival, activation, and cleavage rates of reconstructed oocytes after spindle transfer manipulation did not differ significantly among the four groups. The eight-cell stage embryo formation rates on day 3 and the blastocyst formation rate on day 6 were not significantly different between the in-vitro and in-vivo matured SCC groups when they were transplanted into in-vivo matured ooplasm. The rate of eight-cell stage embryo formation with in-vitro matured ooplasm was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of embryos with in-vivo matured ooplasm, and none of the embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. Therefore, SCC matured in vitro effectively supported the in-vitro development of reconstructed oocytes. Ooplasm matured in vitro, however, could not support the development of reconstructed oocytes, and may not be an appropriate source of ooplasm donation for spindle transfer.

  14. Functionally reduced sensorimotor connections form with normal specificity despite abnormal muscle spindle development: the role of spindle-derived NT3

    PubMed Central

    Shneider, Neil A.; Mentis, George Z.; Schustak, Joshua; O’Donovan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms controlling the formation of synaptic connections between muscle spindle afferents and spinal motor neurons are believed to be regulated by factors originating from muscle spindles. Here, we find that the connections form with appropriate specificity in mice with abnormal spindle development caused by the conditional elimination of the neuregulin1 receptor ErbB2 from muscle precursors. However, despite a modest (~30%) decrease in the number of afferent terminals on motor neuron somata, the amplitude of afferent-evoked synaptic potentials recorded in motor neurons was reduced by ~80%, suggesting that many of the connections that form are functionally silent. The selective elimination of neurotrophin 3 (NT3) from muscle spindles had no effect on the amplitude of afferent-evoked ventral root potentials until the second postnatal week, revealing a late role for spindle-derived NT3 in the functional maintenance of the connections. These findings indicate that spindle-derived factors regulate the strength of the connections, but not their initial formation or their specificity. PMID:19369542

  15. Mitotic Spindle Assembly: Building the Bridge between Sister K-Fibers.

    PubMed

    Simunić, Juraj; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-10-01

    The mitotic spindle performs the task of physically dividing the genetic material between the newly formed daughter cells. To achieve this, bundles of microtubules and associated proteins orchestrate forces that spatially organize and then separate the chromosomes. In the classic view of the spindle, the kinetochore microtubules (k-fibers) are tensed and, thus, straight, whereas interpolar bundles are curved and do not interact with k-fibers close to the spindle equator. The updated view of the spindle depicts k-fibers as curved and interacting with newly identified interpolar bundles, called bridging fibers, along their length. In this Opinion, we propose and discuss scenarios for the origin of this structure in the context of known spindle assembly mechanisms.

  16. Intranodal leiomyoma in a young child: report of a rare spindle cell lesion.

    PubMed

    Girhotra, Manish; Virk, Shehbaaz Singh; Verma, Sarika; Bansal, Kalpana; Gupta, Ruchika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Primary spindle cell lesions of lymph nodes, with the exception of Kaposi's sarcoma, are rare. Intranodal palisaded myofibroblastoma has been described as a spindle cell tumor with prominent amianthoid fibers, intralesional hemorrhage, and intracellular or extracellular inclusions. Another spindle cell lesion, intranodal leiomyoma, has been reported only occasionally. We report the case of a 6-year-old boy with a mass in the neck without other systemic complaints. Excision biopsy of the lymph node revealed a spindle cell tumor with lymph nodal tissue at the periphery. The tumor showed features of smooth muscle differentiation with focally high mitotic index. The classical features of myofibroblastoma were not present. A final pathologic diagnosis of intranodal leiomyoma was rendered. The child has been free of recurrence in the follow-up period. Intranodal leiomyoma is a rare primary spindle cell lesion of the lymph nodes and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the same.

  17. Drosophila parthenogenesis: A tool to decipher centrosomal vs acentrosomal spindle assembly pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Riparbelli, Maria Giovanna; Callaini, Giuliano

    2008-04-15

    Development of unfertilized eggs in the parthenogenetic strain K23-O-im of Drosophila mercatorum requires the stochastic interactions of self-assembled centrosomes with the female chromatin. In a portion of the unfertilized eggs that do not assemble centrosomes, microtubules organize a bipolar anastral mitotic spindle around the chromatin like the one formed during the first female meiosis, suggesting that similar pathways may be operative. In the cytoplasm of eggs in which centrosomes do form, monastral and biastral spindles are found. Analysis by laser scanning confocal microscopy suggests that these spindles are derived from the stochastic interaction of astral microtubules directly with kinetochore regions or indirectly with kinetochore microtubules. Our findings are consistent with the idea that mitotic spindle assembly requires both acentrosomal and centrosomal pathways, strengthening the hypothesis that astral microtubules can dictate the organization of the spindle by capturing kinetochore microtubules.

  18. A force-generating machinery maintains the spindle at the cell center during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Coral, Carlos; Fantana, Horatiu A; Howard, Jonathon

    2016-05-27

    The position and orientation of the mitotic spindle is precisely regulated to ensure the accurate partition of the cytoplasm between daughter cells and the correct localization of the daughters within growing tissue. Using magnetic tweezers to perturb the position of the spindle in intact cells, we discovered a force-generating machinery that maintains the spindle at the cell center during metaphase and anaphase in one- and two-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The forces increase with the number of microtubules and are larger in smaller cells. The machinery is rigid enough to suppress thermal fluctuations to ensure precise localization of the mitotic spindle, yet compliant enough to allow molecular force generators to fine-tune the position of the mitotic spindle to facilitate asymmetric division.

  19. A LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium controls mitotic spindle size.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaoyu; Gholkar, Ankur; Senese, Silvia; Torres, Jorge Z

    2015-01-01

    Leucine carboxyl methyltransferase-1 (LCMT1) and protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) are essential enzymes that regulate the methylation of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2AC). LCMT1 and PME-1 have been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. We show here an important role for an LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium in controlling mitotic spindle size. Depletion of LCMT1 or overexpression of PME-1 led to long spindles. In contrast, depletion of PME-1, pharmacological inhibition of PME-1 or overexpression of LCMT1 led to short spindles. Furthermore, perturbation of the LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium led to mitotic arrest, spindle assembly checkpoint activation, defective cell divisions, induction of apoptosis and reduced cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium is critical for regulating mitotic spindle size and thereby proper cell division.

  20. Chromosome and mitotic spindle dynamics in fission yeast kinesin-8 mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapo, Ammon M.; Gergley, Zachary R.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Betterton, M. D.

    2014-03-01

    Fission yeast proteins Klp5p and Klp6p are plus-end directed motors of the kinesin-8 family which promote microtubule (MT) depolymerization and also affect chromosome segregation, but the mechanism of these activities is not well understood. Using live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of fission yeast wild-type (WT) and klp5/6 mutant strains, we quantify and compare the dynamics of kinetochore motion and mitotic spindle length in 3D. In WT cells, the spindle, once formed, remains a consistent size and chromosomes are correctly organized and segregated. In kinesin-8 mutants, spindles undergo large length fluctuations of several microns. Kinetochore motions are also highly fluctuating, with kinetochores frequently moving away from the spindle rather than toward it. We observe transient pushing of chromosomes away from the spindle by as much as 10 microns in distance.

  1. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-07-04

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis.

  2. Expert and crowd-sourced validation of an individualized sleep spindle detection method employing complex demodulation and individualized normalization

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Laura B.; Sockeel, Stéphane; Soon, Melissa; Bore, Arnaud; Myhr, Ayako; Stojanoski, Bobby; Cusack, Rhodri; Owen, Adrian M.; Doyon, Julien; Fogel, Stuart M.

    2015-01-01

    A spindle detection method was developed that: (1) extracts the signal of interest (i.e., spindle-related phasic changes in sigma) relative to ongoing “background” sigma activity using complex demodulation, (2) accounts for variations of spindle characteristics across the night, scalp derivations and between individuals, and (3) employs a minimum number of sometimes arbitrary, user-defined parameters. Complex demodulation was used to extract instantaneous power in the spindle band. To account for intra- and inter-individual differences, the signal was z-score transformed using a 60 s sliding window, per channel, over the course of the recording. Spindle events were detected with a z-score threshold corresponding to a low probability (e.g., 99th percentile). Spindle characteristics, such as amplitude, duration and oscillatory frequency, were derived for each individual spindle following detection, which permits spindles to be subsequently and flexibly categorized as slow or fast spindles from a single detection pass. Spindles were automatically detected in 15 young healthy subjects. Two experts manually identified spindles from C3 during Stage 2 sleep, from each recording; one employing conventional guidelines, and the other, identifying spindles with the aid of a sigma (11–16 Hz) filtered channel. These spindles were then compared between raters and to the automated detection to identify the presence of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. This method of automated spindle detection resolves or avoids many of the limitations that complicate automated spindle detection, and performs well compared to a group of non-experts, and importantly, has good external validity with respect to the extant literature in terms of the characteristics of automatically detected spindles. PMID:26441604

  3. The spindle pole bodies facilitate nuclear envelope division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liling; Schwartz, Cindi; Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2007-07-01

    Many organisms divide chromosomes within the confines of the nuclear envelope (NE) in a process known as closed mitosis. Thus, they must ensure coordination between segregation of the genetic material and division of the NE itself. Although many years of work have led to a reasonably clear understanding of mitotic spindle function in chromosome segregation, the NE division mechanism remains obscure. Here, we show that fission yeast cells overexpressing the transforming acid coiled coil (TACC)-related protein, Mia1p/Alp7p, failed to separate the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) at the onset of mitosis, but could assemble acentrosomal bipolar and antiparallel spindle structures. Most of these cells arrested in anaphase with fully extended spindles and nonsegregated chromosomes. Spindle poles that lacked the SPBs did not lead the division of the NE during spindle elongation, but deformed it, trapping the chromosomes within. When the SPBs were severed by laser microsurgery in wild-type cells, we observed analogous deformations of the NE by elongating spindle remnants, resulting in NE division failure. Analysis of dis1Delta cells that elongate spindles despite unattached kinetochores indicated that the SPBs were required for maintaining nuclear shape at anaphase onset. Strikingly, when the NE was disassembled by utilizing a temperature-sensitive allele of the Ran GEF, Pim1p, the abnormal spindles induced by Mia1p overexpression were capable of segregating sister chromatids to daughter cells, suggesting that the failure to divide the NE prevents chromosome partitioning. Our results imply that the SPBs preclude deformation of the NE during spindle elongation and thus serve as specialized structures enabling nuclear division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

  4. Classification of muscle spindle afferents innervating the masseter muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Masri, Radi; Ro, Jin Y; Dessem, Dean; Capra, Norman

    2006-09-01

    Taylor et al. [Taylor, A., Durbaba, R., Rodgers, J.F., 1992a. The classification of afferents from muscle spindles of the jaw-closing muscles of the cat. J Physiol 456, 609-628] developed a method to classify muscle spindle afferents using succinylcholine (Sch) and ramp and hold stretches. They demonstrated that cat jaw muscle spindle afferents show high proportion of intermediate responses to ramp and hold jaw stretch. Together with observations on the responses to Sch their data suggests that the majority of jaw muscle spindle afferents are influenced by a combination of nuclear bag(2) and nuclear chain fibres. Relatively few are influenced solely by nuclear bag(1) fibres. The purpose of this study was to categorize jaw muscle spindle afferent in rodents in response to ramp and hold stretches. Several measures were used to classify spindle afferents including (1) conduction velocity, (2) coefficient of variation (C.V.) of the interspike interval during jaw opening, and (3) the dynamic sensitivity and the initial discharge of spindle afferents before and after succinylcholine infusion (Sch, 100mg/kg, i.v.). Consistent with observations in the cat jaw muscles, the distribution of the conduction velocity and the C.V. of Vmes masseter afferents were unimodal. Therefore, these parameters were of little value in functional classification of spindle innervation. Succinylcholine injection either markedly increased the dynamic sensitivity or produced no change in Vmes afferents. Unlike cat jaw muscle spindle afferents, the effect of Sch on the initial discharge was not clearly separable from those responding or not responding to Sch. These results suggest that rat jaw muscle spindle afferents, have physiological properties that are primarily intermediate in nature and are likely to reflect a predominance of influence from nuclear bag(2) and chain fibres. However, the distinction between bag(2) and chain fibres influences is not as clearly defined in the rat compared to

  5. Low cost lobed bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Separate sectors for each lobed area of the bearing are assembled into the bearing housing individually and bolted tightly against the housing inside diameter. The center of a grinding wheel and the center of the housing are offset, resulting in the desired inner radius and tilt of the sector.

  6. Damper bearing rotordynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1990-01-01

    High side loads reduce the life of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. High stiffness damper seals were recommended to reduce the loads on the pump and turbine end bearings in the HPOTP. The seals designed for use on the pump end are expected to adequately reduce the bearing loads; the predicted performance of the planned turbine end seal is marginal. An alternative to the suggested turbine end seal design is a damper bearing with radial holes from the pressurized center of the turbopump rotor, feeding a smooth land region between two rough-stator/smooth-rotor annular seals. An analysis was prepared to predict the leakage and rotor dynamic coefficients (stiffness, damping, and added mass) of the damper bearing. Governing equations of the seal analysis modified to model the damper bearing; differences between the upstream conditions of the damper bearing and a typical annular seal; prediction of the damper bearing analysis; and assumptions of the analysis which require further investigation are described.

  7. Cylindrical bearing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.

    1981-01-01

    Program CYBEAN computes behavior of rolling-element bearings including effects of bearing geometry, shaft misalinement, and temperature. Accurate assessment is possible for various outer-ring and housing configurations. CYBEAN is structured for coordinated execution of modules that perform specific analytical tasks. It is written in FORTRAN IV for use on the UNIVAC 1100/40 computer.

  8. Arcturus and the Bears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, E.

    2009-08-01

    Arcturus is the brightest star in Bootes. The ancient Greek name Arktouros means Bear Guard. The star, however, is not close to Ursa Maior (Big She-Bear) and Ursa Minor (Little She-Bear), as the name would suggest. This curious discrepancy could be explained by the star proper motion, assuming the name Bear Guard is a remote cultural heritage. The proper motion analysis could allow us to get an insight also into an ancient myth regarding Ursa Maior. Though we cannot explain scientifically such a myth, some interesting suggestions can be obtained about its possible origin, in the context of the present knowledge of the importance of the cult of the bear both during the Palaeolithic times and for several primitive populations of modern times, as shown by the ethnological studies.

  9. A waved journal bearing concept with improved steady-state and dynamic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the waved journal bearing concept featuring a waved inner bearing diameter for use with a compressible lubricant (gas) is presented. A three wave, waved journal bearing geometry is used to show the geometry of this concept. The performance of generic waved bearings having either three, four, six, or eight waves is predicted for air lubricated bearings. Steady-state performance is discussed in terms of bearing load capacity, while the dynamic performance is discussed in terms of dynamic coefficients and fluid film stability. It was found that the bearing wave amplitude has an important influence on both steady-state and dynamic performance of the waved journal bearing. For a fixed eccentricity ratio, the bearing steady-state load capacity and direct dynamic stiffness coefficient increase as the wave amplitude increases. Also, the waved bearing becomes more stable as the wave amplitude increases. In addition, increasing the number of waves reduces the waved bearing's sensitivity to the direction of the applied load relative to the wave. However, the range in which the bearing performance can be varied decreases as the number of waves increases. Therefore, both the number and the amplitude of the waves must be properly selected to optimize the waved bearing design for a specific application. It is concluded that the stiffness of an air bearing, due to the hydrodynamic effect, could be doubled and made to run stably by using a six or eight wave geometry with a wave amplitude approximately half of the bearing radial clearance.

  10. Design, fabrication, and operation of a test rig for high-speed tapered-roller bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signer, H. R.

    1974-01-01

    A tapered-roller bearing test machine was designed, fabricated and successfully operated at speeds to 20,000 rpm. Infinitely variable radial loads to 26,690 N (6,000 lbs.) and thrust loads to 53,380 N (12,000 lbs.) can be applied to test bearings. The machine instrumentation proved to have the accuracy and reliability required for parametric bearing performance testing and has the capability of monitoring all programmed test parameters at continuous operation during life testing. This system automatically shuts down a test if any important test parameter deviates from the programmed conditions, or if a bearing failure occurs. A lubrication system was developed as an integral part of the machine, capable of lubricating test bearings by external jets and by means of passages feeding through the spindle and bearing rings into the critical internal bearing surfaces. In addition, provisions were made for controlled oil cooling of inner and outer rings to effect the type of bearing thermal management that is required when testing at high speeds.

  11. Targeting the spindle assembly checkpoint for breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Marques, Sandra; Fonseca, Joana; Silva, Patrícia M A; Bousbaa, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer deaths after lung cancer. As in other malignancies, aneuploidy is a common feature of breast cancer and influences its behavior. Aneuploidy has been linked to inappropriate activity of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a surveillance mechanism that, in normal cells, prevents anaphase onset until correct alignment of all chromosomes at the metaphase is achieved. Interestingly, the widely used anti-microtubule drugs, vinca alkaloids and taxanes, kill cancer cells through chronic arrest in mitosis as a consequence of chronic SAC activation. Deregulated SAC has been reported in breast cancer in many reports and presents an attractive therapeutic strategy. We present here a review of the current knowledge on the SAC defects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in breast cancer, and discuss the potential of SAC components as targets for breast cancer therapies.

  12. Axon and muscle spindle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse.

    PubMed

    Elashry, Mohamed I; Otto, Anthony; Matsakas, Antonios; El-Morsy, Salah E; Jones, Lisa; Anderson, Bethan; Patel, Ketan

    2011-02-01

    Germline deletion of the myostatin gene results in hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the tension-generating (extrafusal) fibres in skeletal muscle. As this gene is expressed predominantly in myogenic tissues it offers an excellent model with which to investigate the quantitative relationship between muscle and axonal development. Here we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in nerve fibres in major nerves of both the fore- and hindlimbs. We show that axons within these nerves undergo hypertrophy. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the age-related neural atrophic process is delayed in the absence of myostatin. Finally, we show that skeletal muscle hyperplasia in the myostatin null mouse is accompanied by an increase in the number of muscle spindles (also called stretch receptors or proprioceptors). However, our work demonstrates that the mechanisms regulating intrafusal fibre hyperplasia and hypertrophy differ from those that control the aetiology of extrafusal fibres.

  13. Spindle activity and monosynaptic reflex excitability during foreperiod.

    PubMed

    Gerilovsky, L; Struppler, A; Altmann, H; Velho, F

    1983-11-01

    Healthy volunteers were instructed to perform an isometric plantar foot flexion as quickly as possible after a foreperiod (FP) of 1000 msec defined by two clicks (warning signal (WS) and response signal (RS). In 6 volunteers the H reflex was evoked in triceps surae muscle and recorded by surface electrodes (stimulus intensity 30% of maximum). The H reflex was elicited at WS and RS as well as during FP at intervals of 100 msec. H reflex amplitudes were taken as a sign of monosynaptic reflex excitability (MSRE). Amplitudes during FP were compared with the average control values at rest. Relaxation of lower limb muscles before and during FP was controlled by EMG. MSRE was increased in the first part of FP with a maximum at 300 msec after WS and decreased in the second part, with a minimum at 800 msec after WS. In a second series of experiments, in 10 volunteers, single fiber activity from primary muscle spindle afferents was recorded with tungsten electrodes from deep peroneal nerve (6 records) and from tibial nerve (3 records). The activity of primary spindle afferents before and during the FP was calculated by instantaneous discharge frequency and histograms of spike distribution. The EMG was taken from sural triceps and anterior tibial muscles with needle electrodes; a mechanogram of tendon deflection was taken by an appropriate strain gauge. In 5 primary afferents without spontaneous activity at rest and during FP, discharge started with a delay of 10-15 msec after the onset of EMG activity during the motor reaction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. The Yeast CDC37 Gene Interacts with MPS1 and Is Required for Proper Execution of Spindle Pole Body Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Schutz, Amy R.; Giddings, Thomas H.; Steiner, Estelle; Winey, Mark

    1997-01-01

    The MPS1 gene from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an essential protein kinase required for spindle pole body (SPB) duplication and for the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint. Cells with the mps1-1 mutation fail early in SPB duplication and proceed through monopolar mitosis with lethal consequences. We identified CDC37 as a multicopy suppressor of mps1-1 temperature-sensitive growth. Suppression is allele specific, and synthetic lethal interactions occur between mps1 and cdc37 alleles. We examined the cdc37-1 phenotype for defects related to the SPB cycle. The cdc37-1 temperature-sensitive allele causes unbudded, G1 arrest at Start (Reed, S.I. 1980. Genetics. 95: 561–577). Reciprocal shifts demonstrate that cdc37-1 arrest is interdependent with α-factor arrest but is not a normal Start arrest. Although the cells are responsive to α-factor at the arrest, SPB duplication is uncoupled from other aspects of G1 progression and proceeds past the satellite-bearing SPB stage normally seen at Start. Electron microscopy reveals side-by-side SPBs at cdc37-1 arrest. The outer plaque of one SPB is missing or reduced, while the other is normal. Using the mps2-1 mutation to distinguish between the SPBs, we find that the outer plaque defect is specific to the new SPB. This phenotype may arise in part from reduced Mps1p function: although Mps1p protein levels are unaffected by the cdc37-1 mutation, kinase activity is markedly reduced. These data demonstrate a requirement for CDC37 in SPB duplication and suggest a role for this gene in G1 control. CDC37 may provide a chaperone function that promotes the activity of protein kinases. PMID:9060463

  15. Cooling system for a bearing of a turbine rotor

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher

    2002-01-01

    In a gas turbine, a bore tube assembly radially inwardly of an aft bearing conveys cooling steam to the buckets of the turbine and returns the cooling steam to a return. To cool the bearing and thermally insulate the bearing from the cooling steam paths, a radiation shield is spaced from the bore tube assembly by a dead air gap. Additionally, an air passageway is provided between the radiation shield and the inner surface of an aft shaft forming part of the rotor. Air is supplied from an inlet for flow along the passage and radially outwardly through bores in the aft shaft disk to cool the bearing and insulate it from transfer of heat from the cooling steam.

  16. Acidianus Tailed Spindle Virus: a New Archaeal Large Tailed Spindle Virus Discovered by Culture-Independent Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hochstein, Rebecca A.; Amenabar, Maximiliano J.; Munson-McGee, Jacob H.; Boyd, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The field of viral metagenomics has expanded our understanding of viral diversity from all three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya). Traditionally, viral metagenomic studies provide information about viral gene content but rarely provide knowledge about virion morphology and/or cellular host identity. Here we describe a new virus, Acidianus tailed spindle virus (ATSV), initially identified by bioinformatic analysis of viral metagenomic data sets from a high-temperature (80°C) acidic (pH 2) hot spring located in Yellowstone National Park, followed by more detailed characterization using only environmental samples without dependency on culturing. Characterization included the identification of the large tailed spindle virion morphology, determination of the complete 70.8-kb circular double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viral genome content, and identification of its cellular host. Annotation of the ATSV genome revealed a potential three-domain gene product containing an N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain, followed by a likely posttranslation regulatory region consisting of high serine and threonine content, and a C-terminal ESCRT-III domain, suggesting interplay with the host ESCRT system. The host of ATSV, which is most closely related to Acidianus hospitalis, was determined by a combination of analysis of cellular clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas loci and dual viral and cellular fluorescence in situ hybridization (viral FISH) analysis of environmental samples and confirmed by culture-based infection studies. This work provides an expanded pathway for the discovery, isolation, and characterization of new viruses using culture-independent approaches and provides a platform for predicting and confirming virus hosts. IMPORTANCE Virus discovery and characterization have been traditionally accomplished by using culture-based methods. While a valuable approach, it is limited by the availability of culturable hosts. In

  17. Touchdown Ball-Bearing System for Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsbury, Edward P.; Price, Robert; Gelotte, Erik; Singer, Herbert B.

    2003-01-01

    The torque-limited touchdown bearing system (TLTBS) is a backup mechanical-bearing system for a high-speed rotary machine in which the rotor shaft is supported by magnetic bearings in steady-state normal operation. The TLTBS provides ball-bearing support to augment or supplant the magnetic bearings during startup, shutdown, or failure of the magnetic bearings. The TLTBS also provides support in the presence of conditions (in particular, rotational acceleration) that make it difficult or impossible to control the magnetic bearings or in which the magnetic bearings are not strong enough (e.g., when the side load against the rotor exceeds the available lateral magnetic force).

  18. Compliance analysis of a 3-DOF spindle head by considering gravitational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Wang, Manxin; Huang, Tian; Chetwynd, Derek G.

    2015-01-01

    The compliance modeling is one of the most significant issues in the stage of preliminary design for parallel kinematic machine(PKM). The gravity ignored in traditional compliance analysis has a significant effect on pose accuracy of tool center point(TCP) when a PKM is horizontally placed. By taking gravity into account, this paper presents a semi-analytical approach for compliance analysis of a 3-DOF spindle head named the A3 head. The architecture behind the A3 head is a 3-R PS parallel mechanism having one translational and two rotational movement capabilities, which can be employed to form the main body of a 5-DOF hybrid kinematic machine especially designed for high-speed machining of large aircraft components. The force analysis is carried out by considering both the externally applied wrench imposed upon the platform as well as gravity of all moving components. Then, the deflection analysis is investigated to establish the relationship between the deflection twist and compliances of all joints and links using semi-analytical method. The merits of this approach lie in that platform deflection twist throughout the entire task workspace can be evaluated in a very efficient manner. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is verified by the FEA and experiment at different configurations and the results show that the discrepancy of the compliances is less than 0.04 μm/N-1 and that of the deformations is less than 10μm. The computational and experimental results show that the deflection twist induced by gravity forces of the moving components has significant bearings on pose accuracy of the platform, providing an informative guidance for the improvement of the current design. The proposed approach can be easily applied to the compliance analysis of PKM by considering gravitational effects and to evaluate the deformation caused by gravity throughout the entire workspace.

  19. A new method to measure circular runout of end-milling spindle based on cutting mark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianlai; Liu, Shuchun

    2008-12-01

    A practical method is introduced to measure the circular runout of a end-milling spindle system at high speed rotations without the need of a reference sphere. A workpiece is held on a linear slide which moves along the axial direction of the spindle. The spindle is then programmed to run at a specific speed. A very sharp edge cutter must be used and the depth of cut will be very shallow in order to keep the cutting force very small. The workpiece is then fed into the end mill in order to make a cutting mark of teens μm in depth. The cutting marks are circular, and their diameters are related to the circular runout of the spindle system. The cutting mark that is generated at a specific speed is expected to contain information about the spindle circular runout at this speed. In practice the cutting marks are not perfectly circular. Therefore, a best-fit circle of a cutting mark is needed to determine its diameter. A high-resolution edge detector machine is used for this purpose. Quantitative precision analysis was carried out to confirm the accuracy and repeatability of this new measurement technique. It is demonstrated that this technique for the measurement of spindle circular runout is an effective tool in verifying the actual running accuracy of spindles at their actual operating speeds and can be accomplished without the need for a reference sphere.

  20. Aurora A phosphorylates MCAK to control ran-dependent spindle bipolarity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C; Walczak, Claire E

    2008-07-01

    During mitosis, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) localizes to chromatin/kinetochores, a cytoplasmic pool, and spindle poles. Its localization and activity in the chromatin region are regulated by Aurora B kinase; however, how the cytoplasmic- and pole-localized MCAK are regulated is currently not clear. In this study, we used Xenopus egg extracts to form spindles in the absence of chromatin and centrosomes and found that MCAK localization and activity are tightly regulated by Aurora A. This regulation is important to focus microtubules at aster centers and to facilitate the transition from asters to bipolar spindles. In particular, we found that MCAK colocalized with NuMA and XMAP215 at the center of Ran asters where its activity is regulated by Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of S196, which contributes to proper pole focusing. In addition, we found that MCAK localization at spindle poles was regulated through another Aurora A phosphorylation site (S719), which positively enhances bipolar spindle formation. This is the first study that clearly defines a role for MCAK at the spindle poles as well as identifies another key Aurora A substrate that contributes to spindle bipolarity.

  1. ASK1 controls spindle orientation and positioning by phosphorylating EB1 and stabilizing astral microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Youguang; Ran, Jie; Xie, Songbo; Yang, Yunfan; Chen, Jie; Li, Shanshan; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Dengwen; Liu, Min; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Orientation and positioning of the mitotic spindle are involved in dictating cell division axis and cleavage site, and play important roles in cell fate determination and tissue morphogenesis. However, how spindle movement is controlled to achieve a defined alignment within the dividing cell is not fully understood. Here, we describe an unexpected role for apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) in regulating spindle behavior. We find that ASK1 is required for proper mitotic progression and daughter cell adhesion to the substratum. ASK1 interacts with end-binding protein 1 (EB1) and phosphorylates EB1 at serine 40, threonine 154 and threonine 206, enhancing its binding to the plus ends of astral microtubules. Consequently, astral microtubules are stabilized and therefore capable of mediating spindle interaction with the cell cortex, a requirement for spindle movement. These findings reveal a previously undiscovered function of ASK1 in cell division by regulating spindle orientation and positioning, and point to the importance of protein phosphorylation in the regulation of spindle behavior. PMID:27721984

  2. Cdc42 activation couples spindle positioning to first polar body formation in oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunqi; Benink, Héléne A; Cheng, Daye; Montplaisir, Véronique; Wang, Ling; Xi, Yanwei; Zheng, Pei-Pei; Bement, William M; Liu, X Johné

    2006-01-24

    During vertebrate egg maturation, cytokinesis initiates after one pole of the bipolar metaphase I spindle attaches to the oocyte cortex, resulting in the formation of a polar body and the mature egg. It is not known what signal couples the spindle pole positioning to polar body formation. We approached this question by drawing an analogy to mitotic exit in budding yeast, as asymmetric spindle attachment to the appropriate cortical region is the common regulatory cue. In budding yeast, the small G protein Cdc42 plays an important role in mitotic exit following the spindle pole attachment . We show here that inhibition of Cdc42 activation blocks polar body formation. The oocytes initiate anaphase but fail to properly form and direct a contractile ring. Endogenous Cdc42 is activated at the spindle pole-cortical contact site immediately prior to polar body formation. The cortical Cdc42 activity zone, which directly overlays the spindle pole, is circumscribed by a cortical RhoA activity zone; the latter defines the cytokinetic contractile furrow . As the RhoA ring contracts during cytokinesis, the Cdc42 zone expands, maintaining its complementary relationship with the RhoA ring. Cdc42 signaling may thus be an evolutionarily conserved mechanism that couples spindle positioning to asymmetric cytokinesis.

  3. Four-dimensional visualization and quantitative analysis of meiotic spindle movements in live mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Tian, N; Zhang, L; Liu, B; Wang, P; Li, Y; Ma, W

    2012-09-01

    This paper made a different attempt of real-time observation of the meiotic spindle movements in living mouse oocyte using a convenient method. This method was based on an experimental phenomenon discovered in our work. In living mouse oocytes, a high concentration of calcium ions (Ca(2+)) was observed throughout the region occupied by the initial meiotic spindle. After Ca(2+) labelling with Fura-2, a weakly fluorescent area (WFA) appeared on each side of the chromosomes. The activities of the WFAs changed during spindle development. By real-time tracking of WFAs, we were able to indirectly observe the meiotic spindle movements. Occasionally, it was observed that the first meiotic spindle rotated from an orientation parallel to the cortex to become perpendicular, instead of migrating from the oocyte centre to the cortex along its axis. Moreover, we analysed this uncommon rotation of the first meiotic spindle and found that the whole rotation process can be divided into two phases: the early slow-speed rotation and the subsequent rapid-speed rotation. We further characterized this rotation with respect to rotational speed and acceleration at all the stages of development. By using a two-photon laser-scanning microscope in combination with Fura-2 dye that is nondamaging to oocytes, we provide a convenient method for indirect visualization and quantitative analysis of spindle movements by real-time tracking of WFAs. This method is easy to operate and master, and economical with time and effort.

  4. Kin4 kinase delays mitotic exit in response to spindle alignment defects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gislene; Schiebel, Elmar

    2005-07-22

    For many polarized cells, it is critical that the mitotic spindle becomes positioned relative to the polarity axis. This is especially important in yeast, where the site of cytokinesis is predetermined. The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) therefore delays mitotic exit of cells with a mispositioned spindle. One component of the SPOC is the Bub2-Bfa1 complex, an inhibitor of the mitotic exit network (MEN). Here, we show that the Kin4 kinase is a component of the SPOC and as such is essential to delay cell cycle progression of cells with a misaligned spindle. When spindles are correctly oriented, Kin4 and Bub2-Bfa1 are asymmetrically localized to opposite spindle pole bodies (SPBs). Bub2-Bfa1 then becomes inhibited by Cdc5 polo kinase with anaphase onset, a prerequisite for mitotic exit. In response to spindle misalignment, Kin4 and Bub2-Bfa1 are brought together at both SPBs. Kin4 now maintains Bub2-Bfa1 activity by counteracting Cdc5, thereby inhibiting mitotic exit.

  5. The chromokinesin Kid is required for maintenance of proper metaphase spindle size.

    PubMed

    Tokai-Nishizumi, Noriko; Ohsugi, Miho; Suzuki, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2005-11-01

    The human chromokinesin Kid/kinesin-10, a plus end-directed microtubule (MT)-based motor with both microtubule- and DNA-binding domains, is required for proper chromosome alignment at the metaphase plate. Here, we performed RNA interference experiments to deplete endogenous Kid from HeLa cells and confirmed defects in metaphase chromosome arm alignment in Kid-depleted cells. In addition, we noted a shortening of the spindle length, resulting in a pole-to-pole distance only 80% of wild type. The spindle microtubule-bundles with which Kid normally colocalize became less robust. Rescue of the two Kid deficiency phenotypes-imprecise chromosome alignment at metaphase and shortened spindles- exhibited distinct requirements. Mutants lacking either the DNA-binding domain or the MT motor ATPase failed to rescue the former defect, whereas rescue of the shortened spindle phenotype required neither activity. Kid also exhibits microtubule bundling activity in vitro, and rescue of the shortened spindle phenotype and the bundling activity displayed similar domain requirements, except that rescue required a coiled-coil domain not needed for bundling. These results suggest that distinct from its role in chromosome movement, Kid contributes to spindle morphogenesis by mediating spindle microtubules stabilization.

  6. HTS magnetic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werfel, Frank N.; Flögel-Delor, Uta; Rothfeld, Rolf; Wippich, Dieter; Riedel, Thomas

    2002-08-01

    Radial HTS magnetic bearings (SMB) up to 200 mm size are developed and tested in prototype fast rotating machines to demonstrate the potential to replace conventional bearings. The individual rotational bearing components HTS and PM, their physical interaction and technology is reviewed. Characterisation experiments are conducted to understand the rotor dynamic behaviour. In terms of unbalance and critical speeds the suspended wheels and rotors compare favourably with conventional bearing devices. The rationale of our present bearing technology lies in the assembling of both low-speed magnetic bearings for centrifugal and wafer processing units up to 20,000 rpm as well as a high-speed optical mirror accelerated to rim speed of more than 500 m/s (174,000 rpm) confirming stable low-drag and low energy operation. Two new-type U shaped semicircle HTS bearings coupled each with a 6 W/80 K cryocooler of the Stirling type allow the contact-free operation of a Si wafer carrier in semiconductor wet processes.

  7. The Specter of an Oily Bear or Geopolitical Challenges of the Modern Russian Petro-State

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-15

    AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY THE SPECTER OF AN OILY BEAR OR GEOPOLITICAL CHALLENGES OF THE MODERN RUSSIAN PETRO-STATE by Gregory S...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Air War College, Air university Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...Lieutenant Colonel Gregory S. Clawson is a student at the Air War College, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. Col Clawson was born in Los Angeles and grew

  8. Vibration Transmission through Bearings with Application to Gearboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Cabin noise has become a major concern to manufacturers and users of helicopters. Gear noise is the largest part of this unwanted sound. The crucial noise path is generally considered to be from the gears through the gear-supporting shafts and bearings into the gearbox case, and from there either through the gearbox mounts or the surrounding air to the helicopter cabin. If the noise, that is, the gear and shaft vibration, can be prevented from traveling through the gearbox bearings, then the noise cannot make its way into the helicopter cabin. Thus the vibration-transmitting properties of bearings are of paramount importance. This paper surveys the literature concerning evaluation of properties for the types of bearings used in helicopter gearboxes. A simple model is proposed to evaluate vibration transmission, using measured or calculated bearing stiffness and damping. Less-commonly used types of gearbox bearings (e.g., fluid film) are evaluated for their potential in reducing vibration transmission.

  9. Automatic sleep spindle detection: benchmarking with fine temporal resolution using open science tools

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Christian; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindle properties index cognitive faculties such as memory consolidation and diseases such as major depression. For this reason, scoring sleep spindle properties in polysomnographic recordings has become an important activity in both research and clinical settings. The tediousness of this manual task has motivated efforts for its automation. Although some progress has been made, increasing the temporal accuracy of spindle scoring and improving the performance assessment methodology are two aspects needing more attention. In this paper, four open-access automated spindle detectors with fine temporal resolution are proposed and tested against expert scoring of two proprietary and two open-access databases. Results highlight several findings: (1) that expert scoring and polysomnographic databases are important confounders when comparing the performance of spindle detectors tested using different databases or scorings; (2) because spindles are sparse events, specificity estimates are potentially misleading for assessing automated detector performance; (3) reporting the performance of spindle detectors exclusively with sensitivity and specificity estimates, as is often seen in the literature, is insufficient; including sensitivity, precision and a more comprehensive statistic such as Matthew's correlation coefficient, F1-score, or Cohen's κ is necessary for adequate evaluation; (4) reporting statistics for some reasonable range of decision thresholds provides a much more complete and useful benchmarking; (5) performance differences between tested automated detectors were found to be similar to those between available expert scorings; (6) much more development is needed to effectively compare the performance of spindle detectors developed by different research teams. Finally, this work clarifies a long-standing but only seldomly posed question regarding whether expert scoring truly is a reliable gold standard for sleep spindle assessment. PMID:26157375

  10. Resting discharge of human muscle spindles is not modulated by increases in sympathetic drive

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Sverrisdottir, Yrsa B; Wallin, B Gunnar

    2003-01-01

    There is evidence in experimental animals that, in addition to receiving fusimotor drive, muscle spindles are subject to modulation by the sympathetic nervous system. We examined the validity of this idea in human subjects by recording from muscle spindles in the relaxed ankle and toe extensor muscles during a strong and sustained physiological activation of muscle sympathetic outflow. Unitary recordings were made from 20 primary and 17 secondary muscle spindle afferents via a tungsten microelectrode inserted percutaneously into the peroneal nerve in 10 awake, healthy subjects seated with the legs supported in the extended position. ECG, blood pressure, respiration and calf circumference were also recorded. The majority of the muscle spindles were spontaneously active at rest; a background discharge was induced in four silent spindles by vibrating the tendon. A sustained increase in muscle vasoconstrictor activity, an increase in calf volume and a fall in pulse pressure were produced by subjects performing a 30–40 s maximal inspiratory breath-hold. Despite this strong increase in muscle sympathetic outflow no significant changes occurred in the discharge of either primary or secondary muscle spindle afferents, measured as a change in mean frequency and variability over sequential 5 s epochs and compared with the preceding period of rest. Strong chemoreceptor-driven sympathetic bursts during sustained expiratory breath-holds also failed to modulate the firing of 14 spindle endings. We conclude that a sustained, physiological increase in muscle sympathetic activity causes no detectable change in muscle spindle firing, lending no support to the concept that the sympathetic nervous system can influence the sensitivity of human muscle spindles directly. PMID:12923218

  11. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

    PubMed

    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation.

  12. Muscle-spindle distribution in relation to the fibre-type composition of masseter in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Rowlerson, A; Mascarello, F; Barker, D; Saed, H

    1988-01-01

    The various parts of the masseter muscle complex (pars superficialis, pars profunda, zygomaticomandibularis, maxillomandibularis) in the rat, guinea-pig, rabbit, cat and macaque monkey were examined to discover whether they showed any relationship between the distribution of muscle spindles and extrafusal fibre types. Intrafusal (spindle) and extrafusal fibre types in masseter were compared with those in limb muscles and were identified by a combination of standard histochemical methods and indirect immunoperoxidase staining with antibodies specific for the various isoforms of myosin characteristic of fibre types in mammalian muscle. In general, the fibre-type properties of intrafusal fibres in masseter resembled those in limb muscle spindles, but the extrafusal fibre-type composition was unlike that in most limb muscles. In the rat masseter, most of the spindles were clustered together in a few very restricted areas. Extensive fusion of the external capsules of adjacent spindles, resulting in the formation of giant spindles, was seen in the cat and monkey masseter; this was sometimes accompanied by the enclosure of extrafusal fibres within the fused spindles. Common to all species, but strongest of all in the rat, was a close association between the distributions of muscle spindles and extrafusal Type I (slow twitch) fibres within the masseter complex. Muscle spindles and Type I fibres were either absent or rarest in the superficial part of masseter, but were most common in the deep layer (pars profunda) or zygomaticomandibularis. The functional significance of these observations is discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:2978294

  13. An Assessment of Six Muscle Spindle Models for Predicting Sensory Information during Human Wrist Movements

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Puja; Jabakhanji, Nuha; Jones, Kelvin E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The muscle spindle is an important sensory organ for proprioceptive information, yet there have been few attempts to use Shannon information theory to quantify the capacity of human muscle spindles to encode sensory input. Methods: Computer simulations linked kinematics, to biomechanics, to six muscle spindle models that generated predictions of firing rate. The predicted firing rates were compared to firing rates of human muscle spindles recorded during a step-tracking (center-out) task to validate their use. The models were then used to predict firing rates during random movements with statistical properties matched to the ergonomics of human wrist movements. The data were analyzed for entropy and mutual information. Results: Three of the six models produced predictions that approximated the firing rate of human spindles during the step-tracking task. For simulated random movements these models predicted mean rates of 16.0 ± 4.1 imp/s (mean ± SD), peak firing rates <50 imp/s and zero firing rate during an average of 25% of the movement. The average entropy of the neural response was 4.1 ± 0.3 bits and is an estimate of the maximum information that could be carried by muscles spindles during ecologically valid movements. The information about tendon displacement preserved in the neural response was 0.10 ± 0.05 bits per symbol; whereas 1.25 ± 0.30 bits per symbol of velocity input were preserved in the neural response of the spindle models. Conclusions: Muscle spindle models, originally based on cat experiments, have predictive value for modeling responses of human muscle spindles with minimal parameter optimization. These models predict more than 10-fold more velocity over length information encoding during ecologically valid movements. These results establish theoretical parameters for developing neuroprostheses for proprioceptive function. PMID:26834618

  14. Localization of the mei-1 gene product of Caenorhaditis elegans, a meiotic-specific spindle component

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Genetic evidence suggests that the product of the mei-1 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans is specifically required for meiosis in the female germline. Loss-of-function mei-1 mutations block meiotic spindle formation while a gain-of-function allele instead results in spindle defects during the early mitotic cleavages. In this report, we use immunocytochemistry to examine the localization of the mei-1 product in wild-type and mutant embryos. During metaphase of meiosis I in wild- type embryos, mei-1 protein was found throughout the spindle but was more concentrated toward the poles. At telophase I, mei-1 product colocalized with the chromatin at the spindle poles. The pattern was repeated during meiosis II but no mei-1 product was visible during the subsequent mitotic cleavages. The mei-1 gain-of-function allele resulted in ectopic mei-1 staining in the centers of the microtubule- organizing centers during interphase and in the spindles during the early cleavages. This aberrant localization is probably responsible for the poorly formed and misoriented cleavage spindles characteristic of the mutation. We also examined the localization of mei-1(+) product in the presence of mutations of genes that genetically interact with mei-1 alleles. mei-2 is apparently required to localize mei-1 product to the spindle during meiosis while mel-26 acts as a postmeiotic inhibitor. We conclude that mei-1 encodes a novel spindle component, one that is specialized for the acentriolar meiotic spindles unique to female meiosis. The genes mei-2 and mel-26 are part of a regulatory network that confines mei-1 activity to meiosis. PMID:8027178

  15. Ball and Roller Bearings. A Teaching Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association for Vocational Instructional Materials, Athens, GA.

    The manual provides a subject reference for ball and roller bearings. The following topics are included: (1) bearing nomenclature, (2) bearing uses, (3) bearing capacities, (4) shop area working conditions, (5) bearing removal, (6) bearing cleaning and inspection, (7) bearing replacement, (8) bearing lubrication, (9) bearing installation, (10)…

  16. Ball Bearing Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Load-deflection relationships for different types of elliptical contacts such as those found in a ball bearing are developed. Simplified expressions that allow quick calculations of deformation to be made simply from a knowledge of the applied load, the material properties, and the geometry of the contacting elements are presented. Ball bearings subjected to radial, thrust and combined ball loads are analyzed. A design criterion for fatigue life of ball bearings is developed. The section of a satisfactory lubricant, as well as describing systems that provide a constant flow of lubricant to the contact, is considered.

  17. Arkansas black bear hunter survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pharris, Larry D.; Clark, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    Questionnaires were mailed to black bear (Ursus americanus) hunters in Arkansas following the 1980-84 bear seasons to determine participation, hunter success, and number of bears observed by hunters. Man-days of hunting to harvest a bear ranged from 148 to 671 and hunter success ranged from 0.4% to 2.2%. With the exception of 1980, number of permits issued, man-days of bear hunting, and bears harvested appear affected by hunting permit cost. 

  18. The activity of thalamus and cerebral cortex neurons in rabbits during "slow wave-spindle" EEG complexes.

    PubMed

    Burikov, A A; Bereshpolova YuI

    1999-01-01

    "Slow wave-spindle" complexes were studied during slow wave sleep in rabbits at the thalamic (medial thalamus) and cortical (upper and lower layers of the sensorimotor cortex) levels. Slow wave complexes are biphasic positive-negative complexes or triphasic complexes with a predominantly negative component. Spindles have characteristics close to those of spontaneous sleep spindles. Complexes arise singly, as though inserted into the rhythm of spontaneous sleep spindles, or in series with periods similar to the spindle rhythm. Medial thalamus neurons and some cortical neurons had the same activity during waves as during spindles: if the neuron decreased (increased) its spike frequency in a spindle, then decreases (increases) in frequency were also seen in slow waves; if the neuron produced trains of discharges during spindles, then trains of activity were also seen from the slow-wave part of "slow wave-spindle" complexes. The membrane potential changed in a similar fashion: on a background of hyperpolarization which started at the slow wave, individual depolarization oscillations appeared in the EEG wave rhythm; these oscillations were not always accompanied by spike trains. The slow wave mechanism, the rhythms of isolated complexes and simultaneous complexes and spontaneous sleep spindles may share a common underlying mechanism: slow, cyclical variations in excitability in thalamocortical neuronal networks, which have previously been demonstrated for spindle-like activity. The possibility that there are common mechanisms for slow waves in complexes and other EEG slow waves, particularly delta activity, remains hypothetical.

  19. And the dead shall rise: Actin and myosin return to the spindle

    PubMed Central

    Sandquist, Joshua C.; Kita, Angela M.; Bement, William M.

    2011-01-01

    The spindle directs chromosome partitioning in eukaryotes and, for the last three decades, has been considered primarily a structure based on microtubules, microtubule motors, and other microtubule binding proteins. However, a surprisingly large body of both old and new studies suggests roles for actin filaments (F-actin) and myosins (F-actin-based motor proteins) in spindle assembly and function. Here we review these data, and conclude that in several cases the evidence for F-actin and myosins participation in spindle function is very strong, and in the situations where it is less strong, there is nevertheless enough evidence to warrant further investigation. PMID:21920311

  20. CKAP2 is necessary to ensure the faithful spindle bipolarity in a dividing diploid hepatocyte.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Bum Ho; Park, Chi-Hu; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Kang, Du-Seock; Bae, Chang-Dae

    2016-05-13

    Spindle bipolarity is crucial for segregating chromosome during somatic cell division. Previous studies have suggested that cytoskeleton associated protein 2 (CKAP2) is involved in spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. In this study, we show that CKAP2-depleted primary hepatocytes exhibit over-duplicated centrosomes with disjoined chromosomes from metaphase plate. These cells proceed to apoptosis or multipolar cell division and subsequent apoptotic cell death. In addition, a mouse liver regeneration experiment showed a marked decrease in efficiency of hepatic regeneration in CKAP2-depleted liver. These data suggest a physiological role of CKAP2 in the formation of spindle bipolarity, which is necessary for maintaining chromosomal stability.

  1. Aging affects passive stiffness and spindle function of the rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Rosant, Cédric; Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Pérot, Chantal

    2007-04-01

    Aging affects many motor functions, notably the spinal stretch reflexes and muscle spindle sensitivity. Spindle activation also depends on the elastic properties of the structures linked to the proprioceptive receptors. We have calculated a spindle efficacy index, SEI, for old rats. This index relates the spindle sensitivity, deduced from electroneurograms recording (ENG), to the passive stiffness of the muscle. Spindle sensitivity and passive incremental stiffness were calculated during ramp and hold stretches imposed on pseudo-isolated soleus muscles of control rats (aged 4 months, n=12) and old rats (aged 24 months, n=16). SEI were calculated for the dynamic and static phases of ramp (1-80 mm/s) and for hold (0.5-2mm) stretches imposed at two reference lengths: length threshold for spindle afferents discharges, L(n) (neurogram length) and slack length, L(s). The passive incremental stiffness was calculated from the peak and steady values of passive tension, measured under the stretch conditions used for the ENG recordings, and taking into account the muscle cross-sectional area. The pseudo-isolated soleus muscles were also stretched to establish the stress-strain relationship and to calculate muscle stiffness constant. The contralateral muscle was used to count muscle spindles and spindle fibers (ATPase staining) and immunostained to identify MyHC isoforms. L(n) and L(s) lengths were not significantly different in the control group, while L(n) was significantly greater than L(s) in old muscles. Under dynamic conditions, the SEI of old muscles was the same as in controls at L(s), but it was significantly lower than in controls at L(n) due to increased passive incremental stiffness under the stretch conditions used to analyze the ENG. Under static conditions, the SEI of old muscles was significantly lower than control values at all the stretch amplitudes and threshold lengths tested, due to increased passive incremental stiffness and decreased spindle sensitivity

  2. Dual approach for automated sleep spindles detection within EEG background activity in infant polysomnograms.

    PubMed

    Held, Claudio M; Causa, Leonardo; Estévez, Pablo; Pérez, Claudio; Garrido, Marcelo; Algarín, Cecilia; Peirano, Patricio

    2004-01-01

    An automated system for sleep spindles detection within EEG background activity, combining two different approaches, is presented. The first approach applies detection criteria on the sigma-band filtered EEG signal, including fuzzy thresholds. The second approach mimics an expert's procedure. A sleep spindle detection is validated if both approaches agree. The method was applied on a testing set, consisting of continuous sleep recordings of two patients, totaling 1132 epochs (pages). A total of 803 sleep spindles events were marked by the experts. Results showed an 87.7% agreement between the detection system and the medical experts.

  3. The dynamic characteristics of hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zhicheng; Sun, Jingwu; Zhai, Wenjie; Liu, Qingming; Chi, Wei

    1993-07-01

    Results of a theoretical study of the characteristics of hydrostatic bearings performed in terms of the compressibility of the air-contained oil are presented. A formula for the stability criterion of a hydrostatic bearing system and a dynamic stiffness formula is derived. It is found that, under the sinusoidal load, each of the pressure compensation systems has its own load frequency-film characteristics. The greater that compressible volume, V(oa), of oil, the smaller the dynamic stiffness. V(oa) must be reduced in the design of high-precision hydrostatic bearings. If the load frequency is in the low-stiffness area, the dynamic stiffness is small. Methods to enhance the dynamic stiffness are discussed.

  4. Process for depositing Cr-bearing layer

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, T.W.; Lograsso, T.A.; Eshelman, M.A.

    1995-05-09

    A method of applying a Cr-bearing layer to a substrate, comprises introducing an organometallic compound, in vapor or solid powder form entrained in a carrier gas to a plasma of an inductively coupled plasma torch or device to thermally decompose the organometallic compound and contacting the plasma and the substrate to be coated so as to deposit the Cr-bearing layer on the substrate. A metallic Cr, Cr alloy or Cr compound such as chromium oxide, nitride and carbide can be provided on the substrate. Typically, the organometallic compound is introduced to an inductively coupled plasma torch that is disposed in ambient air so to thermally decompose the organometallic compound in the plasma. The plasma is directed at the substrate to deposit the Cr-bearing layer or coating on the substrate. 7 figs.

  5. Process for depositing Cr-bearing layer

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Eshelman, Mark A.

    1995-05-09

    A method of applying a Cr-bearing layer to a substrate, comprises introducing an organometallic compound, in vapor or solid powder form entrained in a carrier gas to a plasma of an inductively coupled plasma torch or device to thermally decompose the organometallic compound and contacting the plasma and the substrate to be coated so as to deposit the Cr-bearing layer on the substrate. A metallic Cr, Cr alloy or Cr compound such as chromium oxide, nitride and carbide can be provided on the substrate. Typically, the organometallic compound is introduced to an inductively coupled plasma torch that is disposed in ambient air so to thermally decompose the organometallic compound in the plasma. The plasma is directed at the substrate to deposit the Cr-bearing layer or coating on the substrate.

  6. cut11+: A Gene Required for Cell Cycle-dependent Spindle Pole Body Anchoring in the Nuclear Envelope and Bipolar Spindle Formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    West, Robert R.; Vaisberg, Elena V.; Ding, Rubai; Nurse, Paul; McIntosh, J. Richard

    1998-01-01

    The “cut” mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are defective in spindle formation and/or chromosome segregation, but they proceed through the cell cycle, resulting in lethality. Analysis of temperature-sensitive alleles of cut11+ suggests that this gene is required for the formation of a functional bipolar spindle. Defective spindle structure was revealed with fluorescent probes for tubulin and DNA. Three-dimensional reconstruction of mutant spindles by serial sectioning and electron microscopy showed that the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) either failed to complete normal duplication or were free floating in the nucleoplasm. Localization of Cut11p tagged with the green fluorescent protein showed punctate nuclear envelope staining throughout the cell cycle and SPBs staining from early prophase to mid anaphase. This SPB localization correlates with the time in the cell cycle when SPBs are inserted into the nuclear envelope. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed the localization of Cut11p to mitotic SPBs and nuclear pore complexes. Cloning and sequencing showed that cut11+ encodes a novel protein with seven putative membrane-spanning domains and homology to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene NDC1. These data suggest that Cut11p associates with nuclear pore complexes and mitotic SPBs as an anchor in the nuclear envelope; this role is essential for mitosis. PMID:9763447

  7. Roller bearing geometry design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Pinkston, B. H. W.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of kinematic stabilization of rolling cylinders is extended and applied to the design of cylindrical roller bearings. The kinematic stabilization mechanism puts a reverse skew into the rolling elements by changing the roller taper. Twelve basic bearing modification designs are identified amd modeled. Four have single transverse convex curvature in their rollers while eight have rollers which have compound transverse curvature made up of a central cylindrical band surrounded by symmetric bands with slope and transverse curvature. The bearing designs are modeled for restoring torque per unit axial displacement, contact stress capacity, and contact area including dynamic loading, misalignment sensitivity and roller proportion. Design programs are available which size the single transverse curvature roller designs for a series of roller slopes and load separations and which design the compound roller bearings for a series of slopes and transverse radii of curvature. The compound rollers are proportioned to have equal contact stresses and minimum size. Design examples are also given.

  8. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  9. High speed hybrid bearing comprising a fluid bearing and a rolling bearing convected in series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A description is given of an antifriction bearing and a process by which its fatigue life may be extended. The method involves a rotating shaft supported by a fluid bearing and a rolling element bearing coupled in series. Each bearing turns at a fraction of the rotational speed of the shaft. The fluid bearing is preferably conical, thereby providing thrust and radial load support in a single bearing structure.

  10. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  11. Investigation of Pressurized Wave Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dimofte, Florin

    2003-01-01

    The wave bearing has been pioneered and developed by Dr. Dimofte over the past several years. This bearing will be the main focus of this research. It is believed that the wave bearing offers a number of advantages over the foil bearing, which is the bearing that NASA is currently pursuing for turbomachinery applications. The wave bearing is basically a journal bearing whose film thickness varies around the circumference approximately sinusoidally, with usually 3 or 4 waves. Being a rigid geometry bearing, it provides precise control of shaft centerlines. The wave profile also provides good load capacity and makes the bearing very stable. Manufacturing techniques have been devised that should allow the production of wave bearings almost as cheaply as conventional full-circular bearings.

  12. A ligand-independent integrin β1 mechanosensory complex guides spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Petridou, Nicoletta I.; Skourides, Paris A.

    2016-01-01

    Control of spindle orientation is a fundamental process for embryonic development, morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, while defects are associated with tumorigenesis and other diseases. Force sensing is one of the mechanisms through which division orientation is determined. Here we show that integrin β1 plays a critical role in this process, becoming activated at the lateral regions of the cell cortex in a ligand-independent manner. This activation is force dependent and polar, correlating with the spindle capture sites. Inhibition of integrin β1 activation on the cortex and disruption of its asymmetric distribution leads to spindle misorientation, even when cell adhesion is β1 independent. Examining downstream targets reveals that a cortical mechanosensory complex forms on active β1, and regulates spindle orientation irrespective of cell context. We propose that ligand-independent integrin β1 activation is a conserved mechanism that allows cell responses to external stimuli. PMID:26952307

  13. Chromosome position at the spindle equator is regulated by chromokinesin and a bipolar microtubule array.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Jun; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Kazuya; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2013-09-30

    The chromosome alignment is mediated by polar ejection and poleward forces acting on the chromosome arm and kinetochores, respectively. Although components of the motile machinery such as chromokinesin have been characterized, their dynamics within the spindle is poorly understood. Here we show that a quantum dot (Qdot) binding up to four Xenopus chromokinesin (Xkid) molecules behaved like a nanosize chromosome arm in the meiotic spindle, which is self-organized in cytoplasmic egg extracts. Xkid-Qdots travelled long distances along microtubules by changing several tracks, resulting in their accumulation toward and distribution around the metaphase plate. The analysis indicated that the direction of motion and velocity depend on the distribution of microtubule polarity within the spindle. Thus, this mechanism is governed by chromokinesin motors, which is dependent on symmetrical microtubule orientation that may allow chromosomes to maintain their position around the spindle equator until correct microtubule-kinetochore attachment is established.

  14. A spindle cell hemangioendothelioma on the head resembling an arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Takuya; Hirai, Rintaro

    2014-07-01

    A spindle cell hemangioendothelioma is a relatively uncommon lesion, especially on the head and neck. Recurrence occurs after local excision of 50% to 60% of these lesions; therefore, it is important to recognize this unusual neoplasm and avoid misdiagnosis. Here, we report a rare case of a spindle cell hemangioendothelioma of the head. A 37-year-old woman presented with a soft subcutaneous mass, 2.5 cm in size, on her right occipital region. The mass pulsated strongly and a thrill was present. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that some dilated feeding arteries flowed into the mass and that a flow-void sign was present. The lesion looked like an arteriovenous malformation, and a marginal resection was performed. Histologically, there was a mix of cavernous vascular cavities and Kaposi sarcomalike spindle cell vascular zones, which is compatible with a spindle cell hemangioendothelioma.

  15. Identification of MAC1: A Small Molecule That Rescues Spindle Bipolarity in Monastrol-Treated Cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Mitchison, Timothy J; Crews, Craig M; Mayer, Thomas U

    2016-06-17

    The genetic integrity of each organism is intimately tied to the correct segregation of its genome during mitosis. Insights into the underlying mechanisms are fundamental for both basic research and the development of novel strategies to treat mitosis-relevant diseases such as cancer. Due to their fast mode of action, small molecules are invaluable tools to dissect mitosis. Yet, there is a great demand for novel antimitotic compounds. We performed a chemical genetic suppression screen to identify compounds that restore spindle bipolarity in cells treated with Monastrol, an inhibitor of the mitotic kinesin Eg5. We identified one compound-MAC1-that rescued spindle bipolarity in cells lacking Eg5 activity. Mechanistically, MAC1 induces the formation of additional microtubule nucleation centers, which allows kinesin Kif15-dependent bipolar spindle assembly in the absence of Eg5 activity. Thus, our chemical genetic suppression screen revealed novel unexpected insights into the mechanism of spindle assembly in mammalian cells.

  16. Dyskerin, tRNA genes, and condensin tether pericentric chromatin to the spindle axis in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Chloe E.; Stephens, Andrew D.; Kirkland, Jacob G.; Hamdani, Omar; Kamakaka, Rohinton T.

    2014-01-01

    Condensin is enriched in the pericentromere of budding yeast chromosomes where it is constrained to the spindle axis in metaphase. Pericentric condensin contributes to chromatin compaction, resistance to microtubule-based spindle forces, and spindle length and variance regulation. Condensin is clustered along the spindle axis in a heterogeneous fashion. We demonstrate that pericentric enrichment of condensin is mediated by interactions with transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) genes and their regulatory factors. This recruitment is important for generating axial tension on the pericentromere and coordinating movement between pericentromeres from different chromosomes. The interaction between condensin and tRNA genes in the pericentromere reveals a feature of yeast centromeres that has profound implications for the function and evolution of mitotic segregation mechanisms. PMID:25332162

  17. The nucleoporin ALADIN regulates Aurora A localization to ensure robust mitotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Carvalhal, Sara; Ribeiro, Susana Abreu; Arocena, Miguel; Kasciukovic, Taciana; Temme, Achim; Koehler, Katrin; Huebner, Angela; Griffis, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the mitotic spindle is a complex process that requires massive cellular reorganization. Regulation by mitotic kinases controls this entire process. One of these mitotic controllers is Aurora A kinase, which is itself highly regulated. In this study, we show that the nuclear pore protein ALADIN is a novel spatial regulator of Aurora A. Without ALADIN, Aurora A spreads from centrosomes onto spindle microtubules, which affects the distribution of a subset of microtubule regulators and slows spindle assembly and chromosome alignment. ALADIN interacts with inactive Aurora A and is recruited to the spindle pole after Aurora A inhibition. Of interest, mutations in ALADIN cause triple A syndrome. We find that some of the mitotic phenotypes that we observe after ALADIN depletion also occur in cells from triple A syndrome patients, which raises the possibility that mitotic errors may underlie part of the etiology of this syndrome. PMID:26246606

  18. F-actin mechanics control spindle centring in the mouse zygote

    PubMed Central

    Chaigne, Agathe; Campillo, Clément; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cécile; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène; Terret, Marie-Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position relies on interactions between astral microtubules nucleated by centrosomes and a rigid cortex. Some cells, such as mouse oocytes, do not possess centrosomes and astral microtubules. These cells rely only on actin and on a soft cortex to position their spindle off-centre and undergo asymmetric divisions. While the first mouse embryonic division also occurs in the absence of centrosomes, it is symmetric and not much is known on how the spindle is positioned at the exact cell centre. Using interdisciplinary approaches, we demonstrate that zygotic spindle positioning follows a three-step process: (1) coarse centring of pronuclei relying on the dynamics of an F-actin/Myosin-Vb meshwork; (2) fine centring of the metaphase plate depending on a high cortical tension; (3) passive maintenance at the cell centre. Altogether, we show that F-actin-dependent mechanics operate the switch between asymmetric to symmetric division required at the oocyte to embryo transition. PMID:26727405

  19. The association between sleep spindles and IQ in healthy school-age children.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Reut; Wise, Merrill S; Frenette, Sonia; Knäauper, Bärbel; Boom, Alice; Fontil, Laura; Carrier, Julie

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that sleep is associated with IQ measures in children, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. An association between sleep spindles and IQ has been found in adults, but only two previous studies have explored this topic in children. The goal of this study was to examine whether sleep spindle frequency, amplitude, duration and/or density were associated with performance on the perceptual reasoning, verbal comprehension, working memory, and processing speed subscales of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV (WISC-IV). We recruited 29 typically developing children 7-11 years of age. We used portable polysomnography to document sleep architecture in the natural home environment and evaluated IQ. We found that lower sleep spindle frequency was associated with better performance on the perceptual reasoning and working memory WISC-IV scales, but that sleep spindle amplitude, duration and density were not associated with performance on the IQ test.

  20. Mitotic noncoding RNA processing promotes kinetochore and spindle assembly in Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Grenfell, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription at the centromere of chromosomes plays an important role in kinetochore assembly in many eukaryotes, and noncoding RNAs contribute to activation of the mitotic kinase Aurora B. However, little is known about how mitotic RNA processing contributes to spindle assembly. We found that inhibition of transcription initiation or RNA splicing, but not translation, leads to spindle defects in Xenopus egg extracts. Spliceosome inhibition resulted in the accumulation of high molecular weight centromeric transcripts, concomitant with decreased recruitment of the centromere and kinetochore proteins CENP-A, CENP-C, and NDC80 to mitotic chromosomes. In addition, blocking transcript synthesis or processing during mitosis caused accumulation of MCAK, a microtubule depolymerase, on the spindle, indicating misregulation of Aurora B. These findings suggest that co-transcriptional recruitment of the RNA processing machinery to nascent mitotic transcripts is an important step in kinetochore and spindle assembly and challenge the idea that RNA processing is globally repressed during mitosis. PMID:27402954

  1. Illusion caused by vibration of muscle spindles reveals an involvement of muscle spindle inputs in regulating isometric contraction of masseter muscles.

    PubMed

    Tsukiboshi, Taisuke; Sato, Hajime; Tanaka, Yuto; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Morimoto, Toshifumi; Türker, Kemal Sitki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kang, Youngnam

    2012-11-01

    Spindle Ia afferents may be differentially involved in voluntary isometric contraction, depending on the pattern of synaptic connections in spindle reflex pathways. We investigated how isometric contraction of masseter muscles is regulated through the activity of their muscle spindles that contain the largest number of intrafusal fibers among skeletal muscle spindles by examining the effects of vibration of muscle spindles on the voluntary isometric contraction. Subjects were instructed to hold the jaw at resting position by counteracting ramp loads applied on lower molar teeth. In response to the increasing-ramp load, the root mean square (RMS) of masseter EMG activity almost linearly increased under no vibration, while displaying a steep linear increase followed by a slower increase under vibration. The regression line of the relationship between the load and RMS was significantly steeper under vibration than under no vibration, suggesting that the subjects overestimated the ramp load and excessively counteracted it as reflected in the emergence of bite pressure. In response to the decreasing-ramp load applied following the increasing one, the RMS hardly decreased under vibration unlike under no vibration, leading to a generation of bite pressure even after the offset of the negative-ramp load until the vibration was ceased. Thus the subjects overestimated the increasing rate of the load while underestimating the decreasing rate of the load, due to the vibration-induced illusion of jaw opening. These observations suggest that spindle Ia/II inputs play crucial roles both in estimating the load and in controlling the isometric contraction of masseter muscles in the jaw-closed position.

  2. Slow sleep spindle and procedural memory consolidation in patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Masaki; Nakashima, Yusaku; Nishikawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Evidence has accumulated, which indicates that, in healthy individuals, sleep enhances procedural memory consolidation, and that sleep spindle activity modulates this process. However, whether sleep-dependent procedural memory consolidation occurs in patients medicated for major depressive disorder remains unclear, as are the pharmacological and physiological mechanisms that underlie this process. Methods Healthy control participants (n=17) and patients medicated for major depressive disorder (n=11) were recruited and subjected to a finger-tapping motor sequence test (MST; nondominant hand) paradigm to compare the averaged scores of different learning phases (presleep, postsleep, and overnight improvement). Participants’ brain activity was recorded during sleep with 16 electroencephalography channels (between MSTs). Sleep scoring and frequency analyses were performed on the electroencephalography data. Additionally, we evaluated sleep spindle activity, which divided the spindles into fast-frequency spindle activity (12.5–16 Hz) and slow-frequency spindle activity (10.5–12.5 Hz). Result Sleep-dependent motor memory consolidation in patients with depression was impaired in comparison with that in control participants. In patients with depression, age correlated negatively with overnight improvement. The duration of slow-wave sleep correlated with the magnitude of motor memory consolidation in patients with depression, but not in healthy controls. Slow-frequency spindle activity was associated with reduction in the magnitude of motor memory consolidation in both groups. Conclusion Because the changes in slow-frequency spindle activity affected the thalamocortical network dysfunction in patients medicated for depression, dysregulated spindle generation may impair sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Our findings may help to elucidate the cognitive deficits that occur in patients with major depression both in the waking state and during sleep. PMID

  3. Warts phosphorylates Mud to promote Pins-mediated mitotic spindle orientation in Drosophila independent of Yorkie

    PubMed Central

    Dewey, Evan B.; Sanchez, Desiree; Johnston, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Multicellular animals have evolved conserved signaling pathways that translate cell polarity cues into mitotic spindle positioning to control the orientation of cell division within complex tissue structures. These oriented cell divisions are essential for the development of cell diversity and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Despite intense efforts, the molecular mechanisms that control spindle orientation remain incompletely defined. Here we describe a role for the Hippo (Hpo) kinase complex in promoting Partner of Inscuteable (Pins)-mediated spindle orientation. Knockdown of Hpo, Salvador (Sav), or Warts (Wts) each result in a partial loss of spindle orientation, a phenotype previously described following loss of the Pins-binding protein Mushroom body defect (Mud). Similar to orthologs spanning yeast to mammals, Wts kinase localizes to mitotic spindle poles, a prominent site of Mud localization. Wts directly phosphorylates Mud in vitro within its C-terminal coiled-coil domain. This Mud coiled-coil domain directly binds the adjacent Pins-binding domain to dampen the Pins/Mud interaction, and Wts-mediated phosphorylation uncouples this intramolecular Mud interaction. Loss of Wts prevents cortical Pins/Mud association without affecting Mud accumulation at spindle poles, suggesting phosphorylation acts as a molecular switch to specifically activate cortical Mud function. Finally, loss of Wts in Drosophila imaginal disc epithelial cells results in diminished cortical Mud and defective planar spindle orientation. Our results provide new insights into the molecular basis for dynamic regulation of the cortical Pins/Mud spindle positioning complex and highlight a novel link with an essential, evolutionarily-conserved cell proliferation pathway. PMID:26592339

  4. NuMA Phosphorylation by Aurora-A Orchestrates Spindle Orientation.

    PubMed

    Gallini, Sara; Carminati, Manuel; De Mattia, Fabiola; Pirovano, Laura; Martini, Emanuele; Oldani, Amanda; Asteriti, Italia Anna; Guarguaglini, Giulia; Mapelli, Marina

    2016-02-22

    Spindle positioning is essential for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. The signaling network synchronizing spindle placement with mitotic progression relies on timely recruitment at the cell cortex of NuMA:LGN:Gαi complexes, in which NuMA acts as a receptor for the microtubule motor Dynein. To study the implication of Aurora-A in spindle orientation, we developed protocols for the partial inhibition of its activity. Under these conditions, in metaphase NuMA and Dynein accumulate abnormally at the spindle poles and do not reach the cortex, while the cortical distribution of LGN remains unperturbed. FRAP experiments revealed that Aurora-A governs the dynamic exchange between the cytoplasmic and the spindle pole-localized pools of NuMA. We show that Aurora-A phosphorylates directly the C terminus of NuMA on three Ser residues, of which Ser1969 determines the dynamic behavior and the spindle orientation functions of NuMA. Most interestingly, we identify a new microtubule-binding domain of NuMA, which does not overlap with the LGN-binding motif. Our study demonstrates that in metaphase the direct phosphorylation of NuMA by Aurora-A controls its cortical enrichment, and that this is the major event underlying the spindle orientation functions of Aurora-A in transformed and non-transformed cells in culture. Phosphorylation of NuMA by Aurora-A does not affect its affinity for microtubules or for LGN but rather determines the mobility of the protein at the spindle poles. The finding that NuMA can associate concomitantly with LGN and microtubules suggests that its microtubule-binding activity contributes to anchor Dynein-loaded microtubule +TIPs at cortical sites with LGN.

  5. Rolling-element bearings. [contact sliding friction study of solid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to hydrodynamic bearings, which depend for low-friction characteristics on a fluid film between the journal and the bearing surfaces, roller-element bearings employ a number of balls or rollers that roll in an annular space. The paper briefly outlines the advantages and disadvantages of roller-element bearings as compared to hydrodynamic bearings. The discussion covers bearing types, rolling friction, friction losses in rolling bearings, contact stresses, deformations, kinematics (normal and high speeds), bearing dynamics including elastohydrodynamics, load distribution, lubrication (grease, solid oil, oil-air mist), specific dynamic capacity and life, specific static capacity, and fatigue or wearout (elastohydrodynamics, wear). Rolling bearing wear factor as a function of operating environment is plotted and discussed.

  6. Climate Drives Polar Bear Origins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In their provocative analysis of northern bears (“Nuclear genomic sequences reveal that polar bears are an old and distinct bear lineage,” Reports, 20 April, p. 344), F. Hailer et al. use independent nuclear loci to show that polar bears originated during the middle Pleistocene, rather than during t...

  7. Measured force/current relations in solid magnetic thrust bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.; Wakefield, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    When magnetic bearings are employed in a pump, compressor, turbine, or other rotating machine, measurement of the current in the bearing coils provides knowledge of the forces imposed on the bearings. This can be a significant indicator of machine problems. Additionally, magnetic bearings can be utilized as a load cell for measuring impeller forces in test rigs. The forces supported by magnetic bearings are directly related to the currents, air gaps, and other parameters in the bearings. This paper discusses the current/force relation for magnetic thrust bearings. Force versus current measurements were made on a particular magnetic bearing in a test rig as the bearing coil currents were cycled at various time rates of change.d the quasi-static force versus current relations were measured for a variety of air gaps and currents. The thrust bearing exhibits a hysteresis effect, which creates a significant difference between the measured force when the current is increasing as compared to that when the current is decreasing. For design current loops, 0.95 A to 2.55 A, at the time rate of change of 0.1 A/s, the difference between increasing and decreasing current curves due to hysteresis ranged from 4 to 8%. If the bearing is operated in small trajectories about a fixed (nonzero) operation point on the F/I (force/current) curve, the scatter in the measurement error could be expected to be on the order of 4%. A quasi-static nonlinear current/force equation was developed to model the data and curve-fit parameters established for the measured data. The effects of coercive force and iron reluctance, obtained from conventional magnetic materials tests, were included to improve the model, but theoretically calculated values from simple magnetic circuit theory do not produce accurate results. Magnetic fringing, leakage, and other effects must be included.

  8. Kinesin-8 effects on mitotic microtubule dynamics contribute to spindle function in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Zachary R.; Crapo, Ammon; Hough, Loren E.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2016-01-01

    Kinesin-8 motor proteins destabilize microtubules. Their absence during cell division is associated with disorganized mitotic chromosome movements and chromosome loss. Despite recent work studying effects of kinesin-8s on microtubule dynamics, it remains unclear whether the kinesin-8 mitotic phenotypes are consequences of their effect on microtubule dynamics, their well-established motor activity, or additional, unknown functions. To better understand the role of kinesin-8 proteins in mitosis, we studied the effects of deletion of the fission yeast kinesin-8 proteins Klp5 and Klp6 on chromosome movements and spindle length dynamics. Aberrant microtubule-driven kinetochore pushing movements and tripolar mitotic spindles occurred in cells lacking Klp5 but not Klp6. Kinesin-8–deletion strains showed large fluctuations in metaphase spindle length, suggesting a disruption of spindle length stabilization. Comparison of our results from light microscopy with a mathematical model suggests that kinesin-8–induced effects on microtubule dynamics, kinetochore attachment stability, and sliding force in the spindle can explain the aberrant chromosome movements and spindle length fluctuations seen. PMID:27146110

  9. Telomeres and centromeres have interchangeable roles in promoting meiotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Alex; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Tomita, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres and centromeres have traditionally been considered to perform distinct roles. During meiotic prophase, in a conserved chromosomal configuration called the bouquet, telomeres gather to the nuclear membrane (NM), often near centrosomes. We found previously that upon disruption of the fission yeast bouquet, centrosomes failed to insert into the NM at meiosis I and nucleate bipolar spindles. Hence, the trans-NM association of telomeres with centrosomes during prophase is crucial for efficient spindle formation. Nonetheless, in approximately half of bouquet-deficient meiocytes, spindles form properly. Here, we show that bouquet-deficient cells can successfully undergo meiosis using centromere–centrosome contact instead of telomere–centrosome contact to generate spindle formation. Accordingly, forced association between centromeres and centrosomes fully rescued the spindle defects incurred by bouquet disruption. Telomeres and centromeres both stimulate focal accumulation of the SUN domain protein Sad1 beneath the centrosome, suggesting a molecular underpinning for their shared spindle-generating ability. Our observations demonstrate an unanticipated level of interchangeability between the two most prominent chromosomal landmarks. PMID:25688135

  10. Kif2a regulates spindle organization and cell cycle progression in meiotic oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zi-Yun; Ma, Xue-Shan; Liang, Qiu-Xia; Zhang, Teng; Xu, Zhao-Yang; Meng, Tie-Gang; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Quan, Song

    2016-01-01

    Kif2a is a member of the Kinesin-13 microtubule depolymerases. Here, we report the expression, subcellular localization and functions of Kif2a during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. Immunoblotting analysis showed that Kif2a was gradually increased form GV to the M I stages, and then decreased slightly at the M II stage. Confocal microscopy identified that Kif2a localized to the meiotic spindle, especially concentrated at the spindle poles and inner centromeres in metaphase and translocated to the midbody at telophase. Kif2a depletion by siRNA microinjection generated severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes, reduced microtubule depolymerization, which led to significant pro-M I/M Iarrest and failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion. Kif2a-depleted oocytes were also defective in spindle pole localization of γ-tubulin and showed spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protein Bub3 at the kinetochores even after 10 hr extended culture. These results demonstrate that Kif2a may act as a microtubule depolymerase, regulating microtubule dynamics, spindle assembly and chromosome congression, and thus cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:27991495

  11. The deubiquitinating enzyme complex BRISC is required for proper mitotic spindle assembly in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kaowen; Li, Li; Wang, Xiaojian; Hong, Ruisha; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Hua; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Sha; He, Qihua; Zheng, Duo; Tang, Jun; Yin, Yuxin

    2015-01-01

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) negatively regulate protein ubiquitination and play an important role in diverse physiological processes, including mitotic division. The BRCC36 isopeptidase complex (BRISC) is a DUB that is specific for lysine 63–linked ubiquitin hydrolysis; however, its biological function remains largely undefined. Here, we identify a critical role for BRISC in the control of mitotic spindle assembly in cultured mammalian cells. BRISC is a microtubule (MT)-associated protein complex that predominantly localizes to the minus ends of K-fibers and spindle poles and directly binds to MTs; importantly, BRISC promotes the assembly of functional bipolar spindle by deubiquitinating the essential spindle assembly factor nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA). The deubiquitination of NuMA regulates its interaction with dynein and importin-β, which are required for its function in spindle assembly. Collectively, these results uncover BRISC as an important regulator of the mitotic spindle assembly and cell division, and have important implications for the development of anticancer drugs targeting BRISC. PMID:26195665

  12. A curved edge diffraction-utilized displacement sensor for spindle metrology.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChaBum; Mahajan, Satish M; Zhao, Rui; Jeon, Seongkyul

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new dimensional metrological sensing principle for a curved surface based on curved edge diffraction. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the spindle with non-contact sensors, typically a capacitive sensor (CS) or an eddy current sensor, pointed at the artifact. However, these sensors are designed for flat surface measurement. Therefore, measuring a target with a curved surface causes error. This is due to electric fields behaving differently between a flat and curved surface than between two flat surfaces. In this study, a laser is positioned incident to the cylindrical surface of the spindle, and a photodetector collects the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. The proposed sensor was compared with a CS within a range of 500 μm. The discrepancy between the proposed sensor and CS was 0.017% of the full range. Its sensing performance showed a resolution of 14 nm and a drift of less than 10 nm for 7 min of operation. This sensor was also used to measure dynamic characteristics of the spindle system (natural frequency 181.8 Hz, damping ratio 0.042) and spindle runout (22.0 μm at 2000 rpm). The combined standard uncertainty was estimated as 85.9 nm under current experiment conditions. It is anticipated that this measurement technique allows for in situ health monitoring of a precision spindle system in an accurate, convenient, and low cost manner.

  13. Mathematical models of proprioceptors. I. Control and transduction in the muscle spindle.

    PubMed

    Mileusnic, Milana P; Brown, Ian E; Lan, Ning; Loeb, Gerald E

    2006-10-01

    We constructed a physiologically realistic model of a lower-limb, mammalian muscle spindle composed of mathematical elements closely related to the anatomical components found in the biological spindle. The spindle model incorporates three nonlinear intrafusal fiber models (bag(1), bag(2), and chain) that contribute variously to action potential generation of primary and secondary afferents. A single set of model parameters was optimized on a number of data sets collected from feline soleus muscle, accounting accurately for afferent activity during a variety of ramp, triangular, and sinusoidal stretches. We also incorporated the different temporal properties of fusimotor activation as observed in the twitchlike chain fibers versus the toniclike bag fibers. The model captures the spindle's behavior both in the absence of fusimotor stimulation and during activation of static or dynamic fusimotor efferents. In the case of simultaneous static and dynamic fusimotor efferent stimulation, we demonstrated the importance of including the experimentally observed effect of partial occlusion. The model was validated against data that originated from the cat's medial gastrocnemius muscle and were different from the data used for the parameter determination purposes. The validation record included recently published experiments in which fusimotor efferent and spindle afferent activities were recorded simultaneously during decerebrate locomotion in the cat. This model will be useful in understanding the role of the muscle spindle and its fusimotor control during both natural and pathological motor behavior.

  14. Distribution of slow muscle fiber of muscle spindle in postnatal rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Iwao; Imura, Kosuke; Miwa, Yoko; Ide, Yoshiaki; Murata, Megumi; Sunohara, Masataka

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the properties of the muscle spindle in the masseter muscle at an immunohistochemical level in rats fed for 6 weeks. Slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were measured and intrafusal fibers in the muscle spindle were studied to determine the relationship between the superficial and deep regions of rat masseter muscle after alternated feeding pattern. However, muscle spindles were found in both regions, mainly in the deep region of the posterior superficial region of masseter muscle. The total number of the slow fiber in the intrafusal fiber and number of muscle spindle in the deep region were high from 5 to 8 weeks old in spite of various dimensions of data such as diameter and the compositions of the intrafusal fiber. The relationship of the protein expression of slow MyHC in the two regions at 5 weeks old reversed five weeks later (10 weeks old). This period is an important stage because the mastication system in masseter muscle with muscle spindle may be changed during the alternated feeding pattern of suckling to mastication. The changes may be a marker of the feeding system and of the control by the tension receptor of muscle spindle in this stage of masseter muscle after postnatal development.

  15. The Contribution of Thalamocortical Core and Matrix Pathways to Sleep Spindles

    PubMed Central

    Piantoni, Giovanni; Halgren, Eric; Cash, Sydney S.

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles arise from the interaction of thalamic and cortical neurons. Neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) inhibit thalamocortical neurons, which in turn excite the TRN and cortical neurons. A fundamental principle of anatomical organization of the thalamocortical projections is the presence of two pathways: the diffuse matrix pathway and the spatially selective core pathway. Cortical layers are differentially targeted by these two pathways with matrix projections synapsing in superficial layers and core projections impinging on middle layers. Based on this anatomical observation, we propose that spindles can be classified into two classes, those arising from the core pathway and those arising from the matrix pathway, although this does not exclude the fact that some spindles might combine both pathways at the same time. We find evidence for this hypothesis in EEG/MEG studies, intracranial recordings, and computational models that incorporate this difference. This distinction will prove useful in accounting for the multiple functions attributed to spindles, in that spindles of different types might act on local and widespread spatial scales. Because spindle mechanisms are often hijacked in epilepsy and schizophrenia, the classification proposed in this review might provide valuable information in defining which pathways have gone awry in these neurological disorders. PMID:27144033

  16. Regulation of NDR1 activity by PLK1 ensures proper spindle orientation in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Maomao; Chu, Lingluo; Qin, Bo; Wang, Zhikai; Liu, Xing; Jin, Changjiang; Zhang, Guanglan; Gomez, Marta; Hergovich, Alexander; Chen, Zhengjun; He, Ping; Gao, Xinjiao; Yao, Xuebiao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires the physical separation of sister chromatids which depends on correct position of mitotic spindle relative to membrane cortex. Although recent work has identified the role of PLK1 in spindle orientation, the mechanisms underlying PLK1 signaling in spindle positioning and orientation have not been fully illustrated. Here, we identified a conserved signaling axis in which NDR1 kinase activity is regulated by PLK1 in mitosis. PLK1 phosphorylates NDR1 at three putative threonine residues (T7, T183 and T407) at mitotic entry, which elicits PLK1-dependent suppression of NDR1 activity and ensures correct spindle orientation in mitosis. Importantly, persistent expression of non-phosphorylatable NDR1 mutant perturbs spindle orientation. Mechanistically, PLK1-mediated phosphorylation protects the binding of Mob1 to NDR1 and subsequent NDR1 activation. These findings define a conserved signaling axis that integrates dynamic kinetochore-microtubule interaction and spindle orientation control to genomic stability maintenance. PMID:26057687

  17. The sequential activation of the mitotic microtubule assembly pathways favors bipolar spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Tommaso; Malgaretti, Paolo; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Centrosome maturation is the process by which the duplicated centrosomes recruit pericentriolar components and increase their microtubule nucleation activity before mitosis. The role of this process in cells entering mitosis has been mostly related to the separation of the duplicated centrosomes and thereby to the assembly of a bipolar spindle. However, spindles can form without centrosomes. In fact, all cells, whether they have centrosomes or not, rely on chromatin-driven microtubule assembly to form a spindle. To test whether the sequential activation of these microtubule assembly pathways, defined by centrosome maturation and nuclear envelope breakdown, plays any role in spindle assembly, we combined experiments in tissue culture cells and Xenopus laevis egg extracts with a mathematical model. We found that interfering with the sequential activation of the microtubule assembly pathways compromises bipolar spindle assembly in tissue culture cells but not in X. laevis egg extracts. Our data suggest a novel function for centrosome maturation that determines the contribution of the chromosomal microtubule assembly pathway and favors bipolar spindle formation in most animal cells in which tubulin is in limiting amounts. PMID:27489339

  18. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin−/− mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09384.001 PMID:26406118

  19. The nucleoporin Nup153 affects spindle checkpoint activity due to an association with Mad1

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The nucleoporin Nup153 is known to play pivotal roles in nuclear import and export in interphase cells and as the cell transitions into mitosis, Nup153 is involved in nuclear envelope breakdown. In this study, we demonstrate that the interaction of Nup153 with the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad1 is important in the regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Overexpression of human Nup153 in HeLa cells leads to the appearance of multinucleated cells and induces the formation of multipolar spindles. Importantly, it causes inactivation of the spindle checkpoint due to hypophosphorylation of Mad1. Depletion of Nup153 using RNA interference results in the decline of Mad1 at nuclear pores during interphase and more significantly causes a delayed dissociation of Mad1 from kinetochores in metaphase and an increase in the number of unresolved midbodies. In the absence of Nup153 the spindle checkpoint remains active. In vitro studies indicate direct binding of Mad1 to the N-terminal domain of Nup153. Importantly, Nup153 binding to Mad1 affects Mad1's phosphorylation status, but not its ability to interact with Mad2. Our data suggest that Nup153 levels regulate the localization of Mad1 during the metaphase/anaphase transition thereby affecting its phoshorylation status and in turn spindle checkpoint activity and mitotic exit. PMID:21327106

  20. A curved edge diffraction-utilized displacement sensor for spindle metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Mahajan, Satish M.; Zhao, Rui; Jeon, Seongkyul

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new dimensional metrological sensing principle for a curved surface based on curved edge diffraction. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the spindle with non-contact sensors, typically a capacitive sensor (CS) or an eddy current sensor, pointed at the artifact. However, these sensors are designed for flat surface measurement. Therefore, measuring a target with a curved surface causes error. This is due to electric fields behaving differently between a flat and curved surface than between two flat surfaces. In this study, a laser is positioned incident to the cylindrical surface of the spindle, and a photodetector collects the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. The proposed sensor was compared with a CS within a range of 500 μm. The discrepancy between the proposed sensor and CS was 0.017% of the full range. Its sensing performance showed a resolution of 14 nm and a drift of less than 10 nm for 7 min of operation. This sensor was also used to measure dynamic characteristics of the spindle system (natural frequency 181.8 Hz, damping ratio 0.042) and spindle runout (22.0 μm at 2000 rpm). The combined standard uncertainty was estimated as 85.9 nm under current experiment conditions. It is anticipated that this measurement technique allows for in situ health monitoring of a precision spindle system in an accurate, convenient, and low cost manner.

  1. The critical role of sleep spindles in hippocampal-dependent memory: a pharmacology study.

    PubMed

    Mednick, Sara C; McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Walsh, James K; Wamsley, Erin; Paulus, Martin; Kanady, Jennifer C; Drummond, Sean P A

    2013-03-06

    An important function of sleep is the consolidation of memories, and features of sleep, such as rapid eye movement (REM) or sleep spindles, have been shown to correlate with improvements in discrete memory domains. Because of the methodological difficulties in modulating sleep, however, a causal link between specific sleep features and human memory consolidation is lacking. Here, we experimentally manipulated specific sleep features during a daytime nap via direct pharmacological intervention. Using zolpidem (Ambien), a short-acting GABAA agonist hypnotic, we show increased sleep spindle density and decreased REM sleep compared with placebo and sodium oxybate (Xyrem). Naps with increased spindles produced significantly better verbal memory and significantly worse perceptual learning but did not affect motor learning. The experimental spindles were similar to control spindles in amplitude and frequency, suggesting that the experimental intervention enhanced normal sleep processes. Furthermore, using statistical methods, we demonstrate for the first time a critical role of spindles in human hippocampal memory performance. The gains in memory consolidation exceed sleep-alone or control conditions and demonstrate the potential for targeted, exceptional memory enhancement in healthy adults with pharmacologically modified sleep.

  2. Electro-acoustic behavior of the mitotic spindle: a semi-classical coarse-grained model.

    PubMed

    Havelka, Daniel; Kučera, Ondřej; Deriu, Marco A; Cifra, Michal

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of chromosome separation during mitosis is not fully understood yet. Microtubules forming mitotic spindles are targets of treatment strategies which are aimed at (i) the triggering of the apoptosis or (ii) the interruption of uncontrolled cell division. Despite these facts, only few physical models relating to the dynamics of mitotic spindles exist up to now. In this paper, we present the first electromechanical model which enables calculation of the electromagnetic field coupled to acoustic vibrations of the mitotic spindle. This electromagnetic field originates from the electrical polarity of microtubules which form the mitotic spindle. The model is based on the approximation of resonantly vibrating microtubules by a network of oscillating electric dipoles. Our computational results predict the existence of a rapidly changing electric field which is generated by either driven or endogenous vibrations of the mitotic spindle. For certain values of parameters, the intensity of the electric field and its gradient reach values which may exert a not-inconsiderable force on chromosomes which are aligned in the spindle midzone. Our model may describe possible mechanisms of the effects of ultra-short electrical and mechanical pulses on dividing cells--a strategy used in novel methods for cancer treatment.

  3. Electro-Acoustic Behavior of the Mitotic Spindle: A Semi-Classical Coarse-Grained Model

    PubMed Central

    Havelka, Daniel; Kučera, Ondřej; Deriu, Marco A.; Cifra, Michal

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of chromosome separation during mitosis is not fully understood yet. Microtubules forming mitotic spindles are targets of treatment strategies which are aimed at (i) the triggering of the apoptosis or (ii) the interruption of uncontrolled cell division. Despite these facts, only few physical models relating to the dynamics of mitotic spindles exist up to now. In this paper, we present the first electromechanical model which enables calculation of the electromagnetic field coupled to acoustic vibrations of the mitotic spindle. This electromagnetic field originates from the electrical polarity of microtubules which form the mitotic spindle. The model is based on the approximation of resonantly vibrating microtubules by a network of oscillating electric dipoles. Our computational results predict the existence of a rapidly changing electric field which is generated by either driven or endogenous vibrations of the mitotic spindle. For certain values of parameters, the intensity of the electric field and its gradient reach values which may exert a not-inconsiderable force on chromosomes which are aligned in the spindle midzone. Our model may describe possible mechanisms of the effects of ultra-short electrical and mechanical pulses on dividing cells—a strategy used in novel methods for cancer treatment. PMID:24497952

  4. Sleep Spindle Characteristics in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Their Relation to Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Merrill S.

    2016-01-01

    Empirical evidence indicates that sleep spindles facilitate neuroplasticity and “off-line” processing during sleep, which supports learning, memory consolidation, and intellectual performance. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) exhibit characteristics that may increase both the risk for and vulnerability to abnormal spindle generation. Despite the high prevalence of sleep problems and cognitive deficits in children with NDD, only a few studies have examined the putative association between spindle characteristics and cognitive function. This paper reviews the literature regarding sleep spindle characteristics in children with NDD and their relation to cognition in light of what is known in typically developing children and based on the available evidence regarding children with NDD. We integrate available data, identify gaps in understanding, and recommend future research directions. Collectively, studies are limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneous populations with multiple comorbidities, and nonstandardized methods for collecting and analyzing findings. These limitations notwithstanding, the evidence suggests that future studies should examine associations between sleep spindle characteristics and cognitive function in children with and without NDD, and preliminary findings raise the intriguing question of whether enhancement or manipulation of sleep spindles could improve sleep-dependent memory and other aspects of cognitive function in this population. PMID:27478646

  5. Emerging molecular mechanisms that power and regulate the anastral mitotic spindle of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Bannigan, Alex; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Riley, Margaret; Baskin, Tobias I

    2008-01-01

    Flowering plants, lacking centrosomes as well as dynein, assemble their mitotic spindle via a pathway that is distinct visually and molecularly from that of animals and yeast. The molecular components underlying mitotic spindle assembly and function in plants are beginning to be discovered. Here, we review recent evidence suggesting the preprophase band in plants functions analogously to the centrosome in animals in establishing spindle bipolarity, and we review recent progress characterizing the roles of specific motor proteins in plant mitosis. Loss of function of certain minus-end-directed KIN-14 motor proteins causes a broadening of the spindle pole; whereas, loss of function of a KIN-5 causes the formation of monopolar spindles, resembling those formed when the homologous motor protein (e.g., Eg5) is knocked out in animal cells. We present a phylogeny of the kinesin-5 motor domain, which shows deep divergence among plant sequences, highlighting possibilities for specialization. Finally, we review information concerning the roles of selected structural proteins at mitosis as well as recent findings concerning regulation of M-phase in plants. Insight into the mitotic spindle will be obtained through continued comparison of mitotic mechanisms in a diversity of cells.

  6. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-09-25

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin(-/-) mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division.

  7. Age-related changes in sleep spindles characteristics during daytime recovery following a 25-hour sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Rosinvil, T.; Lafortune, M.; Sekerovic, Z.; Bouchard, M.; Dubé, J.; Latulipe-Loiselle, A.; Martin, N.; Lina, J. M.; Carrier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The mechanisms underlying sleep spindles (~11–15 Hz; >0.5 s) help to protect sleep. With age, it becomes increasingly difficult to maintain sleep at a challenging time (e.g., daytime), even after sleep loss. This study compared spindle characteristics during daytime recovery and nocturnal sleep in young and middle-aged adults. In addition, we explored whether spindles characteristics in baseline nocturnal sleep were associated with the ability to maintain sleep during daytime recovery periods in both age groups. Methods: Twenty-nine young (15 women and 14 men; 27.3 y ± 5.0) and 31 middle-aged (19 women and 13 men; 51.6 y ± 5.1) healthy subjects participated in a baseline nocturnal sleep and a daytime recovery sleep after 25 hours of sleep deprivation. Spindles were detected on artifact-free Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep epochs. Spindle density (nb/min), amplitude (μV), frequency (Hz), and duration (s) were analyzed on parasagittal (linked-ears) derivations. Results: In young subjects, spindle frequency increased during daytime recovery sleep as compared to baseline nocturnal sleep in all derivations, whereas middle-aged subjects showed spindle frequency enhancement only in the prefrontal derivation. No other significant interaction between age group and sleep condition was observed. Spindle density for all derivations and centro-occipital spindle amplitude decreased whereas prefrontal spindle amplitude increased from baseline to daytime recovery sleep in both age groups. Finally, no significant correlation was found between spindle characteristics during baseline nocturnal sleep and the marked reduction in sleep efficiency during daytime recovery sleep in both young and middle-aged subjects. Conclusion: These results suggest that the interaction between homeostatic and circadian pressure modulates spindle frequency differently in aging. Spindle characteristics do not seem to be linked with the ability to maintain daytime recovery sleep. PMID

  8. Comparison of a Four-Section Spindle and Stomacher for Efficacy of Detaching Microorganisms from Fresh Vegetables.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Kyun; Kim, Soo-Ji; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2015-07-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the effect of the spindle and stomacher for detaching microorganisms from fresh vegetables. The spindle is an apparatus for detaching microorganisms from food surfaces, which was developed in our laboratory. When processed with the spindle, food samples were barely disrupted, the original shape was maintained, and the diluent was clear, facilitating further detection analysis more easily than with stomacher treatment. The four-section spindle consists of four sample bag containers (A, B, C, and D) to economize time and effort by simultaneously processing four samples. The aerobic plate counts (APC) of 50 fresh vegetable samples were measured following spindle and stomacher treatment. Correlations between the two methods for each section of the spindle and stomacher were very high (R(2) = 0.9828 [spindle compartment A; Sp A], 0.9855 [Sp B], 0.9848 [Sp C], and 0.9851 [Sp D]). One-tenth milliliter of foodborne pathogens suspensions was inoculated onto surfaces of food samples, and ratios of spindle-to-stomacher enumerations were close to 1.00 log CFU/g between every section of the spindle and stomacher. One of the greatest features of the spindle is that it can treat large-sized samples that exceed 200 g. Uncut whole apples, green peppers, potatoes, and tomatoes were processed by the spindle and by hand massaging by 2 min. Large-sized samples were also assayed for aerobic plate count and recovery of the three foodborne pathogens, and the difference between each section of the spindle and hand massaging was not significant (P > 0.05). This study demonstrated that the spindle apparatus can be an alternative device for detaching microorganisms from all fresh vegetable samples for microbiological analysis by the food processing industry.

  9. Fluid lubricated bearing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.; Menke, John R.

    1976-01-01

    1. A support for a loaded rotatable shaft comprising in combination on a housing having a fluid-tight cavity encasing an end portion of said shaft, a thrust bearing near the open end of said cavity for supporting the axial thrust of said shaft, said thrust bearing comprising a thrust plate mounted in said housing and a thrust collar mounted on said shaft, said thrust plate having a central opening the peripheral portion of which is hermetically sealed to said housing at the open end of said cavity, and means for supplying a fluid lubricant to said thrust bearing, said thrust bearing having a lubricant-conducting path connecting said lubricant supplying means with the space between said thrust plate and collar intermediate the peripheries thereof, the surfaces of said plate and collar being constructed and arranged to inhibit radial flow of lubricant and, on rotation of said thrust collar, to draw lubricant through said path between the bearing surfaces and to increase the pressure therebetween and in said cavity and thereby exert a supporting force on said end portion of said shaft.

  10. Fault tolerant magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, E.H.; Sortore, C.K.; Gillies, G.T.; Williams, R.D.; Fedigan, S.J.; Aimone, R.J.

    1999-07-01

    A fault tolerant magnetic bearing system was developed and demonstrated on a large flexible-rotor test rig. The bearing system comprises a high speed, fault tolerant digital controller, three high capacity radial magnetic bearings, one thrust bearing, conventional variable reluctance position sensors, and an array of commercial switching amplifiers. Controller fault tolerance is achieved through a very high speed voting mechanism which implements triple modular redundancy with a powered spare CPU, thereby permitting failure of up to three CPU modules without system failure. Amplifier/cabling/coil fault tolerance is achieved by using a separate power amplifier for each bearing coil and permitting amplifier reconfiguration by the controller upon detection of faults. This allows hot replacement of failed amplifiers without any system degradation and without providing any excess amplifier kVA capacity over the nominal system requirement. Implemented on a large (2440 mm in length) flexible rotor, the system shows excellent rejection of faults including the failure of three CPUs as well as failure of two adjacent amplifiers (or cabling) controlling an entire stator quadrant.

  11. Tribology of alternative bearings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin; Tipper, Joanne; Stone, Martin; Ingham, Eileen

    2006-12-01

    The tribological performance and biological activity of the wear debris produced has been compared for highly cross-linked polyethylene, ceramic-on-ceramic, metal-on-metal, and modified metal bearings in a series of in vitro studies from a single laboratory. The functional lifetime demand of young and active patients is 10-fold greater than the estimated functional lifetime of traditional polyethylene. There is considerable interest in using larger diameter heads in these high demand patients. Highly cross-linked polyethylene show a four-fold reduction in functional biological activity. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have the lowest wear rates and least reactive wear debris. The functional biological activity is 20-fold lower than with highly cross-linked polyethylene. Hence, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings address the tribological lifetime demand of highly active patients. Metal-on-metal bearings have substantially lower wear rates than highly cross-linked polyethylene and wear decreases with head diameter. Bedding in wear is also lower with reduced radial clearance. Differential hardness ceramic-on-metal bearings and the application of ceramic-like coatings reduce metal wear and ion levels.

  12. Loss of the Greatwall Kinase Weakens the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Kitagawa, Mayumi; Caldez, Matias J.; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lee, Sang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The Greatwall kinase/Mastl is an essential gene that indirectly inhibits the phosphatase activity toward mitotic Cdk1 substrates. Here we show that although Mastl knockout (MastlNULL) MEFs enter mitosis, they progress through mitosis without completing cytokinesis despite the presence of misaligned chromosomes, which causes chromosome segregation defects. Furthermore, we uncover the requirement of Mastl for robust spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) maintenance since the duration of mitotic arrest caused by microtubule poisons in MastlNULL MEFs is shortened, which correlates with premature disappearance of the essential SAC protein Mad1 at the kinetochores. Notably, MastlNULL MEFs display reduced phosphorylation of a number of proteins in mitosis, which include the essential SAC kinase MPS1. We further demonstrate that Mastl is required for multi-site phosphorylation of MPS1 as well as robust MPS1 kinase activity in mitosis. In contrast, treatment of MastlNULL cells with the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA) rescues the defects in MPS1 kinase activity, mislocalization of phospho-MPS1 as well as Mad1 at the kinetochore, and premature SAC silencing. Moreover, using in vitro dephosphorylation assays, we demonstrate that Mastl promotes persistent MPS1 phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A/B55-mediated MPS1 dephosphorylation rather than affecting Cdk1 kinase activity. Our findings establish a key regulatory function of the Greatwall kinase/Mastl->PP2A/B55 pathway in preventing premature SAC silencing. PMID:27631493

  13. Centrin: Another target of monastrol, an inhibitor of mitotic spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Tong-Qing; Bian, Wei; Liu, Wen; Sun, Yue; Yang, Bin-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Monastrol, a cell-permeable inhibitor, considered to specifically inhibit kinesin Eg5, can cause mitotic arrest and monopolar spindle formation, thus exhibiting antitumor properties. Centrin, a ubiquitous protein associated with centrosome, plays a critical role in centrosome duplication. Moreover, a correlation between centrosome amplification and cancer has been reported. In this study, it is proposed for the first time that centrin may be another target of the anticancer drug monastrol since monastrol can effectively inhibit not only the growth of the transformed Escherichia coli cells in vivo, but also the Lu3+-dependent self-assembly of EoCen in vitro. The two closely related compounds (Compounds 1 and 2) could not take the same effect. Fluorescence titration experiments suggest that four monastrols per protein is the optimum binding pattern, and the binding constants at different temperatures were obtained. Detailed thermodynamic analysis indicates that hydrophobic force is the main acting force between monastrol and centrin, and the extent of monastrol inhibition of centrin self-assembly is highly dependent upon the hydrophobic region of the protein, which is largely exposed by the binding of metal ions.

  14. Automated sleep-spindle detection in healthy children polysomnograms.

    PubMed

    Causa, Leonardo; Held, Claudio M; Causa, Javier; Estévez, Pablo A; Perez, Claudio A; Chamorro, Rodrigo; Garrido, Marcelo; Algarín, Cecilia; Peirano, Patricio

    2010-09-01

    We present a new methodology to detect and characterize sleep spindles (SSs), based on the nonlinear algorithms, empirical-mode decomposition, and Hilbert-Huang transform, which provide adequate temporal and frequency resolutions in the electroencephalographic analysis. In addition, the application of fuzzy logic allows to emulate expert's procedures. Additionally, we built a database of 56 all-night polysomnographic recordings from children for training and testing, which is among the largest annotated databases published on the subject. The database was split into training (27 recordings), validation (10 recordings), and testing (19 recordings) datasets. The SS events were marked by sleep experts using visual inspection, and these marks were used as golden standard. The overall SS detection performance on the testing dataset of continuous all-night sleep recordings was 88.2% sensitivity, 89.7% specificity, and 11.9% false-positive (FP) rate. Considering only non-REM sleep stage 2, the results showed 92.2% sensitivity, 90.1% specificity, and 8.9% FP rate. In general, our system presents enhanced results when compared with most systems found in the literature, thus improving SS detection precision significantly without the need of hypnogram information.

  15. Sleep spindles in midday naps enhance learning in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Kurdziel, Laura; Duclos, Kasey; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2013-10-22

    Despite the fact that midday naps are characteristic of early childhood, very little is understood about the structure and function of these sleep bouts. Given that sleep benefits memory in young adults, it is possible that naps serve a similar function for young children. However, children transition from biphasic to monophasic sleep patterns in early childhood, eliminating the nap from their daily sleep schedule. As such, naps may contain mostly light sleep stages and serve little function for learning and memory during this transitional age. Lacking scientific understanding of the function of naps in early childhood, policy makers may eliminate preschool classroom nap opportunities due to increasing curriculum demands. Here we show evidence that classroom naps support learning in preschool children by enhancing memories acquired earlier in the day compared with equivalent intervals spent awake. This nap benefit is greatest for children who nap habitually, regardless of age. Performance losses when nap-deprived are not recovered during subsequent overnight sleep. Physiological recordings of naps support a role of sleep spindles in memory performance. These results suggest that distributed sleep is critical in early learning; when short-term memory stores are limited, memory consolidation must take place frequently.

  16. Robust control of mitotic spindle orientation in the developing epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Poulson, Nicholas D.

    2010-01-01

    Progenitor cells must balance self-amplification and production of differentiated progeny during development and homeostasis. In the epidermis, progenitors divide symmetrically to increase surface area and asymmetrically to promote stratification. In this study, we show that individual epidermal cells can undergo both types of division, and therefore, the balance is provided by the sum of individual cells’ choices. In addition, we define two control points for determining a cell’s mode of division. First is the expression of the mouse Inscuteable gene, which is sufficient to drive asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, there is robust control of division orientation as excessive ACDs are prevented by a change in the localization of NuMA, an effector of spindle orientation. Finally, we show that p63, a transcriptional regulator of stratification, does not control either of these processes. These data have uncovered two important regulatory points controlling ACD in the epidermis and allow a framework for analysis of how external cues control this important choice. PMID:21098114

  17. Large deflection analysis of a tension-foil bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are as follows: rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's. CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contacts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exist for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. Recently, a new tension-foil bearing configuration has been proposed for turbomachinery applications.

  18. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  19. Magnetic bearings for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have been successfully applied to motorized rotor systems in the multi-kilogram range, at speeds up to 1200 radians per second. These engineering models also indicated the need for continued development in specific areas to make them feasible for spacecraft applications. Significant power reductions have recently been attained. A unique magnetic circuit, combining permanent magnets with electromagnetic control, has a bidirectional forcing capability with improved current sensitivity. The multi-dimensional nature of contact-free rotor support is discussed. Stable continuous radial suspension is provided by a rotationally symmetric permanent magnet circuit. Two bearings, on a common shaft, counteract the normal instability perpendicular to the rotational axis. The axial direction is servoed to prevent contact. A new bearing technology and a new field of application for magnetics is foreseen.

  20. Solving bearing overheating problems

    SciTech Connect

    Jendzurski, T.

    1995-05-08

    Overheating is a major indicator, along with vibration and noise, of an underlying problem affecting a bearing or related components. Because normal operating temperatures vary widely from one application to another, no single temperature is a reliable sign of overheating in every situation. By observing an application when it is running smoothly, a technician can establish a benchmark temperature for a particular bearing arrangement. Wide deviations from this accepted norm generally indicate troublesome overheating. The list of possible causes of over-heating ranges from out-of-round housings and oversize shaft diameters to excessive lubrication and bearing preloading. These causes fall into two major categories: improper or faulty lubrication and mechanical problems, such as incorrect fits and tolerances. These are discussed along with solutions.

  1. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  2. Modular gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gearing system using modular gear bearing components. Each component is composed of a core, one or more modules attached to the core and two or more fastening modules rigidly attaching the modules to the core. The modules, which are attached to the core, may consist of gears, rollers or gear bearing components. The core orientation affects the orientation of the modules attached to the core. This is achieved via the keying arrangement of the core and the component modules that attach to the core. Such an arrangement will also facilitate the phase tuning of gear modules with respect to the core and other gear modules attached to the core.

  3. Design and Analysis of an Electromagnetic Thrust Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, Bibhuti; Rao, Dantam K.

    1996-01-01

    A double-acting electromagnetic thrust bearing is normally used to counter the axial loads in many rotating machines that employ magnetic bearings. It essentially consists of an actuator and drive electronics. Existing thrust bearing design programs are based on several assumptions. These assumptions, however, are often violated in practice. For example, no distinction is made between maximum external loads and maximum bearing forces, which are assumed to be identical. Furthermore, it is assumed that the maximum flux density in the air gap occurs at the nominal gap position of the thrust runner. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear theoretical basis for the design of the electromagnetic thrust bearing which obviates such assumptions.

  4. Active Control of Fan Noise in Ducts Using Magnetic Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of magnetic bearings. An axial flow fan creates tonal noise related to its rotational rate. Additional noise exists due to harmonics of this frequency...magnetic bearings. An axial flow fan creates tonal noise related to its rotational rate. Additional noise exists due to harmonics of this frequency as well...systems typically have fans that will move air from the heating or cooling system to any desired space. Fan noise is characterized first by tonal

  5. Pigmented spindle cell nevus: clues for differentiating it from spindle cell malignant melanoma. A comprehensive survey including clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and FISH studies.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Alba; Valera, Alexandra; Carrera, Cristina; Hakim, Sofía; Aguilera, Paula; García, Adriana; Palou, Josep; Puig, Susana; Malvehy, Josep; Alos, Llúcia

    2011-11-01

    Pigmented spindle cell nevus (PSCN), also known as Reed nevus, is a distinctive melanocytic tumor that can show worrisome clinical and histologic features mimicking a malignant melanoma. From a series of 46 pigmented spindle cell melanocytic lesions, including 22 PSCN and 24 spindle cell malignant melanomas (SCMMs), we collected clinical and histopathologic characteristics and evaluated cell cycle and apoptosis regulators by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using probes targeting 6p25 (RREB1), 11q13 (CCND1), 6q23 (MYB), and centromere 6 was performed. PSCN presented in younger people, frequently in women, and were small lesions under 7 mm in diameter affecting the lower limbs, whereas SCMMs arose more frequently in the trunk, upper limbs, and head and neck region. Histologically, symmetry, good lateral demarcation, and uniformity of cellular nests were significantly differential features of PSCN, whereas pagetoid and adnexal spread were frequently seen in both tumors. Immunohistochemical markers that significantly differed from melanomas were Ki-67, cyclin D1, and survivin. FISH was positive in 1 of 15 PSCN and was negative in 4 of 15 SCMMs. These results correlated to a sensitivity of 73% and a specificity of 93%. In conclusion, in the evaluation of pigmented spindle cell melanocytic tumors, the integration of clinical and histologic assessment is essential. However, ancillary techniques such as proliferation antigen Ki-67, cyclin D1, survivin, and FISH can be useful as adjunctive tools.

  6. Prototype ventricular assist device supported on magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Maslen, E.H.; Kim, H.C.; Olsen, D.B.; Bearnson, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Mechanical artificial hearts are now expected to be used as assist or total replacements for failing human hearts, if a reliable, anatomically appropriate design is developed. Initially, ventricular assist or total replacement devices were pulsatile air driven units containing a flexing polymeric diaphragm and two valves for each ventricle. Many reliability problems were encountered. Recently, attention has been focused on axial or centrifugal continuous flow blood pumps. Magnetic bearings employed in such devices offer the advantages of no required lubrication and large operating clearances. This paper describes a prototype continuous flow pump supported in magnetic bearings. The pump performance was measured in a simulated adult human circulation system. It delivered 6 liters/min of flow at 100 mm Hg differential head operating at 2,400 rpm in water. The pump is totally magnetically supported in four magnetic bearings - two radial and two thrust. The geometry and other properties of the bearings are described. Bearing parameters such as load capacity, current gains, and open loop stiffness are discussed. Bearing coil currents were measured during operation in air and water. The rotor was operated in various orientations to determine the actuator current gains. These values were then used to estimate the radial and thrust forces acting on the rotor in both air and water.

  7. An index of spindle efficacy obtained by measuring electroneurographic activity and passive tension in the rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Rosant, Cédric; Pérot, Chantal

    2006-01-30

    While muscle spindle afferent discharges are known to change with altered muscle use, the way in which the changes in spindle discharge are affected by modifications to the elastic properties of the muscle-tendon unit remains to analyze. This paper describes a methodology to define, in the rat, a spindle efficacy index. This index relates the spindle afferent discharges recorded from electroneurograms (ENG) due to muscle stretch to the passive elastic properties of the muscle-tendon unit quantified during the stretch imposed for the ENGs recordings. The stretches were applied to the rat soleus muscle after the Achilles tendon was severed. The spindle afferent discharges were characterized from the root mean square (RMS) values of electroneurograms (ENGs) recorded from the soleus nerve. The first step of the study was to validate the definition of dynamic and static indices (DI and SI) of spindle discharges from RMS-ENG as classically done when isolated afferents are studied. The slopes of the DI-stretch velocity or SI-stretch amplitude relationships gave the indices of spindle sensitivity under dynamic and static conditions, respectively. Incremental stiffness was calculated to describe the passive elastic properties during the dynamic and static phases of ramp and hold stretches applied at different amplitudes and velocities. The spindle efficacy index (SEI) is the ratio between the indices of spindle sensitivity and incremental stiffness values. Both spindle discharges and incremental stiffness increased with stretch amplitude under dynamic and static conditions. The corresponding SEI values were constant whatever the stretch amplitude. This result validates the relationship between spindle discharges and passive incremental stiffness. This method can be proposed to study, in the rat, the spindle function when the muscles are suspected to present changes in their neuromechanical properties.

  8. Fusimotor control of spindle sensitivity regulates central and peripheral coding of joint angles.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ning; He, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Proprioceptive afferents from muscle spindles encode information about peripheral joint movements for the central nervous system (CNS). The sensitivity of muscle spindle is nonlinearly dependent on the activation of gamma (γ) motoneurons in the spinal cord that receives inputs from the motor cortex. How fusimotor control of spindle sensitivity affects proprioceptive coding of joint position is not clear. Furthermore, what information is carried in the fusimotor signal from the motor cortex to the muscle spindle is largely unknown. In this study, we addressed the issue of communication between the central and peripheral sensorimotor systems using a computational approach based on the virtual arm (VA) model. In simulation experiments within the operational range of joint movements, the gamma static commands (γ(s)) to the spindles of both mono-articular and bi-articular muscles were hypothesized (1) to remain constant, (2) to be modulated with joint angles linearly, and (3) to be modulated with joint angles nonlinearly. Simulation results revealed a nonlinear landscape of Ia afferent with respect to both γ(s) activation and joint angle. Among the three hypotheses, the constant and linear strategies did not yield Ia responses that matched the experimental data, and therefore, were rejected as plausible strategies of spindle sensitivity control. However, if γ(s) commands were quadratically modulated with joint angles, a robust linear relation between Ia afferents and joint angles could be obtained in both mono-articular and bi-articular muscles. With the quadratic strategy of spindle sensitivity control, γ(s) commands may serve as the CNS outputs that inform the periphery of central coding of joint angles. The results suggest that the information of joint angles may be communicated between the CNS and muscles via the descending γ(s) efferent and Ia afferent signals.

  9. Can loss of muscle spindle afferents explain the ataxic gait in Riley-Day syndrome?

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Gutiérrez, Joel; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-11-01

    The Riley-Day syndrome is the most common of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (Type III). Among the well-recognized clinical features are reduced pain and temperature sensation, absent deep tendon reflexes and a progressively ataxic gait. To explain the latter we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindles, or their afferents, are absent in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III by attempting to record from muscle spindle afferents from a nerve supplying the leg in 10 patients. For comparison we also recorded muscle spindles from 15 healthy subjects and from two patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, who have profound sensory disturbances but no ataxia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into fascicles of the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. Intraneural stimulation within muscle fascicles evoked twitches at normal stimulus currents (10-30 µA), and deep pain (which often referred) at high intensities (1 mA). Microneurographic recordings from muscle fascicles revealed a complete absence of spontaneously active muscle spindles in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III; moreover, responses to passive muscle stretch could not be observed. Conversely, muscle spindles appeared normal in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, with mean firing rates of spontaneously active endings being similar to those recorded from healthy controls. Intraneural stimulation within cutaneous fascicles evoked paraesthesiae in the fascicular innervation territory at normal stimulus intensities, but cutaneous pain was never reported during high-intensity stimulation in any of the patients. Microneurographic recordings from cutaneous fascicles revealed the presence of normal large-diameter cutaneous mechanoreceptors in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III. Our results suggest that the complete absence of functional muscle spindles in these patients explains

  10. Responses in Rat Core Auditory Cortex are Preserved during Sleep Spindle Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Yaniv; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio; Nir, Yuval

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep is defined as a reversible state of reduction in sensory responsiveness and immobility. A long-standing hypothesis suggests that a high arousal threshold during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is mediated by sleep spindle oscillations, impairing thalamocortical transmission of incoming sensory stimuli. Here we set out to test this idea directly by examining sensory-evoked neuronal spiking activity during natural sleep. Methods: We compared neuronal (n = 269) and multiunit activity (MUA), as well as local field potentials (LFP) in rat core auditory cortex (A1) during NREM sleep, comparing responses to sounds depending on the presence or absence of sleep spindles. Results: We found that sleep spindles robustly modulated the timing of neuronal discharges in A1. However, responses to sounds were nearly identical for all measured signals including isolated neurons, MUA, and LFPs (all differences < 10%). Furthermore, in 10% of trials, auditory stimulation led to an early termination of the sleep spindle oscillation around 150–250 msec following stimulus onset. Finally, active ON states and inactive OFF periods during slow waves in NREM sleep affected the auditory response in opposite ways, depending on stimulus intensity. Conclusions: Responses in core auditory cortex are well preserved regardless of sleep spindles recorded in that area, suggesting that thalamocortical sensory relay remains functional during sleep spindles, and that sensory disconnection in sleep is mediated by other mechanisms. Citation: Sela Y, Vyazovskiy VV, Cirelli C, Tononi G, Nir Y. Responses in rat core auditory cortex are preserved during sleep spindle oscillations. SLEEP 2016;39(5):1069–1082. PMID:26856904

  11. B-Cyclin/CDKs Regulate Mitotic Spindle Assembly by Phosphorylating Kinesins-5 in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Mark K.; Haase, Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Although it has been known for many years that B-cyclin/CDK complexes regulate the assembly of the mitotic spindle and entry into mitosis, the full complement of relevant CDK targets has not been identified. It has previously been shown in a variety of model systems that B-type cyclin/CDK complexes, kinesin-5 motors, and the SCFCdc4 ubiquitin ligase are required for the separation of spindle poles and assembly of a bipolar spindle. It has been suggested that, in budding yeast, B-type cyclin/CDK (Clb/Cdc28) complexes promote spindle pole separation by inhibiting the degradation of the kinesins-5 Kip1 and Cin8 by the anaphase-promoting complex (APCCdh1). We have determined, however, that the Kip1 and Cin8 proteins are present at wild-type levels in the absence of Clb/Cdc28 kinase activity. Here, we show that Kip1 and Cin8 are in vitro targets of Clb2/Cdc28 and that the mutation of conserved CDK phosphorylation sites on Kip1 inhibits spindle pole separation without affecting the protein's in vivo localization or abundance. Mass spectrometry analysis confirms that two CDK sites in the tail domain of Kip1 are phosphorylated in vivo. In addition, we have determined that Sic1, a Clb/Cdc28-specific inhibitor, is the SCFCdc4 target that inhibits spindle pole separation in cells lacking functional Cdc4. Based on these findings, we propose that Clb/Cdc28 drives spindle pole separation by direct phosphorylation of kinesin-5 motors. PMID:20463882

  12. Prolonged hyperpolarizing potentials precede spindle oscillations in the thalamic reticular nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Timofeev, Igor; Steriade, Mircea

    2004-01-01

    The thalamic reticular (RE) nucleus is a key structure in the generation of spindles, a hallmark bioelectrical oscillation during early stages of sleep. Intracellular recordings of RE neurons in vivo revealed the presence of prolonged hyperpolarizing potentials preceding spindles in a subgroup (30%) of neurons. These hyperpolarizations (6-10 mV) lasted for 200-300 ms and were present just before the onset of spontaneously occurring spindle waves. Corticothalamic volleys also were effective in generating such hyperpolarizations followed by spindles in RE neurons. A drop of up to 40% in the apparent input resistance (Rin) was associated with these hyperpolarizing potentials, suggesting an active process rather than disfacilitation. Accordingly, the reversal potential was approximately -100 mV for both spontaneous and cortically elicited hyperpolarizations, consistent with the activation of slow K+ conductances. QX-314 in the recording pipettes decreased both the amplitude and incidence of prolonged hyperpolarizations, suggesting the participation of G protein-dependent K+ currents in the generation of hyperpolarizations. Simultaneous extracellular and intracellular recordings in the RE nucleus demonstrated that some RE neurons discharged during the hyperpolarizations and, thus, may be implicated in their generation. The prolonged hyperpolarizations preceding spindles may play a role in the transition from tonic to bursting firing of RE neurons within a range of membrane potential (-60 to -65 mV) at which they set favorable conditions for the generation of low-threshold spike bursts that initiate spindle sequences. These data are further arguments for the generation of spindles within the thalamic RE nucleus. PMID:15210981

  13. Composite Bear Canister

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W. Richard; Jara, Steve; Suffel, Susan

    2003-01-01

    To many national park campers and mountain climbers saving their foods in a safe and unbreakable storage container without worrying being attacked by a bear is a challenging task. In some parks, the park rangers have mandated that park visitors rent a bear canister for their food storage. Commercially available bear canisters are made of ABS plastic, weigh 2.8 pounds, and have a 180 cubic inch capacity for food storage. A new design with similar capacity was conducted in this study to reduce its weight and make it a stiffer and stronger canister. Two prototypes incorporating carbon prepreg with and without honeycomb constructions were manufactured using hand lay-up and vacuum bag forming techniques. A 6061-T6-aluminum ring was machined to dimensions in order to reinforce the opening area of the canister. Physical properties (weight and volume) along with mechanical properties (flexural strength and specific allowable moment) of the newly fabricated canisters are compared against the commercial ones. The composite canister weighs only 56% of the ABS one can withstand 9 times of the force greater. The advantages and limitations of using composite bear canisters will be discussed in the presentation.

  14. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-04-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB's) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS's) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS's, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, we present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  15. The Teddy Bears' Disc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurillard, Diana

    1985-01-01

    Reports an evaluation of the Teddy Bear disc, an interactive videodisc developed at the Open University for a second-level course in metallurgy and materials technology. Findings from observation of students utilizing the videodisc are reviewed; successful design features and design problems are considered; and development costs are outlined. (MBR)

  16. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-01-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB's) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS's) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS's, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, we present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  17. History of ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowson, D.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The familiar precision rolling-element bearings of the twentieth century are products of exacting technology and sophisticated science. Their very effectiveness and basic simplicity of form may discourage further interest in their history and development. Yet the full story covers a large portion of recorded history and surprising evidence of an early recognition of the advantages of rolling motion over sliding action and progress toward the development of rolling-element bearings. The development of rolling-element bearings is followed from the earliest civilizations to the end of the eighteenth century. The influence of general technological developments, particularly those concerned with the movement of large building blocks, road transportation, instruments, water-raising equipment, and windmills are discussed, together with the emergence of studies of the nature of rolling friction and the impact of economic factors. By 1800 the essential features of ball and rolling-element bearings had emerged and it only remained for precision manufacture and mass production to confirm the value of these fascinating machine elements.

  18. Magnetically leviated superconducting bearing

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer

    1993-01-01

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet (2) mounted on a shaft (12) that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor (6) supported on a stator (14) in proximity to the magnet (2). The superconductor (6) is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet (2) to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet (2) and supports a load on the shaft (12). The interaction between the superconductor (6) and magnet(2) also produces surface screening currents (8) that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature (16, 18). The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet (2) is supported on the stator (14) and the superconductor (6) is mounted on the shaft (12). The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor (6) to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field.

  19. Optimal Synchronizability of Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, N. A. M.; Seybold, H.; Baram, R. M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.

    2013-02-01

    Bearings are mechanical dissipative systems that, when perturbed, relax toward a synchronized (bearing) state. Here we find that bearings can be perceived as physical realizations of complex networks of oscillators with asymmetrically weighted couplings. Accordingly, these networks can exhibit optimal synchronization properties through fine-tuning of the local interaction strength as a function of node degree [Motter, Zhou, and Kurths, Phys. Rev. E 71, 016116 (2005)PLEEE81539-3755]. We show that, in analogy, the synchronizability of bearings can be maximized by counterbalancing the number of contacts and the inertia of their constituting rotor disks through the mass-radius relation, m˜rα, with an optimal exponent α=α× which converges to unity for a large number of rotors. Under this condition, and regardless of the presence of a long-tailed distribution of disk radii composing the mechanical system, the average participation per disk is maximized and the energy dissipation rate is homogeneously distributed among elementary rotors.

  20. Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.

    1995-04-01

    Hybrid superconductor magnet bearings (HSMB`s) utilize high temperature superconductors (HTS`s) together with permanent magnets to form a frictionless interface between relatively rotating parts. They are low mass, stable, and do not incur expenditure of energy during normal operation. There is no direct physical contact between rotor and stator, and hence there is no wear and tear. However, just as any other applications of HTS`s, it requires a very cold temperature to function. Whereas this might be perceived as a disadvantage on earth, it is of no great concern in space or on the moon. To astronomers, the moon is an excellent site for an observatory, but the cold and dusty vacuum environment on the moon precludes the use of mechanical bearings on the telescope mounts. Furthermore, drive mechanisms with very fine steps, and hence bearings with extremely low friction are needed to track a star from the moon, because the moon rotates very slowly. All aspects considered, the HSMB is about the only candidate that fits in naturally. Here, the authors present a design for one such bearing, capable of supporting a telescope that weighs about 3 lbs on Earth.

  1. Bearings Incorporating Deadband Rollers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gualtieri, Guy V.

    1996-01-01

    Bearings in high-pressure turbopump redesigned to incorporate rollers allowing limited axial motion within small deadband. Does not permit radial deadband motion. Axial deadband motion used for rotor-thrust-balance control. Design eliminates some nonlinearities in dynamics of pump rotor and assists in suppressing vibrations at harmonics of frequency of rotation.

  2. Magnetic-Bearing Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.; Poole, William L.

    1991-01-01

    Microcomputer-controlled magnetic-bearing test fixture used to develop approaches to design of controls for magnetic bearing actuators designed and constructed. Includes load cells connected to bar, in turn, connected through screw positioners to geared drive motors. Position of equivalent suspended element sensed by position sensors and controlled by drive motors. Provides control of gap in magnetic bearing and of current in electromagnet coil. Measurements made include magnetic-bearing gaps, magnetic flux in bearing gaps, and bearing forces. Approaches to linearization and control developed by use of fixture applicable to wide range of small-gap suspension systems.

  3. Bearing-Cartridge Damping Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goggins, David G.; Scharrer, Joseph K.; Chen, Wei C.

    1991-01-01

    In proposed design for improved ball-bearing cartridge, damping seal in form of thin-layer fluid journal bearing incorporated into cartridge. Damping seal acts as auxiliary bearing, relieving bearing balls of significant portions of both static and dynamic bearing loads. Damping from seal reduces dynamic loads even further by reducing amplitude of vibrations in second vibrational mode of rotor, which mode occurs when rotor turning at nearly full operating speed. Intended for use in high-pressure-oxygen turbopump of Space Shuttle main engine, also applicable to other turbomachinery bearings.

  4. Flexure Bearing Reduces Startup Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, W. Dean

    1991-01-01

    Design concept for ball bearing incorporates small pieces of shim stock, wire spokes like those in bicycle wheels, or other flexing elements to reduce both stiction and friction slope. In flexure bearing, flexing elements placed between outer race of ball bearing and outer ring. Elements flex when ball bearings encounter small frictional-torque "bumps" or even larger ones when bearing balls encounter buildups of grease on inner or outer race. Flexure of elements reduce high friction slopes of "bumps", helping to keep torque between outer ring and inner race low and more nearly constant. Concept intended for bearings in gimbals on laser and/or antenna mirrors.

  5. Lubricant effects on bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1986-01-01

    Lubricant considerations for rolling-element bearings have within the last two decades taken on added importance in the design and operation of mechanical systems. The phenomenon which limits the useful life of bearings is rolling-element or surface pitting fatigue. The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness which separates the ball or roller surface from those of the raceways of the bearing directly affects bearing life. Chemical additives added to the lubricant can also significantly affect bearings life and reliability. The interaction of these physical and chemical effects is important to the design engineer and user of these systems. Design methods and lubricant selection for rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed.

  6. Expression of nestin, desmin and vimentin in intact and regenerating muscle spindles of rat hind limb skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Cízková, Dana; Soukup, Tomás; Mokrý, Jaroslav

    2009-02-01

    We describe the expression and distribution patterns of nestin, desmin and vimentin in intact and regenerating muscle spindles of the rat hind limb skeletal muscles. Regeneration was induced by intramuscular isotransplantation of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) or soleus muscles from 15-day-old rats into the EDL muscle of adult female inbred Lewis rats. The host muscles with grafts were excised after 7-, 16-, 21- and 29-day survival and immunohistochemically stained. Nestin expression in intact spindles in host muscles was restricted to Schwann cells of sensory and motor nerves. In transplanted muscles, however, nestin expression was also found in regenerating "spindle fibers", 7 and 16 days after grafting. From the 21st day onwards, the regenerated spindle fibers were devoid of nestin immunoreactivity. Desmin was detected in spindle fibers at all developmental stages in regenerating as well as in intact spindles. Vimentin was expressed in cells of the outer and inner capsules of all muscle spindles and in newly formed myoblasts and myotubes of regenerating spindles 7 days after grafting. Our results show that the expression pattern of these intermediate filaments in regenerating spindle fibers corresponds to that found in regenerating extrafusal fibers, which supports our earlier suggestion that they resemble small-diameter extrafusal fibers.

  7. Caenorhabditis elegans oocyte meiotic spindle pole assembly requires microtubule severing and the calponin homology domain protein ASPM-1

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Amy A.; Osterberg, Valerie; Christensen, Sara; Price, Meredith; Lu, Chenggang; Chicas-Cruz, Kathy; Lockery, Shawn; Mains, Paul E.; Bowerman, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    In many animals, including vertebrates, oocyte meiotic spindles are bipolar but assemble in the absence of centrosomes. Although meiotic spindle positioning in oocytes has been investigated extensively, much less is known about their assembly. In Caenorhabditis elegans, three genes previously shown to contribute to oocyte meiotic spindle assembly are the calponin homology domain protein encoded by aspm-1, the katanin family member mei-1, and the kinesin-12 family member klp-18. We isolated temperature-sensitive alleles of all three and investigated their requirements using live-cell imaging to reveal previously undocumented requirements for aspm-1 and mei-1. Our results indicate that bipolar but abnormal oocyte meiotic spindles assemble in aspm-1(-) embryos, whereas klp-18(-) and mei-1(-) mutants assemble monopolar and apolar spindles, respectively. Furthermore, two MEI-1 functions—ASPM-1 recruitment to the spindle and microtubule severing—both contribute to monopolar spindle assembly in klp-18(-) mutants. We conclude that microtubule severing and ASPM-1 both promote meiotic spindle pole assembly in C. elegans oocytes, whereas the kinesin 12 family member KLP-18 promotes spindle bipolarity. PMID:24554763

  8. NuMA-microtubule interactions are critical for spindle orientation and the morphogenesis of diverse epidermal structures

    PubMed Central

    Seldin, Lindsey; Muroyama, Andrew; Lechler, Terry

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is used to generate cell fate diversity and drive proper tissue morphogenesis. A complex of NuMA and dynein/dynactin is required for robust spindle orientation in a number of cell types. Previous research proposed that cortical dynein/dynactin was sufficient to generate forces on astral microtubules (MTs) to orient the spindle, with NuMA acting as a passive tether. In this study, we demonstrate that dynein/dynactin is insufficient for spindle orientation establishment in keratinocytes and that NuMA’s MT-binding domain, which targets MT tips, is also required. Loss of NuMA-MT interactions in skin caused defects in spindle orientation and epidermal differentiation, leading to neonatal lethality. In addition, we show that NuMA-MT interactions are also required in adult mice for hair follicle morphogenesis and spindle orientation within the transit-amplifying cells of the matrix. Loss of spindle orientation in matrix cells results in defective differentiation of matrix-derived lineages. Our results reveal an additional and direct function of NuMA during mitotic spindle positioning, as well as a reiterative use of spindle orientation in the skin to build diverse structures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12504.001 PMID:26765568

  9. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1.

    PubMed

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-10-02

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning.

  10. Coupling spindle position with mitotic exit in budding yeast: The multifaceted role of the small GTPase Tem1

    PubMed Central

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast S. cerevisiae divides asymmetrically and is an excellent model system for asymmetric cell division. As for other asymmetrically dividing cells, proper spindle positioning along the mother-daughter polarity axis is crucial for balanced chromosome segregation. Thus, a surveillance mechanism named Spindle Position Checkpoint (SPOC) inhibits mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the mitotic spindle is properly oriented, thereby preventing the generation of cells with aberrant ploidies. The small GTPase Tem1 is required to trigger a Hippo-like protein kinase cascade, named Mitotic Exit Network (MEN), that is essential for mitotic exit and cytokinesis but also contributes to correct spindle alignment in metaphase. Importantly, Tem1 is the target of the SPOC, which relies on the activity of the GTPase-activating complex (GAP) Bub2-Bfa1 to keep Tem1 in the GDP-bound inactive form. Tem1 forms a hetero-trimeric complex with Bub2-Bfa1 at spindle poles (SPBs) that accumulates asymmetrically on the bud-directed spindle pole during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. We have recently shown that Tem1 residence at SPBs depends on its nucleotide state and, importantly, asymmetry of the Bub2-Bfa1-Tem1 complex does not promote mitotic exit but rather controls spindle positioning. PMID:26507466

  11. Extravasation and transcytosis of liposomes in Kaposi's sarcoma-like dermal lesions of transgenic mice bearing the HIV tat gene.

    PubMed

    Huang, S K; Martin, F J; Jay, G; Vogel, J; Papahadjopoulos, D; Friend, D S

    1993-07-01

    Transgenic mice bearing the HIV tat gene develop dermal lesions resembling a common malignant tumor in AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). To evaluate the permeability characteristics of these lesions and the therapeutic potential of drug-carrying liposomes, we have studied the localization of sterically stabilized liposomes, which show long circulation time in blood and increased accumulation in tumors. Liposomes encapsulating colloidal gold were injected intravenously into transgenic mice bearing KS lesions, and tissues were processed 24 hours later for both electron microscopy and for light microscopy with silver enhancement. Liposomes and silver marker were detected predominantly in the dermis surrounding the early and mature KS lesions, which were characterized by a proliferation of fibroblast-like spindle cells and abnormal blood vessels close to the epidermis. The silver-enhanced gold marker often surrounded vascular channels and scattered erythrocytes. As determined by electron microscopy, some spindle cells and macrophages had ingested intact liposomes. Transendothelial transport of liposomes was observed both through open channels between endothelial cells and also through endothelial cells lining intact vessels. Both extravasation and transcytosis of liposomes through irregular endothelium were much higher in KS lesions than in the adjacent normal skin. The high accumulation of sterically stabilized liposomes in KS lesions and their intracellular uptake by some spindle cells enhances their potential as carriers of chemotherapeutic agents against this neoplasm.

  12. Formation of bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in tetraploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu; Seyama, Atsushi

    2012-09-01

    Tetraploid cells with unstable chromosomes frequently arise as an early step in tumorigenesis and lead to the formation of aneuploid cells. The mechanisms responsible for the chromosome instability of polyploid cells are not fully understood, although the supernumerary centrosomes in polyploid cells have been considered the major cause of chromosomal instability. The aim of this study was to examine the integrity of mitotic spindles and centrosomes in proliferative polyploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts. TIG-1 human fibroblasts were treated with demecolcine (DC) for 4 days to induce polyploidy, and the change in DNA content was monitored. Localization of centrosomes and mitotic spindles in polyploid mitotic cells was examined by immunohistochemistry and laser scanning cytometry. TIG-1 cells treated with DC became almost completely tetraploid at 2 weeks after treatment and grew at the same rate as untreated diploid cells. Most mitotic cells with 8C DNA content had only two centrosomes with bipolar spindles in established tetraploid cells, although they had four or more centrosomes with multipolar spindles at 3 days after DC treatment. The frequency of aneuploid cells increased as established tetraploid cells were propagated. These results indicate that tetraploid cells that form bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in mitosis can proliferate as diploid cells. These cells may serve as a useful model for studying the chromosome instability of polyploid cells.

  13. Aberrant spindle dynamics and cytokinesis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells that lack glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Adrian J; Forde-Thomas, Josephine E; Williams, Hazel; Samereier, Matthias; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell division requires the co-ordinated assembly and disassembly of the mitotic spindle, accurate chromosome segregation and temporal control of cytokinesis to generate two daughter cells. While the absolute details of these processes differ between organisms, there are evolutionarily conserved core components common to all eukaryotic cells, whose identification will reveal the key processes that control cell division. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is a major protein kinase found throughout the eukaryotes and regulates many processes, including cell differentiation, growth, motility and apoptosis. In animals, GSK-3 associates with mitotic spindles and its inhibition causes mis-regulation of chromosome segregation. Two suppressor screens in yeast point to a more general effect of GSK-3 on cell division, however the direct role of GSK-3 in control of mitosis has not been explored outside the animal kingdom. Here we report that the Dictyostelium discoideum GSK-3 orthologue, GskA, associates with the mitotic spindle during cell division, as seen for its mammalian counterparts. Dictyostelium possesses only a single GSK-3 gene that can be deleted to eliminate all GSK-3 activity. We found that gskA-null mutants failed to elongate their mitotic spindle and were unable to divide in shaking culture, but have no chromosome segregation defect. These results suggest further conservation for the role of GSK-3 in the regulation of spindle dynamics during mitosis, but also reveal differences in the mechanisms ensuring accurate chromosome segregation.

  14. Patterns of tubulin isotype synthesis and usage during mitotic spindle morphogenesis in Physarum.

    PubMed

    Paul, E C; Roobol, A; Foster, K E; Gull, K

    1987-01-01

    Tubulin synthesis in the naturally synchronous plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum is a markedly periodic event restricted to the late G2 period of the cell cycle. Mitosis in the plasmodium is intranuclear, and there are no cytoplasmic microtubules at any stage of the cell cycle. We have combined a biochemical investigation of the synthesis of the plasmodial tubulin isotypes and their participation in the mitotic spindle with a microscopic study (immunofluorescence) of the development of spindle microtubules throughout the cell cycle. We have shown that all four tubulin isotypes identified in the plasmodium (alpha 1, alpha 2, beta 1 and beta 2) are present in the mitotic spindle. The stoichiometry of isotype usage in the mitotic spindle generally reflects the overall abundance of isotypes in the plasmodium as a whole: beta 2 greater than alpha 1 greater than alpha 2 greater than beta 1. We have also shown that tubulins synthesized in the G2 period of one cell cycle can be incorporated into the spindles of the immediately ensuing mitosis and have sufficient biological longevity to allow participation in the mitotic divisions of future cell cycles. Thus, the phenomenon of periodic tubulin synthesis does not reflect a restricted use of tubulin to the cell cycle in which it was synthesized. The major polymerization of tubulin in the nucleus occurred less than 30 min before metaphase. A novel tubulin-containing structure was, however, present in the nucleus approximately 60 min before metaphase. Polymerized tubulin is rapidly removed from the nucleus following nucleokinesis.

  15. MLL5 maintains spindle bipolarity by preventing aberrant cytosolic aggregation of PLK1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Deng, Lih-Wen

    2016-03-28

    Faithful chromosome segregation with bipolar spindle formation is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. Perturbation of this process often leads to severe mitotic failure, contributing to tumorigenesis. MLL5 has been demonstrated to play vital roles in cell cycle progression and the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we identify a novel interaction between MLL5 and PLK1 in the cytosol that is crucial for sustaining spindle bipolarity during mitosis. Knockdown of MLL5 caused aberrant PLK1 aggregation that led to acentrosomal microtubule-organizing center (aMTOC) formation and subsequent spindle multipolarity. Further molecular studies revealed that the polo-box domain (PBD) of PLK1 interacted with a binding motif on MLL5 (Thr887-Ser888-Thr889), and this interaction was essential for spindle bipolarity. Overexpression of wild-type MLL5 was able to rescue PLK1 mislocalization and aMTOC formation in MLL5-KD cells, whereas MLL5 mutants incapable of interacting with the PBD failed to do so. We thus propose that MLL5 preserves spindle bipolarity through maintaining cytosolic PLK1 in a nonaggregated form.

  16. The CENP-A NAC/CAD kinetochore complex controls chromosome congression and spindle bipolarity.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Sarah E; Borusu, Satyarebala; Amaro, Ana C; Winter, Jennifer R; Belwal, Mukta; McAinsh, Andrew D; Meraldi, Patrick

    2007-12-12

    Kinetochores are complex protein machines that link chromosomes to spindle microtubules and contain a structural core composed of two conserved protein-protein interaction networks: the well-characterized KMN (KNL1/MIND/NDC80) and the recently identified CENP-A NAC/CAD. Here we show that the CENP-A NAC/CAD subunits can be assigned to one of two different functional classes; depletion of Class I proteins (Mcm21R(CENP-O) and Fta1R(CENP-L)) causes a failure in bipolar spindle assembly. In contrast, depletion of Class II proteins (CENP-H, Chl4R(CENP-N), CENP-I and Sim4R(CENP-K)) prevents binding of Class I proteins and causes chromosome congression defects, but does not perturb spindle formation. Co-depletion of Class I and Class II proteins restores spindle bipolarity, suggesting that Class I proteins regulate or counteract the function of Class II proteins. We also demonstrate that CENP-A NAC/CAD and KMN regulate kinetochore-microtubule attachments independently, even though CENP-A NAC/CAD can modulate NDC80 levels at kinetochores. Based on our results, we propose that the cooperative action of CENP-A NAC/CAD subunits and the KMN network drives efficient chromosome segregation and bipolar spindle assembly during mitosis.

  17. Zika virus causes supernumerary foci with centriolar proteins and impaired spindle positioning

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Benita; Diop, Fodé; Ferraris, Pauline; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Busso, Coralie; Missé, Dorothée

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) causes congenital microcephaly. Although ZIKV can impair cell cycle progression and provoke apoptosis, which probably contributes to disease aetiology through depletion of neural progenitor cells, additional cellular mechanisms may be important. Here, we investigated whether ZIKV infection alters centrosome number and spindle positioning, because such defects are thought to be at the root of inherited primary autosomal recessive microcephaly (MCPH). In addition to HeLa cells, in which centrosome number and spindle positioning can be well monitored, we analysed retinal epithelial cells (RPE-1), as well as brain-derived microglial (CHME-5) and neural progenitor (ReN) cells, using immunofluorescence. We established that ZIKV infection leads to supernumerary foci containing centriolar proteins that in some cases drive multipolar spindle assembly, as well as spindle positioning defects in HeLa, RPE-1 and CHME-5 cells, but not in ReN cells. We uncovered similar phenotypes in HeLa cells upon infection with dengue virus (DENV-2), another flavivirus that does not target brain cells and does not cause microcephaly. We conclude that infection with Flaviviridae can increase centrosome numbers and impair spindle positioning, thus potentially contributing to microcephaly in the case of Zika. PMID:28100662

  18. [Response properties of the jaw-closing muscle spindle during decreased occlusal vertical dimension in rats].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Koichi

    2008-03-01

    The masseter-muscle spindle is regarded as being highly adaptable to increases in the occlusal vertical dimension (iOVD), it is hypothesized that spindle function would adapt to a decrease in occlusal vertical dimension (dOVD) as well. Seventy-five 5-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into Control (n = 25) and Experimental (n = 50) groups; those in the Experimental group received a 2.0-mm composite resin build-up to the maxillary molars. The Experimental group was divided into the resin-removal group (n = 25, build-up resin was removed) and the non resin-removal group (n = 25) 8 weeks later; i. e., when the animals were 13 weeks old. Electrophysiological recordings were obtained from masseter-muscle spindle afferents in 13, 14, 15, 19, 21-week-old rats (n = 5 rats each) under general anesthesia Masseter-muscle spindle sensitivity was significantly lower in the resin-removal group 1 week after resin-removal and for the rest of the observation period. The present results indicate that masseter-muscle spindles may not completely adapt to dOVD and may affect jaw function.

  19. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    PubMed

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles.

  20. [Method of isolation of intrafusal fibres of muscle spindle in soleus of rats].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Hong; Fan, Xiao-Li; Liu, Guang-Bin

    2013-08-25

    Capsule restricts the further study on muscle spindle function and the involved mechanism. The aim of this study was to establish the isolation method of intrafusal fibres from the isolated rat muscle spindle. Intrafusal fibres were harvested from muscle spindle of soleus muscle in rats using neutrase-collagenase digestion. A variety of incubation mediums have been tested to find out an appropriate medium of intrafusal fibers in vitro. Trypan blue staining was used to detect cell death, and patch clamp was used to record resting potential. The results showed that the intrafusal fibres incubated with amine acid-saline solution were almost all dead. DMEM could maintain good condition of the fibres, but excess CO2 ventilation would induce cellular swelling or even death. While Leiboviz's 15 (L-15) medium can guarantee 1-2 h of physiological condition of the intrafusal fibres. Coverslips treated with gelatin, polylysine and serum was the better interfaces for the intrafusal fibres to adhere easily, compared with regularly treated coverslip. The resting potential of intrafusal fibres was (-45.3 ± 5.1) mV, consistent with others obtained from in vivo muscle spindle from cats and frogs. These results suggest that the isolation method of the intrafusal fibres has been successfully established in the present study, providing a new approach in better understanding of muscle spindle activities and the involved mechanism.