Science.gov

Sample records for air bearing surface

  1. Hydrodynamic air lubricated compliant surface bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine. 1: Journal bearing performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruscitto, D.; Mccormick, J.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    A 38.1 mm (1.5 inch) diameter Hydresil Compliant Surface Air Lubricated Journal Bearing was designed and tested to obtain bearing performance characteristics at both room temperature and 315 C (600 F). Testing was performed at various speeds up to 60,000 rpm with varying loads. Rotating sensors provided an opportunity to examine the film characteristics of the compliant surface bearing. In addition to providing minimum film thickness values and profiles, many other insights into bearing operation were gained such as the influence of bearing fabrication accuracy and the influence of smooth foil deflection between the bumps.

  2. Linear kinematic air bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayall, S. D.

    1974-01-01

    Bearing provides continuous, smooth movement of the cat's-eye mirror, eliminating wear and deterioration of bearing surface and resulting oscillation effects in servo system. Design features self-aligning configuration; single-point, pivotal pad mounting, having air passage through it; and design of pads that allows for precise control of discharge path of air from pads.

  3. Development of a large support surface for an air-bearing type zero-gravity simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, K. E.

    1976-01-01

    The methods used in producing a large, flat surface to serve as the supporting surface for an air-bearing type zero-gravity simulator using low clearance, thrust-pad type air bearings are described. Major problems encountered in the use of self-leveled epoxy coatings in this surface are discussed and techniques are recommended which proved effective in overcoming these problems. Performance requirements of the zero-gravity simulator vehicle which were pertinent to the specification of the air-bearing support surface are also discussed.

  4. Hydrodynamic air lubricated compliant surface bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine. 2: Materials and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.; Ruscitto, D.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    Material coatings for an air-lubricated, compliant journal bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine were exposed to service test temperatures of 540 C or 650 C for 300 hours, and to 10 temperature cycles from room temperatures to the service test temperatures. Selected coatings were then put on journal and partial-arc foils and tested in start-stop cycle tests at 14 kPa (2 psi) loading for 2000 cycles. Half of the test cycles were performed at a test chamber service temperature of 540 C (1000 F) or 650 C (1200 F); the other half were performed at room temperature. Based on test results, the following combinations and their service temperature limitations are recommended: HL-800 TM (CdO and graphite) on foil versus chrome carbide on journal up to 370 C (700 F); NASA PS 120 (Tribaloy 400, silver and CaF2 on journal versus uncoated foil up to 540 C (1000 F); and Kaman DES on journal and foil up to 640 C (1200 F). Kaman DES coating system was further tested successfully at 35 kPa (5 psi) loading for 2000 start-stop cycles.

  5. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  6. Horizontal Air Bearing Experiment Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Clauson, T.L.

    1999-08-31

    The Horizontal Air Bearing Experiment No.1 is a series of tests intended to further the understanding of rotational dynamics. A simple experimental assembly is rotated using the Horizontal Air Bearing and allowed to spin freely as the internal rotational damping is measured. The low friction of the bearing effectively isolates the test assembly, allowing the internal damping of the test object to be evaluated. The experimental assembly is composed of an aluminum ball within a spherical cavity. A flanged pipe section and an auxiliary adapter plate secure the assembly to the Air Bearing interface plate. Three aluminum balls are interchanged to vary test parameters. The aluminum balls are free to move independently as the entire assembly rotates. The aluminum balls vary in diameter and/or surface finish. While the diameter and surface finish is varied, the space between the ball and socket is dry. To examine the effect of viscosity, the space is filled with a lubricant while the ball diameter and surface finish is held constant.

  7. Future Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  8. Future bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  9. Effect of Surface Roughness on Hydrodynamic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. C.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis on the performance of hydrodynamic oil bearings is made considering surface roughness effect. The hydrodynamic as well as asperity contact load is found. The contact pressure was calculated with the assumption that the surface height distribution was Gaussian. The average Reynolds equation of partially lubricated surface was used to calculate hydrodynamic load. An analytical expression for average gap was found and was introduced to modify the average Reynolds equation. The resulting boundary value problem was then solved numerically by finite difference methods using the method of successive over relaxation. The pressure distribution and hydrodynamic load capacity of plane slider and journal bearings were calculated for various design data. The effects of attitude and roughness of surface on the bearing performance were shown. The results are compared with similar available solution of rough surface bearings. It is shown that: (1) the contribution of contact load is not significant; and (2) the hydrodynamic and contact load increase with surface roughness.

  10. Low-friction coatings for air bearings in fuel cell air compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G. R.; Erdemir, A.; Woodford, J.; Sitts, J.; Elshot, K.; Griffey, K.

    2000-01-06

    In an effort to reduce fuel consumption and emissions, hybrid vehicles incorporating fuel cell systems are being developed by automotive manufacturers, their suppliers, federal agencies (specifically, the US Department of Energy) and national laboratories. The fuel cell system will require an air management subsystem that includes a compressor/expander. Certain components in the compressor will require innovative lubrication technology in order to reduce parasitic energy losses and improve their reliability and durability. One such component is the air bearing for air turbocompressors designed and fabricated by Meruit, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory recently developed a carbon-based coating with low friction and wear attributes; this near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coating is a potential candidate for use in turbocompressor air bearings. The authors present here an evaluation of the Argonne coating for air compressor thrust bearings. With two parallel 440C stainless steel discs in unidirectional sliding contact, the NFC reduced the frictional force four times and the wear rate by more than two orders of magnitude. Wear mechanism on the uncoated surface involved oxidation and production of iron oxide debris. Wear occurred on the coated surfaces primarily by a polishing mechanism.

  11. Comparison of rotational speeds and torque properties between air-bearing and ball-bearing air-turbine handpieces.

    PubMed

    Taira, M; Wakasa, K; Yamaki, M; Matsui, A

    1989-06-01

    We examined the effects of air pressure on the free-running speed of air-bearing and torque-type ball-bearing air-turbine handpieces. The air pressure for the former should be kept at a certain high level to maintain the stable super-thin air-bearing film and to provide the quasi-constant speed of around 420,000 to 480,000 rpm. On the other hand, the air pressure for the latter could be adjusted to provide some varieties of speeds, ranging from about 150,000 to 320,000 rpm. Subsequently, to compare torque properties and cutting effectiveness between these two handpieces, weight-load cutting tests were conducted, using a glass-ceramic workpiece and a commercial diamond point. It was confirmed that the air-bearing handpiece had the lower torque power but exhibited better cutting effectiveness, compared with its counterpart.

  12. Load Capacity Estimation of Foil Air Journal Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper introduces a simple "Rule of Thumb" (ROT) method to estimate the load capacity of foil air journal bearings, which are self-acting compliant-surface hydrodynamic bearings being considered for Oil-Free turbo-machinery applications such as gas turbine engines. The ROT is based on first principles and data available in the literature and it relates bearing load capacity to the bearing size and speed through an empirically based load capacity coefficient, D. It is shown that load capacity is a linear function of bearing surface velocity and bearing projected area. Furthermore, it was found that the load capacity coefficient, D, is related to the design features of the bearing compliant members and operating conditions (speed and ambient temperature). Early bearing designs with basic or "first generation" compliant support elements have relatively low load capacity. More advanced bearings, in which the compliance of the support structure is tailored, have load capacities up to five times those of simpler designs. The ROT enables simplified load capacity estimation for foil air journal bearings and can guide development of new Oil-Free turbomachinery systems.

  13. Pressure measurements of a three wave journal air bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin; Addy, Harold E., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    In order to validate theoretical predictions of a wave journal bearing concept, a bench test rig was assembled at NASA Lewis Research Center to measure the steady-state performance of a journal air bearing. The tester can run up to 30,000 RPM and the spindle has a run out of less than 1 micron. A three wave journal bearing (50 mm diameter and 58 mm length) has been machined at NASA Lewis. The pressures at 16 ports along the bearing circumference at the middle of the bearing length were measured and compared to the theoretical prediction. The bearing ran at speeds up to 15,000 RPM and certain loads. Good agreement was found between the measured and calculated pressures.

  14. Air-bearing spin facility for measuring energy dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The air-bearing spin facility was developed to determine experimentally the effect of energy dissipation upon the motion of spinning spacecraft. The facility consists of an air-bearing spin table, a telemetry system, a command system, and a ground control station. The air-bearing spin table was designed to operate in a vacuum chamber. Tests were run on spacecraft components such as fuel tanks, nutation dampers, reaction wheels, and active nutation damper systems. Each of these items affected the attitude of a spinning spacecraft. An experimental approach to determine these effects was required because the dissipation of these components could not be adequately analyzed. The results of these experiments have been used, with excellent results, to predict spacecraft motion.

  15. A Systems Approach to the Solid Lubrication of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Zaldana, Antonio R.; Radil, Kevin C.

    2002-01-01

    Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings which rely upon solid lubricants to reduce friction and minimize wear during sliding which occurs at start-up and shut-down when surface speeds are too low to allow the formation of a hydrodynamic air film. This solid lubrication is typically accomplished by coating the non-moving foil surface with a thin, soft polymeric film. The following paper introduces a systems approach in which the solid lubrication is provided by a combination of self lubricating shaft coatings coupled with various wear resistant and lubricating foil coatings. The use of multiple materials, each providing different functions is modeled after oil-lubricated hydrodynamic sleeve bearing technology which utilizes various coatings and surface treatments in conjunction with oil lubricants to achieve optimum performance. In this study, room temperature load capacity tests are performed on journal foil air bearings operating at 14,000 rpm. Different shaft and foil coating technologies such as plasma sprayed composites, ceramic, polymer and inorganic lubricant coatings are evaluated as foil bearing lubricants. The results indicate that bearing performance is improved through the individual use of the lubricants and treatments tested. Further, combining several solid lubricants together yielded synergistically better results than any material alone.

  16. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    Air foil bearings use ambient air as a lubricant allowing environment-friendly operation. When they are designed, installed, and operated properly, air foil bearings are very cost effective and reliable solution to oil-free turbomachinery. Because air is used as a lubricant, there are no mechanical contacts between the rotor and bearings and when the rotor is lifted off the bearing, near frictionless quiet operation is possible. However, due to the high speed operation, thermal management is one of the very important design factors to consider. Most widely accepted practice of the cooling method is axial cooling, which uses cooling air passing through heat exchange channels formed underneath the bearing pad. Advantage is no hardware modification to implement the axial cooling because elastic foundation structure of foil bearing serves as a heat exchange channels. Disadvantage is axial temperature gradient on the journal shaft and bearing. This work presents the experimental feasibility study of alternative cooling method using radial injection of cooling air directly on the rotor shaft. The injection speeds, number of nozzles, location of nozzles, total air flow rate are important factors determining the effectiveness of the radial injection cooling method. Effectiveness of the radial injection cooling was compared with traditional axial cooling method. A previously constructed test rig was modified to accommodate a new motor with higher torque and radial injection cooling. The radial injection cooling utilizes the direct air injection to the inlet region of air film from three locations at 120° from one another with each location having three axially separated holes. In axial cooling, a certain axial pressure gradient is applied across the bearing to induce axial cooling air through bump foil channels. For the comparison of the two methods, the same amount of cooling air flow rate was used for both axial cooling and radial injection. Cooling air flow rate was

  17. Yaw rate control of an air bearing vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walcott, Bruce L.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a 6 week project which focused on the problem of controlling the yaw (rotational) rate the air bearing vehicle used on NASA's flat floor facility are summarized. Contained within is a listing of the equipment available for task completion and an evaluation of the suitability of this equipment. The identification (modeling) process of the air bearing vehicle is detailed as well as the subsequent closed-loop control strategy. The effectiveness of the solution is discussed and further recommendations are included.

  18. Textured bearing surface in artificial joints to reduce macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Nishi, Naoki; Chikaura, Hiroto; Nakashima, Yuta; Miura, Hiromasa; Higaki, Hidehiko; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro

    2015-12-01

    Micro slurry-jet erosion has been proposed as a precision machining technique for the bearing surfaces of artificial joints in order to reduce the total amount of polyethylene wear and to enlarge the size of the wear debris. The micro slurry-jet erosion method is a wet blasting technique which uses alumina particles as the abrasive medium along with compressed air and water to create an ideal surface. Pin-on-disc wear tests with multidirectional sliding motion on the textured surface of a \\text{Co}-\\text{Cr}-\\text{Mo} alloy counterface for polyethylene resulted in both a reduction of wear as well as enlargement of the polyethylene debris size. In this study, primary human peripheral blood mononuclear phagocytes were incubated with the debris, and it was elucidated that the wear debris generated on the textured surface regulated secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, indicating a reduction in the induced tissue reaction and joint loosening.

  19. An air bearing system for small high speed gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. B.; Davies, S. J.; Nimir, Y. L.

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes the second phase of an experimental program concerning the application of air bearings to small turbomachinery test rigs and small gas turbines. The first phase examined externally pressurized (EP) journal bearings, with a novel EP thrust bearing, for application to 'warm air' test rigs, and was entirely successful at rotational speeds in excess of 100,000 rpm. This second phase examined several designs of tilting pad-spiring journal bearings, one with a novel form of externally pressurized pad, but all using the original EP thrust bearing. The designs tested are described, including some oscillogram traces, for tests up to a maximum of 70,000 rpm; the most successful using a carbon pad-titanium beam spring arrangement. The thrust bearing which gave trouble-free operation throughout, is also described. The results of an original experiment to measure the 'runway speed' of a radial inflow turbine are also presented, which show that overspeeds of 58 percent above the design speed can result from free-power turbine coupling failure.

  20. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In

  1. Determining the surface temperature of liquid oxygen cooled bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naerheim, Y.; Stocker, P. J.; Lumsden, J. B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a method for determining the surface temperature of liquid-oxygen turbopump bearings during the operation of the turbopump. The method relies on the fact that the surface temperature of a bearing can be correlated with the composition of oxides used to cover the bearings, using oxidation samples for calibration and AES for chemical analysis. Using this method, it was found that, for the bearings studied, the maximum temperature reached by stainless steel bearings was 600 C, which is well below the 1100-C autoignition temperature of the AISI stainless steel.

  2. Transient hemorheology in an air-bearing viscosimeter.

    PubMed

    Ravey, J C; Ikimoto, S; Stoltz, J F

    1984-01-01

    Blood suspensions have been studied by using an air-bearing viscosimeter which is driven by a rotating magnetic induction. Each transient motion (rise, relaxation with zero or intermittent field) can be considered as a quasi-static motion, from which the curve viscosity-shear gradient can be obtained. Combining several transient motions allows an easier determination of the parameters describing a non newtonian fluid like blood. PMID:6592001

  3. An Experimental Investigation Into the Temperature Profile of a Compliant Foil Air Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin; Zeszotek, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    A series of tests was performed to determine the internal temperature profile in a compliant bump-type foil journal air bearing operating at room temperature under various speeds and load conditions. The temperature profile was collected by instrumenting a foil bearing with nine, type K thermocouples arranged in the center and along the bearing s edges in order to measure local temperatures and estimate thermal gradients in the axial and circumferential directions. To facilitate the measurement of maximum temperatures from viscous shearing in the air film, the thermocouples were tack welded to the backside of the bumps that were in direct contact with the top foil. The mating journal was coated with a high temperature solid lubricant that, together with the bearing, underwent high temperature start-stop cycles to produce a smooth, steady-state run-in surface. Tests were conducted at speeds from 20 to 50 krpm and loads ranging from 9 to 222 N. The results indicate that, over the conditions tested, both journal rotational speed and radial load are responsible for heat generation with speed playing a more significant role in the magnitude of the temperatures. The temperature distribution was nearly symmetric about the bearing center at 20 and 30 krpm but became slightly skewed toward one side at 40 and 50 krpm. Surprisingly, the maximum temperatures did not occur at the bearing edge where the minimum film thickness is expected but rather in the middle of the bearing where analytical investigations have predicted the air film to be much thicker. Thermal gradients were common during testing and were strongest in the axial direction from the middle of the bearing to its edges, reaching 3.78 8C/mm. The temperature profile indicated the circumferential thermal gradients were negligible.

  4. Planar air-bearing microgravity simulators: Review of applications, existing solutions and design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybus, Tomasz; Seweryn, Karol

    2016-03-01

    All devices designed to be used in space must be thoroughly tested in relevant conditions. For several classes of devices the reduced gravity conditions are the key factor. In early stages of development and later due to financial reasons, the tests need to be done on Earth. However, in Earth conditions it is impossible to obtain a different gravity field independent on all linear and rotational spatial coordinates. Therefore, various test-bed systems are used, with their design driven by the device's specific needs. One of such test-beds are planar air-bearing microgravity simulators. In such an approach, the tested objects (e.g., manipulators intended for on-orbit operations or vehicles simulating satellites in a close formation flight) are mounted on planar air-bearings that allow almost frictionless motion on a flat surface, thus simulating microgravity conditions in two dimensions. In this paper we present a comprehensive review of research activities related to planar air-bearing microgravity simulators, demonstrating achievements of the most active research groups and describing newest trends and ideas, such as tests of landing gears for low-g bodies. Major design parameters of air-bearing test-beds are also reviewed and a list of notable existing test-beds is presented.

  5. Air entrainment in hairy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasto, Alice; Regli, Marianne; Brun, P.-T.; Alvarado, José; Clanet, Christophe; Hosoi, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by diving semiaquatic mammals, we investigate the mechanism of dynamic air entrainment in hairy surfaces submerged in liquid. Hairy surfaces are cast out of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer and plunged into a fluid bath at different velocities. Experimentally, we find that the amount of air entrained is greater than what is expected for smooth surfaces. Theoretically, we show that the hairy surface can be considered as a porous medium and we describe the air entrainment via a competition between the hydrostatic forcing and the viscous resistance in the pores. A phase diagram that includes data from our experiments and biological data from diving semiaquatic mammals is included to place the model system in a biological context and predict the regime for which the animal is protected by a plastron of air.

  6. Hardening treatment of friction surfaces of ball journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlenko, A. O.; Davidov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents the technology of finishing plasma hardening by the application of the multi-layer nanocoating Si-O-C-N system to harden the friction surfaces of the ball journal bearings. The authors of the paper have studied the applied wear-resistant anti-friction coating tribological characteristics, which determine the increase in wear resistance of the ball journal bearings.

  7. The Effect of Journal Roughness and Foil Coatings on the Performance of Heavily Loaded Foil Air Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Foil air bearing load capacity tests were conducted to investigate if a solid lubricant coating applied to the surface of the bearing's top foil can function as a break-in coating. Two foil coating materials, a conventional soft polymer film (polyimide) and a hard ceramic (alumina), were independently evaluated against as-ground and worn (run-in) journals coated with NASA PS304, a high-temperature solid lubricant composite coating. The foil coatings were evaluated at journal rotational speeds of 30,000 rpm and at 25 C. Tests were also performed on a foil bearing with a bare (uncoated) nickel-based superalloy top foil to establish a baseline for comparison. The test results indicate that the presence of a top foil solid lubricant coating is effective at increasing the load capacity performance of the foil bearing. Compared to the uncoated baseline, the addition of the soft polymer coating on the top foil increased the bearing load coefficient by 120% when operating against an as-ground journal surface and 85 percent against a run-in journal surface. The alumina coating increased the load coefficient by 40% against the as-ground journal but did not have any affect when the bearing was operated with the run-in journal. The results suggest that the addition of solid lubricant films provide added lubrication when the air film is marginal indicating that as the load capacity is approached foil air bearings transition from hydrodynamic to mixed and boundary lubrication.

  8. Performance and Durability of High Temperature Foil Air Bearing for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Valco, M. J.; Radil, K. C.; Heshmat, H.

    1999-01-01

    The performance and durability of advanced, high temperature foil air bearings are evaluated under a wide range (10-50 kPa) of loads at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The bearings are made from uncoated nickel based superalloy foils. The foil surface experiences sliding contact with the shaft during initial start/stop operation. To reduce friction and wear, the solid lubricant coating, PS304, is applied to the shaft by plasma spraying. PS304, is a NiCr based Cr2O3 coating with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride solid lubricant additions. The results show that the bearings provide lives well in excess of 30,000 cycles under all of the conditions tested. Several bearings exhibited lives in excess of 100,000 cycles. Wear is a linear function of the bearing load. The excellent performance measured in this study suggests that these bearings and the PS304 coating are well suited for advanced high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

  9. Performance and Durability of High Temperature Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V.; Valco, M. J.; Radil, K. C.; Heshmat, H.

    2000-01-01

    The performance and durability of advanced, high temperature foil air bearings are evaluated under a wide range (10-50 kPa) of loads at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The bearings are made from uncoated nickel based superalloy foils. The foil surface experiences sliding contact with the shaft during initial start/stop operation. To reduce friction and wear, the solid lubricant coating, PS304, is applied to the shaft by plasma spraying. PS304 is a NiCr based Cr2O3 coating with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride solid lubricant additions. The results show that the bearings provide lives well in excess of 30,000 cycles under all of the conditions tested. Several bearings exhibited lives in excess of 100,000 cycles. Wear is a linear function of the bearing load. The excellent performance measured in this study suggests that these bearings and the PS304 coating are well suited for advanced high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

  10. Mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle on a machine tool

    DOEpatents

    Lunsford, J.S.; Crisp, D.W.; Petrowski, P.L.

    1987-12-07

    The present invention is directed to a mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle utilized on a machine tool such as a lathe. The mounting arrangement of the present invention comprises a housing which is secured to the casing of the air bearing in such a manner that the housing position can be selectively adjusted to provide alignment of the air-bearing drive shaft supported by the housing and the air-bearing spindle. Once this alignment is achieved the air between spindle and the drive arrangement is maintained in permanent alignment so as to overcome misalignment problems encountered in the operation of the machine tool between the air-bearing spindle and the shaft utilized for driving the air-bearing spindle.

  11. Progress report on air bearing slumping of thin glass mirrors for x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattenburg, Mark L.; Chalifoux, Brandon; DeTienne, Michael D.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Zuo, Heng

    2015-09-01

    The successful NuSTAR telescope was fabricated with thin glass mirrors formed into conic shapes by thermal slumping of thin glass sheets onto high precision mandrels. While mirrors generated by this process have very good figure, the best mirrors to date have a resolution limited to ~7 arc sec, due primarily to mid-range scale spatial frequency errors. These mid-range errors are believed to be due to clumping and particulates in the anti-stick coatings used to prevent sticking between mandrel and mirrors. We have developed a new slumping process which avoids sticking and surface-induced mid-range error by floating hot glass substrates between a pair of porous air bearing mandrels through which compressed nitrogen is forced. We report on the design and testing of an improved air bearing slumping tool and show results of short and long slumping cycles.

  12. Surface texture and micromechanics of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) orthopaedic implant bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Monica A.

    2001-07-01

    Tibial bearings of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were characterized to identify differences in morphology, surface texture (roughness and skewness), and micro-scale mechanical behavior. These orthopaedic implant components were fabricated by direct molding or by machining after isostatic compression molding. Sterilization was by gamma irradiation (3.3 Mrad) in air, followed by shelf aging for 2 years. Comparisons were made between unsterile and sterile bearings to identify differences in structure and properties related to wear debris. Characterization methods included confocal optical microscopy, nanoindentation, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and polarized light microscopy. Morphology was compared between bulk and surface (top and bottom) specimens of the bearings. Cryo-microtomy was used to prepare thin specimens transverse to the top surface for polarized microscopy. Nanoindentation was performed on the top bearing surfaces, near areas examined by confocal microscopy. Processing methods affected both small- and large-scale morphology of UHMWPE. Direct molding produced thinner lamellae, thicker long periods, and slightly lower crystallinity than isostatic compression molding. Both bearing types contained a thick interface between the crystalline and amorphous phases. Interfacial free energy varied with interface thickness. Resin particles were consolidated better in direct molded bearings than in machined bearings. Segregated amorphous regions were observed in the machined bearings. Sterilization and shelf aging affected nanometer-scale morphology. Chain scission significantly decreased the interface thickness, causing an increase in lamellar thickness and a small increase in crystallinity. Only a small decrease in the amorphous thickness resulted. Heterogeneous oxidation increased these changes in interface

  13. Distinctive Damage Patterns on THA Metal Bearing Surfaces: Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Heiner, Anneliese D; Tikekar, Nishant M; Kruger, Karen M; Lannutti, John J; Brown, Thomas D

    2014-01-01

    Retrieval analysis of total joint arthroplasty components has primarily focused on assessing wear or other damage to polyethylene components. As damage to the opposing bearing surface can accelerate polyethylene wear and damage, and especially with the use of hard-on-hard articulations, retrieval analysis benefits from incorporating evaluation of hard bearing surfaces as well. The purpose of this study is to report six case studies of metal bearing surfaces with distinctive damage patterns, to interpret them in the context of adverse events plausibly responsible for their creation, and to suggest their likely clinical or scientific significance. The specific damage patterns reported here are 1) extensive scraping, 2) circumferential discoloration, 3) a long chain of periodic micro-indentations, 4) pitting with deposits, 5) scratches with small-radius directional changes, and 6) indentation with scraping. PMID:25328465

  14. Alumina-on-Polyethylene Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yup Lee; Kim, Shin-Yoon

    2010-01-01

    The long-term durability of polyethylene lining total hip arthroplasty (THA) mainly depends on periprosthetic osteolysis due to wear particles, especially in young active patients. In hip simulator study, reports revealed significant wear reduction of the alumina ceramic-on-polyethylene articulation of THA compared with metal-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces. However, medium to long-term clinical studies of THA using the alumina ceramic-on-polyethylene are few and the reported wear rate of this articulation is variable. We reviewed the advantages and disadvantages of ceramicon- polyethylene articulation in THA, hip simulator study and retrieval study for polyethylene wear, in vivo clinical results of THA using alumina ceramic-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces in the literature, and new trial alumina ceramic-onhighly cross linked polyethylene bearing surfaces. PMID:20224739

  15. NEW BEARING SURFACES IN TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is being increasingly indicated for younger and more active patients, in addition to a naturally growing demand for the procedure because of increasing life expectancy among patients. The high costs of this surgery and the controversies regarding implant performance have made this topic the subject of constant research, seeking new materials with better resistance to wear and better biocompatibility. The present article provides a review of new surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27042614

  16. Parameter estimation of an air-bearing suspended test table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhenxian; Lin, Yurong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xinglin; Chen, Fang

    2015-02-01

    A parameter estimation approach is proposed for parameter determination of a 3-axis air-bearing suspended test table. The table is to provide a balanced and frictionless environment for spacecraft ground test. To balance the suspension, the mechanical parameters of the table, including its angular inertias and centroid deviation from its rotating center, have to be determined first. Then sliding masses on the table can be adjusted by stepper motors to relocate the centroid of the table to its rotating center. Using the angular momentum theorem and the coriolis theorem, dynamic equations are derived describing the rotation of the table under the influence of gravity imbalance torque and activating torques. To generate the actuating torques, use of momentum wheels is proposed, whose virtue is that no active control is required to the momentum wheels, which merely have to spin at constant rates, thus avoiding the singularity problem and the difficulty of precisely adjusting the output torques, issues associated with control moment gyros. The gyroscopic torques generated by the momentum wheels, as they are forced by the table to precess, are sufficient to activate the table for parameter estimation. Then least-square estimation is be employed to calculate the desired parameters. The effectiveness of the method is validated by simulation.

  17. The Role of Radial Clearance on the Performance of Foil Air Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin; Howard, Samuel; Dykas, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Load capacity tests were conducted to determine how radial clearance variations affect the load capacity coefficient of foil air bearings. Two Generation III foil air bearings with the same design but possessing different initial radial clearances were tested at room temperature against an as-ground PS304 coated journal operating at 30,000 rpm. Increases in radial clearance were accomplished by reducing the journal's outside diameter via an in-place grinding system. From each load capacity test the bearing load capacity coefficient was calculated from the rule-of-thumb (ROT) model developed for foil air bearings. The test results indicate that, in terms of the load capacity coefficient, radial clearance has a direct impact on the performance of the foil air bearing. Each test bearing exhibited an optimum radial clearance that resulted in a maximum load capacity coefficient. Relative to this optimum value are two separate operating regimes that are governed by different modes of failure. Bearings operating with radial clearances less than the optimum exhibit load capacity coefficients that are a strong function of radial clearance and are prone to a thermal runaway failure mechanism and bearing seizure. Conversely, a bearing operating with a radial clearance twice the optimum suffered only a 20 percent decline in its maximum load capacity coefficient and did not experience any thermal management problems. However, it is unknown to what degree these changes in radial clearance had on other performance parameters, such as the stiffness and damping properties of the bearings.

  18. Theoretical Analysis and Optimum Design of High Speed Air Film Thrust Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Hiromu; Ochiai, Masayuki; Nanba, Tadashi

    Hydrodynamic air film thrust bearings are widely used for very high speed, lightly loaded rotating machinery such as gas expander, compressor, gyroscope and business machines, etc. In the design of hydrodynamic air film thrust bearings, it is of cardinal importance to enhance the friction and stability capacities of air films for keeping the minimum friction loss within a particular level and for minimizing the vibration due to external excitations. Among various types of hydrodynamic air film thrust bearings, spiral and herring bone types of grooved bearings have an advantage of high stability and load carrying capacity, but the characteristics of the bearings depend on many design parameters. Therefore, when these parameters are designed suitably, it is expected to improve considerably the friction and stability characteristics of the bearings. In this paper, the optimum design methodology is presented to minimize the friction torque and also to maximize the stiffness of air film for spiral and herring bone types of grooved air film thrust bearings, and the applicability of the methodology is verified experimentally.

  19. Surface Temperature variability from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Dang, V. T.; Aumann, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    To address the existence and possible causes of the climate hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014for the day and night conditions. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We compare the satellite data with the new surface data produced by Karl et al. (2015) who denies the reality of the climate hiatus. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The day-night difference is an indicator of the anthropogenic trend. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. The SOFIA telescope mounting on a large segment air-bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Hans J.; Lautner, H.

    1990-11-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) telescope concepts are briefly discussed, and a new air-bearing design philosophy is presented. The telescope mounting system inside the hull of a Boeing 747 SP aircraft encompasses a large spherical air-bearing which supports the telescope in the rear bulkhead of the aircraft cavity in order to make it independent of the rotary movements of the airplane and to isolate it from aircraft vibrations through an additional vibration isolation system.

  1. Oxidized Zirconium Bearing Surfaces in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Efe, Turgay; Heyse, Thomas J; Haas, Steven B

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty is a still unsolved problem resulting in osteolysis and long-term failure of knee joint replacement. To address the problem of polyethylene wear, research aimed for an optimal implant design and for an optimal combination of bearing surfaces. Oxidized zirconium was introduced to minimize surface wear and thus potentially increase long-term implant survival. This review comprises the current literature related to in vitro and in vivo studies evaluating performance of oxidized zirconium total knee arthroplasty and results from retrieval analyses. PMID:26216647

  2. Oxidized Zirconium Bearing Surfaces in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Efe, Turgay; Heyse, Thomas J; Haas, Steven B

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty is a still unsolved problem resulting in osteolysis and long-term failure of knee joint replacement. To address the problem of polyethylene wear, research aimed for an optimal implant design and for an optimal combination of bearing surfaces. Oxidized zirconium was introduced to minimize surface wear and thus potentially increase long-term implant survival. This review comprises the current literature related to in vitro and in vivo studies evaluating performance of oxidized zirconium total knee arthroplasty and results from retrieval analyses.

  3. Surface profile changes of scuffed bearing surfaces. [before and after acid treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Fung, S. S.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A phase locked interference microscope capable of resolving depth differences to 30 A and planar displacements of 6000 A was constructed for the examination of the profiles of bearing surfaces without physical contact. This instrument was used to determine surface chemical reactivity by applying a drop of dilute alcoholic hydrochloric acid and measuring the profile of the solid surface before and after application of this probe. Scuffed bearing surfaces reacted much faster than unscuffed ones, but bearing surfaces which had been previously exposed to lubricants containing an organic chloride reacted much more slowly. In a separate series of experiments, a number of stainless steel plates were heated in a nitrogen atmosphere to different temperatures and their reactivity examined later at room temperature. The change of surface contour as a result of the probe reaction followed an Arrhenius type relation with respect to heat treatment temperature. This result could have implications on the scuffing mechanism.

  4. Changes in Hardware in Order to Accommodate Compliant Foil Air Bearings of a Larger Size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeszotek, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Compliant foil air bearings are at the forefront of the Oil-Free turbomachinery revolution of supporting gas turbine engines with air lubricated hydrodynamic bearings. Foil air bearings have existed for almost fifty years, yet their commercialization has been confined to relatively small, high-speed systems characterized by low temperatures and loads, such as in air cycle machines, turbocompressors and micro-turbines. Recent breakthroughs in foil air bearing design and solid lubricant coating technology, have caused a resurgence of research towards applying Oil-Free technology to more demanding applications on the scale of small and mid range aircraft gas turbine engines. In order to foster the transition of Oil-Free technology into gas turbine engines, in-house experiments need to be performed on foil air bearings to further the understanding of their complex operating principles. During my internship at NASA Glenn in the summer of 2003, a series of tests were performed to determine the internal temperature profile in a compliant bump- type foil journal air bearing operating at room temperature under various speeds and load conditions. From these tests, a temperature profile was compiled, indicating that the circumferential thermal gradients were negligible. The tests further indicated that both journal rotational speed and radial load are responsible for heat generation with speed playing a more significant role in the magnitude of the temperatures. As a result of the findings from the tests done during the summer of 2003, it was decided that further testing would need to be done, but with a bearing of a larger diameter. The bearing diameter would now be increased from two inches to three inches. All of the currently used testing apparatus was designed specifically for a bearing that was two inches in diameter. Thus, my project for the summer of 2004 was to focus specifically on the scatter shield put around the testing rig while running the bearings. Essentially

  5. MOISTURE AND SURFACE AREA MEASUREMENTS OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Scogin, J.; Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.

    2009-09-28

    To ensure safe storage, plutonium-bearing oxides are stabilized at 950 C for at least two hours in an oxidizing atmosphere. Stabilization conditions are expected to decompose organic impurities, convert metals to oxides, and result in moisture content below 0.5 wt%. During stabilization, the specific surface area is reduced, which minimizes readsorption of water onto the oxide surface. Plutonium oxides stabilized according to these criteria were sampled and analyzed to determine moisture content and surface area. In addition, samples were leached in water to identify water-soluble chloride impurity content. Results of these analyses for seven samples showed that the stabilization process produced low moisture materials (< 0.2 wt %) with low surface area ({le} 1 m{sup 2}/g). For relatively pure materials, the amount of water per unit surface area corresponded to 1.5 to 3.5 molecular layers of water. For materials with chloride content > 360 ppm, the calculated amount of water per unit surface area increased with chloride content, indicating hydration of hygroscopic salts present in the impure PuO{sub 2}-containing materials. The low moisture, low surface area materials in this study did not generate detectable hydrogen during storage of four or more years.

  6. Verification of Spin Magnetic Attitude Control System using air-bearing-based attitude control simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousaloo, H. S.; Nodeh, M. T.; Mehrabian, R.

    2016-09-01

    This paper accomplishes one goal and it was to verify and to validate a Spin Magnetic Attitude Control System (SMACS) program and to perform Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) air-bearing experiments. A study of a closed-loop magnetic spin controller is presented using only magnetic rods as actuators. The magnetic spin rate control approach is able to perform spin rate control and it is verified with an Attitude Control System (ACS) air-bearing MATLAB® SIMULINK® model and a hardware-embedded LABVIEW® algorithm that controls the spin rate of the test platform on a spherical air bearing table. The SIMULINK® model includes dynamic model of air-bearing, its disturbances, actuator emulation and the time delays caused by on-board calculations. The air-bearing simulator is employed to develop, improve, and carry out objective tests of magnetic torque rods and spin rate control algorithm in the experimental framework and to provide a more realistic demonstration of expected performance of attitude control as compared with software-based architectures. Six sets of two torque rods are used as actuators for the SMACS. It is implemented and simulated to fulfill mission requirement including spin the satellite up to 12 degs-1 around the z-axis. These techniques are documented for the full nonlinear equations of motion of the system and the performances of these techniques are compared in several simulations.

  7. Mystery of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-free Turbomachinery Unlocked: Load Capacity Rule-of-thumb Allows Simple Estimation of Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2002-01-01

    The Oil-Free Turbomachinery team at the NASA Glenn Research Center has unlocked one of the mysteries surrounding foil air bearing performance. Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings that use ambient air, or any fluid, as their lubricant. In operation, the motion of the shaft's surface drags fluid into the bearing by viscous action, creating a pressurized lubricant film. This lubricating film separates the stationary foil bearing surface from the moving shaft and supports load. Foil bearings have been around for decades and are widely employed in the air cycle machines used for cabin pressurization and cooling aboard commercial jetliners. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery team is fostering the maturation of this technology for integration into advanced Oil-Free aircraft engines. Elimination of the engine oil system can significantly reduce weight and cost and could enable revolutionary new engine designs. Foil bearings, however, have complex elastic support structures (spring packs) that make the prediction of bearing performance, such as load capacity, difficult if not impossible. Researchers at Glenn recently found a link between foil bearing design and load capacity performance. The results have led to a simple rule-of-thumb that relates a bearing's size, speed, and design to its load capacity. Early simple designs (Generation I) had simple elastic (spring) support elements, and performance was limited. More advanced bearings (Generation III) with elastic supports, in which the stiffness is varied locally to optimize gas film pressures, exhibit load capacities that are more than double those of the best previous designs. This is shown graphically in the figure. These more advanced bearings have enabled industry to introduce commercial Oil-Free gas-turbine-based electrical generators and are allowing the aeropropulsion industry to incorporate the technology into aircraft engines. The rule-of-thumb enables engine and bearing designers to easily size and

  8. Porous Squeeze Film Bearing with Rough Surfaces Lubricated by a Bingham Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walicka, A.; Walicki, E.; Jurczak, P.; Falicki, J.

    2014-11-01

    In the paper the effect of both bearing surfaces and the porosity of one bearing surface on the pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity of a squeeze film bearing is discussed. The equations of motion of a Bingham fluid in a bearing clearance and in a porous layer are presented. Using the Morgan-Cameron approximation and Christensen theory of rough lubrication the modified Reynolds equation is obtained. The analytical solutions of this equation for a squeeze film bearing are presented. As a result one obtains the formulae expressing pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity. A thrust radial bearing is considered as a numerical example.

  9. An air bearing fan for EVA suit ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murry, Roger P.

    1990-01-01

    The portable life-support system (PLSS) ventilation requirements are outlined, along with the application of a high-speed axial fan technology for extravehicular-activity (EVA) space-suit ventilation. Focus is placed on a mechanical design employing high-speed gas bearings, permanent magnet rotor, and current-fed chopper/inverter electronics. The operational characteristics of the fan unit and its applicability for use in a pure-oxygen environment are discussed. It delivers a nominal 0.17 cu m/min at 1.24 kPa pressure rise using 13.8 w of input power. It is shown that the overall selection of materials for all major component meets the NASA requirements.

  10. ENHANCING DAMAGE VISIBILITY ON METALLIC BEARING SURFACES: A SIMPLE TECHNIQUE FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIEWING

    PubMed Central

    Heiner, Anneliese D.; Kruger, Karen M.; Baer, Thomas E.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Damage to metallic bearing surfaces typically involves scratches, scrapes, metal transfer, and organic deposits. This damage can cause accelerated wear of the opposing surface and subsequent implant failure. Photography and viewing of metallic bearing surfaces, for documenting this damage, is hindered by optical reflectivity. This note demonstrates a simple, practical technique for metallic bearing surface photography and viewing that minimizes this reflectivity problem, that does not involve any modification of the bearing surface, and that allows for improved observation and documentation of overall damage. When the metallic bearing surface is placed within a tube of translucent material, the appearance of damage on that bearing surface is dramatically enhanced, showing up against a smooth, even background with excellent contrast and with fine detail achievable. PMID:23333257

  11. Enhancing damage visibility on metallic bearing surfaces: a simple technique for photography and viewing.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Anneliese D; Kruger, Karen M; Baer, Thomas E; Brown, Thomas D

    2013-03-01

    Damage to metallic bearing surfaces typically involves scratches, scrapes, metal transfer, and organic deposits. This damage can cause accelerated wear of the opposing surface and subsequent implant failure. Photography and viewing of metallic bearing surfaces, for documenting this damage, are hindered by optical reflectivity. This note demonstrates a simple, practical technique for metallic bearing surface photography and viewing that minimizes this reflectivity problem, that does not involve any modification of the bearing surface, and that allows for improved observation and documentation of overall damage. When the metallic bearing surface is placed within a tube of translucent material, the appearance of damage on that bearing surface is dramatically enhanced, showing up against a smooth, even background with excellent contrast and with fine detail achievable.

  12. Porous metals and alternate bearing surfaces in shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon R; Urits, Ivan; Murthi, Anand M

    2016-03-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) provides an effective solution for the treatment of glenohumeral arthritis. However, long-term outcomes have been limited by glenoid component aseptic loosening and polyethylene (PE) wear. Previous attempts to improve glenoid fixation with metal-backed glenoids resulted in inferior results. Newer component designs that contain porous metal allow for biological ingrowth of the prosthesis, potentially improving longevity and overall outcomes. Porous metal can also improve humeral component fixation, obviating the need for cement and simplifying revision surgery. Advances such as highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE), vitamin E-doped HXLPE, and alternate bearing surfaces like ceramics and pyrolytic carbon have proven to provide superior wear characteristics in other joint replacements and may prove beneficial in the shoulder as well. PMID:26797775

  13. Contact sheet recording with a self-acting negative air bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muftu , Sinan (Inventor); Hinteregger, Hans F (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A flat head and a tape transport arrangement impart a wrap angle to the tape at the upstream corner of the head. The wrap angle, corner sharpness and tape stiffness are sufficient to cause a moving tape to form a hollow bump at the upstream corner, thereby creating a hollow into which entrained air can expand, causing a subambient pressure within and downstream of the bump. This pressure keeps the tape in contact with the head. It is created without the need for a groove or complex pressure relief slot(s). No contact pressure arises at the signal exchange site due to media wrap. The highest contact pressures are developed at a wrapped upstream corner. For a tape drive, traveling in both forward and reverse, the wrap can be at both the upstream and downstream (which is the reverse upstream) corners. Heads that are not flat can also be used, if the wrap angle relative to a main surface is sufficient and not too large. The wrapped head can also be used with rotating media, such as disks (floppy and hard) and rotating heads, such as helical wound heads for video recording. Multiple flat tape bearing surfaces can be separated by grooves and/or angles. Each flat can carry heads along one or more gap lines. Multiple adjacent narrow tracks can thus be written for extreme high track density recording.

  14. A New Foil Air Bearing Test Rig for Use to 700 C and 70,000 rpm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Chris

    1997-01-01

    A new test rig has been developed for evaluating foil air bearings at high temperatures and speeds. These bearings are self acting hydrodynamic air bearings which have been successfully applied to a variety of turbomachinery operating up to 650 C. This unique test rig is capable of measuring bearing torque during start-up, shut-down and high speed operation. Load capacity and general performance characteristics, such as durability, can be measured at temperatures to 700 C and speeds to 70,000 rpm. This paper describes the new test rig and demonstrates its capabilities through the preliminary characterization of several bearings. The bearing performance data from this facility can be used to develop advanced turbomachinery incorporating high temperature oil-free air bearing technology.

  15. System Being Developed to Measure the Rotordynamic Characteristics of Air Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    Because of the many possible advantages of oil-free engine operation, interest in using air lubricated foil-bearing technology in advanced oil-free engine concepts has recently increased. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has partially driven this recent push for oil-free technology. The program's goal of developing an innovative, practical, oil-free gas turbine engine for aeropropulsion began with the development of NASA's high-temperature solid-lubricant coating, PS304. This coating virtually eliminates the life-limiting wear that occurs during the startup and shutdown of the bearings. With practically unlimited life, foil air bearings are now very attractive to rotating machinery designers for use in turbomachinery. Unfortunately, the current knowledge base of these types of bearings is limited. In particular, the understanding of how these types of bearings contribute to the rotordynamic stability of turbomachinery is insufficient for designers to design with confidence. Recent work in oil-free turbomachinery has concentrated on advancing the understanding of foil bearings. A high-temperature fiber-optic displacement probe system and measurement method were developed to study the effects of speed, load, temperature, and other environmental issues on the stiffness characteristics of air foil bearings. Since high temperature data are to be collected in future testing, the testing method was intentionally simplified to minimize the need for expensive test hardware. The method measures the displacement induced upon a bearing in response to an applied perturbation load. The early results of these studies, which are shown in the accompanying figure, indicate trends in steady state stiffness that suggest stiffness increases with load and decreases with speed. It can be seen, even from these data, that stiffness is not expected to change by orders of magnitude over the normal operating range of most turbomachinery; a

  16. Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Nixon, H. P.; Darragh, Craig V.; Howe, Jane Y; Coffey, Dorothy W

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

  17. The Epidemiology and National Trends of Bearing Surface Usage in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Kim, Yunjung; Yoo, Seungmi; Lee, Sahnghoon; Kim, Hee Joong

    2016-01-01

    Background We analyzed the data for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) in the Korean nationwide database to assess (1) the epidemiology and national trends of bearing surface usage in THAs and (2) the prevalence of each type of bearing surface according to age, gender, hospital type, primary payer, and hospital procedure volume. Methods A total of 30,881 THAs were analyzed using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database for 2007 through 2011. Bearing surfaces were sub-grouped according to device code for national health insurance claims and consisted of ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC), metal-on-polyethylene (MoP), ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP), and metal-on-metal (MoM). The prevalence of each type of bearing surface was calculated and stratified by age, gender, hospital type, primary payer, and procedure volume of each hospital. Results CoC was the most frequently used bearing surface (76.7%), followed by MoP (11.9%), CoP (7.3%), and MoM (4.1%). The proportion of THAs using a CoC bearing surface increased steadily from 71.6% in 2007 to 81.4% in 2011, whereas the proportions using CoP, MoP, and MoM bearing surfaces decreased. The order of prevalence was identical to that in the general population regardless of age, gender, hospital type, primary payer, and hospital procedure volume. Conclusions The trends and epidemiology of bearing surface usage in THAs in Korea are different from those in other countries, and the CoC bearing surface is the most prevalent articulation. In future, the results of a large-scale study using nationwide data of THAs involving a CoC bearing surface will be reported in Korea. PMID:26929796

  18. Performance evaluation of half-wetted hydrodynamic bearings with DLC coated surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Eryilmaz, O.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Systems

    2008-01-01

    In conventional liquid lubrication it is assumed that surfaces are fully wetted and no slip occurs between the fluid and the solid boundary. Under the 'no slip' condition the maximum shear gradient occurs at the fluid-surface interface. When one or both surfaces are non-wetted by the fluid, boundary slip can occur due to weak bonding between the fluid and the solid surface, which reduces shear stresses in the fluid adjacent to the non-wetted surface. A thrust bearing tribometer was used to compare the performance of 'no slip' hydrodynamic thrust bearings with bearings surfaces that were made to slip at the interface between the surface and fluid. Hydrophobic surfaces on both runner and bearing were achieved with the deposition of hydrogenated diamond like carbon (H-DLC) films, produced by plasma-enhanced CVD on titanium alloy surfaces. Hydrophilic surfaces were created through the surface modification of DLC. A mixtures of water and glycerol was used as the lubricant. The tests were conducted using different constant bearing gaps. The normal load and the torque or traction force between the rotating runner and hydrodynamic thrust bearing were measured with load cells. The experimental results confirmed that load support is still possible when surfaces are partially-wetted or nonwetted.

  19. Development of an air-bearing fan for space extravehicular activity (EVA) suit ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumoto, Paul; Allen, Norman; Stonesifer, Greg

    1992-01-01

    A high-speed/variable flow fan has been developed for EVA suit ventilation which combines air bearings with a two-pole, toothless permanent-magnet motor. The fan has demonstrated quiet and vibration-free operation and a 2:1 range in flow rate variation. System weight is 0.9 kg, and input powers range from 12.4 to 42 W.

  20. The system integration and verification testing of an orbital maneuvering vehicle for an air bearing floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, N. L., Jr.; Martin, M. F.; Paulukaitis, K. R.; Haslam, J. W., Jr.; Henderson, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The teleoperator and Robotics Evaluation Facility (TOREF) is composed of a 4,000 square foot precision air bearing floor, the Teleoperator Motion Base, the Target Motion and Support Simulator, the mock-ups of the Hubble Space Telescope, Multi-mission Modular Spacecraft, and the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The TOREF and its general capabilities to support the OMV and other remote system simulations; the facility operating procedures and requirements; and the results of generic OMV investigations are summarized.

  1. Photoreactive Polymers Bearing a Zwitterionic Phosphorylcholine Group for Surface Modification of Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojie; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-12

    Photoreactive polymers bearing zwitterionic phosphorylcholine and benzophenone groups on the side chain were synthesized and used as surface modification reagents for biomaterials. A photoreactive methacrylate containing the benzophenone group, 3-methacryloyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl-4-oxybenzophenone (MHPBP), was synthesized via a ring-opening and addition reaction between glycidyl methacrylate and 4-hydroxybenzophenone. Then, water-soluble, amphiphilic polymers poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-co-MHPBP) (PMH) and poly(MPC-co-n-butyl methacrylate-co-MHPBP), with different monomer unit compositions, were synthesized through radical polymerization. Ultraviolet-visible (UV/vis) absorption spectra of these polymer solutions showed that these polymers have maximum absorption peaks at 254 and 289 nm that can be attributed to the benzophenone unit. The intensity of UV adsorption at 289 nm was decreased with increased UV irradiation time, and it was saturated within a few minutes, indicating that the polymers are highly sensitive to UV irradiation. A commercial material (i.e., cyclic polyolefin) was simply modified by a UV irradiation for 1.0 min. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis results indicated that the stability of the polymer on the surface was dramatically enhanced because of the photochemical reaction of the benzophenone moiety. The air contact angles of PMH surfaces measured in water were up to 160°. Thus, highly hydrophilic surfaces were obtained. The critical surface tension of the PMH-modified surface was 45.7 mN/m. By evaluating the biological reactivity of the treated surface, protein adsorption and cell adhesion were completely inhibited on the surface, which was prepared using a photopatterning procedure using PMH. In conclusion, photoreactive MPC polymers with a benzophenone moiety could be used as a novel and effective surface modifier.

  2. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 197.432 Section 197.432...-supplied air diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Surface-supplied air diving is conducted... space; and (f) The surface-supplied air diver has the equipment required by § 197.346 (b) or (d)....

  3. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425... Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied air...-supplied air diving shall not be conducted at depths deeper than 190 fsw, except that dives with...

  4. Start-stop testing of two self-acting air-lubricated spiral groove thrust bearing coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunfee, J. D.; Shapiro, W.

    1974-01-01

    Start-stop tests were conducted on air-lubricated spiral-groove thrust bearings. Application of a matrix-bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) coating over a porous chrome oxide coating resulted in significantly lower friction, compared to bearings coated with chrome oxide only. The MoS2 coated bearing sustained 15,000 start-stop cycles at a maximum of 3600 rpm. Each cycle was 15 seconds on, 30 seconds off. The chrome oxide coated bearing failed by local welding after 2030 cycles. Both types of coatings exhibited early failures under higher thrust loads when operating films were insufficient to sustain the load without overheating.

  5. Evaluation of Advanced Solid Lubricant Coatings for Foil Air Bearings Operating at 25 and 500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Fellenstein, James A.; Benoy, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The tribological properties of one chrome oxide and one chrome carbide based solid lubricant coating were evaluated in a partial-arc foil bearing at 25 and 500 C. Start/stop bearing operation up to 20,000 cycles were run under 10 kPa (1.5 psi) static deadweight load. Bearing friction (torque) was measured during the test. Specimen wear and SEM/EDS surface analyses were conducted after testing to understand and elucidate the tribological characteristics observed. The chrome oxide coating which contains both (Ag) and (BaF2/CaF2) for low and high temperature lubrication, exhibited low friction in sliding against Al2O3 coated foils at 25 and 500 C. The chrome carbide coating, which lacked a low temperature lubricant but contained BaF2/CaF2 as a high temperature lubricant, exhibited high friction at 25 C and low friction at 500 C against both bare and Al2O3 coated superalloy foil surfaces. Post test surface analyses suggest that improved tribological performance is exhibited when a lubricant film from the coating transfers to the foil surface.

  6. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of a functionally graded layered bearing surface, with particular reference to 'cushion form bearings' for artificial knee joints.

    PubMed

    Virdee, S S; Wang, F C; Xu, H; Jin, Z M

    2003-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication of a functionally graded layered (FGL) bearing surface, whose elastic modulus increases with depth from the bearing surface, was investigated in this study. The finite difference method was employed to solve the Reynolds equation, simultaneously with the elasticity equation of the bearing surface, under circular point contacts. The finite element method was adopted to solve the elasticity equation for the FGL bearing surface. The displacement coefficients thus obtained were used to calculate the elastic deformation of the bearing surface, required for the elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis. Good agreement of the predicted film thickness and pressure distribution was obtained, between the present method and a previous study for a single layered bearing surface with a uniform elastic modulus. The general numerical methodology was then applied to an FGL bearing surface with both linear and exponential variations in elastic modulus, with particular reference to the 'cushion form bearing' for artificial knee joints. The predicted film thickness and pressure distribution were shown to be quite close to those obtained for a single layer under typical operating conditions representative of artificial knee joints, provided that the elastic modulus of the single layer was chosen to be the average elastic modulus of the graded layer.

  7. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 197.432 Section 197.432... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.432 Surface-supplied air diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Surface-supplied air diving is...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dive area from ascending directly to the surface. ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425... Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dive area from ascending directly to the surface. ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425... Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dive area from ascending directly to the surface. ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425... Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied...

  11. Materials and lubrication for gear and bearing surfaces in uhv

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, R.E.; Collet, G.J.; Garwin, E.L.

    1980-06-01

    During design and construction of the SLAC polarized LEED (PLEED) system, a search was made for a dependable gear, bearing, and lubrication system for the computer-controlled Faraday cup used to measure diffracted beams. Components must be nonmagnetic, bakeable to 250/sup 0/C, and at room temperature must operate at pressures in the 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -10/ Pa range. A test system was constructed which incorporated a meshed pair of dissimilar pitch diameter spur gears, one of which was confined to (by bushings) and rotated on a fixed shaft, while the other gear was driven by a commercial rotary motion feedthrough which was rotated by a servo motor driven in sine fashion with a direction reversal every six turns and peak speeds of 50 rpm. The criterion for a successful pair was approx. 10/sup 5/ turns, the life rating for the feedthrough. Pairs had actual turn counts from less than 1 to 91,000. Materials for gears included stainless steel, beryllium copper, and aluminum alloys. Lubricants used singly and in concert were MoS/sub 2/, WS/sub 2/, Ag, hard chrome, and a MoS/sub 2/-graphite-sodium silicate mixture. The successful gear pair was Ag-plated Al alloy and MoS/sub 2/-graphite-sodium silicate-coated Be-Cu. Subsequent performance in the PLEED system after repeated bakeouts will also be discussed.

  12. Bearing surfaces in total hip replacements: state of the art and future developments.

    PubMed

    McKellop, H A

    2001-01-01

    Because the UHMWPE components fabricated by the historic process of gamma-sterilization in air are no longer marketed, a surgeon who wishes to continue performing joint replacement surgery must choose among the new polyethylenes, or he or she may choose a modern metal-metal or ceramic-ceramic bearing, each of which has its potential advantages and disadvantages (Table 4). Ultimately, it is the responsibility of the surgeon to assess the risk-benefit ratios of each of the new bearing combinations and make an informed and wise choice among them. PMID:11372311

  13. Groundwater and surface-water interactions near White Bear Lake, Minnesota, through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Jackson, P. Ryan; Bode, Jenifer A.; O'Grady, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the White Bear Lake Conservation District, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and other State, county, municipal, and regional planning agencies, watershed organizations, and private organizations, conducted a study to characterize groundwater and surface-water interactions near White Bear Lake through 2011. During 2010 and 2011, White Bear Lake and other lakes in the northeastern part of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area were at historically low levels. Previous periods of lower water levels in White Bear Lake correlate with periods of lower precipitation; however, recent urban expansion and increased pumping from the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer have raised the question of whether a decline in precipitation is the primary cause for the recent water-level decline in White Bear Lake. Understanding and quantifying the amount of groundwater inflow to a lake and water discharge from a lake to aquifers is commonly difficult but is important in the management of lake levels. Three methods were used in the study to assess groundwater and surface-water interactions on White Bear Lake: (1) a historical assessment (1978-2011) of levels in White Bear Lake, local groundwater levels, and their relation to historical precipitation and groundwater withdrawals in the White Bear Lake area; (2) recent (2010-11) hydrologic and water-quality data collected from White Bear Lake, other lakes, and wells; and (3) water-balance assessments for White Bear Lake in March and August 2011. An analysis of covariance between average annual lake-level change and annual precipitation indicated the relation between the two variables was significantly different from 2003 through 2011 compared with 1978 through 2002, requiring an average of 4 more inches of precipitation per year to maintain the lake level. This shift in the linear relation between annual lake-level change and annual precipitation

  14. Tracking Phragmites Australis Expansion in Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge using AggieAir Aircraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, B.; McKee, M.

    2010-12-01

    This research examines the use of unmanned air vehicles (UAV), a cutting edge technology developed at the Utah Water research lab for acquiring airborne imagery using drones for the assessment of abundance of an invasive species Phragmites australis in a wetland vegetation setup. These UAV’s acquire multispectral data in the visible and near-infrared bands with a spatial resolution of 0.5 meters. The study area is the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge (MBR) which lies in northern Utah, where the Bear River flows into the northeast arm of the Great Salt Lake. The Refuge protects the marshes found at the mouth of the Bear River; these marshes are the largest freshwater component of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. A common reed, Phragmites australis, is a tall (1.5-4.0 m) coarse perennial grass found primarily in brackish and freshwater wetlands, growing at or above mean high water. The methodology is to build Bayesian statistical supervised classification model using relevance vector machine (RVM) employing the inexpensive and readily available UAV data. The UAV images of the bird refuge are processed to obtain calibrated reflectance imagery. Thereafter, the isodata clustering algorithm is applied to classify the multispectral imagery into different classes. Using ground sampling of the species, pixels containing the Phragmites australis are deduced. The training set for the supervised RVM classification model is prepared using the deduced pixel values. A separate set of ground sampling points containing the Phragmites australis are kept aside for validation. The distribution of Phragmites australis in the study area as obtained from RVM classification model is compared to the validation set. The RVM model results for tracking of Phragmites are encouraging and the new technique has promising real-time implementation for similar applications.

  15. Bending fatigue of electron-beam-welded foils. Application to a hydrodynamic air bearing in the Chrysler/DOE upgraded automotive gas tubine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrodynamic air bearing with a compliment surface is used in the gas generator of an upgraded automotive gas turbine engine. In the prototype design, the compliant surface is a thin foil spot welded at one end to the bearing cartridge. During operation, the foil failed along the line of spot welds which acted as a series of stress concentrators. Because of its higher degree of geometric uniformity, electron beam welding of the foil was selected as an alternative to spot welding. Room temperature bending fatigue tests were conducted to determine the fatigue resistance of the electron beam welded foils. Equations were determined relating cycles to crack initiation and cycles to failure to nominal total strain range. A scaling procedure is presented for estimating the reduction in cyclic life when the foil is at its normal operating temperature of 260 C (500 F).

  16. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  17. Dynamic Stiffness and Damping Characteristics of a High-Temperature Air Foil Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Heshmat, Hooshang

    2001-01-01

    Using a high-temperature optically based displacement measurement system, a foil air bearing's stiffness and damping characteristics were experimentally determined. Results were obtained over a range of modified Sommerfeld Number from 1.5E6 to 1.5E7, and at temperatures from 25 to 538 C. An Experimental procedure was developed comparing the error in two curve fitting functions to reveal different modes of physical behavior throughout the operating domain. The maximum change in dimensionless stiffness was 3.0E-2 to 6.5E-2 over the Sommerfeld Number range tested. Stiffness decreased with temperature by as much as a factor of two from 25 to 538 C. Dimensionless damping was a stronger function of Sommerfeld Number ranging from 20 to 300. The temperature effect on damping being more qualitative, showed the damping mechanism shifted from viscous type damping to frictional type as temperature increased.

  18. Stability of rigid rotors supported by air foil bearings: Comparison of two fundamental approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jon S.; Santos, Ilmar F.; von Osmanski, Sebastian

    2016-10-01

    High speed direct drive motors enable the use of Air Foil Bearings (AFB) in a wide range of applications due to the elimination of gear forces. Unfortunately, AFB supported rotors are lightly damped, and an accurate prediction of their Onset Speed of Instability (OSI) is therefore important. This paper compares two fundamental methods for predicting the OSI. One is based on a nonlinear time domain simulation and another is based on a linearised frequency domain method and a perturbation of the Reynolds equation. Both methods are based on equivalent models and should predict similar results. Significant discrepancies are observed leading to the question, is the classical frequency domain method sufficiently accurate? The discrepancies and possible explanations are discussed in detail.

  19. Analysis of a two row hydrostatic journal bearing with variable properties, inertia effects and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Adams, M. L.; Mullen, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A computer algorithm for simulation of hydrostatic journal bearing pressure-flow behavior has been generated. The effects taken into account are inertia, cavitation, variable properties (isothermal bearing) and roughness. The program has been specifically tailored for simulation of the hybrid bearing of the cryogenic turbopumps of the main shuttle engine. Due to the high pressure (515 psia) of the supply line no cavitation has been found. The influence of the roughness effects have been found to become important only when the surface-roughness order of magnitude is comparable with that of the bearing clearance itself. Pocket edge inertia and variable properties have been found to have quite an important influence upon the pocket pressure, field pressure distribution and lubricant mass flow.

  20. Trends in Surface Temperature from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Aumann, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    To address possible causes of the current hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We find a monotonic positive trend for the land temperature but not for the ocean temperature. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The results are compared with the model studies. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. Effect of wear of bearing surfaces on elastohydrodynamic lubrication of metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Jin, Z M; Hirt, F; Rieker, C; Roberts, P; Grigoris, P

    2005-09-01

    The effect of geometry change of the bearing surfaces owing to wear on the elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) of metal-on-metal (MOM) hip bearings has been investigated theoretically in the present study. A particular MOM Metasul bearing (Zimmer GmbH) was considered, and was tested in a hip simulator using diluted bovine serum. The geometry of the worn bearing surface was measured using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and was modelled theoretically on the assumption of spherical geometries determined from the maximum linear wear depth and the angle of the worn region. Both the CMM measurement and the theoretical calculation were directly incorporated into the elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis. It was found that the geometry of the original machined bearing surfaces, particularly of the femoral head with its out-of-roundness, could lead to a large reduction in the predicted lubricant film thickness and an increase in pressure. However, these non-spherical deviations can be expected to be smoothed out quickly during the initial running-in period. For a given worn bearing surface, the predicted lubricant film thickness and pressure distribution, based on CMM measurement, were found to be in good overall agreement with those obtained with the theoretical model based on the maximum linear wear depth and the angle of the worn region. The gradual increase in linear wear during the running-in period resulted in an improvement in the conformity and consequently an increase in the predicted lubricant film thickness and a decrease in the pressure. For the Metasul bearing tested in an AMTI hip simulator, a maximum total linear wear depth of approximately 13 microm was measured after 1 million cycles and remained unchanged up to 5 million cycles. This resulted in a threefold increase in the predicted average lubricant film thickness. Consequently, it was possible for the Metasul bearing to achieve a fluid film lubrication regime during this period, and this was

  2. Surface Wave Driven Air-Water Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarova, Elena; Henriques, Julio; Ferreira, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The performance of a surface wave driven air-water plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure and 2.45 GHz has been analyzed. A 1D model has been developed in order to describe in detail the creation and loss processes of active species of interest and to provide a complete characterization of the axial structure of the source, including the discharge and the afterglow zones. The main electron creation channel was found to be the associative ionization process N +O -->NO+ + e. The NO(X) relative density in the afterglow plasma jet ranges from 1.2% to 1.6% depending on power and water percentage according to the model predictions and the measurements. Other types of species such as NO2 and nitrous acid HNO2 have also been detected by mass and FT-IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, high densities of O2(a1Δg) singlet delta oxygen molecules and OH radicals (1% and 5%, respectively) can be achieved in the discharge zone. In the late afterglow the O2(a1Δg) density is about 0.1% of the total density. The plasma source has a flexible operation and potential for channeling the energy in ways that maximize the density of active species of interest. This study was funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology, Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science, under the research contract PTDC/FIS/108411/2008.

  3. Surface characterization of carbon-bearing magnetite (CBM) and carbon-bearing Ni(II)-ferrite (CBNF)

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Akanuma, K.; Tsuji, M.; Tamaura, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Oxygen-deficient magnetite (ODM; Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4{minus}{delta}}, {delta} > 0) synthesized by reduction of magnetite with H{sub 2} at 300 C decomposed CO{sub 2} to carbon with an efficiency of nearly 100% at 300 C. In this reaction, two oxygen ions of the CO{sub 2} were incorporated into the spinel structure of ODM and carbon was deposited on the surface of ODM with zero valence to form visible particles. The particles of carbon separated from ODM were studied by Raman, energy-dispersive X-ray and wave-dispersive X-ray spectroscopies. The carbon which had been deposited on the ODM was found to be a mixture of graphite and amorphous carbon in at least two levels of crystallization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction patterns of the carbon-bearing magnetite (CBM) showed no indication of carbide (Fe{sub 3}C) or metallic iron ({alpha}-Fe) phase formation. In the C 1s XPS spectra of the CBM, no peaks were observed which could be assigned to CO{sub 2} or CO. X-ray diffractometry, chemical analysis and TG-MS measurement showed that the carbon-bearing Ni(II)-ferrite (CBNF) (Ni(II)/Fe{sub total} = 0.15) synthesized by the carbon deposition reaction from CO{sub 2} with the H{sub 2}-reduced Ni(II)-ferrite was represented by (Ni{sub 0.28}Fe{sub 2.72}O{sub 4.00}){sub 1{minus}{delta}} (Ni{sub 0.69}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 2.31}{sup 2+}O{sub 3.00}){sub {delta}}C{sub {tau}} ({delta} = 0.27, {tau} = 0.17). The carbon of the CBNF gave the CIOlayer-like oxide containing some Ni{sup 2+} ions.

  4. Inadequate thickness of the weight-bearing surface of claws in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, A S

    2009-12-01

    The term 'thin soles' refers to the suboptimal thickness of the weight-bearing surface of claws in ruminants. These palmar/plantar surfaces of the claws support the weight of the animal and consist of the distal wall horn, the sole proper, the heel and the minute white line area. The sole should normally only bear weight on uneven or undulating surfaces. A decrease in the thickness of the weight-bearing claw surface will decrease the protective function of this structure and may alter the proportion of weight-bearing by each section with possible detrimental effects on hoof function. Horn tissue readily absorbs water and becomes softer which can lead to increased wear rates. Growth rates normally match wear rates but, unlike the latter, time is needed for the growth rate response to adapt to changes in wear rate. Concrete surfaces can be abrasive and dairy cows that spend their lactation cycle on these floors should be let out to pasture in the dry period so that their claws can recoup lost horn. Frictional coefficient is a measure of the'slipperiness' of hooves on various surfaces. Newly laid or fresh concrete is not only abrasive but the thin surface suspension of calcium hydroxide that forms has a very alkaline pH which causes keratin degradation and is mostly responsible for the excessive claw wear that occurs. Four case studies are used to illustrate the importance of the distal wall horn, the dangers of over-trimming and the effects of disease and concrete on horn growth and wear rates.

  5. Journal bearing

    DOEpatents

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  6. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Operations Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  11. On the nonlinear steady-state response of rigid rotors supported by air foil bearings-Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jon S.; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2015-06-01

    The demand for oil-free turbo compressors is increasing. Current trends are divided between active magnetic bearings and air foil bearings (AFB), the latter being important due to mechanical simplicity. AFB supported rotors are sensitive to unbalance due to low damping and nonlinear characteristics, hence accurate prediction of their response is important. This paper gives theoretical and experimental contributions by implementing and validating a new method to simulate the nonlinear steady-state response of a rotor supported by three pads segmented AFBs. The fluid film pressures, foil deflections and rotor movements are simultaneously solved, considering foil stiffness and damping coefficients estimated using a structural model, previously described and validated against experiments.

  12. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  13. Group reorientation and migration of amphiphilic polymer bearing phosphorylcholine functionalities on surface of cellular membrane mimicking coating.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan; Zhang, Shi-Ping; Winnik, Françoise M; Mwale, Fackson; Gong, Yong-Kuan

    2008-03-01

    Amphiphilic polymers bearing phosphorylcholine (PC) groups can form films of interfacial structure similar to that of the outer membrane of living cells. The films, as prepared, present PC groups to the external aqueous environment and exhibit good biocompatibility. However, under certain conditions, the surface structure can change irreversibly due to the reorientation and deep migration of the surface groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic contact angle measurements, and cell culture experiments were used to investigate the reorientation and migration of the surface groups of an amphiphilic PC-polymer coating. When the polymer surface is immersed into or drawn out of water, significant reorientation and group migration occurs, as suggested by the large difference between the advancing and receding contact angles. Angle-resolved XPS measurements indicate that the hydrophobic groups move to the air/film interface while the hydrophilic groups migrate towards the bulk of the polymer coating. Long periods of aging may result in irreversible changes of the surface structure and decrease the biocompatibility of the materials.

  14. Prediction of lubrication regimes in wrist implants with spherical bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pylios, T; Shepherd, D E T

    2004-03-01

    The wrist joint is frequently affected by rheumatoid arthritis, resulting in wrist pain, deformity and ultimately loss of function. Artificial wrist implants have been introduced to treat the rheumatoid wrist, to attempt to alleviate pain and restore some function to the joint. The aim of this study was to predict the likely lubrication regimes that occur in wrist implants with spherical bearing surfaces. The implant was modelled as an equivalent ball-on-plane. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to determine the minimum film thickness for the implant under different load, entraining velocity, lubricant viscosity, size of implant and material combinations. The results show that the highest film thickness is found in large implants, with high viscosity, high entraining velocity and low load. Hard-on-soft material combinations will operate with a boundary lubrication regime. Material combinations involving ceramic bearing surfaces have the potential to operate with a mixed lubrication regime.

  15. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature from MODIS 1km Resolution Land Surface Temperature Over Northern China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Surface air temperature is a critical variable to describe the energy and water cycle of the Earth-atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. It is a very important variable in agricultural applications and climate change studies. This is a preliminary study to examine statistical relationships between ground meteorological station measured surface daily maximum/minimum air temperature and satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature from MODIS over the dry and semiarid regions of northern China. Studies were conducted for both MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua by using year 2009 data. Results indicate that the relationships between surface air temperature and remotely sensed land surface temperature are statistically significant. The relationships between the maximum air temperature and daytime land surface temperature depends significantly on land surface types and vegetation index, but the minimum air temperature and nighttime land surface temperature has little dependence on the surface conditions. Based on linear regression relationship between surface air temperature and MODIS land surface temperature, surface maximum and minimum air temperatures are estimated from 1km MODIS land surface temperature under clear sky conditions. The statistical errors (sigma) of the estimated daily maximum (minimum) air temperature is about 3.8 C(3.7 C).

  16. Groundwater and surface-water interactions near White Bear Lake, Minnesota, through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Perry M.; Trost, Jared J.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Jackson, P. Ryan; Bode, Jenifer A.; O'Grady, Ryan M.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the White Bear Lake Conservation District, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and other State, county, municipal, and regional planning agencies, watershed organizations, and private organizations, conducted a study to characterize groundwater and surface-water interactions near White Bear Lake through 2011. During 2010 and 2011, White Bear Lake and other lakes in the northeastern part of the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area were at historically low levels. Previous periods of lower water levels in White Bear Lake correlate with periods of lower precipitation; however, recent urban expansion and increased pumping from the Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer have raised the question of whether a decline in precipitation is the primary cause for the recent water-level decline in White Bear Lake. Understanding and quantifying the amount of groundwater inflow to a lake and water discharge from a lake to aquifers is commonly difficult but is important in the management of lake levels. Three methods were used in the study to assess groundwater and surface-water interactions on White Bear Lake: (1) a historical assessment (1978-2011) of levels in White Bear Lake, local groundwater levels, and their relation to historical precipitation and groundwater withdrawals in the White Bear Lake area; (2) recent (2010-11) hydrologic and water-quality data collected from White Bear Lake, other lakes, and wells; and (3) water-balance assessments for White Bear Lake in March and August 2011. An analysis of covariance between average annual lake-level change and annual precipitation indicated the relation between the two variables was significantly different from 2003 through 2011 compared with 1978 through 2002, requiring an average of 4 more inches of precipitation per year to maintain the lake level. This shift in the linear relation between annual lake-level change and annual precipitation

  17. Interaction between Air Bubbles and Superhydrophobic Surfaces in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Zhang, Xurui; Tchoukov, Plamen; Liu, Qingxia; Encinas, Noemi; Paven, Maxime; Geyer, Florian; Vollmer, Doris; Xu, Zhenghe; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-07-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are usually characterized by a high apparent contact angle of water drops in air. Here we analyze the inverse situation: Rather than focusing on water repellency in air, we measure the attractive interaction of air bubbles and superhydrophobic surfaces in water. Forces were measured between microbubbles with radii R of 40-90 μm attached to an atomic force microscope cantilever and submerged superhydrophobic surfaces. In addition, forces between macroscopic bubbles (R = 1.2 mm) at the end of capillaries and superhydrophobic surfaces were measured. As superhydrophobic surfaces we applied soot-templated surfaces, nanofilament surfaces, micropillar arrays with flat top faces, and decorated micropillars. Depending on the specific structure of the superhydrophobic surfaces and the presence and amount of entrapped air, different interactions were observed. Soot-templated surfaces in the Cassie state showed superaerophilic behavior: Once the electrostatic double-layer force and a hydrodynamic repulsion were overcome, bubbles jumped onto the surface and fully merged with the entrapped air. On nanofilaments and micropillar arrays we observed in addition the formation of sessile bubbles with finite contact angles below 90° or the attachment of bubbles, which retained their spherical shape.

  18. The Role of Iron-Bearing Minerals in NO2 to HONO Conversion on Soil Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Mulu A; Bish, David L; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Engelhard, Mark H; Raff, Jonathan D

    2016-08-16

    Nitrous acid (HONO) accumulates in the nocturnal boundary layer where it is an important source of daytime hydroxyl radicals. Although there is clear evidence for the involvement of heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on surfaces as a source of HONO, mechanisms remain poorly understood. We used coated-wall flow tube measurements of NO2 reactivity on environmentally relevant surfaces (Fe (hydr)oxides, clay minerals, and soil from Arizona and the Saharan Desert) and detailed mineralogical characterization of substrates to show that reduction of NO2 by Fe-bearing minerals in soil can be a more important source of HONO than the putative NO2 hydrolysis mechanism. The magnitude of NO2-to-HONO conversion depends on the amount of Fe(2+) present in substrates and soil surface acidity. Studies examining the dependence of HONO flux on substrate pH revealed that HONO is formed at soil pH < 5 from the reaction between NO2 and Fe(2+)(aq) present in thin films of water coating the surface, whereas in the range of pH 5-8 HONO stems from reaction of NO2 with structural iron or surface complexed Fe(2+) followed by protonation of nitrite via surface Fe-OH2(+) groups. Reduction of NO2 on ubiquitous Fe-bearing minerals in soil may explain HONO accumulation in the nocturnal boundary layer and the enhanced [HONO]/[NO2] ratios observed during dust storms in urban areas. PMID:27409359

  19. Development of magnetically preloaded air bearings for a linear slide: active compensation of three degrees of freedom motion errors.

    PubMed

    Ro, Seung-Kook; Kim, Soohyun; Kwak, Yoonkeun; Park, Chun-Hong

    2008-03-01

    This article describes a linear air-bearing stage that uses active control to compensate for its motion errors. The active control is based on preloads generated by magnetic actuators, which were designed to generate nominal preloads for the air bearings using permanent magnets to maintain the desired stiffness while changing the air-bearing clearance by varying the magnetic flux generated by the current in electromagnetic coils. A single-axis linear stage with a linear motor and 240 mm of travel range was built to verify this design concept and used to test its performance. The motion of the table in three directions was controlled with four magnetic actuators driven by current amplifiers and a DSP (Digital Signal Processor)-based digital controller. The motion errors were measured using a laser interferometer combined with a two-probe method, and had 0.085 microm of repeatability for the straightness error. As a result of feed-forward active compensation, the errors were reduced from 1.09 to 0.11 microm for the vertical motion, from 9.42 to 0.18 arcsec for the pitch motion, and from 2.42 to 0.18 arcsec for the roll motion. PMID:18377049

  20. Droplet detachment by air flow for microstructured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hao, Pengfei; Lv, Cunjing; Yao, Zhaohui

    2013-04-30

    Quantitative correlation between critical air velocity and roughness of microstructured surface has still not been established systematically until the present; the dynamics of water droplet detachment by air flow from micropillar-like superhydrophobic surfaces is investigated by combining experiments and simulation comparisons. Experimental evidence demonstrates that the onset of water droplet detachment from horizontal micropillar-like superhydrophobic surfaces under air flow always starts with detachment of the rear contact lines of the droplets from the pillar tops, which exhibits a similar dynamic mechanism for water droplet motion under a gravity field. On the basis of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, an explicit analytical model is proposed for investigating the detaching mechanism, in which the critical air velocity can be fully determined by several intrinsic parameters: water-solid interface area fraction, droplet volume, and Young's contact angle. This model gives predictions of the critical detachment velocity of air flow that agree well with the experimental measurements.

  1. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  2. Lessons Learned from AIRS: Improved Determination of Surface and Atmospheric Temperatures Using Only Shortwave AIRS Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of shortwave channels available to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) to improve the determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures. The AIRS instrument is compared with the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on-board the MetOp-A satellite. The objectives of the AIRS/AMSU were to (1) provide real time observations to improve numerical weather prediction via data assimilation, (2) Provide observations to measure and explain interannual variability and trends and (3) Use of AIRS product error estimates allows for QC optimized for each application. Successive versions in the AIRS retrieval methodology have shown significant improvement.

  3. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Surface Air Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing (Inventor); Hu, Yongxiang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for remotely measuring surface air pressure. In one embodiment, the method of the present invention utilizes the steps of transmitting a signal having multiple frequencies into the atmosphere, measuring the transmitted/reflected signal to determine the relative received power level of each frequency and then determining the surface air pressure based upon the attenuation of the transmitted frequencies.

  4. Contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication in a novel metal-on-metal hip implant with an aspherical bearing surface.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingen; Gao, Leiming; Liu, Feng; Yang, Peiran; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-22

    Diameter and diametral clearance of the bearing surfaces of metal-on-metal hip implants and structural supports have been recognised as key factors to reduce the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures and improve lubrication performance. On the other hand, application of aspherical bearing surfaces can also significantly affect the contact mechanics and lubrication performance by changing the radius of the curvature of a bearing surface and consequently improving the conformity between the head and the cup. In this study, a novel metal-on-metal hip implant employing a specific aspherical bearing surface, Alpharabola, as the acetabular surface was investigated for both contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication under steady-state conditions. When compared with conventional spherical bearing surfaces, a more uniform pressure distribution and a thicker lubricant film thickness within the loaded conjunction were predicted for this novel Alpharabola hip implant. The effects of the geometric parameters of this novel acetabular surface on the pressure distribution and lubricant thickness were investigated. A significant increase in the predicted lubricant film thickness and a significant decrease in the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures were found with appropriate combinations of these geometric parameters, compared with the spherical bearing surface.

  5. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  6. Associations between PBDEs in office air, dust, and surface wipes.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Deborah J; McClean, Michael D; Fraser, Alicia J; Weinberg, Janice; Stapleton, Heather M; Webster, Thomas F

    2013-09-01

    Increased use of flame-retardants in office furniture may increase exposure to PBDEs in the office environment. However, partitioning of PBDEs within the office environment is not well understood. Our objectives were to examine relationships between concurrent measures of PBDEs in office air, floor dust, and surface wipes. We collected air, dust, and surface wipe samples from 31 offices in Boston, MA. Correlation and linear regression were used to evaluate associations between variables. Geometric mean (GM) concentrations of individual BDE congeners in air and congener specific octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) were used to predict GM concentrations in dust and surface wipes and compared to the measured concentrations. GM concentrations of PentaBDEs in office air, dust, and surface wipes were 472pg/m(3), 2411ng/g, and 77pg/cm(2), respectively. BDE209 was detected in 100% of dust samples (GM=4202ng/g), 93% of surface wipes (GM=125pg/cm(2)), and 39% of air samples. PentaBDEs in dust and air were moderately correlated with each other (r=0.60, p=0.0003), as well as with PentaBDEs in surface wipes (r=0.51, p=0.003 for both dust and air). BDE209 in dust was correlated with BDE209 in surface wipes (r=0.69, p=0.007). Building (three categories) and PentaBDEs in dust were independent predictors of PentaBDEs in both air and surface wipes, together explaining 50% (p=0.0009) and 48% (p=0.001) of the variation respectively. Predicted and measured concentrations of individual BDE congeners were highly correlated in dust (r=0.98, p<0.0001) and surface wipes (r=0.94, p=002). BDE209 provided an interesting test of this equilibrium partitioning model as it is a low volatility compound. Associations between PentaBDEs in multiple sampling media suggest that collecting dust or surface wipes may be a convenient method of characterizing exposure in the indoor environment. The volatility of individual congeners, as well as physical characteristics of the indoor environment

  7. Associations between PBDEs in Office Air, Dust, and Surface Wipes

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Deborah J.; McClean, Michael D.; Fraser, Alicia J.; Weinberg, Janice; Stapleton, Heather M.; Webster, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Increased use of flame-retardants in office furniture may increase exposure to PBDEs in the office environment. However, partitioning of PBDEs within the office environment is not well understood. Our objectives were to examine relationships between concurrent measures of PBDEs in office air, floor dust, and surface wipes. We collected air, dust, and surface wipe samples from 31 offices in Boston, MA. Correlation and linear regression were used to evaluate associations between variables. Geometric mean (GM) concentrations of individual BDE congeners in air and congener specific octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) were used to predict GM concentrations in dust and surface wipes and compared to the measured concentrations. GM concentrations of PentaBDEs in office air, dust, and surface wipes were 472 pg/m3, 2411 ng/g, and 77 pg/cm2, respectively. BDE209 was detected in 100% of dust samples (GM=4202 ng/g), 93% of surface wipes (GM=125 pg/cm2), and 39% of air samples. PentaBDEs in dust and air were moderately correlated with each other (r=0.60, p=0.0003), as well as with PentaBDEs in surface wipes (r=0.51, p=0.003 for both dust and air). BDE209 in dust was correlated with BDE209 in surface wipes (r=0.69, p=0.007). Building (three categories) and PentaBDEs in dust were independent predictors of PentaBDEs in both air and surface wipes, together explaining 50% (p=0.0009) and 48% (p=0.001) of the variation respectively. Predicted and measured concentrations of individual BDE congeners were highly correlated in dust (r=0.98, p<0.0001) and surface wipes (r=0.94, p=002). BDE209 provided an interesting test of this equilibrium partitioning model as it is a low volatility compound. Associations between PentaBDEs in multiple sampling media suggest that collecting dust or surface wipes may be a convenient method of characterizing exposure in the indoor environment. The volatility of individual congeners, as well as physical characteristics of the indoor environment

  8. Associations between PBDEs in office air, dust, and surface wipes.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Deborah J; McClean, Michael D; Fraser, Alicia J; Weinberg, Janice; Stapleton, Heather M; Webster, Thomas F

    2013-09-01

    Increased use of flame-retardants in office furniture may increase exposure to PBDEs in the office environment. However, partitioning of PBDEs within the office environment is not well understood. Our objectives were to examine relationships between concurrent measures of PBDEs in office air, floor dust, and surface wipes. We collected air, dust, and surface wipe samples from 31 offices in Boston, MA. Correlation and linear regression were used to evaluate associations between variables. Geometric mean (GM) concentrations of individual BDE congeners in air and congener specific octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) were used to predict GM concentrations in dust and surface wipes and compared to the measured concentrations. GM concentrations of PentaBDEs in office air, dust, and surface wipes were 472pg/m(3), 2411ng/g, and 77pg/cm(2), respectively. BDE209 was detected in 100% of dust samples (GM=4202ng/g), 93% of surface wipes (GM=125pg/cm(2)), and 39% of air samples. PentaBDEs in dust and air were moderately correlated with each other (r=0.60, p=0.0003), as well as with PentaBDEs in surface wipes (r=0.51, p=0.003 for both dust and air). BDE209 in dust was correlated with BDE209 in surface wipes (r=0.69, p=0.007). Building (three categories) and PentaBDEs in dust were independent predictors of PentaBDEs in both air and surface wipes, together explaining 50% (p=0.0009) and 48% (p=0.001) of the variation respectively. Predicted and measured concentrations of individual BDE congeners were highly correlated in dust (r=0.98, p<0.0001) and surface wipes (r=0.94, p=002). BDE209 provided an interesting test of this equilibrium partitioning model as it is a low volatility compound. Associations between PentaBDEs in multiple sampling media suggest that collecting dust or surface wipes may be a convenient method of characterizing exposure in the indoor environment. The volatility of individual congeners, as well as physical characteristics of the indoor environment

  9. AIRS Sea Surface Temperature and Pacific Decadal Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. L.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been providing necessary measurements for long term atmospheric and surface processes aboard NASA' s Aqua polar orbiter since May 2002. Here, we use time series of AIRS sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies to show the time evolution of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) in the Gulf of Alaska (lon:-144.5, lat:54.5) from 2003 to 2014. PDO is connected to the first mode of North Pacific SST variability and is tele-connected to ENSO in the tropics. Further analysis of AIRS data can provide clarification of Pacific climate variability.

  10. Role of surface characteristics in urban meteorology and air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, D.J.

    1993-08-01

    Urbanization results in a landscape with significantly modified surface characteristics. The lower values of reflectivity to solar radiation, surface moisture availability, and vegetative cover, along with the higher values of anthropogenic heat release and surface roughness combine to result higher air temperatures in urban areas relative to their rural counterparts. Through their role in the surface energy balance and surface exchange processes, these surface characteristics are capable of modifying the local meteorology. The impacts on wind speeds, air temperatures, and mixing heights are of particular importance, as they have significant implications in terms of urban energy use and air quality. This research presents several major improvements to the meteorological modeling methodology for highly heterogeneous terrain. A land-use data-base is implemented to provide accurate specification of surface characteristic variability in simulations of the Los Angeles Basin. Several vegetation parameterizations are developed and implemented, and a method for including anthropogenic heat release into the model physics is presented. These modeling advancements are then used in a series of three-dimensional simulations which were developed to investigate the potential meteorological impact of several mitigation strategies. Results indicate that application of moderate tree-planting and urban-lightening programs in Los Angeles may produce summertime air temperature reductions on the order of 4{degree}C with a concomitant reduction in air pollution. The analysis also reveals several mechanisms whereby the application of these mitigation strategies may potentially increase pollutant concentrations. The pollution and energy use consequences are discussed in detail.

  11. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic c...

  12. Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

  13. Ocular surface adverse effects of ambient levels of air pollution.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, André Augusto Miranda; Novaes, Priscila; Matsuda, Monique; Alves, Milton Ruiz; Monteiro, Mário Luiz Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    It is widely recognized today that outdoor air pollution can affect human health. Various chemical components that are present in ambient pollution may have an irritant effect on the mucous membranes of the body, particularly those of the respiratory tract. Much less attention has been focused on the adverse effect on the ocular surface, despite the fact that this structure is even more exposed to air pollution than the respiratory mucosa since only a very thin tear film separates the corneal and conjunctival epithelia from the air pollutants. So far, clinical data are the more widespread tools used by ophthalmologists for assessing possible aggression to the ocular surface; however, clinical findings alone appears not to correlate properly with the complaints presented by the patients pointing out the need for further clinical and laboratory studies on the subject. The purpose of this study is to review signs and symptoms associated with chronic long-term exposure to environmental air pollutants on the ocular structures currently defined as the ocular surface and to review clinical and laboratory tests used to investigate the adverse effects of air pollutants on such structures. We also review previous studies that investigated the adverse effects of air pollution on the ocular surface and discuss the need for further investigation on the subject.

  14. Turbulent drag reduction over air- and liquid- impregnated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Brian J.; Van Buren, Tyler; Fu, Matthew K.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    Results on turbulent skin friction reduction over air- and liquid-impregnated surfaces are presented for aqueous Taylor-Couette flow. The surfaces are fabricated by mechanically texturing the inner cylinder and chemically modifying the features to make them either non-wetting with respect to water (air-infused, or superhydrophobic case), or wetting with respect to an oil that is immiscible with water (liquid-infused case). The drag reduction, which remains fairly constant over the Reynolds number range tested (100 ≤ Reτ ≤ 140), is approximately 10% for the superhydrophobic surface and 14% for the best liquid-infused surface. Our results suggest that liquid-infused surfaces may enable robust drag reduction in high Reynolds number turbulent flows without the shortcomings associated with conventional superhydrophobic surfaces, namely, failure under conditions of high hydrodynamic pressure and turbulent flow fluctuations.

  15. Eddy-Current Inspection of Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankston, B.

    1985-01-01

    Custom eddy-current probe locates surface anomalies. Low friction air cushion within cone allows ball to roll easily. Eddy current probe reliably detects surface and near-surface cracks, voids, and material anomalies in bearing balls or other spherical objects. Defects in ball surface detected by probe displayed on CRT and recorded on strip-chart recorder.

  16. Preliminary Investigation of Molybdenum Disulfide-air-mist Lubrication for Roller Bearings Operating to DN Values of 1 x 10(exp 6) and Ball Bearings Operating to Temperatures of 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macks, E F; Nemeth, Z N; Anderson, W J

    1951-01-01

    The effectiveness of molybdenum disulfide MoS2 as a bearing lubricant was determined at high temperature and at high speeds. A 1-inch-bore ball bearing operated at temperatures to 1000 F, a speed of 1725 rpm, and a thrust load of 20 pounds when lubricated only with MoS2-air mist. A 75-millimeter-bore cageless roller bearing, provided with a MoS2-syrup coating before operation, operated at DN values to 1 x 10(exp 6) with a load of 368 pounds.

  17. Evaluation of chromium oxide and molybdenum disulfide coatings in self-acting stops of an air-lubricated Rayleigh step thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1974-01-01

    Two coatings for a Rayleigh step thrust bearing were tested when coasting down and stopping under self-acting operation in air. The thrust bearing had an outside diameter of 8.9 cm (3.5 in.), an inside diameter of 5.4 cm (2.1 in.), and nine sectors. The load was 73 N (16.4 lbf). The load pressure was 19.1 kN/per square meter (2.77 lbf/per square inch) on the total thrust bearing area. The chromium oxide coating was good to 150 stops without bearing deterioration, and the molybdenum disulfide coating was good for only four stops before bearing deterioration. The molybdenum disulfide coated bearing failed after nine stops.

  18. Dropwise Condensation Experiments with Humid Air at a Polymer Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götze, P.; Philipp, Ch; Gross, U.

    2012-11-01

    A new test facility has been developed to investigate dropwise condensation heat transfer in a humid air environment. It is designed as a closed loop system in which air is circulated by a fan, enabling investigations in the following parameter ranges: velocity up to 20 m/s; Reynolds number up to 20,000; temperature 20 to 100 °C relative humidity up to 100 %. Heat transfer measurements are done with a specifically designed micro sensor which is flush mounted at one of the vertical surfaces of a horizontal flow channel 12 mm × 32 mm (inner width and height, respectively) and covered at its air-side surface by a newly developed polymer layer containing 20 % of carbon nanotubes for improvement of the thermal conductivity. A total of 8 thermocouples is embedded inside the sensor. Their readings serve as input data to a numerical model which enables consideration of heat losses and evaluation of surface temperature and heat flux. The measuring system allows to analyse the effects of heat flux, air-to-wall temperature difference, absolute and relative humidity, and Reynolds number on the heat transfer coefficient. Single phase heat transfer results show excellent agreement with well established correlations for turbulent air flow. The onset of dropwise condensation was detected with very good repeatability. This paper covers details of the experimental device, measuring system and data evaluation including accuracy considerations. Single phase and preliminary dropwise condensation results with humid air are reported.

  19. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1990--1993 data

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.; Kada, J.

    1995-11-01

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1990--1993, with the exception of April 1993, indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the sampling and analytical techniques that were used to collect and measure them. The occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. Following the April 6, 1993 accident and release of radionuclides into the atmosphere at a reprocessing plant in the Tomsk-7 military nuclear complex located 16 km north of the Siberian city of Tomsk, Russia, weekly air filter samples from Barrow, Alaska; Thule, Greenland and Moosonee, Canada were selected for special analyses. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that the authors measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. Variations in the annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites appear to result primarily from changes in the atmospheric production rate of this cosmogenic radionuclide. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. The monthly gross gamma-ray activity and the monthly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb measured at sampling sites in SASP during 1990--1993 are presented. The weekly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb for samples collected during 1990--1993 are given for 17 sites.

  20. The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and northern high latitude wintertime surface air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Bond, Nicholas A.

    2004-02-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the primary mode of large-scale intraseasonal variability in the tropics. Recent work has connected the MJO to atmospheric variability in mid-latitudes. We focus on relationships between the MJO and wintertime surface air temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes. The MJO is diagnosed using principal EOF of 850 hPa zonal winds from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis for 1979-2002. Station data are used for surface air temperature in Alaska, Canada, the former U.S.S.R., Greenland, and Iceland. The phase of the MJO has a substantial systematic and spatially coherent effect on intraseasonal variability in wintertime surface air temperature through the global Arctic. Composites of geopotential height and specific humidity suggest that radiative and advective effects are important in the observed connections. These statistical connections may be useful for wintertime temperature forecasts. The mechanisms connecting intraseasonal tropical variability with polar and sub-polar variability bear examination.

  1. Laser surface pretreatment of 100Cr6 bearing steel - Hardening effects and white etching zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buling, Anna; Sändker, Hendrik; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Krupp, Ulrich; Hamann-Steinmeier, Angela

    2016-08-01

    In order to achieve a surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 (1-1.5 wt.% Cr) a laser-based process was used. The obtained modification may result in an optimization of the adhesive properties of the surface with respect to an anticorrosion polymer coating on the basis of PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone), which is applied on the steel surface by a laser melting technique. This work deals with the influence of the laser-based pretreatment regarding the surface microstructure and the micro-hardness of the steel, which has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and automated micro-hardness testing. The most suitable parameter set for the laser-based pretreatment leads to the formation of very hard white etching zones (WEZ) with a thickness of 23 μm, whereas this pretreatment also induces topographical changes. The occurrence of the white etching zones is attributed to near-surface re-austenitization and rapid quenching. Moreover, dark etching zones (DEZ) with a thickness of 32 μm are found at the laser path edges as well as underneath the white etching zones (WEZ). In these areas, the hardness is decreased due to the formation of oxides as a consequence of re-tempering.

  2. The nature of the air-cleaved mica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Hugo K.; Thomson, Neil H.

    2016-06-01

    The accepted image of muscovite mica is that of an inert and atomically smooth surface, easily prepared by cleavage in an ambient atmosphere. Consequently, mica is extensively used a model substrate in many fundamental studies of surface phenomena and as a substrate for AFM imaging of biomolecules. In this review we present evidence from the literature that the above picture is not quite correct. The mica used in experimental work is almost invariably cleaved in laboratory air, where a reaction between the mica surface, atmospheric CO2 and water occurs immediately after cleavage. The evidence suggests very strongly that as a result the mica surface becomes covered by up to one formula unit of K2CO3 per nm2, which is mobile under humid conditions, and crystallises under drier conditions. The properties of mica in air or water vapour cannot be fully understood without reference to the surface K2CO3, and many studies of the structure of adsorbed water on mica surfaces may need to be revisited. With this new insight, however, the air-cleaved mica should provide exciting opportunities to study phenomena such as two-dimensional ion diffusion, electrolyte effects on surface conductivity, and two-dimensional crystal nucleation.

  3. Problems in determining air-surface fluxes for climate studies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.A.

    1994-12-31

    The modelling of global air-surface fluxes for climate studies has many problems. Data are sparse. Classical parameterization formulas have received limited verification over the ocean, the pack ice and in many remote regions with various surface characteristics. Nevertheless, surface layer models and bulk parameterization schemes often are adequate for flux calculations based on mean flow parameters. The real problems then lie in the quality of input data for the flux calculations. In general circulation models (GCMs), the surface winds and temperatures may have large errors. These have been shown to be significant to long-term fluxes.

  4. White Light Used to Enable Enhanced Surface Topography, Geometry, and Wear Characterization of Oil-Free Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucero, John M.

    2003-01-01

    A new optically based measuring capability that characterizes surface topography, geometry, and wear has been employed by NASA Glenn Research Center s Tribology and Surface Science Branch. To characterize complex parts in more detail, we are using a three-dimensional, surface structure analyzer-the NewView5000 manufactured by Zygo Corporation (Middlefield, CT). This system provides graphical images and high-resolution numerical analyses to accurately characterize surfaces. Because of the inherent complexity of the various analyzed assemblies, the machine has been pushed to its limits. For example, special hardware fixtures and measuring techniques were developed to characterize Oil- Free thrust bearings specifically. We performed a more detailed wear analysis using scanning white light interferometry to image and measure the bearing structure and topography, enabling a further understanding of bearing failure causes.

  5. Design for H type co-planar precision stage based on closed air bearing guideway with vacuum attraction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Shi, Zhaoyao; Lin, Jiachun; Zhang, Hua

    2011-12-01

    The accuracy of traditional two-dimensional precision stage is limited not only by the accuracy of each guideway but also by the configuration of the stage. It is not easy to calculate and compensate the total accuracy of the stage due to the complicated influence caused by the different position of the slides. An air bearing guideways with vacuum attraction forces has been designed with closed slide structure to enhance the stiffness and avoid the deformation caused by the weight of slide and workpieces. An H style two-dimension ultra-precision stage with co-planar structure has been developed based on the air bearing guideways to avoid the multi-influence by the axes. Driven by linear motors, the position of the workpiece is encoded by length scales with resolution of 50nm and thermal expansion of 0.6 μm/m/°C (0 °C to 30 °C). The travel span of the stage is 320x320mm, during which each axis has a positioning accuracy of +/-1μm, a repeatability of +/-0.3μm and a straightness of +/-0.5μm. The stage can be applied in precision manufacturing and measurement.

  6. Surface materials map of Afghanistan: iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Dudek, Kathleen B.; Livo, Keith E.

    2012-01-01

    This map shows the distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of HyMap imaging spectrometer data of Afghanistan. Using a NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) WB-57 aircraft flown at an altitude of ~15,240 meters or ~50,000 feet, 218 flight lines of data were collected over Afghanistan between August 22 and October 2, 2007. The HyMap data were converted to apparent surface reflectance, then further empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap data was compared to the spectral features of reference entries in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, ice, and snow. This map shows the spatial distribution of iron-bearing minerals and other materials having diagnostic absorptions at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. These absorptions result from electronic processes in the minerals. Several criteria, including (1) the reliability of detection and discrimination of minerals using the HyMap spectrometer data, (2) the relative abundance of minerals, and (3) the importance of particular minerals to studies of Afghanistan's natural resources, guided the selection of entries in the reference spectral library and, therefore, guided the selection of mineral classes shown on this map. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated. Minerals having similar spectral features were less easily discriminated, especially where the minerals were not particularly abundant and (or) where vegetation cover reduced the absorption strength of mineral features. Complications in reflectance calibration also affected the detection and identification of minerals.

  7. Emperor penguin body surfaces cool below air temperature.

    PubMed

    McCafferty, D J; Gilbert, C; Thierry, A-M; Currie, J; Le Maho, Y; Ancel, A

    2013-06-23

    Emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri are able to survive the harsh Antarctic climate because of specialized anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations for minimizing heat loss. Heat transfer theory predicts that metabolic heat loss in this species will mostly depend on radiative and convective cooling. To examine this, thermal imaging of emperor penguins was undertaken at the breeding colony of Pointe Géologie in Terre Adélie (66°40' S 140° 01' E), Antarctica in June 2008. During clear sky conditions, most outer surfaces of the body were colder than surrounding sub-zero air owing to radiative cooling. In these conditions, the feather surface will paradoxically gain heat by convection from surrounding air. However, owing to the low thermal conductivity of plumage any heat transfer to the skin surface will be negligible. Future thermal imaging studies are likely to yield further insights into the adaptations of this species to the Antarctic climate.

  8. Emperor penguin body surfaces cool below air temperature

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, D. J.; Gilbert, C.; Thierry, A.-M.; Currie, J.; Le Maho, Y.; Ancel, A.

    2013-01-01

    Emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri are able to survive the harsh Antarctic climate because of specialized anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations for minimizing heat loss. Heat transfer theory predicts that metabolic heat loss in this species will mostly depend on radiative and convective cooling. To examine this, thermal imaging of emperor penguins was undertaken at the breeding colony of Pointe Géologie in Terre Adélie (66°40′ S 140° 01′ E), Antarctica in June 2008. During clear sky conditions, most outer surfaces of the body were colder than surrounding sub-zero air owing to radiative cooling. In these conditions, the feather surface will paradoxically gain heat by convection from surrounding air. However, owing to the low thermal conductivity of plumage any heat transfer to the skin surface will be negligible. Future thermal imaging studies are likely to yield further insights into the adaptations of this species to the Antarctic climate. PMID:23466479

  9. Quantification of air plasma chemistry for surface disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew J.; Clark, Douglas S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air plasmas, created by a variety of discharges, are promising sources of reactive species for the emerging field of plasma biotechnology because of their convenience and ability to operate at ambient conditions. One biological application of ambient-air plasma is microbial disinfection, and the ability of air plasmas to decontaminate both solid surfaces and liquid volumes has been thoroughly established in the literature. However, the mechanism of disinfection and which reactive species most strongly correlate with antimicrobial effects are still not well understood. We describe quantitative gas-phase measurements of plasma chemistry via infrared spectroscopy in confined volumes, focusing on air plasma generated via surface micro-discharge (SMD). Previously, it has been shown that gaseous chemistry is highly sensitive to operating conditions, and the measurements we describe here extend those findings. We quantify the gaseous concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) throughout the established ‘regimes’ for SMD air plasma chemistry: the low-power, ozone-dominated mode; the high-power, nitrogen oxides-dominated mode; and the intermediate, unstable transition region. The results presented here are in good agreement with previously published experimental studies of aqueous chemistry and parameterized models of gaseous chemistry. The principal finding of the present study is the correlation of bacterial inactivation on dry surfaces with gaseous chemistry across these time and power regimes. Bacterial decontamination is most effective in ‘NOx mode’ and less effective in ‘ozone mode’, with the weakest antibacterial effects in the transition region. Our results underscore the dynamic nature of air plasma chemistry and the importance of careful chemical characterization of plasma devices intended for biological applications.

  10. Static evaluation of surface coatings for compliant gas bearings in an oxidizing atmosphere to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    Hard wear-resistant coatings and soft low shear strength coatings were developed for an air-lubricated compliant journal bearing for a future automotive gas turbine engine. The coatings were expected to function in either 540 or 650 C ambient. Soft lubricant coatings were generally limited in temperature. Therefore emphasis was on the hard wear-resistant coatings. The coating materials covered were TiC, B4C, Cr3C2, WC, SiC, CrB2, TiB2, Cr2O3, Al2O3, Si3N4, Tribaloy 800, CaF2, CaF2-BaF2 eutectic, Ni-Co, silver, CdO-graphite and proprietary compounds. The coatings on test coupons were subjected to static oven screening tests. The test consisted of exposure of material samples in an oven for 300 h at the maximum temperature (540 or 650 C) and ten temperature cycles from room temperature to the maximum service temperature. On the basis of the specimen examinations the following coatings were recommended for future wear tests: TiC (sputtered), Cr2O3 (sputtered), Si3N4 (sputtered), CdO and graphite (fused), Kaman DES (a proprietary coating), CrB2 (plasma sprayed), Cr3C2 (detonation gun) and NASA PS-106 (plasma sprayed).

  11. Evaluation of rotor-bearing system dynamic response to unbalance. [air conditioning equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, R. E.; Ozimek, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    The vibration environment within air conditioner rotating machinery referred to as an air cycle machine (ACM) was investigated to effectively increase ACM reliability. To assist in the selection of design changes which would result in improved ACM performance, various design modifications were incorporated into a baseline ACM configuration. For each design change, testing was conducted with the best balance achieveable (baseline) and with various degrees of unbalance. Relationships between unbalance (within the context of design changes) and the parameters associated with design goals were established. The results of rotor dynamics tests used to establish these relationships are presented.

  12. Dry air-surface exchange in hilly terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, W.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Hart, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Surface fluxes of sensible heat, water vapor, carbon dioxide, ozone, and momentum were measured by using the eddy correlation method near the top of a small hill within the Konza Prairie in Kansas during the four 1987 Intensive Field Campaigns of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). Parameterizations of dry air-surface exchange in nonuniform terrain were examined. Larger drag coefficients, larger surface roughness lengths, and smaller aerodynamic resistances appeared to be associated with the deeper, rolling terrain upwind. Surface resistances were less affected by terrain inhomogeneities but were closely related to levels of photosynthetically active radiation. Normalized standard deviations of temperature, humidity, and vertical velocity are slightly different from values predicted by similarity relationships for uniform surfaces. The influences of these differences on fluxes estimated by use of a variance technique are relatively small as compared to the data scatter; computed variance fluxes are statistically in good agreement with eddy correlation fluxes. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, A.; Randall, C. E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rozanov, E.; Rodger, C. J.

    2009-10-01

    Here we use the ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature data sets from 1957 to 2006 to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the A p index. Previous modeling work has suggested that NO x produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in surface air temperatures (SATs). We find that during winter months, polar SATs in years with high A p index are different than in years with low A p index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, depending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are excluded. We take into account solar irradiance variations, unlike previous analyses of geomagnetic effects in ERA-40 and operational data. Although we cannot conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating wintertime surface air temperatures. We tested our SAT results against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode, and we cannot robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature variability and geomagnetic activity.

  14. Biphilic Surfaces for Enhanced Water Collection from Humid Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoski, Jason; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Luedeman, William

    Surface wettability plays an important role in water recovery, distillation, dehumidification, and heat transfer. The efficiency of each process depends on the rate of droplet nucleation, droplet growth, and mass transfer. Unfortunately, hydrophilic surfaces are good at nucleation but poor at shedding. Hydrophobic surfaces are the reverse. Many plants and animals overcome this tradeoff through biphilic surfaces with patterned wettability. For example, the Stenocara beetle uses hydrophilic patches on a superhydrophobic background to collect fog from air. Cribellate spiders similarly collect fog on their webs through periodic spindle-knot structures. In this study, we investigate the effects of wettability patterns on the rate of water collection from humid air. The steady state rate of water collection per unit area is measured as a function of undercooling, angle of inclination, water contact angle, hydrophilic patch size, patch spacing, area fraction, and patch height relative to the hydrophobic background. We then model each pattern by comparing the potential and kinetic energy of a droplet as it rolls downwards at a fixed angle. The results indicate that the design rules for collecting fog differ from those for condensation from humid air. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Office of Naval Research for financial support through Grant Number N00014-15-1-2107.

  15. Determination of ortho-phthalaldehyde in air and on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Samuel P

    2008-11-01

    Three sampling and analytical methods have been developed and evaluated for ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA): (1) an HPLC-UV method for OPA in air, (2) a fluorimetric method for OPA on surfaces, and (3) a colorimetric method for OPA on surfaces. (1) The air sampler contains 350 mg of silica gel coated with 1 mg of acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). Air sampling may be conducted at 0.03 to 1.0 L min(-1) for periods up to 8 h. Samples were eluted with ethyl acetate, and the eluents were allowed to stand for 72 h. Analysis was by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a UV detector set at 369 nm. An unusual phenomenon was the observation that the stability of the sample on a sampler at 3 degrees C tends to decrease as the total quantity of OPA collected on the sampler decreases. Elution of the samples within 24 h of air sampling is required. The detection limit (LOD) is approximately 0.02 microg of OPA per sample. OPA on surfaces may be collected with strips cut from a sheet of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA wipe). (2) In the surface wipe method with analysis by fluorescence measurement, the strips of PVA wipe were placed into dimethyl sulfoxide. An aliquot was treated with aqueous N-acetyl-l-cysteine and ethylenediamine. Analysis was performed with a portable fluorometer (excitation and emission wavelengths = 365 nm and 438 nm, respectively). The LOD is 0.2 microg per sample. (3) In the surface wipe method with visual colorimetric detection, the strips of PVA wipe were placed into 30 : 70 acetonitrile : water. An aliquot was treated with N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine in 0.1 m sulfuric acid. After color development, the LOD is approximately 48 microg per sample. These methods have been field tested in a hospital.

  16. Performance Testing of a Magnetically Suspended Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyro Based on the Single Axis Air Bearing Table

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Peiling; Zhang, Huijuan; Yan, Ning; Fang, Jiancheng

    2012-01-01

    Integrating the advantage of magnetic bearings with a double gimble control moment gyroscope (DGCMG), a magnetically suspended DGCMG (MSDGCMG) is an ideal actuator in high-precision, long life, and rapid maneuver attitude control systems. The work presented here mainly focuses on performance testing of a MSDGCMG independently developed by Beihang University, based on the single axis air bearing table. In this paper, taking into sufficient consideration to the moving-gimbal effects and the response bandwidth limit of the gimbal, a special MSDGCMG steering law is proposed subject to the limits of gimbal angle rate and angle acceleration. Finally, multiple experiments are carried out, with different MSDGCMG angular momenta as well as different desired attitude angles. The experimental results indicate that the MSDGCMG has a good gimbal angle rate and output torque tracking capabilities, and that the attitude stability with MSDGCMG as actuator is superior to 10−3°/s. The MSDGCMG performance testing in this paper, carried out under moving-base condition, will offer a technique base for the future research and application of MSDGCMGs. PMID:23012536

  17. High strength, surface porous polyether-ether-ketone for load-bearing orthopaedic implants

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Nathan T.; Torstrick, F. Brennan; Lee, Christopher S.D.; Dupont, Kenneth M.; Safranski, David L.; Chang, W. Allen; Macedo, Annie E.; Lin, Angela; Boothby, Jennifer M.; Whittingslow, Daniel C.; Carson, Robert A.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Gall, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Despite its widespread clinical use in load-bearing orthopaedic implants, polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) is often associated with poor osseointegration. In this study, a surface porous PEEK material (PEEK-SP) was created using a melt extrusion technique. The porous layer thickness was 399.6±63.3 µm and possessed a mean pore size of 279.9±31.6 µm, strut spacing of 186.8±55.5 µm, porosity of 67.3±3.1%, and interconnectivity of 99.9±0.1%. Monotonic tensile tests showed that PEEK-SP preserved 73.9% of the strength (71.06±2.17 MPa) and 73.4% of the elastic modulus (2.45±0.31 GPa) of as-received, injection molded PEEK. PEEK-SP further demonstrated a fatigue strength of 60.0 MPa at one million cycles, preserving 73.4% of the fatigue resistance of injection molded PEEK. Interfacial shear testing showed the pore layer shear strength to be 23.96±2.26 MPa. An osseointegration model in the rat revealed substantial bone formation within the pore layer at 6 and 12 weeks via µCT and histological evaluation. Ingrown bone was more closely apposed to the pore wall and fibrous tissue growth was reduced in PEEK-SP when compared to non-porous PEEK controls. These results indicate that PEEK-SP could provide improved osseointegration while maintaining the structural integrity necessary for load-bearing orthopaedic applications. PMID:25463499

  18. Airmass Characteristics of Surface Air Quality over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, G.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Edwards, D. P.; Emmons, L. K.

    2010-12-01

    We present results from a study that quantifies the impacts of various sources on surface air quality over California. The focus of the analysis is on summer 2008, when the ARCTAS-CARB aircraft campaign, a joint program between NASA and the California Air Resources Board took place. The study integrates the global chemistry transport model MOZART-V4 with the regional WRF-Chem model. Both models employ the same chemistry scheme and emissions allowing for a high level of synergy across model scales. The global model provides time and space varying boundary conditions for the regional simulations. Aircraft measurements from the field campaign will be used together with in-situ observations from ground (U.S. EPA Air Quality Monitoring System) as well as satellite retrievals (e.g. Aura/OMI NO2 and HCHO, Aura/TES CO and O3, Terra/MOPITT CO) for evaluating the model simulations and supporting the analysis. Tracer simulations are performed to estimate the relative impacts of anthropogenic emissions, wildfires and pollution inflow on surface air.

  19. Surface modification of PE film by DBD plasma in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, C.-S.; Wang, K.; Nie, Q.-Y.; Wang, D.-Z.; Guo, S.-H.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, surface modification of polyethylene (PE) films is studied by dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment in air. The treated samples were examined by water contact angle measurement, calculation of surface free energy, Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The water contact angle changes from the original value of 93.2° to the minimum value of 53.3° and surface free energy increases from 27.3 to 51.89 J/m 2 after treatment time of 50 s. Both ATR and XPS show some oxidized species are introduced into the sample surface by the plasma treatment and that the change tendencies of the water contact angle and surface free energy with the treatment time are the same as that of the oxygen concentration on the treated sample surface. Cu films were deposited on the treated and untreated PE surfaces. The peel adhesive strength between the Cu film and the treated sample is 1.5 MPa, whereas the value is only 0.8 MPa between the Cu film and the untreated PE. SEM pictures show that the Cu film deposited on the plasma treated PE surface is smooth and the crystal grain is smaller, contrarily the Cu film on the untreated PE surface is rough and the crystal grain is larger.

  20. Pedicled sensate composite calcaneal flap to achieve full weight-bearing surface in midshaft leg amputations: case report.

    PubMed

    Livani, Bruno; de Castro, Gabriel F; Filho, Jose R Tonelli; Belangero, William D; Ramos, Tamara M; Mongon, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Of the possible levels of amputation, transtibial amputations result in functionally excellent outcomes. However, in contrast to hind foot amputations, such as Syme and especially Boyd amputation, acute or late complications related to the amputated stump are frequent with the various described techniques. The aim of this study was to describe a hind foot (including the calcaneum and fat pad) pedicled sensate flap with a surface that allowed full terminal weight-bearing in transtibial amputations in adults. One male patient, 66 years old with schizophrenia and chronic distal tibial osteomyelitis, underwent a leg amputation with sensate composite calcaneal flap construction. The stump was painless and able to bear total terminal weight at 12 weeks. Calcaneum tibial fusion was observed at 12-week postoperative follow-up. A below-knee prosthesis was adapted in 12 weeks, and at the 1-year follow-up, the patient was completely satisfied with the functional performance of his stump. The flap described provides proprioceptive feedback with the best bone and skin to support weight bearing. Another advantage is the possibility to use the same prosthesis commonly used in Boyd or Syme amputation due a longer arm leverage, which also allows full terminal weight-bearing. In the current study, a transtibial amputation covered with a pedicled sensate plantar flap preserving the calcaneum was proposed. In theory, the anatomic structures spared in this technique provide a strong full weight-bearing terminal surface of the stump that will last a lifetime. PMID:20945284

  1. Small Loosening of Bolt-nut Fastener Due to Micro Bearing-Surface Slip: A Finite Element Method Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Satoshi; Kimura, Masatake; Sakai, Shinsuke

    Bolt-nut fasteners are widely used in mechanical structures due to the systems' ease of disassembly for maintenance and their relatively low cost. However, vibration-induced loosening has remained problematic. In this paper, we investigated the mechanisms of the loosening process due to micro bearing-surface slip within the framework of the three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). The results show close agreement with Kasei's experimental results. It is found that the early-stage nut rotation observed experimentally originates from simultaneous bolt-nut rotation induced by the tightening torsion of the bolt and does not correspond to loosening rotation. Therefore, loosening rotation should be defined by the relative rotation angle of the nut with respect to the bolt. It is also found that small loosening is initiated when the vibration force reaches about 50 to 60% of the critical loading necessary for bearing-surface slip. Attention should be paid to the contact state of both bearing and thread surfaces when considering the loosening of bolt-nut tightening systems. Contact states can be classified into three types: complete slip involving no sticking region, micro slip involving no constant-sticking region over a vibration cycle, and localized slip involving a constant-sticking region over a vibration cycle. It is also found that loosening rotation can proceed when either micro slip or complete slip occurs at both the thread and bearing contact surfaces.

  2. Surface modification and fatigue behavior of nitinol for load bearing implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Sheldon A.

    Musculoskeletal disorders are recognized amongst the most significant human health problems that exist today. Even though considerable research and development has gone towards understanding musculoskeletal disorders, there is still lack of bone replacement materials that are appropriate for restoring lost structures and functions, particularly for load-bearing applications. Many materials on the market today, such as titanium and stainless steel, suffer from significantly higher modulus than natural bone and low bioactivity leading to stress shielding and implant loosening over longer time use. Nitinol (NiTi) is an equiatomic intermetallic compound of nickel and titanium whose unique biomechanical and biological properties contributed to its increasing use as a biomaterial. An innovative method for creating dense and porous net shape NiTi alloy parts has been developed to improve biological properties while maintaining comparable or better mechanical properties than commercial materials that are currently in use. Laser engineered net shaping (LENS(TM)) and surface electrochemistry modification was used to create dense/porous samples and micro textured surfaces on NiTi parts, respectively. Porous implants are known to promote cell adhesion and have a low elastic modulus, a combination that can significantly increase the life of an implant. However, porosity can significantly reduce the fatigue life of an implant, and very little work has been reported on the fatigue behavior of bulk porous metals, specifically on porous nitinol alloy. High-cycle rotating bending and compression-compression fatigue behavior of porous NiTi fabricated using LENS(TM) were studied. In cyclic compression loading, plastic strain increased with increasing porosity and it was evident that maximum strain was achieved during the first 50000 cycles and remained constant throughout the remaining loading. No failures were observed due to loading up to 150% of the yield strength. When subjected

  3. Global Distribution and Variability of Surface Skin and Surface Air Temperatures as Depicted in the AIRS Version-6 Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we will briefly describe the significant improvements made in the AIRS Version-6 retrieval algorithm, especially as to how they affect retrieved surface skin and surface air temperatures. The global distribution of seasonal 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM local time 12 year climatologies of Ts,a will be presented for the first time. We will also present the spatial distribution of short term 12 year anomaly trends of Ts,a at 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM, as well as the spatial distribution of temporal correlations of Ts,a with the El Nino Index. It will be shown that there are significant differences between the behavior of 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM Ts,a anomalies in some arid land areas.

  4. A comparison between the dimensions of positive transtibial residual limb molds prepared by air pressure casting and weight-bearing casting methods

    PubMed Central

    Hajiaghaei, Behnam; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Saeedi, Hassan; Jalali, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Creating a socket with proper fit is an important factor to ensure the comfort and control of prosthetic devices. Several techniques are commonly used to cast transtibial stumps but their effect on stump shape deformation is not well understood. This study compares the dimensions, circumferences and volumes of the positive casts and also the socket comfort between two casting methods. Our hypothesis was that the casts prepared by air pressure method have less volume and are more comfortable than those prepared by weight bearing method. Methods: Fifteen transtibial unilateral amputees participated in the study. Two weight bearing and air pressure casting methods were utilized for their residual limbs. The diameters and circumferences of various areas of the residual limbs and positive casts were compared. The volumes of two types of casts were measured by a volumeter and compared. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to measure the sockets fit comfort. Results: Circumferences at 10 and 15 cm below the patella on the casts were significantly smaller in air pressure casting method compared to the weight bearing method (p=0.00 and 0.01 respectively). The volume of the cast in air pressure method was lower than that of the weight bearing method (p=0.006). The amputees found the fit of the sockets prepared by air pressure method more comfortable than the weight bearing sockets (p=0.015). Conclusion: The air pressure casting reduced the circumferences of the distal portion of residual limbs which has more soft tissue and because of its snug fit it provided more comfort for amputees, according to the VAS measurements. PMID:27390711

  5. IMPACTS OF MARINE AEROSOLS ON SURFACE WATER CHEMISTRY AT BEAR BROOK WATERSHED, MAINE USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The East Bear catchment at Bear Brook Watershed, Maine receives moderate (for the eastern U.S.) amounts of Cl- in wet and dry deposition. In 1989, Cl- in precipitation ranged from 2 to 55 eq/L. Dry, occult, and wet deposition plus evapotranspiration resulted in stream Cl- averagi...

  6. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  7. Effects of surface mining on the aquatic insects of Bear Creek, Boyd County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of surface mining on the aquatic insect community of Bear Creek, Boyd County, Kentucky, were examined. Sampling stations were established above the mine, near the mine and below the mine and selected biological and physiochemical factors were examined at these stations. Station 3 (above mine) had a higher pH, higher alkalinity, lower mineral hardness, less siltation and less ferric hydroxide deposition than either Station 2 (at mine) or Station 1 (below mine). The greatest number of specimens (81%) was collected at Station 3. There were 19 mayfly and stonefly taxa represented at Station 3. The Shannon-Weaver diversity index was significantly higher (P < 0.05) at Station 3 than at either Station 1 or Station 2. Examination of trophic relationships showed that shredders (chew and mine vascular plant tissue) were the most abundant group at Station 3, which may have been due to less ferric hydroxide deposition and thereby more vascular plant tissue available. Station 2 (at mine) had the least number of taxa collected, the lowest Shannon-Weaver diversity index value and predators were the most important (Importance Value) trophic group. Station 1 (below mine) was intermediate between Station 2 and Station 3, i.e., it seemed to be a recovery zone where the number of taxa collected began to increase and the physiochemical parameter values began to approach those of Station 3.

  8. [Relationship between surface UV radiation and air pollution in Beijing].

    PubMed

    An, Jun-lin; Wang, Yue-si; Li, Xin; Sun, Yang; Shen, Shuang-he

    2008-04-01

    Based on the data of solar radiation and air pollutants collected in Beijing, the relationship between surface ultraviolet (UV) radiation and the content of air pollutants were analyzed, using the radiative transfer model TUV4.4 (Tropospheric Ultraviolet Visible). The results show that average total ozone content is 329 DU and higher in winter and spring, lower in summer and autumn. The inverse relationship exists between ground level UV radiation and total ozone content. This study also shows that a substantial reduction (up to 50%) in the UV radiation on days with high levels of air pollution. Larger fluctuations are found in UV radiation in the summer. The effects of clouds and air pollution on UV are higher than on total solar radiation, and the reduction in UV is about twice as large as the total solar radiation values. Strong reduction in the UV radiation reaching the ground is associated with the increase of tropospheric ozone and nitrogen oxides in Beijing. The correlation coefficient between ozone concentration and decrease in UV radiation is 0.70 in the early afternoon.

  9. Surface-slip equations for multicomponent nonequilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Scott, C. D.; Moss, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Equations are presented for the surface-slip (or jump) values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature in the low-Reynolds number, high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. The equations are obtained from closed form solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy flux equations using the Chapman-Enskog velocity distribution function. This function represents a solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Navier-Stokes approximation. The analysis, obtained for nonequilibrium multicomponent air flow, includes the finite-rate surface catalytic recombination and changes in the internal energy during reflection from the surface. Expressions for the various slip quantities were obtained in a form which can be employed in flowfield computations. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures. Expression is also provided for the finite-rate, species-concentration boundary condition for a multicomponent mixture in absence of slip.

  10. Surface-slip equations for multicomponent, nonequilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Scott, Carl D.; Moss, James N.; Goglia, Gene

    1985-01-01

    Equations are presented for the surface slip (or jump) values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature in the low-Reynolds-number, high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. These are obtained from closed-form solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy flux equations using the Chapman-Enskog velocity distribution function. This function represents a solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Navier-Stokes approximation. The analysis, obtained for nonequilibrium multicomponent air flow, includes the finite-rate surface catalytic recombination and changes in the internal energy during reflection from the surface. Expressions for the various slip quantities have been obtained in a form which can readily be employed in flow-field computations. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures. Expression is also provided for the finite-rate species-concentration boundary condition for a multicomponent mixture in absence of slip.

  11. Is Air Temperature Enough to Predict Lake Surface Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Toffolon, M.; Majone, B.

    2014-12-01

    Lake surface water (LST) is a key factor that controls most of the physical and ecological processes occurring in lakes. Reliable estimates are especially important in the light of recent studies, which revealed that inland water bodies are highly sensitive to climate, and are rapidly warming throughout the world. However, an accurate estimation of LST usually requires a significant amount of information that is not always available. In this work, we present an application of air2water, a lumped model that simulates LST as a function of air temperature only. In addition, air2water allows for a qualitative evaluation of the depth of the epilimnion during the annual stratification cycle. The model consists in a simplification of the complete heat budget of the well-mixed surface layer, and has a few parameters (from 4 to 8 depending on the version) that summarize the role of the different heat flux components. Model calibration requires only air and water temperature data, possibly covering sufficiently long historical periods in order to capture inter-annual variability and long-term trends. During the calibration procedure, the information included in input data is retrieved to directly inform model parameters, which can be used to classify the thermal behavior of the lake. In order to investigate how thermal dynamics are related to morphological features, the model has been applied to 14 temperate lakes characterized by different morphological and hydrological conditions, by different sources of temperature data (buoys, satellite), and by variable frequency of acquisition. A good agreement between observed and simulated LST has been achieved, with a RMSE in the order of 1°C, which is fully comparable to the performances of more complex process-based models. This application allowed for a deeper understanding of the thermal response of lakes as a function of their morphology, as well as for specific analyses as for example the investigation of the exceptional

  12. Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These bearings are non-linear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method, a rule-of-thumb, to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current paper extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced Oil-Free machines operating on foil gas bearings

  13. Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Della-Corte, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging oilfree turbomachinery systems. These bearings are nonlinear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness, and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current work extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced oil-free machines operating on foil gas bearings.

  14. High temperature self-lubricating coatings for air lubricated foil bearings for the automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.

    1980-01-01

    coating combinations were developed for compliant surface bearings and journals to be used in an automotive gas turbine engine. The coatings were able to withstand the sliding start/stops during rotor liftoff and touchdown and occasional short time, high speed rubs under representative loading of the engine. Some dozen coating variations of CdO-graphite, Cr2O3 (by sputtering) and CaF2 (plasma sprayed) were identified. The coatings were optimized and they were examined for stoichiometry, metallurgical condition, and adhesion. Sputtered Cr2O3 was most adherent when optimum parameters were used and it was applied on an annealed (soft) substrate. Metallic binders and interlayers were used to improve the ductility and the adherence.

  15. 30 CFR 57.5006 - Air Quality-Surface Only [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air Quality-Surface Only 57.5006 Section 57..., Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and Underground § 57.5006... Quality—Surface Only Air Quality—Underground Only...

  16. Identification of water-bearing zones by the use of geophysical logs and borehole television surveys, collected February to September 1997, at the Former Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.

    1998-01-01

    Between February 1997 and September 1997, 10 monitor wells were drilled near the site of the former Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, Bucks County, Pa., to monitor water levels and sample ground-water contaminants in the shallow, intermediate, and deep water-bearing zones. The sampling will determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of contaminated ground water migrating from known or suspected contaminant sources. Four wells were drilled north of the property adjacent to Area A, three wells along strike located on Lewis Drive, and three wells directly down dip on Ivyland Road. Well depths range from 69 feet to 300 feet below land surface. Borehole-geophysical logging and television surveys were used to identify water-bearing zones so that appropriate intervals could be screened in each monitor well. Geophysical logs were obtained at the 10 monitor wells. Borehole television surveys were obtained at the four monitor wells adjacent to Area A. Caliper and borehole television surveys were used to locate fractures, inflections on fluidtemperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-bearing fractures, and heatpulse- flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, borehole television surveys, and driller?s logs, all wells were screened such that water-level fluctuations could be monitored and water samples collected from discrete water-bearing zones in each borehole.

  17. Bearing surfaces for hip arthroplasty - is metal-on-metal a passing fancy?

    PubMed

    Lee, Reginald K; Nevelos, Jim; Vigdorchik, Jonathan; Markel, David C

    2012-12-01

    Metal-on-metal bearings have had popularity that has waxed and waned over the years. The advantages realized relative to wear resistance and strength had been offset by early failures, manufacturing difficulty, and most recently by adverse soft tissue responses to the metallic debris. The bearing's history, evolution, advantages and disadvantages will be discussed in attempt to answer the question: is metal-on-metal a passing fancy?

  18. Ceramic bearings. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, fabrication, and evaluation of ceramic bearings. Citations discuss roller, ball, fuel-lubricated, and dry-lubricated bearings. Applications in machinery, automobiles, rails, and air transport are examined. References to surface hardness, wear, and fatigue tests are presented. (Contains a minimum of 125 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. The influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings: Experimental analysis of the lubricant film and surface wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, William; Van Hooreweder, Brecht; Boonen, Rene; Sas, Paul; Moens, David

    2016-06-01

    Precise prediction of the lifetime of rolling element bearings is a crucial step towards a reliable design of many rotating machines. For bearings subjected to highly varying loads, recent research emphasises a strong reduction of the actual bearing lifetime w.r.t. the classically calculated bearing lifetime. This paper experimentally analyses the influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings. A novel bearing test rig is introduced. The test rig is able to apply a fully controlled multi-axial static and dynamic load on a single test bearing. Also, different types and sizes of bearings can be tested. Two separate investigations are conducted. First, the behaviour of the lubricant film between the rolling elements and raceways is analysed. Increased metallic contact or breakdown of the film during dynamic excitation is investigated based on the measured electrical resistance through the bearing. The study shows that the lubricant film thickness follows the imposed variations of the load. Variations of the lubricant film thickness are similar to the variations when the magnitude of the static bearing load is changed. Second, wear of the raceway surfaces is analysed. Surface wear is investigated after a series of accelerated lifetime tests under high dynamic load. Due to sliding motion between asperities of the contacting surfaces in the bearing, polishing of the raceway honing structure occurs. This polishing is clearly observed on SEM images of the inner raceway after a test duration of only 0.5% of the calculated L10 life. Polishing wear of the surfaces, such as surface induced cracks and material delamination, is expected when the bearing is further exposed to the high dynamic load.

  20. Linking geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppala, Annika

    ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature (SAT) data sets from 1957 to 2006 were used to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the Ap index. Previous modelling work has suggested that NOx produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in polar SATs. We find that during winter months, ERA-40 and ECMWF polar SATs in years with high Ap index are different than in years with low Ap index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, de-pending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings are excluded. Solar irradiance variations were taken into account in the analysis. Although using the re-analysis and operational data sets it was not possible to conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating polar wintertime surface air temperature patterns. The SAT results were tested against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Annular Mode n (SAM). The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and we could not robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature (SST) variability and geomagnetic activity. Examining the physical link between geomagnetic activity and polar surface temperature variability patterns using atmospheric models is an ongoing task.

  1. Dynamic behavior of air lubricated pivoted-pad journal-bearing, rotor system. 2: Pivot consideration and pad mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1972-01-01

    Rotor bearing dynamic tests were conducted with tilting-pad journal bearings having three different pad masses and two different pivot geometries. The rotor was vertically mounted and supported by two three-pad tilting-pad gas journal bearings and a simple externally pressurized thrust bearing. The bearing pads were 5.1 cm (2.02 in.) in diameter and 2.8 cm (1.5 in.) long. The length to diameter ratio was 0.75. One pad was mounted on a flexible diaphragm. The bearing supply pressure ranged from 0 to 690 kilonewtons per square meter (0 to 100 psig), and speeds ranged to 38,500 rpm. Heavy mass pad tilting-pad assemblies produced three rotor-bearing resonances above the first two rotor critical speeds. Lower supply pressure eliminated the resonances. The resonances were oriented primarily in the direction normal to the diaphragm.

  2. Supersonic moist air jet impingements on flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Miah Md. Ashraful; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2010-02-01

    Pronounced aeroacoustic resonances are exhibited in the flowfield where a jet emerges from an orifice or a nozzle and impinges on a solid surface. One instance where such resonances are produced is in a high speed jet impingement, such as in the space launch vehicle systems, jet-engine exhaust impingement, and in the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, etc. A highly unsteady flowfield leading to a drastic increase of noise level with very high dynamic pressure and thermal loads are noticed on nearby surfaces results dramatic lift loss, severe ground erosion and hot gas ingestion to the inlet in the jet engines. This highly unsteady behavior of the impinging jets is due to a feedback loop between the fluid and acoustic fields. In actual jet flow, the working gas may contain condensable gas such as steam or moist air. In these cases, the non-equilibrium condensation may occur at the region between nozzle exit and an object. The jet flow with non-equilibrium condensation may be quite different from that without condensation. Therefore, in this study, the effect of the non-equilibrium condensation of moist air on the axisymmetric under-expanded supersonic impinging jet on a vertical flat plate was investigated numerically.

  3. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, L.; Lunelli, N.; Paschuk, S.; Oliveira, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Schelin, H.; Miguel, C.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.; Tilly, J.; Khoury, H.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography. An evaluation of 301 radiographical examinations in anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) (166 examinations) and lateral (LAT) (135 examinations) projections was performed. The analyses were performed on patients grouped by age; the groups included ages 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. The entrance surface air kerma was determined with DoseCal software (Radiological Protection Center of Saint George's Hospital, London) and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Two different exposure techniques were compared. The doses received by patients who had undergone LAT examinations were 40% higher, on average, those in AP/PA examinations because of the difference in tube voltage. A large high-dose “tail” was observed for children up to 5 y old. An increase in tube potential and corresponding decrease in current lead to a significant dose reduction. The difference between the average dose values for different age ranges was not practically observed, implying that the exposure techniques are still not optimal. Exposure doses received using the higher tube voltage and lower current-time product correspond to the international diagnostic reference levels.

  4. Design, development and evaluation of a precision air bearing rotary table with large diameter through-hole

    SciTech Connect

    Accatino, M.R.

    1991-11-01

    A large diameter precision air bearing rotary table with a 16.0 inch diameter through-hole was designed, fabricated and tested in the course of this research. The rotary table will be used in conjunction with a specialized, computer controlled precision inspection machine being designed for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The design process included a complete engineering analysis to predict the final performance of the rotary table, and to ensure that the rotary table meets the required accuracy of 4.0 microinches of total radial (3.5 microinches average radial) and 4.0 microinches total axial (3.5 microinches average axial) errors. The engineering analysis included structural deformation, thermal sensitivity and dynamic analyses using finite element methods in some cases, as well as other analytic solutions. Comparisons are made between predicted and tested values, which are listed in the rotary table error budget. The rotary table performed as predicted with measured axial and radial stiffnesses of 1.1E06 lbf/inch and 2.9E06 lbf/inch, respectively, as well as average radial, axial and tilt errors of 2.5 microinches, 1.5 microinches, and less than 0.05 arcseconds, respectively.

  5. Foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-11-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  6. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  7. Evolution of Microroughness with Increasing Slip Magnitude on Pseudotachylyte-Bearing Fault Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessey, S.; Resor, P. G.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    High velocity rock friction experiments reproducing seismic slip deformation conditions have shown that there is an initial shear strengthening prior to a significant weakening with slip. This change in shear resistance is inferred to occur due to the development of melt patches, which initially strengthen the fault, and is associated with the evolution of microroughness of the melt-wall rock interface (Hirose and Shimamoto, 2003). Additional melting leads to a continuous layer of melt, allowing easier sliding and weakening. Once there is a balance between formation and extrusion of melt, a steady state shear resistance (and associated effective friction coefficient) is reached (Nielsen et al. 2008). In natural fault zones, the process of frictional melting, slip weakening, and steady state is both recorded and influenced by the microroughness of the fault surface. Our study explores natural faults over a range of slip magnitudes from mm to m of slip, the magnitudes over which this process is most likely to occur during earthquakes. The Gole Larghe fault zone (Italy) is an exhumed strike-slip fault zone in tonalite of the Adamello batholith. The fault zone is characterized by multiple fault strands containing pseudotachylyte or pseudotachylyte overprinting cataclasite. We have sampled several individual faults segments from within the fault zone, with slips ranging from 23 mm to 1.9 m. The smaller scale samples are from pseudotachylyte-only fault strands and therefore probably record single-slip events. The two largest slip faults have pseudotachylyte and cataclasite, indicating that they may have more complicated slip histories. Individual samples consist of cores (2-3.5 cm diameter, 2-6 cm length) drilled parallel to the fault surface and ~perpendicular to the slip. Samples were scanned with an Xradia MicroCT scanner to image the 3D geometry of the fault and wall rocks. Fault surfaces (contact between the pseudotachylyte-bearing slipping zone and the wall rock

  8. Using Satellite Aerosol Retrievals to Monitor Surface Particulate Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Holben, Brent N.; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS and MISR aerosol products were designed nearly two decades ago for the purpose of climate applications. Since launch of Terra in 1999, these two sensors have provided global, quantitative information about column-integrated aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and relative aerosol type parameters (such as Angstrom exponent). Although primarily designed for climate, the air quality (AQ) community quickly recognized that passive satellite products could be used for particulate air quality monitoring and forecasting. However, AOD and particulate matter (PM) concentrations have different units, and represent aerosol conditions in different layers of the atmosphere. Also, due to low visible contrast over brighter surface conditions, satellite-derived aerosol retrievals tend to have larger uncertainty in urban or populated regions. Nonetheless, the AQ community has made significant progress in relating column-integrated AOD at ambient relative humidity (RH) to surface PM concentrations at dried RH. Knowledge of aerosol optical and microphysical properties, ambient meteorological conditions, and especially vertical profile, are critical for physically relating AOD and PM. To make urban-scale maps of PM, we also must account for spatial variability. Since surface PM may vary on a finer spatial scale than the resolution of standard MODIS (10 km) and MISR (17km) products, we test higher-resolution versions of MODIS (3km) and MISR (1km research mode) retrievals. The recent (July 2011) DISCOVER-AQ campaign in the mid-Atlantic offers a comprehensive network of sun photometers (DRAGON) and other data that we use for validating the higher resolution satellite data. In the future, we expect that the wealth of aircraft and ground-based measurements, collected during DISCOVER-AQ, will help us quantitatively link remote sensed and ground-based measurements in the urban region.

  9. Moisture permeability of the total surface bearing prosthetic socket with a silicone liner: is it superior to the patella-tendon bearing prosthetic socket?

    PubMed

    Hachisuka, K; Matsushima, Y; Ohmine, S; Shitama, H; Shinkoda, K

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the moisture permeability properties of materials used for total surface bearing (TSB) socket with a silicone liner, a combination of Silicone Suction Socket or Icelandic Roll-On Silicone Socket (ICEROSS) and an acrylic plastic sheet (Degaplast), patella-tendon bearing (PTB) socket, a combination of Pe-Lite and Degaplast, and wooden socket made of poplar. Moisture permeability of the socket materials was measured as the diminution of water in a container after 12 hours in a climatic chamber. Eight containers with their open, top side were uncovered (no material) or sealed with one of the socket materials; the experiment was repeated four times. One-way analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni's test was applied to examine the differences in moisture permeability. Moisture permeability levels were as follows: no material, 85.9 +/- 1.3 g; poplar, 4.3 +/- 0.4 g; Silicone Suction Socket, 1.1 +/- 0.2 g; ICEROSS, 1.0 +/- 0.2 g; Pe-Lite, 0.8 +/- 0.1 g; 3S + Degaplast, 0.8 +/- 0.1 g; ICEROSS + Degaplast, 0.8 +/- 0.2 g; and Pe-Lite + Degaplast, 0.8 +/- 0.1 g. There were significant differences between the uncovered container and the others, and between poplar and the others (P < 0.05). We concluded that the TSB socket with a silicone liner is not superior to the PTB socket with regard to moisture permeability, and that it is necessary to develop a new prosthetic socket that allows heat release and drainage of sweat.

  10. Ontogeny of B lymphocytes. II. Relative rates of appearance of lymphocytes bearing surface immunoglobulin and complement receptors.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, M C; Elfenbein, G J; Frank, M M; Paul, W E

    1974-05-01

    Many bursa-equivalent (B) lymphocytes of adult mice bear surface Ig and receptors for C3. The frequency of Ig-bearing cells increases rapidly immediately after birth, but these cells lack complement (C) receptors. Lymphocytes bearing C receptors are not found in the spleens of BALB/c, DBA/2, and C57BL/6 mice until 2 wk of age and do not attain substantial numbers until 3-4 wk of age. In AKR mice, a lag between appearance of Ig-bearing and complement receptor lymphocytes (CRL) is also observed but it is of much shorter duration. AKR mice have a frequency of CRL at 2 wk of age of 28% in comparison to a frequency of 4.8% for DBA/2 mice. The difference in frequency between young and adult mice and between "low" and "high CRL" strains cannot be explained by a nonspecific inability to form rosettes as similar results are obtained with soluble antigen-antibody-complement complexes. Analysis of CRL frequency in (AKR x DBA/2)F(1) mice and F(1) x parental backcross progeny suggests that two independent genes control the rate of appearance of CRL. Furthermore, the genetic difference in the ontogeny of CRL is recapitulated in the repopulation of the B-lymphocyte line in adult-irradiated mice restored with syngeneic bone marrow. Thus, the "CRL genes" described here appear to control B-cell differentiation throughout life.

  11. Air-sea fluxes and surface layer turbulence around a sea surface temperature front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friehe, C. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Davidson, K. L.; Rogers, D. P.; Large, W. G.; Stage, S. A.; Crescenti, G. H.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Greenhut, G. K.; Li, F.

    1991-01-01

    The observed effects of sharp changes in sea surface temperature (SST) on the air-sea fluxes, surface roughness, and the turbulence structure in the surface layer and the marine atmospheric boundary layer are discussed. In situ flux and turbulence observations were carried out from three aircraft and two ships within the FASINEX framework. Three other aircraft used remote sensors to measure waves, microwave backscatter, and lidar signatures of cloud tops. Descriptions of the techniques, intercomparison of aircraft and ship flux data, and use of different methods for analyzing the fluxes from the aircraft data are described. Changing synoptic weather on three successive days yielded cases of wind direction both approximately parallel and perpendicular to a surface temperature front. For the wind perpendicular to the front, wind over both cold-to-warm and warm-to-cold surface temperatures occurred. Model results consistent with the observations suggest that an internal boundary layer forms at the SST.

  12. Optimum design of amphiphilic polymers bearing hydrophobic groups for both cell surface ligand presentation and intercellular cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Masafumi; Li, Cuicui; Matsuda, Masayoshi; Nagai, Hiroko; Hatanaka, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilic polymers bearing hydrophobic alkyl groups are expected to be applicable for both ligand presentation on the cell surface and intercellular crosslinking. To explore the optimum design for each application, we synthesized eight different acyl-modified dextrans with varying molecular weight, alkyl length, and alkyl modification degree. We found that the behenate-modified polymers retained on the cell surface longer than the palmitate-modified ones. Since the polymers were also modified with biotin, streptavidin can be presented on the cell surface through biotin-streptavidin recognition. The duration of streptavidin on the cell surface is longer in the behenate-modified polymer than the palmitate-modified one. As for the intercellular crosslinking, the palmitate-modified polymers were more efficient than the behenate-modified polymers. The findings in this research will be helpful to design the acyl-modified polymers for the cell surface engineering.

  13. Atomically resolved graphitic surfaces in air by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wastl, Daniel S; Weymouth, Alfred J; Giessibl, Franz J

    2014-05-27

    Imaging at the atomic scale using atomic force microscopy in biocompatible environments is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate atomic resolution of graphite and hydrogen-intercalated graphene on SiC in air. The main challenges arise from the overall surface cleanliness and the water layers which form on almost all surfaces. To further investigate the influence of the water layers, we compare data taken with a hydrophilic bulk-silicon tip to a hydrophobic bulk-sapphire tip. While atomic resolution can be achieved with both tip materials at moderate interaction forces, there are strong differences in force versus distance spectra which relate to the water layers on the tips and samples. Imaging at very low tip-sample interaction forces results in the observation of large terraces of a naturally occurring stripe structure on the hydrogen-intercalated graphene. This structure has been previously reported on graphitic surfaces that are not covered with disordered adsorbates in ambient conditions (i.e., on graphite and bilayer graphene on SiC, but not on monolayer graphene on SiC). Both these observations indicate that hydrogen-intercalated graphene is close to an ideal graphene sample in ambient environments.

  14. Atomically resolved graphitic surfaces in air by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wastl, Daniel S; Weymouth, Alfred J; Giessibl, Franz J

    2014-05-27

    Imaging at the atomic scale using atomic force microscopy in biocompatible environments is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate atomic resolution of graphite and hydrogen-intercalated graphene on SiC in air. The main challenges arise from the overall surface cleanliness and the water layers which form on almost all surfaces. To further investigate the influence of the water layers, we compare data taken with a hydrophilic bulk-silicon tip to a hydrophobic bulk-sapphire tip. While atomic resolution can be achieved with both tip materials at moderate interaction forces, there are strong differences in force versus distance spectra which relate to the water layers on the tips and samples. Imaging at very low tip-sample interaction forces results in the observation of large terraces of a naturally occurring stripe structure on the hydrogen-intercalated graphene. This structure has been previously reported on graphitic surfaces that are not covered with disordered adsorbates in ambient conditions (i.e., on graphite and bilayer graphene on SiC, but not on monolayer graphene on SiC). Both these observations indicate that hydrogen-intercalated graphene is close to an ideal graphene sample in ambient environments. PMID:24746062

  15. Electron beam seals outer surfaces of porous bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, W. H.; Kurtz, A. D.; Kurtz, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Porous tungsten plugs provide even airflow for frictionless bearings used in air bearing supported gyros. The plugs have their outer cylindrical surface sealed by an electron beam process to ensure unidirectional airflow through their exit ends.

  16. Air Surface Temperature Correlation with Greenhouse Gases by Using Airs Data Over Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim Mohammed; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.

    2014-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop algorithms for calculating the air surface temperature (AST). This study also aims to analyze and investigate the effects of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the AST value in Peninsular Malaysia. Multiple linear regression is used to achieve the objectives of the study. Peninsular Malaysia has been selected as the research area because it is among the regions of tropical Southeast Asia with the greatest humidity, pockets of heavy pollution, rapid economic growth, and industrialization. The predicted AST was highly correlated ( R = 0.783) with GHGs for the 6-year data (2003-2008). Comparisons of five stations in 2009 showed close agreement between the predicted AST and the observed AST from AIRS, especially in the wet season (within 1.3 K). The in situ data ranged from 1 to 2 K. Validation results showed that AST ( R = 0.776-0.878) has values nearly the same as the observed AST from AIRS. We found that O3 during the wet season was indicated by a strongly positive beta coefficient (0.264-0.992) with AST. The CO2 yields a reasonable relationship with temperature with low to moderate beta coefficient (-0.065 to 0.238). The O3, CO2, and environmental variables experienced different seasonal fluctuations that depend on weather conditions and topography. The concentration of gases and pollution were the highest over industrial zones and overcrowded cities, and the dry season was more polluted compared with the wet season. These results indicate the advantage of using the satellite AIRS data and a correlation analysis to investigate the effect of atmospheric GHGs on AST over Peninsular Malaysia. An algorithm that is capable of retrieving Peninsular Malaysian AST in all weather conditions with total uncertainties ranging from 1 to 2 K was developed.

  17. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing assembly (10) has an intermediate rotatable section (33) having an outer cylindrical member (30) coaxially suspended by a torsion wire (72) around an axially polarized cylindrical magnet (32). Axial alignment between the pole faces (40-43) of the intermediate section (33) and end surfaces (50-53) of opposed end bells (20, 22) provides a path of least reluctance across intervening air gaps (60-63) for the magnetic flux emanating from magnet (32). Radial dislocation increases the reluctance and creates a radial restoring force. Substitution of radially polarized magnets 107 fixed to a magnetically permeable cylinder (32') and insertion of pairs of armature coil windings (109-112) between the cylinder pair (33') provides an integral magnetic bearing and torsion motor (100) able to provide arcuately limited rotational drive.

  18. 30 CFR 57.5006 - Air Quality-Surface Only [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air Quality-Surface Only 57.5006 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and Underground §...

  19. 30 CFR 57.5006 - Air Quality-Surface Only [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air Quality-Surface Only 57.5006 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and Underground §...

  20. 30 CFR 57.5006 - Air Quality-Surface Only [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air Quality-Surface Only 57.5006 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and Underground §...

  1. 30 CFR 57.5006 - Air Quality-Surface Only [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air Quality-Surface Only 57.5006 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Air Quality-Surface and Underground §...

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Slider Air Bearing Problem of Hard Disk Drives by Two Multidimensional Upwind Residual Distribution Schemes over Unstructured Triangular Meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Bogy, D. B.

    2001-09-01

    In this paper we present two multigrid numerical schemes over unstructured triangular meshes that solve the slider air bearing problem of hard disk drives. For each fixed slider attitude, the air bearing pressure is obtained by solving the generalized Reynolds equation. The convection part of the equation is modeled in one scheme by the PSI multidimensional upwind residual distribution approach and in the other scheme by the SUPG finite element approach cast in residual distribution form. In both schemes, a linear Galerkin method is used to discretize the diffusion terms. In addition, a non-nested multigrid iteration technique is used to speed up the convergence rate. Finally, the balanced steady state flying attitude of the slider subject to pre-applied suspension force and torques is obtained by a Quasi-Newton iteration method (Broyden's method), and the results of the numerical solutions are compared to each other and to experimental data.

  3. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  4. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  5. Impacts of wind farms on surface air temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin J.

    2010-01-01

    Utility-scale large wind farms are rapidly growing in size and numbers all over the world. Data from a meteorological field campaign show that such wind farms can significantly affect near-surface air temperatures. These effects result from enhanced vertical mixing due to turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors. The impacts of wind farms on local weather can be minimized by changing rotor design or by siting wind farms in regions with high natural turbulence. Using a 25-y-long climate dataset, we identified such regions in the world. Many of these regions, such as the Midwest and Great Plains in the United States, are also rich in wind resources, making them ideal candidates for low-impact wind farms. PMID:20921371

  6. Air bubble-shock wave interaction adjacent to gelantine surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, P. A.; Tomita, Y.; Onodera, O.; Takayama, K.; Sanada, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kitayama, O.

    1990-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and an air bubble-adjacent to a gelatine surface is investigated in order to simulate human tissue damage resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Using high speed cine photography it is found that a shock wave of strength 11 MPa causes 1-3 mm diameter bubbles to produce high velocity microjets with penetration rates of approximately 110 m/s and penetration depths approximately equal to twice the initial bubble diameter. Theoretical considerations for liquid impact on soft solid of similar density indicate that microjet velocities will be twice the penetration rate, i.e. 220 m/s in the present case. Such events are the probable cause of observed renal tissue damage.

  7. Air plasma processing of poly(methyl methacrylate) micro-beads: Surface characterisations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaozong; Cui, Nai-Yi; Osbeck, Susan; Liang, He

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports the surface processing of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) micro-beads by using a rotary air plasma reactor, and its effects on surface properties. The surface properties, including surface wettability, surface chemistry and textures of the PMMA beads, were characterised. It was observed that the air plasma processing can improve the surface wettability of the PMMA microbeads significantly. A 15 min plasma processing can reduce the surface water contact angle of PMMA beads to about 50° from its original value of 80.3°. This was accompanied by about 8% increase in surface oxygen concentration as confirmed by XPS analysis. The optical profilometry examination revealed the air plasma processing resulted in a rougher surface that has a “delicate” surface texture. It is concluded that the surface chemistry and texture, induced by air plasma processing, co-contributed to the surface wettability improvement of PMMA micro-beads.

  8. Subseasonal variability of North American wintertime surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai

    2015-09-01

    Using observational pentad data of the recent 34 Northern Hemisphere extended winters, subseasonal variability of surface air temperature (SAT) over North America is analyzed. The four leading modes of subseasonal SAT variability, that are identified with an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, account for about 60% of the total variance. The first (EOF1) and second (EOF2) modes are independent of other modes, and thus are likely controlled by distinct processes. The third (EOF3) and fourth (EOF4) modes, however, tend to have a phase shift to each other in space and time, indicating that part of their variability is related to a common process and represent a propagating pattern over North America. Lagged regression analysis is conducted to identify the precursors of large-scale atmospheric circulation for each mode a few pentads in advance, and to understand the processes that influence the subseasonal SAT variability and the predictability signal sources. EOF1 is found to be closely related to the Pacific-North American (PNA) circulation pattern and at least part of its variability is preceded by the East Asian cold surge. The cold surge leads to low-level convergence and enhanced convection in the tropical central Pacific which in turn induces the PNA. EOF2 tends to oscillate at a period of about 70 days, and is influenced by the low-frequency component of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). On the other hand, EOF3 and EOF4 are connected to the high-frequency part of the MJO which has a period range of 30-50 days. These findings would help understanding the mechanisms of subseasonal surface air temperature variability in North America and improving weather predictions on a subseasonal time scale.

  9. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Reker, Meike; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Summary Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect) are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m2 depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes. PMID:24991518

  10. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Matthias J; Bohn, Holger F; Reker, Meike; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect) are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m(2) depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes.

  11. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    1982-01-01

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  12. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-05-04

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

  13. Radioisotope Deposition on Interior Building Surfaces: Air Flow and Surface Roughness Influences

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Bobby E

    2005-12-15

    Interior surface deposition effects of vaporized radioactive aerosols are important in understanding their behavior in accident conditions such as the Japanese nuclear laboratory accident in 1999 and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986, where entire communities had to be abandoned because of surface contamination, and the hopefully unlikelihood of a terrorist dirty nuclear bomb attack. Airborne radon progeny offers an opportunity to study radioisotope surface deposition. A significant annual lung cancer rate is also attributed to airborne radon progeny in the interior domestic environment. Surface deposition rates influence the airborne progeny levels. Here, we report extensive {sup 218}Po deposition rates over typical air change rates (ACHs) from 0.02 to 1.0 h{sup -1} for interior furnishings surfaces in a 0.283-m{sup 3} test chamber to supplement earlier reported deposition rates for interior wall, ceiling, and floor surfaces. In analyzing the deposition results from the different materials, it is found that they correlate in terms of roughness with relative static friction and aerodynamic shear stress. Extrapolation to perfectly smooth surfaces provides a good estimate of the Fick's law value. Contrary to prior radon analysis at higher air flow, where the Crump and Seinfeld (CS) turbulent deposition models seemed to fit, at low ACH below 0.5 h{sup -1} the deposition data found excellent agreement with a new Brownian diffusive deposition model for laminar flow. A composite model using the Brownian diffusive laminar flow and the CS turbulent flow models provides an excellent fit to all data. These results provide insight into contamination issues relative to other airborne radioisotopes, with the relative effects being dependent on the airborne contaminant particle sizes and their respective diffusion coefficients as seen in the two deposition models.

  14. A Comprehensive Analysis of AIRS Near Surface Air Temperature and Water Vapor Over Land and Tropical Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. V. T.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Manning, E. M.; Fetzer, E. J.; Wong, S.; Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    Version 6 (V6) of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder's (AIRS) combined infrared and microwave (IR+MW) retrieval of near surface air temperature (NSAT) and water vapor (NSWV) is validated over the United States with the densely populated MESONET data. MESONET data is a collection of surface/near surface meteorological data from many federal and state agencies. The ones used for this analysis are measured from instruments maintained by the National Weather Service (NWS), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Interagency Remote Automatic Weather Stations (RAWS), resulting in a little more than four thousand locations throughout the US. Over the Tropical oceans, NSAT and NSWV are compared to a network of moored buoys from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean/Triangle Trans-Ocean Buoy Network (TAO/TRITON), and the Pilot Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA). With the analysis of AIRS surface and near surface products over ocean, we glean information on how retrieval of NSAT and NSWV over land can be improved and why it needs some adjustments. We also compare AIRS initial guess of near surface products that are trained on fifty days of ECMWF along with AIRS calibrated radiances, to ECMWF analysis data. The comparison is done to show the differing characteristics of AIRS initial guesses from ECMWF.

  15. Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, V. A.; Ott, C. M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of risk from infectious disease during spaceflight missions is composed of several factors including both the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms to which the crew are exposed. Thus, having a good understanding of the microbial ecology aboard spacecraft provides the necessary information to mitigate health risks to the crew. While preventive measures are taken to minimize the presence of pathogens on spacecraft, medically significant organisms have been isolated from both the Mir and International Space Station (ISS). Historically, the method for isolation and identification of microorganisms from spacecraft environmental samples depended upon their growth on culture media. Unfortunately, only a fraction of the organisms may grow on a specific culture medium, potentially omitting those microorganisms whose nutritional and physical requirements for growth are not met. To address this bias in our understanding of the ISS environment, the Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment was designed to investigate and develop monitoring technology to provide better microbial characterization. For the SWAB flight experiment, we hypothesized that environmental analysis using non-culture-based technologies would reveal microorganisms, allergens, and microbial toxins not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. Key findings during this experiment included: a) Generally, advanced molecular techniques were able to reveal a few organisms not recovered using culture-based methods; however, there is no indication that current monitoring is "missing" any medically significant bacteria or fungi. b) Molecular techniques have tremendous potential for microbial monitoring, however, sample preparation and data analysis present challenges for spaceflight hardware. c) Analytical results indicate that some molecular techniques, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), can

  16. COMETARY SCIENCE. CHO-bearing organic compounds at the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko revealed by Ptolemy.

    PubMed

    Wright, I P; Sheridan, S; Barber, S J; Morgan, G H; Andrews, D J; Morse, A D

    2015-07-31

    The surface and subsurface of comets preserve material from the formation of the solar system. The properties of cometary material thus provide insight into the physical and chemical conditions during their formation. We present mass spectra taken by the Ptolemy instrument 20 minutes after the initial touchdown of the Philae lander on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Regular mass distributions indicate the presence of a sequence of compounds with additional -CH2- and -O- groups (mass/charge ratios 14 and 16, respectively). Similarities with the detected coma species of comet Halley suggest the presence of a radiation-induced polymer at the surface. Ptolemy measurements also indicate an apparent absence of aromatic compounds such as benzene, a lack of sulfur-bearing species, and very low concentrations of nitrogenous material.

  17. CHO-bearing organic compounds at the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko revealed by Ptolemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Sheridan, S.; Barber, S. J.; Morgan, G. H.; Andrews, D. J.; Morse, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    The surface and subsurface of comets preserve material from the formation of the solar system. The properties of cometary material thus provide insight into the physical and chemical conditions during their formation. We present mass spectra taken by the Ptolemy instrument 20 minutes after the initial touchdown of the Philae lander on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Regular mass distributions indicate the presence of a sequence of compounds with additional -CH2- and -O- groups (mass/charge ratios 14 and 16, respectively). Similarities with the detected coma species of comet Halley suggest the presence of a radiation-induced polymer at the surface. Ptolemy measurements also indicate an apparent absence of aromatic compounds such as benzene, a lack of sulfur-bearing species, and very low concentrations of nitrogenous material.

  18. COMETARY SCIENCE. CHO-bearing organic compounds at the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko revealed by Ptolemy.

    PubMed

    Wright, I P; Sheridan, S; Barber, S J; Morgan, G H; Andrews, D J; Morse, A D

    2015-07-31

    The surface and subsurface of comets preserve material from the formation of the solar system. The properties of cometary material thus provide insight into the physical and chemical conditions during their formation. We present mass spectra taken by the Ptolemy instrument 20 minutes after the initial touchdown of the Philae lander on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Regular mass distributions indicate the presence of a sequence of compounds with additional -CH2- and -O- groups (mass/charge ratios 14 and 16, respectively). Similarities with the detected coma species of comet Halley suggest the presence of a radiation-induced polymer at the surface. Ptolemy measurements also indicate an apparent absence of aromatic compounds such as benzene, a lack of sulfur-bearing species, and very low concentrations of nitrogenous material. PMID:26228155

  19. Potential effects of surface coal mining on the hydrology of the Little Bear Creek area, Moorhead coal field, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClymonds, N.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Little Bear Creek area of the Moorhead Coal Field, 27 miles south of Ashland, Montana, contains large reserves of Federally owned coal that have been identified for potential lease sale. A hydrologic study was conducted in the area to describe existing hydrologic system and to assess potential effects of surface mining on local water resources. Hydrologic data collected from private wells, observation wells, test holes and springs indicate that the aquifers are coal and sandstone beds in the upper part of the Tongue River Member, Fort Union Formation (Paleocene age), and sand and gravel layers of valley alluvium (Pleistocene and Holocene age). Surface water is available from ephemeral flow along stretches of the main streams, and from stock ponds throughout the area. Mining the Anderson and Dietz coal beds would destroy one stock well and several stock ponds, would possibly interfere with the flow of one spring, and would lower the potentiometric surface within the coal and sandstone aquifers. The alluvial aquifer beneath Little Bear Creek and Davidson Draw would be removed at the mine site, as would sandstone and coal aquifers above the mine floor. Although mining would alter existing hydrologic systems, alternative water supplies are available. Planned structuring of the spoils and reconstruction of the alluvial aquifers could minimize downstream water-quality degradation. (USGS)

  20. Microbial Diversity in Hydrate-bearing and -free Seafloor Surface Sediments in the Shenhu Area, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, X.

    2015-12-01

    In 2007, the China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition GMGS-1 in the Shenhu area on the northern continental slope of the South China Sea was performed (Zhang et al., 2007). Six holes (namely Sites SH1B, SH2B, SH3B, SH5B, SH5C and SH7B) were drilled, and gas hydrate samples were recovered at three sites: Sites SH2B, SH3B and SH7B. In order to investigate microbial diversity and community features in correlation to gas hydrate-bearing sediments, a study on microbial diversity in the surface sediments at hydrate-bearing sites (SH3B and SH7B) and -free sites (SH1B, SH5B, SH5C) was carried out by using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis. The phylogenetic results indicated difference in microbial communities between hydrate-bearing and -free sediments. At the gas hydrate-bearing sites, bacterial communities were dominated by Deltaproteobacteria (30.5%), and archaeal communities were dominated by Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group (33.8%); In contrast, Planctomycetes was the major group (43.9%) in bacterial communities, while Marine Benthic Group-D (MBG-D) (32.4%) took up the largest proportion in the archaeal communities. Moreover, the microbial communities have characteristics different from those in other hydrate-related sediments around the world, indicating that the presence of hydrates could affect the microbial distribution and community composition. In addition, the microbial community composition in the studied sediments has its own uniqueness, which may be resulted by co-effect of geochemical characteristics and presence/absence of gas hydrates.

  1. Skin frictional resistance of plane surfaces in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diehl, W S

    1922-01-01

    Given here is the most recent research on skin frictional resistance of plane surfaces in air that was conducted by Dr. Wieselsberger under the direction of Dr. Prandtl of Gottingen University. In all, 16 models were tested. These were divided into four groups, as follows: 1) cloth, in the original condition; 2) cloth, with the nap singed off; 3) cloth, with three coats of dope; and 4) cloth, with six coats of dope. Each group consisted of four models of uniform width, 1 meter, and of lengths of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 meters. Tests were made on each model at speeds varying from 7.0 to 50 meters per second. The observed total resistance was corrected for the form resistance which was obtained from the pressure distribution on the end of the model. Previous tests had shown that the form resistance due to the rounded front edge used on the models was negligible. The results are expressed in terms of the absolute coefficient of frictionless resistance, C(sub F).

  2. Assessing surface air temperature variability using quantile regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. A.; Sterin, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Many researches in climate change currently involve linear trends, based on measured variables. And many of them only consider trends in mean values, whereas it is clear, that not only means, but also whole shape of distribution changes over time and requires careful assessment. For example extreme values including outliers may get bigger, while median has zero slope.Quantile regression provides a convenient tool, that enables detailed analysis of changes in full range of distribution by producing a vector of quantile trends for any given set of quantiles.We have applied quantile regression to surface air temperature observations made at over 600 weather stations across Russian Federation during last four decades. The results demonstrate well pronounced regions with similar values of significant trends in different parts of temperature value distribution (left tail, middle part, right tail). The uncertainties of quantile trend estimations for several spatial patterns of trends over Russia are estimated and analyzed for each of four seasons.For temperature trend estimation over vast territories, quantile regression is an effort consuming approach, but is more informative than traditional instrument, to assess decadal evolution of temperature values, including evolution of extremes.Partial support of ERA NET RUS ACPCA joint project between EU and RBRF 12-05-91656-ЭРА-А is highly appreciated.

  3. Sensate composite calcaneal flap in leg amputation: a full terminal weight-bearing surface-experience in eight adult patients.

    PubMed

    Livani, Bruno; Castro, Gabriel; Filho, Jose Roberto Tonelli; Morgatho, Tâmara Ramos; Mongon, Mauricio Leal Dias; Belangero, William Dias; Davitt, Michael; Carvalho, Jose André

    2011-08-01

    Despite modern reconstruction techniques and replantation, the preservation of a severely traumatised limb, or even a limb affected by a congenital malformation, usually gives poorer functional results compared with amputation and prosthetisation. The aim of this study was to describe a hind foot (including the calcaneum and fat pad) sensate flap with a surface that allows full terminal weight bearing in transtibial amputations in adults. Between June 2007 and September 2008, eight patients underwent leg amputations with a sensate composite calcaneal flap reconstruction of the stump. Patients consisted of four men and four women with a mean age of 46.5 (26-66) years. All amputations were unilateral. The mean follow-up was 28.3 (25-42) months. There were no complications. Calcaneum tibial fusion was observed in all patients in a mean time of 3.5 (3-4) months. A below-knee prosthesis was adapted at 16 weeks postoperatively in all cases, and no need for stump revision occurred in this series during the entire follow-up period. A transtibial amputation covered with a sensate plantar flap preserving the calcaneum was proposed. In theory, the anatomic structures spared in this technique provide a strong, full, weight-bearing terminal surface of the stump that will last a lifetime. PMID:21789589

  4. Temporal and spatial distributions of directional counterface motion at the acetabular bearing surface in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, D. R.; Brown, T. D.; Maxian, T. A.; Callaghan, J. J.

    1998-01-01

    The motions of counterface articulation against the bearing surface of the acetabular liner strongly influence polyethylene wear debris production in contemporary total hip arthroplasty. However, the available body of relevant articular force and motion information is largely confined to resultant load excursions measured relative to instrumented femoral components, and/or to global angular motions (flexion, adduction, endorotation) of the joint. Analytical frameworks are here developed to transform such information into temporal and spatial variations of the resultant load and of the local counterface sliding velocity relative to an ordered set of discrete locations (e.g., finite element nodes) on the acetabular bearing surface. Whole-duty-cycle time histories of acetabular resultant load and counterface velocity distributions are presented for two important practical situations: human level walking gait, and a 23 degrees biaxial rocking hip simulation machine. The local counterface motions occurring in the simulator are characterized by higher velocities, smoother motion patterns, and wider directional variation than those occurring in human gait. PMID:9807707

  5. Phospholipid surface bilayers at the air-water interface. II. Water permeability of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine surface bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, L; Gershfeld, N L

    1985-01-01

    Dispersions of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in water have been reported to form a structure at 29 degrees C at the equilibrium air/water surface with a molecular density equal to that of a typical bilayer. In this study, the water permeability of this structure has been evaluated by measuring the rate of water evaporation from DMPC dispersions in water in the temperature range where the surface film density exceeds that of a monolayer. Evaporation rates for the lipid dispersions did not deviate from those for lipid-free systems throughout the entire temperature range examined (20-35 degrees C) except at 29 degrees C, where a barrier to evaporation was detected. This strengthens the view that the structure that forms at this temperature has the properties of a typical bilayer. PMID:3978199

  6. [Bionic surface design in metal on metal bearings for total hip arthroplasty--optimization of tribological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Böhling, U; Scholz, J; Thomas, W; Grundei, H

    2005-04-01

    Bionic systems are aiming to integrate natural observing into mechanical solutions. This has been realized in the design of metal on metal bearing in total hip resurface arthroplasty. The articular side of the femoral cup is covered with a dimple like surface. Under laboratory condition this so called "surf-metal-cup" achieved a reduction of the mechanical wear to almost a third part in comparison to a metal-cup with plane surface. This advantage, caused by the reduced friction-coefficient due to improved hydrodynamic lubrication could also be proved under laboratory conditions. The clinical introduction is expected to offer a significant extension of durability in this prosthetic system and needs to be proved in a long-term study.

  7. Dry under water: comparative morphology and functional aspects of air-retaining insect surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Alexander; Florian Bohn, Holger; Ditsche-Kuru, Petra; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2011-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces prevent certain body parts of semiaquatic and aquatic insects from getting wet while submerged in water. The air layer on these surfaces can serve the insects as a physical gill. Using scanning electron microscopy, we investigated the morphology of air-retaining surfaces in five insect species with different levels of adaptation to aquatic habitats. We found surfaces with either large and sparse hairs (setae), small and dense hairs (microtrichia), or hierarchically structured surfaces with both types of hairs. The structural parameters and air-film persistence of these surfaces were compared. Air-film persistence varied between 2 days in the beetle Galerucella nymphaea possessing only sparse setae and more than 120 days in the bugs Notonecta glauca and Ilyocoris cimicoides possessing dense microtrichia (up to 6.6 × 10(6) microtrichia per millimeter square). From our results, we conclude that the density of the surface structures is the most important factor that affects the persistence of air films. Combinations of setae and microtrichia are not decisive for the overall persistence of the air film but might provide a thick air store for a short time and a thin but mechanically more stable air film for a long time. Thus, we assume that a dense cover of microtrichia acts as a "backup system" preventing wetting of the body surface in case the air-water interface is pressed toward the surface. Our findings might be beneficial for the development of biomimetic surfaces for long-term air retention and drag reduction under water. In addition, the biological functions of the different air retention capabilities are discussed.

  8. Dry under water: comparative morphology and functional aspects of air-retaining insect surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Alexander; Florian Bohn, Holger; Ditsche-Kuru, Petra; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2011-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces prevent certain body parts of semiaquatic and aquatic insects from getting wet while submerged in water. The air layer on these surfaces can serve the insects as a physical gill. Using scanning electron microscopy, we investigated the morphology of air-retaining surfaces in five insect species with different levels of adaptation to aquatic habitats. We found surfaces with either large and sparse hairs (setae), small and dense hairs (microtrichia), or hierarchically structured surfaces with both types of hairs. The structural parameters and air-film persistence of these surfaces were compared. Air-film persistence varied between 2 days in the beetle Galerucella nymphaea possessing only sparse setae and more than 120 days in the bugs Notonecta glauca and Ilyocoris cimicoides possessing dense microtrichia (up to 6.6 × 10(6) microtrichia per millimeter square). From our results, we conclude that the density of the surface structures is the most important factor that affects the persistence of air films. Combinations of setae and microtrichia are not decisive for the overall persistence of the air film but might provide a thick air store for a short time and a thin but mechanically more stable air film for a long time. Thus, we assume that a dense cover of microtrichia acts as a "backup system" preventing wetting of the body surface in case the air-water interface is pressed toward the surface. Our findings might be beneficial for the development of biomimetic surfaces for long-term air retention and drag reduction under water. In addition, the biological functions of the different air retention capabilities are discussed. PMID:21290417

  9. Room temperature freezing and orientational control of surface-immobilized peptides in air.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaoxin; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Myers, John; Abbott, Nicholas L; Chen, Zhan

    2015-07-14

    Sugar coatings can stabilize the "native" structure and control the orientation of surface-immobilized peptides in air, providing a potential approach to retain biological functions of surface-immobilized biomolecules in air. This method is general and applicable to complex enzymes. PMID:26068205

  10. Colonization by Cladosporium spp. of painted metal surfaces associated with heating and air conditioning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, D. G.; Simmons, R. B.; Switzer, K. F.; Ajello, L.; Pierson, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. hebarum colonized painted metal surfaces of covering panels and register vents of heating, air conditioning and ventilation systems. Hyphae penetrated the paint film and developed characteristic conidiophores and conidia. The colonies were tightly appressed to the metal surface and conidia were not readily detectable via standard air sampling procedures.

  11. 77 FR 38595 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Precision Strike Weapon and Air-to-Surface Gunnery Training...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ...; Precision Strike Weapon and Air-to-Surface Gunnery Training and Testing Operations at Eglin Air Force Base... with Precision Strike Weapon (PSW) and Air-to-Surface (AS) gunnery missions, both of which are military... two weapons: (1) The Joint Air-to-Surface Stand-off Missile (JASSM) AGM-158 A and B; and (2) the...

  12. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  13. Rolling-element bearings. [contact sliding friction study of solid bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to hydrodynamic bearings, which depend for low-friction characteristics on a fluid film between the journal and the bearing surfaces, roller-element bearings employ a number of balls or rollers that roll in an annular space. The paper briefly outlines the advantages and disadvantages of roller-element bearings as compared to hydrodynamic bearings. The discussion covers bearing types, rolling friction, friction losses in rolling bearings, contact stresses, deformations, kinematics (normal and high speeds), bearing dynamics including elastohydrodynamics, load distribution, lubrication (grease, solid oil, oil-air mist), specific dynamic capacity and life, specific static capacity, and fatigue or wearout (elastohydrodynamics, wear). Rolling bearing wear factor as a function of operating environment is plotted and discussed.

  14. ToF-SIMS analysis of anti-fretting films generated on the surface of ball bearings containing dithiocarbamate and dithiophosphate grease additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque, Ricardo G.; Wang, Zhiyu; Duell, Dave; Fowler, David E.

    2004-06-01

    During transport of hard drives from the factory to the end customer, vibrations can induce small repetitive displacements of the ball bearings giving rise to fretting corrosion at the metal surfaces. On the other hand, it has been found that some particular types of grease additives can form thin layers on steel surfaces and thus protect against fretting corrosion. ToF-SIMS has been used to study the chemical nature of layers formed on bearing surfaces containing greases with dithiocarbamates, dithiophosphates, and metal sulfonate additives. In cases where fretting was prevented, the presence of MoS 2-, FeS - and ion fragments containing Mo-Fe-S - were observed, whereas none of these ions were detected on the surfaces of fretted bearings. Finally, it is inferred that the action of metal sulfonates may have an antagonist effect on the anti-fretting activity of the dithiocarbamate and dithiophosphate compounds studied.

  15. The EUSTACE project: delivering global, daily information on surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morice, C. P.; Rayner, N. A.; Auchmann, R.; Bessembinder, J.; Bronnimann, S.; Brugnara, Y.; Conway, E. A.; Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Herring, K.; Kennedy, J.; Lindgren, F.; Madsen, K. S.; Merchant, C. J.; van der Schrier, G.; Stephens, A.; Tonboe, R. T.; Waterfall, A. M.; Mitchelson, J.; Woolway, I.

    2015-12-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional (land and marine) surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. These relationships can be derived either empirically or with the help of a physical model.Here we discuss the science needed to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types. Information contained in the satellite retrievals would be used to create globally-complete fields in the past, using statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. As the data volumes involved are considerable, such work needs to include development of new "Big Data" analysis methods.We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018), i.e.: • providing new, consistent, multi-component estimates of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; • identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; • estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; • using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras.Information will also be given on how interested users can become

  16. Reduced platelet adhesion on the surface of polyurethane bearing structure of sulfobetaine.

    PubMed

    Yuan, J; Zhang, J; Zhu, J; Shen, J; Lin, S C; Zhu, W; Fang, J L

    2003-10-01

    Poly(etherurethane)s are widely used as blood-contacting biomaterials due to their good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. Nevertheless, their blood compatibility is still not adequate for the more demanding applications. Surface modification is an effective way to improve the blood compatibility and retain the bulk properties of biomaterials. The purpose of present study was to design and synthesize a novel nonthrombogenic biomaterial by modifying the surface of poly(etherurethane) with zwitterionic monomer. Films of polyurethane were grafted with sulfobetaine by a three-step procedure. In the first step, the film surfaces were treated with hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) in toluene at 50 degrees C in the presence of di-n-butyl tin dilaurate (DBTDL) as a catalyst. The extent of the reaction was measured by ATR-IR spectra; a maximum number of free NCO group was obtained after a reaction time of 90 min. In the second step, the hydroxyl group of 4-dimethylamino-1-butanol (DMAB) was allowed to react in toluene with isocyanate groups bound on the surface. In the third step, sulfobetaine was formed on the surface through the ring-opening reaction between tertiary amine of DMAB and 1,3- propane-sultone (PS). It was characterized by ATR-IR, XPS. The data showed that the grafted surfaces were composed of sulfobetaine. The results of the contact angle measurements showed that they were strongly hydrophilic. The state of platelet adhesion and shape variation for the attached platelets was described. The modified surface shows excellent blood compatibility feature by the low platelet adhesion. PMID:14621338

  17. Cooling system for a bearing of a turbine rotor

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher

    2002-01-01

    In a gas turbine, a bore tube assembly radially inwardly of an aft bearing conveys cooling steam to the buckets of the turbine and returns the cooling steam to a return. To cool the bearing and thermally insulate the bearing from the cooling steam paths, a radiation shield is spaced from the bore tube assembly by a dead air gap. Additionally, an air passageway is provided between the radiation shield and the inner surface of an aft shaft forming part of the rotor. Air is supplied from an inlet for flow along the passage and radially outwardly through bores in the aft shaft disk to cool the bearing and insulate it from transfer of heat from the cooling steam.

  18. Diamond-like carbon coatings enhance the hardness and resilience of bearing surfaces for use in joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Roy, M E; Whiteside, L A; Xu, J; Katerberg, B J

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a hard diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating to enhance the hardness and resilience of a bearing surface in joint replacement. The greater hardness of a magnesium-stabilized zirconium (Mg-PSZ) substrate was expected to provide a harder coating-substrate composite microhardness than the cobalt-chromium alloy (CoCr) also used in arthroplasty. Three femoral heads of each type (CoCr, Mg-PSZ, DLC-CoCr and DLC-Mg-PSZ) were examined. Baseline (non-coated) and composite coating/substrate hardness was measured by Vickers microhardness tests, while nanoindentation tests measured the hardness and elastic modulus of the DLC coating independent of the Mg-PSZ and CoCr substrates. Non-coated Mg-PSZ heads were considerably harder than non-coated CoCr heads, while DLC coating greatly increased the microhardness of the CoCr and Mg-PSZ substrates. On the nanoscale the non-coated heads were much harder than on the microscale, with CoCr exhibiting twice as much plastic deformation as Mg-PSZ. The mechanical properties of the DLC coatings were not significantly different for both the CoCr and Mg-PSZ substrates, producing similar moduli of resilience and plastic resistance ratios. DLC coatings greatly increased hardness on both the micro and nano levels and significantly improved resilience and resistance to plastic deformation compared with non-coated heads. Because Mg-PSZ allows less plastic deformation than CoCr and provides a greater composite microhardness, DLC-Mg-PSZ will likely be more durable for use as a bearing surface in vivo.

  19. Use of satellite land surface temperatures in the EUSTACE global surface air temperature analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Rayner, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    EUSTACE (EU Surface Temperatures for All Corners of Earth) is a Horizon2020 project that will produce a spatially complete, near-surface air temperature (NSAT) analysis for the globe for every day since 1850. The analysis will be based on both satellite and in situ surface temperature observations over land, sea, ice and lakes, which will be combined using state-of-the-art statistical methods. The use of satellite data will enable the EUSTACE analysis to offer improved estimates of NSAT in regions that are poorly observed in situ, compared with existing in-situ based analyses. This presentation illustrates how satellite land surface temperature (LST) data - sourced from the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobTemperature project - will be used in EUSTACE. Satellite LSTs represent the temperature of the Earth's skin, which can differ from the corresponding NSAT by several degrees or more, particularly during the hottest part of the day. Therefore the first challenge is to develop an approach to estimate global NSAT from satellite observations. Two methods will be trialled in EUSTACE, both of which are summarised here: an established empirical regression-based approach for predicting NSAT from satellite data, and a new method whereby NSAT is calculated from LST and other parameters using a physics-based model. The second challenge is in estimating the uncertainties for the satellite NSAT estimates, which will determine how these data are used in the final blended satellite-in situ analysis. This is also important as a key component of EUSTACE is in delivering accurate uncertainty information to users. An overview of the methods to estimate the satellite NSATs is also included in this presentation.

  20. Distillation and Air Stripping Designs for the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin E.; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Air stripping and distillation are two different gravity-based methods, which may be applied to the purification of wastewater on the lunar base. These gravity-based solutions to water processing are robust physical separation techniques, which may be advantageous to many other techniques for their simplicity in design and operation. The two techniques can be used in conjunction with each other to obtain high purity water. The components and feed compositions for modeling waste water streams are presented in conjunction with the Aspen property system for traditional stage distillation models and air stripping models. While the individual components for each of the waste streams will vary naturally within certain bounds, an analog model for waste water processing is suggested based on typical concentration ranges for these components. Target purity levels for the for recycled water are determined for each individual component based on NASA s required maximum contaminant levels for potable water Distillation processes are modeled separately and in tandem with air stripping to demonstrate the potential effectiveness and utility of these methods in recycling wastewater on the Moon. Optimum parameters such as reflux ratio, feed stage location, and processing rates are determined with respect to the power consumption of the process. Multistage distillation is evaluated for components in wastewater to determine the minimum number of stages necessary for each of 65 components in humidity condensate and urine wastewater mixed streams. Components of the wastewater streams are ranked by Henry s Law Constant and the suitability of air stripping in the purification of wastewater in terms of component removal is evaluated. Scaling factors for distillation and air stripping columns are presented to account for the difference in the lunar gravitation environment. Commercially available distillation and air stripping units which are considered suitable for Exploration Life Support

  1. Wettability-independent bouncing on flat surfaces mediated by thin air films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Lagraauw, Rudy; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of drops onto solid surfaces plays a crucial role in a variety of processes, including inkjet printing, fog harvesting, anti-icing, dropwise condensation and spray coating. Recent efforts in understanding and controlling drop impact behaviour focused on superhydrophobic surfaces with specific surface structures enabling drop bouncing with reduced contact time. Here, we report a different universal bouncing mechanism that occurs on both wetting and non-wetting flat surfaces for both high and low surface tension liquids. Using high-speed multiple-wavelength interferometry, we show that this bouncing mechanism is based on the continuous presence of an air film for moderate drop impact velocities. This submicrometre `air cushion' slows down the incoming drop and reverses its momentum. Viscous forces in the air film play a key role in this process: they provide transient stability of the air cushion against squeeze-out, mediate momentum transfer, and contribute a substantial part of the energy dissipation during bouncing.

  2. Generation of large-area and glow-like surface discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ying; Xia, Yang; Bi, Zhenhua; Wang, Xueyang; Qi, Zhihua; Ji, Longfei; Li, Bin; Liu, Dongping

    2016-08-01

    A large-area (6 cm × 6 cm) air surface dielectric barrier discharge has been generated at atmospheric pressure by using well-aligned and micron-sized dielectric tubes with tungsten wire electrodes. Intensified CCD images with an exposure time of 5 ns show that the uniform surface air discharge can be generated during the rising and falling time of pulsed DC voltage. Current and voltage and optical measurements confirm the formation of glow-like air discharges on the surface of micron-sized dielectric tubes. Simulation results indicate that the microelectrode configuration contributes to the formation of strong surface electric field and plays an important role in the generation of uniform surface air discharge.

  3. Bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Kapich, Davorin D.

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  4. Land Surface Process and Air Quality Research and Applications at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale; Khan, Maudood

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of land surface process and air quality research at MSFC including atmospheric modeling and ongoing research whose objective is to undertake a comprehensive spatiotemporal analysis of the effects of accurate land surface characterization on atmospheric modeling results, and public health applications. Land use maps as well as 10 meter air temperature, surface wind, PBL mean difference heights, NOx, ozone, and O3+NO2 plots as well as spatial growth model outputs are included. Emissions and general air quality modeling are also discussed.

  5. Air at hydrophobic surfaces and kinetics of three phase contact formation.

    PubMed

    Krasowska, M; Zawala, J; Malysa, K

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the importance of air presence at hydrophobic solid surfaces for wetting film rupture and kinetics of three phase contact formation. Affinity to air is a typical feature of hydrophobic surfaces, but it has been often either overlooked or not taken into consideration. When the hydrophobic surface, contacted earlier with air, is immersed into water then air can stay attached to the surface. The origin of long range hydrophobic forces and data showing that these interactions were due to the bridging of nanobubbles attached to the hydrophobic surfaces are discussed. A major part of the review is devoted to the description and analysis of data showing that air (nano-, micro-bubbles and/or air film) present at a hydrophobic surface facilitated rupture of the liquid film and three phase contact formation during bubble collisions with flat Teflon plates of different surface roughness. Although all Teflon plates were highly hydrophobic (contact angles ca. 100 degrees -130 degrees ) the time of the three phase contact (TPC) formation and attachment of the colliding bubble was strongly affected by the plate surface roughness. The time of the TPC formation was shortened from over 80 down to 2-3 ms when the roughness was increased from below 1 microm to over 50 microm. Higher surface roughness means that larger amounts of air was entrapped during the Teflon plates' immersion in water. Additional experimental evidence is given, showing that facilitation of the TPC formation and the bubble attachment was due to air presence and re-distribution over the Teflon surfaces: i) prolonging the plate immersion time resulted in quicker attachment; ii) irregular and disappearing air pockets were recorded at a Teflon surface; iii) a satellite bubble left at a Teflon surface during the first collision facilitated the attachment; iv) attachment always occurred during the first collision in the case of a very rough "Teflon V" surface, but in highly concentrated n

  6. Charging of moving surfaces by corona discharges sustained in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun-Chieh Kushner, Mark J.; Zhang, Daihua; Leoni, Napoleon Birecki, Henryk Gila, Omer

    2014-07-28

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharges are used in electrophotographic (EP) printing technologies for charging imaging surfaces such as photoconductors. A typical corona discharge consists of a wire (or wire array) biased with a few hundred volts of dc plus a few kV of ac voltage. An electric discharge is produced around the corona wire from which electrons drift towards and charge the underlying dielectric surface. The surface charging reduces the voltage drop across the gap between the corona wire and the dielectric surface, which then terminates the discharge, as in a dielectric barrier discharge. In printing applications, this underlying surface is continuously moving throughout the charging process. For example, previously charged surfaces, which had reduced the local electric field and terminated the local discharge, are translated out of the field of view and are replaced with uncharged surface. The uncharged surface produces a rebound in the electric field in the vicinity of the corona wire which in turn results in re-ignition of the discharge. The discharge, so reignited, is then asymmetric. We found that in the idealized corona charging system we investigated, a negatively dc biased corona blade with a dielectric covered ground electrode, the discharge is initially sustained by electron impact ionization from the bulk plasma and then dominated by ionization from sheath accelerated secondary electrons. Depending on the speed of the underlying surface, the periodic re-ignition of the discharge can produce an oscillatory charging pattern on the moving surface.

  7. A Comparison of Statistical Techniques for Combining Modeled and Observed Concentrations to Create High-Resolution Ozone Air Quality Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality surfaces representing pollutant concentrations across space and time are needed for many applications, including tracking trends and relating air quality to human and ecosystem health. The spatial and temporal characteristics of these surfaces may reveal new informat...

  8. Bearing material. [composite material with low friction surface for rolling or sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A composite material is described which will provide low friction surfaces for materials in rolling or sliding contact and is self-lubricating and oxidation resistant up to and in excess of about 930 C. The composite is comprised of a metal component which lends strength and elasticity to the structure, a fluoride salt component which provides lubrication and, lastly, a glass component which not only provides oxidation protection to the metal but may also enhance the lubrication qualities of the composite.

  9. Static SIMS Analysis of Carbonate on Basic Alkali-bearing Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Cortez, Marnie Michelle; Appelhans, Anthony David; Olsen, J.E.; Shaw, A. D.; Karahan, C.; Avci, R.

    2003-02-01

    Carbonate is a somewhat enigmatic anion in static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) because abundant ions containing intact CO32- are not detected when analyzing alkaline-earth carbonate minerals common to the geochemical environment. In contrast, carbonate can be observed as an adduct ion when it is bound with alkali cations. In this study, carbonate was detected as the adduct Na2CO3·Na+ in the spectra of sodium carbonate, bicarbonate, hydroxide, oxalate, formate and nitrite and to a lesser extent nitrate. The appearance of the adduct Na2CO3·Na+ on hydroxide, oxalate, formate and nitrite surfaces was interpreted in terms of these basic surfaces fixing CO2 from the ambient atmosphere. The low abundance of Na2CO3·Na+ in the static SIMS spectrum of sodium nitrate, compared with a significantly higher abundance in salts having stronger conjugate bases, suggested that the basicity of the conjugate anions correlated with aggressive CO2 fixation; however, the appearance of Na2CO3·Na+ could not be explained simply in terms of solution basicity constants. The oxide molecular ion Na2O+ and adducts NaOH·Na+ and Na2O·Na+ also constituted part of the carbonate spectral signature, and were observed in spectra from all the salts studied. In addition to the carbonate and oxide ions, a low-abundance oxalate ion series was observed that had the general formula Na2-xHxC2O4·Na+, where 0 < x < 2. Oxalate adsorption from the laboratory atmosphere was demonstrated but the oxalate ion series also was likely to be formed from reductive coupling occurring during the static SIMS bombardment event. The remarkable spectral similarity observed when comparing the sodium salts indicated that their surfaces shared common chemical speciation and that the chemistry of the surfaces was very different from the bulk of the particle. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature Over Central and Eastern Eurasia from MODIS Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.

    2011-01-01

    Surface air temperature (T(sub a)) is a critical variable in the energy and water cycle of the Earth.atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. This is a preliminary study to evaluate estimation of T(sub a) from satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature (T(sub s)) by using MODIS-Terra data over two Eurasia regions: northern China and fUSSR. High correlations are observed in both regions between station-measured T(sub a) and MODIS T(sub s). The relationships between the maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) depend significantly on land cover types, but the minimum T(sub a) and nighttime T(sub s) have little dependence on the land cover types. The largest difference between maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) appears over the barren and sparsely vegetated area during the summer time. Using a linear regression method, the daily maximum T(sub a) were estimated from 1 km resolution MODIS T(sub s) under clear-sky conditions with coefficients calculated based on land cover types, while the minimum T(sub a) were estimated without considering land cover types. The uncertainty, mean absolute error (MAE), of the estimated maximum T(sub a) varies from 2.4 C over closed shrublands to 3.2 C over grasslands, and the MAE of the estimated minimum Ta is about 3.0 C.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterovirus D68 Detected in Classroom Air and on Environmental Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Tania S.; Morris, J. Glenn; Loeb, Julia C.

    2016-01-01

    We amplified and sequenced the complete genome of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) that had been collected from classroom air using a filter-based air sampling method and by swab sampling of environmental surfaces. Relatively high levels of EV-D68 genome equivalents were found per cubic meter of air by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). PMID:27313311

  12. Processes of Ammonia Air-Surface Exchange in a Fertilized Zea Mays Canopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent incorporation of coupled soil biogeochemical and bi-directional NH3 air-surface exchange algorithms into regional air quality models holds promise for further reducing uncertainty in estimates of NH3 emissions from fertilized soils. While this advancement represents a sig...

  13. Rough surface improves stability of air- sounding balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.

    1965-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability of balloons used for measuring the intensity and direction of atmospheric winds at various elevations is improved by incorporating a rough surface on the balloons. The rough-surfaced balloon is useful for collecting wind profiles and other meteorological data.

  14. Impact of surface treatment of different reinforced glass-ceramic anterior crowns on load bearing capacity.

    PubMed

    Emslander, Angela; Reise, Michael; Eichberger, Marlis; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of different surface treatments on fracture load (FL) of canine crowns fabricated from two different pressable lithium-disilicate ceramics: A (HS10PC, estetic ceram, n=180) and B (IPS e.max Press, IvoclarVivadent, n=120). The standardized specimens were divided into groups of six different surface treatments and two glazing temperatures. A-group specimens were additionally assigned two glazing pastes with various thermal expansion coefficients (TEC). FL was measured and TECs were determined. Data were analyzed using three/one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Scheffe's test. B showed comparable or higher FL than A (B: 503-876 N; A: 375-734 N). Lithium-disilicate crowns show higher FL when not grinded but only polished or glazed. Glazing pastes affected FL depending on their TECs, firing temperature and crown treatment. TEC of A and B was 10 ppm/K, glazing pastes for A presented TECs of 7.5 ppm/K and 10 ppm/K and for B of 9 ppm/K. PMID:26438982

  15. Load-bearing ability of the mosquito tarsus on water surfaces arising from its flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X. Q.; Liu, J. L.; Zhang, W. J.; Qu, Y. D.

    2015-03-01

    Mosquitoes possess a remarkable ability to stand effortlessly and walk freely on water surfaces because their six legs provide a large force to support the body weight. This study is focused on the role of the tarsus (the distal segment of the mosquito leg) because it was observed that normally only the tarsi make contact with water. The maximum value of the supporting force of the tarsus (6 mm long) in contact with water is estimated as 492 ± 5 μN, nearly 20 times the body weight of the mosquito, whereas the value for the whole leg (11 mm) is about 23 times the body weight. We demonstrate that the huge force provided by the tarsus originates from its flexibility, which ensures that the leg does not easily pierce the water. Adjustment of the initial stepping angle of the tarsus assists the mosquito to control the supporting force. These findings help to illustrate how mosquitoes stand or walk on water with only their tarsi in nearly horizontal contact with the water surface. Besides enhancing our understanding of mechanisms underlying "walking on water" by semi-aquatic insects, these investigations could provide inspiration for the biomimetic design of miniature robotics.

  16. Liquid-Infused Surfaces with Trapped Air (LISTA) for Drag Force Reduction.

    PubMed

    Hemeda, A A; Tafreshi, H Vahedi

    2016-03-29

    Superhydrophobic (SHP) surfaces are known for their drag-reducing attributes thanks to their ability to trap air in their surface pores and thereby reduce the contact between water and the frictional solid area. SHP surfaces are prone to failure under elevated pressures or because of air-layer dissolution into the surrounding water. Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) or liquid-infused surfaces (LIS) in which the trapped air is replaced with a lubricant have been proposed in the literature as a way of eliminating the air dissolution problem as well as improving the surface stability under pressure. While an LIS surface has been shown to reduce drag for flow of water-glycerol mixture (ref 18), no significant drag reduction has yet been reported for the flow of water (a lower viscosity fluid) over LIS. In this concern, we have designed a new surface in which a layer of air is trapped underneath the infused lubricant to reduce the frictional forces preventing the LIS to provide drag reduction for water or any fluid with a viscosity less than that of the lubricant. Drag reduction performance of such surfaces, referred to here as liquid-infused surfaces with trapped air (LISTA), is predicted by solving the biharmonic equation for the water-oil-air three-phase system in transverse grooves with enhanced meniscus stability thanks to double-reentry designs. For the arbitrary dimensions considered in our proof-of-concept study, LISTA designs showed 20-37% advantage over their LIS counterparts.

  17. Optical and other property changes of M-50 bearing steel surfaces for different lubricants and additive prior to scuffing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Marxer, N.

    1984-01-01

    An ester lubricant base oil containing one or more standard additives to protect against wear, corrosion, and oxidation was used in an experimental ball/plate elastohydrodynamic contact under load and speed conditions such as to induce scuffing failure in short times. Both the ball and the plate were of identically treated M-50 steel. After various periods of operating time the wear track on the plate was examined with an interference microscope of plus or minus 30 A depth resolution and sometimes also with a scanning ellipsometer and an Auger spectrometer. The optically deduced surface profiles varied with wavelength, indicating the presence of surface coatings, which were confirmed by the other instruments. As scuffing was approached, a thin (approximately A) oxide layer and a carbide layer formed in the wear track in particular when tricresylphosphate antiwear additive was present in the lubricant. The rates of the formation of these layers and their reactivity toward dilute alcholic HCl depended strongly on the lubricant and additives. Based on these results suggestions for improved formulations and a test method for bearing reliability could be proposed.

  18. Permeability of stylolite-bearing chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, I.; Nykjaer, O.; Priisholm, S. ); Springer, N.

    1994-11-01

    Permeabilities were measured on core plugs from stylolite-bearing chalk of the Gorm field in the Danish North Sea. Air and liquid permeabilities were measured in directions parallel to and perpendicular to the stylolite surface. Permeability was measured with sleeve pressure equal to in-situ reservoir stress. Permeabilities of plugs with stylolites but without stylolite-associated fractures were equal in the two directions. The permeability is equal to the matrix permeability of non-stylolite-bearing chalk. In contrast, when fractures were associated with the stylolites, permeability was enhanced. The enhancement was most significant in the horizontal direction parallel to the stylolites.

  19. Contribution of (222)Rn-bearing water to indoor radon and indoor air quality assessment in hot spring hotels of Guangdong, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Gang; Wang, Xinming; Chen, Diyun; Chen, Yongheng

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates the contribution of radon ((222)Rn)-bearing water to indoor (222)Rn in thermal baths. The (222)Rn concentrations in air were monitored in the bathroom and the bedroom. Particulate matter (PM, both PM(10) and PM(2.5)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) were also monitored with portable analyzers. The bathrooms were supplied with hot spring water containing 66-260 kBq m(-3) of (222)Rn. The results show that the spray of hot spring water from the bath spouts is the dominant mechanism by which (222)Rn is released into the air of the bathroom, and then it diffuses into the bedroom. Average (222)Rn level was 110-410% higher in the bedrooms and 510-1200% higher in the bathrooms compared to the corresponding average levels when there was no use of hot spring water. The indoor (222)Rn levels were influenced by the (222)Rn concentrations in the hot spring water and the bathing times. The average (222)Rn transfer coefficients from water to air were 6.2 × 10(-4)-4.1 × 10(-3). The 24-h average levels of CO(2) and PM(10) in the hotel rooms were 89% and 22% higher than the present Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) standard of China. The main particle pollutant in the hotel rooms was PM(2.5). Radon and PM(10) levels in some hotel rooms were at much higher concentrations than guideline levels, and thus the potential health risks to tourists and especially to the hotel workers should be of great concern, and measures should be taken to lower inhalation exposure to these air pollutants.

  20. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-03-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature.

  1. Wear reduction in ceramic bearings by surface generated pyrolytic carbon continuously replenished by ethylene gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Davis, L. C.

    1993-01-01

    Sliding tests with a pin-on-disc tribometer and both sliding and rolling tests with a modified four-ball tester at bulk temperatures of about 500 C and contact pressures of about 2.2 GPa have demonstrated up to 80% reductions of friction and wear with silicon nitride surfaces when a stream of ethylene is directed into the conjunction region. The effects are even more pronounced when the ethylene is prenucleated by a flow over a coil of nichrome wire electrically heated to about 800 C and located about 30 cm upstream of the exit nozzle. Steel and Ni-plated steel are lubricated by this method even more efficiently at lower temperatures.

  2. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature. PMID:26988392

  3. Validation of AIRS V6 Surface Temperature over Greenland with GCN and NOAA Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Hearty, Thomas; Cullather, Richard; Nowicki, Sophie; Susskind, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This work compares the temporal and spatial characteristics of the AIRSAMSU (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A) Version 6 and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Collection 5 derived surface temperatures over Greenland. To estimate uncertainties in space-based surface temperature measurements, we re-projected the MODIS Ice Surface Temperature (IST) to 0.5 by 0.5 degree spatial resolution. We also re-gridded AIRS Skin Temperature (Ts) into the same grid but classified with different cloud conditions and surface types. These co-located data sets make intercomparison between the two instruments relatively straightforward. Using this approach, the spatial comparison between the monthly mean AIRS Ts and MODIS IST is in good agreement with RMS 2K for May 2012. This approach also allows the detection of any long-term calibration drift and the careful examination of calibration consistency in the MODIS and AIRS temperature data record. The temporal correlations between temperature data are also compared with those from in-situ measurements from GC-Net (GCN) and NOAA stations. The coherent time series of surface temperature evident in the correlation between AIRS Ts and GCN temperatures suggest that at monthly time scales both observations capture the same climate signal over Greenland. It is also suggested that AIRS surface air temperature (Ta) can be used to estimate the boundary layer inversion.

  4. Forces of Interaction between Surfaces Bearing Looped Polymer Brushes in Good Solvent.

    SciTech Connect

    Alonzo, Jose; Mays, Jimmy; Kilbey, II, S Michael

    2009-01-01

    In a previous publication we suggested [Huang et al., Macromolecules, 2008, 41, 1745-1752] that looped polymer brushes formed by tethering chains by both ends to a surface may exhibit a polydispersity-like effect due to a distribution of distances between tethering points, leading to segment density profiles dominated by a long and diffuse exponentially-decaying tail. To study this issue in more detail, the force profiles (forces of interaction as a function of separation distance) of a series of looped polymer brushes made by preferential adsorption of poly(2-vinylpyridine)-polystyrene-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PVP-b-PS-b-PVP) triblock copolymers of varying molecular weight and asymmetry ratio are measured using the surface forces apparatus. The force profiles are analyzed using an equivalent diblock model, which considers the triblock copolymer brushes as being comprised of two diblock copolymers of half the PS molecular weight. While scaling the dependencies of the interaction energy and distance on molecular weight, the tethering density and segment size coalesce the measured force profiles to the universal profile, it is necessary to include polydispersity in the description of the equilibrium structure. This is done using the self-consistent field model of Milner et al. [Macromolecules, 1988, 21, 2610-2619]. For looped brushes formed from the symmetric and moderately symmetric triblock copolymers we find that the polydispersity due to molecular weight distribution effectively accounts for the observed force profiles. On the other hand, agreement between the measured and predicted force profiles of looped brushes formed from highly asymmetric copolymers at low degrees-of-compression is achieved only if a much smaller value of the polydispersity index is used in the fitting. The implication of these results is that the shape of the segment density profiles is not due to the previously proposed anchor-induced polydispersity arising due to loop formation; however in

  5. Adsorption of polystyrene sulfonate to the air surface of water by neutron reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    YIM,HYUN; KENT,MICHAEL S.; MATHESON,AARON J.; IVKOV,R.; SATIJA,S.; MAJEWSKI,J.; SMITH,G.S.

    2000-05-16

    The adsorption of the strong polyelectrolyte polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) to the air surface of dilute aqueous solutions was investigated as a function of molecular weight and salt concentration. Detailed segment profiles of the deuterated polymer were determined by neutron reflection. Surface activity was also examined through surface tension measurements. In general, the segment profiles are composed of a thin layer (10--20 {angstrom} thick) of high concentration at the air surface, followed by a distinct second layer of much lower segment concentration that extends to larger depths into the liquid. The high segment density at the air surface is due to a strong surface attraction, arising from the low surface tension of the PSS backbone relative to the surface tension of water. At low salt concentration, the profiles tend toward a single dense layer, suggesting that the chains lie nearly flat at the interface in that limit. The adsorbed amount increases with salt concentration, with a stronger dependence for higher molecular weight chains. The adsorbed amounts at the air/water interface are higher than reported previously for PSS adsorbed onto neutral solid surfaces, consistent with the fact that the air-liquid interface provides a stronger surface attraction. While the trends of adsorbed amount and layer thickness with salt concentration and molecular weight are in good agreement with numerical self-consistent field lattice calculations, the measured bilayer profiles are rather different from the smoothly decaying theoretical profiles. The surface tensions of the PSS solutions are significantly lowered relative to those of pure salt solutions. Combining the reflectivity and surface tension measurements, an approximately linear relationship is established between the surface pressure and the PSS adsorbed amount.

  6. Comparison of MODIS Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature over the Continental USA Meteorological Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ping; Bounoua, Lahouari; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Thome, Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Impervious Surface Area (ISA) and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the surface-temperature-based urban heat island's (UHIS) signature on LST amplitude over the continental USA and to make comparisons to local air temperatures. Air-temperature-based UHIs (UHIA), calculated using the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) daily air temperatures, are compared with UHIS for urban areas in different biomes during different seasons. NLCD ISA is used to define urban and rural temperatures and to stratify the sampling for LST and air temperatures. We find that the MODIS LST agrees well with observed air temperature during the nighttime, but tends to overestimate it during the daytime, especially during summer and in nonforested areas. The minimum air temperature analyses show that UHIs in forests have an average UHIA of 1 C during the summer. The UHIS, calculated from nighttime LST, has similar magnitude of 1-2 C. By contrast, the LSTs show a midday summer UHIS of 3-4 C for cities in forests, whereas the average summer UHIA calculated from maximum air temperature is close to 0 C. In addition, the LSTs and air temperatures difference between 2006 and 2011 are in agreement, albeit with different magnitude.

  7. Elasticity of the hair cover in air-retaining Salvinia surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditsche, Petra; Gorb, Elena; Mayser, Matthias; Gorb, Stanislav; Schimmel, Thomas; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2015-11-01

    Immersed in water superhydrophobic surfaces (e.g., lotus) maintain thin temporary air films. In certain aquatic plants and animals, these films are thicker and more persistent. Floating ferns of the genus Salvinia show elaborated hierarchical superhydrophobic surface structures: a hairy cover of complex trichomes. In the case of S. molesta, they are eggbeater shaped and topped by hydrophilic tips, which pin the air-water interface and prevent rupture of contact. It has been proposed that these trichomes can oscillate with the air-water interface, when turbulences occur and thereby stabilize the air film. The deformability of such arrays of trichomes requires a certain elasticity of the structures. In this study, we determined the stiffness of the trichome coverage of S. molesta and three other Salvinia species. Our results confirm the elasticity of the trichome coverage in all investigated Salvinia species. We did not reveal a clear relationship between the time of air retention and stiffness of the trichome coverage, which means that the air retention function is additionally dependent on different parameters, e.g., the trichome shape and surface free energy. These data are not only interesting for Salvinia biology, but also important for the development of biomimetic air-retaining surfaces.

  8. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify themore » particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.« less

  9. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  10. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. However, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. A charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. The study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  11. In vivo macroscopic HPD fluorescence reflectance imaging on small animals bearing surface ARO/NPA tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria C.; Riccio, Patrizia; Russo, Paolo; Roberti, Giuseppe

    2005-08-01

    Recently multimodal imaging systems have been devised because the combination of different imaging modalities results in the complementarity and integration of the techniques and in a consequent improvement of the diagnostic capabilities of the multimodal system with respect to each separate imaging modality. We developed a simple and reliable HematoPorphyrin (HP) mediated Fluorescence Reflectance Imaging (FRI) system that allows for in vivo real time imaging of surface tumors with a large field of view. The tumor cells are anaplastic human thyroid carcinoma-derived ARO cells, or human papillary thyroid carcinoma-derived NPA cells. Our measurements show that the optical contrast of the tumor region image is increased by a simple digital subtraction of the background fluorescence and that HP fluorescence emissivity of ARO tumors is about 2 times greater than that of NPA tumors, and about 4 times greater than that of healthy tissues. This is also confirmed by spectroscopic measurements on histological sections of tumor and healthy tissues. It was shown also the capability of this system to distinguish the tumor type on the basis of the different intensity of the fluorescence emission, probably related to the malignancy degree. The features of this system are complementary with those ones of a pixel radionuclide detection system, which allows for relatively time expensive, narrow field of view measurements, and applicability to tumors also deeply imbedded in tissues. The fluorescence detection could be used as a large scale and quick analysis tool and could be followed by narrow field, higher resolution radionuclide measurements on previously determined highly fluorescent regions.

  12. Satellite versus Surface Estimates of Air Temperature since 1979.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurrell, James W.; Trenberth, Kevin E.

    1996-09-01

    A comparison of near-global monthly mean surface temperature anomalies to those of global Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) 2R temperatures for 1979-95 reveals differences in global annual mean trends that are shown to be largely attributable to important physical differences in the quantities that are measured. Maps of standard deviations of the monthly mean anomalies, which can be viewed as mostly measuring the size of the climate signal, reveal pronounced differences regionally in each dataset. At the surface, the variability of temperatures is relatively small over the oceans but large over land, whereas in the MSU record the signal is much more zonally symmetric. The largest differences are found over the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans where the monthly standard deviations of the MSU temperatures are larger by more than a factor of 2. Locally over land, the variance of the surface record is larger than that of the MSU. In addition to differential responses to forcings from the El Niño-Southern Oscillation phenomenon and volcanic eruptions, these characteristics are indicative of differences of the response to physical processes arising from the relative importance of advection versus surface interactions and the different heat capacities of land and ocean. The result is that the regions contributing to hemispheric or global mean anomalies differ substantially between the two temperature datasets. This helps to account for the observed differences in decadal trends where the surface record shows a warming trend since 1979 of 0.18°C per decade, relative to the MSU record. While a common perception from this result is that the MSU and surface measurements of global temperature change are inconsistent, the issue should not be about which record is better, but rather that both give a different perspective on the same events.

  13. Deformable bearing seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreman, O. S., III (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A deformable bearing seat is described for seating a bearing assembly in a housing. The seat includes a seating surface in the housing having a first predetermined spheroidal contour when the housing is in an undeformed mode. The seating surface is deformable to a second predetermined spherically contoured surface when the housing is in a deformed mode. The seat is particularly adaptable for application to a rotating blade and mounting ring assembly in a gas turbine engine.

  14. Lubricant effects on bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1986-01-01

    Lubricant considerations for rolling-element bearings have within the last two decades taken on added importance in the design and operation of mechanical systems. The phenomenon which limits the useful life of bearings is rolling-element or surface pitting fatigue. The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness which separates the ball or roller surface from those of the raceways of the bearing directly affects bearing life. Chemical additives added to the lubricant can also significantly affect bearings life and reliability. The interaction of these physical and chemical effects is important to the design engineer and user of these systems. Design methods and lubricant selection for rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed.

  15. Cost effectiveness of total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: comparison of devices with differing bearing surfaces and modes of fixation.

    PubMed

    Pulikottil-Jacob, R; Connock, M; Kandala, N-B; Mistry, H; Grove, A; Freeman, K; Costa, M; Sutcliffe, P; Clarke, A

    2015-04-01

    Many different designs of total hip arthroplasty (THA) with varying performance and cost are available. The identification of those which are the most cost-effective could allow significant cost-savings. We used an established Markov model to examine the cost effectiveness of five frequently used categories of THA which differed according to bearing surface and mode of fixation, using data from the National Joint Registry for England and Wales. Kaplan-Meier analyses of rates of revision for men and women were modelled with parametric distributions. Costs of devices were provided by the NHS Supply Chain and associated costs were taken from existing studies. Lifetime costs, lifetime quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs) and the probability of a device being cost effective at a willingness to pay £20 000/QALY were included in the models. The differences in QALYs between different categories of implant were extremely small (< 0.0039 QALYs for men or women over the patient's lifetime) and differences in cost were also marginal (£2500 to £3000 in the same time period). As a result, the probability of any particular device being the most cost effective was very sensitive to small, plausible changes in quality of life estimates and cost. Our results suggest that available evidence does not support recommending a particular device on cost effectiveness grounds alone. We would recommend that the choice of prosthesis should be determined by the rate of revision, local costs and the preferences of the surgeon and patient. PMID:25820881

  16. Impact of the equivalent center of mass separating from the sliding surface on the isolation performance of friction pendulum bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Junyong; Ning, Xiangliang; Tan, Ping; Hao, Hongxiao; Chen, Guoping

    2015-12-01

    A new equivalent center of mass model of FPBs (friction pendulum bearings) is introduced, and based on this model, coefficient j of the equivalent center of mass separating from the sliding surface is defined. It is thought in theory that j has a significant impact on the isolation parameter of FPBs, since the equivalent post-yielding stiffness and friction coefficients are not simply determined by sliding radius and sliding friction pairs. The results of numerical simulation analysis using ABAQUS conducted on two groups of FPBs support this viewpoint. For FPBs with the same sliding radius and sliding friction pairs, the FPB modules of structural analysis software such as ETABS could only distinguish the equivalent transformation using j one by one. The seismic response data obtained in a base isolation calculation example of FPBs are very different, which reveals that j's impact on the isolation effectiveness of FPBs cannot be ignored. The introduction of j will help improve the classical structural theory of FPBs and the weak points of structural analysis software based on this theory, which is important in achieving more accurate analyses in structural design.

  17. Predictable surface ablation of dielectrics with few-cycle laser pulse even beyond air ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquier, C.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O.; Sanner, N.

    2016-08-01

    We study surface ablation of dielectrics with single-shot few-cycle optical pulse (˜10 fs) in air, at intensities below and above the onset of air ionization. We perform 3D analysis and careful calibration of the fluence distribution at the laser focus, spanning from linear- to nonlinear- focusing regimes, enabling to thoroughly characterize the severe limitation of the fluence delivered onto the sample surface upon increase of incident pulse energy. Despite significant beam reshaping taking place at high fluence, we demonstrate that it is nevertheless possible to confidently predict the resulting crater profiles on fused silica surface, even in the regime of filamentation.

  18. Nonpoint sources of volatile organic compounds in urban areas - Relative importance of land surfaces and air

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, T.J.; Bender, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly detected in urban waters across the United States include gasoline-related compounds (e.g. toluene, xylene) and chlorinated compounds (e.g. chloroform, tetrachloroethane [PCE], trichloroethene [TCE]). Statistical analysis of observational data and results of modeling the partitioning of VOCs between air and water suggest that urban land surfaces are the primary nonpoint source of most VOCs. Urban air is a secondary nonpoint source, but could be an important source of the gasoline oxygenate methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE). Surface waters in urban areas would most effectively be protected by controlling land-surface sources.

  19. The effect of air pollutants on lung surfactant surface tension

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, E.S.; Fettissoff, P.

    1981-01-01

    This study is concerned with the effects of certain pollutants on the surface tension of pulmonary surfactant (..gamma..). Surface tension of the aqueous phase of a canine lung homogenate was measured by a ring tensiometer. Environmental pollutants (Cl/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, HCl, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, NH/sub 3/ and SO/sub 2/) were added to the lung extract in liquid form. Variations of ..gamma.. with time, temperature and pollutant concentration were observed. Effects were observed with Cl/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ but not with NH/sub 3/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or HCl. No clear distinction was observed between oxidants and reductants, but some intriguing time variations were observed.

  20. Variation of Local Surface Properties of an Air Bubble in Water Caused by Its Interaction with Another Surface.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Lorena A; Ohnishi, Satomi; Carnie, Steven L; Horn, Roger G

    2016-08-01

    Surface and hydrodynamic forces acting between an air bubble and a flat mica surface in surfactant-free water and in 1 mM KCl solution have been investigated by observing film drainage using a modified surface force apparatus (SFA). The bubble shapes observed with the SFA are compared to theoretical profiles computed from a model that considers hydrodynamic interactions, surface curvature, and disjoining pressure arising from electrical double layer and van der Waals interactions. It is shown that the bubble experiences double-layer forces, and a final equilibrium wetting film between the bubble and mica surfaces is formed by van der Waals repulsion. However, comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the double-layer forces are not simply a function of surface separation. Rather, they appear to be changed by one of more of the following: the bubble's dynamic deformation, its proximity to another surface, and/or hydrodynamic flow in the aqueous film that separate them. The same comments apply to the hydrodynamic mobility or immobility of the air-water interface. Together the results show that the bubble's surface is "soft" in two senses: in addition to its well-known deformability, its local properties are affected by weak external forces, in this case the electrical double-layer interactions with a nearby surface and hydrodynamic flow in the neighboring aqueous phase. PMID:27391417

  1. Surface behavior of malonic acid adsorption at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Blower, Patrick G; Shamay, Eric; Kringle, Loni; Ota, Stephanie T; Richmond, Geraldine L

    2013-03-28

    The presence of organic materials adsorbed to the surfaces of aerosol particles has been demonstrated to be a determining factor in relevant atmospheric processes. Malonic acid is a small, water-soluble organic acid that is common in aerosols and is surface-active. A comprehensive investigation of the adsorption of malonic acid to the air/water interface was accomplished using vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy (VSFS) and surface tension measurements as functions of concentration and pH. Malonic acid was found to be weakly solvated at the air/water interface, and its orientation as a function of concentration was explored through different VSFS polarization schemes. pH-dependent experiments revealed that the surface-active species is the fully protonated species. Computational analyses were used to obtain depth-specific geometries of malonic acid at the air/water interface that confirm and enrich the experimental results. PMID:23384061

  2. BOREAS AES Five-Day Averaged Surface Meteorological and Upper Air Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Strub, Richard; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) provided BOREAS with hourly and daily surface meteorological data from 23 of the AES meteorological stations located across Canada and upper air data from 1 station at The Pas, Manitoba. Due to copyright restrictions on the full resolution surface meteorological data, this data set contains 5-day average values for the surface parameters. The upper air data are provided in their full resolution form. The 5-day averaging was performed in order to create a data set that could be publicly distributed at no cost. Temporally, the surface meteorological data cover the period of January 1975 to December 1996 and the upper air data cover the period of January 1961 to November 1996. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-staff data. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  3. Comparison of Near-Surface Air Temperatures and MODIS Ice-Surface Temperatures at Summit, Greenland (2008-2013)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuman, Christopher A.; Hall, Dorothy K.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Mefford, Thomas K.; Schnaubelt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the stability of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared-derived ice surface temperature (IST) data from Terra for use as a climate quality data record. The availability of climate quality air temperature data (TA) from a NOAA Global Monitoring Division observatory at Greenlands Summit station has enabled this high temporal resolution study of MODIS ISTs. During a 5 year period (July 2008 to August 2013), more than 2500 IST values were compared with 3-minute average TA values derived from the 1-minute data from NOAAs primary 2 m air temperature sensor. These data enabled an expected small offset between air and surface temperatures at this the ice sheet location to be investigated over multiple annual cycles.

  4. Sensitivity of coastal meteorology and air quality to urban surface characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Surface characteristics play an important role in shaping the local meteorological conditions in urban areas, and subsequently affect the generation and transport of pollutants. A basic understanding of this relationship in urban climates has led researchers to explore surface modification strategies for cooling cities, saving energy, and reducing pollution. These strategies include planting of urban vegetation and increasing urban albedo, both of which represent a significant modification to the urban surface. The air temperature reductions resulting from enhanced evapotranspiration (from increasing vegetation), and reduced solar gain (from increasing albedo) have positive energy use and air quality implications. Research has shown that decreasing air temperature by 1{degrees}C in the Los Angeles Basin could save consumers $50,000 per hour in avoided energy use and reduce peak ozone levels by 5 to 10 parts per billion. Driven by these figures, this study is part of a larger research effort focusing on air quality in the Los Angeles Basin. Prior to conducting full three-dimensional meteorological simulations and the corresponding photochemical smog simulations, two-dimensional simulations were designed to isolate each surface characteristic and examine its role in a developing mesoscale coastal flow. The air temperature and mixing height impacts, having the most air quality significance, were then investigated through a preliminary photochemical sensitivity study.

  5. Variations of 210Pb concentrations in surface air at Thessaloniki, Greece (40°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, A.; Kotsopoulou, E.; Karanatsiou, A.; Papastefanou, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of 210Pb were measured over the year 2009 in ground level air at Thessaloniki, Northern Greece (40°62' N, 22°95'E). The mean activity concentrations of 210Pb in surface air have been found to be 671 ± 213 μBq m-3. The highest values of monthly atmospheric concentrations of 210Pb were observed in the autumn and the lowest in the spring period. The higher values of 210Pb during autumn were attributed to frequent inversion conditions of the surface layers, resulting in an enrichment of radon and its decay products in surface air. The lower values during the winter months might be due to the low emanation of radon from the frozen or snow-covered soil. The minima of 210Pb concentrations during spring might reflect on higher washout during this period, which results in less emanation of radon from saturated with water soil, resulting in less production of 210Pb near ground-level air. The relative high values during summer are probably due to the higher 222Rn exhalation from the ground and due to the higher air mixing within the troposphere, which has as a result to carry down to the surface layer 210Pb whose origin is older air masses which entered into the free troposphere.

  6. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1980-05-02

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  7. Bearings: Technology and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A brief status report on bearing technology and present and near-term future problems that warrant research support is presented. For rolling element bearings a material with improved fracture toughness, life data in the low Lambda region, a comprehensive failure theory verified by life data and incorporated into dynamic analyses, and an improved corrosion resistant alloy are perceived as important needs. For hydrodynamic bearings better definition of cavitation boundaries and pressure distributions for squeeze film dampers, and geometry optimization for minimum power loss in turbulent film bearings are needed. For gas film bearings, foil bearing geometries that form more nearly optimum film shapes for maximum load capacity, and more effective surface protective coatings for high temperature operation are needed.

  8. Regional change in snow water equivalent-surface air temperature relationship over Eurasia during boreal spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Renguang; Chen, Shangfeng

    2016-10-01

    Present study investigates local relationship between surface air temperature and snow water equivalent (SWE) change over mid- and high-latitudes of Eurasia during boreal spring. Positive correlation is generally observed around the periphery of snow covered region, indicative of an effect of snow on surface temperature change. In contrast, negative correlation is usually found over large snow amount area, implying a response of snow change to wind-induced surface temperature anomalies. With the seasonal retreat of snow covered region, region of positive correlation between SWE and surface air temperature shifts northeastward from March to May. A diagnosis of surface heat flux anomalies in April suggests that the snow impact on surface air temperature is dominant in east Europe and west Siberia through modulating surface shortwave radiation. In contrast, atmospheric effect on SWE is important in Siberia and Russia Far East through wind-induced surface sensible heat flux change. Further analysis reveals that atmospheric circulation anomalies in association with snowmelt over east Siberia may be partly attributed to sea surface temperature anomalies in the North Atlantic and the atmospheric circulation anomaly pattern associated with snowmelt over Russia Far East has a close association with the Arctic Oscillation.

  9. Permanent hydrophilization of outer and inner surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes using ambient air plasma generated by surface dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Pavliňák, D.; Galmiz, O.; Zemánek, M.; Brablec, A.; Čech, J.; Černák, M.

    2014-10-13

    We present an atmospheric pressure ambient air plasma technique developed for technically simple treatment of inner and/or outer surfaces of plastic tubes and other hollow dielectric bodies. It is based on surface dielectric barrier discharge generating visually diffuse plasma layers along the treated dielectric surfaces using water-solution electrodes. The observed visual uniformity and measured plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures of 333 K and 2350 K indicate that the discharge can be readily applied to material surface treatment without significant thermal effect. This is exemplified by the obtained permanent surface hydrophilization of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes related to the replacement of a high fraction (more than 80%) of the surface fluorine determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A tentative explanation of the discharge mechanism based on high-speed camera observations and the discharge current and voltage of measurements is outlined.

  10. Flow visualization study of grooved surface/surfactant/air sheet interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Jason C.; Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of groove geometry, surfactants, and airflow rate have been ascertained by a flow-visualization study of grooved-surface models which addresses the possible conditions for skin friction-reduction in marine vehicles. It is found that the grooved surface geometry holds the injected bubble stream near the wall and, in some cases, results in a 'tube' of air which remains attached to the wall. It is noted that groove dimension and the use of surfactants can substantially affect the stability of this air tube; deeper grooves, surfactants with high contact angles, and angled air injection, are all found to increase the stability of the attached air tube, while convected disturbances and high shear increase interfacial instability.

  11. Bearing strength of lunar soil.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1971-01-01

    Bearing load vs penetration curves have been measured on a 1.3 g sample of lunar soil from the scoop of the Surveyor 3 soil mechanics surface sampler, using a circular indentor 2 mm in diameter. Measurements were made in an Earth laboratory, in air. This sample provided a unique opportunity to evaluate earlier, remotely controlled, in-situ measurements of lunar surface bearing properties. Bearing capacity, measured at a penetration equal to the indentor diameter, varied from 0.02-0.04 N/sq cm at bulk densities of 1.15 g/cu cm to 30-100 N/sq cm at 1.9 g/cu cm. Deformation was by compression directly below the indentor at bulk densities below 1.61 g/cu cm, by outward displacement at bulk densities over 1.62 g/cu cm. Preliminary comparison of in-situ remote measurements with those on returned material indicates good agreement if the lunar regolith at Surveyor 3 has a bulk density of 1.6 g/cu cm at 2.5 cm depth.

  12. Fabrication of photoluminescent Si-based layers by air optical breakdown near the silicon surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabashin, A. V.; Meunier, M.

    2002-01-01

    A novel "dry" method for the fabrication of Si/SiO x nanostructures exhibiting strong visible photoluminescence (PL) is introduced. The method consists in the treatment of a silicon target surface by air breakdown plasma produced by a CO 2 laser radiation in atmospheric air. The treatment leads to the formation of a thin porous layer on the silicon wafer, which exhibits a 1.9-2.0 eV PL. Possible mechanisms of nanostructure formation and PL origin are discussed.

  13. Air Processes Resulting in a Surface Layer Pollution in Industrial Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesin, Yu V.; Leshukov, T. V.

    2016-08-01

    The article describes the air quality research in Western Siberia (Kemerovo region). The problem of air quality preservation in the conditions of mining industry intensive development is caused by the weather conditions which lead either to the concentration of pollutants in the surface layer, or to their migration to other geosphere, or to dissipation as a result of convective mixing or advection of air masses. Zoning of the territory in view of the research results provides insight into areas where the greatest risk to human health and life is formed.

  14. Oxidation Behavior of Germanium- and/or Silicon-Bearing Near-α Titanium Alloys in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitashima, Tomonori; Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko

    2015-06-01

    The effect of germanium (Ge) and/or silicon (Si) addition on the oxidation behavior of the near-α alloy Ti-5Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo was investigated in air at 973 K (700 °C). Ge addition decreased the oxidation resistance because of the formation of a Ge-rich layer in the substrate at the TiO2/substrate interface, enhancing Sn segregation at the interface. In addition, a small amount of Ge dissolved in the external Al2O3 layer. These results reduced the aluminum activity at the interface, suppressed the formation of Al2O3, and increased the diffusivity of oxygen in the oxide scales. The addition of 0.2 and 0.9 wt pct Si was beneficial for improving oxidation resistance. The effect of germanide and silicide precipitates in the matrix on the oxide growth process was also discussed.

  15. Properties of the flexible pressure sensor under laboratory conditions simulating the internal environment of the total surface bearing socket.

    PubMed

    Hachisuka, K; Takahashi, M; Ogata, H; Ohmine, S; Shitama, H; Shinkoda, K

    1998-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the properties of the flexible pressure sensor under laboratory conditions simulating the internal environment of the total surface bearing (TSB) socket to determine optimal conditions for measuring normal stresses on the stump. The equipment used in the study was the Pressure Distribution Sensor System for Sockets. In a climatic chamber maintained at 37 degrees C and 70% humidity the sensor sheet was mounted on a measuring apparatus loaded with three 10 kg weights, and output from the sensor was recorded. Because of sensor creep, a sample 60 seconds after loading was adopted as the measured output. Output was greater when weight was decreased than when weight was increased because of hysteresis (paired t-test, p<0.05). The sensor had temperature sensitivity but differences in output were not statistically significant (paired t-test, 0.10>p>0.05). There were no significant differences in output among five sensor sheets or among five sections of four sensor sheets (two-way ANOVA, p>0.05), but repeated loading on the same section of the sensor sheet increased output (two-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Reproducibility and sensitivity distribution of the sensor are considered satisfactory under laboratory conditions, but measurements of rapid and repetitive movements may not be accurate and comparing subtle changes in output from a single sensor is not suitable. The reliability of the sensor in a clinical setting for measuring normal stresses on the stump with the TSB socket should be examined.

  16. An Air Temperature Cloud Height Precipitation Phase Determination Scheme for Surface Based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiccabrino, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Many hydrological and ecological models use simple surface temperature threshold equations rather than coupling with a complex meteorological model to determine if precipitation is rain or snow. Some comparative studies have found, the most common rain/snow threshold variable, air temperature to have more precipitation phase error than dew-point or wet-bulb temperature, which account for the important secondary role of humidity in the melting and sublimation processes. However, just like surface air temperature, surface humidity is often effected by soil conditions and vegetation and is therefore not always representative of the atmospheric humidity precipitation falls through. A viable alternative to using surface humidity as a proxy for atmospheric moisture would be to adjust the rain snow threshold for changes in cloud height. The height of a cloud base above the ground gives the depth of an unsaturated layer. An unsaturated atmospheric layer should have much different melting and sublimation rates than a saturated cloud layer. Therefore, rain and snow percentages at a given surface air temperature should change with the height of the lowest cloud base. This study uses hourly observations from 12 U.S. manually augmented meteorological stations located in the Great Plains and Midwest upwind or away from major water bodies in relatively flat areas in an attempt to limit geographical influences. The surface air temperature threshold for the ground to 200 feet (under 100m) was 0.0°C, 0.6°C for 300-600 feet (100-200m), 1.1°C for 700-1200 feet (300-400m), 1.7°C for 1300-2000 feet (500-600m), and 2.2°C for 2100-3300 feet (700-1000m). Total precipitation error for these cloud height air temperature thresholds reduced the error from the single air temperature threshold 1.1°C by 15% from 14% to 12% total error between -2.2°C and 3.9°C. These air temperature cloud height thresholds resulted in 1.5% less total error than the dew-point temperature threshold 0.0

  17. Properties of impurity-bearing ferrihydrite II: Insights into the surface structure and composition of pure, Al- and Si-bearing ferrihydrite from Zn(II) sorption experiments and Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cismasu, A. Cristina; Levard, Clément; Michel, F. Marc; Brown, Gordon E.

    2013-10-01

    Naturally occurring ferrihydrite often contains impurities such as Al and Si, which can impact its chemical reactivity with respect to metal(loid) adsorption and (in)organic or microbially induced reductive dissolution. However, the surface composition of impure ferrihydrites is not well constrained, and this hinders our understanding of the factors controlling the surface reactivity of these nanophases. In this study, we conducted Zn(II) adsorption experiments combined with Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements on pure ferrihydrite (Fh) and Al- or Si-bearing ferrihydrites containing 10 and 20 mol% Al or Si (referred to as 10AlFh, 20AlFh and 10SiFh, 20SiFh) to evaluate Zn(II) uptake in relation to Zn(II) speciation at their surfaces. Overall, Zn(II) uptake at the surface of AlFh is similar to that of pure Fh, and based on Zn K-edge EXAFS data, Zn(II) speciation at the surface of Fh and AlFh also appears similar. Binuclear bidentate IVZn-VIFe complexes (at ∼3.46 Å (2C[1]) and ∼3.25 Å (2C[2])) were identified at low Zn(II) surface coverages from Zn K-edge EXAFS fits. With increasing Zn(II) surface coverage, the number of second-neighbor Fe ions decreased, which was interpreted as indicating the formation of IVZn polymers at the ferrihydrite surface, and a deviation from Langmuir uptake behavior. Zn(II) uptake at the surface of SiFh samples was more significant than at Fh and AlFh surfaces, and was attributed to the formation of outer-sphere complexes (on average 24% of sorbed Zn). Although similar Zn-Fe/Zn distances were obtained for the Zn-sorbed SiFh samples, the number of Fe second neighbors was lower in comparison with Fh. The decrease in second-neighbor Fe is most pronounced for sample 20SiFh, suggesting that the amount of reactive surface Fe sites diminishes with increasing Si content. Although our EXAFS results shown here do not provide evidence for the existence of Zn-Al or Zn-Si complexes, their presence is not excluded for Zn-sorbed Al

  18. Impact of Bay-Breeze Circulations on Surface Air Quality and Boundary Layer Export

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Follette-Cook, Melanie; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Goldberg, Daniel; Satam, Chinmay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Crawford, James H.; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Meteorological and air-quality model simulations are analyzed alongside observations to investigate the role of the Chesapeake Bay breeze on surface air quality, pollutant transport, and boundary layer venting. A case study was conducted to understand why a particular day was the only one during an 11-day ship-based field campaign on which surface ozone was not elevated in concentration over the Chesapeake Bay relative to the closest upwind site and why high ozone concentrations were observed aloft by in situ aircraft observations. Results show that southerly winds during the overnight and early-morning hours prevented the advection of air pollutants from the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan areas over the surface waters of the bay. A strong and prolonged bay breeze developed during the late morning and early afternoon along the western coastline of the bay. The strength and duration of the bay breeze allowed pollutants to converge, resulting in high concentrations locally near the bay-breeze front within the Baltimore metropolitan area, where they were then lofted to the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Near the top of the PBL, these pollutants were horizontally advected to a region with lower PBL heights, resulting in pollution transport out of the boundary layer and into the free troposphere. This elevated layer of air pollution aloft was transported downwind into New England by early the following morning where it likely mixed down to the surface, affecting air quality as the boundary layer grew.

  19. 3-D Surface Depression Profiling Using High Frequency Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Kautz, Harold E.; Abel, Phillip B.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. This article shows quantitative surface topography profiles as obtained using only high-frequency focused air-coupled ultrasonic pulses. The profiles were obtained using a profiling system developed by NASA Glenn Research Center and Sonix, Inc (via a formal cooperative agreement). (The air transducers are available as off-the-shelf items from several companies.) The method is simple and reproducible because it relies mainly on knowledge and constancy of the sound velocity through the air. The air transducer is scanned across the surface and sends pulses to the sample surface where they are reflected back from the surface along the same path as the incident wave. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface are acquired and converted to depth/surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in air (V). The system has the ability to resolve surface depression variations as small as 25 microns, is useable over a 1.4 mm vertical depth range, and can profile large areas only limited by the scan limits of the particular ultrasonic system. (Best-case depth resolution is 0.25 microns which may be achievable with improved isolation from vibration and air currents.) The method using an optimized configuration is reasonably rapid and has all quantitative analysis facilities on-line including 2-D and 3-D visualization capability, extreme value filtering (for faulty data), and leveling capability. Air-coupled surface profilometry is applicable to plate-like and curved samples. In this article, results are shown for several proof-of-concept samples, plastic samples burned in microgravity on the STS-54 space shuttle mission, and a partially-coated cylindrical ceramic

  20. Reduced reactivity to air on HF-treated YBa2Cu3O7 - x surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Hunt, B. D.; Foote, M. C.

    1989-06-01

    Treatment of YBa2Cu3O7-x films with a nonaqueous solution of HF in absolute ethanol results in the formation of an oxyfluoride with relative Y:Ba:Cu concentrations of 1:4:3 on the surface, as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The passivation properties of chemically treated films were tested by monitoring the growth of the high binding energy O 1s peak, associated with nonsuperconducting surface species, as a function of air exposure time, for both HF-treated and untreated films. The native oxyfluoride is shown to reduce the reactivity of the superconductor to air.

  1. Frictionless Bearing Uses Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation was to develop a frictionless bearing for high speed, light load applications. The device involves the incorporation of permanent magnets in the bearing design. The repulsion of like magnetic poles provides concentric support of the inner member so that no metallic contact occurs between the bearing surfaces.

  2. Impact of Asian Dust on Global Surface Air Quality and Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Ginoux, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Dust originating from Asian deserts and desertification areas can be transported regionally and globally to affect surface air quality, visibility, and radiation budget not only at immediate downwind locations (e.g., eastern Asia) but also regions far away from the sources (e.g., North America). Deposition of Asian dust to the North Pacific Ocean basin influences the ocean productivity. In this study, we will use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, remote sensing data form satellite and from the ground-based network, and in-situ data from aircraft and surface observations to address the following questions: - What are the effects of Asian dust on the surface air quality and visibility over Asia and North America? - What are the seasonal and spatial variations of dust deposition to the North Pacific Ocean? How does the Asian dust affect surface radiation budget?

  3. Atmospheric Precipitable Water and its association with Surface Air Temperatures over Different Climate Regims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, H.; Fetzer, E. J.; Olsene, E. T.; Granger, S. L.; Kahn, B. H.; Fishbein, E. F.; Chen, L.; Teixeira, J.; Lambrigtsen, B. H.

    2008-12-01

    As a greenhouse gas and a key component in the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric water vapor is very important in the earth's climate system. The relationship between air temperature and water vapor content at the surface and in different layers of the atmosphere have been examined in many studies in trying to better understand the magnitude of water vapor feedback in our climate system. Studies have found large spatial variability and large regional and vertical deviations from the Clapeyron-Clausius relation of constant relative humidity. However, there is an ongoing need to understand the climatology of the relationship between the surface air temperature and total column water vapor, and to examine any potential thresholds associated with sudden changes in this relationship as air temperatures continue to increase. This study uses 5-year total precipitable water vapor records measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounders (AIRS) and surface air temperature to examine their relationships at tropical to mid latitude conditions found at 60°S- 60°N for winter and summer seasons. In addition, the relationships will be examined for different climate regimes based on Koppen's system. This will help distinguish the geographical regions and physical processes where different relationships are found. This information will improve our understanding of the regional patterns of water vapor feedback associated with warming climate.

  4. Morphing Surfaces Enable Acoustophoretic Contactless Transport of Ultrahigh-Density Matter in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresti, Daniele; Sambatakakis, Giorgio; Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-11-01

    The controlled contactless transport of heavy drops and particles in air is of fundamental interest and has significant application potential. Acoustic forces do not rely on special material properties, but their utility in transporting heavy matter in air has been restricted by low power and poor controllability. Here we present a new concept of acoustophoresis, based on the morphing of a deformable reflector, which exploits the low reaction forces and low relaxation time of a liquid with enhanced surface tension through the use of thin overlaid membrane. An acoustically induced, mobile deformation (dimple) on the reflector surface enhances the acoustic field emitted by a line of discretized emitters and enables the countinuos motion of heavy levitated samples. With such interplay of emitters and reflecting soft-structure, a 5 mm steel sphere (0.5 grams) was contactlessly transported in air solely by acoustophoresis.

  5. Morphing Surfaces Enable Acoustophoretic Contactless Transport of Ultrahigh-Density Matter in Air

    PubMed Central

    Foresti, Daniele; Sambatakakis, Giorgio; Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-01-01

    The controlled contactless transport of heavy drops and particles in air is of fundamental interest and has significant application potential. Acoustic forces do not rely on special material properties, but their utility in transporting heavy matter in air has been restricted by low power and poor controllability. Here we present a new concept of acoustophoresis, based on the morphing of a deformable reflector, which exploits the low reaction forces and low relaxation time of a liquid with enhanced surface tension through the use of thin overlaid membrane. An acoustically induced, mobile deformation (dimple) on the reflector surface enhances the acoustic field emitted by a line of discretized emitters and enables the countinuos motion of heavy levitated samples. With such interplay of emitters and reflecting soft-structure, a 5 mm steel sphere (0.5 grams) was contactlessly transported in air solely by acoustophoresis. PMID:24212104

  6. Air-surface exchange of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Gouin, T; Thomas, G O; Cousins, I; Barber, J; Mackay, D; Jones, K C

    2002-04-01

    Air and leaf-litter samples were collected from a rural site in southern Ontario under meteorologically stable conditions in the early spring, prior to bud burst, over a three-day period to measure the simultaneous diurnal variations in polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PBDEs are used in a wide range of commercial products as flame retardants and are being assessed internationally as potential persistent organic pollutants. Total PBDE concentrations in the air ranged between 88 and 1250 pg m(-3), and were dominated primarily by the lighter congeners PBDEs 17, 28, and 47, and concentrations of total PCBs ranged between 96 and 950 pg m(-3), and were dominated by the lower chlorinated (tri- to tetra-) congeners. Slopes of Clausius-Clapeyron plots indicate that both PCBs and PBDEs are experiencing active air-surface exchange. Fugacities were estimated from concentrations in the air and leaf-litter and suggest near equilibrium conditions. Following the three-day intensive sampling period, 40 air samples were collected at 24-hour intervals in an attempt to evaluate the effect of bud burst on atmospheric concentrations. Total PBDE concentrations in the daily air samples ranged between 10 and 230 pg m(-3), and were dominated by the lighter congeners PBDE 17, 28, and 47, whereas concentrations of total PCBs ranged between 30 and 450 pg m(-3) during this period. It is hypothesized thatthe high PBDE concentrations observed at the beginning of the sampling period are the result of an "early spring pulse" in which PBDEs deposited in the snowpack over the winter are released with snowmelt, resulting in elevated concentrations in the surface and air. Later in the sampling period, following bud burst, PBDE concentrations in air fell to 10 to 20 pg m(-3), possibly due to the high sorption capacity of this freshly emerging foliage compartment.

  7. Detachment of colloids from a solid surface by a moving air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Prabhakar; Flury, Markus; Zhou, Jun

    2008-10-01

    Colloid attachment to liquid-gas interfaces is an important process used in industrial applications to separate suspended colloids from the fluid phase. Moving gas bubbles can also be used to remove colloidal dust from surfaces. Similarly, moving liquid-gas interfaces lead to colloid mobilization in the natural subsurface environment, such as in soils and sediments. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of moving air-water interfaces on the detachment of colloids deposited on an air-dried glass surface, as a function of colloidal properties and interface velocity. We selected four types of polystyrene colloids (positive and negative surface charge, hydrophilic and hydrophobic). The colloids were deposited on clean microscope glass slides using a flow-through deposition chamber. Air-water interfaces were passed over the colloid-deposited glass slides, and we varied the number of passages and the interface velocity. The amounts of colloids deposited on the glass slides were visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy and quantified by image analysis. Our results showed that colloids attached under unfavorable conditions were removed in significantly greater amounts than those attached under favorable conditions. Hydrophobic colloids were detached more than hydrophilic colloids. The effect of the air-water interface on colloid removal was most pronounced for the first two passages of the air-water interface. Subsequent passages of air-water interfaces over the colloid-deposited glass slides did not cause significant additional colloid removal. Increasing interface velocity led to decreased colloid removal. The force balances, calculated from theory, supported the experimental findings, and highlight the dominance of detachment forces (surface tension forces) over the attachment forces (DLVO forces).

  8. Superhydrophobic metallic surfaces functionalized via femtosecond laser surface processing for long term air film retention when submerged in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhlke, Craig A.; Anderson, Troy P.; Li, Pengbo; Lucis, Michael J.; Roth, Nick; Shield, Jeffrey E.; Terry, Benjamin; Alexander, Dennis R.

    2015-03-01

    Femtosecond laser surface processing (FLSP) is a powerful technique used to create self-organized microstructures with nanoscale features on metallic surfaces. By combining FLSP surface texturing with surface chemistry changes, either induced by the femtosecond laser during processing or introduced through post processing techniques, the wetting properties of metals can be altered. In this work, FLSP is demonstrated as a technique to create superhydrophobic surfaces on grade 2 titanium and 304 stainless steel that can retain an air film (plastron) between the surface and a surrounding liquid when completely submerged. It is shown that the plastron lifetime when submerged in distilled water or synthetic stomach acid is critically dependent on the specific degree of surface micro- and nano-roughness, which can be tuned by controlling various FLSP parameters. The longest plastron lifetime was on a 304 stainless steel sample that was submerged in distilled water and maintained a plastron for 41 days, the length of time of the study, with no signs of degradation. Also demonstrated for the first time is the precise control of pulse fluence and pulse count to produce three unique classes of surface micron/nano-structuring on titanium.

  9. Air Temperature estimation from Land Surface temperature and solar Radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzarini, Michele; Eissa, Yehia; Marpu, Prashanth; Ghedira, Hosni

    2013-04-01

    Air Temperature (AirT) is a fundamental parameter in a wide range of applications such as climate change studies, weather forecast, energy balance modeling, efficiency of Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells, etc. Air temperature data are generally obtained through regular measurements from meteorological stations. The distribution of these stations is normally sparse, so the spatial pattern of this parameter cannot be accurately estimated by interpolation methods. This work investigated the relationship between Air Temperature measured at meteorological stations and spatially contiguous measurements derived from Remote Sensing techniques, such as Land Surface Temperature (LST) maps, emissivity maps and shortwave radiation maps with the aim of creating a continuous map of AirT. For LST and emissivity, MSG-SEVIRI LST product from Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA-SAF) has been used. For shortwave radiation maps, an Artificial Neural Networks ensemble model has been developed and previously tested to create continuous maps from Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) point measurements, utilizing six thermal channels of MSG-SEVIRI. The testing sites corresponded to three meteorological stations located in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where in situ measurements of Air Temperature were available. From the starting parameters, energy fluxes and net radiation have been calculated, in order to have information on the incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation and the incoming short-wave radiation. The preliminary analysis (day and Night measurements, cloud free) showed a strong negative correlation (0.92) between Outgoing long-wave radiation - GHI and LST- AirT, with a RMSE of 1.84 K in the AirT estimation from the initial parameters. Regression coefficients have been determined and tested on all the ground stations. The analysis also demonstrated the predominant impact of the incoming short-wave radiation in the AirT hourly variation, while the incoming

  10. Evaluation of outer race tilt and lubrication on ball wear and SSME bearing life reductions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Merriman, T. L.; Stockwell, R. D.; Dufrane, K. F.

    1983-01-01

    Several aspects of the SSME bearing operation were evaluated. The possibility of elastohydrodynamics (EHD) lubrication with a cryogenic fluid was analyzed. Films as thick as .61 microns were predicted with one theory which may be thick enough to provide hydrodynamic support. The film formation, however, is heavily dependent on good surface finish and a low bulk bearing temperature. Bearing dynamics to determine if the radial stiffness of a bearing which are dependent on bearing misalignment were analyzed. Four ball tests were conducted at several environmental conditions from an LN2 bath to 426 C in air. Surface coatings and ball materials are evaluated. Severe wear and high friction are measured for all ball materials except when the balls have surface lubricant coatings.

  11. Adsorption of air pollutants on the grain surface of Japanese cedar pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Yuji; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Okochi, Hiroshi; Igawa, Manabu

    The contaminants adsorbed on the surface of pollen may affect the development of hay fever, because the patients of the fever are larger in areas with much air pollution than in nonpolluted areas and the fine particles and gases are susceptible to deposit on the nasal cavities and eyes by their transfer on the pollen. Since Japanese cedar pollinosis is the most common hay fever in Japan, we analyzed the air pollutants adsorbed on the surface of dispersed Japanese cedar pollen in the urban and mountainous districts. Fine anthropogenic particles were significantly adsorbed and many elements were concentrated on the surface of the pollen in the urban site of Yokohama, while they were not concentrated on the surface of the pollen collected at a mountainous site. The acid gases are also adsorbed and acidify the surface, and their amounts increase with their concentrations in the ambient air. The high adsorption of nitric acid on the pollen determined by an exposure experiment of nitric acid gas suggests that nitric acid is dissolved in the inner part of the pollen. The adsorption amounts of the gases on the pollen were especially greater than those on other natural particles, humic acid and yellow sand.

  12. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  13. Determining Land Surface Temperature Relations with Land Use-Land Cover and Air Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahya, Ceyhan; Bektas Balcik, Filiz; Burak Oztaner, Yasar; Guney, Burcu

    2016-04-01

    Rapid population growth in conjunction with unplanned urbanization, expansion, and encroachment into the limited agricultural fields and green areas have negative impacts on vegetated areas. Land Surface Temperature (LST), Urban Heat Islands (UHI) and air pollution are the most important environmental problems that the extensive part of the world suffers from. The main objective of this research is to investigate the relationship between LST, air pollution and Land Use-Land Cover (LULC) in Istanbul, using Landsat 8 OLI satellite image. Mono-window algorithm is used to compute LST from Landsat 8 TIR data. In order to determine the air pollution, in-situ measurements of particulate matter (PM10) of the same day as the Landsat 8 OLI satellite image are obtained. The results of this data are interpolated using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) method and LULC categories of Istanbul were determined by using remote sensing indices. Error matrix was created for accuracy assessment. The relationship between LST, air pollution and LULC categories are determined by using regression analysis method. Keywords: Land Surface Temperature (LST), air pollution, Land Use-Land Cover (LULC), Istanbul

  14. Investigation of the Shockley surface state on clean and air-exposed Au (1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, P. J.; Puchalski, M.; Kozłowski, W.; Dąbrowski, P.; Klusek, Z.; Olejniczak, W.

    2008-05-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) carried out in vacuum and air were used to study the electronic structure of the Au (1 1 1) surface in the range of 0.0-0.7 eV below the Fermi level. The STS experiment carried out in UHV showed the existence of the Shockley surface state (SS) located 0.48 eV below the Fermi level. STS carried out in air showed strong local maximum located 0.35 eV below the Fermi level. This maximum was ascribed to the SS shifted toward lower energy due to carbon and oxygen overlayer. To confirm that the SS could exist on the sample exposed to air we did ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) experiment on air-treated and clean Au (1 1 1). Our results suggest that the SS position initially measured at 0.38 eV below the Fermi level was shifted to 0.27 eV after air treatment. Additionally, the level of contamination was measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  15. Degassing pathways of Cl-, F-, H-, and S-bearing magmas near the lunar surface: Implications for the composition and Cl isotopic values of lunar apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustunisik, G. K.; Nekvasil, H.; Lindsley, D. H.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental degassing of H-, F-, Cl-, C-, and S-bearing species from volatile-bearing magma of lunar composition at low P and fO2 close to quartz-iron-fayalite indicates that the composition of the fluid/vapor phase that is lost changes over time. A highly H-rich vapor phase is exsolved within the first 10 min. of degassing leaving behind a melt that is effectively dehydrated. Some Cl, F, and S is also lost during this time, presumably as HCl, HF, and H2S gaseous species; however much of the original inventory of Cl, F, and S components are retained in the melt. After 10 min., the exsolved vapor is dry and dominated by S- and halogen-bearing phases, presumably consisting of metal halides and sulfides, which evolves over time towards F enrichment. This vapor evolution provides important constraints on the geochemistry of volatile-bearing lunar phases that form subsequent to or during degassing. The rapidity of H loss suggests that little if any OH-bearing apatite will crystallize from surface or near surface (≈7m) melts and that degassing of lunar magmas will cause the compositions of apatites to evolve first towards the F-Cl apatite binary and eventually towards end member fluorapatite during crystallization. During the stage of loss of primarily H component from the melt, Cl would have been lost primarily as HCl, which is reported not to fractionate Cl isotopes at magmatic temperatures. After the loss of H-bearing species, continued loss of Cl would result in the degassing of metal chlorides, as a mechanism to fractionate Cl isotopes. After the onset of metal chloride degassing, the δ37Cl of the melt would increase to +6 (82% Cl loss), +8 (85% Cl loss), and +20‰ (95% Cl loss) at 1, 4, and 6 hours, respectively, approximated in a computed trajectory of δ37Cl values in basalt during degassing of FeCl2. This strong enrichment of 37Cl in the melt after metal chloride volatilization is fully consistent with values measured for the non-leachates of a variety of

  16. Effect of Air-Polishing on Titanium Surfaces, Biofilm Removal, and Biocompatibility: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bennani, Vincent; Hwang, Linda; Tawse-Smith, Andrew; Dias, George J.; Cannon, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate morphological changes induced by glycine powder air-polishing on titanium surfaces, biofilm removal, and biocompatibility. Material and Methods. Titanium grade IV discs were allocated into two groups: (1) discs without biofilm and (2) discs for Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation. Discs in each group were further subdivided into (a) no treatment and (b) air-polishing treatment with glycine powder. Discs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and confocal microscopy. Bacterial biofilms were quantified using a crystal violet dye-binding assay. Biocompatibility was evaluated by measuring the coverage and viability of L929 fibroblast cells cultured on the discs. Results. Air-polishing increased the roughness of treated discs (P < 0.05). EDS analysis did not show significant differences in the chemical composition of treated and nontreated discs. The amount of residual biofilm on treated discs was 8.6-fold lower than untreated controls (P < 0.05). Coverage of treated discs by fibroblasts was half that of untreated discs (P < 0.05) although both groups had the same cell viability. Conclusions. Air-polishing removed a significant amount of biofilm from titanium surfaces. The “polishing” was accompanied by increased surface roughness, but there were no changes in chemical and elemental compositions, nor the biocompatibility. PMID:26881198

  17. Surface tension of ab initio liquid water at the water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-05-01

    We report calculations on the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the influence of the cell size on surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is essential for small systems that are customary in AIMD simulations. Moreover, AIMD simulations reveal that the use of a double-ζ basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress while more accurate triple and quadruple-ζ basis sets give converged results. We further demonstrate that van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension while the van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in a value for the surface tension that is too high. The Grimme's D3 van der Waals correction provides a surface tension close to the experimental value. Whereas the specific choices for the van der Waals correction and basis sets critically affect the calculated surface tension, the surface tension is remarkably insensitive to the details of the exchange and correlation functionals, which highlights the impact of long-range interactions on the surface tension. Our simulated values provide important benchmarks, both for improving van der Waals corrections and AIMD simulations of aqueous interfaces.

  18. Surface tension of ab initio liquid water at the water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D

    2016-05-28

    We report calculations on the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the influence of the cell size on surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is essential for small systems that are customary in AIMD simulations. Moreover, AIMD simulations reveal that the use of a double-ζ basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress while more accurate triple and quadruple-ζ basis sets give converged results. We further demonstrate that van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension while the van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in a value for the surface tension that is too high. The Grimme's D3 van der Waals correction provides a surface tension close to the experimental value. Whereas the specific choices for the van der Waals correction and basis sets critically affect the calculated surface tension, the surface tension is remarkably insensitive to the details of the exchange and correlation functionals, which highlights the impact of long-range interactions on the surface tension. Our simulated values provide important benchmarks, both for improving van der Waals corrections and AIMD simulations of aqueous interfaces.

  19. Optimization of microwave-assisted hot air drying conditions of okra using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Prasad, Suresh; Murthy, Ganti S

    2014-02-01

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) was dried to a moisture level of 0.1 g water/g dry matter using a microwave-assisted hot air dryer. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the drying conditions based on specific energy consumption and quality of dried okra. The drying experiments were performed using a central composite rotatable design for three variables: air temperature (40-70 °C), air velocity (1-2 m/s) and microwave power level (0.5-2.5 W/g). The quality of dried okra was determined in terms of color change, rehydration ratio and hardness of texture. A second-order polynomial model was well fitted to all responses and high R(2) values (>0.8) were observed in all cases. The color change of dried okra was found higher at high microwave power and air temperatures. Rehydration properties were better for okra samples dried at higher microwave power levels. Specific energy consumption decreased with increase in microwave power due to decrease in drying time. The drying conditions of 1.51 m/s air velocity, 52.09 °C air temperature and 2.41 W/g microwave power were found optimum for product quality and minimum energy consumption for microwave-convective drying of okra.

  20. Optimization of microwave-assisted hot air drying conditions of okra using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Prasad, Suresh; Murthy, Ganti S

    2014-02-01

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) was dried to a moisture level of 0.1 g water/g dry matter using a microwave-assisted hot air dryer. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the drying conditions based on specific energy consumption and quality of dried okra. The drying experiments were performed using a central composite rotatable design for three variables: air temperature (40-70 °C), air velocity (1-2 m/s) and microwave power level (0.5-2.5 W/g). The quality of dried okra was determined in terms of color change, rehydration ratio and hardness of texture. A second-order polynomial model was well fitted to all responses and high R(2) values (>0.8) were observed in all cases. The color change of dried okra was found higher at high microwave power and air temperatures. Rehydration properties were better for okra samples dried at higher microwave power levels. Specific energy consumption decreased with increase in microwave power due to decrease in drying time. The drying conditions of 1.51 m/s air velocity, 52.09 °C air temperature and 2.41 W/g microwave power were found optimum for product quality and minimum energy consumption for microwave-convective drying of okra. PMID:24493879

  1. Multitechnique characterisation of 304L surface states oxidised at high temperature in steam and air atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamede, Anne-Sophie; Nuns, Nicolas; Cristol, Anne-Lise; Cantrel, Laurent; Souvi, Sidi; Cristol, Sylvain; Paul, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In case of a severe accident occurring in a nuclear reactor, surfaces of the reactor coolant system (RCS), made of stainless steel (304L) rich in Cr (>10%) and Ni (8-12%), are oxidised. Fission products (FPs) are released from melt fuel and flow through the RCS. A part of them is deposited onto surfaces either by vapour condensation or by aerosol deposition mechanisms. To be able to understand the nature of interactions between these FPs and the RCS surfaces, a preliminary step is to characterize the RSC surface states in steam and air atmosphere at high temperatures. Pieces of 304L stainless steel have been treated in a flow reactor at two different temperatures (750 °C and 950 °C) for two different exposition times (24 h and 72 h). After surfaces analysing by a unique combination of surface analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS and LEIS), for 304L, the results show a deep oxide scale with multi layers and the outer layer is composed of chromium and manganese oxides. Oxide profiles differ in air or steam atmosphere. Fe2O3 oxide is observed but in minor proportion and in all cases no nickel is detected near the surface. Results obtained are discussed and compared with the literature data.

  2. Surface functionalization of macroporous polymeric materials by treatment with air low temperature plasma.

    PubMed

    Molina, R; Sole, I; Vílchez, A; Bertran, E; Solans, C; Esquena, J

    2013-04-01

    Polystyrene/divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) macroporous monoliths obtained using highly concentrated emulsions as templates show a superhydrophobic behaviour, restricting their potential technological applications, especially those related to adhesion and wetting. Air plasma treatments were carried out in order to modulate wetting properties, modifying the surface chemical composition of macroporous polystyrene/divinylbenzene materials. The superhydrophobic behaviour was rapidly suppressed by air plasma treatment, greatly reducing the water contact angle, from approximately 150 degrees to approximately 90 degrees, in only 10 seconds of treatment. The new surface chemical groups, promoted by plasma active species, were characterized by surface analysis techniques with different depth penetration specificity (contact angle, XPS, FTIR and SEM). Results demonstrated that very short treatment times produced different chemical functionalities, mainly C-O, C=O, O-C=O and C-N, which provide the materials with predominantly acidic surface properties. However, plasma active species did not penetrate deeply through the interconnected pores of the material. FTIR analysis evidenced that the new hydrophilic surface groups promoted by plasma active species are in a negligibly concentration compared to bulk chemical groups, and are located in a very thin surface region on the PS-DVB monolith surface (significantly below 2 microm). XPS analysis of treated monoliths revealed a progressive increase of oxygen and nitrogen content as a function of plasma treatment time. However, oxidation of the PS-DVB monoliths surface prevails over the incorporation of nitrogen atoms. Finally, SEM studies indicated that the morphology of the plasma treated PS-DVB does not significantly change even for the longest air plasma treatment time studied (120 s).

  3. A theoretical remark about waves on a static water surface beneath a layer of moving air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, T.; Hayashi, R.; Yasutomi, Z.

    1990-12-01

    Grundy and Tuck (1987) treat the problem of large-amplitude waves on an air-water interface where the air is a steady nonuniform flow and the water is stationary. Both periodic nonlinear Stokes-like waves far downstream and a configuration of the water surface from the edge region of a hovercraft were computed. However, there is no work that treats the existence of such Stokes-like waves theoretically. The present work aims to prove the existence of such solutions in the case where the cushion pressure is low, that is, the depression at the upstream stagnation point from the mean water level is small.

  4. Grizzly bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.; Feldhamer, G.; Thompson, B.; Chapman, J.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  5. The cold and atmospheric-pressure air surface barrier discharge plasma for large-area sterilization applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dacheng; Zhao Di; Feng Kecheng; Zhang Xianhui; Liu Dongping; Yang Size

    2011-04-18

    This letter reports a stable air surface barrier discharge device for large-area sterilization applications at room temperature. This design may result in visually uniform plasmas with the electrode area scaled up (or down) to the required size. A comparison for the survival rates of Escherichia coli from air, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} surface barrier discharge plasmas is presented, and the air surface plasma consisting of strong filamentary discharges can efficiently kill Escherichia coli. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH generated in the room temperature air plasmas play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  6. Is it Necessary to Consider Air Flow in Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y.; Su, Z.; Wan, L.; Wen, J.

    2011-12-01

    From a subsurface physical point of view, this paper discusses the necessity and feasibility of considering two-phase heat and mass transfer process in land surface models (LSMs). The potential-based equations of coupled mass and heat transport under constant air pressure are adopted as the basis. The proposed model is developed on this basis by considering dry air as a single phase, and including mechanical dispersion in the water vapor and dry air transfer. The adsorbed liquid flux due to thermal gradient is also taken into account. The set of equations for the two-phase heat and mass transfer is formulated fully considering diffusion, advection and dispersion. The advantage of the proposed model over the traditional equation system is discussed. The accuracy of the proposed model is assessed through comparison with analytical work for coupled mass and heat transfer and experimental work for isothermal two-phase flow (moisture/air transfer). Further investigation is carried out to elucidate how the coupled moisture and heat transfer is influenced by adding the air flow, and how the isothermal two-phase flow is affected by considering the heat flow. The importance of including the air flow in the coupled mass and heat transfer is clearly identified. Concerning the two-phase flow, the influence of heat flow is only significant if the air phase plays a significant role in solving the equations of the water phase. Based on a field experiment, the proposed model is compared with the measured soil moisture, temperature and evaporation rate, the results show clearly that it is necessary to consider the air flow mechanism for soil-atmosphere interaction studies.

  7. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  8. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  9. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  10. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  11. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  12. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  13. Surface modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) fibers induced by radio frequency air plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, Claudia; Barni, Ruggero; Selli, Elena; Mazzone, Giovanni; Massafra, Maria Rosaria; Marcandalli, Bruno; Poletti, Giulio

    2003-04-01

    The surface chemical and physical modifications of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers induced by radiofrequency air plasma treatments were correlated with the characteristics of the discharge parameters and the chemical composition of the plasma itself, to identify the plasma-induced surface processes prevailing under different operating conditions. Treated polymer surfaces were characterized by water droplet absorption time measurements and XPS analysis, as a function of the aging time in different media, and by AFM analysis. They exhibited a remarkable increase in hydrophilicity, accompanied by extensive etching and by the implantation of both oxygen- and nitrogen-containing polar groups. Etching was mainly a consequence of ion bombardment, yielding low molecular weight, water soluble oxidation products, while surface chemical modifications were mainly due to the action of neutral species on the plasma-activated polymer surface.

  14. Microbial Air Quality and Bacterial Surface Contamination in Ambulances During Patient Services

    PubMed Central

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Pipitsangjan, Sirikun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to assess microbial air quality and bacterial surface contamination on medical instruments and the surrounding areas among 30 ambulance runs during service. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 106 air samples collected from 30 ambulances before patient services and 212 air samples collected during patient services to assess the bacterial and fungal counts at the two time points. Additionally, 226 surface swab samples were collected from medical instrument surfaces and the surrounding areas before and after ambulance runs. Groups or genus of isolated bacteria and fungi were preliminarily identified by Gram’s stain and lactophenol cotton blue. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient with a p-value of less than 0.050 considered significant. Results The mean and standard deviation of bacterial and fungal counts at the start of ambulance runs were 318±485cfu/m3 and 522±581cfu/m3, respectively. Bacterial counts during patient services were 468±607cfu/m3 and fungal counts were 656±612cfu/m3. Mean bacterial and fungal counts during patient services were significantly higher than those at the start of ambulance runs, p=0.005 and p=0.030, respectively. For surface contamination, the overall bacterial counts before and after patient services were 0.8±0.7cfu/cm2 and 1.3±1.1cfu/cm2, respectively (p<0.001). The predominant isolated bacteria and fungi were Staphylococcus spp. and Aspergillus spp., respectively. Additionally, there was a significantly positive correlation between bacterial (r=0.3, p<0.010) and fungal counts (r=0.2, p=0.020) in air samples and bacterial counts on medical instruments and allocated areas. Conclusions This study revealed high microbial contamination (bacterial and fungal) in ambulance air during services and higher bacterial contamination on medical instrument surfaces and allocated areas after ambulance services compared to the start of ambulance runs

  15. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems.

  16. Global fields of soil moisture and land surface evapotranspiration derived from observed precipitation and surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Y.; Walker, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    The global fields of normal monthly soil moisture and land surface evapotranspiration are derived with a simple water budget model that has precipitation and potential evapotranspiration as inputs. The precipitation is observed and the potential evapotranspiration is derived from the observed surface air temperature with the empirical regression equation of Thornthwaite (1954). It is shown that at locations where the net surface radiation flux has been measured, the potential evapotranspiration given by the Thornthwaite equation is in good agreement with those obtained with the radiation-based formulations of Priestley and Taylor (1972), Penman (1948), and Budyko (1956-1974), and this provides the justification for the use of the Thornthwaite equation. After deriving the global fields of soil moisture and evapotranspiration, the assumption is made that the potential evapotranspiration given by the Thornthwaite equation and by the Priestley-Taylor equation will everywhere be about the same; the inverse of the Priestley-Taylor equation is used to obtain the normal monthly global fields of net surface radiation flux minus ground heat storage. This and the derived evapotranspiration are then used in the equation for energy conservation at the surface of the earth to obtain the global fields of normal monthly sensible heat flux from the land surface to the atmosphere.

  17. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  18. Lead-free bearing alloys for engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratke, Lorenz; Ågren, John; Ludwig, Andreas; Tonn, Babette; Gránásy, László; Mathiesen, Ragnvald; Arnberg, Lars; Anger, Gerd; Reifenhäuser, Bernd; Lauer, Michael; Garen, Rune; Gust, Edgar

    2005-10-01

    Recent developments to reduce the fuel consumption, emission and air pollution, size and weight of engines for automotive, truck, ship propulsion and electrical power generation lead to temperature and load conditions within the engines that cannot be borne by conventional bearings. Presently, only costly multilayer bearings with electroplated or sputtered surface coatings can cope with the load/speed combinations required. Ecological considerations in recent years led to a ban by the European Commission on the use of lead in cars a problem for the standard bronze-lead bearing material. This MAP project is therefore developing an aluminium-based lead-free bearing material with sufficient hardness, wear and friction properties and good corrosion resistance. Only alloys made of components immiscible in the molten state can meet the demanding requirements. Space experimentation plays a crucial role in optimising the cast microstructure for such applications.

  19. Air-sea interaction and surface flux in non-equilibrium sea-states

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, G.; Ek, M.; Mahrt, L.

    1994-12-31

    The wind forcing over the ocean determines the air-sea exchanges of heat, moisture and momentum which affect and drive the surface wave dynamics and the mixed layer circulation. In turn, it has been shown that wave dynamics and wave age affect ocean surface roughness and air-sea exchange processes so that the wind flow is not always in equilibrium with the ocean surface waves. This effect of wave spectrum on surface roughness has been discussed by many authors; yet it is rarely, if ever, accounted for in flux parameterization in models of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). Proper representation of these effects in both remote sensors` signal to geophysical-parameter models and in physical models of the ocean and the atmosphere on all scales is essential given the increased reliance of ocean monitoring systems on remote sea-surface sensors and the fundamental sensitivity of physical models to surface fluxes. In this paper the authors present a methodology for modeling these effects from data along with some results from data analyses of observations taken in two field experiments.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent stably stratified air flow above a wavy water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the roughness of the underlaying water surface on turbulence is studied in a stably stratified boundary layer (SSBL). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is conducted at various Reynolds (Re) and Richardson (Ri) numbers and the wave steepness ka. It is shown that, at constant Re, the stationary turbulent regime is set in at Ri below the threshold value Ri c depending on Re. At Ri > Ri c , in the absence of turbulent fluctuations near the wave water surface, three-dimensional quasiperiodical structures are identified and their threshold of origin depends on the steepness of the surface wave on the water surface. This regime is called a wave pumping regime. The formation of three-dimensional structures is explained by the development of parametric instability of the disturbances induced by the surface water in the air flow. The DNS results are quite consistent with prediction of the theoretical model of the SSBL flow, in which solutions for the disturbances of the fields of velocity and temperature in the wave pumping regime are found to be a solution of a two-dimensional linearized system with the heterogeneous boundary condition, which is caused by the presence of the surface wave. In addition to the turbulent fluctuations, the three-dimensional structures in the wave pumping regime provide for the transfer of impulse and heat, i.e., the increase in the roughness of the water-air boundary caused by the presence of waves intensifies the exchange in the SSBL.

  1. Effects of platinum stagnation surface on the lean extinction limits of premixed methane/air flames at moderate surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wiswall, J.T.; Li, J.; Wooldridge, M.S.; Im, H.G.

    2011-01-15

    A stagnation flow reactor was used to study the effects of platinum on the lean flammability limits of atmospheric pressure premixed methane/air flames at moderate stagnation surface temperatures. Experimental and computational methods were used to quantify the equivalence ratio at the lean extinction limit ({phi}{sub ext}) and the corresponding stagnation surface temperature (T{sub s}). A range of flow rates (57-90 cm/s) and corresponding strain rates were considered. The results indicate that the gas-phase methane/air flames are sufficiently strong relative to the heterogeneous chemistry for T{sub s} conditions less than 750 K that the platinum does not affect {phi}{sub ext}. The computational results are in good agreement with the experimentally observed trends and further indicate that higher reactant flow rates (>139 cm/s) and levels of dilution (>{proportional_to}10% N{sub 2}) are required to weaken the gas-phase flame sufficiently for surface reaction to play a positive role on extending the lean flammability limits. (author)

  2. Analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in concurrently sampled Chinese air and surface soil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Liu, Liyan; Li, Yi-Fan; Wang, Degao; Jia, Hongliang; Harner, Tom; Sverko, Ed; Wan, Xinnan; Xu, Diandou; Ren, Nanqi; Ma, Jianmin; Pozo, Karla

    2008-09-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations were measured in a concurrent air and surface soil sampling program across China. Passive air samples were collected for approximately 3 months from mid-July to mid-October, 2005 using polyurethane foam (PUF) disk type samplers at 97 sites and surface soil samples were collected in a subset of 51 sites in the same year. As expected, the air concentrations (pg m(-3)) were highest at urban sites (mean of 350 +/- 218) followed by rural (230 +/- 180) and background sites (77 +/- 50). The PCB homologue composition was similar across China, with no distinction among site types, and reflected the profile of Chinese transformer oil with a greater proportion of lower molecular weight (LMW) congeners, particularly the tri-PCBs. This differs from the profile in Chinese soil that was shifted toward the higher molecular weight (HMW) congeners and likely attributed to numerous years of deposition and accumulation in this reservoir. The PCB profile in surface soil also reflects an "urban fractionation effect" with preferential deposition of HMW congeners near sources. The profile of PCBs in Chinese air was shown to be different than reported for Europe and for the Great Lakes Area (GLA) in North America. European and GLA air samples show a distinction between urban and rural/V background sites, with urban sites dominated by tetra- and penta-PCBs, whereas rural and background sites are shifted toward LMW congeners. European and GLA samples also exhibit much higher PCB concentrations at urban sites. This may be attributed to the use of PCBs in building materials in European and North American cities. In China, the difference between urban and rural/background sites is less pronounced. Strong soil-air correlations were found for the LMW PCBs at the background and rural sites, and for the HMW PCBs at the urban sites, a strong evidence of the urban fractionation effect. To our knowledge, this is the first national-scale study in China

  3. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; ,; Lentfer, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  4. Microbes at Surface-Air Interfaces: The Metabolic Harnessing of Relative Humidity, Surface Hygroscopicity, and Oligotrophy for Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Wendy; Kroukamp, Otini; Korber, Darren R.; McKelvie, Jennifer; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.

    2016-01-01

    The human environment is predominantly not aqueous, and microbes are ubiquitous at the surface-air interfaces with which we interact. Yet microbial studies at surface-air interfaces are largely survival-oriented, whilst microbial metabolism has overwhelmingly been investigated from the perspective of liquid saturation. This study explored microbial survival and metabolism under desiccation, particularly the influence of relative humidity (RH), surface hygroscopicity, and nutrient availability on the interchange between these two phenomena. The combination of a hygroscopic matrix (i.e., clay or 4,000 MW polyethylene glycol) and high RH resulted in persistent measurable microbial metabolism during desiccation. In contrast, no microbial metabolism was detected at (a) hygroscopic interfaces at low RH, and (b) less hygroscopic interfaces (i.e., sand and plastic/glass) at high or low RH. Cell survival was conversely inhibited at high RH and promoted at low RH, irrespective of surface hygroscopicity. Based on this demonstration of metabolic persistence and survival inhibition at high RH, it was proposed that biofilm metabolic rates might inversely influence whole-biofilm resilience, with ‘resilience’ defined in this study as a biofilm’s capacity to recover from desiccation. The concept of whole-biofilm resilience being promoted by oligotrophy was supported in desiccation-tolerant Arthrobacter spp. biofilms, but not in desiccation-sensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The ability of microbes to interact with surfaces to harness water vapor during desiccation was demonstrated, and potentially to harness oligotrophy (the most ubiquitous natural condition facing microbes) for adaptation to desiccation. PMID:27746774

  5. Anti-backlash gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission. One preferred embodiment discloses and describes an anti-backlash feature to counter ''dead zones'' in the gear bearing movement.

  6. Liquid oxygen cooled bearing ignition potential assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Arthur T.; Goode, Brian K.; Owen, James W.

    1990-01-01

    Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump bearings have shown evidence of heavy oxidation on the surfaces of the balls and races. Extensive analyses were performed to assess the ignition potential in the bearing system during normal and off-nominal operation. Test programs and analyses were used to determine the bearing thermal condition and bearing material ignition characteristics.

  7. Improved Determination of Surface and Atmospheric Temperatures Using Only Shortwave AIRS Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind,Joel

    2009-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. AIRS is a grating spectrometer with a number of linear arrays of detectors with each detector sensitive to outgoing radiation in a characteristic frequency v(sub i) with a spectral band pass delta v(sub i) of roughly v(sub i) /1200. AIRS contains 2378 spectral channels covering portions of the spectral region 650 cm(exp -1) (15.38 gm) - 2665 cm(exp -1)' (3.752 micrometers). These spectral regions contain significant absorption features from two CO2 absorption bands, the 15 micrometer (longwave) CO2 band, and the 4.3 micrometer (shortwave) CO, absorption band. There are also two atmospheric window regions, the 12 micrometerm - 8 micrometer (longwave) window, and the 4.17 micrometer - 3.75 micrometer (shortwave) window. Historically, determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures from satellite observations was performed using primarily observations in the longwave window and CO2 absorption regions. One reason for this was concerns about the effects, during the day, of reflected sunlight and non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (non-LTE) on the observed radiances in the shortwave portion of the spectrum. According to cloud clearing theory, more accurate soundings of both surface skin and atmospheric temperatures can be obtained under partial cloud cover conditions if one uses the longwave channels to determine cloud cleared radiances R(sub i) for all channels, and uses R(sub i) only from shortwave channels in the determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures. This procedure is now being used by the AIRS Science Team in preparation for the AIRS Version 6 Retrieval Algorithm. This paper describes how the effects on the radiances of solar radiation reflected by clouds and the Earth's surface, and also of non-LTE, are accounted for in the analysis of the data. Results are presented for both

  8. Ontogeny of the antibody-forming cell line in mice. IV. Appearance of cells bearing Fc receptors, complement receptors, and surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Y J; Parish, C R

    1977-02-01

    The ontogeny of Ig, FcR, and CR-bearing cells in liver and spleen has been followed by using rosetting procedures. These studies demonstrated a sequential appearance of surface receptors during development. Two types of Ig+ cells could be distinguished according to their rosette morphology and adherence to carbonyl iron: 1) an adherent cell which bound few erythrocytes was found predominantly in fetal liver from 13 days gestation and 2) a nonadherent cell which bound larger numbers of erythrocytes appeared in small numbers in fetal liver from day-16 gestation but represented the major Ig+ cell type after birth. Changes in the proportions of receptor-bearing populations occurred at two particular periods during ontogeny. The first was at birth, where an increase in the proportion of FcR+ cells occurred and the proportion of type 2 Ig+ cells rose rapidly. This probably represented the first appearance of FcR+ B lymphocytes even though cells bearing FcR were detected in fetal liver of all ages (days 12 to 18). The second period was around 10 days after birth when the proportion of Ig+ cells again increased concomitant with the appearance of CR+ nonadherent cells.

  9. The air bubble entrapped under a drop impacting on a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoroddsen, S. T.; Etoh, T. G.; Takehara, K.; Ootsuka, N.; Hatsuki, Y.

    2005-12-01

    We present experimental observations of the disk of air caught under a drop impacting onto a solid surface. By imaging the impact through an acrylic plate with an ultra-high-speed video camera, we can follow the evolution of the air disk as it contracts into a bubble under the centre of the drop. The initial size and contraction speed of the disk were measured for a range of impact Weber and Reynolds numbers. The size of the initial disk is related to the bottom curvature of the drop at the initial contact, as measured in free-fall. The initial contact often leaves behind a ring of micro-bubbles, marking its location. The air disk contracts at a speed comparable to the corresponding air disks caught under a drop impacting onto a liquid surface. This speed also seems independent of the wettability of the liquid, which only affects the azimuthal shape of the contact line. For some impact conditions, the dynamics of the contraction leaves a small droplet at the centre of the bubble. This arises from a capillary wave propagating from the edges of the contracting disk towards the centre. As the wave converges its amplitude grows until it touches the solid substrate, thereby pinching off the micro-droplet at the plate, in the centre of the bubble. The effect of increasing liquid viscosity is to slow down the contraction speed and to produce a more irregular contact line leaving more micro-bubbles along the initial ring.

  10. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration fields near air bubble surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sabita; Duke, Steve R.

    2000-09-01

    This article describes a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for measuring dissolved oxygen concentration gradients in water near the surface of an air bubble. Air bubbles are created at the tip of a needle in a rectangular bubble column filled with water that contains pyrenebutyric acid (PBA). The fluorescence of the PBA is induced by a planar pulse of nitrogen laser light. Oxygen transferring from the air bubble to the deoxygenated water quenches the fluorescence of the PBA. Images of the instantaneous and two-dimensional fluorescence field are obtained by a UV-intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Quenching of fluorescence intensity is determined at each pixel in the CCD image to measure dissolved oxygen concentration. Two-dimensional concentration fields are presented for a series of measurements of oxygen transfer from 1.6 mm bubbles suspended on the tip of a needle in a quiescent fluid. The images show the spatially varying concentration profiles, gradients, and boundary layer thicknesses at positions around the bubble surfaces. These direct and local measurements of concentration behavior within the mass transfer boundary layer show the potential of this LIF technique for the development of general and mechanistic models for oxygen transport across the air-water interface.

  11. Optical Diagnostics of Air Flows Induced in Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobatake, Takuya; Deguchi, Masanori; Suzuki, Junya; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2014-10-01

    A surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator has recently been intensively studied for the flow control over airfoils and turbine blades in the fields of aerospace and aeromechanics. It consists of two electrodes placed on both sides of the dielectric, where one is a top powered electrode exposed to the air, and the other is a bottom grounded electrode encapsulated with an insulator. The unidirectional gas flow along the dielectric surfaces is induced by the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) body force. It is known that the thinner the exposed electrode, the greater the momentum transfer to the air is, indicating that the thickness of the plasma is important. To analyze plasma profiles and air flows induced in the SDBD plasma actuator, we performed time-resolved and -integrated optical emission and schlieren imaging of the side view of the SDBD plasma actuator in atmospheric air. We applied a high voltage bipolar pulse (4-8 kV, 1-10 kHz) between electrodes. Experimental results indicated that the spatial extent of the plasma is much smaller than that of the induced flows. Experimental results further indicated that in the positive-going phase, a thin and long plasma is generated, where the optical emission is weak and uniform; on the other hand, in the negative-going phase, a thick and short plasma is generated, where a strong optical emission is observed near the top electrode.

  12. Retrieval of Atmospheric and Surface Parameters from AIRS/AMSU/HSB Data Under Cloudy Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Barnet, Chris; Blaisdell, John; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    New state of the art methodology is described to analyze AIRS/AMSU/HSB data in the presence of multiple cloud formations. The methodology forms the basis for the AIRS Science Team algorithm which will be used to analyze AIRS/AMSU/HSB data on EOS Aqua. The cloud clearing methodology requires no knowledge of the spectral properties of the clouds. The basic retrieval methodology is general and extracts the maximum information from the radiances, consistent with the channel noise covariance matrix. The retrieval methodology minimizes the dependence of the solution on the first guess field and the first guess error characteristics. Results are shown for AIRS Science Team simulation studies with multiple cloud formations. These simulation studies imply that clear column radiances can be reconstructed under partial cloud cover with an accuracy comparable to single spot channel noise in the temperature and water vapor sounding regions, temperature soundings can be produced under partial cloud cover with RMS errors on the order of, or better than, 1deg K in 1 km thick layers from the surface to 700 mb, 1 km layers from 700 mb to 300 mb, 3 km layers from 300 mb to 30 mb, and 5 km layers from 30 mb to 1 mb, and moisture profiles can be obtained with an accuracy better than 20% absolute errors in 1 km layers from the surface to nearly 200 mb.

  13. Global surface air temperature in 1995: Return to pre-Pinatubo level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Ruedy, R.; Sato, M.; Reynolds, R.

    Global surface air temperature has increased about 0.5°C from the minimum of mid-1992, a year after the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. Both a land-based surface air temperature record and a land-marine temperature index place the meteorological year 1995 at approximately the same level as 1990, previously the warmest year in the period of instrumental data. As El Niño warming was small in 1995, the solar cycle near a minimum, and ozone depletion near record levels, the observed high temperature supports the contention of an underlying global warming trend. The pattern of Northern Hemisphere temperature change in recent decades appears to reflect a change of atmospheric dynamics.

  14. Airborne measurements of surface layer turbulence over the ocean during cold air outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Shien; Yeh, Eueng-Nan

    1987-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of surface layer turbulence for the near-shore cloud street regions over the Atlantic Ocean were examined using 50-m level data of airborne measurements of atmospheric turbulence spectra above the western Atlantic Ocean during cold air outbreaks. The present study, performed for the Mesoscale Air-Sea Exchange (MASEX) experiment, extends and completes the preliminary analyses of Chou and Yeh (1987). In the inertial subrange, a near 4/3 ratio was observed between velocity spectra normal to and those along the aircraft heading. A comparison of the turbulent kinetic energy budgets with those of Wyngaard and Cote (1971) and Caughey and Wyngaard (1979) data indicates that the turbulent kinetic energy in the surface layer is dissipated less in the MASEX data than in data obtained by the previous groups.

  15. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing for passively suspending a rotatable element subjected to axial and radial thrust forces is disclosed. The magnetic bearing employs a taut wire stretched along the longitudinal axis of the bearing between opposed end pieces and an intermediate magnetic section. The intermediate section is segmented to provide oppositely directed magnetic flux paths between the end pieces and may include either an axially polarized magnets interposed between the segments. The end pieces, separated from the intermediate section by air gaps, control distribution of magnetic flux between the intermediate section segments. Coaxial alignment of the end pieces with the intermediate section minimizes magnetic reluctance in the flux paths endowing the bearing with self-centering characteristics when subjected to radial loads. In an alternative embodiment, pairs of oppositely wound armature coils are concentrically interposed between segments of the intermediate section in concentric arcs adjacent to radially polarized magnets to equip a magnetic bearing as a torsion drive motor. The magnetic suspension bearing disclosed provides long term reliability without maintenance with application to long term space missions such as the VISSR/VAS scanning mirror instrument in the GOES program.

  16. Particles at Oil-Air Surfaces: Powdered Oil, Liquid Oil Marbles, and Oil Foam.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Johnston, Shaun K; Sekine, Tomoko; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2015-07-01

    The type of material stabilized by four kinds of fluorinated particles (sericite and bentonite platelet clays and spherical zinc oxide) in air-oil mixtures has been investigated. It depends on the particle wettability and the degree of shear. Upon vigorous agitation, oil dispersions are formed in all the oils containing relatively large bentonite particles and in oils of relatively low surface tension (γla < 26 mN m(-1)) like dodecane, 20 cS silicone, and cyclomethicone containing the other fluorinated particles. Particle-stabilized oil foams were obtained in oils having γla > 26 mN m(-1) where the advancing air-oil-solid contact angle θ lies between ca. 90° and 120°. Gentle shaking, however, gives oil-in-air liquid marbles with all the oil-particle systems except for cases where θ is <60°. For oils of tension >24 mN m(-1) with omniphobic zinc oxide and sericite particles for which advancing θ ≥ 90°, dry oil powders consisting of oil drops in air which do not leak oil could be made upon gentle agitation up to a critical oil:particle ratio (COPR). Above the COPR, catastrophic phase inversion of the dry oil powders to air-in-oil foams was observed. When sheared on a substrate, the dry oil powders containing at least 60 wt % of oil release the encapsulated oil, making these materials attractive formulations in the cosmetic and food industries. PMID:26107421

  17. Regression analysis in modeling of air surface temperature and factors affecting its value in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim Mohammed; Jafri, Mohd. Zubir Mat; Lim, Hwee San; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2012-10-01

    This study encompasses air surface temperature (AST) modeling in the lower atmosphere. Data of four atmosphere pollutant gases (CO, O3, CH4, and H2O) dataset, retrieved from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), from 2003 to 2008 was employed to develop a model to predict AST value in the Malaysian peninsula using the multiple regression method. For the entire period, the pollutants were highly correlated (R=0.821) with predicted AST. Comparisons among five stations in 2009 showed close agreement between the predicted AST and the observed AST from AIRS, especially in the southwest monsoon (SWM) season, within 1.3 K, and for in situ data, within 1 to 2 K. The validation results of AST with AST from AIRS showed high correlation coefficient (R=0.845 to 0.918), indicating the model's efficiency and accuracy. Statistical analysis in terms of β showed that H2O (0.565 to 1.746) tended to contribute significantly to high AST values during the northeast monsoon season. Generally, these results clearly indicate the advantage of using the satellite AIRS data and a correlation analysis study to investigate the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases on AST over the Malaysian peninsula. A model was developed that is capable of retrieving the Malaysian peninsulan AST in all weather conditions, with total uncertainties ranging between 1 and 2 K.

  18. The EUSTACE project: combining different components of the observing system to deliver global, daily information on surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways and are fundamental information for many climate services; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. Here we reflect on our experience so far within the Horizon 2020 project EUSTACE of using satellite skin temperature retrievals to help us to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types and developing new statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018): - providing new, consistent, multi-component estimation of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; - identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; - estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; - using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras. Information will also be given on how interested users can become involved.

  19. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure air plasma source for polymer surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shujun; Tang, Jiansheng

    2013-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure air plasma source was generated through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It was used to modify polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces with very high throughput. An equivalent circuit model was used to calculate the peak average electron density. The emission spectrum from the plasma was taken and the main peaks in the spectrum were identified. The ozone density in the down plasma region was estimated by Absorption Spectroscopy. NSF and ARC-ODU

  20. Characteristics of a glow discharge in atmospheric pressure air over the water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Chuchman, M. P.; Mesarosh, L. V.

    2014-06-01

    The current-voltage characteristics, the amount of cathode fall, and the spectra of plasma radiation from different spatial domains are presented versus the molecular band intensity of products arising in an atmospheric-pressure air glow discharge over the distilled water surface. The plasma electron temperature is also reported. The distance to a liquid cathode or anode is varied from 1 to 10 mm at a discharge mean current of 10-36 mA.

  1. Air sampling for hepatitis B surface antigen in a dental operatory.

    PubMed

    Petersen, N J; Bond, W W; Favero, M S

    1979-09-01

    Forty samples of air with a mean sample volume of 104 liters were collected during the treatment of patients whose blood was positive for HBsAG: no samples contained HBsAG and occult blood. These findings suggest that, if environmentally mediated transmission of hepatitis B occurs in the dental operatory, it is more likely to occur through contact with contaminated surfaces than through the airborne route.

  2. Surface pressure-induced layer growth of a monolayer at the air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, J.Y.; Uphaus, R.A. )

    1994-04-01

    Spread monolayers containing a nematic liquid crystal and stearic acid were characterized at various mole fractions by determination of surface pressure-area isotherms at the air-water interface. The surface-composition phase diagrams indicate that compression induces a new phase transition in the films, which changes from a mixed monolayer to a supermonomolecular system. X-ray diffraction and optical absorption spectra demonstrate that the supermolecular array consists of an island liquid crystal monolayer and a uniform stearic acid monolayer. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Surface-dependent inactivation of model microorganisms with shielded sliding plasma discharges and applied air flow.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Malik, Muhammad A; Heller, Loree C

    2015-06-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma inactivates bacteria through reactive species produced from the applied gas. The use of cold plasma clinically has gained recent interest, as the need for alternative or supplementary strategies are necessary for preventing multi-drug resistant infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of a novel shielded sliding discharge based cold plasma reactor operated by nanosecond voltage pulses in atmospheric air on both biotic and inanimate surfaces. Bacterial inactivation was determined by direct quantification of colony forming units. The plasma activated air (afterglow) was bactericidal against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis seeded on culture media, laminate, and linoleum vinyl. In general, E. coli was more susceptible to plasma exposure. A bacterial reduction was observed with the application of air alone on a laminate surface. Whole-cell real-time PCR revealed a decrease in the presence of E. coli genomic DNA on exposed samples. These findings suggest that plasma-induced bacterial inactivation is surface-dependent.

  4. Microbial Air and Surface Monitoring Results from International Space Station Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Bruce, Rebekah J.; Castro, Victoria A.; Novikova, Natalia D.; Pierson, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Over the course of long-duration spaceflight, spacecraft develop a microbial ecology that directly interacts with the crew of the vehicle. While most microorganisms are harmless or beneficial to the inhabitants of the vehicle, the presence of medically significant organisms appearing in this semi-closed environment could adversely affect crew health and performance. The risk of exposure of the crew to medically significant organisms during a mission is estimated using information gathered during nominal and contingency environmental monitoring. Analysis of the air and surface microbiota in the habitable compartments of the International Space Station (ISS) over the last four years indicate a high presence of Staphylococcus species reflecting the human inhabitants of the vehicle. Generally, air and surface microbial concentrations are below system design specifications, suggesting a lower risk of contact infection or biodegradation. An evaluation of sample frequency indicates a decrease in the identification of new species, suggesting a lower potential for unknown microorganisms to be identified. However, the opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, has been identified in 3 of the last 5 air samples and 5 of the last 9 surface samples. In addition, 47% of the coagulase negative Staphylococcus species that were isolated from the crew, ISS, and its hardware were found to be methicillin resistance. In combination, these observations suggest the potential of methicillin resistant infectious agents over time.

  5. Compositions of surface layers formed on amalgams in air, water, and saline.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, T; Gnade, B E; Ferracane, J L; Okabe, T; Watari, F

    1993-12-01

    The surface layers formed on both a zinc-free and a zinc-containing dental amalgam after polishing and aging in air, water, or saline, were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine the compositions of the surface layers which might govern the release of mercury from amalgam. The XPS data revealed that the formation of the surface layer on the zinc-containing amalgam was affected by the environment in which the amalgam was polished and aged, whereas that on the zinc-free amalgam was not affected. In addition, among the elements contained in amalgam, zinc was the most reactive with the environment, and was preferentially dissolved from amalgam into water or saline. Mercury atoms existed in the metallic state in the surface layer.

  6. Surface Pressure Study of Lipid Aggregates at the Air Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Woody; Ploplis Andrews, Anna

    1996-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the growth of fatty acid aggregates on a water/air interface were made by analyzing surface pressure measurements taken with a Langmuir Balance. High concentrations of palmitic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, and also phosphatidylethanolamine in solution with chloroform were applied with a syringe to the surface of the Langmuir Balance and surface pressure was monitored as aggregates assembled spontaneously. The aggregation process for palmitic acid was determined to consist of three distinct parts. Exponential curves were fit to the individual regions of the data and growth and decay constants were determined. Surface pressure varied in very complex ways for lauric acid, myristic acid, and phosphatidylethanolamine yet kinetic measurements yield qualitative information about assembly of those aggregates. This research was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-93-22301.

  7. Mesoscale climatic simulation of surface air temperature cooling by highly reflective greenhouses in SE Spain.

    PubMed

    Campra, Pablo; Millstein, Dev

    2013-01-01

    A long-term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world, at the Province of Almeria, SE Spain, associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area. The availability of reliable long-term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, we have run a sensitivity experiment to simulate the impact of the observed surface albedo change on monthly and annual surface air temperatures. The model output showed a mean annual cooling of 0.25 °C associated with a 0.09 albedo increase, and a reduction of 22.8 W m(-2) of net incoming solar radiation at surface. Mean reduction of summer daily maximum temperatures was 0.49 °C, with the largest single-day decrease equal to 1.3 °C. WRF output was evaluated and compared with observations. A mean annual warm bias (MBE) of 0.42 °C was estimated. High correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.9) were found between modeled and observed values. This study has particular interest in the assessment of the potential for urban temperature cooling by cool roofs deployment projects, as well as in the evaluation of mesoscale climatic models performance. PMID:24074145

  8. Evaluation Of Calendar Year 1997 Groundwater and surface Water Quality Data For the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1997. The monitoring data were obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Regime and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, and are reported ixx Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater A40nitoringReport for the Bear Creek Hydrogeolo@"c Regime at the US. Department ofEnergy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (AJA Technical Services, Inc. 1998a). This report provides an evaluation of the monitoring data with respect to historical results for each sampling location, the regime-wide extent of groundwater and surface water contamination, and long-term concentration trends for selected groundwater and surface water contaminants.

  9. Mercury emission from terrestrial background surfaces in the eastern USA. Part I: Air/surface exchange of mercury within a southeastern deciduous forest (Tennessee) over one year

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Todd; Zhang, Hong; Gustin, Mae S.; Lindberg, Steven Eric

    2008-03-01

    This study focused on the development of a seasonal data set of the Hg air/surface exchange over soils associated with low Hg containing surfaces in a deciduous forest in the southern USA. Data were collected every month for 11 months in 2004 within Standing Stone State Forest in Tennessee using the dynamic flux chamber method. Mercury air/surface exchange associated with the litter covered forest floor was very low with the annual mean daytime flux being 0.4 0.5 ng m-2 h-1 (n = 301). The daytime Hg air/surface exchange over the year oscillated between emission (81% of samples with positive flux) and deposition (19% of samples with negative flux). A seasonal trend of lower emission in the spring and summer (closed canopy) relative to the fall and winter (open canopy) was observed. Correlations were found between the air/surface exchange and certain environmental factors on specific days sampled but not collectively over the entire year. The very low magnitude of Hg air/surface exchange as observed in this study suggests that an improved methodology for determining and reporting emission fluxes is needed when the values of fluxes and chamber blanks are both very low and comparable. This study raises questions and points to a need for more research regarding how to scale the Hg air/surface exchange for surfaces with very low emissions.

  10. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and 0) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and 02 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  11. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and O2 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  12. Efficiency of air/liquid interfaces in detaching bacteria from a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Gas/liquid interfaces are known to be significantly more effective than shear stress in detaching microscale colloids from substrates by inducing surface tension forces. Providing that a three-phase contact at the interface of a gas bubble, the liquid phase and the particle occurs, the magnitude of the surface tension force can potentially exceed by orders of magnitude the adhesion force, which keeps the micro particles on the surface. We investigate the ability of a moving air/liquid interface to stimulate the detachment of bacteria from a surface. Bacteria are micron-sized living organisms with strong tendency to attach to almost any substrate that they come into contact with. Attachment of bacteria on the surface is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of their growth medium, substrate, and cell surface. Moreover, once fixed on the surface, the microorganisms evolve in time to create intricate biofilm structures, which are highly challenging to be removed. The objective of this study to characterise the efficiency of this detachment process as a function of bacterial attachment as well as hydrodynamic parameters such the surface tension and the interface velocity. Swiss National Science Foundation P2ELP2-158896.

  13. Surface shear rheology of WPI-monoglyceride mixed films spread at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Carrera Sánchez, Cecilio; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M

    2004-07-01

    Surface shear viscosity of food emulsifiers may contribute appreciably to the long-term stability of food dispersions (emulsions and foams). In this work we have analyzed the structural, topographical, and shear characteristics of a whey protein isolate (WPI) and monoglyceride (monopalmitin and monoolein) mixed films spread on the air-water interface at pH 7 and at 20 degrees C. The surface shear viscosity (etas) depend on the surface pressure and on the composition of the mixed film. The surface shear viscosity varies greatly with the surface pressure. In general, the greater the surface pressure, the greater are the values of etas. The values of etas for the mixed WPI-monoolein monolayer were more than one order of magnitude lower than those for a WPI-monopalmitin mixed film, especially at the higher surface pressures. At higher surface pressures, collapsed WPI residues may be displaced from the interface by monoglyceride molecules with important repercussions on the shear characteristics of the mixed films. A shear-induced change in the topography and a segregation between domains of the film forming components were also observed. The displacement of the WPI by the monoglycerides is facilitates under shear conditions, especially for WPI-monoolein mixed films.

  14. Detachment of tobacco-smoke-material carriers from surfaces by turbulent air flow.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, A H; Ghosh, S; Dunn, P F

    2009-01-01

    The influence of tobacco-smoke-material (TSM) on the detachment of microparticles from surfaces by turbulent air flow was investigated experimentally. Both clean and dusty glass surfaces were subjected to TSM either before or after the deposition of 64 microm to 76 microm-diameter stainless steel microparticles onto the surfaces. The TSM was generated by mechanically puffing research-grade cigarettes inside a smoking box that contained the surfaces. Microparticle detachment characteristics were studied in a wind tunnel using video microphotography. Measured nicotine concentration was used to determine the amount of TSM deposited on a surface.The 5% and 50% threshold velocities for detachment were used to quantify the effect of TSM on microparticle detachment. These velocities were compared with those obtained using a clean surface with no TSM exposure. The effect of TSM exposure on microparticle detachment depended significantly on whether exposure occurred before or after microparticle deposition. TSM exposure before microparticle deposition had little effect. TSM exposure after deposition delayed detachment to much higher velocities. The presence of dust on the surface with TSM also delayed detachment and increased the variability in the detachment velocities as compared to the case of a clean surface with no TSM exposure.

  15. Polymer Brush Surfaces Showing Superhydrophobicity and Air-Bubble Repellency in a Variety of Organic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Dunderdale, Gary J; England, Matt W; Urata, Chihiro; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2015-06-10

    Silicon (Si) substrates were modified with polyalkyl methacrylate brushes having different alkyl chain lengths (C(n), where n = 1, 4, 8, and 18) using ARGET-ATRP at ambient temperature without purging the reaction solution of oxygen. The dynamic hydrophobicity of these polymer brush-covered Si surfaces when submerged in a variety of organic solvents (1-butanol, dichloromethane, toluene, n-hexane) depended markedly on the alkyl chain length and to a lesser extent polymer solubility. Long-chain poly(stearyl methacrylate) brushes (C(n) = 18) submerged in toluene showed excellent water-repellant properties, having large advancing/receding contact angles (CAs) of 169°/168° with negligible CA hysteresis (1°). Whereas polymer brushes with short alkyl-chain (C(n) ≤ 4) had significantly worse water drop mobility because of small CAs (as low as 125°/55°) and large CA hysteresis (up to 70°). However, such poor dynamic dewetting behavior of these surfaces was found to significantly improve when water drops impacted onto the surfaces at moderate velocities. Under these conditions, all brush surfaces were able to expel water drops from their surface. In addition, our brush surfaces were also highly repellant toward air bubbles under all conditions, irrespective of C(n) or polymer solubility. These excellent surface properties were found to be vastly superior to the performance of conventional perfluoroalkylsilane-derived surfaces. PMID:25988214

  16. Observed screen (air) and GCM surface/screen temperatures: Implications for outgoing longwave fluxes at the surface

    SciTech Connect

    Garratt, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    There is direct evidence that excess net radiation calculated in general circulation models at continental surfaces (of about 11-17 W m{sup -2} (20%-27%) on an annual basis) is not only due to overestimates in annual incoming shortwave fluxes of 9-18 W m{sup -2} (6%-9%), but also to underestimates in outgoing longwave fluxes. THe bias in the outgoing longwave flux is deduced from a comparison of screen-air temperature observations, available as a global climatology of mean monthly values, and model-calculated surface and screen-air temperatures. An underestimate in the screen temperature computed in general circulation models over continents, of about 3 K on an annual basis, implies an underestimate in the outgoing longwave flux, averaged in six models under study, of 11-15 W m{sup -2} (3%-4%). For a set of 22 inland stations studied previously, the residual bias on an annual basis (the residual is the net radiation minus incoming shortwave plus outgoing longwave) varies between 18 and -23 W m{sup -2} for the models considered. Additional biases in one or both of the reflected shortwave and incoming longwave components cannot be ruled out. 13 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Residual tobacco smoke pollution in used cars for sale: air, dust, and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Matt, Georg E; Quintana, Penelope J E; Hovell, Melbourne F; Chatfield, Dale; Ma, Debbie S; Romero, Romina; Uribe, Anna

    2008-09-01

    Regular tobacco use in the enclosed environment of a car raises concerns about longer-term contamination of a car's microenvironment with residual secondhand smoke pollutants. This study (a) developed and compared methods to measure residual contamination of cars with secondhand smoke, (b) examined whether cars of smokers and nonsmokers were contaminated by secondhand smoke, and (c) how smoking behavior and restrictions affected contamination levels. Surface wipe, dust, and air samples were collected in used cars sold by nonsmokers (n = 20) and smokers (n = 87) and analyzed for nicotine. Sellers were interviewed about smoking behavior and restrictions, and car interiors were inspected for signs of tobacco use. Cars of smokers who smoked in their vehicles showed significantly elevated levels of nicotine (p < .001) in dust, on surfaces, and in the air compared with nonsmoker cars with smoking ban. When smokers imposed car smoking bans, air nicotine levels were significantly lower (p < .01), but dust and surface contamination levels remained at similar levels. Smoking more cigarettes in the car and overall higher smoking rate of the seller were significantly associated with higher secondhand smoke contamination of the car (p < .001). Use of a cutpoint for nicotine levels from surface wipe samples correctly identified 82% of smoker cars without smoking bans, 75% of smoker cars with bans, and 100% of nonsmoker cars. Surface nicotine levels provide a relatively inexpensive and accurate method to identify cars and other indoor environments contaminated with residual secondhand smoke. Disclosure requirements and smoke-free certifications could help protect nonsmoking buyers of used cars.

  18. Unravelling air-sea interactions driven by photochemistry in the sea-surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Christian; Alpert, Peter; Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Perrier, Sébastien; Bernard, Francois; Ciuraru, Raluca; Hayeck, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, and in addition many atmospheric key processes, such as gas deposition, aerosol and cloud formation are, at one stage or the other, strongly impacted by physical- and chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Unfortunately, these processes have only been suggested and discussed but never fully addressed because they were beyond reach. We suggest now that photochemistry or photosensitized reactions exist at interfaces, and we will present and discuss their possible atmospheric implications. Obviously, one of the largest interface is the sea-surface microlayer (SML), which is a region lying at the uppermost tens to hundreds of micrometres of the water surface, with physical, chemical and biological properties that differ from those of the underlying sub-surface water. Organic film formation at the sea surface is made possible in the presence of an excess of surface-active material. Hydrophobic surfactant films are typically believed to play the role of a physical barrier to air-sea exchanges, especially at low wind speed. We will show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) can trigger photochemistry at the air-sea interface, releasing unsaturated, functionalized volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including isoprene,... acting as precursors for the formation of organic aerosols, that were thought, up to now, to be solely of biological origin! In addition, we suggest that when arranged at an air/water interface, hydrophobic surfactant can have weak chemical interactions among them, which can trigger the absorption of sunlight and can consequently induce photochemistry at such interfaces. A major question arises from such observations, namely: can the existence of such weak intra- or intermolecular interactions and the subsequent photochemistry be generalized to many other atmospheric objects such as aerosols? This topic will be presented and discussed.

  19. Effects of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants on surface ozone concentrations over Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Walters, Stacy; Horowitz, Larry W.; Tao, Shu

    2014-11-01

    Due to a lack of industrialization in Western China, surface air there was, until recently, believed to be relatively unpolluted. However, recent measurements and modeling studies have found high levels of ozone (O3) there. Based on the state-of-the-science global chemical transport model MOZART-4, we identify the origin, pathway, and mechanism of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants to Western China in 2000. MOZART-4 generally simulates well the observed surface O3 over inland areas of China. Simulations find surface ozone concentrations over Western China on average to be about 10 ppbv higher than Eastern China. Using sensitivity studies, we find that anthropogenic emissions from all Eurasian regions except China contribute 10-15 ppbv surface O3 over Western China, superimposed upon a 35-40 ppbv natural background. Transport from European anthropogenic sources to Northwestern China results in 2-6 ppbv O3 enhancements in spring and summer. Indian anthropogenic sources strongly influence O3 over the Tibetan Plateau during the summer monsoon. Transport of O3 originating from emissions in the Middle East occasionally reach Western China and increase surface ozone there by about 1-4 ppbv. These influences are of similar magnitude as trans-Pacific and transatlantic transport of O3 and its precursors, indicating the significance of trans-Eurasian ozone transport in hemispheric transport of air pollution. Our study further indicates that mitigation of anthropogenic emissions from Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East could benefit public health and agricultural productivity in Western China.

  20. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  1. Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption by a natural aluminum- and iron-bearing surface coating on an aquifer sand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coston, J.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption was studied in batch experiments with material collected from a shallow, unconfined aquifer of glacial outwash sand and gravel in Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA. The aquifer solids contain primarily quartz with minor amounts of alkali feldspars and ferromagnetic minerals. Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption experiments with various grain size and mineral fractions of the aquifer solids showed that: 1) Zn2+ adsorption was independent of grain size, but Pb2+ was preferentially adsorbed by the <64 ??m size fraction and 2) Pb2+ adsorption decreased after removal of the paramagnetic, Fe-bearing mineral fraction, but Zn2+ adsorption was unaffected. Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption on mineral separates from the aquifer material compared with metal adsorption on a purified quartz powder indicated that adsorption of both metal ions was dominated by coatings on the quartz fraction of the sediment. Characterization of the coatings by AES, SEM-EDS, and TOF-SIMS demonstrated that the natural quartz grains were extensively coated with Al- and Fe-bearing minerals of variable composition. -from Authors

  2. Soil Surface Carbon Dioxide Fluxes and Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Soil Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkebauer, T. J.; Billesbach, D.

    2006-12-01

    We have been monitoring soil surface CO2 fluxes at three AmeriFlux sites in eastern Nebraska for several years. Recently, we have installed soil CO2 sensors at the rainfed soybean site in order to obtain profiles of CO2 concentrations in soil air (to 0.8 m depth). Supporting data include profiles of soil water content and soil temperature, aboveground biomass, leaf area index and precipitation. Soil surface fluxes had been rather small for much of the 2006 growing season (e.g., midday values of about 5 umol/m2/s) due, in large part, to the very dry conditions in eastern Nebraska and the consequent low soil water contents. However, copious rainfall in August raised soil water contents to field capacity throughout the profile. Soil air CO2 concentrations during this period also increased and reached peaks near 10% (at 0.4 and 0.8 m depth). Through analyses of relationships between surface CO2 flux and profiles of soil parameters we seek to identify biophysical factors responsible for controlling surface fluxes as well as to begin to quantify sources and sinks of CO2 within the soil profile (e.g., plant-related production of CO2 due to root exudation and respiration). The influence of precipitation events on CO2 profiles and fluxes is of particular interest.

  3. Investigation of drop impact on dry and wet surfaces with consideration of surrounding air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yisen; Lian, Yongsheng; Sussman, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations were conducted to investigate drop impingement and splashing on both dry and wet surfaces at impact velocities greater than 50 m/s with the consideration of the effect of surrounding air. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the variable density pressure projection method on a dynamic block structured adaptive grid. The moment of fluid method was used to reconstruct interfaces separating different phases. A dynamic contact angle model was used to define the boundary condition at the moving contact line. Simulations showed that lowering the ambient gas density can suppress dry surface splashing, which is in agreement with the experiments. A recirculation zone was observed inside the drop after contact: a larger recirculation zone was formed earlier in the higher gas density case than in the lower gas density case. Increasing gas density also enhances the creation of secondary droplets from the lamella breakup. For high speed impact on a dry surface, lowering ambient gas density attenuates splashing. However, ambient air does not significantly affect splashing on a wet surface. Simulations showed that the splashed droplets are primarily from the exiting liquid film.

  4. Fabrication of dense α-alumina layer on Ti-6Al-4V alloy hybrid for bearing surfaces of artificial hip joint.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Rohit; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Takadama, Hiroaki

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in hip replacements are focused towards producing reliable bearing surfaces to enhance their longevity. In this perspective, progressive attempts have been made to improve the wear resistance of polyethylene to eliminate osteolysis and mechanical reliability of brittle alumina ceramics, but in vain. It is proposed that both high wear resistance and mechanical reliability can be retained if a thin layer of dense alumina is formed onto high toughness Ti-6Al-4V alloy. For this purpose, we devised a unique methodology in which a layer of Al metal was deposited onto the Ti alloy substrate by cold spraying (CS), followed by a heat treatment to form Al3Ti reaction layer at their interface to improve adhesion and subsequent micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment to transform Al to alumina layer. An optimal MAO treatment of cold sprayed Al formed an adherent and dense α-alumina layer with high Vickers hardness matching with that of sintered alumina used as a femoral head. Structure-phase-property relationships in dense α-alumina layer have been revealed and discussed in the light of our research findings. The designed alumina/Ti alloy hybrid might be a potential candidate for reliable bearing surfaces of artificial hip joint. PMID:27612821

  5. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D. X.; Liu, Z. C.; Chen, C.; Yang, A. J.; Li, D.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H+, nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2− and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios. PMID:27033381

  6. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. X.; Liu, Z. C.; Chen, C.; Yang, A. J.; Li, D.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2016-04-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H+, nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2‑ and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios.

  7. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, D X; Liu, Z C; Chen, C; Yang, A J; Li, D; Rong, M Z; Chen, H L; Kong, M G

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H(+), nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2(-) and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios. PMID:27033381

  8. Keeping warm with fur in cold water: entrainment of air in hairy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasto, Alice; Regli, Marianne; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Clanet, Christophe; Hosoi, Anette

    2015-11-01

    Instead of relying on a thick layer of body fat for insulation as many aquatic mammals do, fur seals and otters trap air in their dense fur for insulation in cold water. Using a combination of model experiments and theory, we rationalize this mechanism of air trapping underwater for thermoregulation. For the model experiments, hairy surfaces are fabricated using laser cut molds and casting samples with PDMS. Modeling the hairy texture as a network of capillary tubes, the imbibition speed of water into the hairs is obtained through a balance of hydrostatic pressure and viscous stress. In this scenario, the bending of the hairs and capillary forces are negligible. The maximum diving depth that can be achieved before the hairs are wetted to the roots is predicted from a comparison of the diving speed and imbibition speed. The amount of air that is entrained in hairy surfaces is greater than what is expected for classic Landau-Levich-Derjaguin plate plunging. A phase diagram with the parameters from experiments and biological data allows a comparison of the model system and animals.

  9. Cold air plasma to decontaminate inanimate surfaces of the hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Orla J; Claro, Tânia; O'Connor, Niall; Cafolla, Anthony A; Stevens, Niall T; Daniels, Stephen; Humphreys, Hilary

    2014-03-01

    The hospital environment harbors bacteria that may cause health care-associated infections. Microorganisms, such as multiresistant bacteria, can spread around the patient's inanimate environment. Some recently introduced biodecontamination approaches in hospitals have significant limitations due to the toxic nature of the gases and the length of time required for aeration. This study evaluated the in vitro use of cold air plasma as an efficient alternative to traditional methods of biodecontamination of hospital surfaces. Cultures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii were applied to different materials similar to those found in the hospital environment. Artificially contaminated sections of marmoleum, mattress, polypropylene, powder-coated mild steel, and stainless steel were then exposed to a cold air pressure plasma single jet for 30 s, 60 s, and 90 s, operating at approximately 25 W and 12 liters/min flow rate. Direct plasma exposure successfully reduced the bacterial load by log 3 for MRSA, log 2.7 for VRE, log 2 for ESBL-producing E. coli, and log 1.7 for A. baumannii. The present report confirms the efficient antibacterial activity of a cold air plasma single-jet plume on nosocomial bacterially contaminated surfaces over a short period of time and highlights its potential for routine biodecontamination in the clinical environment.

  10. Cold Air Plasma To Decontaminate Inanimate Surfaces of the Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Claro, Tânia; O'Connor, Niall; Cafolla, Anthony A.; Stevens, Niall T.; Daniels, Stephen; Humphreys, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The hospital environment harbors bacteria that may cause health care-associated infections. Microorganisms, such as multiresistant bacteria, can spread around the patient's inanimate environment. Some recently introduced biodecontamination approaches in hospitals have significant limitations due to the toxic nature of the gases and the length of time required for aeration. This study evaluated the in vitro use of cold air plasma as an efficient alternative to traditional methods of biodecontamination of hospital surfaces. Cultures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii were applied to different materials similar to those found in the hospital environment. Artificially contaminated sections of marmoleum, mattress, polypropylene, powder-coated mild steel, and stainless steel were then exposed to a cold air pressure plasma single jet for 30 s, 60 s, and 90 s, operating at approximately 25 W and 12 liters/min flow rate. Direct plasma exposure successfully reduced the bacterial load by log 3 for MRSA, log 2.7 for VRE, log 2 for ESBL-producing E. coli, and log 1.7 for A. baumannii. The present report confirms the efficient antibacterial activity of a cold air plasma single-jet plume on nosocomial bacterially contaminated surfaces over a short period of time and highlights its potential for routine biodecontamination in the clinical environment. PMID:24441156

  11. Seasonal 7Be and 137Cs activities in surface air before and after the Chernobyl event.

    PubMed

    Kulan, A

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal fluctuations of cosmogenic (7)Be (T(1/2)=53.4 days) and anthropogenic (137)Cs (T(1/2)=30 years) activities in surface air (aerosols) have been extracted from a long data record (1972-2000) at high latitude (56 degrees N-68 degrees N, Sweden). Normalization to weekly average values was used to control long-term trends so that cyclical trends could be investigated. Enhanced (7)Be activity was observed in spring and summer seasons and likely relates to the seasonal thinning of the tropopause. Variations in the (137)Cs activity record seem to reflect how the isotope was injected in the atmosphere (stratospheric from bomb tests and tropospheric from the Chernobyl accident) and subsequent transport mechanisms. Accordingly, until 1986, the surface air (137)Cs activity was strongly related to nuclear weapons test fallout and exhibits temporal fluctuations resembling the (7)Be. Conversely, since 1986 the Chernobyl-produced (137)Cs dominates the long-term record that shows annual cycles that are strongly controlled by atmospheric boundary layer conditions. Additionally, short-term data within the post-Chernobyl period suggest subtle intrusion of air masses rich in (137)Cs that may occur throughout the year, and differences resulting from spatial occurrence at these latitudes. This is an important observation that may have to do with year-to-year variation and calls for caution when interpreting short-term data records. PMID:16876295

  12. Slip length measurement of confined air flow on three smooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yunlu; Bhushan, Bharat; Maali, Abdelhamid

    2013-04-01

    An experimental measurement of the slip length of air flow close to three different solid surfaces is presented. The substrate was driven by a nanopositioner moving toward an oscillating glass sphere glued to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever. A large separation distance was used to get more effective data. The slip length value was obtained by analyzing the amplitude and phase data of the cantilever. The measurements show that the slip length does not depend on the oscillation amplitude of the cantilever. Because of the small difference among the slip lengths of the three surfaces, a simplified analysis method was used. The results show that on glass, graphite, and mica surfaces the slip lengths are 98, 234, and 110 nm, respectively.

  13. Polyampholyte/surfactant complexes at the water-air interface: a surface tension study.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Mabya; Koetz, Joachim

    2013-06-25

    The present paper is related to interactions between strongly alternating polyampholytes, i.e., copolymers of N,N'-diallyl-N,N'-dimethylammonium chloride and maleamic acid derivatives, varying in hydrophobicity and excess charges and the oppositely charged anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Surface tension measurements have revealed a complex behavior with the formation of polyampholyte-SDS complexes at water-air interfaces which depends on both the hydrophobic character of the polyampholyte and electrostatic attractive forces between the polyampholyte and the anionic surfactant in dependence on pH. Hereby, maleamic acid copolymers with additional carboxylic groups in the phenylic side chain show a significant lower surface tension at the critical association concentration (CAC) due to the formation of surface-active SDS complexes and multicomplexes. In the presence of only one carboxylic group in the p-position the CAC can be strongly shifted by varying the pH due to repulsive electrostatic interactions.

  14. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  15. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact.

  16. Identification of Iron-Bearing Phases on the Martian Surface and in Martian Meteorites and Analogue Samples by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingelhoefer, G.; Agresti, D. G.; Schroeder, C.; Rodionov, D.; Yen, A.; Ming, Doug; Morris, Richard V.

    2007-01-01

    The Moessbauer spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) Spirit (Gusev Crater) and Opportunity (Meridiani Planum) have each analyzed more than 100 targets during their ongoing missions (>1050 sols). Here we summarize the Fe-bearing phases identified to date and compare the results to Moessbauer analyses of martian meteorites and lunar samples. We use lunar samples as martian analogues because some, particularly the low-Ti Apollo 15 mare basalts, have bulk chemical compositions that are comparable to basaltic martian meteorites [1,2]. The lunar samples also provide a way to study pigeonite-rich samples. Pigeonite is a pyroxene that is not common in terrestrial basalts, but does often occur on the Moon and is present in basaltic martian meteorites

  17. Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in an ultrathin air film causes drop splashing on smooth surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Tan, Peng; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    When a fast-moving drop impacts onto a smooth substrate, splashing will be produced at the edge of the expanding liquid sheet. This ubiquitous phenomenon lacks a fundamental understanding. Combining experiment with model, we illustrate that the ultrathin air film trapped under the expanding liquid front triggers splashing. Because this film is thinner than the mean free path of air molecules, the interior airflow transfers momentum with an unusually high velocity comparable to the speed of sound and generates a stress 10 times stronger than the airflow in common situations. Such a large stress initiates Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities at small length scales and effectively produces splashing. Our model agrees quantitatively with experimental verifications and brings a fundamental understanding to the ubiquitous phenomenon of drop splashing on smooth surfaces. PMID:25713350

  18. Biological threat detection in the air and on the surface: how to define the risk.

    PubMed

    Trafny, Elżbieta Anna; Lewandowski, Rafał; Stępińska, Małgorzata; Kaliszewski, Miron

    2014-08-01

    The improvements in the existing methods of rapid detection and biological pathogen surveillance are still needed. The new spectroscopic methods that rely on the unique structural features and intrinsic fluorescence of microorganisms are well fitted for monitoring the spread of airborne biological agents or their reagentless detection in the air, and these methods may bring a new quality to bioaerosols remote detection. This review describes the problem of the confidence in the environmental testing results that may affect clearance standard, sampling techniques, and the estimation of risk of human exposure to the low concentrations of harmful microorganisms during bioterrorist event or naturally occurring outbreaks. Higher recovery efficiency of dangerous biological agents from the air and contaminated surfaces would enable more reliable environmental human risk exposure assessment. PMID:24917429

  19. Evaluation of a bisphosphonate enriched ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene for enhanced total joint replacement bearing surface functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright-Walker, Cassandra Jane

    Each year in the United States there is an increasing trend of patients receiving total joint replacement (TJR) procedures. Approximately a half million total knee replacements (TKRs) are performed annually in the United States with increasing prevalence attributed to baby-boomers, obesity, older, and younger patients. This trend is also seen for total hip replacements (THRs) as well. The use of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) inserts in TJRs results in wear particle-induced osteolysis, which is the predominant cause for prosthesis failure and revision surgery. Sub-micron size particle generation is inevitable despite the numerous efforts in improving this bearing material. Work by others has shown that the use of oral and intravenous systemic bisphosphonates (BP) can significantly minimize periprosthetic osteolysis. However, the systemic delivery and the high solubility of BPs results in a predominant portion of the drug being excreted via the kidney without reaching its target, bone. This doctoral research project is focused on the development and evaluation of a novel method to administer BPs locally using the inherent wear of UHMWPE for possible use as an anti-osteolysis treatment. For new materials to be considered, they must be mechanically and tribologically comparable to the current gold standard, UHMWPE. In order to evaluate this material, mechanical, drug elution and tribological experiments were performed to allow assessment of material properties. Tensile tests showed comparable yield stress and pin-on-disk testing showed comparable wear to standard virgin UHMWPE. Further, drug elution tests have shown that BP was released from the enriched material both in static and dynamic conditions. Additionally, an aggressive 2 million cycle total knee simulator experiment has shown statistically similar wear results for the two materials. Overall, this research has provided the groundwork for further characterization and development of a new

  20. Effects of surface roughness on the average heat transfer of an impinging air jet

    SciTech Connect

    Beitelmal, A.H.; Saad, M.A.; Patel, C.D.

    2000-01-01

    Localized cooling by impinging flow has been used in many industrial applications such as in cooling of gas turbine blades and drying processes. Here, effect of surface roughness of a uniformly heated plate on the average heat transfer characteristics of an impinging air jet was experimentally investigated. Two aluminum plates, one with a flat surface and the second with some roughness added to the surface were fabricated. The roughness took the shape of a circular array of protrusions of 0.5mm base and 0.5mm height. A circular Kapton heater of the same diameter as the plates (70mm) supplied the necessary power. The surfaces of the plates were polished to reduce radiation heat losses and the back and sides insulated to reduce conduction heat losses. temperatures were measured over a Reynolds number ranging from 9,600 to 38,500 based on flow rate through a 6.85mm diameter nozzle. The temperature measurements were repeated for nozzle exit-to-plate spacing, z/d, ranging from 1 to 10. The average Nusselt number for both cases was plotted versus the Reynolds number and their functional correlation was determined. The results indicate an increase of up to 6.0% of the average Nusselt number due to surface roughness. This modest increase provides evidence to encourage further investigation and characterization of the surface roughness as a parameter for enhancing heat transfer.

  1. Seasonal trends in precipitation and surface air temperature extremes in mainland Portugal, 1941-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, M. I. P.; Santo, F. E.; Ramos, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Several climate models predict, on a global scale, modifications in climate variables that are expected to have impact on society and the environment. The concern is on changes in the variability of processes, the mean and extreme events (maximum and minimum). To explore recent changes in precipitation and near surface air temperature extremes in mainland Portugal, we have inspected trends in time series of specific indices defined for daily data. These indices were recommended by the Commission for Climatology/Climate Variability and Predictability (CCl/CLIVAR) Working Group on Climate Change Detection, and include threshold indices, probability indices, duration indices and other indices. The precipitation and air temperature data used in this study are from, respectively, 57 and 23 measuring stations scattered across mainland Portugal, and cover the periods 1941-2007, for precipitation, and 1941-2006, for temperature. The study focuses on changes at the seasonal scale. Strong seasonality is one of the main features of climate in mainland Portugal. Intensification of the seasonality signal across the territory, particularly in the more sensitive regions, might contribute to endanger already fragile soil and water resources and ecosystems, and the local environmental and economic sustainability. Thus, the understanding of variations in the intensity, frequency and duration of extreme precipitation and air temperature events at the intra-annual scale is particularly important in this geographical area. Trend analyses were conducted over the full period of the records and for sub-periods, exploring patterns of change. Results show, on the one hand, regional differences in the tendency observed in the time series analysed; and, on the other hand, that although trends in annual indices are in general not statistically significant, there are sometimes significant changes over time in the data at the seasonal scale that point out to an increase in the already existing

  2. Seismic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Dennis

    2009-05-01

    Textron Systems (Textron) has been using geophones for target detection for many years. This sensing capability was utilized for detection and classification purposes only. Recently Textron has been evaluating multiaxis geophones to calculate bearings and track targets more specifically personnel. This capability will not only aid the system in locating personnel in bearing space or cartesian space but also enhance detection and reduce false alarms. Textron has been involved in the testing and evaluation of several sensors at multiple sites. One of the challenges of calculating seismic bearing is an adequate signal to noise ratio. The sensor signal to noise ratio is a function of sensor coupling to the ground, seismic propagation and range to target. The goals of testing at multiple sites are to gain a good understanding of the maximum and minimum ranges for bearing and detection and to exploit that information to tailor sensor system emplacement to achieve desired performance. Test sites include 10A Site Devens, MA, McKenna Airfield Ft. Benning, GA and Yuma Proving Ground Yuma, AZ. Geophone sensors evaluated include a 28 Hz triax spike, a 15 Hz triax spike and a hybrid triax spike consisting of a 10 Hz vertical geophone and two 28 Hz horizontal geophones. The algorithm uses raw seismic data to calculate the bearings. All evaluated sensors have triaxial geophone configuration mounted to a spike housing/fixture. The suite of sensors also compares various types of geophones to evaluate benefits in lower bandwidth. The data products of these tests include raw geophone signals, seismic features, seismic bearings, seismic detection and GPS position truth data. The analyses produce Probability of Detection vs range, bearing accuracy vs range, and seismic feature level vs range. These analysis products are compared across test sites and sensor types.

  3. Hydrostatic pressure effect on micro air bubbles deposited on surfaces with a retreating tip.

    PubMed

    Huynh, So Hung; Wang, Jingming; Yu, Yang; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2014-06-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on 6 μL air bubbles formed on micropillar structured PDMS and silicone surfaces using a 2 mm diameter stainless steel tip retreated at 1 mm/s was investigated. Dimensional analysis of the tip retraction process showed the experiments to be conducted in the condition where fluid inertial forces are comparable in magnitude with surface tension forces, while viscous forces were lower. Larger bubbles could be left behind on the structured PDMS surface. For hydrostatic pressures in excess of 20 mm H2O (196 Pa), the volume of bubble deposited was found to decrease progressively with pressure increase. The differences in width of the deposited bubbles (in contact with the substrate) were significant at any particular pressure but marginal in height. The attainable height before rupture reduced with pressure increase, thereby accounting for the reducing dispensed volume characteristic. On structured PDMS, the gaseous bridge width (in contact with the substrate) was invariant with tip retraction, while on silicone it was initially reducing before becoming invariant in the lead up to rupture. With silicone, hence, reductions in the contact width and height were both responsible for reduced volumes with pressure increase. Increased hydrostatic pressure was also found to restrict the growth in contact width on silicone during the stage when air was injected in through the tip. The ability to effect bubble size in such a simple manner may already be harnessed in nature and suggests possibilities in technological applications.

  4. Diagnosis of surface damage induced by air pollution on 20th-century concrete buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozga, I.; Bonazza, A.; Bernardi, E.; Tittarelli, F.; Favoni, O.; Ghedini, N.; Morselli, L.; Sabbioni, C.

    2011-09-01

    The present work focuses on the impact of anthropogenic multi-pollutants on modern concrete buildings exposed in two different European urban areas: Centennial Hall in Wroclaw (Poland) and Casa Galleria Vichi in Florence (Italy). Through a range of analytical techniques the complete characterization of the damage layer collected from the buildings under study has been achieved for the first time, including quantitative measurements of the carbon content. The experimental results allow the identification and prioritization of the air pollutants responsible for the surface deterioration, finding gypsum to be the main damage product on surfaces sheltered from rain runoff, with embedded particulate matter, especially carbonaceous particles, responsible for darkening of the building walls. The discrimination of carbon fractions shows different concentrations of elemental and organic carbon within the damage layers, depending on the location of the buildings. This step is essential for identifying the anthropogenic sources causing deterioration on the buildings, including the aesthetic impairment of surfaces. The contribution of air pollutants is also reflected by the elements found in the damage layers, while the evaluation of the enrichment factors is useful for identifying the elements of anthropogenic origin.

  5. BOREAS AFM-08 ECMWF Hourly Surface and Upper Air Data for the SSA and NSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterbo, Pedro; Betts, Alan; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-8 team focused on modeling efforts to improve the understanding of the diurnal evolution of the convective boundary layer over the boreal forest. This data set contains hourly data from the European Center for for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational model from below the surface to the top of the atmosphere, including the model fluxes at the surface. Spatially, the data cover a pair of the points that enclose the rawinsonde sites at Candle Lake, Saskatchewan, in the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Thompson, Manitoba, in the Northern Study Area (NSA). Temporally, the data include the two time periods of 13 May 1994 to 30 Sept 1994 and 01 Mar 1996 to 31 Mar 1997. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The number of records in the upper air data files may exceed 20,000, causing a problem for some software packages. The ECMWF hourly surface and upper air data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  6. An Autosampler and Field Sample Carrier for Maximizing Throughput Using an Open-Air, Surface Sampling Ion Source for MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently developed, commercially available, open-air, surface sampling ion source for mass spectrometers provides individual analyses in several seconds. To realize its full throughput potential, an autosampler and field sample carrier were designed and built. The autosampler ...

  7. Active-Controlled Fluid Film Based on Wave-Bearing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    It has been known since 1967 that the steady-state and dynamic performance, including the stability of a wave bearing, are highly dependent on the wave amplitude. A wave-bearing profile can be readily obtained by elastically distorting the stationary bearing sleeve surface. The force that distorts the elastic sleeve surface could be an applied force or pressure. The magnitude and response of the distorting force would be defined by the relation between the bearing surface stiffness and the bearing pressure, or load, in a feedback loop controller. Using such devices as piezoelectric or other electromechanical elements, one could step control or fully control the bearing. The selection between these systems depends on the manner in which the distortion forces are applied, the running speed, and the reaction time of the feedback loop. With these techniques, both liquid- (oil-) or gas- (air-) lubricated wave bearings could be controlled. This report gives some examples of the dependency of the bearing's performance on the wave amplitude. The analysis also was proven experimentally.

  8. TOOL ASSEMBLY WITH BI-DIRECTIONAL BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Longhurst, G.E.

    1961-07-11

    A two-direction motion bearing which is incorporated in a refueling nuclear fuel element trsnsfer tool assembly is described. A plurality of bi- directional bearing assembliesare fixed equi-distantly about the circumference of the transfer tool assembly to provide the tool assembly with a bearing surface- for both axial and rotational motion. Each bi-directional bearing assembly contains a plurality of circumferentially bulged rollers mounted in a unique arrangement which will provide a bearing surface for rotational movement of the tool assembly within a bore. The bi-direc tional bearing assembly itself is capable of rational motion and thus provides for longitudinal movement of the tool assembly.

  9. Detection of Measles Virus RNA in Air and Surface Specimens in a Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Werner E; McNall, Rebecca J; Blevins, Maria W; Turner, JoLyn; Lopareva, Elena N; Rota, Paul A; Stehle, John R

    2016-02-15

    Measles virus (MeV) is known to be highly contagious, with an infectious period lasting from 4 days before to 4 days after rash onset. An unvaccinated, young, female patient with measles confirmed by direct epidemiologic link was hospitalized on day 5 after rash onset. Environmental samples were collected over the 4-day period of hospitalization in a single room. MeV RNA was detectable in air specimens, on surface specimens, and on respirators on days 5-8 after rash onset. This is the first report of environmental surveillance for MeV, and the results suggest that MeV-infected fomites may be present in healthcare settings.

  10. Propagation of detonation wave in hydrogen-air mixture in channels with sound-absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivol, G. Yu.; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    The possibility of using sound-absorbing surfaces for attenuating the intensity of detonation waves propagating in hydrogen-air mixtures has been experimentally studied in a cylindrical detonation tube open at one end, with an explosive initiated by spark discharge at the closed end. Sound-absorbing elements were made of an acoustic-grade foamed rubber with density of 0.035 g/cm3 containing open pores with an average diameter of 0.5 mm. The degree of attenuation of the detonation wave front velocity was determined as dependent on the volume fraction of hydrogen in the gas mixture.

  11. The Air-Sea Interface and Surface Stress under Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark; Ginis, Isaac

    2013-04-01

    of the drag coefficient wind speed dependence around 65 m/s. This minimum may contribute to the rapid intensification of storms to major tropical cyclones. The subsequent slow increase of the drag coefficient with wind above 65 m/s serves as an obstacle for further intensification of tropical cyclones. Such dependence may explain the observed bi-modal distribution of tropical cyclone intensity. Implementation of the new parameterization into operational models is expected to improve predictions of tropical cyclone intensity and the associated wave field. References: Donelan, M. A., B. K. Haus, N. Reul, W. Plant, M. Stiassnie, H. Graber, O. Brown, and E. Saltzman, 2004: On the limiting aerodynamic roughness of the ocean in very strong winds, Farrell, B.F, and P.J. Ioannou, 2008: The stochastic parametric mechanism for growth of wind-driven surface water waves. Journal of Physical Oceanography 38, 862-879. Kelly, R.E., 1965: The stability of an unsteady Kelvin-Helmholtz flow. J. Fluid Mech. 22, 547-560. Koga, M., 1981: Direct production of droplets from breaking wind-waves-Its observation by a multi-colored overlapping exposure technique, Tellus 33, 552-563. Miles, J.W., 1959: On the generation of surface waves by shear flows, part 3. J. Fluid. Mech. 6, 583-598. Soloviev, A.V. and R. Lukas, 2010: Effects of bubbles and sea spray on air-sea exchanges in hurricane conditions. Boundary-Layer Meteorology 136, 365-376. Soloviev, A., A. Fujimura, and S. Matt, 2012: Air-sea interface in hurricane conditions. J. Geophys. Res. 117, C00J34.

  12. Fluid lubricated bearing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.; Menke, John R.

    1976-01-01

    1. A support for a loaded rotatable shaft comprising in combination on a housing having a fluid-tight cavity encasing an end portion of said shaft, a thrust bearing near the open end of said cavity for supporting the axial thrust of said shaft, said thrust bearing comprising a thrust plate mounted in said housing and a thrust collar mounted on said shaft, said thrust plate having a central opening the peripheral portion of which is hermetically sealed to said housing at the open end of said cavity, and means for supplying a fluid lubricant to said thrust bearing, said thrust bearing having a lubricant-conducting path connecting said lubricant supplying means with the space between said thrust plate and collar intermediate the peripheries thereof, the surfaces of said plate and collar being constructed and arranged to inhibit radial flow of lubricant and, on rotation of said thrust collar, to draw lubricant through said path between the bearing surfaces and to increase the pressure therebetween and in said cavity and thereby exert a supporting force on said end portion of said shaft.

  13. Effect of surface reactions on ignition delay of methanol/air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, J. P.; Yang, H. L.; Jiang, L. Q.; Wang, X. H.; Zhao, D. Q.

    2014-11-01

    A surface reaction kinetic model for the combustion of methanol/air mixture was developed in order to investigate the ignition inhibitory mechanism of wall on the premixed gas in a micro closed volume. In this model, except for H, O, OH and CH3 radicals, the absorption of hydrogen peroxide and hydroperoxyl on the surface were also considered. By applying CHEMKIN-Pro software, the model was integrated into the calculation of homogeneous combustion process of gas mixture. Surface reactions were found resulting in the increase of ignition delay time. The sensitivity analysis showed that the loss of hydrogen peroxide on the wall was the main reason, due to the direct suppression effect on the generation and accumulation of OH in the radical pool. However, the loss of hydroperoxyl would take the place of hydrogen peroxide as the main inhibitory factor when the sticking coefficient became as large as the order of 10-3. In addition, the ignition delay time increased with sticking coefficient or surface-area-to-volume ratio. Enhancing the initial temperature of premixed gas was able to reduce the inhibitory effect of surface reactions.

  14. Permanent-Magnet Meissner Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Permanent-magnet meissner bearing features inherently stable, self-centering conical configuration. Bearing made stiffer or less stiff by selection of magnets, springs, and spring adjustments. Cylindrical permanent magnets with axial magnetization stacked coaxially on rotor with alternating polarity. Typically, rare-earth magnets used. Magnets machined and fitted together to form conical outer surface.

  15. Air surface microdischarge-photon synergy in antibacterial plasma-activated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David; Pavlovich, Mathew; Chang, Hung-Wen; Sakiyama, Yuki; Clark, Douglas

    2013-09-01

    We show that the antibacterial effects of air plasma on water can be amplified by synergy with ultraviolet (UV) photons. We use the surface microdischarge configuration (SMD) in atmospheric air adjacent to bacteria-laden water coupled with UVA (360 nm) photons from a light emitting diode (LED) to demonstrate this synergy. Air SMD, especially if operated in a confined space, can operate in different modes: low power mode (<0.1 W/cm2) generates primarily O3 whereas higher powers generate mainly nitrogen oxides; we focus here on the latter. The nitrogen oxide mode creates a powerful antibacterial mixture in water, including NO2-, NO3- and H2O2. Although these species alone can be strongly antibacterial, especially at low pH, we show that addition of UVA photons greatly amplifies the antibacterial effect. We first measured log reductions with only photons and then only plasma. Only when UVA exposes water after plasma does the synergy appear. Synergy appears to be due to UVA photolysis of plasma-generated NO2- to form NO and OH. We conclude that combining plasma-generated chemical species with activating photons can amplify and strengthen plasma effectiveness in many biological and other applications. Supported by Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Science Plasma Science Center.

  16. Near-surface physics during convection affecting air-water gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The gas flux at the water surface is affected by physical processes including turbulence from wind shear, microscale wave breaking, large-scale breaking, and convection due to heat loss at the surface. The main route in the parameterizations of the gas flux has been to use the wind speed as a proxy for the gas flux velocity, indirectly taking into account the dependency of the wind shear and the wave processes. The interest in the contributions from convection processes has increased as the gas flux from inland waters (with typically lower wind and sheltered conditions) now is believed to play a substantial role in the air-water gas flux budget. The gas flux is enhanced by convection through the mixing of the mixed layer as well as by decreasing the diffusive boundary layer thickness. The direct numerical simulations performed in this study are shown to be a valuable tool to enhance the understanding of this flow configuration often present in nature.

  17. TOF-SIMS measurements for toxic air pollutants adsorbed on the surface of airborne particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyasu, Bunbunoshin; Hoshi, Takahiro; Owari, Masanori; Nihei, Yoshimasa

    2003-01-01

    Three kinds of particulate matter were collected: diesel and gasoline exhaust particles emitted directly from exhaust nozzle, and suspended particulate matter (SPM) near the traffic route. Soxhlet extraction was performed on each sample. By gas-chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis of these extracts, di-ethyl phthalate and di- n-butyl phthalate were detected from the extract of SPM and diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). Because these phthalates were sometimes suspected as contamination, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) measurements were also performed on the samples collected at the same environment. By comparing obtained spectra, it is clear that these environmental endocrine disrupters (EEDs) were adsorbed on DEP surface. Thus, we concluded that the combination of conventional method and TOF-SIMS measurement is one of the most powerful techniques for analyzing the toxic air pollutants adsorbed on SPM surface.

  18. Air stable colloidal copper nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization and their surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Thekkathu; Leon Prasanth, K.; Sreedhar, Bojja

    2016-03-01

    Air stable colloidal copper nanoparticles are synthesized by a simple chemical reduction method using octadecylsilane as a reducing agent and octadecylamine as a stabilizing agent in toluene without any inert gas. The formation of nanosized copper was confirmed by its characteristic surface plasmon absorption peaks in UV-visible spectra. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images show that the resulting copper nanoparticles are distributed uniformly with a narrow size distribution. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrated that the obtained copper nanoparticles are single crystalline nanoparticles. Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopic data suggested that the silane Si-H is responsible for the reduction of copper ions. And also the resulting colloidal copper nanoparticles exhibit large surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals.

  19. Air Flow Path Dynamics In The Vadose Zone Under Various Land Surface Climate Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illangasekare, T. H.; Sakaki, T.; Schulte, P. E.; Cihan, A.; Christ, J.

    2010-12-01

    Vapor intrusion (VI) refers to the transport of volatile chemical vapors from subsurface sources to surface and subsurface structures through the vadose zone. Because of the difference in pressure between the inside of the building and the subsurface soil pores, vapor can enter the building through cracks in the foundation, slab and walls and utility openings. The processes that govern the vapor transport in the heterogeneous subsurface “outside the home” are complex, and the sampling to assess potential pathways is subjected to spatial and temporal variability. Spatial variability is a result of a number of factors that include changing soil and soil moisture conditions. Temporal variability is a result of transient heat, wind, ambient pressure and a water flux boundary conditions at the land-atmospheric interface. Fluctuating water table conditions controlled by recharge, pumping, and stream-aquifer interactions will also contribute to the transient vapor flux generation at the sources. When the soil moisture changes as a result of precipitation events and other soil surface boundary conditions, the soil moisture content changes and hence the air permeability. Therefore, the primary pathways for the vapor are preferential channels that change with the transient soil moisture distribution. Both field and laboratory studies have shown that heterogeneity has a significant influence on soil moisture conditions in unsaturated soils. Uncertainties in vapor transport predictions have been attributed to heterogeneity and spatial variability in hydraulic properties. In this study, our goal was to determine the role of soil moisture variability on vapor transport and intrusion as affected by the climate driven boundary conditions on the land surface. A series of experiments were performed to generate a comprehensive data set to understand and evaluate how the spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture affected by the mass and heat flux boundary conditions on the

  20. Assessing the ability of mechanistic volatilization models to simulate soil surface conditions: a study with the Volt'Air model.

    PubMed

    Garcia, L; Bedos, C; Génermont, S; Braud, I; Cellier, P

    2011-09-01

    Ammonia and pesticide volatilization in the field is a surface phenomenon involving physical and chemical processes that depend on the soil surface temperature and water content. The water transfer, heat transfer and energy budget sub models of volatilization models are adapted from the most commonly accepted formalisms and parameterizations. They are less detailed than the dedicated models describing water and heat transfers and surface status. The aim of this work was to assess the ability of one of the available mechanistic volatilization models, Volt'Air, to accurately describe the pedo-climatic conditions of a soil surface at the required time and space resolution. The assessment involves: (i) a sensitivity analysis, (ii) an evaluation of Volt'Air outputs in the light of outputs from a reference Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model (SiSPAT) and three experimental datasets, and (iii) the study of three tests based on modifications of SiSPAT to establish the potential impact of the simplifying assumptions used in Volt'Air. The analysis confirmed that a 5 mm surface layer was well suited, and that Volt'Air surface temperature correlated well with the experimental measurements as well as with SiSPAT outputs. In terms of liquid water transfers, Volt'Air was overall consistent with SiSPAT, with discrepancies only during major rainfall events and dry weather conditions. The tests enabled us to identify the main source of the discrepancies between Volt'Air and SiSPAT: the lack of gaseous water transfer description in Volt'Air. They also helped to explain why neither Volt'Air nor SiSPAT was able to represent lower values of surface water content: current classical water retention and hydraulic conductivity models are not yet adapted to cases of very dry conditions. Given the outcomes of this study, we discuss to what extent the volatilization models can be improved and the questions they pose for current research in water transfer modeling and parameterization.

  1. Nanowell-Trapped Charged Ligand-Bearing Nanoparticle Surfaces – A Novel Method of Enhancing Flow-Resistant Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phat L.; Gamboa, Jessica R.; McCracken, Katherine E.; Riley, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Assuring cell adhesion to an underlying biomaterial surface is vital in implant device design and tissue engineering, particularly under circumstances where cells are subjected to potential detachment from overriding fluid flow. Cell-substrate adhesion is a highly regulated process involving the interplay of mechanical properties, surface topographic features, electrostatic charge, and biochemical mechanisms. At the nanoscale level the physical properties of the underlying substrate are of particular importance in cell adhesion. Conventionally, natural, pro-adhesive, and often thrombogenic, protein biomaterials are frequently utilized to facilitate adhesion. In the present study nanofabrication techniques are utilized to enhance the biological functionality of a synthetic polymer surface, polymethymethacrylate, with respect to cell adhesion. Specifically we examine the effect on cell adhesion of combining: 1. optimized surface texturing, 2. electrostatic charge and 3. cell adhesive ligands, uniquely assembled on the substrata surface, as an ensemble of nanoparticles trapped in nanowells. Our results reveal that the ensemble strategy leads to enhanced, more than simply additive, endothelial cell adhesion under both static and flow conditions. This strategy may be of particular utility for enhancing flow-resistant endothelialization of blood-contacting surfaces of cardiovascular devices subjected to flow-mediated shear. PMID:23225491

  2. CO2-Brine-Iron-bearing Clay Mineral Interactions: Surface Area Changes and Fracture-Filling Potentials in Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Y.; Hu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) is a promising option to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emission from coal-fired power plants. The injected CO2 in GCS sites can induce dissolution of rocks and secondary mineral formation, potentially change the physical properties of the geological formations, and thus influence the transport and injectivity of CO2. However, most of the relevant studies are based on hydrological transport, using simulation models rather than studying actual interfacial chemical reactions. The mechanisms and kinetics of interfacial reactions among supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-saline water-rock surfaces at the molecular scale and their impacts on CO2 leakage have not been well understood. This research investigated the effects of various environmental factors (such as temperature, pressure, salinity, and different metal ion and organic-containing brine) on the dissolution and surface morphological changes of clay minerals. In this work, iron-bearing clay mineral, biotite [K(Mg,Fe)3AlSi3O10(OH,F)2], was used for model clay minerals in potential GCS sites. Both fluid/solid chemistry analysis and interfacial topographic studies were conducted to investigate the dissolution/precipitation on clay mineral surfaces under GCS conditions in high salinity systems. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the interfacial surface morphology changes were observed. Shortly after a CO2 pressure of 102 atm is applied at 95oC, in situ pH of solutions was 3.15 ± 0.10. The early intrinsic dissolution rates of biotite were 8.4 ± 2.8 × 10-13 and 11.2 ± 3.0 × 10-13 mol Si m-2s-1 in water and NaCl solution, respectively. At the early stage of reaction, fast growth of fibrous illite on biotite basal planes was observed. After 22-70 h reaction, the biotite basal surface cracked, resulting in illite detaching from the surfaced. Later, the cracked surface layer was released into solution, thus the inner layer was exposed as a renewed

  3. Biodegradable polyester films from renewable aleuritic acid: surface modifications induced by melt-polycondensation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesús Benítez, José; Alejandro Heredia-Guerrero, José; Inmaculada de Vargas-Parody, María; Cruz-Carrillo, Miguel Antonio; Morales-Flórez, Victor; de la Rosa-Fox, Nicolás; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Good water barrier properties and biocompatibility of long-chain biopolyesters like cutin and suberin have inspired the design of synthetic mimetic materials. Most of these biopolymers are made from esterified mid-chain functionalized ω-long chain hydroxyacids. Aleuritic (9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic) acid is such a polyhydroxylated fatty acid and is also the major constituent of natural lac resin, a relatively abundant and renewable resource. Insoluble and thermostable films have been prepared from aleuritic acid by melt-condensation polymerization in air without catalysts, an easy and attractive procedure for large scale production. Intended to be used as a protective coating, the barrier's performance is expected to be conditioned by physical and chemical modifications induced by oxygen on the air-exposed side. Hence, the chemical composition, texture, mechanical behavior, hydrophobicity, chemical resistance and biodegradation of the film surface have been studied by attenuated total reflection–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR–FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindentation and water contact angle (WCA). It has been demonstrated that the occurrence of side oxidation reactions conditions the surface physical and chemical properties of these polyhydroxyester films. Additionally, the addition of palmitic acid to reduce the presence of hydrophilic free hydroxyl groups was found to have a strong influence on these parameters.

  4. Frontal vitrification of PDMS using air plasma and consequences for surface wrinkling.

    PubMed

    Nania, Manuela; Matar, Omar K; Cabral, João T

    2015-04-21

    We study the surface oxidation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by air plasma exposure and its implications for the mechanically-induced surface wrinkling of the resulting glass-elastomer bilayers. The effect of plasma frequency (kHz and MHz), oxygen content (from O2 to air), pressure (0.5 ≤ P ≤ 1.5 mbar), as well as exposure time and power, is quantified in terms of the resulting glassy skin thickness h, inferred from wrinkling experiments. The glassy skin thickness is found to increase logarithmically with an exposure time t, for different induction powers p, and all data collapse in terms of a plasma dose, D ≡ p × t. The kinetics of film propagation are found to increase with the oxygen molar fraction yO2 and decrease with the gas pressure P, allowing both the wrinkling wavelength λ and amplitude A to be effectively controlled by gas pressure and composition. A generalised relationship for frontal vitrification is obtained by re-scaling all λ and h data by D/P. A coarse-grained wave propagation model effectively describes and quantifies the process stages (induction, skin formation and propagation) under all the conditions studied. Equipped with this knowledge, we further expand the capabilities of plasma oxidation for PDMS wrinkling, and a wavelength of λ ≈ 100 nm is readily attained with a modest strain εprestrain ≈ 20%.

  5. Biodegradable polyester films from renewable aleuritic acid: surface modifications induced by melt-polycondensation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesús Benítez, José; Alejandro Heredia-Guerrero, José; Inmaculada de Vargas-Parody, María; Cruz-Carrillo, Miguel Antonio; Morales-Flórez, Victor; de la Rosa-Fox, Nicolás; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Good water barrier properties and biocompatibility of long-chain biopolyesters like cutin and suberin have inspired the design of synthetic mimetic materials. Most of these biopolymers are made from esterified mid-chain functionalized ω-long chain hydroxyacids. Aleuritic (9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic) acid is such a polyhydroxylated fatty acid and is also the major constituent of natural lac resin, a relatively abundant and renewable resource. Insoluble and thermostable films have been prepared from aleuritic acid by melt-condensation polymerization in air without catalysts, an easy and attractive procedure for large scale production. Intended to be used as a protective coating, the barrier's performance is expected to be conditioned by physical and chemical modifications induced by oxygen on the air-exposed side. Hence, the chemical composition, texture, mechanical behavior, hydrophobicity, chemical resistance and biodegradation of the film surface have been studied by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindentation and water contact angle (WCA). It has been demonstrated that the occurrence of side oxidation reactions conditions the surface physical and chemical properties of these polyhydroxyester films. Additionally, the addition of palmitic acid to reduce the presence of hydrophilic free hydroxyl groups was found to have a strong influence on these parameters.

  6. An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

    1991-10-01

    This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Temporal and spatial assessments of minimum air temperature using satellite surface temperature measurements in Massachusetts, USA.

    PubMed

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2012-08-15

    Although meteorological stations provide accurate air temperature observations, their spatial coverage is limited and thus often insufficient for epidemiological studies. Satellite data expand spatial coverage, enhancing our ability to estimate near surface air temperature (Ta). However, the derivation of Ta from surface temperature (Ts) measured by satellites is far from being straightforward. In this study, we present a novel approach that incorporates land use regression, meteorological variables and spatial smoothing to first calibrate between Ts and Ta on a daily basis and then predict Ta for days when satellite Ts data were not available. We applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to calibrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Ts data with monitored Ta measurements for 2003. Then, we used a generalized additive mixed model with spatial smoothing to estimate Ta in days with missing Ts. Out-of-sample tenfold cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with available Ts and days without Ts observations (mean out-of-sample R(2)=0.946 and R(2)=0.941 respectively). Furthermore, based on the high quality predictions we investigated the spatial patterns of Ta within the study domain as they relate to urban vs. non-urban land uses. PMID:22721687

  8. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7 kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  9. Extreme air-sea surface turbulent fluxes in mid latitudes - estimation, origins and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulev, Sergey; Natalia, Tilinina

    2014-05-01

    Extreme turbulent heat fluxes in the North Atlantic and North Pacific mid latitudes were estimated from the modern era and first generation reanalyses (NCEP-DOE, ERA-Interim, MERRA NCEP-CFSR, JRA-25) for the period from 1979 onwards. We used direct surface turbulent flux output as well as reanalysis state variables from which fluxes have been computed using COARE-3 bulk algorithm. For estimation of extreme flux values we analyzed surface flux probability density distribution which was approximated by Modified Fisher-Tippett distribution. In all reanalyses extreme turbulent heat fluxes amount to 1500-2000 W/m2 (for the 99th percentile) and can exceed 2000 W/m2 for higher percentiles in the western boundary current extension (WBCE) regions. Different reanalyses show significantly different shape of MFT distribution, implying considerable differences in the estimates of extreme fluxes. The highest extreme turbulent latent heat fluxes are diagnosed in NCEP-DOE, ERA-Interim and NCEP-CFSR reanalyses with the smallest being in MERRA. These differences may not necessarily reflect the differences in mean values. Analysis shows that differences in statistical properties of the state variables are the major source of differences in the shape of PDF of fluxes and in the estimates of extreme fluxes while the contribution of computational schemes used in different reanalyses is minor. The strongest differences in the characteristics of probability distributions of surface fluxes and extreme surface flux values between different reanalyses are found in the WBCE extension regions and high latitudes. In the next instance we analyzed the mechanisms responsible for forming surface turbulent fluxes and their potential role in changes of midlatitudinal heat balance. Midlatitudinal cyclones were considered as the major mechanism responsible for extreme turbulent fluxes which are typically occur during the cold air outbreaks in the rear parts of cyclones when atmospheric conditions

  10. Influence of near-surface stratigraphy on coastal landslides at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Lake Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Jaffe, B.E.; Kayen, R.E.; Cochrane, G.R.

    2004-01-01

    Lake-level change and landslides are primary controls on the development of coastal environments along the coast of northeastern Lake Michigan. The late Quaternary geology of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore was examined with high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and boreholes. Based on sequence-stratigraphic principles, this study recognizes ten stratigraphic units and three major unconformities that were formed by late Pleistocene glaciation and postglacial lake-level changes. Locally high sediment supply, and reworking by two regressions and a transgression have produced a complex stratigraphy that is prone to episodic failure. In 1995, a large landslide deposited approximately 1 million m3 of sediment on the lake floor. The highly deformed landslide deposits, up to 18 m thick, extend 3-4 km offshore and unconformably overlie well-stratified glacial and lacustrine sediment. The landslide-prone bluff is underlain by channel-fill deposits that are oriented nearly perpendicular to the shoreline. The paleochannels are at least 10 m deep and 400 m wide and probably represent stream incision during a lake-level lowstand about 10.3 ka B.P. The channels filled with sediment during the subsequent transgression and lake-level highstand, which climaxed about 4.5 ka B.P. As lake level fell from the highstand, the formation of beach ridges and sand dunes sealed off the channel and isolated a small inland lake (Glen Lake), which lies 5 m above the level of Lake Michigan and may be a source of piped groundwater. Our hypothesis is that the paleochannels act as conduits for pore water flow, and thereby locally reduce soil strength and promote slope failure.

  11. Ultrafast laser induced periodic sub-wavelength aluminum surface structures and nanoparticles in air and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Dar, Mudasir H.; Deepak, K. L. N.; Rao, D. Narayana

    2014-09-01

    In this communication, we demonstrate the generation of laser-induced periodic sub-wavelength surface structures (LIPSS) or ripples on a bulk aluminum (Al) and Al nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Al surface at normal incidence in air and by immersing in ethanol (C2H5OH) and water (H2O) using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ˜110 fs pulse duration and ˜800 nm wavelength. Field emission scanning electron microscope is utilized for imaging surface morphology of laser written structures and it reveals that the spatial periodicity as well as the surface morphology of the LIPSS depends on the surrounding dielectric medium and also on the various laser irradiation parameters. The observed LIPSS have been classified as low spatial frequency LIPSS which are perpendicularly oriented to the laser polarization with a periodicity from 460 to 620 nm and high spatial frequency LIPSS which spectacles a periodicity less than 100 nm with the orientation parallel to the polarization of the incident laser beam. Fabricated colloidal solutions, which contain the Al NPs, were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM results reveal the formation of internal cavities in Al NPs both in ethanol and water. Formation mechanism of LIPSS and cavities inside the nanoparticles are discussed in detail.

  12. Bifurcations and structure of surface interacting methane-air diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Gummalla, M.; Vlachos, D.G.; Delichatsios, M.A.

    2000-02-01

    Methane-air diffusion flames near surfaces are modeled using numerical bifurcation theory. Ignition, extinction, and stability boundaries are studied as functions of fuel flow rate and oxidizer strain rate, using three reaction mechanisms of varying complexity (a one-step reaction, a C{sub 1} reaction mechanism, and the Gas Research Institute [GRI 1.2] mechanism). It is found that as the fuel flow rate increases, the ignition temperature increases, whereas the extinction temperature decreases. For sufficiently high fuel flow rates and low oxidizer strain rates, the flame separates from the surface, and extinction cannot be caused by thermal quenching. In the absence of surface heat low, two distinct extinction branches are found, namely, a blowoff or stretch limit branch at high fuel flow rates and a thermal quenching limit branch at low fuel flow rates. The complexity of the reaction mechanism affects primarily the blowoff branch at high fuel flow rates but not the thermal quenching branch due to the O{sub 2} leaking through the reaction zone at low strain rates. Surface radiation alters the bifurcation behavior, beyond an absolute stability curve. The theoretically predicted flame structure and stability limits compare well with experimental results. Implications for modeling of extinction of complex condensed fuels are also discussed.

  13. The variability of California summertime marine stratus: impacts on surface air temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iacobellis, Sam F.; Cayan, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the variability of clouds, primarily marine stratus clouds, and how they are associated with surface temperature anomalies over California, especially along the coastal margin. We focus on the summer months of June to September when marine stratus are the dominant cloud type. Data used include satellite cloud reflectivity (cloud albedo) measurements, hourly surface observations of cloud cover and air temperature at coastal airports, and observed values of daily surface temperature at stations throughout California and Nevada. Much of the anomalous variability of summer clouds is organized over regional patterns that affect considerable portions of the coast, often extend hundreds of kilometers to the west and southwest over the North Pacific, and are bounded to the east by coastal mountains. The occurrence of marine stratus is positively correlated with both the strength and height of the thermal inversion that caps the marine boundary layer, with inversion base height being a key factor in determining their inland penetration. Cloud cover is strongly associated with surface temperature variations. In general, increased presence of cloud (higher cloud albedo) produces cooler daytime temperatures and warmer nighttime temperatures. Summer daytime temperature fluctuations associated with cloud cover variations typically exceed 1°C. The inversion-cloud albedo-temperature associations that occur at daily timescales are also found at seasonal timescales.

  14. Ultrafast laser induced periodic sub-wavelength aluminum surface structures and nanoparticles in air and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Dar, Mudasir H.; Rao, D. Narayana E-mail: dnr-laserlab@yahoo.com; Deepak, K. L. N.

    2014-09-21

    In this communication, we demonstrate the generation of laser-induced periodic sub-wavelength surface structures (LIPSS) or ripples on a bulk aluminum (Al) and Al nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Al surface at normal incidence in air and by immersing in ethanol (C₂H₅OH) and water (H₂O) using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ~110 fs pulse duration and ~800 nm wavelength. Field emission scanning electron microscope is utilized for imaging surface morphology of laser written structures and it reveals that the spatial periodicity as well as the surface morphology of the LIPSS depends on the surrounding dielectric medium and also on the various laser irradiation parameters. The observed LIPSS have been classified as low spatial frequency LIPSS which are perpendicularly oriented to the laser polarization with a periodicity from 460 to 620 nm and high spatial frequency LIPSS which spectacles a periodicity less than 100 nm with the orientation parallel to the polarization of the incident laser beam. Fabricated colloidal solutions, which contain the Al NPs, were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM results reveal the formation of internal cavities in Al NPs both in ethanol and water. Formation mechanism of LIPSS and cavities inside the nanoparticles are discussed in detail.

  15. Surface modification of gold nanoparticles and their monolayer behavior at the air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chaio-Ling; Wang, Ke-Hsuan; Chang, Chien-Hsiang; Hsu, Wen-Ping; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were prepared by two different methods. The first method was chemically grafting the particles with different lengths of alkylthiol (C6SH, C12SH and C18SH). For the second method, the Au particles were surface modified first by mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) to render a surface with carboxylic acid groups which play a role to physically adsorb cationic surfactant in chloroform. This method was termed physical/chemical method. In the first method, the effects of alkyl chain length and dispersion solvent on the monolayer behavior of surface modified gold nanoparticles was evaluated. The gold nanoparticles prepared by 1-hexanthiol demonstrated the narrowest size distribution. Most of them showed narrower particle size distributions in chloroform than in hexane. For the physical/chemical method, the particles can spread more uniformly on the water surface which is attributed to the amphiphilic character of the particles at the air/water interface. However, the particles cannot pack closely due to the relatively weak particle-particle interaction. The effect of alkyl chain length was also assessed for the second method.

  16. Requirements analysis for an air traffic control tower surface surveillance enhanced vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffner, John W.; Deaver, Dawne M.; Henry, Daniel J.

    2003-09-01

    Tower controllers are responsible for maintaining separation between aircraft and expediting the flow of traffic in the air. On the airport surface, they also are responsible for maintaining safe separation between aircraft, ground equipment, and personnel. They do this by sequencing departing and arriving aircraft, and controlling the location and movement of aircraft, vehicles, equipment, and personnel on the airport surface. The local controller and ground controller are responsible for determining aircraft location and intent, and for ensuring that aircraft, vehicles, and other surface objects maintain a safe separation distance. During nighttime or poor visibility conditions, controllers' situation awareness is significantly degraded, resulting in lower safety margins and increased errors. Safety and throughput can be increased by using an Enhanced Vision System, based upon state-of-the-art infrared sensor technology, to restore critical visual cues. We discuss the results of an analysis of tower controller critical visual tasks and information requirements. The analysis identified: representative classes of ground obstacles/targets (e.g., aircraft, vehicles, wildlife); sample airport layouts and tower-to-runway distances; and obstacle subtended visual angles. We performed NVTherm modeling of candidate sensors and field data collections. This resulted in the identification of design factors for an airport surface surveillance Enhanced Vision System.

  17. Long-term hip simulator testing of the artificial hip joint bearing surface grafted with biocompatible phospholipid polymer.

    PubMed

    Moro, Toru; Takatori, Yoshio; Kyomoto, Masayuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masami; Ito, Hideya; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Oshima, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Shigeyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi

    2014-03-01

    To prevent periprosthetic osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening of artificial hip joints, we recently developed a novel acetabular highly cross-linked polyethylene (CLPE) liner with graft polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) on its surface. We investigated the wear resistance of the poly(MPC) (PMPC)-grafted CLPE liner during 20 million cycles in a hip joint simulator. We extended the simulator test of one liner to 70 million cycles to investigate the long-term durability of the grafting. Gravimetric, surface, and wear particle analyses revealed that PMPC grafting onto the CLPE liner surface markedly decreased the production of wear particles and showed that the effect of PMPC grafting was maintained through 70 million cycles. We believe that PMPC grafting can significantly improve the wear resistance of artificial hip joints. PMID:24249706

  18. Processes at the magnesium-bearing carbonates/solution interface. I. A surface speciation model for magnesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques; Thomas, Fabien

    1999-07-01

    The surface charge of magnesite (MgCO 3) was measured at 25°C as a function of pH (4.6 to 11) and ionic strength (0.01, 0.1 and 0.5 M NaCl) under pCO 2 from 10 -3.5 to 0.96 atm. The acid-base titrations were performed in a limited residence time reactor following the approach developed by Charlet et al. (1990) for rhodochrosite and siderite. Magnesite zeta potential (ζ) was determined as a function of pH (1.5 to 12), ionic strength (0.001 to 0.1 M) and Mg 2+ and HCO 3- concentrations. Based on these results and spectoscopic data on the calcite and dolomite/water inerfaces, a surface complexation model is presented which postulates the formation of the primary hydration species >CO 3H° and >MgOH°. Within this scheme, magnesite surface speciation is governed by the following species: >CO 3H°, >CO 3-, >CO 3Mg +, >MgOH°, >MgO -, >MgOH 2+, >MgHCO °3, and >MgCO 3-. The intrinsic stability constants of these species were determined by fitting the pH dependent surface charge over a wide range of solution composition. For the conditions investigated in this study, the measured ζ-potential values of magnesite are in good agreement with the sign of the surface potential and its dependence on solution composition calculated using the surface complexation model generated in this study.

  19. Wave Journal Bearing. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1995-01-01

    A wave journal bearing concept features a waved inner bearing diameter of the non-rotating bearing side and it is an alternative to the plain journal bearing. The wave journal bearing has a significantly increased load capacity in comparison to the plain journal bearing operating at the same eccentricity. It also offers greater stability than the plain circular bearing under all operating conditions. The wave bearing's design is relatively simple and allows the shaft to rotate in either direction. Three wave bearings are sensitive to the direction of an applied stationary side load. Increasing the number of waves reduces the wave bearing's sensitivity to the direction of the applied load relative to the wave. However, the range in which the bearing performance can be varied decreases as the number of waves increases. Therefore, both the number and the amplitude of the waves must be properly selected to optimize the wave bearing design for a specific application. It is concluded that the stiffness of an air journal bearing, due to hydrodynamic effect, could be doubled and made to run stably by using a six or eight wave geometry with a wave amplitude approximately half of the bearing radial clearance.

  20. Near-surface air temperature and snow skin temperature comparison from CREST-SAFE station data with MODIS land surface temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Díaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Muñoz, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Yu, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable (commonly studied to understand the hydrological cycle) that helps drive the energy balance and water exchange between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. One observable constituent of much importance in the land surface water balance model is snow. Snow cover plays a critical role in the regional to global scale hydrological cycle because rain-on-snow with warm air temperatures accelerates rapid snow-melt, which is responsible for the majority of the spring floods. Accurate information on near-surface air temperature (T-air) and snow skin temperature (T-skin) helps us comprehend the energy and water balances in the Earth's hydrological cycle. T-skin is critical in estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow covered areas because incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and the air temperature above make it different from the average snowpack temperature. This study investigates the correlation between MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data and observed T-air and T-skin data from NOAA-CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE) for the winters of 2013 and 2014. LST satellite validation is imperative because high-latitude regions are significantly affected by climate warming and there is a need to aid existing meteorological station networks with the spatially continuous measurements provided by satellites. Results indicate that near-surface air temperature correlates better than snow skin temperature with MODIS LST data. Additional findings show that there is a negative trend demonstrating that the air minus snow skin temperature difference is inversely proportional to cloud cover. To a lesser extent, it will be examined whether the surface properties at the site are representative for the LST properties within the instrument field of view.

  1. An Inter-comparative Study of the Effects of Aircraft on Surface Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, M. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Barrett, S. R. H.; Bian, H.; Chen, C. C.; Eastham, S. D.; Gettelman, A.; Khodayari, A.; Liang, Q.; Phoenix, D. B.; Selkirk, H. B.; Unger, N.; Wuebbles, D. J.; Yue, X.

    2015-12-01

    This study inter-compares, among five global models, the potential impacts of all commercial aircraft emissions worldwide on surface ozone and PM2.5. The models include climate-response models (CRMs) with interactive meteorology, chemical-transport models (CTMs) with prescribed meteorology, and models that integrate aspects of both. Previously, few studies have addressed the effects of cruise-altitude aircraft emissions on surface air quality, and each has provided a marginally different result. Here, model inputs are substantially harmonized in an effort to achieve a consensus about the state of understanding of impacts of 2006 commercial aviation emissions. Whereas, all models find that aircraft increase near-surface ozone (0.4 to 1.9% globally), perturbations in the Northern Hemisphere are highest in winter, when ambient ozone levels are lower and potentially of not as much concern to human health compared to the higher ozone in the summer months. Changes in surface-level PM2.5 in the CTMs (0.14 to 0.4%) and CRMs (-1.9 to 1.2%) may depend on highly-varying background aerosol fields among models and the inclusion of feedbacks between aircraft emissions and changes in meteorology. The CTMs tend to show an increase in surface PM2.5 primarily over high-traffic regions in the North American mid-latitudes. The CRMs, on the other hand, demonstrate the effects of changing meteorological fields and potential feedbacks on aviation emission impacts, and exhibit large perturbations over regions where natural emissions (e.g., soil dust and sea spray) are abundant. Excluding these emissions in the CRMs results in a smaller-in-magnitude surface change due to aviation. The changes in ozone and PM2.5 found here may be used to estimate ranges in the net impacts of aircraft on human health.

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3770, Faizabad (217) and Parkhaw (218) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3670, Jurm-Kishim (223) and Zebak (224) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3266, Uruzgan (519) and Moqur (520) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  5. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3164, Lashkar Gah (605) and Kandahar (606) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3568, Pul-e Khumri (503) and Charikar (504) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3564, Jowand (405) and Gurziwan (406) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3368, Ghazni (515) and Gardez (516) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3468, Chak-e Wardak-Siyahgird (509) and Kabul (510) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3264, Naw Zad-Musa Qala (423) and Dihrawud (424) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3470, Jalalabad (511) and Chaghasaray (512) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3466, La`l wa Sar Jangal (507) and Bamyan (508) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3562, Khawja-Jir (403) and Murghab (404) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3162, Chakhansur (603) and Kotalak (604) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral Surface Materials Map of Quadrangle 3268, Khayr Kot (521) and Urgun (522) Quadrangles, Afghanistan, Showing Iron-bearing Minerals and Other Materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3366, Gizab (513) and Nawer (514) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3462, Herat (409) and Chishti Sharif (410) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3464, Shahrak (411) and Kasi (412) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-e-pur-Chaman (422) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  20. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3166, Jaldak (701) and Maruf-Nawa (702) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  1. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3570, Tagab-e-Munjan (505) and Asmar-Kamdesh (506) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3364, Pasaband (417) and Markaz-e Kajiran (418) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3362, Shindand (415) and Tulak (416) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3566, Sangcharak (501) and Sayghan-o-Kamard (502) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  5. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3260, Dasht-e-Chah-e-Mazar (419) and Anar Darah (420) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  6. Solar Cycle and Anthropogenic Forcing of Surface-Air Temperature at Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of 10-yr moving average (yma) values of Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland) surface-air temperatures with selected solar cycle indices (sunspot number (SSN) and the Aa geomagnetic index (Aa)), sea-surface temperatures in the Nino 3.4 region, and Mauna Loa carbon dioxide (CO2) (MLCO2) atmospheric concentration measurements reveals a strong correlation (r = 0.686) between the Armagh temperatures and Aa, especially, prior to about 1980 (r = 0.762 over the interval of 1873-1980). For the more recent interval 1963-2003, the strongest correlation (r = 0.877) is between Armagh temperatures and MLCO2 measurements. A bivariate fit using both Aa and Mauna Loa values results in a very strong fit (r = 0.948) for the interval 1963-2003, and a trivariate fit using Aa, SSN, and Mauna Loa values results in a slightly stronger fit (r = 0.952). Atmospheric CO2 concentration now appears to be the stronger driver of Armagh surface-air temperatures. An increase of 2 C above the long-term mean (9.2 C) at Armagh seems inevitable unless unabated increases in anthropogenic atmospheric gases can be curtailed. The present growth in 10-yma Armagh temperatures is about 0.05 C per yr since 1982. The present growth in MLCO2 is about 0.002 ppmv, based on an exponential fit using 10-yma values, although the growth appears to be steepening, thus, increasing the likelihood of deleterious effects attributed to global warming.

  7. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Glenn C.

    1999-12-01

    {sup {minus}7}, 10{sup {minus}5}, and 10{sup {minus}5} respectively. To understand how internal surface area influences the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet, a model of ozone diffusion into and reaction with internal carpet components was developed. This was then used to predict apparent reaction probabilities for carpet. He combines this with a modified model of turbulent mass transfer developed by Liu, et al. to predict deposition rates and indoor ozone concentrations. The model predicts that carpet should have an equivalent reaction probability of about 10{sup {minus}5}, matching laboratory measurements of the reaction probability. For both carpet and duct materials, surfaces become progressively quenched (aging), losing the ability to react or otherwise take up ozone. He evaluated the functional form of aging and find that the reaction probability follows a power function with respect to the cumulative uptake of ozone. To understand ozone aging of surfaces, he developed several mathematical descriptions of aging based on two different mechanisms. The observed functional form of aging is mimicked by a model which describes ozone diffusion with internal reaction in a solid. He shows that the fleecy nature of carpet materials in combination with the model of ozone diffusion below a fiber surface and internal reaction may explain the functional form and the magnitude of power function parameters observed due to ozone interactions with carpet. The ozone induced aldehyde emissions, measured from duct materials, were combined with an indoor air quality model to show that concentrations of aldehydes indoors may approach odorous levels. He shows that ducts are unlikely to be a significant sink for ozone due to the low reaction probability in combination with the short residence time of air in ducts.

  8. Effect of surface passivation on corrosion resistance and antibacterial properties of Cu-bearing 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinlong; Xu, Dake; Shahzad, M. Babar; Kang, Qiang; Sun, Ying; Sun, Ziqing; Zhang, Shuyuan; Ren, Ling; Yang, Chunguang; Yang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    The resistance for pitting corrosion, passive film stability and antibacterial performance of 316L-Cu SS passivated by nitric acid solution containing certain concentration of copper sulfate, were studied by electrochemical cyclic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and co-culture with bacteria. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to analyze the Cu2+ ions release from 316L-Cu SS surface. XPS analysis proved that the enrichment of CuO, Cr2O3 and Cr(OH)3 on the surface of specimen could simultaneously guarantee a better corrosion resistance and stable antibacterial properties. The biocompatibility evaluation determined by RTCA assay also indicated that the 316L-Cu SS after antibacterial passivation was completely biocompatible.

  9. Regional climates in the GISS general circulation model: Surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitson, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    One of the more viable research techniques into global climate change for the purpose of understanding the consequent environmental impacts is based on the use of general circulation models (GCMs). However, GCMs are currently unable to reliably predict the regional climate change resulting from global warming, and it is at the regional scale that predictions are required for understanding human and environmental responses. Regional climates in the extratropics are in large part governed by the synoptic-scale circulation and the feasibility of using this interscale relationship is explored to provide a way of moving to grid cell and sub-grid cell scales in the model. The relationships between the daily circulation systems and surface air temperature for points across the continental United States are first developed in a quantitative form using a multivariate index based on principal components analysis (PCA) of the surface circulation. These relationships are then validated by predicting daily temperature using observed circulation and comparing the predicted values with the observed temperatures. The relationships predict surface temperature accurately over the major portion of the country in winter, and for half the country in summer. These relationships are then applied to the surface synoptic circulation of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM control run, and a set of surface grid cell temperatures are generated. These temperatures, based on the larger-scale validated circulation, may now be used with greater confidence at the regional scale. The generated temperatures are compared to those of the model and show that the model has regional errors of up to 10 C in individual grid cells.

  10. Recent Improvements in Retrieving Near-Surface Air Temperature and Humidity Using Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent

    2010-01-01

    Detailed studies of the energy and water cycles require accurate estimation of the turbulent fluxes of moisture and heat across the atmosphere-ocean interface at regional to basin scale. Providing estimates of these latent and sensible heat fluxes over the global ocean necessitates the use of satellite or reanalysis-based estimates of near surface variables. Recent studies have shown that errors in the surface (10 meter)estimates of humidity and temperature are currently the largest sources of uncertainty in the production of turbulent fluxes from satellite observations. Therefore, emphasis has been placed on reducing the systematic errors in the retrieval of these parameters from microwave radiometers. This study discusses recent improvements in the retrieval of air temperature and humidity through improvements in the choice of algorithms (linear vs. nonlinear) and the choice of microwave sensors. Particular focus is placed on improvements using a neural network approach with a single sensor (Special Sensor Microwave/Imager) and the use of combined sensors from the NASA AQUA satellite platform. The latter algorithm utilizes the unique sampling available on AQUA from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A). Current estimates of uncertainty in the near-surface humidity and temperature from single and multi-sensor approaches are discussed and used to estimate errors in the turbulent fluxes.

  11. New and Emerging Technologies for Real-Time Air and Surface Beryllium Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, B.E. Jr.; Churnetski, E.L.; Cooke, L.E.; Reed, J.J.; Howell, M.L.; Smith, V.D.

    2001-09-01

    In this study, five emerging technologies were identified for real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium: Microwave-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (MIPS), Aerosol Beam-Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (ABFLIPS), Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Spectroscopy, and Micro-Calorimetric Spectroscopy (CalSpec). Desired features of real-time air beryllium monitoring instrumentation were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies as well as their unique demonstrated capability to provide real-time monitoring of similar materials. However, best available technologies were considered, regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features. None of the five technologies have the capability to measure the particle size of airborne beryllium. Although reducing the total concentration of airborne beryllium is important, current literature suggests that reducing or eliminating the concentration of respirable beryllium is critical for worker health protection. Eight emerging technologies were identified for surface monitoring of beryllium. CalSpec, MIPS, SERS, LIBS, Laser Ablation, Absorptive Stripping Voltametry (ASV), Modified Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectroscopy, and Gamma BeAST. Desired features of real-time surface beryllium monitoring were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies. However, the best available technologies were considered regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features.

  12. Multiyear predictability of Northern Hemisphere surface air temperature in the Kiel Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Latif, M.; Park, W.

    2016-08-01

    The multiyear predictability of Northern Hemisphere surface air temperature (SAT) is examined in a multi-millennial control integration of the Kiel Climate Model, a coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice general circulation model. A statistical method maximizing average predictability time (APT) is used to identify the most predictable SAT patterns in the model. The two leading APT modes are much localized and the physics are discussed that give rise to the enhanced predictability of SAT in these limited regions. Multiyear SAT predictability exists near the sea ice margin in the North Atlantic and mid-latitude North Pacific sector. Enhanced predictability in the North Atlantic is linked to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and to the sea ice changes. In the North Pacific, the most predictable SAT pattern is characterized by a zonal band in the western and central mid-latitude Pacific. This pattern is linked to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, which drives sea surface temperature anomalies. The temperature anomalies subduct into deeper ocean layers and re-emerge at the sea surface during the following winters, providing multiyear memory. Results obtained from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 ensemble yield similar APT modes. Overall, the results stress the importance of ocean dynamics in enhancing predictability in the atmosphere.

  13. The surface cracking behavior in air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system incorporating interface roughness effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W. X.; Fan, X. L.; Wang, T. J.

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this work is to understand the effect of interface roughness on the strain energy release rate and surface cracking behavior in air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating system. This is achieved by a parameter investigation of the interfacial shapes, in which the extended finite element method (XFEM) and periodic boundary condition are used. Predictions for the stress field and driving force of multiple surface cracks in the film/substrate system are presented. It is seen that the interface roughness has significant effects on the strain energy release rate, the interfacial stress distribution, and the crack propagation patterns. One can see the completely different distributions of stress and strain energy release rate in the regions of convex and concave asperities of the substrate. Variation of the interface asperity is responsible for the oscillatory characteristics of strain energy release rate, which can cause the local arrest of surface cracks. It is concluded that artificially created rough interface can enhance the durability of film/substrate system with multiple cracks.

  14. Air jet erosion test on plasma sprayed surface by varying erodent impingement pressure and impingement angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Ajit; Behera, Asit; Mishra, S. C.; Pani, S.; Parida, P.

    2015-02-01

    Fly-ash premixed with quartz and illmenite powder in different weight proportions are thermal sprayed on mild steel and copper substrates at various input power levels of the plasma torch ranging from 11 kW to 21 kW DC. The erosion test has done using Air Jet erosion test Reg (As per ASTM G76) with silica erodent typically 150-250 pm in size. Multiple tests were performed at increasing the time duration from 60 sec to 180 sec with increasing pressure (from 1 bar to 2.5 bar) and angle (60° & 90°). This study reveals that the impact velocity and impact angle are two most significant parameters among various factors influencing the wear rate of these coatings. The mechanisms and microstructural changes that arise during erosion wear are studied by using SEM. It is found that, when erodent are impacting the fresh un-eroded surface, material removal occurs by the continuous evolution of craters on the surface. Upper layer splats are removed out after 60 sec and second layer splat erosion starts. Based on these observations Physical models are developed. Some graphs plotted between mass loss-rate versus time period/impact Pressure/impact Angle gives good correlation with surface features observed.

  15. Measurement of the impulse produced by a pulsed surface discharge actuator in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, P. Q.; Castera, P.

    2013-09-01

    The pulsed surface discharge in atmospheric pressure air generates a shock wave, thereby transferring an impulse to the surrounding gas. The aim of this work is to measure this impulse, using implementation of a plasma actuator based on linear surface discharges of length up to 10 cm, and of linear energy in a range 0.1-0.5 J cm-1. The shock wave generated by the discharge is visualized using a pulsed schlieren system and the impulse is measured with a dedicated balance. These measurements are correlated with 1D numerical simulations of pulsed energy depositions in a perfect gas. Experiments show that the discharge generates a cylindrical shock wave that travels at sonic speed after a few tens of microseconds, and produces an impulse that varies from 1 to 4 mN s m-1 and scales linearly with the linear energy density. This linearity agrees with the numerical simulations when 9.5% of the energy dissipated in the discharge is assumed to heat the gas. Overall, to produce a time-averaged force similar to the one achieved by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuators, 2 to 3 times more power is required. However, surface discharge actuators do not saturate, and thus can induce time-averaged forces one or two orders of magnitude above DBD when pulsed at several hundreds of hertz.

  16. Inkjet patterned superhydrophobic paper for open-air surface microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Elsharkawy, Mohamed; Schutzius, Thomas M; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2014-03-21

    We present a facile approach for the fabrication of low-cost surface biomicrofluidic devices on superhydrophobic paper created by drop-casting a fluoroacrylic copolymer onto microtextured paper. Wettability patterning is performed with a common household printer, which produces regions of varying wettability by simply controlling the intensity of ink deposited over prespecified domains. The procedure produces surfaces that are capable of selective droplet sliding and adhesion, when inclined. Using this methodology, we demonstrate the ability to tune the sliding angles of 10 μL water droplets in the range from 13° to 40° by printing lines of constant ink intensity and varied width from 0.1 mm to 2 mm. We also formulate a simple model to predict the onset of droplet sliding on printed lines of known width and wettability. Experiments demonstrate open-air surface microfluidic devices that are capable of pumpless transport, mixing and rapid droplet sampling (~0.6 μL at 50 Hz). Lastly, post treatment of printed areas with pH indicator solutions exemplifies the utility of these substrates in point-of-care diagnostics, which are needed at geographical locations where access to sophisticated testing equipment is limited or non-existent.

  17. CUSHIONED BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping device effective to dampen vibrations occurring at the several critical speeds encountered in the operation of a high-speed centrifuge is described. A self-centering bearing mechanism is used to protect both the centrifuge shaft and the damping mechanism. The damping mechanism comprises spaced-apant, movable, and stationary sleeve members arranged concentrically of a rotating shaft with a fluid maintained between the members. The movable sleeve member is connected to the shaft for radial movement therewith.

  18. (7)Be, (210)Pb, and (210)Po in the surface air from the Arctic to Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Persson, Bertil R R; Holm, Elis

    2014-12-01

    In the present study we have investigated the activity concentrations of (210)Pb, (210)Po as well as (7)Be in surface air of the North and South Atlantic (1988-1989), the Arctic Ocean (1991), and along the coastline of Siberia (1994) during succeeding expeditions in the Swedish Polar Research program. During the cruises in the Arctic Ocean during 1991-07-28 to 1991-10-04 the average air concentrations of (7)Be was 0.6 ± 0.4 mBq/m(3), (210)Pb 40 ± 4 μBq/m(3) and (210)Po-38 ± 10 μBq/m(3). During the Swedish-Russian Tundra Ecology-94 expedition along the Siberian coastline the average air concentrations of (7)Be and (210)Pb measured during May-July were 11 ± 3, and 2.4 ± 0.4 mBq/m(3), and during July-September they were 7.2 ± 2 and 2.7 ± 1.1 mBq/m(3) respectively. The results from measurements of the activity concentration of (210)Pb in the air over the Arctic Ocean vary between 75 and 176 μBq/m(3). In the air close to land masses, however, the activity concentration of (210)Pb in the air increases to 269-2712 μBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (7)Be in the South Atlantic during the cruise down to Antarctica varied between 1.3 and 1.7 with an average of 1.5 ± 0.8 mBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (210)Pb in the South Atlantic down to Antarctica varied between 6 and 14 μBq/m(3). At the Equator the activity concentration recorded in November 1988 was 630 μBq/m(3) and in April 1989 it was 260 μBq/m(3). The average activity concentration of (210)Pb during the route Gothenburg-Montevideo in 1988 was 290 and on the return Montevideo-Gothenburg it was 230 μBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (210)Po in the South Atlantic down to Antarctica varied between 15 and 58 μBq/m(3). At the Equator the activity concentration in November 1988 was 170 and in April 1989 it was 70 μBq/m(3). The average activity concentration of (210)Po during the route Gothenburg-Montevideo in 1988 was 63 and on the return Montevideo

  19. (7)Be, (210)Pb, and (210)Po in the surface air from the Arctic to Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Persson, Bertil R R; Holm, Elis

    2014-12-01

    In the present study we have investigated the activity concentrations of (210)Pb, (210)Po as well as (7)Be in surface air of the North and South Atlantic (1988-1989), the Arctic Ocean (1991), and along the coastline of Siberia (1994) during succeeding expeditions in the Swedish Polar Research program. During the cruises in the Arctic Ocean during 1991-07-28 to 1991-10-04 the average air concentrations of (7)Be was 0.6 ± 0.4 mBq/m(3), (210)Pb 40 ± 4 μBq/m(3) and (210)Po-38 ± 10 μBq/m(3). During the Swedish-Russian Tundra Ecology-94 expedition along the Siberian coastline the average air concentrations of (7)Be and (210)Pb measured during May-July were 11 ± 3, and 2.4 ± 0.4 mBq/m(3), and during July-September they were 7.2 ± 2 and 2.7 ± 1.1 mBq/m(3) respectively. The results from measurements of the activity concentration of (210)Pb in the air over the Arctic Ocean vary between 75 and 176 μBq/m(3). In the air close to land masses, however, the activity concentration of (210)Pb in the air increases to 269-2712 μBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (7)Be in the South Atlantic during the cruise down to Antarctica varied between 1.3 and 1.7 with an average of 1.5 ± 0.8 mBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (210)Pb in the South Atlantic down to Antarctica varied between 6 and 14 μBq/m(3). At the Equator the activity concentration recorded in November 1988 was 630 μBq/m(3) and in April 1989 it was 260 μBq/m(3). The average activity concentration of (210)Pb during the route Gothenburg-Montevideo in 1988 was 290 and on the return Montevideo-Gothenburg it was 230 μBq/m(3). The activity concentration of (210)Po in the South Atlantic down to Antarctica varied between 15 and 58 μBq/m(3). At the Equator the activity concentration in November 1988 was 170 and in April 1989 it was 70 μBq/m(3). The average activity concentration of (210)Po during the route Gothenburg-Montevideo in 1988 was 63 and on the return Montevideo

  20. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  1. The relationship between ozone formation and air temperature in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belan, Boris D.; Savkin, Denis; Tolmachev, Gennadii

    2016-04-01

    Studying the formation and dynamics of ozone in the atmosphere is important due to several reasons. First, the contribution of tropospheric ozone to the global greenhouse effect is only slightly less than that of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and methane. Second, tropospheric ozone acts as a strong poison that has negative effects on human health, animals, and vegetation. Third, being a potent oxidizer, ozone destroys almost all materials, including platinum group metals and compounds. Fourthly, ozone is formed in situ from precursors as a result of photochemical processes, but not emitted into the atmosphere by any industrial enterprises directly. In this work, we present some results of the study aimed at the revealing relationship between ozone formation rate and surface air temperature in the background atmosphere. It has been found that this relationship is nonlinear. Analysis of the possible reasons showed that the nonlinear character of this relationship may be due to a nonlinear increase in the reaction constants versus air temperature and a quadratic increase in the concentration of hydrocarbons with increasing temperature. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science contract no.14.613.21.0013 (ID: RFMEFI61314X0013).

  2. Traceability and reliable uncertainty calculation of near-surface air temperature measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, C. G.; Merlone, A.

    2014-12-01

    Near-surface air temperature is one of the Essential Climate Variables defined by GCOS (Global Climate Observing System) and currently, it is the most important variable in the climatic analysis of global warming. A reliable affirmation of climate change or global warming must be based on reliable measurements which imply traceability of such measurements and a consistent uncertainty calculation. The improvement of these two aspects is covered by the European projects MeteoMet1 and its successor, MeteoMet2, within the frame of the European Metrology Research Program (EMRP). These two projects count on the participation of several European metrology and meteorology national institutes together with universities and manufacturers. They are focused on responding to the need for new stable and comparable measurement standards, protocols, sensors and calibration procedures, data-fusion and uncertainty evaluation methods, to enhance data reliability and to reduce uncertainties in climate models. This presentation describes the activities related with air temperature measurements included in both projects and the scientific achievements reached in MeteoMet1 project

  3. The air-sea interface and surface stress under tropical cyclones.

    PubMed

    Soloviev, Alexander V; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark A; Haus, Brian K; Ginis, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    Tropical cyclone track prediction is steadily improving, while storm intensity prediction has seen little progress in the last quarter century. Important physics are not yet well understood and implemented in tropical cyclone forecast models. Missing and unresolved physics, especially at the air-sea interface, are among the factors limiting storm predictions. In a laboratory experiment and coordinated numerical simulation, conducted in this work, the microstructure of the air-water interface under hurricane force wind resembled Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability between fluids with a large density difference. Supported by these observations, we bring forth the concept that the resulting two-phase environment suppresses short gravity-capillary waves and alters the aerodynamic properties of the sea surface. The unified wave-form and two-phase parameterization model shows the well-known increase of the drag coefficient (Cd) with wind speed, up to ~30 ms(-1). Around 60 ms(-1), the new parameterization predicts a local peak of Ck/Cd, under constant enthalpy exchange coefficient Ck. This peak may explain rapid intensification of some storms to major tropical cyclones and the previously reported local peak of lifetime maximum intensity (bimodal distribution) in the best-track records. The bimodal distribution of maximum lifetime intensity, however, can also be explained by environmental parameters of tropical cyclones alone. PMID:24930493

  4. Yttrium Siloxide Complexes Bearing Terminal Methyl Ligands: Molecular Models for Ln-CH3 Terminated Silica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dettenrieder, Nicole; Dietrich, H Martin; Maichle-Mössmer, Cäcilia; Anwander, Reiner

    2016-09-01

    Surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) on silica materials is a prominent approach for the generation of highly active heterogenized polymerization catalysts. Despite advanced methods of characterization, the elucidation of the catalytically active surface species remains a challenging task. Alkylated rare-earth metal siloxide complexes can be regarded as molecular models of respective covalently bonded alkylated surface species, primarily used for 1,3-diene polymerization. Here, we performed both salt metathesis reactions of [Y(MMe4 )3 ] (M = Al, Ga) with [K{OSi(OtBu)3 }] and alkylation reactions of [Y{OSi(OtBu)3 }3 ]2 with AlMe3 . The obtained complexes [Y(CH3 )[(AlMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ](AlMe4 )]2 , [Y(CH3 )[(AlMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ]-{OSi(OtBu)3 }], [Y{OSi(OtBu)3 }3 (μ-Me)Y(μ-Me)2 Y{OSi(OtBu)3 }2 (AlMe4 )], and [Y(CH3 )(GaMe4 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }]2 represent rare examples of organoyttrium species with terminal methyl groups. The formation and purity of the mixed methyl/siloxy yttrium complexes could be enhanced by treating [Y(MMe4 )3 ] with [K(MMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ]n (M=Al: n=2; M=Ga: n=∞). Complexes [K(MMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ]n were obtained by addition of [K{OSi(OtBu)3 }] to [Me2 M{OSi(OtBu)3 }]2 . Deeper insight into the fluxional behavior of the mixed methyl/siloxy yttrium complexes in solution was gained by (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopic studies at variable temperature and (1) H-(89) Y HSQC NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27492852

  5. Yttrium Siloxide Complexes Bearing Terminal Methyl Ligands: Molecular Models for Ln-CH3 Terminated Silica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dettenrieder, Nicole; Dietrich, H Martin; Maichle-Mössmer, Cäcilia; Anwander, Reiner

    2016-09-01

    Surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) on silica materials is a prominent approach for the generation of highly active heterogenized polymerization catalysts. Despite advanced methods of characterization, the elucidation of the catalytically active surface species remains a challenging task. Alkylated rare-earth metal siloxide complexes can be regarded as molecular models of respective covalently bonded alkylated surface species, primarily used for 1,3-diene polymerization. Here, we performed both salt metathesis reactions of [Y(MMe4 )3 ] (M = Al, Ga) with [K{OSi(OtBu)3 }] and alkylation reactions of [Y{OSi(OtBu)3 }3 ]2 with AlMe3 . The obtained complexes [Y(CH3 )[(AlMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ](AlMe4 )]2 , [Y(CH3 )[(AlMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ]-{OSi(OtBu)3 }], [Y{OSi(OtBu)3 }3 (μ-Me)Y(μ-Me)2 Y{OSi(OtBu)3 }2 (AlMe4 )], and [Y(CH3 )(GaMe4 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }]2 represent rare examples of organoyttrium species with terminal methyl groups. The formation and purity of the mixed methyl/siloxy yttrium complexes could be enhanced by treating [Y(MMe4 )3 ] with [K(MMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ]n (M=Al: n=2; M=Ga: n=∞). Complexes [K(MMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ]n were obtained by addition of [K{OSi(OtBu)3 }] to [Me2 M{OSi(OtBu)3 }]2 . Deeper insight into the fluxional behavior of the mixed methyl/siloxy yttrium complexes in solution was gained by (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopic studies at variable temperature and (1) H-(89) Y HSQC NMR spectroscopy.

  6. Tooling Converts Stock Bearings To Custom Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleenor, E. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for reworking stock bearings saves time and produces helicopter-rotor bearings ground more precisely. Split tapered ring at one end of threaded bolt expands to hold inside of inner race bearing assembly; nut, at other end of bolt, adjusts amount of spring tension. Piece of hardware grasps bearing firmly without interfering with grinding operation. Operation produces bearing of higher quality than commercially available bearings.

  7. Air-to-surface missile wound of the thorax reconstructed with a polytetrafluoroethylene patch: case report.

    PubMed

    Flis, V; Antonic, J; Crnjac, A; Zorko, A

    1993-11-01

    A method of reconstructing a chest wall defect following non-guided air-to-surface missile injury is described. The wall defect was simply closed with a polytetrafluoroethylene patch. The high risk of infection following use of the described method is well recognized. No infection occurred in this case. It could be stated that under the exigencies of the moment the use of prosthetic material to reconstruct the chest is not invariably followed by infection. However, when the patient is stable this latter problem can then be addressed by a variety of standard methods. It is concluded that the described method is particularly suitable in war circumstances, when it is usually necessary to attend to a large number of patients in a short period of time. PMID:8230352

  8. Surface Tension Drives the Orientation of Crystals at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nicolas R; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-07-21

    The fabrication of oriented crystalline thin films is essential for a range of applications ranging from semiconductors to optical components, sensors, and catalysis. Here we show by depositing micrometric crystal particles on a liquid interface from an aerosol phase that the surface tension of the liquid alone can drive the crystallographic orientation of initially randomly oriented particles. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the particles at the interface are identical to those of a monocrystalline sample cleaved along the {104} (CaCO3) or {111} (CaF2) face. We show how this orientation effect can be used to produce thin coatings of oriented crystals on a solid substrate. These results also have important implications for our understanding of heterogeneous crystal growth beneath amphiphile monolayers and for 2D self-assembly processes at the air-liquid interface. PMID:27389283

  9. Surface cleaning of metals in air with a one atmosphere uniform glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, J.R.; Ku, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The authors report the use of active species generated in a one atmosphere uniform glow discharge plasma reactor with a parallel-plate configuration to clean the surface of as-received metal samples from the machine shop floor. The experimental arrangement used to expose the 7 by 10 cm metal samples is shown. The lower parallel-plate electrode is a flat copper plate 22 by 22 cm, covered by a 5mm thick pyrex sheet. The upper electrode is formed by the bare metal sample plate, with the side to be cleaned facing the plasma. To assure plasma uniformity between the electrodes, it was helpful to direct a flow of air on the edges of the plasma volume. The cleanliness of the metal samples was determined with the standard sessile water drop test.

  10. The evolution of the clear air convective layer revealed by surface-based remote sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noonkester, V. R.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for simultaneous observations of the growth and decay of the clear-air convective mixing layer near a coastline, which were made with an FM-CW radar, a high-power narrow-beam S-band radar, and an acoustic echo sounder. The main purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the rise rate of the convective depth and the lapse rate of temperature, particularly in the morning hours. The results indicate that the three remote sensors can provide excellent mutually supporting data on the convective depth. It is found that this depth is well behaved during the day and that its rise rate varies roughly linearly with the inverse square root of the temperature lapse rate during the morning. The data suggest that some models concerning the rise rate require modification, since these models imply that the surface heat flux would have to be unreasonably large to produce the observed relationship.

  11. Surface Tension Drives the Orientation of Crystals at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Nicolas R; Guenoun, Patrick

    2016-07-21

    The fabrication of oriented crystalline thin films is essential for a range of applications ranging from semiconductors to optical components, sensors, and catalysis. Here we show by depositing micrometric crystal particles on a liquid interface from an aerosol phase that the surface tension of the liquid alone can drive the crystallographic orientation of initially randomly oriented particles. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the particles at the interface are identical to those of a monocrystalline sample cleaved along the {104} (CaCO3) or {111} (CaF2) face. We show how this orientation effect can be used to produce thin coatings of oriented crystals on a solid substrate. These results also have important implications for our understanding of heterogeneous crystal growth beneath amphiphile monolayers and for 2D self-assembly processes at the air-liquid interface.

  12. Fast, high-resolution surface potential measurements in air with heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-06-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) adapts an atomic force microscope to measure electric potential on surfaces at nanometer length scales. Here we demonstrate that Heterodyne-KPFM enables scan rates of several frames per minute in air, and concurrently maintains spatial resolution and voltage sensitivity comparable to frequency-modulation KPFM, the current spatial resolution standard. Two common classes of topography-coupled artifacts are shown to be avoidable with H-KPFM. A second implementation of H-KPFM is also introduced, in which the voltage signal is amplified by the first cantilever resonance for enhanced sensitivity. The enhanced temporal resolution of H-KPFM can enable the imaging of many dynamic processes, such as such as electrochromic switching, phase transitions, and device degredation (battery, solar, etc), which take place over seconds to minutes and involve changes in electric potential at nanometer lengths.

  13. On the Potential Impact of Daytime Surface Sensible Heat Flux on the Dissipation of Martian Cold Air Outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, M.; Arritt, R. W.; Tillman, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    The Martian daytime soil surface temperature is governed primarily by the net irradiance balance and surface soil heat flux. Thus the outbreak of a cold air mass generates increased sensible heat flux that is conducive to daytime dissipation of the cold air mass thermal characteristics. Conceptual and scaling evaluations of this dissipation are provided while comparison is made with similar situations on Earth. It is estimated that sensible heat flux contribution to the dissipation of the original thermal structure of the cold air could be three times larger than the corresponding situation on Earth. Illustrative numerical model simulations provide scaling of the potential impact on the dissipation of cold air masses for various combinations of background wind speed and latitudes.

  14. Dynamic Surface Properties of Asphaltenes and Resins at the Oil-Air Interface.

    PubMed

    Bauget, Fabrice; Langevin, Dominique; Lenormand, Roland

    2001-07-15

    Because of the existence of large reserves, the production of heavy oils is presently the object of much interest. Some heavy oil reservoirs show anomalous behavior in primary production, with rates of production better than predicted. In Canada and Venezuela some heavy oils are produced in the form of "bubbly" oil, which is stable for several hours in open vessels. These crude oils are therefore commonly called "foamy oils". Since the presence of bubbles could be responsible for an enhanced rate of production, a better knowledge of the properties of the gas-oil interface is desirable. We have experimentally studied the effect of concentration of asphaltenes and resins on static and dynamic properties of oil-air interfaces and also on bulk viscosity. The experiments include surface tension measurements using the pendant-drop method, surface viscosity by the oscillating-drop method, foamability by continuous gas injection, and film lifetime. All the experiments were performed using resins and asphaltenes in toluene solutions at 20 degrees C. At first asphaltenes enhance foamability and film lifetime. All the experiments performed showed a change in regime for asphaltene concentrations around 10% by weight, possibly due to clustering. At the studied concentrations, the adsorption process at the air-oil interface is not diffusion controlled but rather involves a reorganization of asphaltene molecules in a network structure. The formation of a solid skin is well identified by the increase of the elastic modulus. This elastic modulus is also an important property for foam stability, since a rigid interface limits bubble rupture. The interface rigidity at long times decreases with increases in resin fraction, which could decrease foam stability as well as emulsion stability. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  15. Effects of surface texturing on the performance of biocompatible UHMWPE as a bearing material during in vitro lubricated sliding/rolling motion.

    PubMed

    López-Cervantes, Adrián; Domínguez-López, Iván; Barceinas-Sánchez, José Dolores Oscar; García-García, Adrián Luis

    2013-04-01

    The effect of surface texturing on the performance of biocompatible ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as a bearing material has been investigated using the kinematic range of motions reported for a knee-joint replacement. An experimental apparatus consisting of a ball and a disk rotating independently from each other was used to compare the performance of UHMWPE textured versus plain surfaces, under different combinations of sliding and rolling motion, better known as sliding-to-rolling ratio (SRR). Performance was evaluated through the coefficient of traction of a tribosystem comprising a steel ball on a flat UHMWPE disk and distilled water at 36°C, acting as lubricant. A square array of cavities with diameter D=0.397mm and center-to-center spacing of 1.5D was machined on UHMWPE disks. The experimental design considered two levels for cavity depth, D and D/2, and two for the applied load, 17 and 25N. The SRR was varied from 1 to 11% and the mean speed range was set from 5 to 55mm/s, covering the kinematics and contact pressure conditions of a sauntering cycle on a knee-joint replacement. Stribeck curves of the plain and textured surfaces were obtained and compared against one another. The results demonstrate that the proposed surface pattern reduces the coefficient of traction of the tribological system for the 17N load in the entire kinematic range explored, while for the 25N load the effects were more noticeable at low mean speed and SRR, corresponding to the beginning of motion.

  16. Relating trends in land surface-air temperature difference to soil moisture and evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veal, Karen; Taylor, Chris; Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Ghent, Darren; Harris, Phil; Remedios, John

    2016-04-01

    Soil water is central to both physical and biogeochemical processes within the Earth System. Drying of soils leads to evapotranspiration (ET) becoming limited or "water-stressed" and is accompanied by rises in land surface temperature (LST), land surface-air temperature difference (delta T), and sensible heat flux. Climate models predict sizable changes to the global water cycle but there is variation between models in the time scale of ET decay during dry spells. The e-stress project is developing novel satellite-derived diagnostics to assess the ability of Earth System Models (ESMs) to capture behaviour that is due to soil moisture controls on ET. Satellite records of LST now extend 15 years or more. MODIS Terra LST is available from 2000 to the present and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) LST record runs from 1995 to 2012. This paper presents results from an investigation into the variability and trends in delta T during the MODIS Terra mission. We use MODIS Terra and MODIS Aqua LST and ESA GlobTemperature ATSR LST with 2m air temperatures from reanalyses to calculate trends in delta T and "water-stressed" area. We investigate the variability of delta T in relation to soil moisture (ESA CCI Passive Daily Soil Moisture), vegetation (MODIS Monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and precipitation (TRMM Multi-satellite Monthly Precipitation) and compare the temporal and spatial variability of delta T with model evaporation data (GLEAM). Delta T anomalies show significant negative correlations with soil moisture, in different seasons, in several regions across the planet. Global mean delta T anomaly is small (magnitude mostly less than 0.2 K) between July 2002 and July 2008 and decreases to a minimum in early 2010. The reduction in delta T anomaly coincides with an increase in soil moisture anomaly and NDVI anomaly suggesting an increase in evapotranspiration and latent heat flux with reduced sensible heat flux. In conclusion there have been

  17. Variation in surface air temperature of China during the 20th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soon, Willie; Dutta, Koushik; Legates, David R.; Velasco, Victor; Zhang, Weijia

    2011-10-01

    The 20th century surface air temperature (SAT) records of China from various sources are analyzed using data which include the recently released Twentieth Century Reanalysis Project dataset. Two key features of the Chinese records are confirmed: (1) significant 1920s and 1940s warming in the temperature records, and (2) evidence for a persistent multidecadal modulation of the Chinese surface temperature records in co-variations with both incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere as well as the modulated solar radiation reaching ground surface. New evidence is presented for this Sun-climate link for the instrumental record from 1880 to 2002. Additionally, two non-local physical aspects of solar radiation-induced modulation of the Chinese SAT record are documented and discussed.Teleconnections that provide a persistent and systematic modulation of the temperature response of the Tibetan Plateau and/or the tropospheric air column above the Eurasian continent (e.g., 30°N-70°N; 0°-120°E) are described. These teleconnections may originate from the solar irradiance-Arctic-North Atlantic overturning circulation mechanism proposed by Soon (2009). Also considered is the modulation of large-scale land-sea thermal contrasts both in terms of meridional and zonal gradients between the subtropical western Pacific and mid-latitude North Pacific and the continental landmass of China. The Circum-global teleconnection (CGT) pattern of summer circulation of Ding and Wang (2005) provides a physical framework for study of the Sun-climate connection over East Asia. Our results highlight the importance of solar radiation reaching the ground and the concomitant importance of changes in atmospheric transparency or cloudiness or both in motivating a true physical explanation of any Sun-climate connection. We conclude that ground surface solar radiation is an important modulating factor for Chinese SAT changes on multidecadal to centennial timescales. Therefore, a

  18. Improved AIRS/AMSU Surface and Atmospheric Soundings Under Partial Cloud Cover Using an AIRS Only Cloud Clearing Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Dr. Joel

    2007-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4,2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. This paper describes the latest scientific advances made in the AIRS Science Team Version 5.0 retrieval algorithm. Starting in early 2007, the Goddard DAAC will use this algorithm to analyze near real time AIRS/AMSU observations. These products are then made available to the scientific community for research purposes. The products include twice daily measurements of the Earth's three dimensional global temperature, water vapor, and ozone distribution as well as cloud cover. In addition, accurate twice daily measurements of the earth's land and ocean temperatures are derived and reported. Scientists use this important set of observations for two major uses. They provide important information for climate studies of global and regional variability and trends of different aspects of the earth's atmosphere. They also provide information for researchers to improve the skill of weather forecasting. A very important new product of the AIRS Version 5 algorithm is accurate case-by-case error estimates of the retrieved products. This heightens their utility for use in both weather and climate applications. These error estimates are also used directly for quality control of the retrieved products.

  19. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-31

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H{sub 2}O), glycerol (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O{sub 3}) and diiodomethane (CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  20. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    minimizing it on the opposite side. The advantage of this configuration is that it makes it possible to approach the theoretical maximum force per unit area that could be exerted by a given amount of permanent-magnet material. The configuration is named after physicist Klaus Halbach, who conceived it for use in particle accelerators. Halbach arrays have also been studied for use in magnetic-levitation ("maglev") railroad trains. In a radial Halbach magnetic bearing, the basic Halbach arrangement is modified into a symmetrical arrangement of sector-shaped permanent magnets mounted on the outer cylindrical surface of a drum rotor (see Figure 2). The magnets are oriented to concentrate the magnetic field on their radially outermost surface. The stator coils are mounted in a stator shell surrounding the rotor.

  1. Projected increases in near-surface air temperature over Ontario, Canada: a regional climate modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuquan; Huang, Guohe; Liu, Jinliang

    2015-09-01

    As the biggest economy in Canada, the Province of Ontario is now suffering many consequences caused by or associated with global warming, such as frequent and intense heat waves, floods, droughts, and wind gust. Planning of mitigation and adaptation strategies against the changing climate, which requires a better understanding of possible future climate outcomes over the Province in the context of global warming, is of great interest to local policy makers, stakeholders, and development practitioners. Therefore, in this study, high-resolution projections of near-surface air temperature outcomes including mean, maximum, and minimum daily temperature over Ontario are developed, aiming at investigating how the global warming would affect the local climatology of the major cities as well as the spatial patterns of air temperature over the entire Province. The PRECIS modeling system is employed to carry out regional climate ensemble simulations driven by the boundary conditions of a five-member HadCM3-based perturbed-physics ensemble (i.e., HadCM3Q0, Q3, Q10, Q13, and Q15). The ensemble simulations are then synthesized through a Bayesian hierarchical model to develop probabilistic projections of future temperature outcomes with consideration of some uncertain parameters involved in the regional climate modeling process. The results suggest that there would be a consistent increasing trend in the near-surface air temperature with time periods from 2030s to 2080s. The most likely mean temperature in next few decades (i.e., 2030s) would be [-2, 2] °C in northern Ontario, [2, 6] °C in the middle, and [6, 12] °C in the south, afterwards the mean temperature is likely to keep rising by ~ 2 °C per 30-years period. The continuous warming across the Province would drive the lowest mean temperature up to 2 °C in the north and the highest mean temperature up to 16 °C in the south. In addition, the spread of the most likely ranges of future outcomes shows a consistent

  2. Asymmetric varus and valgus stability of the anatomic cadaver knee and the load sharing between collateral ligaments and bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaonan; Malik, Aamer; Bartel, Donald L; Wickiewicz, Thomas L; Wright, Timothy

    2014-08-01

    Knee joint stability is important in maintaining normal joint motion during activities of daily living. Joint instability not only disrupts normal motion but also plays a crucial role in the initiation and progression of osteoarthritis. Our goal was to examine knee joint coronal plane stability under varus or valgus loading and to understand the relative contributions of the mechanisms that act to stabilize the knee in response to varus-valgus moments, namely, load distribution between the medial and lateral condyles and the ligaments. A robot testing system was used to determine joint stability in human cadaveric knees as described by the moment versus angular rotation behavior under varus and valgus loads at extension and at 30 deg and 90 deg of flexion. The anatomic knee joint was more stable in response to valgus than varus moments, and stability decreased with flexion angle. The primary mechanism for providing varus-valgus stability was the redistribution of the contact force on the articular surfaces from both condyles to a single condyle. Stretching of the collateral ligaments provided a secondary stabilizing mechanism after the lift-off of a condyle occurred. Compressive loads applied across the knee joint, such as would occur with the application of muscle forces, enhanced the ability of the articular surface to provide varus-valgus moment, and thus, helped stabilize the joint in the coronal plane. Coupled internal/external rotations and anteroposterior and medial-lateral translations were variable and in the case of the rotations were often as large as the varus-valgus rotations created by the applied moment.

  3. An empirical technique for estimating near-surface air temperature trends in central Greenland from SSM/I brightness temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, C.A.; Alley, R.B.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Stearns, C.R.

    1995-02-01

    In central Greenland, near-surface air temperatures can be estimated from long-term satellite passive microwave brightness temperatures supported by limited air-temperature data from automatic weather stations. In this region, brightness temperature depends on snow emissivity, which varies slowly over time, and on snow temperature, which varies more rapidly and is controlled by air temperature. The air temperature and brightness temperature data define an emissivity trend which can be modeled as an annual sinusoid. An air temperature trend can then be derived from the brightness temperature and modeled emissivity information. The estimated air temperature values represent an integrated near-surface value that defines the overall temperature trend at the Greenland Summit. The modeled emissivity cycle allows daily-average air temperatures to be estimated across significant gaps in weather station records, as well as quality control of their temperature data. The technique also generates annual trends of emissivity which can be used to evaluate radiative transfer models of microwave emissivity from dry firn.

  4. Design of gas bearing systems for precision applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junming

    Research to provide the up to date knowledge and efficient tools to design better Externally Pressurized Gas (EPG) bearing systems, including the design of individual bearings, and to arrange all the bearings used in an optimal way is reported. Both circular and rectangular EPG pads with rigid bearing surfaces and rigid inlet restrictors were used. The following topics closely related to the applications in precision engineering are discussed: influences of gap shape on the bearing performance; effects of bearing body tilt on the bearing performance; influences of bearing surface imperfections on bearing performance; temperature drops in EPG bearings in quasistationary conditions; the optimal use of multiple bearings in a mechanical system; the use of EPG bearing damping characteristics in the design; and the effects of motion velocity.

  5. Impacts of land use and land cover on surface and air temperature in urban landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, S.; Jenerette, D.

    2015-12-01

    Accelerating urbanization affects regional climate as the result of changing land cover and land use (LCLU). Urban land cover composition may provide valuable insight into relationships among urbanization, air, and land-surface temperature (Ta and LST, respectively). Climate may alter these relationships, where hotter climates experience larger LULC effects. To address these hypotheses we examined links between Ta, LST, LCLU, and vegetation across an urban coastal to desert climate gradient in southern California, USA. Using surface temperature radiometers, continuously measuring LST on standardized asphalt, concrete, and turf grass surfaces across the climate gradient, we found a 7.2°C and 4.6°C temperature decrease from asphalt to vegetated cover in the coast and desert, respectively. There is 131% more temporal variation in asphalt than turf grass surfaces, but 37% less temporal variation in concrete than turf grass. For concrete and turf grass surfaces, temporal variation in temperature increased from coast to desert. Using ground-based thermal imagery, measuring LST for 24 h sequences over citrus orchard and industrial use locations, we found a 14.5°C temperature decrease from industrial to orchard land use types (38.4°C and 23.9°C, respectively). Additionally, industrial land use types have 209% more spatial variation than orchard (CV=0.20 and 0.09, respectively). Using a network of 300 Ta (iButton) sensors mounted in city street trees throughout the region and hyperspectral imagery data we found urban vegetation greenness, measured using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), was negatively correlated to Ta at night across the climate gradient. Contrasting previous findings, the closest coupling between NDVI and Ta is at the coast from 0000 h to 0800 h (highest r2 = 0.6, P < 0.05) while relationships at the desert are weaker (highest r2 = 0.38, P < 0.05). These findings indicate that vegetation cover in urbanized regions of southern

  6. Evaluation of Calendar Year 1996 groundwater and surface water quality data for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The monitoring data were collected for the multiple programmatic purposes of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) and have been reported in Calendar Year 1996 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Annual Monitoring report presents only the results of the monitoring data evaluations required for waste management sites addressed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Regime. The Annual Monitoring Report also serves as a consolidated reference for the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained throughout the Bear Creek Regime under the auspices of the Y-12 GWPP. This report provides an evaluation of the CY 1996 monitoring data with an emphasis on regime-wide groundwater and surface water quality and long-term concentration trends of regulated and non-regulated monitoring parameters.

  7. Effect of air-drying dentin surfaces on dentin bond strength of a solvent-free one-step adhesive.

    PubMed

    Takai, Tomoyuki; Hosaka, Keiichi; Kambara, Keisuke; Thitthaweerat, Suppason; Matsui, Naoko; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kishikawa, Ryuzo; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate the effect of air-drying dentin surfaces on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of a solvent-free onestep adhesive (Bond 1 SF). Twelve human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper. Before applying bonding agent, the dentin surface was rinsed with distilled water and blot-dried with tissue paper, followed by air-drying for 0, 3, 30, and 60 s using with a dental air syringe. After applying and curing Bond 1 SF, resin composite was incrementally built up. Specimens were then stored in distilled water for 24 h and then μTBSs were measured at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Higher μTBS were observed when the dentin surface was air-dried for 3 s (33.2±6.8MPa)>0 s (26.7±4.5MPa)>30 s (22.6±5.5MPa)=60 s (20.4±5.0MPa). The results suggested that prolonged air-drying of the dentin surface removed water and decreased the bond strengths of Bond 1 SF. PMID:22864208

  8. The impact of heterogeneous surface temperatures on the 2-m air temperature over the Arctic Ocean in spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetzlaff, A.; Kaleschke, L.; Lüpkes, C.; Ament, F.; Vihma, T.

    2012-07-01

    The influence of spatial surface temperature changes over the Arctic Ocean on the 2-m air temperature variability is estimated using backward trajectories based on ERA-Interim and the JRA25 wind fields. They are initiated at Alert, Barrow and at the Tara drifting station. Three different methods are used. The first one compares mean ice surface temperatures along the trajectories to the observed 2-m air temperatures at the stations. The second one correlates the observed temperatures to air temperatures obtained using a simple Lagrangian box model which only includes the effect of sensible heat fluxes. For the third method, mean sensible heat fluxes from the model are correlated with the difference of the air temperatures at the model starting point and the observed temperatures at the stations. The calculations are based on MODIS ice surface temperatures and four different sets of ice concentration derived from SSM/I and AMSR-E data. Under nearly cloud free conditions, up to 90% of the 2-m air temperature variance can be explained for Alert, and 60% for Barrow using these methods. The differences are attributed to the different ice conditions, which are characterized by high ice concentration around Alert and lower ice concentration near Barrow. These results are robust for the different sets of reanalyses and ice concentration data. Near-surface winds of both reanalyses show a large inconsistency in the Central Arctic, which leads to a large difference in the correlations between modeled and observed 2-m air temperatures at Tara. Explained variances amount to 70% using JRA and only 45% using ERA. The results also suggest that near-surface temperatures at a given site are influenced by the variability of surface temperatures in a domain of about 150 to 350 km radius around the site.

  9. Surface Air Temperature - Long-Term Anomaly Series and Absolute Values (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. D.

    2013-12-01

    Of all the possible domains of the Earth's surface, surface air temperature has the longest records extending back at some European locations to the late-17th century. Since that time coverage has expanded to encompass most of the world since the 1950s onwards. It is this domain that provides our long-term record of change providing the yardstick against which we define both cooler and warmer and cooling and warming periods during the last 300 years. Assembling all the recorded data is beset with an array of problems: the reasons for collecting the data during this long period have been many and varied and instruments, exposures, observation times and methods of calculating averages have regularly changed. Even today, there is not a WMO-defined method of calculating the daily and monthly average with countries allowed to use whatever method they deem appropriate. The talk will discuss the history, the problems and the methods that have been used to overcome them. As we move to more automated measurements and dynamical approaches to interpolation (Reanalyses) the talk will conclude with a number of recommendations.

  10. Surface Decontamination of Chemical Agent Surrogates Using an Atmospheric Pressure Air Flow Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhanguo; Li, Ying; Cao, Peng; Zhao, Hongjie

    2013-07-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma jet generator using air flow as the feedstock gas was applied to decontaminate the chemical agent surrogates on the surface of aluminum, stainless steel or iron plate painted with alkyd or PVC. The experimental results of material decontamination show that the residual chemical agent on the material is lower than the permissible value of the National Military Standard of China. In order to test the corrosion effect of the plasma jet on different material surfaces in the decontamination process, corrosion tests for the materials of polymethyl methacrylate, neoprene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyethylene (PE), phenolic resin, iron plate painted with alkyd, stainless steel, aluminum, etc. were carried out, and relevant parameters were examined, including etiolation index, chromatism, loss of gloss, corrosion form, etc. The results show that the plasma jet is slightly corrosive for part of the materials, but their performances are not affected. A portable calculator, computer display, mainboard, circuit board of radiogram, and a hygrometer could work normally after being treated by the plasma jet.

  11. The statistical inhomogeneity of surface air temperature in global atmospheric reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Lee, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new generation of so-called climate reanalyses has emerged, including the 161-year NOAA—Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (NOAA-CIRES) Twentieth Century Reanalysis Version 2c (20CR V2c), the 111-year ECMWF pilot reanalysis of the twentieth century (ERA-20C), and the 55-year JMA conventional reanalysis (JRA-55C). These reanalyses were explicitly designed to achieve improved homogeneity through assimilation of a fixed subset of (mostly surface) observations. We apply structural breakpoint analysis to evaluate inhomogeneity of the surface air temperature in these reanalyses (1851-2011). For the modern satellite era (1979-2013), we intercompare their inhomogeneity to that of all eleven available satellite reanalyses. Where possible, we distinguish between breakpoints that are likely linked to climate variability and those that are likely due to an artificial observational network shift. ERA-20C is found to be the most homogenous reanalysis, with 40% fewer artificial breaks than 20CR V2c. Despite its gains in homogeneity, continued improvements to ERA-20C are needed. In this presentation, we highlight the most spatially extensive artificial break events in ERA-20C.

  12. Multiyear Predictability of Surface Air Temperature in the Kiel Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yanling; Latif, Mojib; Park, Wonsun

    2015-04-01

    The multiyear predictability of unforced surface air temperature (SAT) variability is examined in the Kiel Climate Model (KCM), a coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice general circulation model. A statistical method that maximizes Average Predictability Time (APT) is used to find the most predictable patterns in the model. Multiyear SAT predictability is detected in the North Atlantic and North Pacific sectors. In both regions, ocean dynamics enhances predictability, while the net heat flux is a damping factor. Enhanced predictability in the North Atlantic sector is concentrated near the sea ice margin. The multiyear predictability there is linked to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation/Variability (AMO/V) and also associated with variability of the subpolar gyre. In the North Pacific, the most predictable pattern is characterized by a zonal band in the western and central mid-latitude Pacific. It is linked to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) which produces temperature anomalies in the surface layer during winter. These are subducted into deeper layers and re-emerge during the following winters, giving rise to multiyear predictability. The results are consistent with those obtained from the CMIP5 ensemble.

  13. Stress response of Escherichia coli induced by surface streamer discharge in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doležalová, Eva; Prukner, Václav; Lukeš, Petr; Šimek, Milan

    2016-02-01

    Inactivation of Escherichia coli by means of surface streamer discharge has been investigated to obtain new insights into the key mechanisms involved, with a particular emphasis placed on the microbial response to plasma-induced stress. The surface streamer discharge was produced in coplanar dielectric barrier discharge electrode geometry, and was driven by an amplitude-modulated ac high voltage in humid synthetic air at atmospheric pressure. The response to plasma-induced stress was evaluated by using conventional cultivation, sublethal injury and resazurin assay and the LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ Bacterial Viability kit. Compared to conventional cultivation, the LIVE/DEAD® test labels bacteria with damaged membranes, while resazurin assay tracks their metabolic activity. Our results clearly demonstrate that the treated bacteria partly lost their ability to grow properly, i.e. they became injured and culturable, or even viable but nonculturable (VBNC). The ability to develop colonies could have been lost due to damage of the bacterial membrane. Damage of the membranes was mainly caused by the lipid peroxidation, evidencing the key role of oxygen reactive species, in particular ozone. We conclude that the conventional cultivation method overestimates the decontamination efficiency of various plasma sources, and must therefore be complemented by alternative techniques capable of resolving viable but nonculturable bacteria.

  14. Dyella jiangningensis sp. nov., a γ-proteobacterium isolated from the surface of potassium-bearing rock.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Guo, Xin-qi; Wang, Peng; He, Lin-yan; Huang, Zhi; Sheng, Xia-fang

    2013-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, motile with one polar flagellum γ-proteobacterium, designated strain SBZ3-12(T), was isolated from surfaces of weathered potassic trachyte. Phylogenetic analysis of this strain based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that it was most closely related to Dyella japonica XD53(T) (97.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Dyella terrae JS14-6(T) (97.7%), Dyella soli JS12-10(T) (97.5%) and Dyella koreensis BB4(T) (97.0%). The DNA G+C content of strain SBZ3-12(T) was 64.0 mol%. In addition, iso-C(17:1)ω9c, iso-C(15:0) and iso-C(16:0) were the major cellular fatty acids and ubiquinone Q-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone. The low DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain SBZ3-12(T) and recognized species of the genus Dyella and the many phenotypic properties supported the classification of strain SBZ3-12(T) as a representative of a novel species of the genus Dyella, for which the name Dyella jiangningensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SBZ3-12(T) ( =CCTCC AB 2012160(T) =KACC 16539(T) =DSM 26119(T)).

  15. Dyella jiangningensis sp. nov., a γ-proteobacterium isolated from the surface of potassium-bearing rock.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Guo, Xin-qi; Wang, Peng; He, Lin-yan; Huang, Zhi; Sheng, Xia-fang

    2013-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, motile with one polar flagellum γ-proteobacterium, designated strain SBZ3-12(T), was isolated from surfaces of weathered potassic trachyte. Phylogenetic analysis of this strain based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that it was most closely related to Dyella japonica XD53(T) (97.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Dyella terrae JS14-6(T) (97.7%), Dyella soli JS12-10(T) (97.5%) and Dyella koreensis BB4(T) (97.0%). The DNA G+C content of strain SBZ3-12(T) was 64.0 mol%. In addition, iso-C(17:1)ω9c, iso-C(15:0) and iso-C(16:0) were the major cellular fatty acids and ubiquinone Q-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone. The low DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain SBZ3-12(T) and recognized species of the genus Dyella and the many phenotypic properties supported the classification of strain SBZ3-12(T) as a representative of a novel species of the genus Dyella, for which the name Dyella jiangningensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SBZ3-12(T) ( =CCTCC AB 2012160(T) =KACC 16539(T) =DSM 26119(T)). PMID:23435246

  16. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Anderson, Ren

    2001-01-01

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  17. Stacked magnet superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Rigney, T.K. II; Saville, M.P.

    1993-06-15

    A superconducting bearing is described, comprising: a plurality of permanent magnets magnetized end-to-end and stacked side-by-side in alternating polarity, such that flux lines flow between ends of adjacent magnets; isolating means, disposed between said adjacent magnets, for reducing flux leakage between opposing sides of said adjacent magnets; and a member made of superconducting material having at least one surface in communication with said flux lines.

  18. A Passive Magnetic Bearing Flywheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark; Ebihara, Ben; Jansen, Ralph; Fusaro, Robert L.; Morales, Wilfredo; Kascak, Albert; Kenny, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A 100 percent passive magnetic bearing flywheel rig employing no active control components was designed, constructed, and tested. The suspension clothe rotor was provided by two sets of radial permanent magnetic bearings operating in the repulsive mode. The axial support was provided by jewel bearings on both ends of the rotor. The rig was successfully operated to speeds of 5500 rpm, which is 65 percent above the first critical speed of 3336 rpm. Operation was not continued beyond this point because of the excessive noise generated by the air impeller and because of inadequate containment in case of failure. Radial and axial stiffnesses of the permanent magnetic bearings were experimentally measured and then compared to finite element results. The natural damping of the rotor was measured and a damping coefficient was calculated.

  19. Reduced reactivity to air on HF-treated YBa2Cu3O(7-x)surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, R. P.; Hunt, B. D.; Foote, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Treatment of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films with a nonaqueous solution of HF in absolute ethanol results in the formation of an oxyfluoride with relative Y:Ba:Cu concentrations of 1:4:3 on the surface, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The passivation properties of chemically treated films were tested by monitoring the growth of the high binding energy O 1s peak, associated with nonsuperconducting surface species, as a function of air exposure time, for both HF-treated and untreated films. The native oxyfluoride is shown to reduce the reactivity of the superconductor to air.

  20. Bearing strength of the lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion is presented on the bearing strength and bearing load-penetration relations in lunar soil. These were measured in air as a function of bulk density. It was found that the relation between bulk density and the logarithm of the bearing capacity is about linear. Shapes of the load vs penetration curves were observed to be similar to those obtained with particulate material of terrestrial origin.