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Sample records for air bearing surface

  1. Hydrodynamic air lubricated compliant surface bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine. 1: Journal bearing performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruscitto, D.; Mccormick, J.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    A 38.1 mm (1.5 inch) diameter Hydresil Compliant Surface Air Lubricated Journal Bearing was designed and tested to obtain bearing performance characteristics at both room temperature and 315 C (600 F). Testing was performed at various speeds up to 60,000 rpm with varying loads. Rotating sensors provided an opportunity to examine the film characteristics of the compliant surface bearing. In addition to providing minimum film thickness values and profiles, many other insights into bearing operation were gained such as the influence of bearing fabrication accuracy and the influence of smooth foil deflection between the bumps.

  2. Development of a large support surface for an air-bearing type zero-gravity simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, K. E.

    1976-01-01

    The methods used in producing a large, flat surface to serve as the supporting surface for an air-bearing type zero-gravity simulator using low clearance, thrust-pad type air bearings are described. Major problems encountered in the use of self-leveled epoxy coatings in this surface are discussed and techniques are recommended which proved effective in overcoming these problems. Performance requirements of the zero-gravity simulator vehicle which were pertinent to the specification of the air-bearing support surface are also discussed.

  3. Air Bearing Lift Pad (ABLP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dane, Dan H.; Blaise, Herman T.

    1968-01-01

    Typical air bearings float on air films of only a few thousandths of an inch and so will only operate above very smooth, even surfaces. For the mechanical simulation of space, the small drag of the bladder type air pads is much more than can be coped with, and the practicality of large floor areas being machined for precision air bearings is nonexistent. To enable operation above surfaces that undulate slightly or feature cracks and discontinuities, an ABLP has been developed. It consists of a rigid pad beneath which an inflatable bladder is mounted. The bladder is inflated with air which then escapes through passages into a cavity in the center of the bladder to produce the lifting energy. As the air escapes about the perimeter of the bladder, a certain degree of balance and equilibrium is imparted to the pad as it is able to move a limited weight across slightly uneven surfaces.

  4. Dynamics of air bearing sliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witelski, T. P.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper we present new results for the dynamics of a problem for the interaction of a compressible gas flow with a movable rigid surface. Compressible lubrication theory is applied to describe the dynamics of the vertical motion of air bearing sliders used in computer hard disk drives. In the limit of large bearing number we show this problem can be reduced to a nonlinear integrodifferential equation. Linear stability analysis and perturbation methods show that over the range of possible slider positions there is an infinite sequence of Hopf bifurcations yielding stable large amplitude periodic orbits. The dynamics of near-crash behavior and interaction with a moving disk surface are also addressed.

  5. Hydrodynamic air lubricated compliant surface bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine. 2: Materials and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.; Ruscitto, D.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    Material coatings for an air-lubricated, compliant journal bearing for an automotive gas turbine engine were exposed to service test temperatures of 540 C or 650 C for 300 hours, and to 10 temperature cycles from room temperatures to the service test temperatures. Selected coatings were then put on journal and partial-arc foils and tested in start-stop cycle tests at 14 kPa (2 psi) loading for 2000 cycles. Half of the test cycles were performed at a test chamber service temperature of 540 C (1000 F) or 650 C (1200 F); the other half were performed at room temperature. Based on test results, the following combinations and their service temperature limitations are recommended: HL-800 TM (CdO and graphite) on foil versus chrome carbide on journal up to 370 C (700 F); NASA PS 120 (Tribaloy 400, silver and CaF2 on journal versus uncoated foil up to 540 C (1000 F); and Kaman DES on journal and foil up to 640 C (1200 F). Kaman DES coating system was further tested successfully at 35 kPa (5 psi) loading for 2000 start-stop cycles.

  6. Air bearing vacuum seal assembly

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Rex

    1978-01-01

    An air bearing vacuum seal assembly capable of rotating at the speed of several thousand revolutions per minute using an air cushion to prevent the rotating and stationary parts from touching, and a two stage differential pumping arrangement to maintain the pressure gradient between the air cushion and the vacuum so that the leak rate into the vacuum is, for example, less than 1 .times. 10.sup.-4 Pa m.sup.3 /s. The air bearing vacuum seal has particular application for mounting rotating targets to an evacuated accelerator beam tube for bombardment of the targets with high-power charged particle beams in vacuum.

  7. Development of surface coatings for air-lubricated, compliant journal bearings to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    Surface coatings for an air-lubricated, compliant journal for an automotive gas turbine engine were tested to find those capable of withstanding temperatures of either 540 C (1000 F) or 650 C (1200 F). Also, the coatings have to be capable of surviving the start-stop sliding contact cycles prior to rotor lift-off and at touchdown. Selected coating combinations were tested in start-stop tests at 14 kPa (2 psi) loading for 2000 cycles at room and maximum temperatures. Specific coating recommendations are: Cdo and graphite on foil versus chrome carbide on journal up to 370 C (700 F); NASA PS-120 (Tribaloy 400, silver, and CaF2) on journal versus uncoated foil up to 540 C (1000 F); and chemically adherent Cr2O3 on journal and foil up to 650 C (1200 F). The chemically adherent Cr2O3 coating system was further tested successfully at 35 kPa (5 psi) loading for 2000 start-stop cycles.

  8. Maximizing the rigidity of a large planar orifice air bearing.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Michael; Broadhurst, John

    2014-08-01

    A rotating support for a large astronomical mirror has been implemented using an opposed surface planar orifice air bearing. This bearing needs to provide rotation as free as possible of static and dynamic friction, as well as maximizing the resistance to sudden angular deviations produced by wind gusts. Information on the design of traditional bearings, namely, a cavity supplied with air under pressure through an orifice or diffuser flow restriction and closed by the moving member, has been published in detail. These traditional bearings are not suitable for the application described, due to their slow speed of response to transient changes in forces, a considerable volume of air being needed to change the pressure in the cavity. The air bearing used in this application has no cavity but consists of two flat surfaces in close proximity with air under pressure introduced at the center of one of the surfaces. The volume of air in the bearing is therefore minimized, improving the response to load change transients. The load capacity of this type bearing is reduced as the air between the bearing surfaces is not at constant pressure, but is expanding from the center point of injection to its escape at the edges. This paper indicates a quantitative method of determining the size of the air supply orifices to achieve the maximum rigidity orthogonal to the direction of motion. The approach described can also be applied to optimizing the geometry of other non-cavity air bearings. PMID:25173317

  9. Horizontal Air Bearing Experiment Number 1

    SciTech Connect

    Clauson, T.L.

    1999-08-31

    The Horizontal Air Bearing Experiment No.1 is a series of tests intended to further the understanding of rotational dynamics. A simple experimental assembly is rotated using the Horizontal Air Bearing and allowed to spin freely as the internal rotational damping is measured. The low friction of the bearing effectively isolates the test assembly, allowing the internal damping of the test object to be evaluated. The experimental assembly is composed of an aluminum ball within a spherical cavity. A flanged pipe section and an auxiliary adapter plate secure the assembly to the Air Bearing interface plate. Three aluminum balls are interchanged to vary test parameters. The aluminum balls are free to move independently as the entire assembly rotates. The aluminum balls vary in diameter and/or surface finish. While the diameter and surface finish is varied, the space between the ball and socket is dry. To examine the effect of viscosity, the space is filled with a lubricant while the ball diameter and surface finish is held constant.

  10. Application of laser microetching in formation of air-bearing surface for magnetic head sliders

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.F.; Ye, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    Laser-induced etching of polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}TiC material by a tightly-focused CW Ar ion laser has been investigated in a KOH solution with different concentrations. It is found that the KOH concentration can strongly affect the etching quality where low KOH concentration can result in rough and irregular patterns. The etching effect is also related to laser power and scanning speed. Laser-induced etching of polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}TiC in a KOH solution is found to be a photothermal reaction in which a threshold laser power exists. With an appropriate set of etching parameters, well defined grooves can be obtained with clean side walls and with an etching rate up to several hundred micrometers per second. It is also found that the grains in the polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}TiC material play an important role in the etching dynamics and etching quality. This etching process is believed to be applicable to the formation of a slider surface of magnetic heads in the future.

  11. Development of a multiple-microhole aerostatic air bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kuang-Chao; Ho, Chi-Chung; Mou, Jong-I.

    2002-09-01

    New types of aerostatic air bearing and linear slide systems have been developed. The prototype of a multiple-microhole, instead of a porous-type, air bearing was developed and the surface roughness was improved by finished process. Instead of the conventional drilling process, the air bearing pads were fabricated by using microfabrication technology in this research. The spectral element method was employed to simulate the pressure distribution of air bearing and a comparison was made with experimental results. A granite straight edge was used as linear slide to guide the moving table that was supported by the developed air bearing system. A laser interferometer system was used to assess the performance of the stage.

  12. Gauge Measures Large Spherical Bearing Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George L.

    1992-01-01

    Radius of spherical portion of surface computed from reading of depth gauge. Measuring tool calibrated by applying it to reference spherical surface of known radius. Used onsite, so unnecessary to ship bearings to laboratory for examination by computerized test equipment.

  13. Future Bearing Surfaces in Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  14. Future bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jun-Dong

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the modern total hip arthroplasty (THA) is the bearing surface. Extensive research on bearing surfaces is being conducted to seek an ideal bearing surface for THA. The ideal bearing surface for THA should have superior wear characteristics and should be durable, bio-inert, cost-effective, and easy to implant. However, bearing surfaces that are currently being implemented do not completely fulfill these requirements, especially for young individuals for whom implant longevity is paramount. Even though various new bearing surfaces have been investigated, research is still ongoing, and only short-term results have been reported from clinical trials. Future bearing surfaces can be developed in the following ways: (1) change in design, (2) further improvement of polyethylene, (3) surface modification of the metal, (4) improvement in the ceramic, and (5) use of alternative, new materials. One way to reduce wear and impingement in THA is to make changes in its design by using a large femoral head, a monobloc metal shell with preassembled ceramic liner, dual mobility cups, a combination of different bearing surfaces, etc. Polyethylene has improved over time with the development of highly crosslinked polyethylene. Further improvements can be made by reinforcing it with vitamin E or multiwalled carbon nanotubes and by performing a surface modification with a biomembrane. Surface modifications with titanium nitride or titanium niobium nitride are implemented to try to improve the metal bearings. The advance to the fourth generation ceramics has shown relatively promising results, even in young patients. Nevertheless, further improvement is required to reduce fragility and squeaking. Alternative materials like diamond coatings on surfaces, carbon based composite materials, oxidized zirconium, silicon nitride, and sapphire are being sought. However, long-term studies are necessary to confirm the efficacy of these surfaces after enhancements

  15. Simulation of air gap vibration on aerostatic bearing under flow/structure coupled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Wu, Jianjin; Li, Dongsheng

    2008-10-01

    The vibration of aerostatic bearing air gap is one of the main factors, which restricts the precision of nano-processing and nano-measurement. Finite volume method was employed to obtain the air gap steady flow of different air gap thicknesses for the demonstration of vibrations under flow/structure coupled conditions. The unsteady flow of air gap was analyzed numerically by using the air gap flow & boundary movement control equations to get the pressure distribution on the slide surface and the amplitude of air gap for further study on the self-excited vibration of aerostatic bearings. Numerical analyses show that the highest aerostatic bearing amplitude is relative to the difference between load capacity and gravity at the initial moment as air gap rises, and the final air gap thickness has nothing to do with the initial air gap thickness. The results presented a new analytic demonstration for the research on the reduction of aerostatic bearing vibration.

  16. Effect of Surface Roughness on Hydrodynamic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. C.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis on the performance of hydrodynamic oil bearings is made considering surface roughness effect. The hydrodynamic as well as asperity contact load is found. The contact pressure was calculated with the assumption that the surface height distribution was Gaussian. The average Reynolds equation of partially lubricated surface was used to calculate hydrodynamic load. An analytical expression for average gap was found and was introduced to modify the average Reynolds equation. The resulting boundary value problem was then solved numerically by finite difference methods using the method of successive over relaxation. The pressure distribution and hydrodynamic load capacity of plane slider and journal bearings were calculated for various design data. The effects of attitude and roughness of surface on the bearing performance were shown. The results are compared with similar available solution of rough surface bearings. It is shown that: (1) the contribution of contact load is not significant; and (2) the hydrodynamic and contact load increase with surface roughness.

  17. High capacity aerodynamic air bearing (HCAB) for laser scanning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Sean M.

    2005-08-01

    A high capacity aerodynamic air bearing (HCAB) has been developed for the laser scanning market. The need for increasing accuracies in the prepress and print plate-making market is causing a shift from ball bearing to air bearing scanners. Aerostatic air bearings are a good option to meet this demand for better performance however, these bearings tend to be expensive and require an additional air supply, filtering and drying system. Commercially available aerodynamic bearings have been typically limited to small mirrors, on the order of 3.5" diameter and less than 0.5" thick. A large optical facet, hence a larger mirror, is required to generate the high number of pixels needed for this type of application. The larger optic necessitated the development of a high capacity 'self-generating' or aerodynamic air bearing that would meet the needs of the optical scanning market. Its capacity is rated up to 6.0" diameter and 1.0" thick optics. The performance of an aerodynamic air bearing is better than a ball bearing and similar to an aerostatic air bearing. It retains the low costs while eliminating the need for ancillary equipment required by an aerostatic bearing.

  18. Dynamics of air bearing sliders in hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witelski, Thomas

    1998-11-01

    In this paper we present new results for the dynamics of a problem for the interaction of a compressible gas flow with a movable rigid surface. Compressible lubrication theory is applied to describe the dynamics of the vertical motion of air bearing sliders used in computer hard disk drives. In the limit of large bearing number we show this problem can be reduced to a nonlinear integro-differential equation. Linear stability analysis and perturbation methods show that over the range of possible slider positions there is an infinite sequence of Hopf bifurcations yielding stable large amplitude periodic orbits. The dynamics of near-crash behavior and interactions with a moving, non-flat disk surface are also addressed.

  19. Low-friction coatings for air bearings in fuel cell air compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G. R.; Erdemir, A.; Woodford, J.; Sitts, J.; Elshot, K.; Griffey, K.

    2000-01-06

    In an effort to reduce fuel consumption and emissions, hybrid vehicles incorporating fuel cell systems are being developed by automotive manufacturers, their suppliers, federal agencies (specifically, the US Department of Energy) and national laboratories. The fuel cell system will require an air management subsystem that includes a compressor/expander. Certain components in the compressor will require innovative lubrication technology in order to reduce parasitic energy losses and improve their reliability and durability. One such component is the air bearing for air turbocompressors designed and fabricated by Meruit, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory recently developed a carbon-based coating with low friction and wear attributes; this near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coating is a potential candidate for use in turbocompressor air bearings. The authors present here an evaluation of the Argonne coating for air compressor thrust bearings. With two parallel 440C stainless steel discs in unidirectional sliding contact, the NFC reduced the frictional force four times and the wear rate by more than two orders of magnitude. Wear mechanism on the uncoated surface involved oxidation and production of iron oxide debris. Wear occurred on the coated surfaces primarily by a polishing mechanism.

  20. Alternative bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Inzerillo, V Christopher; Garino, Jonathan P

    2003-01-01

    Polyethylene wear and extension of indications of total hip arthroplasty into younger and younger age groups have pushed manufacturers to develop more durable bearing surfaces. Standard polyethylene, the plastic used for the first 3 decades of hip replacement, virtually ceases to exist in its original form. Modifications of the processing, including sterlization in an inert environment and cross-linking, have demonstrated some improvements in wear. Hard-on-hard bearings such as ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal also have demonstrated extremely low wear. This article reviews the pros and cons of the alternative bearing options available to assist in the proper bearing selection for a particular patient. PMID:12882250

  1. Load Capacity Estimation of Foil Air Journal Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper introduces a simple "Rule of Thumb" (ROT) method to estimate the load capacity of foil air journal bearings, which are self-acting compliant-surface hydrodynamic bearings being considered for Oil-Free turbo-machinery applications such as gas turbine engines. The ROT is based on first principles and data available in the literature and it relates bearing load capacity to the bearing size and speed through an empirically based load capacity coefficient, D. It is shown that load capacity is a linear function of bearing surface velocity and bearing projected area. Furthermore, it was found that the load capacity coefficient, D, is related to the design features of the bearing compliant members and operating conditions (speed and ambient temperature). Early bearing designs with basic or "first generation" compliant support elements have relatively low load capacity. More advanced bearings, in which the compliance of the support structure is tailored, have load capacities up to five times those of simpler designs. The ROT enables simplified load capacity estimation for foil air journal bearings and can guide development of new Oil-Free turbomachinery systems.

  2. A Systems Approach to the Solid Lubrication of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Zaldana, Antonio R.; Radil, Kevin C.

    2002-01-01

    Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings which rely upon solid lubricants to reduce friction and minimize wear during sliding which occurs at start-up and shut-down when surface speeds are too low to allow the formation of a hydrodynamic air film. This solid lubrication is typically accomplished by coating the non-moving foil surface with a thin, soft polymeric film. The following paper introduces a systems approach in which the solid lubrication is provided by a combination of self lubricating shaft coatings coupled with various wear resistant and lubricating foil coatings. The use of multiple materials, each providing different functions is modeled after oil-lubricated hydrodynamic sleeve bearing technology which utilizes various coatings and surface treatments in conjunction with oil lubricants to achieve optimum performance. In this study, room temperature load capacity tests are performed on journal foil air bearings operating at 14,000 rpm. Different shaft and foil coating technologies such as plasma sprayed composites, ceramic, polymer and inorganic lubricant coatings are evaluated as foil bearing lubricants. The results indicate that bearing performance is improved through the individual use of the lubricants and treatments tested. Further, combining several solid lubricants together yielded synergistically better results than any material alone.

  3. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    Air foil bearings use ambient air as a lubricant allowing environment-friendly operation. When they are designed, installed, and operated properly, air foil bearings are very cost effective and reliable solution to oil-free turbomachinery. Because air is used as a lubricant, there are no mechanical contacts between the rotor and bearings and when the rotor is lifted off the bearing, near frictionless quiet operation is possible. However, due to the high speed operation, thermal management is one of the very important design factors to consider. Most widely accepted practice of the cooling method is axial cooling, which uses cooling air passing through heat exchange channels formed underneath the bearing pad. Advantage is no hardware modification to implement the axial cooling because elastic foundation structure of foil bearing serves as a heat exchange channels. Disadvantage is axial temperature gradient on the journal shaft and bearing. This work presents the experimental feasibility study of alternative cooling method using radial injection of cooling air directly on the rotor shaft. The injection speeds, number of nozzles, location of nozzles, total air flow rate are important factors determining the effectiveness of the radial injection cooling method. Effectiveness of the radial injection cooling was compared with traditional axial cooling method. A previously constructed test rig was modified to accommodate a new motor with higher torque and radial injection cooling. The radial injection cooling utilizes the direct air injection to the inlet region of air film from three locations at 120° from one another with each location having three axially separated holes. In axial cooling, a certain axial pressure gradient is applied across the bearing to induce axial cooling air through bump foil channels. For the comparison of the two methods, the same amount of cooling air flow rate was used for both axial cooling and radial injection. Cooling air flow rate was

  4. Yaw rate control of an air bearing vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walcott, Bruce L.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a 6 week project which focused on the problem of controlling the yaw (rotational) rate the air bearing vehicle used on NASA's flat floor facility are summarized. Contained within is a listing of the equipment available for task completion and an evaluation of the suitability of this equipment. The identification (modeling) process of the air bearing vehicle is detailed as well as the subsequent closed-loop control strategy. The effectiveness of the solution is discussed and further recommendations are included.

  5. An air bearing system for small high speed gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, A. B.; Davies, S. J.; Nimir, Y. L.

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes the second phase of an experimental program concerning the application of air bearings to small turbomachinery test rigs and small gas turbines. The first phase examined externally pressurized (EP) journal bearings, with a novel EP thrust bearing, for application to 'warm air' test rigs, and was entirely successful at rotational speeds in excess of 100,000 rpm. This second phase examined several designs of tilting pad-spiring journal bearings, one with a novel form of externally pressurized pad, but all using the original EP thrust bearing. The designs tested are described, including some oscillogram traces, for tests up to a maximum of 70,000 rpm; the most successful using a carbon pad-titanium beam spring arrangement. The thrust bearing which gave trouble-free operation throughout, is also described. The results of an original experiment to measure the 'runway speed' of a radial inflow turbine are also presented, which show that overspeeds of 58 percent above the design speed can result from free-power turbine coupling failure.

  6. Mastication forces and implant-bearing surface.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, M G; Lauret, J F; Saadoun, A P

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses the shift of emphasis in implantology from the phenomenon of osseointegration of implants to the accurate fabrication of the prosthesis, recognizing the implant/prosthesis unit as an actual replica rather than a replacement of the missing tooth. The study of kinetics with its succession of mandibular cycles is used to discuss the integration of mastication and occlusion. The importance of periimplant ligament in natural teeth is discussed, along with the impact of its absence on implant mobility. The impact of the bone types and the root surface architecture on the implant-bearing surface is presented along with the stress of the mastication forces. All these factors have to be considered in the treatment planning and effectively communicated to the laboratory. The learning objective of this article is to provide updated information in those areas for the reader. PMID:7488751

  7. Textured bearing surface in artificial joints to reduce macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Nishi, Naoki; Chikaura, Hiroto; Nakashima, Yuta; Miura, Hiromasa; Higaki, Hidehiko; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Fujiwara, Yukio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro

    2015-12-01

    Micro slurry-jet erosion has been proposed as a precision machining technique for the bearing surfaces of artificial joints in order to reduce the total amount of polyethylene wear and to enlarge the size of the wear debris. The micro slurry-jet erosion method is a wet blasting technique which uses alumina particles as the abrasive medium along with compressed air and water to create an ideal surface. Pin-on-disc wear tests with multidirectional sliding motion on the textured surface of a \\text{Co}-\\text{Cr}-\\text{Mo} alloy counterface for polyethylene resulted in both a reduction of wear as well as enlargement of the polyethylene debris size. In this study, primary human peripheral blood mononuclear phagocytes were incubated with the debris, and it was elucidated that the wear debris generated on the textured surface regulated secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, indicating a reduction in the induced tissue reaction and joint loosening.

  8. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In

  9. Thrust Bearing with Rough Surfaces Lubricated by an Ellis Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walicka, A.; Walicki, E.; Jurczak, P.; Falicki, J.

    2014-11-01

    In the paper the influence of bearing surfaces roughness on the pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity of a thrust bearing is discussed. The equations of motion of an Ellis pseudo-plastic fluid are used to derive the Reynolds equation. After general considerations on the flow in a bearing clearance and using the Christensen theory of hydrodynamic rough lubrication the modified Reynolds equation is obtained. The analytical solutions of this equation for the cases of a squeeze film bearing and an externally pressurized bearing are presented. As a result one obtains the formulae expressing pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity. A thrust radial bearing is considered as a numerical example.

  10. Bearing Surface Pressure Distribution of Nut with Cone-form Bearing Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Manabu; Kasei, Shinji

    Recently, wheel separation accidents in such vehicles as trucks, buses and passenger cars have drawn a social concern. Explications of their causes and adequate practices of countermeasures for them have been urgently required. In relation to this issue, the authors have taken notice of subjects which are concerned in bolted joints at wheels and are especially trying to study the pressure distribution at the bearing surface of nuts. This report deals with the subject of a nut with a cone-form bearing surface. Considerations are based on numerical results derived from finite-element-analysis. Feature of the pressure distribution by this profile and influences from geometrical deviations of the form are mainly discussed, and some other information concerning this issue is presented.

  11. Transient hemorheology in an air-bearing viscosimeter.

    PubMed

    Ravey, J C; Ikimoto, S; Stoltz, J F

    1984-01-01

    Blood suspensions have been studied by using an air-bearing viscosimeter which is driven by a rotating magnetic induction. Each transient motion (rise, relaxation with zero or intermittent field) can be considered as a quasi-static motion, from which the curve viscosity-shear gradient can be obtained. Combining several transient motions allows an easier determination of the parameters describing a non newtonian fluid like blood. PMID:6592001

  12. An Experimental Investigation Into the Temperature Profile of a Compliant Foil Air Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin; Zeszotek, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    A series of tests was performed to determine the internal temperature profile in a compliant bump-type foil journal air bearing operating at room temperature under various speeds and load conditions. The temperature profile was collected by instrumenting a foil bearing with nine, type K thermocouples arranged in the center and along the bearing s edges in order to measure local temperatures and estimate thermal gradients in the axial and circumferential directions. To facilitate the measurement of maximum temperatures from viscous shearing in the air film, the thermocouples were tack welded to the backside of the bumps that were in direct contact with the top foil. The mating journal was coated with a high temperature solid lubricant that, together with the bearing, underwent high temperature start-stop cycles to produce a smooth, steady-state run-in surface. Tests were conducted at speeds from 20 to 50 krpm and loads ranging from 9 to 222 N. The results indicate that, over the conditions tested, both journal rotational speed and radial load are responsible for heat generation with speed playing a more significant role in the magnitude of the temperatures. The temperature distribution was nearly symmetric about the bearing center at 20 and 30 krpm but became slightly skewed toward one side at 40 and 50 krpm. Surprisingly, the maximum temperatures did not occur at the bearing edge where the minimum film thickness is expected but rather in the middle of the bearing where analytical investigations have predicted the air film to be much thicker. Thermal gradients were common during testing and were strongest in the axial direction from the middle of the bearing to its edges, reaching 3.78 8C/mm. The temperature profile indicated the circumferential thermal gradients were negligible.

  13. Planar air-bearing microgravity simulators: Review of applications, existing solutions and design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybus, Tomasz; Seweryn, Karol

    2016-03-01

    All devices designed to be used in space must be thoroughly tested in relevant conditions. For several classes of devices the reduced gravity conditions are the key factor. In early stages of development and later due to financial reasons, the tests need to be done on Earth. However, in Earth conditions it is impossible to obtain a different gravity field independent on all linear and rotational spatial coordinates. Therefore, various test-bed systems are used, with their design driven by the device's specific needs. One of such test-beds are planar air-bearing microgravity simulators. In such an approach, the tested objects (e.g., manipulators intended for on-orbit operations or vehicles simulating satellites in a close formation flight) are mounted on planar air-bearings that allow almost frictionless motion on a flat surface, thus simulating microgravity conditions in two dimensions. In this paper we present a comprehensive review of research activities related to planar air-bearing microgravity simulators, demonstrating achievements of the most active research groups and describing newest trends and ideas, such as tests of landing gears for low-g bodies. Major design parameters of air-bearing test-beds are also reviewed and a list of notable existing test-beds is presented.

  14. Hardening treatment of friction surfaces of ball journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlenko, A. O.; Davidov, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents the technology of finishing plasma hardening by the application of the multi-layer nanocoating Si-O-C-N system to harden the friction surfaces of the ball journal bearings. The authors of the paper have studied the applied wear-resistant anti-friction coating tribological characteristics, which determine the increase in wear resistance of the ball journal bearings.

  15. Performance and Durability of High Temperature Foil Air Bearing for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Valco, M. J.; Radil, K. C.; Heshmat, H.

    1999-01-01

    The performance and durability of advanced, high temperature foil air bearings are evaluated under a wide range (10-50 kPa) of loads at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The bearings are made from uncoated nickel based superalloy foils. The foil surface experiences sliding contact with the shaft during initial start/stop operation. To reduce friction and wear, the solid lubricant coating, PS304, is applied to the shaft by plasma spraying. PS304, is a NiCr based Cr2O3 coating with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride solid lubricant additions. The results show that the bearings provide lives well in excess of 30,000 cycles under all of the conditions tested. Several bearings exhibited lives in excess of 100,000 cycles. Wear is a linear function of the bearing load. The excellent performance measured in this study suggests that these bearings and the PS304 coating are well suited for advanced high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

  16. Performance and Durability of High Temperature Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, C.; Lukaszewicz, V.; Valco, M. J.; Radil, K. C.; Heshmat, H.

    2000-01-01

    The performance and durability of advanced, high temperature foil air bearings are evaluated under a wide range (10-50 kPa) of loads at temperatures from 25 to 650 C. The bearings are made from uncoated nickel based superalloy foils. The foil surface experiences sliding contact with the shaft during initial start/stop operation. To reduce friction and wear, the solid lubricant coating, PS304, is applied to the shaft by plasma spraying. PS304 is a NiCr based Cr2O3 coating with silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride solid lubricant additions. The results show that the bearings provide lives well in excess of 30,000 cycles under all of the conditions tested. Several bearings exhibited lives in excess of 100,000 cycles. Wear is a linear function of the bearing load. The excellent performance measured in this study suggests that these bearings and the PS304 coating are well suited for advanced high temperature, oil-free turbomachinery applications.

  17. The Effect of Journal Roughness and Foil Coatings on the Performance of Heavily Loaded Foil Air Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    Foil air bearing load capacity tests were conducted to investigate if a solid lubricant coating applied to the surface of the bearing's top foil can function as a break-in coating. Two foil coating materials, a conventional soft polymer film (polyimide) and a hard ceramic (alumina), were independently evaluated against as-ground and worn (run-in) journals coated with NASA PS304, a high-temperature solid lubricant composite coating. The foil coatings were evaluated at journal rotational speeds of 30,000 rpm and at 25 C. Tests were also performed on a foil bearing with a bare (uncoated) nickel-based superalloy top foil to establish a baseline for comparison. The test results indicate that the presence of a top foil solid lubricant coating is effective at increasing the load capacity performance of the foil bearing. Compared to the uncoated baseline, the addition of the soft polymer coating on the top foil increased the bearing load coefficient by 120% when operating against an as-ground journal surface and 85 percent against a run-in journal surface. The alumina coating increased the load coefficient by 40% against the as-ground journal but did not have any affect when the bearing was operated with the run-in journal. The results suggest that the addition of solid lubricant films provide added lubrication when the air film is marginal indicating that as the load capacity is approached foil air bearings transition from hydrodynamic to mixed and boundary lubrication.

  18. Air entrainment in hairy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasto, Alice; Regli, Marianne; Brun, P.-T.; Alvarado, José; Clanet, Christophe; Hosoi, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by diving semiaquatic mammals, we investigate the mechanism of dynamic air entrainment in hairy surfaces submerged in liquid. Hairy surfaces are cast out of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer and plunged into a fluid bath at different velocities. Experimentally, we find that the amount of air entrained is greater than what is expected for smooth surfaces. Theoretically, we show that the hairy surface can be considered as a porous medium and we describe the air entrainment via a competition between the hydrostatic forcing and the viscous resistance in the pores. A phase diagram that includes data from our experiments and biological data from diving semiaquatic mammals is included to place the model system in a biological context and predict the regime for which the animal is protected by a plastron of air.

  19. Mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle on a machine tool

    DOEpatents

    Lunsford, J.S.; Crisp, D.W.; Petrowski, P.L.

    1987-12-07

    The present invention is directed to a mounting arrangement for the drive system of an air-bearing spindle utilized on a machine tool such as a lathe. The mounting arrangement of the present invention comprises a housing which is secured to the casing of the air bearing in such a manner that the housing position can be selectively adjusted to provide alignment of the air-bearing drive shaft supported by the housing and the air-bearing spindle. Once this alignment is achieved the air between spindle and the drive arrangement is maintained in permanent alignment so as to overcome misalignment problems encountered in the operation of the machine tool between the air-bearing spindle and the shaft utilized for driving the air-bearing spindle.

  20. Progress report on air bearing slumping of thin glass mirrors for x-ray telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattenburg, Mark L.; Chalifoux, Brandon; DeTienne, Michael D.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Zuo, Heng

    2015-09-01

    The successful NuSTAR telescope was fabricated with thin glass mirrors formed into conic shapes by thermal slumping of thin glass sheets onto high precision mandrels. While mirrors generated by this process have very good figure, the best mirrors to date have a resolution limited to ~7 arc sec, due primarily to mid-range scale spatial frequency errors. These mid-range errors are believed to be due to clumping and particulates in the anti-stick coatings used to prevent sticking between mandrel and mirrors. We have developed a new slumping process which avoids sticking and surface-induced mid-range error by floating hot glass substrates between a pair of porous air bearing mandrels through which compressed nitrogen is forced. We report on the design and testing of an improved air bearing slumping tool and show results of short and long slumping cycles.

  1. Surface texture and micromechanics of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) orthopaedic implant bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Monica A.

    2001-07-01

    Tibial bearings of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were characterized to identify differences in morphology, surface texture (roughness and skewness), and micro-scale mechanical behavior. These orthopaedic implant components were fabricated by direct molding or by machining after isostatic compression molding. Sterilization was by gamma irradiation (3.3 Mrad) in air, followed by shelf aging for 2 years. Comparisons were made between unsterile and sterile bearings to identify differences in structure and properties related to wear debris. Characterization methods included confocal optical microscopy, nanoindentation, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and polarized light microscopy. Morphology was compared between bulk and surface (top and bottom) specimens of the bearings. Cryo-microtomy was used to prepare thin specimens transverse to the top surface for polarized microscopy. Nanoindentation was performed on the top bearing surfaces, near areas examined by confocal microscopy. Processing methods affected both small- and large-scale morphology of UHMWPE. Direct molding produced thinner lamellae, thicker long periods, and slightly lower crystallinity than isostatic compression molding. Both bearing types contained a thick interface between the crystalline and amorphous phases. Interfacial free energy varied with interface thickness. Resin particles were consolidated better in direct molded bearings than in machined bearings. Segregated amorphous regions were observed in the machined bearings. Sterilization and shelf aging affected nanometer-scale morphology. Chain scission significantly decreased the interface thickness, causing an increase in lamellar thickness and a small increase in crystallinity. Only a small decrease in the amorphous thickness resulted. Heterogeneous oxidation increased these changes in interface

  2. Optimum Design of Thrust Air Bearing for Hard Disk Drive Spindle Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mohd Danial; Namba, Tadashi; Ochiai, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Hiromu

    This paper describes the application of geometry optimization method proposed by Hashimoto to the design of air lubricated thrust bearings used for HDD spindle motors. The optimization is carried out to maximize the dynamic stiffness of air films because the low stiffness is a serious problem of thrust air bearings in the actual application to HDD spindle motor. The optimized dynamic stiffnesses are obtained by changing the allowable film thickness, which is corresponding to the tolerance of bearings. The results obtained show that the optimized thrust air bearings have the comparable stiffness to the oil lubricated thrust bearings and it is verified theoretically that this type of thrust air bearing can be used for HDD spindle motors.

  3. Ion Implantatiion Improves Bearing-Surface Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, M. S.; Kustas, F. M.

    1985-01-01

    Selected ions fired into rolling elements to increase resistance to rolling-contact fatique. Mask strips confine implantation to 105 degree arcs on cylindrical surfaces. Specimens kept cool by copper block through which refrigerant is circulated. Implanting nitrogen or titanium ions in metals improves resistance to fatigue, corrosion, and wear without altering bulk properties. Unlike such surface treatments as conventional nitriding, conventional carburizing, and coating, ion implantation is low-temperature process, requires no finishing operations, and produces highly-alloyed surface layer. Implantation process also helps conserve such strategic materials as chromium and cobalt by using them only where needed.

  4. Surface analysis of stainless steel outer race bearing specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, D. K.; Hand, H. M.

    1991-10-01

    The results of analysis of R-4 stainless steel instrument bearings, subjected to various wear cycles, are reported to describe the fate of a synthetic Schiff base lubricant additive at the bearing wear track surfaces. The surfaces were monitored by x-ray, photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to characterize all lubricant (and grease) species of interest. The data indicate a general modification or degradation of both the lubricant and ubiquitous fluorinated grease ('Kryto-x') additive during the wear stages. Chemical and structural compositions are described for residual derivatives at the bearing track surfaces. Further studies are recommended that will enable confirmation of both the chemical fate and the molecular mechanism of lubricant additives candidates.

  5. Surface roughness effect on finite oil journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. C.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical study of the performance of finite oil journal bearings is made, considering the surface roughness effect. The total load supporting ability under such a condition derives from the hydrodynamic as well as asperity contact pressure. These two components of load are calculated separately. The average Reynolds equation for partially lubricated surfaces is used to evaluate hydrodynamic pressure. An analytical expression for average film thickness is obtained and introduced to modify the average Reynolds equation. The resulting differential equation is then solved numerically by finite difference methods for mean hydrodynamic pressure, which in turn gives the hydrodynamic load. Assuming the surface height distribution as Gaussian, the asperity contact pressure is found. The effect of surface roughness parameter, surface pattern, eccentricity ratio, and length to diameter ratio on hydrodynamic load and on side leakage is investigated. It is shown that hydrodynamic load increases with increasing surface roughness when both journal and bearing surfaces have identical roughness structures or when the journal only has a rough surface. The trend of hydrodynamic load is reversed if the journal surface is smooth and the bearing surface is rough.

  6. Effects of bearing surfaces on lap joint energy dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Kess, H. R.; Rosnow, N. J.; Sidle, B. C.

    2001-01-01

    Energy is dissipated in mechanical systems in several forms. The major contributor to damping in bolted lap joints is friction, and the level of damping is a function of stress distribution in the bearing surfaces. This study examines the effects of bearing surface configuration on lap joint energy dissipation. The examination is carried out through the analysis of experimental results in a nonlinear framework. Then finite element models are constructed in a nonlinear framework to simulate the results. The experimental data were analyzed using piecewise linear log decrement. Phenomenological and non-phenomenological mathematical models were used to simulate joint behavior. Numerical results of experiments and analyses are presented.

  7. NEW BEARING SURFACES IN TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes; de Freitas Spinelli, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty is being increasingly indicated for younger and more active patients, in addition to a naturally growing demand for the procedure because of increasing life expectancy among patients. The high costs of this surgery and the controversies regarding implant performance have made this topic the subject of constant research, seeking new materials with better resistance to wear and better biocompatibility. The present article provides a review of new surfaces in total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27042614

  8. Bearing surfaces in hip replacement – Evolution and likely future

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narinder; Arora, Gen N.C.; Datta, Barun

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty has evolved from the first total hip arthroplasty in 1938, through the revolutionization of hip arthroplasty by principles of low friction arthroplasty introduced by Sir John Charnley in 1960s to the present state of the art implants and techniques. The main concern regarding failure of total hip arthroplasty has been the biological response to particulate polyethylene debris generated by conventional metal on polyethylene bearing surfaces leading to osteolysis and aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. Therefore, recent research has been focussing on alternative bearing surfaces to reduce the particulate debris generated. These bearing surfaces include ceramic-polyethylene, metal–metal as well as ceramic–ceramic articulations and have demonstrated lesser friction rates as well as significantly lower wear rates as compared to widely used metal on polyethylene surfaces. Clinical experience until now has shown that metal on metal articulations have significant safety concerns whereas metal-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene, ceramic on ceramic and ceramic on highly crosslinked polyethylene articulations have shown encouraging results to hold promise for wider use in younger and more active patients. This review article discusses positives and drawbacks of various bearing surfaces in current clinical use in total hip arthroplasty as well as briefly explores the newer technologies on the horizon which may even further decrease wear and improve total hip arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:25382913

  9. Parameter estimation of an air-bearing suspended test table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhenxian; Lin, Yurong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xinglin; Chen, Fang

    2015-02-01

    A parameter estimation approach is proposed for parameter determination of a 3-axis air-bearing suspended test table. The table is to provide a balanced and frictionless environment for spacecraft ground test. To balance the suspension, the mechanical parameters of the table, including its angular inertias and centroid deviation from its rotating center, have to be determined first. Then sliding masses on the table can be adjusted by stepper motors to relocate the centroid of the table to its rotating center. Using the angular momentum theorem and the coriolis theorem, dynamic equations are derived describing the rotation of the table under the influence of gravity imbalance torque and activating torques. To generate the actuating torques, use of momentum wheels is proposed, whose virtue is that no active control is required to the momentum wheels, which merely have to spin at constant rates, thus avoiding the singularity problem and the difficulty of precisely adjusting the output torques, issues associated with control moment gyros. The gyroscopic torques generated by the momentum wheels, as they are forced by the table to precess, are sufficient to activate the table for parameter estimation. Then least-square estimation is be employed to calculate the desired parameters. The effectiveness of the method is validated by simulation.

  10. The Role of Radial Clearance on the Performance of Foil Air Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin; Howard, Samuel; Dykas, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Load capacity tests were conducted to determine how radial clearance variations affect the load capacity coefficient of foil air bearings. Two Generation III foil air bearings with the same design but possessing different initial radial clearances were tested at room temperature against an as-ground PS304 coated journal operating at 30,000 rpm. Increases in radial clearance were accomplished by reducing the journal's outside diameter via an in-place grinding system. From each load capacity test the bearing load capacity coefficient was calculated from the rule-of-thumb (ROT) model developed for foil air bearings. The test results indicate that, in terms of the load capacity coefficient, radial clearance has a direct impact on the performance of the foil air bearing. Each test bearing exhibited an optimum radial clearance that resulted in a maximum load capacity coefficient. Relative to this optimum value are two separate operating regimes that are governed by different modes of failure. Bearings operating with radial clearances less than the optimum exhibit load capacity coefficients that are a strong function of radial clearance and are prone to a thermal runaway failure mechanism and bearing seizure. Conversely, a bearing operating with a radial clearance twice the optimum suffered only a 20 percent decline in its maximum load capacity coefficient and did not experience any thermal management problems. However, it is unknown to what degree these changes in radial clearance had on other performance parameters, such as the stiffness and damping properties of the bearings.

  11. Designing prosthetic knee joints with bio-inspired bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mingfeng; Chyr, Anthony; Sanders, Anthony P; Raeymaekers, Bart

    2014-09-01

    It has long been known that articular cartilage exhibits a surface microtexture with shallow indentations. By contrast, prosthetic joints consist of ultra-smooth bearing surfaces, the longevity of which does not reach that of natural cartilage. We show that adding a microtexture to the smooth femoral component of a prosthetic knee joint reduces friction by increasing the lubricant film thickness between the bearing surfaces of the knee. We have implemented an elastohydrodynamic lubrication model to optimize the geometry of the microtexture, while taking into account the deformation of the polyethylene tibial insert. We have manufactured several microtexture designs on a surrogate femoral component, and experimentally demonstrate that the microtexture reduces friction between the surrogate femoral component and tibial insert. PMID:25049441

  12. Characterization of lubricated bearing surfaces operated under high loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Marxer, N.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The composition and surface profiles of M-50 steel surfaces were measured after operation at high loads in a bearing contact simulator. An ester lubricant (trimethyolpropane triheptanoate) was used with and without various additives. Optical profiles were obtained + or - to 30 depth resolution with a phase-locked interference microscope in 10 micron diameter areas within and outside the wear tracks. Optical constants and surface film thickness were measured in the same areas with an electronic scanning ellipsometer. Film composition was measured with a scanning Auger electron spectrometer. It is concluded that metal oxide formation is accelerated within the wear tracks.

  13. Surface Temperature variability from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Dang, V. T.; Aumann, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    To address the existence and possible causes of the climate hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014for the day and night conditions. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We compare the satellite data with the new surface data produced by Karl et al. (2015) who denies the reality of the climate hiatus. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The day-night difference is an indicator of the anthropogenic trend. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Surface profile changes of scuffed bearing surfaces. [before and after acid treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Fung, S. S.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A phase locked interference microscope capable of resolving depth differences to 30 A and planar displacements of 6000 A was constructed for the examination of the profiles of bearing surfaces without physical contact. This instrument was used to determine surface chemical reactivity by applying a drop of dilute alcoholic hydrochloric acid and measuring the profile of the solid surface before and after application of this probe. Scuffed bearing surfaces reacted much faster than unscuffed ones, but bearing surfaces which had been previously exposed to lubricants containing an organic chloride reacted much more slowly. In a separate series of experiments, a number of stainless steel plates were heated in a nitrogen atmosphere to different temperatures and their reactivity examined later at room temperature. The change of surface contour as a result of the probe reaction followed an Arrhenius type relation with respect to heat treatment temperature. This result could have implications on the scuffing mechanism.

  15. Radial Clearance Found To Play a Key Role in the Performance of Compliant Foil Air Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radil, Kevin C.

    2003-01-01

    Compliant foil air bearings are at the forefront of the Oil-Free turbomachinery revolution, which supports gas turbine engines with hydrodynamic bearings that use air instead of oil as the working fluid. These types of bearings have been around for almost 50 years and have found a home in several commercial applications, such as in air cycle machines, turbocompressors, and microturbines, but are now being aggressively pursued for use in small and midrange aircraft gas turbine engines. Benefits include higher operating speeds and temperatures, lower maintenance costs, and greater reliability. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery team at the NASA Glenn Research Center is working to foster the transition of Oil-Free technology into gas turbine engines by performing in-house experiments on foil air bearings in order to gain a greater insight into their complex operating principles. A research program recently undertaken at Glenn focused on the concept of radial clearance and its influence on bearing performance. The tests were conducted on foil bearings with different radial clearances. As defined for a foil bearing, radial clearance is a measure of the small amount of shaft radial motion that is present from play that exists in the elastic support structure, such as between the top and bump foils and the bump foils and bearing shell (see the drawing). With an insufficient amount of radial clearance, the bearing imparts a high preload on the shaft, which when excessive, can reduce the loadcarrying capability of the bearing. On the other hand, systems using foil bearings with excessive radial clearance may experience rotordynamic instabilities because of low bearing preload. Therefore, without a more thorough understanding of radial clearance, it is difficult to accurately predict the performance of a given bearing design. The test program demonstrated that there is a direct correlation between radial clearance and the performance of foil air bearings. As shown in the graph, an

  16. MOISTURE AND SURFACE AREA MEASUREMENTS OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Scogin, J.; Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.

    2009-09-28

    To ensure safe storage, plutonium-bearing oxides are stabilized at 950 C for at least two hours in an oxidizing atmosphere. Stabilization conditions are expected to decompose organic impurities, convert metals to oxides, and result in moisture content below 0.5 wt%. During stabilization, the specific surface area is reduced, which minimizes readsorption of water onto the oxide surface. Plutonium oxides stabilized according to these criteria were sampled and analyzed to determine moisture content and surface area. In addition, samples were leached in water to identify water-soluble chloride impurity content. Results of these analyses for seven samples showed that the stabilization process produced low moisture materials (< 0.2 wt %) with low surface area ({le} 1 m{sup 2}/g). For relatively pure materials, the amount of water per unit surface area corresponded to 1.5 to 3.5 molecular layers of water. For materials with chloride content > 360 ppm, the calculated amount of water per unit surface area increased with chloride content, indicating hydration of hygroscopic salts present in the impure PuO{sub 2}-containing materials. The low moisture, low surface area materials in this study did not generate detectable hydrogen during storage of four or more years.

  17. Gyroscope Pivot Bearing Dimension and Surface Defect Detection

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Wenqian; Zhao, Huijie; Li, Xudong

    2011-01-01

    Because of the perceived lack of systematic analysis in illumination system design processes and a lack of criteria for design methods in vision detection a method for the design of a task-oriented illumination system is proposed. After detecting the micro-defects of a gyroscope pivot bearing with a high curvature glabrous surface and analyzing the characteristics of the surface detection and reflection model, a complex illumination system with coaxial and ring lights is proposed. The illumination system is then optimized based on the analysis of illuminance uniformity of target regions by simulation and grey scale uniformity and articulation that are calculated from grey imagery. Currently, in order to apply the Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN) method, structural parameters must be tested and adjusted repeatedly. Therefore, this paper proposes the use of a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, in which the maximum between cluster variance rules is used as fitness function with a linearily reduced inertia factor. This algorithm is used to adaptively set PCNN connection coefficients and dynamic threshold, which avoids algorithmic precocity and local oscillations. The proposed method is used for pivot bearing defect image processing. The segmentation results of the maximum entropy and minimum error method and the one described in this paper are compared using buffer region matching, and the experimental results show that the method of this paper is effective. PMID:22163796

  18. Mystery of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-free Turbomachinery Unlocked: Load Capacity Rule-of-thumb Allows Simple Estimation of Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2002-01-01

    The Oil-Free Turbomachinery team at the NASA Glenn Research Center has unlocked one of the mysteries surrounding foil air bearing performance. Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings that use ambient air, or any fluid, as their lubricant. In operation, the motion of the shaft's surface drags fluid into the bearing by viscous action, creating a pressurized lubricant film. This lubricating film separates the stationary foil bearing surface from the moving shaft and supports load. Foil bearings have been around for decades and are widely employed in the air cycle machines used for cabin pressurization and cooling aboard commercial jetliners. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery team is fostering the maturation of this technology for integration into advanced Oil-Free aircraft engines. Elimination of the engine oil system can significantly reduce weight and cost and could enable revolutionary new engine designs. Foil bearings, however, have complex elastic support structures (spring packs) that make the prediction of bearing performance, such as load capacity, difficult if not impossible. Researchers at Glenn recently found a link between foil bearing design and load capacity performance. The results have led to a simple rule-of-thumb that relates a bearing's size, speed, and design to its load capacity. Early simple designs (Generation I) had simple elastic (spring) support elements, and performance was limited. More advanced bearings (Generation III) with elastic supports, in which the stiffness is varied locally to optimize gas film pressures, exhibit load capacities that are more than double those of the best previous designs. This is shown graphically in the figure. These more advanced bearings have enabled industry to introduce commercial Oil-Free gas-turbine-based electrical generators and are allowing the aeropropulsion industry to incorporate the technology into aircraft engines. The rule-of-thumb enables engine and bearing designers to easily size and

  19. Porous Squeeze Film Bearing with Rough Surfaces Lubricated by a Bingham Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walicka, A.; Walicki, E.; Jurczak, P.; Falicki, J.

    2014-11-01

    In the paper the effect of both bearing surfaces and the porosity of one bearing surface on the pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity of a squeeze film bearing is discussed. The equations of motion of a Bingham fluid in a bearing clearance and in a porous layer are presented. Using the Morgan-Cameron approximation and Christensen theory of rough lubrication the modified Reynolds equation is obtained. The analytical solutions of this equation for a squeeze film bearing are presented. As a result one obtains the formulae expressing pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity. A thrust radial bearing is considered as a numerical example.

  20. Gas bearings. [fluid lubrication theory of sliding contact surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, C. H. T.

    1980-01-01

    The present work deals with the fundamentals of gas lubrication theory, which forms the foundation of all analytical design tools for gas bearings. Most of the hard lessons learned in the past are outlined with reference to dry contact, debris ingestion, sliding speed, and chemical stability of lubricant. The mathematical theory of gas lubrication is described for scaling rules in thin-film viscous flow, momentum conservation, mass conservation, energy conservation, isothermal gas bearing theory, coupling effects, and global bearing characteristics. Particular attention is given to the governing differential equations for common bearing configurations. Also discussed are representative solutions of self-acting gas bearings, externally pressurized bearings, and time-dependent effects.

  1. An air bearing fan for EVA suit ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murry, Roger P.

    1990-01-01

    The portable life-support system (PLSS) ventilation requirements are outlined, along with the application of a high-speed axial fan technology for extravehicular-activity (EVA) space-suit ventilation. Focus is placed on a mechanical design employing high-speed gas bearings, permanent magnet rotor, and current-fed chopper/inverter electronics. The operational characteristics of the fan unit and its applicability for use in a pure-oxygen environment are discussed. It delivers a nominal 0.17 cu m/min at 1.24 kPa pressure rise using 13.8 w of input power. It is shown that the overall selection of materials for all major component meets the NASA requirements.

  2. ENHANCING DAMAGE VISIBILITY ON METALLIC BEARING SURFACES: A SIMPLE TECHNIQUE FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIEWING

    PubMed Central

    Heiner, Anneliese D.; Kruger, Karen M.; Baer, Thomas E.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Damage to metallic bearing surfaces typically involves scratches, scrapes, metal transfer, and organic deposits. This damage can cause accelerated wear of the opposing surface and subsequent implant failure. Photography and viewing of metallic bearing surfaces, for documenting this damage, is hindered by optical reflectivity. This note demonstrates a simple, practical technique for metallic bearing surface photography and viewing that minimizes this reflectivity problem, that does not involve any modification of the bearing surface, and that allows for improved observation and documentation of overall damage. When the metallic bearing surface is placed within a tube of translucent material, the appearance of damage on that bearing surface is dramatically enhanced, showing up against a smooth, even background with excellent contrast and with fine detail achievable. PMID:23333257

  3. Porous metals and alternate bearing surfaces in shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Shannon R; Urits, Ivan; Murthi, Anand M

    2016-03-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) provides an effective solution for the treatment of glenohumeral arthritis. However, long-term outcomes have been limited by glenoid component aseptic loosening and polyethylene (PE) wear. Previous attempts to improve glenoid fixation with metal-backed glenoids resulted in inferior results. Newer component designs that contain porous metal allow for biological ingrowth of the prosthesis, potentially improving longevity and overall outcomes. Porous metal can also improve humeral component fixation, obviating the need for cement and simplifying revision surgery. Advances such as highly cross-linked polyethylene (HXLPE), vitamin E-doped HXLPE, and alternate bearing surfaces like ceramics and pyrolytic carbon have proven to provide superior wear characteristics in other joint replacements and may prove beneficial in the shoulder as well. PMID:26797775

  4. Contact sheet recording with a self-acting negative air bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muftu , Sinan (Inventor); Hinteregger, Hans F (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A flat head and a tape transport arrangement impart a wrap angle to the tape at the upstream corner of the head. The wrap angle, corner sharpness and tape stiffness are sufficient to cause a moving tape to form a hollow bump at the upstream corner, thereby creating a hollow into which entrained air can expand, causing a subambient pressure within and downstream of the bump. This pressure keeps the tape in contact with the head. It is created without the need for a groove or complex pressure relief slot(s). No contact pressure arises at the signal exchange site due to media wrap. The highest contact pressures are developed at a wrapped upstream corner. For a tape drive, traveling in both forward and reverse, the wrap can be at both the upstream and downstream (which is the reverse upstream) corners. Heads that are not flat can also be used, if the wrap angle relative to a main surface is sufficient and not too large. The wrapped head can also be used with rotating media, such as disks (floppy and hard) and rotating heads, such as helical wound heads for video recording. Multiple flat tape bearing surfaces can be separated by grooves and/or angles. Each flat can carry heads along one or more gap lines. Multiple adjacent narrow tracks can thus be written for extreme high track density recording.

  5. Helical scan recording with a self-acting negative air bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muftu , Sinan (Inventor); Hinteregger, Hans F (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A flat head and a tape transport arrangement impart a wrap angle to the tape at the upstream corner of the head. The wrap angle, corner sharpness and tape stiffness are sufficient to cause a moving tape to form a hollow bump at the upstream corner, thereby creating a hollow into which entrained air can expand, causing a subambient pressure within and downstream of the bump. This pressure keeps the tape in contact with the head. It is created without the need for a groove or complex pressure relief slot(s). No contact pressure arises at the signal exchange site due to media wrap. The highest contact pressures are developed at a wrapped upstream corner. For a tape drive, traveling in both forward and reverse, the wrap can be at both the upstream and downstream (which is the reverse upstream) corners. Heads that are not flat can also be used, if the wrap angle relative to a main surface is sufficient and not too large. The wrapped head can also be used with rotating media, such as disks (floppy and hard) and rotating heads, such as helical wound heads for video recording. Multiple flat tape bearing surfaces can be separated by grooves and/or angles. Each flat can carry heads along one or more gap lines. Multiple adjacent narrow tracks can thus be written for extreme high track density recording.

  6. Tribological thin films on steel rolling element bearing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ryan David

    Tribological thin films are of interest to designers and end-users of friction management and load transmission components such as steel rolling element bearings. This study sought to reveal new information about the properties and formation of such films, spanning the scope of their technical evolution from natural oxide films, to antiwear films from lubricant additives, and finally engineered nanocomposite metal carbide/amorphous hydrocarbon (MC/a-C:H) films. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed on the near-surface material (depth < 500 nm) of tapered roller bearing inner rings (cones) that were tested at two levels of boundary-lubricated conditions in mineral oil with and without sulfur- and phosphorus-containing gear oil additives. Site-specific thinning of cross-section cone surface sections for TEM analyses was conducted using the focused ion beam milling technique. Two types of oxide surface films were characterized for the cones tested in mineral oil only, each one corresponding to a different lubrication severity. Continuous and adherent antiwear films were found on the cone surfaces tested with lubricant additives, and their composition depended on the lubrication conditions. A sharp interface separated the antiwear film and base steel. Various TEM analytical techniques were used to study the segregation of elements throughout the film volume. The properties of nanocomposite tantalum carbide/amorphous hydrocarbon (TaC/a-C:H) thin films depend sensitively on reactive magnetron sputtering deposition process conditions. TaC/a-C:H film growth was studied as a function of three deposition parameters in designed experiments: acetylene flow rate, applied d.c. bias voltage, and substrate carousel rotation rate. Empirical models were developed for the following film characteristics to identify process-property trend relationships: Ta/C atomic ratio, hydrogen content, film thickness. TaC crystallite size, Raman spectrum, compressive stress, hardness

  7. A New Foil Air Bearing Test Rig for Use to 700 C and 70,000 rpm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Chris

    1997-01-01

    A new test rig has been developed for evaluating foil air bearings at high temperatures and speeds. These bearings are self acting hydrodynamic air bearings which have been successfully applied to a variety of turbomachinery operating up to 650 C. This unique test rig is capable of measuring bearing torque during start-up, shut-down and high speed operation. Load capacity and general performance characteristics, such as durability, can be measured at temperatures to 700 C and speeds to 70,000 rpm. This paper describes the new test rig and demonstrates its capabilities through the preliminary characterization of several bearings. The bearing performance data from this facility can be used to develop advanced turbomachinery incorporating high temperature oil-free air bearing technology.

  8. Feasibility of Air Levitated Surface Stage for Lithography Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keiichi

    The application of light-weight drive technology into the lithography stage has been the current state of art because of minimization of power loss. The purpose of this article is to point out the so-called, "surface stage" which is composed of Lorentz forced 3 DOF (Degree Of Freedom) planar motor (x, y and theta z), air levitation (bearing) system and motor cooling system, is the most balanced concept for the next generation lithography through the verification of each component by manufacturing simple parts and test stand. This paper presents the design method and procedure, and experimental results of the air levitated surface stage which was conducted several years ago, however the author is convinced that the results are enough to adapt various developments of precision machining tool.

  9. System Being Developed to Measure the Rotordynamic Characteristics of Air Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.

    2000-01-01

    Because of the many possible advantages of oil-free engine operation, interest in using air lubricated foil-bearing technology in advanced oil-free engine concepts has recently increased. The Oil-Free Turbomachinery Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has partially driven this recent push for oil-free technology. The program's goal of developing an innovative, practical, oil-free gas turbine engine for aeropropulsion began with the development of NASA's high-temperature solid-lubricant coating, PS304. This coating virtually eliminates the life-limiting wear that occurs during the startup and shutdown of the bearings. With practically unlimited life, foil air bearings are now very attractive to rotating machinery designers for use in turbomachinery. Unfortunately, the current knowledge base of these types of bearings is limited. In particular, the understanding of how these types of bearings contribute to the rotordynamic stability of turbomachinery is insufficient for designers to design with confidence. Recent work in oil-free turbomachinery has concentrated on advancing the understanding of foil bearings. A high-temperature fiber-optic displacement probe system and measurement method were developed to study the effects of speed, load, temperature, and other environmental issues on the stiffness characteristics of air foil bearings. Since high temperature data are to be collected in future testing, the testing method was intentionally simplified to minimize the need for expensive test hardware. The method measures the displacement induced upon a bearing in response to an applied perturbation load. The early results of these studies, which are shown in the accompanying figure, indicate trends in steady state stiffness that suggest stiffness increases with load and decreases with speed. It can be seen, even from these data, that stiffness is not expected to change by orders of magnitude over the normal operating range of most turbomachinery; a

  10. Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Nixon, H. P.; Darragh, Craig V.; Howe, Jane Y; Coffey, Dorothy W

    2007-01-01

    Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

  11. Static properties of hydrostatic thrust gas bearings with curved surfaces.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehsteiner, F. H.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The classical treatment of circular, hydrostatic, orifice-regulated thrust gas bearings, in which perfectly plane bearing plates are assumed, is extended to include axisymmetric, but otherwise arbitrary, plate profiles. Plate curvature has a strong influence on bearing load capability, static stiffness, tilting stiffness, and side force per unit misalignment angle. By a suitable combination of gas inlet impedance and concave plate profile, the static stiffness can be made almost constant over a wide load range, and to remain positive at the closure load. Extensive measurements performed with convex and concave plates agree with theory to within the experimental error throughout and demonstrate the practical feasibility of using curved plates.

  12. The Epidemiology and National Trends of Bearing Surface Usage in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Kim, Yunjung; Yoo, Seungmi; Lee, Sahnghoon; Kim, Hee Joong

    2016-01-01

    Background We analyzed the data for primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) in the Korean nationwide database to assess (1) the epidemiology and national trends of bearing surface usage in THAs and (2) the prevalence of each type of bearing surface according to age, gender, hospital type, primary payer, and hospital procedure volume. Methods A total of 30,881 THAs were analyzed using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database for 2007 through 2011. Bearing surfaces were sub-grouped according to device code for national health insurance claims and consisted of ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC), metal-on-polyethylene (MoP), ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP), and metal-on-metal (MoM). The prevalence of each type of bearing surface was calculated and stratified by age, gender, hospital type, primary payer, and procedure volume of each hospital. Results CoC was the most frequently used bearing surface (76.7%), followed by MoP (11.9%), CoP (7.3%), and MoM (4.1%). The proportion of THAs using a CoC bearing surface increased steadily from 71.6% in 2007 to 81.4% in 2011, whereas the proportions using CoP, MoP, and MoM bearing surfaces decreased. The order of prevalence was identical to that in the general population regardless of age, gender, hospital type, primary payer, and hospital procedure volume. Conclusions The trends and epidemiology of bearing surface usage in THAs in Korea are different from those in other countries, and the CoC bearing surface is the most prevalent articulation. In future, the results of a large-scale study using nationwide data of THAs involving a CoC bearing surface will be reported in Korea. PMID:26929796

  13. Turbo test rig with hydroinertia air bearings for a palmtop gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuji; Isomura, Kousuke; Togo, Shin-ichi; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes a turbo test rig to test the compressor of a palmtop gas turbine generator at low temperature (<100 °C). Impellers are 10 mm in diameter and have three-dimensional blades machined using a five-axis NC milling machine. Hydroinertia bearings are employed in both radial and axial directions. The performance of the compressor was measured at 50% (435 000 rpm) and 60% (530 000 rpm) of the rated rotational speed (870 000 rpm) by driving a turbine using compressed air at room temperature. The measured pressure ratio is lower than the predicted value. This could be mainly because impeller tip clearance was larger than the designed value. The measured adiabatic efficiency is unrealistically high due to heat dissipation from compressed air. During acceleration toward the rated rotational speed, a shaft crashed to the bearing at 566 000 rpm due to whirl. At that time, the whirl ratio was 8.

  14. The system integration and verification testing of an orbital maneuvering vehicle for an air bearing floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, N. L., Jr.; Martin, M. F.; Paulukaitis, K. R.; Haslam, J. W., Jr.; Henderson, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The teleoperator and Robotics Evaluation Facility (TOREF) is composed of a 4,000 square foot precision air bearing floor, the Teleoperator Motion Base, the Target Motion and Support Simulator, the mock-ups of the Hubble Space Telescope, Multi-mission Modular Spacecraft, and the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The TOREF and its general capabilities to support the OMV and other remote system simulations; the facility operating procedures and requirements; and the results of generic OMV investigations are summarized.

  15. Development of an air-bearing fan for space extravehicular activity (EVA) suit ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumoto, Paul; Allen, Norman; Stonesifer, Greg

    1992-01-01

    A high-speed/variable flow fan has been developed for EVA suit ventilation which combines air bearings with a two-pole, toothless permanent-magnet motor. The fan has demonstrated quiet and vibration-free operation and a 2:1 range in flow rate variation. System weight is 0.9 kg, and input powers range from 12.4 to 42 W.

  16. Performance evaluation of half-wetted hydrodynamic bearings with DLC coated surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Eryilmaz, O.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Systems

    2008-01-01

    In conventional liquid lubrication it is assumed that surfaces are fully wetted and no slip occurs between the fluid and the solid boundary. Under the 'no slip' condition the maximum shear gradient occurs at the fluid-surface interface. When one or both surfaces are non-wetted by the fluid, boundary slip can occur due to weak bonding between the fluid and the solid surface, which reduces shear stresses in the fluid adjacent to the non-wetted surface. A thrust bearing tribometer was used to compare the performance of 'no slip' hydrodynamic thrust bearings with bearings surfaces that were made to slip at the interface between the surface and fluid. Hydrophobic surfaces on both runner and bearing were achieved with the deposition of hydrogenated diamond like carbon (H-DLC) films, produced by plasma-enhanced CVD on titanium alloy surfaces. Hydrophilic surfaces were created through the surface modification of DLC. A mixtures of water and glycerol was used as the lubricant. The tests were conducted using different constant bearing gaps. The normal load and the torque or traction force between the rotating runner and hydrodynamic thrust bearing were measured with load cells. The experimental results confirmed that load support is still possible when surfaces are partially-wetted or nonwetted.

  17. Influence of atmospheric pressure supplied on permittivity of air-film of aerostatic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Yubing; Li, Dong-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Influence of atmospheric pressure supplied on permittivity of the air-film is researched based on the capacitive testing method of the air film thickness of aerostatic bearing. An experiment platform is designed. The experimental results illustrate that permittivity has significant negative correlation with atmospheric pressure which varies from 0.1MPa to 0.48MPa when other environmental conditions remain unchanged. The curves conform to the fourth-order polynomial approximately. All of the values of R2 are beyond 0.944 which means that trend lines fit the data curves well. Relative permittivity of the air film is between 0.996 and 1.324. This interval shows that weak current exists between restrictor and flat of the experiment which are not absolutely insulating and atmosphere of the air film is not pure. This result provides a basis both for establishing accurate mathematical model of air film thickness and capacitance value of the aerostatic bearing and for other exploratory experiments later.

  18. Photoreactive Polymers Bearing a Zwitterionic Phosphorylcholine Group for Surface Modification of Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaojie; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-12

    Photoreactive polymers bearing zwitterionic phosphorylcholine and benzophenone groups on the side chain were synthesized and used as surface modification reagents for biomaterials. A photoreactive methacrylate containing the benzophenone group, 3-methacryloyloxy-2-hydroxypropyl-4-oxybenzophenone (MHPBP), was synthesized via a ring-opening and addition reaction between glycidyl methacrylate and 4-hydroxybenzophenone. Then, water-soluble, amphiphilic polymers poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-co-MHPBP) (PMH) and poly(MPC-co-n-butyl methacrylate-co-MHPBP), with different monomer unit compositions, were synthesized through radical polymerization. Ultraviolet-visible (UV/vis) absorption spectra of these polymer solutions showed that these polymers have maximum absorption peaks at 254 and 289 nm that can be attributed to the benzophenone unit. The intensity of UV adsorption at 289 nm was decreased with increased UV irradiation time, and it was saturated within a few minutes, indicating that the polymers are highly sensitive to UV irradiation. A commercial material (i.e., cyclic polyolefin) was simply modified by a UV irradiation for 1.0 min. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis results indicated that the stability of the polymer on the surface was dramatically enhanced because of the photochemical reaction of the benzophenone moiety. The air contact angles of PMH surfaces measured in water were up to 160°. Thus, highly hydrophilic surfaces were obtained. The critical surface tension of the PMH-modified surface was 45.7 mN/m. By evaluating the biological reactivity of the treated surface, protein adsorption and cell adhesion were completely inhibited on the surface, which was prepared using a photopatterning procedure using PMH. In conclusion, photoreactive MPC polymers with a benzophenone moiety could be used as a novel and effective surface modifier. PMID:26202385

  19. Start-stop testing of two self-acting air-lubricated spiral groove thrust bearing coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunfee, J. D.; Shapiro, W.

    1974-01-01

    Start-stop tests were conducted on air-lubricated spiral-groove thrust bearings. Application of a matrix-bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) coating over a porous chrome oxide coating resulted in significantly lower friction, compared to bearings coated with chrome oxide only. The MoS2 coated bearing sustained 15,000 start-stop cycles at a maximum of 3600 rpm. Each cycle was 15 seconds on, 30 seconds off. The chrome oxide coated bearing failed by local welding after 2030 cycles. Both types of coatings exhibited early failures under higher thrust loads when operating films were insufficient to sustain the load without overheating.

  20. Evaluation of Advanced Solid Lubricant Coatings for Foil Air Bearings Operating at 25 and 500 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Fellenstein, James A.; Benoy, Patricia A.

    1998-01-01

    The tribological properties of one chrome oxide and one chrome carbide based solid lubricant coating were evaluated in a partial-arc foil bearing at 25 and 500 C. Start/stop bearing operation up to 20,000 cycles were run under 10 kPa (1.5 psi) static deadweight load. Bearing friction (torque) was measured during the test. Specimen wear and SEM/EDS surface analyses were conducted after testing to understand and elucidate the tribological characteristics observed. The chrome oxide coating which contains both (Ag) and (BaF2/CaF2) for low and high temperature lubrication, exhibited low friction in sliding against Al2O3 coated foils at 25 and 500 C. The chrome carbide coating, which lacked a low temperature lubricant but contained BaF2/CaF2 as a high temperature lubricant, exhibited high friction at 25 C and low friction at 500 C against both bare and Al2O3 coated superalloy foil surfaces. Post test surface analyses suggest that improved tribological performance is exhibited when a lubricant film from the coating transfers to the foil surface.

  1. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 197.432 Section 197.432...-supplied air diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Surface-supplied air diving is conducted... space; and (f) The surface-supplied air diver has the equipment required by § 197.346 (b) or (d)....

  2. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425... Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied air...-supplied air diving shall not be conducted at depths deeper than 190 fsw, except that dives with...

  3. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425... Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied air...-supplied air diving shall not be conducted at depths deeper than 190 fsw, except that dives with...

  4. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 197.432 Section 197.432...-supplied air diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Surface-supplied air diving is conducted... space; and (f) The surface-supplied air diver has the equipment required by § 197.346 (b) or (d)....

  5. Tilted wheel satellite attitude control with air-bearing table experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inumoh, Lawrence O.; Forshaw, Jason L.; Horri, Nadjim M.

    2015-12-01

    Gyroscopic actuators for satellite control have attracted significant research interest over the years, but their viability for the control of small satellites has only recently started to become clear. Research on variable speed gyroscopic actuators has long been focused on single gimbal actuators; double gimbal actuators typically operate at constant wheel spin rate and allow tilt angle ranges far larger than the ranges needed to operate most satellite missions. This research examines a tilted wheel, a newly proposed type of inertial actuator that can generate torques in all three principal axes of a rigid satellite using a spinning wheel and a double tilt mechanism. The tilt mechanism tilts the angular momentum vector about two axes providing two degree of freedom control, while variation of the wheel speed provides the third. The equations of motion of the system lead to a singularity-free system during nominal operation avoiding the need for complex steering logic. This paper describes the hardware design of the tilted wheel and the experimental setup behind both standalone and spherical air-bearing tables used to test it. Experimental results from the air bearing table are provided with the results depicting the high performance capabilities of the proposed actuator in torque generation.

  6. Rotational infrared polarization modulator using a MEMS-based air turbine with different types of journal bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Motoaki; Tanaka, Shuji; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes rotational infrared polarization modulators using a micro-electromechanical-system-based (MEMS-based) air turbine with different types of journal bearing. Three types of journal bearing, circular, symmetrical two-lobed and asymmetrical seven-lobed journal bearing, were compared. Using an optical displacement meter and a high speed camera, it was confirmed that all turbines exhibit three modes of rotation: (a) low speed mode, (b) intermediate mode and (c) high speed mode in this order, when decreasing N2 flow rate to an aerostatic thrust bearing. In the low speed mode, the rotor is lifted up by excess flow to the thrust bearing, making a contact with an upper layer. In the high speed mode, the rotor is levitated without any contact to the upper and lower layers by balanced flow to the thrust bearing, and the maximum rotational speed of 74000 rpm was achieved using the asymmetrical seven-lobed bearing. The rotation in this mode is, however, discontinuous due to the collision between the rotor and the journal bearing. It was concluded that a journal bearing with sufficient load capacity is necessary for continuous high speed rotation.

  7. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 197.432 Section 197.432... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.432 Surface-supplied air diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Surface-supplied air diving is...

  8. 46 CFR 197.432 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 197.432 Section 197.432... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.432 Surface-supplied air diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) Surface-supplied air diving is...

  9. Tracking Phragmites Australis Expansion in Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge using AggieAir Aircraft Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, B.; McKee, M.

    2010-12-01

    This research examines the use of unmanned air vehicles (UAV), a cutting edge technology developed at the Utah Water research lab for acquiring airborne imagery using drones for the assessment of abundance of an invasive species Phragmites australis in a wetland vegetation setup. These UAV’s acquire multispectral data in the visible and near-infrared bands with a spatial resolution of 0.5 meters. The study area is the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge (MBR) which lies in northern Utah, where the Bear River flows into the northeast arm of the Great Salt Lake. The Refuge protects the marshes found at the mouth of the Bear River; these marshes are the largest freshwater component of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. A common reed, Phragmites australis, is a tall (1.5-4.0 m) coarse perennial grass found primarily in brackish and freshwater wetlands, growing at or above mean high water. The methodology is to build Bayesian statistical supervised classification model using relevance vector machine (RVM) employing the inexpensive and readily available UAV data. The UAV images of the bird refuge are processed to obtain calibrated reflectance imagery. Thereafter, the isodata clustering algorithm is applied to classify the multispectral imagery into different classes. Using ground sampling of the species, pixels containing the Phragmites australis are deduced. The training set for the supervised RVM classification model is prepared using the deduced pixel values. A separate set of ground sampling points containing the Phragmites australis are kept aside for validation. The distribution of Phragmites australis in the study area as obtained from RVM classification model is compared to the validation set. The RVM model results for tracking of Phragmites are encouraging and the new technique has promising real-time implementation for similar applications.

  10. Bending fatigue of electron-beam-welded foils. Application to a hydrodynamic air bearing in the Chrysler/DOE upgraded automotive gas tubine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltsman, J. F.; Halford, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrodynamic air bearing with a compliment surface is used in the gas generator of an upgraded automotive gas turbine engine. In the prototype design, the compliant surface is a thin foil spot welded at one end to the bearing cartridge. During operation, the foil failed along the line of spot welds which acted as a series of stress concentrators. Because of its higher degree of geometric uniformity, electron beam welding of the foil was selected as an alternative to spot welding. Room temperature bending fatigue tests were conducted to determine the fatigue resistance of the electron beam welded foils. Equations were determined relating cycles to crack initiation and cycles to failure to nominal total strain range. A scaling procedure is presented for estimating the reduction in cyclic life when the foil is at its normal operating temperature of 260 C (500 F).

  11. Dynamic Stiffness and Damping Characteristics of a High-Temperature Air Foil Journal Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Samuel A.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Valco, Mark J.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Heshmat, Hooshang

    2001-01-01

    Using a high-temperature optically based displacement measurement system, a foil air bearing's stiffness and damping characteristics were experimentally determined. Results were obtained over a range of modified Sommerfeld Number from 1.5E6 to 1.5E7, and at temperatures from 25 to 538 C. An Experimental procedure was developed comparing the error in two curve fitting functions to reveal different modes of physical behavior throughout the operating domain. The maximum change in dimensionless stiffness was 3.0E-2 to 6.5E-2 over the Sommerfeld Number range tested. Stiffness decreased with temperature by as much as a factor of two from 25 to 538 C. Dimensionless damping was a stronger function of Sommerfeld Number ranging from 20 to 300. The temperature effect on damping being more qualitative, showed the damping mechanism shifted from viscous type damping to frictional type as temperature increased.

  12. Analysis of a two row hydrostatic journal bearing with variable properties, inertia effects and surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Adams, M. L.; Mullen, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A computer algorithm for simulation of hydrostatic journal bearing pressure-flow behavior has been generated. The effects taken into account are inertia, cavitation, variable properties (isothermal bearing) and roughness. The program has been specifically tailored for simulation of the hybrid bearing of the cryogenic turbopumps of the main shuttle engine. Due to the high pressure (515 psia) of the supply line no cavitation has been found. The influence of the roughness effects have been found to become important only when the surface-roughness order of magnitude is comparable with that of the bearing clearance itself. Pocket edge inertia and variable properties have been found to have quite an important influence upon the pocket pressure, field pressure distribution and lubricant mass flow.

  13. Asphaltene Surface Erosion in Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, M.; Calixto-Rodriguez, M.; Martinez, H.; Poveda C., J.; Reyes G., P.; Altuzar, P.

    2010-02-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was applied for plasma characterization during erosion of substrates of asphaltene. The amount of 100 mg of asphaltene was carefully applied to an electrode and exposed to air plasma glow discharge at a pressure of 1.0 Torr. The plasma was generated in a stainless steel discharge chamber by an AC generator with a frequency of 60 Hz and an output power of about 60 W. The electron temperature was found to be 6.88 eV, and the ion density is about 3.5 × 1016 cm-3. As the asphaltene was exposed to the air plasma, the surface was etched. The emission from molecular bands CS2, O3, N2+, NO, O2, CS, S2, CN, C7H7, C2, H2, C2-, NiO, N2 and SO, and atomic line O, were observed and some of them were used to monitor the evolution of asphaltene erosion. The asphaltene weight was reduced gradually with an etching rate of about 0.844 mg/min, during the first 20 min.

  14. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  15. Air-bearing-based satellite attitude dynamics simulator for control software research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Brij N.; Rasmussen, Richard E.

    2001-08-01

    A Satellite Attitude Dynamics Simulator (SADS) has been developed to facilitate the research and development of spacecraft flight attitude control software at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA. The simulator provides a real-time 3 degree of freedom (3DOF) synthetic spacecraft hardware-in-the-loop environment, that includes realistic angular motions, sensor-effector delays, and control torque profiles. Control software, entered into a notebook PC mounted on the equipment platform, is input as high level object oriented code, allowing rapid code development and thorough post-test analysis. Three flight-like reaction wheels and eight cold-gas thrusters that are mounted to the SADS equipment platform provide motion simulation torque. The equipment platform is suspended in air by a spherical segment air bearing. This virtually frictionless suspension allows free rotation of the equipment platform about any rotation axis. Three separate sets of sensors, three single-axis rate gyros, a three-axis magnetometer, and a two-axis sun sensor monitor SADS platform motion. This paper discusses the SADS design, and the practical uses of this simulator for satellite attitude control system software research and development.

  16. Trends in Surface Temperature from AIRS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Aumann, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    To address possible causes of the current hiatus in the Earth's global temperature we investigate the trends and variability in the surface temperature using retrievals obtained from the measurements by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and its companion instrument, the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), onboard of Aqua spacecraft in 2002-2014. The data used are L3 monthly means on a 1x1degree spatial grid. We separate the land and ocean temperatures, as well as temperatures in Artic, Antarctic and desert regions. We find a monotonic positive trend for the land temperature but not for the ocean temperature. The difference in the regional trends can help to explain why the global surface temperature remains almost unchanged but the frequency of occurrence of the extreme events increases under rising anthropogenic forcing. The results are compared with the model studies. This work was supported by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Operations Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied...

  18. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1910.425 Section 1910.425..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Operations Procedures § 1910.425 Surface-supplied air diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in surface-supplied...

  19. Journal bearing

    DOEpatents

    Menke, John R.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-05-11

    1. An improved journal bearing comprising in combination a non-rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a first bearing surface, a rotatable cylindrical bearing member having a confronting second bearing surface having a plurality of bearing elements, a source of lubricant adjacent said bearing elements for supplying lubricant thereto, each bearing element consisting of a pair of elongated relatively shallowly depressed surfaces lying in a cylindrical surface co-axial with the non-depressed surface and diverging from one another in the direction of rotation and obliquely arranged with respect to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member to cause a flow of lubricant longitudinally along said depressed surfaces from their distal ends toward their proximal ends as said bearing members are rotated relative to one another, each depressed surface subtending a radial angle of less than 360.degree., and means for rotating said rotatable bearing member to cause the lubricant to flow across and along said depressed surfaces, the flow of lubricant being impeded by the non-depressed portions of said second bearing surface to cause an increase in the lubricant pressure.

  20. Identification of water-bearing fractures by the use of geophysical logs, May to July 1998, former Naval Air Warfare Center, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.; Bird, Philip H.

    1999-01-01

    Between May and July 1998, 10 monitor wells were drilled near the site of the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Warminster, Bucks County, Pa., to monitor water levels and sample ground water in shallow and intermediate water-bearing fractures. The sampling will determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of contaminated ground water migrating from known or suspected sources. Three boreholes were drilled on the property at 960 Jacksonville Road, at the northwestern side of NAWC, along strike from Area A; seven boreholes were drilled in Area B in the southeastern corner of NAWC. Depths range from 40.5 to 150 feet below land surface. Borehole geophysical logging and video surveys were used to identify water-bearing fractures so that appropriate intervals could be screened in each monitor well. Geophysical logs were obtained at the 10 monitor wells. Video surveys were obtained at three monitor wells in the southeastern corner of the NAWC property. Caliper logs and video surveys were used to locate fractures. Inflections on fluid-temperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-bearing fractures. Heatpulse-flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, video surveys, and driller?s logs, all wells were screened such that water-level fluctuations could be monitored and water samples collected from discrete water-bearing fractures in each monitor well.

  1. On the nonlinear steady-state response of rigid rotors supported by air foil bearings-Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jon S.; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2015-06-01

    The demand for oil-free turbo compressors is increasing. Current trends are divided between active magnetic bearings and air foil bearings (AFB), the latter being important due to mechanical simplicity. AFB supported rotors are sensitive to unbalance due to low damping and nonlinear characteristics, hence accurate prediction of their response is important. This paper gives theoretical and experimental contributions by implementing and validating a new method to simulate the nonlinear steady-state response of a rotor supported by three pads segmented AFBs. The fluid film pressures, foil deflections and rotor movements are simultaneously solved, considering foil stiffness and damping coefficients estimated using a structural model, previously described and validated against experiments.

  2. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  3. Two-phase air/oil flow in aero engine bearing chambers: Characterization of oil film flows

    SciTech Connect

    Glahn, A.; Wittig, S.

    1996-07-01

    For the design of secondary air and lubrication oil systems, a sufficient knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena under bearing chamber flow conditions is required. The characterization of oil film flows at the bearing chamber walls is one of the major tasks for a better understanding of these processes and, therefore, a necessity for improvements of the efficiency of aero engines. The present paper gives a contribution to this subject. Utilizing a fiber-optic LDV setup, measurements of oil film velocity profiles have been performed in the high-speed bearing chamber rig simulating real engine conditions. All data have been compared with different theoretical approaches, which have been derived from a force balance at a liquid film element, including geometric conditions and temperature dependent fluid properties, and by approaches for the eddy viscosity available in the literature.

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1085 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface-supplied air diving. 1926.1085 Section 1926.1085..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1085 Surface-supplied air diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction...

  9. Bearing surface design changes affect contact patterns in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Jocelyn M; Townsend, Elizabeth; Lipman, Joseph; Sculco, Thomas P; Wright, Timothy M

    2007-11-01

    The impact of design changes intended to improve wear of knee replacements can be assessed from analysis of retrieved implants. We hypothesized changes in bearing surface conformity from the Insall-Burstein II knee to a successor, the Optetrak, intended to improve contact stresses would be apparent in wear patterns observed on retrieved tibial inserts. From 151 Insall-Burstein II and 54 Optetrak retrieved components, 35 pairs (Insall-Burstein II and Optetrak) were matched on length of implantation, body mass index, and age. Digital images of the bearing surfaces were used to identify and measure wear modes, which were then converted to a percentage of the total possible contact area. Burnishing was the most prevalent mode for both designs followed by scratching and then pitting. The percentage of involved area was greater for the Optetrak for 23 pairs. Interestingly, for the nine matched pairs with length of implantation longer than 2 years, six of the Insall-Burstein II inserts had considerably greater scratching and pitting and five exhibited abrasion and creep absent from Optetrak implants. Bearing surface design is a major factor that can affect kinematics and contact patterns. Our observations confirm the considerable impact of small changes in conformity and suggest models predicting contact stresses adequately reflect in vivo performance. PMID:18062045

  10. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  11. Development of magnetically preloaded air bearings for a linear slide: active compensation of three degrees of freedom motion errors.

    PubMed

    Ro, Seung-Kook; Kim, Soohyun; Kwak, Yoonkeun; Park, Chun-Hong

    2008-03-01

    This article describes a linear air-bearing stage that uses active control to compensate for its motion errors. The active control is based on preloads generated by magnetic actuators, which were designed to generate nominal preloads for the air bearings using permanent magnets to maintain the desired stiffness while changing the air-bearing clearance by varying the magnetic flux generated by the current in electromagnetic coils. A single-axis linear stage with a linear motor and 240 mm of travel range was built to verify this design concept and used to test its performance. The motion of the table in three directions was controlled with four magnetic actuators driven by current amplifiers and a DSP (Digital Signal Processor)-based digital controller. The motion errors were measured using a laser interferometer combined with a two-probe method, and had 0.085 microm of repeatability for the straightness error. As a result of feed-forward active compensation, the errors were reduced from 1.09 to 0.11 microm for the vertical motion, from 9.42 to 0.18 arcsec for the pitch motion, and from 2.42 to 0.18 arcsec for the roll motion. PMID:18377049

  12. Development of magnetically preloaded air bearings for a linear slide: Active compensation of three degrees of freedom motion errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Seung-Kook; Kim, Soohyun; Kwak, Yoonkeun; Park, Chun-Hong

    2008-03-01

    This article describes a linear air-bearing stage that uses active control to compensate for its motion errors. The active control is based on preloads generated by magnetic actuators, which were designed to generate nominal preloads for the air bearings using permanent magnets to maintain the desired stiffness while changing the air-bearing clearance by varying the magnetic flux generated by the current in electromagnetic coils. A single-axis linear stage with a linear motor and 240mm of travel range was built to verify this design concept and used to test its performance. The motion of the table in three directions was controlled with four magnetic actuators driven by current amplifiers and a DSP (Digital Signal Processor)-based digital controller. The motion errors were measured using a laser interferometer combined with a two-probe method, and had 0.085μm of repeatability for the straightness error. As a result of feed-forward active compensation, the errors were reduced from 1.09to0.11μm for the vertical motion, from 9.42to0.18arcsec for the pitch motion, and from 2.42to0.18arcsec for the roll motion.

  13. The Role of Iron-Bearing Minerals in NO2 to HONO Conversion on Soil Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kebede, Mulu A; Bish, David L; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Engelhard, Mark H; Raff, Jonathan D

    2016-08-16

    Nitrous acid (HONO) accumulates in the nocturnal boundary layer where it is an important source of daytime hydroxyl radicals. Although there is clear evidence for the involvement of heterogeneous reactions of NO2 on surfaces as a source of HONO, mechanisms remain poorly understood. We used coated-wall flow tube measurements of NO2 reactivity on environmentally relevant surfaces (Fe (hydr)oxides, clay minerals, and soil from Arizona and the Saharan Desert) and detailed mineralogical characterization of substrates to show that reduction of NO2 by Fe-bearing minerals in soil can be a more important source of HONO than the putative NO2 hydrolysis mechanism. The magnitude of NO2-to-HONO conversion depends on the amount of Fe(2+) present in substrates and soil surface acidity. Studies examining the dependence of HONO flux on substrate pH revealed that HONO is formed at soil pH < 5 from the reaction between NO2 and Fe(2+)(aq) present in thin films of water coating the surface, whereas in the range of pH 5-8 HONO stems from reaction of NO2 with structural iron or surface complexed Fe(2+) followed by protonation of nitrite via surface Fe-OH2(+) groups. Reduction of NO2 on ubiquitous Fe-bearing minerals in soil may explain HONO accumulation in the nocturnal boundary layer and the enhanced [HONO]/[NO2] ratios observed during dust storms in urban areas. PMID:27409359

  14. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature from MODIS 1km Resolution Land Surface Temperature Over Northern China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.; Gerasimov, Irina

    2010-01-01

    Surface air temperature is a critical variable to describe the energy and water cycle of the Earth-atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. It is a very important variable in agricultural applications and climate change studies. This is a preliminary study to examine statistical relationships between ground meteorological station measured surface daily maximum/minimum air temperature and satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature from MODIS over the dry and semiarid regions of northern China. Studies were conducted for both MODIS-Terra and MODIS-Aqua by using year 2009 data. Results indicate that the relationships between surface air temperature and remotely sensed land surface temperature are statistically significant. The relationships between the maximum air temperature and daytime land surface temperature depends significantly on land surface types and vegetation index, but the minimum air temperature and nighttime land surface temperature has little dependence on the surface conditions. Based on linear regression relationship between surface air temperature and MODIS land surface temperature, surface maximum and minimum air temperatures are estimated from 1km MODIS land surface temperature under clear sky conditions. The statistical errors (sigma) of the estimated daily maximum (minimum) air temperature is about 3.8 C(3.7 C).

  15. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  16. Lessons Learned from AIRS: Improved Determination of Surface and Atmospheric Temperatures Using Only Shortwave AIRS Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of shortwave channels available to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) to improve the determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures. The AIRS instrument is compared with the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on-board the MetOp-A satellite. The objectives of the AIRS/AMSU were to (1) provide real time observations to improve numerical weather prediction via data assimilation, (2) Provide observations to measure and explain interannual variability and trends and (3) Use of AIRS product error estimates allows for QC optimized for each application. Successive versions in the AIRS retrieval methodology have shown significant improvement.

  17. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Surface Air Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bing (Inventor); Hu, Yongxiang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for remotely measuring surface air pressure. In one embodiment, the method of the present invention utilizes the steps of transmitting a signal having multiple frequencies into the atmosphere, measuring the transmitted/reflected signal to determine the relative received power level of each frequency and then determining the surface air pressure based upon the attenuation of the transmitted frequencies.

  18. Ceramic-on-ceramic versus ceramic-on-polyethylene bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dongcai; Yang, Xiao; Tan, Yang; Alaidaros, Mohammed; Chen, Liaobin

    2015-04-01

    The choice between ceramic-on-ceramic (COC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (COP) in primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and durability of COC vs COP bearing surfaces in THA. Based on published randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) identified in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the authors performed a meta-analysis comparing the clinical and radiographic outcomes of COC with those of COP. Two investigators independently selected the studies and extracted the data. The methodological quality of each RCT was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Relative risks and 95% confidence intervals from each trial were pooled using random-effects or fixed-effects models depending on the heterogeneity of the included studies. Nine RCTs involving 1575 patients (1747 hips) met the predetermined inclusion criteria. Eight of 9 included RCTs had high methodological quality. The heterogeneity was not significant, and all the results were pooled using a fixed-effects model. The results demonstrated that COC significantly increased the risks of squeaking and total implant fracture compared with COP. No significant differences with respect to revision, osteolysis and radiolucent lines, loosening, dislocation, and deep infection were observed between the COC and COP bearing surfaces. This meta-analysis resulted in no sufficient evidence to identify any clinical or radiographic advantage of COC vs COP bearing surfaces in the short- to mid-term follow-up period. Long-term follow-up is required for further evaluation. PMID:25901628

  19. Very high cycle fatigue behavior of SAE52100 bearing steel by ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification.

    PubMed

    Cho, In Shik; He, Yinsheng; Li, Kejian; Oh, Joo Yeon; Shin, Keesam; Lee, Chang Soon; Park, In Gyu

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the SAE52100 bearing steel contained large quantities of cementite dispersed in ferrite matrix was subjected to the ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) treatment that aims for the extension of fatigue life. The microstructure and fatigue life of the untreated and treated specimens were studied by using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and a developed ultra-high cycle fatigue test (UFT). After UNSM treatment, the coarse ferrite grains (- 10 μm) were refined to nanosize (- 200 nm), therefore, nanostructured surface layers were fabricated. Meanwhile, in the deformed layer, the number density and area fraction of cementite were increased up to - 400% and - 550%, respectively, which increased with the decrease in depth from the topmost treated surface. The improvement of hardness (from 200 Hv to 280 Hv) and high cycles fatigue strength by - 10% were considered the contribution of the developed nanostructure in the UNSM treated specimen. PMID:25958512

  20. Associations between PBDEs in office air, dust, and surface wipes.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Deborah J; McClean, Michael D; Fraser, Alicia J; Weinberg, Janice; Stapleton, Heather M; Webster, Thomas F

    2013-09-01

    Increased use of flame-retardants in office furniture may increase exposure to PBDEs in the office environment. However, partitioning of PBDEs within the office environment is not well understood. Our objectives were to examine relationships between concurrent measures of PBDEs in office air, floor dust, and surface wipes. We collected air, dust, and surface wipe samples from 31 offices in Boston, MA. Correlation and linear regression were used to evaluate associations between variables. Geometric mean (GM) concentrations of individual BDE congeners in air and congener specific octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) were used to predict GM concentrations in dust and surface wipes and compared to the measured concentrations. GM concentrations of PentaBDEs in office air, dust, and surface wipes were 472pg/m(3), 2411ng/g, and 77pg/cm(2), respectively. BDE209 was detected in 100% of dust samples (GM=4202ng/g), 93% of surface wipes (GM=125pg/cm(2)), and 39% of air samples. PentaBDEs in dust and air were moderately correlated with each other (r=0.60, p=0.0003), as well as with PentaBDEs in surface wipes (r=0.51, p=0.003 for both dust and air). BDE209 in dust was correlated with BDE209 in surface wipes (r=0.69, p=0.007). Building (three categories) and PentaBDEs in dust were independent predictors of PentaBDEs in both air and surface wipes, together explaining 50% (p=0.0009) and 48% (p=0.001) of the variation respectively. Predicted and measured concentrations of individual BDE congeners were highly correlated in dust (r=0.98, p<0.0001) and surface wipes (r=0.94, p=002). BDE209 provided an interesting test of this equilibrium partitioning model as it is a low volatility compound. Associations between PentaBDEs in multiple sampling media suggest that collecting dust or surface wipes may be a convenient method of characterizing exposure in the indoor environment. The volatility of individual congeners, as well as physical characteristics of the indoor environment

  1. Associations between PBDEs in Office Air, Dust, and Surface Wipes

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Deborah J.; McClean, Michael D.; Fraser, Alicia J.; Weinberg, Janice; Stapleton, Heather M.; Webster, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Increased use of flame-retardants in office furniture may increase exposure to PBDEs in the office environment. However, partitioning of PBDEs within the office environment is not well understood. Our objectives were to examine relationships between concurrent measures of PBDEs in office air, floor dust, and surface wipes. We collected air, dust, and surface wipe samples from 31 offices in Boston, MA. Correlation and linear regression were used to evaluate associations between variables. Geometric mean (GM) concentrations of individual BDE congeners in air and congener specific octanol-air partition coefficients (Koa) were used to predict GM concentrations in dust and surface wipes and compared to the measured concentrations. GM concentrations of PentaBDEs in office air, dust, and surface wipes were 472 pg/m3, 2411 ng/g, and 77 pg/cm2, respectively. BDE209 was detected in 100% of dust samples (GM=4202 ng/g), 93% of surface wipes (GM=125 pg/cm2), and 39% of air samples. PentaBDEs in dust and air were moderately correlated with each other (r=0.60, p=0.0003), as well as with PentaBDEs in surface wipes (r=0.51, p=0.003 for both dust and air). BDE209 in dust was correlated with BDE209 in surface wipes (r=0.69, p=0.007). Building (three categories) and PentaBDEs in dust were independent predictors of PentaBDEs in both air and surface wipes, together explaining 50% (p=0.0009) and 48% (p=0.001) of the variation respectively. Predicted and measured concentrations of individual BDE congeners were highly correlated in dust (r=0.98, p<0.0001) and surface wipes (r=0.94, p=002). BDE209 provided an interesting test of this equilibrium partitioning model as it is a low volatility compound. Associations between PentaBDEs in multiple sampling media suggest that collecting dust or surface wipes may be a convenient method of characterizing exposure in the indoor environment. The volatility of individual congeners, as well as physical characteristics of the indoor environment

  2. Role of Surface Characteristics in Urban Meteorology and Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailor, David Jean

    Urbanization results in a landscape with significantly modified surface characteristics. The lower values of reflectivity to solar radiation, surface moisture availability, and vegetative cover, along with the higher values of anthropogenic heat release and surface roughness combine to result in higher air temperatures in urban areas relative to their rural counterparts. Through their role in the surface energy balance and surface exchange processes, these surface characteristics are capable of modifying the local meteorology. The impacts on wind speeds, air temperatures, and mixing heights are of particular importance, as they have significant implications in terms of urban energy use and air quality. This research presents several major improvements to the meteorological modeling methodology for highly heterogeneous terrain. A land-use data base is implemented to provide accurate specification of surface characteristic variability in simulations of the Los Angeles Basin. Several vegetation parameterizations are developed and implemented, and a method for including anthropogenic heat release into the model physics is presented. These modeling advancements are then used in a series of three-dimensional simulations which were developed to investigate the potential meteorological impact of several mitigation strategies. Results indicate that application of moderate tree-planting and urban-lightening programs in Los Angeles may produce summertime air temperature reductions on the order of 4^circ C with a concomitant reduction in air pollution. The analysis also reveals several mechanisms whereby the application of these mitigation strategies may potentially increase pollutant concentrations. The pollution and energy use consequences are discussed in detail.

  3. Role of surface characteristics in urban meteorology and air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, D.J.

    1993-08-01

    Urbanization results in a landscape with significantly modified surface characteristics. The lower values of reflectivity to solar radiation, surface moisture availability, and vegetative cover, along with the higher values of anthropogenic heat release and surface roughness combine to result higher air temperatures in urban areas relative to their rural counterparts. Through their role in the surface energy balance and surface exchange processes, these surface characteristics are capable of modifying the local meteorology. The impacts on wind speeds, air temperatures, and mixing heights are of particular importance, as they have significant implications in terms of urban energy use and air quality. This research presents several major improvements to the meteorological modeling methodology for highly heterogeneous terrain. A land-use data-base is implemented to provide accurate specification of surface characteristic variability in simulations of the Los Angeles Basin. Several vegetation parameterizations are developed and implemented, and a method for including anthropogenic heat release into the model physics is presented. These modeling advancements are then used in a series of three-dimensional simulations which were developed to investigate the potential meteorological impact of several mitigation strategies. Results indicate that application of moderate tree-planting and urban-lightening programs in Los Angeles may produce summertime air temperature reductions on the order of 4{degree}C with a concomitant reduction in air pollution. The analysis also reveals several mechanisms whereby the application of these mitigation strategies may potentially increase pollutant concentrations. The pollution and energy use consequences are discussed in detail.

  4. Preliminary Investigation of Molybdenum Disulfide-air-mist Lubrication for Roller Bearings Operating to DN Values of 1 x 10(exp 6) and Ball Bearings Operating to Temperatures of 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macks, E F; Nemeth, Z N; Anderson, W J

    1951-01-01

    The effectiveness of molybdenum disulfide MoS2 as a bearing lubricant was determined at high temperature and at high speeds. A 1-inch-bore ball bearing operated at temperatures to 1000 F, a speed of 1725 rpm, and a thrust load of 20 pounds when lubricated only with MoS2-air mist. A 75-millimeter-bore cageless roller bearing, provided with a MoS2-syrup coating before operation, operated at DN values to 1 x 10(exp 6) with a load of 368 pounds.

  5. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic c...

  6. Evaluation of chromium oxide and molybdenum disulfide coatings in self-acting stops of an air-lubricated Rayleigh step thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1974-01-01

    Two coatings for a Rayleigh step thrust bearing were tested when coasting down and stopping under self-acting operation in air. The thrust bearing had an outside diameter of 8.9 cm (3.5 in.), an inside diameter of 5.4 cm (2.1 in.), and nine sectors. The load was 73 N (16.4 lbf). The load pressure was 19.1 kN/per square meter (2.77 lbf/per square inch) on the total thrust bearing area. The chromium oxide coating was good to 150 stops without bearing deterioration, and the molybdenum disulfide coating was good for only four stops before bearing deterioration. The molybdenum disulfide coated bearing failed after nine stops.

  7. Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

  8. Morphology of Air Nanobubbles Trapped atHydrophobic Nanopatterned Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Checco, A.; Hofmann, T.; DiMasi, E.; Black, C.T.; Ocko, B.M.

    2010-04-01

    The details of air nanobubble trapping at the interface between water and a nanostructured hydrophobic silicon surface are investigated using X-ray scattering and contact angle measurements. Large-area silicon surfaces containing hexagonally packed, 20 nm wide hydrophobic cavities provide ideal model surfaces for studying the morphology of air nanobubbles trapped inside cavities and its dependence on the cavity depth. Transmission small-angle X-ray scattering measurements show stable trapping of air inside the cavities with a partial water penetration of 5-10 nm into the pores, independent of their large depth variation. This behavior is explained by consideration of capillary effects and the cavity geometry. For parabolic cavities, the liquid can reach a thermodynamically stable configuration - a nearly planar nanobubble meniscus - by partially penetrating into the pores. This microscopic information correlates very well with the macroscopic surface wetting behavior.

  9. Turbulent drag reduction over air- and liquid- impregnated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Brian J.; Van Buren, Tyler; Fu, Matthew K.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    Results on turbulent skin friction reduction over air- and liquid-impregnated surfaces are presented for aqueous Taylor-Couette flow. The surfaces are fabricated by mechanically texturing the inner cylinder and chemically modifying the features to make them either non-wetting with respect to water (air-infused, or superhydrophobic case), or wetting with respect to an oil that is immiscible with water (liquid-infused case). The drag reduction, which remains fairly constant over the Reynolds number range tested (100 ≤ Reτ ≤ 140), is approximately 10% for the superhydrophobic surface and 14% for the best liquid-infused surface. Our results suggest that liquid-infused surfaces may enable robust drag reduction in high Reynolds number turbulent flows without the shortcomings associated with conventional superhydrophobic surfaces, namely, failure under conditions of high hydrodynamic pressure and turbulent flow fluctuations.

  10. Laser surface pretreatment of 100Cr6 bearing steel - Hardening effects and white etching zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buling, Anna; Sändker, Hendrik; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Krupp, Ulrich; Hamann-Steinmeier, Angela

    2016-08-01

    In order to achieve a surface pretreatment of the bearing steel 100Cr6 (1-1.5 wt.% Cr) a laser-based process was used. The obtained modification may result in an optimization of the adhesive properties of the surface with respect to an anticorrosion polymer coating on the basis of PEEK (poly-ether-ether-ketone), which is applied on the steel surface by a laser melting technique. This work deals with the influence of the laser-based pretreatment regarding the surface microstructure and the micro-hardness of the steel, which has been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and automated micro-hardness testing. The most suitable parameter set for the laser-based pretreatment leads to the formation of very hard white etching zones (WEZ) with a thickness of 23 μm, whereas this pretreatment also induces topographical changes. The occurrence of the white etching zones is attributed to near-surface re-austenitization and rapid quenching. Moreover, dark etching zones (DEZ) with a thickness of 32 μm are found at the laser path edges as well as underneath the white etching zones (WEZ). In these areas, the hardness is decreased due to the formation of oxides as a consequence of re-tempering.

  11. Design for H type co-planar precision stage based on closed air bearing guideway with vacuum attraction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Shi, Zhaoyao; Lin, Jiachun; Zhang, Hua

    2011-12-01

    The accuracy of traditional two-dimensional precision stage is limited not only by the accuracy of each guideway but also by the configuration of the stage. It is not easy to calculate and compensate the total accuracy of the stage due to the complicated influence caused by the different position of the slides. An air bearing guideways with vacuum attraction forces has been designed with closed slide structure to enhance the stiffness and avoid the deformation caused by the weight of slide and workpieces. An H style two-dimension ultra-precision stage with co-planar structure has been developed based on the air bearing guideways to avoid the multi-influence by the axes. Driven by linear motors, the position of the workpiece is encoded by length scales with resolution of 50nm and thermal expansion of 0.6 μm/m/°C (0 °C to 30 °C). The travel span of the stage is 320x320mm, during which each axis has a positioning accuracy of +/-1μm, a repeatability of +/-0.3μm and a straightness of +/-0.5μm. The stage can be applied in precision manufacturing and measurement.

  12. White Light Used to Enable Enhanced Surface Topography, Geometry, and Wear Characterization of Oil-Free Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucero, John M.

    2003-01-01

    A new optically based measuring capability that characterizes surface topography, geometry, and wear has been employed by NASA Glenn Research Center s Tribology and Surface Science Branch. To characterize complex parts in more detail, we are using a three-dimensional, surface structure analyzer-the NewView5000 manufactured by Zygo Corporation (Middlefield, CT). This system provides graphical images and high-resolution numerical analyses to accurately characterize surfaces. Because of the inherent complexity of the various analyzed assemblies, the machine has been pushed to its limits. For example, special hardware fixtures and measuring techniques were developed to characterize Oil- Free thrust bearings specifically. We performed a more detailed wear analysis using scanning white light interferometry to image and measure the bearing structure and topography, enabling a further understanding of bearing failure causes.

  13. Influence of reconstruction water-bearing levels on surface displacement of post-mining areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milczarek, Wojciech; Blachowski, Jan; Grzempowski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    The phenomenon of secondary deformation characteristic of the post-mining areas is not sufficiently recognized. For ground surfaces phenomenon may be continuous or discontinuous. There is no sufficient information that describes behavior of the rock mass in the long term after end of exploitation. It is considered that this phenomenon is gradually disappears with end of exploitation. Reliable quantitative data comes only from the analysis of direct measurements in selected areas: geodetic and satellites measurements. Analyzing current situation of operating mines can be said that in the near years, more centers will limit the mining of coal mining. This will contribute to separation further of post-mining areas, in which will be required to maintaining a permanent monitoring and making predictions on the impact of ended exploitation of the rock mass surface. This will be particularly important for highly urbanized areas. This study used finite element method (FEM) to describe phenomenon of reconstruction water-bearing levels and its impact on displacement on the ground surface. It was assumed that significant factors that influence the occurrence and size of secondary deformations are: reconstruction of water-bearing levels in the prior drainer rock mass, size of past exploitation, spatial distribution of coal seams and geological and tectonic structure has been assumed. The transversally isotropic model of six elastic constants: E1 = E2, E3, ν = ν12, ν13, G12, G13 has been assumed to describe of rock mass in the numerical calculations. Geometrical models used in the numerical calculations have been developed using GIS tools. For the study two-dimensional and three-dimensional models characterized by different geological conditions and different configuration of mining data have been developed. The results obtained displacements of the ground surface for the period of mining activity has been verified with the results based on the Knothe theory. The results of

  14. EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1990--1993 data

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G.; Kada, J.

    1995-11-01

    Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1990--1993, with the exception of April 1993, indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the sampling and analytical techniques that were used to collect and measure them. The occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. Following the April 6, 1993 accident and release of radionuclides into the atmosphere at a reprocessing plant in the Tomsk-7 military nuclear complex located 16 km north of the Siberian city of Tomsk, Russia, weekly air filter samples from Barrow, Alaska; Thule, Greenland and Moosonee, Canada were selected for special analyses. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that the authors measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. Variations in the annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites appear to result primarily from changes in the atmospheric production rate of this cosmogenic radionuclide. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. The monthly gross gamma-ray activity and the monthly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb measured at sampling sites in SASP during 1990--1993 are presented. The weekly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb for samples collected during 1990--1993 are given for 17 sites.

  15. The nature of the air-cleaved mica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Hugo K.; Thomson, Neil H.

    2016-06-01

    The accepted image of muscovite mica is that of an inert and atomically smooth surface, easily prepared by cleavage in an ambient atmosphere. Consequently, mica is extensively used a model substrate in many fundamental studies of surface phenomena and as a substrate for AFM imaging of biomolecules. In this review we present evidence from the literature that the above picture is not quite correct. The mica used in experimental work is almost invariably cleaved in laboratory air, where a reaction between the mica surface, atmospheric CO2 and water occurs immediately after cleavage. The evidence suggests very strongly that as a result the mica surface becomes covered by up to one formula unit of K2CO3 per nm2, which is mobile under humid conditions, and crystallises under drier conditions. The properties of mica in air or water vapour cannot be fully understood without reference to the surface K2CO3, and many studies of the structure of adsorbed water on mica surfaces may need to be revisited. With this new insight, however, the air-cleaved mica should provide exciting opportunities to study phenomena such as two-dimensional ion diffusion, electrolyte effects on surface conductivity, and two-dimensional crystal nucleation.

  16. A systematic study of ball passing frequencies based on dynamic modeling of rolling ball bearings with localized surface defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Linkai; Cao, Hongrui; He, Zhengjia; Li, Yamin

    2015-11-01

    Ball passing frequencies (BPFs) are very important features for condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rolling ball bearings. The ball passing frequency on outer raceway (BPFO) and the ball passing frequency on inner raceway (BPFI) are usually calculated by two well-known kinematics equations. In this paper, a systematic study of BPFs of rolling ball bearings is carried out. A novel method for accurately calculating BPFs based on a complete dynamic model of rolling ball bearings with localized surface defects is proposed. In the used dynamic model, three-dimensional motions, relative slippage, cage effects and localized surface defects are all considered. Moreover, localized surface defects are modeled accurately with consideration of the finite size of the ball, the additional clearance due to material absence, and changes of contact force directions. The reasonability of the proposed method for the prediction of dynamic behaviors of actual ball bearings with localized surface defects and for the calculation of BPFs is discussed by investigating the motion characteristics of a ball when it rolls through a defect. Parametric investigation shows that the shaft speed, external loads, the friction coefficient, raceway groove curvature factors, the initial contact angle, and defect sizes have great effects on BPFs. For a loaded ball bearing, the combination of rolling and sliding in contact region occurs, and the BPFs calculated by simple kinematical relationships are inaccurate, especially for high speed, low external load, and large initial contact angle conditions where severe skidding occurs. The hypothesis that the percentage variation of the spacing between impulses in a defective ball bearing was about 1-2% reported in previous investigations can be satisfied only for the conditions where the skidding effect in a bearing is slight. Finally, the proposed method is verified with two experiments.

  17. Symmetric scaling properties in global surface air temperature anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotsos, Costas A.; Efstathiou, Maria N.

    2015-08-01

    We have recently suggested "long-term memory" or internal long-range correlation within the time-series of land-surface air temperature (LSAT) anomalies in both hemispheres. For example, an increasing trend in the LSAT anomalies is followed by another one at a different time in a power-law fashion. However, our previous research was mainly focused on the overall long-term persistence, while in the present study, the upward and downward scaling dynamics of the LSAT anomalies are analysed, separately. Our results show that no significant fluctuation differences were found between the increments and decrements in LSAT anomalies, over the whole Earth and over each hemisphere, individually. On the contrary, the combination of land-surface air and sea-surface water temperature anomalies seemed to cause a departure from symmetry and the increments in the land and sea surface temperature anomalies appear to be more persistent than the decrements.

  18. Three-dimensional stress intensity factor analysis of a surface crack in a high-speed bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Hsu, Yingchun

    1990-01-01

    The boundary element method is applied to calculate the stress intensity factors of a surface crack in the rotating inner raceway of a high-speed roller bearing. The three-dimensional model consists of an axially stressed surface cracked plate subjected to a moving Hertzian contact loading. A multidomain formulation and singular crack-tip elements were employed to calculate the stress intensity factors accurately and efficiently for a wide range of configuration parameters. The results can provide the basis for crack growth calculations and fatigue life predictions of high-performance rolling element bearings that are used in aircraft engines.

  19. Calcium phosphate-titanium composites for articulating surfaces of load-bearing implants.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Dittrick, Stanley; Gualtieri, Thomas; Wu, Jeffrey; Bose, Susmita

    2016-04-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP)-titanium (Ti) composites were processed using a commercial laser engineered net shaping (LENS™) machine to increase wear resistance of articulating surfaces of load-bearing implants. Such composites could be used to cover the surface of titanium implants and potentially increase the lifetime of a joint replacement. It was hypothesized that adding calcium phosphate to commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) and Ti6Al4V alloy via laser processing would decrease the material loss when subjected to wear. This added protection would be due to the in situ formation of a CaP tribofilm. Different amounts of CaP were mixed by weight with pure Ti and Ti6Al4V powders. The mixed powders were then made into cylindrical samples using a commercial LENS™-750 system. Microstructures were observed and it was found the CaP had integrated into the titanium metal matrix. Compression test revealed that CaP significantly increased the 0.2% offset yield strength as well as the ultimate compressive strength of CP-Ti. It was found that the addition of CaP to pure titanium reduced the material loss and increased wear resistance. This was due to the formation of CaP tribofilm on the articulating surface. The in situ formed tribofilm also lowered the coefficient of friction and acted as a solid lubricant between the two interacting metal surfaces. Overall, CaP addition to Ti and its alloy Ti6Al4V show an effective way to minimize wear induced damage due to the formation of in situ tribofilm at the articulating surface, a strategy that can be utilized in various biomedical devices. PMID:26826471

  20. Evaluation of rotor-bearing system dynamic response to unbalance. [air conditioning equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, R. E.; Ozimek, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    The vibration environment within air conditioner rotating machinery referred to as an air cycle machine (ACM) was investigated to effectively increase ACM reliability. To assist in the selection of design changes which would result in improved ACM performance, various design modifications were incorporated into a baseline ACM configuration. For each design change, testing was conducted with the best balance achieveable (baseline) and with various degrees of unbalance. Relationships between unbalance (within the context of design changes) and the parameters associated with design goals were established. The results of rotor dynamics tests used to establish these relationships are presented.

  1. Static evaluation of surface coatings for compliant gas bearings in an oxidizing atmosphere to 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.; Gray, S.

    1978-01-01

    Hard wear-resistant coatings and soft low shear strength coatings were developed for an air-lubricated compliant journal bearing for a future automotive gas turbine engine. The coatings were expected to function in either 540 or 650 C ambient. Soft lubricant coatings were generally limited in temperature. Therefore emphasis was on the hard wear-resistant coatings. The coating materials covered were TiC, B4C, Cr3C2, WC, SiC, CrB2, TiB2, Cr2O3, Al2O3, Si3N4, Tribaloy 800, CaF2, CaF2-BaF2 eutectic, Ni-Co, silver, CdO-graphite and proprietary compounds. The coatings on test coupons were subjected to static oven screening tests. The test consisted of exposure of material samples in an oven for 300 h at the maximum temperature (540 or 650 C) and ten temperature cycles from room temperature to the maximum service temperature. On the basis of the specimen examinations the following coatings were recommended for future wear tests: TiC (sputtered), Cr2O3 (sputtered), Si3N4 (sputtered), CdO and graphite (fused), Kaman DES (a proprietary coating), CrB2 (plasma sprayed), Cr3C2 (detonation gun) and NASA PS-106 (plasma sprayed).

  2. Performance Testing of a Magnetically Suspended Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyro Based on the Single Axis Air Bearing Table

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Peiling; Zhang, Huijuan; Yan, Ning; Fang, Jiancheng

    2012-01-01

    Integrating the advantage of magnetic bearings with a double gimble control moment gyroscope (DGCMG), a magnetically suspended DGCMG (MSDGCMG) is an ideal actuator in high-precision, long life, and rapid maneuver attitude control systems. The work presented here mainly focuses on performance testing of a MSDGCMG independently developed by Beihang University, based on the single axis air bearing table. In this paper, taking into sufficient consideration to the moving-gimbal effects and the response bandwidth limit of the gimbal, a special MSDGCMG steering law is proposed subject to the limits of gimbal angle rate and angle acceleration. Finally, multiple experiments are carried out, with different MSDGCMG angular momenta as well as different desired attitude angles. The experimental results indicate that the MSDGCMG has a good gimbal angle rate and output torque tracking capabilities, and that the attitude stability with MSDGCMG as actuator is superior to 10−3°/s. The MSDGCMG performance testing in this paper, carried out under moving-base condition, will offer a technique base for the future research and application of MSDGCMGs. PMID:23012536

  3. Performance testing of a magnetically suspended double gimbal control moment gyro based on the single axis air bearing table.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peiling; Zhang, Huijuan; Yan, Ning; Fang, Jiancheng

    2012-01-01

    Integrating the advantage of magnetic bearings with a double gimble control moment gyroscope (DGCMG), a magnetically suspended DGCMG (MSDGCMG) is an ideal actuator in high-precision, long life, and rapid maneuver attitude control systems. The work presented here mainly focuses on performance testing of a MSDGCMG independently developed by Beihang University, based on the single axis air bearing table. In this paper, taking into sufficient consideration to the moving-gimbal effects and the response bandwidth limit of the gimbal, a special MSDGCMG steering law is proposed subject to the limits of gimbal angle rate and angle acceleration. Finally, multiple experiments are carried out, with different MSDGCMG angular momenta as well as different desired attitude angles. The experimental results indicate that the MSDGCMG has a good gimbal angle rate and output torque tracking capabilities, and that the attitude stability with MSDGCMG as actuator is superior to 10(-3)°/s. The MSDGCMG performance testing in this paper, carried out under moving-base condition, will offer a technique base for the future research and application of MSDGCMGs. PMID:23012536

  4. High-strength, surface-porous polyether-ether-ketone for load-bearing orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nathan T; Torstrick, F Brennan; Lee, Christopher S D; Dupont, Kenneth M; Safranski, David L; Chang, W Allen; Macedo, Annie E; Lin, Angela S P; Boothby, Jennifer M; Whittingslow, Daniel C; Carson, Robert A; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2015-02-01

    Despite its widespread clinical use in load-bearing orthopedic implants, polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) is often associated with poor osseointegration. In this study, a surface-porous PEEK material (PEEK-SP) was created using a melt extrusion technique. The porous layer was 399.6±63.3 μm thick and possessed a mean pore size of 279.9±31.6 μm, strut spacing of 186.8±55.5 μm, porosity of 67.3±3.1% and interconnectivity of 99.9±0.1%. Monotonic tensile tests showed that PEEK-SP preserved 73.9% of the strength (71.06±2.17 MPa) and 73.4% of the elastic modulus (2.45±0.31 GPa) of as-received, injection-molded PEEK. PEEK-SP further demonstrated a fatigue strength of 60.0 MPa at one million cycles, preserving 73.4% of the fatigue resistance of injection-molded PEEK. Interfacial shear testing showed the pore layer shear strength to be 23.96±2.26 MPa. An osseointegration model in the rat revealed substantial bone formation within the pore layer at 6 and 12 weeks via microcomputed tomography and histological evaluation. Ingrown bone was more closely apposed to the pore wall and fibrous tissue growth was reduced in PEEK-SP when compared to non-porous PEEK controls. These results indicate that PEEK-SP could provide improved osseointegration while maintaining the structural integrity necessary for load-bearing orthopedic applications. PMID:25463499

  5. High strength, surface porous polyether-ether-ketone for load-bearing orthopaedic implants

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Nathan T.; Torstrick, F. Brennan; Lee, Christopher S.D.; Dupont, Kenneth M.; Safranski, David L.; Chang, W. Allen; Macedo, Annie E.; Lin, Angela; Boothby, Jennifer M.; Whittingslow, Daniel C.; Carson, Robert A.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Gall, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Despite its widespread clinical use in load-bearing orthopaedic implants, polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) is often associated with poor osseointegration. In this study, a surface porous PEEK material (PEEK-SP) was created using a melt extrusion technique. The porous layer thickness was 399.6±63.3 µm and possessed a mean pore size of 279.9±31.6 µm, strut spacing of 186.8±55.5 µm, porosity of 67.3±3.1%, and interconnectivity of 99.9±0.1%. Monotonic tensile tests showed that PEEK-SP preserved 73.9% of the strength (71.06±2.17 MPa) and 73.4% of the elastic modulus (2.45±0.31 GPa) of as-received, injection molded PEEK. PEEK-SP further demonstrated a fatigue strength of 60.0 MPa at one million cycles, preserving 73.4% of the fatigue resistance of injection molded PEEK. Interfacial shear testing showed the pore layer shear strength to be 23.96±2.26 MPa. An osseointegration model in the rat revealed substantial bone formation within the pore layer at 6 and 12 weeks via µCT and histological evaluation. Ingrown bone was more closely apposed to the pore wall and fibrous tissue growth was reduced in PEEK-SP when compared to non-porous PEEK controls. These results indicate that PEEK-SP could provide improved osseointegration while maintaining the structural integrity necessary for load-bearing orthopaedic applications. PMID:25463499

  6. Emperor penguin body surfaces cool below air temperature.

    PubMed

    McCafferty, D J; Gilbert, C; Thierry, A-M; Currie, J; Le Maho, Y; Ancel, A

    2013-06-23

    Emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri are able to survive the harsh Antarctic climate because of specialized anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations for minimizing heat loss. Heat transfer theory predicts that metabolic heat loss in this species will mostly depend on radiative and convective cooling. To examine this, thermal imaging of emperor penguins was undertaken at the breeding colony of Pointe Géologie in Terre Adélie (66°40' S 140° 01' E), Antarctica in June 2008. During clear sky conditions, most outer surfaces of the body were colder than surrounding sub-zero air owing to radiative cooling. In these conditions, the feather surface will paradoxically gain heat by convection from surrounding air. However, owing to the low thermal conductivity of plumage any heat transfer to the skin surface will be negligible. Future thermal imaging studies are likely to yield further insights into the adaptations of this species to the Antarctic climate. PMID:23466479

  7. Emperor penguin body surfaces cool below air temperature

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, D. J.; Gilbert, C.; Thierry, A.-M.; Currie, J.; Le Maho, Y.; Ancel, A.

    2013-01-01

    Emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri are able to survive the harsh Antarctic climate because of specialized anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations for minimizing heat loss. Heat transfer theory predicts that metabolic heat loss in this species will mostly depend on radiative and convective cooling. To examine this, thermal imaging of emperor penguins was undertaken at the breeding colony of Pointe Géologie in Terre Adélie (66°40′ S 140° 01′ E), Antarctica in June 2008. During clear sky conditions, most outer surfaces of the body were colder than surrounding sub-zero air owing to radiative cooling. In these conditions, the feather surface will paradoxically gain heat by convection from surrounding air. However, owing to the low thermal conductivity of plumage any heat transfer to the skin surface will be negligible. Future thermal imaging studies are likely to yield further insights into the adaptations of this species to the Antarctic climate. PMID:23466479

  8. Quantification of air plasma chemistry for surface disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew J.; Clark, Douglas S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air plasmas, created by a variety of discharges, are promising sources of reactive species for the emerging field of plasma biotechnology because of their convenience and ability to operate at ambient conditions. One biological application of ambient-air plasma is microbial disinfection, and the ability of air plasmas to decontaminate both solid surfaces and liquid volumes has been thoroughly established in the literature. However, the mechanism of disinfection and which reactive species most strongly correlate with antimicrobial effects are still not well understood. We describe quantitative gas-phase measurements of plasma chemistry via infrared spectroscopy in confined volumes, focusing on air plasma generated via surface micro-discharge (SMD). Previously, it has been shown that gaseous chemistry is highly sensitive to operating conditions, and the measurements we describe here extend those findings. We quantify the gaseous concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) throughout the established ‘regimes’ for SMD air plasma chemistry: the low-power, ozone-dominated mode; the high-power, nitrogen oxides-dominated mode; and the intermediate, unstable transition region. The results presented here are in good agreement with previously published experimental studies of aqueous chemistry and parameterized models of gaseous chemistry. The principal finding of the present study is the correlation of bacterial inactivation on dry surfaces with gaseous chemistry across these time and power regimes. Bacterial decontamination is most effective in ‘NOx mode’ and less effective in ‘ozone mode’, with the weakest antibacterial effects in the transition region. Our results underscore the dynamic nature of air plasma chemistry and the importance of careful chemical characterization of plasma devices intended for biological applications.

  9. Bioactive surface modification of metal oxides via catechol-bearing modular peptides: multivalent-binding, surface retention, and peptide bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen; Policastro, Gina M; Hua, Geng; Guo, Kai; Zhou, Jinjun; Wesdemiotis, Chrys; Doll, Gary L; Becker, Matthew L

    2014-11-19

    A series of multivalent dendrons containing a bioactive osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) domain and surface-binding catechol domains were obtained through solid phase synthesis, and their binding affinity to hydroxyapatite, TiO2, ZrO2, CeO2, Fe3O4 and gold was characterized using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-d). Using the distinct difference in binding affinity of the bioconjugate to the metal oxides, TiO2-coated glass slides were selectively patterned with bioactive peptides. Cell culture studies demonstrated the bioavailability of the OGP and that OGP remained on the surface for at least 2 weeks under in vitro cell culture conditions. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcein (OCN) markers were upregulated 3-fold and 60-fold, respectively, relative to controls at 21 days. Similarly, 3-fold more calcium was deposited using the OGP tethered dendron compared to TiO2. These catechol-bearing dendrons provide a fast and efficient method to functionalize a wide range of inorganic materials with bioactive peptides and have the potential to be used in coating orthopaedic implants and fixation devices. PMID:25343707

  10. Pedicled sensate composite calcaneal flap to achieve full weight-bearing surface in midshaft leg amputations: case report.

    PubMed

    Livani, Bruno; de Castro, Gabriel F; Filho, Jose R Tonelli; Belangero, William D; Ramos, Tamara M; Mongon, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Of the possible levels of amputation, transtibial amputations result in functionally excellent outcomes. However, in contrast to hind foot amputations, such as Syme and especially Boyd amputation, acute or late complications related to the amputated stump are frequent with the various described techniques. The aim of this study was to describe a hind foot (including the calcaneum and fat pad) pedicled sensate flap with a surface that allowed full terminal weight-bearing in transtibial amputations in adults. One male patient, 66 years old with schizophrenia and chronic distal tibial osteomyelitis, underwent a leg amputation with sensate composite calcaneal flap construction. The stump was painless and able to bear total terminal weight at 12 weeks. Calcaneum tibial fusion was observed at 12-week postoperative follow-up. A below-knee prosthesis was adapted in 12 weeks, and at the 1-year follow-up, the patient was completely satisfied with the functional performance of his stump. The flap described provides proprioceptive feedback with the best bone and skin to support weight bearing. Another advantage is the possibility to use the same prosthesis commonly used in Boyd or Syme amputation due a longer arm leverage, which also allows full terminal weight-bearing. In the current study, a transtibial amputation covered with a pedicled sensate plantar flap preserving the calcaneum was proposed. In theory, the anatomic structures spared in this technique provide a strong full weight-bearing terminal surface of the stump that will last a lifetime. PMID:20945284

  11. Biphilic Surfaces for Enhanced Water Collection from Humid Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkoski, Jason; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Luedeman, William

    Surface wettability plays an important role in water recovery, distillation, dehumidification, and heat transfer. The efficiency of each process depends on the rate of droplet nucleation, droplet growth, and mass transfer. Unfortunately, hydrophilic surfaces are good at nucleation but poor at shedding. Hydrophobic surfaces are the reverse. Many plants and animals overcome this tradeoff through biphilic surfaces with patterned wettability. For example, the Stenocara beetle uses hydrophilic patches on a superhydrophobic background to collect fog from air. Cribellate spiders similarly collect fog on their webs through periodic spindle-knot structures. In this study, we investigate the effects of wettability patterns on the rate of water collection from humid air. The steady state rate of water collection per unit area is measured as a function of undercooling, angle of inclination, water contact angle, hydrophilic patch size, patch spacing, area fraction, and patch height relative to the hydrophobic background. We then model each pattern by comparing the potential and kinetic energy of a droplet as it rolls downwards at a fixed angle. The results indicate that the design rules for collecting fog differ from those for condensation from humid air. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Office of Naval Research for financial support through Grant Number N00014-15-1-2107.

  12. Geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, A.; Randall, C. E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rozanov, E.; Rodger, C. J.

    2009-10-01

    Here we use the ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature data sets from 1957 to 2006 to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the A p index. Previous modeling work has suggested that NO x produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in surface air temperatures (SATs). We find that during winter months, polar SATs in years with high A p index are different than in years with low A p index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, depending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are excluded. We take into account solar irradiance variations, unlike previous analyses of geomagnetic effects in ERA-40 and operational data. Although we cannot conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating wintertime surface air temperatures. We tested our SAT results against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode, and we cannot robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature variability and geomagnetic activity.

  13. Surface modification and fatigue behavior of nitinol for load bearing implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Sheldon A.

    Musculoskeletal disorders are recognized amongst the most significant human health problems that exist today. Even though considerable research and development has gone towards understanding musculoskeletal disorders, there is still lack of bone replacement materials that are appropriate for restoring lost structures and functions, particularly for load-bearing applications. Many materials on the market today, such as titanium and stainless steel, suffer from significantly higher modulus than natural bone and low bioactivity leading to stress shielding and implant loosening over longer time use. Nitinol (NiTi) is an equiatomic intermetallic compound of nickel and titanium whose unique biomechanical and biological properties contributed to its increasing use as a biomaterial. An innovative method for creating dense and porous net shape NiTi alloy parts has been developed to improve biological properties while maintaining comparable or better mechanical properties than commercial materials that are currently in use. Laser engineered net shaping (LENS(TM)) and surface electrochemistry modification was used to create dense/porous samples and micro textured surfaces on NiTi parts, respectively. Porous implants are known to promote cell adhesion and have a low elastic modulus, a combination that can significantly increase the life of an implant. However, porosity can significantly reduce the fatigue life of an implant, and very little work has been reported on the fatigue behavior of bulk porous metals, specifically on porous nitinol alloy. High-cycle rotating bending and compression-compression fatigue behavior of porous NiTi fabricated using LENS(TM) were studied. In cyclic compression loading, plastic strain increased with increasing porosity and it was evident that maximum strain was achieved during the first 50000 cycles and remained constant throughout the remaining loading. No failures were observed due to loading up to 150% of the yield strength. When subjected

  14. A comparison between the dimensions of positive transtibial residual limb molds prepared by air pressure casting and weight-bearing casting methods

    PubMed Central

    Hajiaghaei, Behnam; Ebrahimi, Ismail; Kamyab, Mojtaba; Saeedi, Hassan; Jalali, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Creating a socket with proper fit is an important factor to ensure the comfort and control of prosthetic devices. Several techniques are commonly used to cast transtibial stumps but their effect on stump shape deformation is not well understood. This study compares the dimensions, circumferences and volumes of the positive casts and also the socket comfort between two casting methods. Our hypothesis was that the casts prepared by air pressure method have less volume and are more comfortable than those prepared by weight bearing method. Methods: Fifteen transtibial unilateral amputees participated in the study. Two weight bearing and air pressure casting methods were utilized for their residual limbs. The diameters and circumferences of various areas of the residual limbs and positive casts were compared. The volumes of two types of casts were measured by a volumeter and compared. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to measure the sockets fit comfort. Results: Circumferences at 10 and 15 cm below the patella on the casts were significantly smaller in air pressure casting method compared to the weight bearing method (p=0.00 and 0.01 respectively). The volume of the cast in air pressure method was lower than that of the weight bearing method (p=0.006). The amputees found the fit of the sockets prepared by air pressure method more comfortable than the weight bearing sockets (p=0.015). Conclusion: The air pressure casting reduced the circumferences of the distal portion of residual limbs which has more soft tissue and because of its snug fit it provided more comfort for amputees, according to the VAS measurements. PMID:27390711

  15. Airmass Characteristics of Surface Air Quality over California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, G.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Edwards, D. P.; Emmons, L. K.

    2010-12-01

    We present results from a study that quantifies the impacts of various sources on surface air quality over California. The focus of the analysis is on summer 2008, when the ARCTAS-CARB aircraft campaign, a joint program between NASA and the California Air Resources Board took place. The study integrates the global chemistry transport model MOZART-V4 with the regional WRF-Chem model. Both models employ the same chemistry scheme and emissions allowing for a high level of synergy across model scales. The global model provides time and space varying boundary conditions for the regional simulations. Aircraft measurements from the field campaign will be used together with in-situ observations from ground (U.S. EPA Air Quality Monitoring System) as well as satellite retrievals (e.g. Aura/OMI NO2 and HCHO, Aura/TES CO and O3, Terra/MOPITT CO) for evaluating the model simulations and supporting the analysis. Tracer simulations are performed to estimate the relative impacts of anthropogenic emissions, wildfires and pollution inflow on surface air.

  16. Global surface air temperature variations: 1851-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.D.; Raper, S.C.B.; Kelly, P.M.

    1986-11-01

    Many attempts have been made to combine station surface air temperature data into an average for the Northern Hemisphere. Fewer attempts have been made for the Southern Hemisphere because of the unavailability of data from the Antarctic mainland before the 1950s and the uncertainty of making a hemispheric estimate based solely on land-based analyses for a hemisphere that is 80% ocean. Past estimates have been based largely on data from the World Weather Records (Smithsonian Institution, 1927, 1935, 1947, and U.S. Weather Bureau, 1959-82) and have been made without considerable effort to detect and correct station inhomogeneities. Better estimates for the Southern Hemisphere are now possible because of the availability of 30 years of climatological data from Antarctica. The mean monthly surface air temperature anomalies presented in this package for the than those previously published because of the incorporation of data previously hidden away in archives and the analysis of station homogeneity before estimation.

  17. IMPACTS OF MARINE AEROSOLS ON SURFACE WATER CHEMISTRY AT BEAR BROOK WATERSHED, MAINE USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The East Bear catchment at Bear Brook Watershed, Maine receives moderate (for the eastern U.S.) amounts of Cl- in wet and dry deposition. In 1989, Cl- in precipitation ranged from 2 to 55 eq/L. Dry, occult, and wet deposition plus evapotranspiration resulted in stream Cl- averagi...

  18. Improved surface parameter retrievals using AIRS/AMSU data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John

    2008-04-01

    The AIRS Science Team Version 5.0 retrieval algorithm became operational at the Goddard DAAC in July 2007 generating near real-time products from analysis of AIRS/AMSU sounding data. This algorithm contains many significant theoretical advances over the AIRS Science Team Version 4.0 retrieval algorithm used previously. Two very significant developments of Version 5 are: 1) the development and implementation of an improved Radiative Transfer Algorithm (RTA) which allows for accurate treatment of non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (non-LTE) effects on shortwave sounding channels; and 2) the development of methodology to obtain very accurate case by case product error estimates which are in turn used for quality control. These theoretical improvements taken together enabled a new methodology to be developed which further improves soundings in partially cloudy conditions. In this methodology, longwave CO2 channel observations in the spectral region 700 cm -1 to 750 cm -1 are used exclusively for cloud clearing purposes, while shortwave CO II channels in the spectral region 2195 cm -1 to 2395 cm -1 are used for temperature sounding purposes. This allows for accurate temperature soundings under more difficult cloud conditions. This paper further improves on the methodology used in Version 5 to derive surface skin temperature and surface spectral emissivity from AIRS/AMSU observations. Now, following the approach used to improve tropospheric temperature profiles, surface skin temperature is also derived using only shortwave window channels. This produces improved surface parameters, both day and night, compared to what was obtained in Version 5. These in turn result in improved boundary layer temperatures and retrieved total O 3 burden.

  19. Effects of surface mining on the aquatic insects of Bear Creek, Boyd County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of surface mining on the aquatic insect community of Bear Creek, Boyd County, Kentucky, were examined. Sampling stations were established above the mine, near the mine and below the mine and selected biological and physiochemical factors were examined at these stations. Station 3 (above mine) had a higher pH, higher alkalinity, lower mineral hardness, less siltation and less ferric hydroxide deposition than either Station 2 (at mine) or Station 1 (below mine). The greatest number of specimens (81%) was collected at Station 3. There were 19 mayfly and stonefly taxa represented at Station 3. The Shannon-Weaver diversity index was significantly higher (P < 0.05) at Station 3 than at either Station 1 or Station 2. Examination of trophic relationships showed that shredders (chew and mine vascular plant tissue) were the most abundant group at Station 3, which may have been due to less ferric hydroxide deposition and thereby more vascular plant tissue available. Station 2 (at mine) had the least number of taxa collected, the lowest Shannon-Weaver diversity index value and predators were the most important (Importance Value) trophic group. Station 1 (below mine) was intermediate between Station 2 and Station 3, i.e., it seemed to be a recovery zone where the number of taxa collected began to increase and the physiochemical parameter values began to approach those of Station 3.

  20. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazines: Environmental chamber studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of fuel hydrazines were studied in a 6500-liter fluorocarbon-film chamber at 80 to 100 ppm concentrations. First-order rate constants for the reactions catalyzed by aluminum, water-damaged aluminum (Al/Al2O3), stainless steel 304L, galvanized steel and titanium plates with surface areas of 2 to 24 sq m were determined. With 23.8 sq m of Al/Al2O3 the surface-catalyzed air oxidation of hydrazine had a half-life of 2 hours, diimide (N2H2) was observed as an intermediate and traces of ammonia were present in the final product mixture. The Al/Al2O3 catalyzed oxidation of monomethylhydrazine yielded methyldiazine (HN = NCH3) as an intermediate and traces of methanol. Unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine gave no detectable products. The relative reactivities of hydrazine, MMH and UDMH were 130 : 7.3 : 1.0, respectively. The rate constants for Al/Al2O3-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and MMH were proportional to the square of the surface area of the plates. Mechanisms for the surface-catalyzed oxidation of hydrazine and diimide and the formation of ammonia are proposed.

  1. The stability of oxyamphiboles: Existence of Ferric-bearing minerals under the reducing conditions on the surface of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straub, Darcy W.; Burns, Roger G.

    1993-01-01

    An enigma of Venusian mineralogy is the suggestion that Fe(3+)-bearing minerals exist under the reducing conditions of the Venusian atmosphere. Analysis of the spectrophotometric data from the Venera 13 and 14 missions, combined with the laboratory reflectance spectral measurements of oxidized basalts at elevated temperatures, led to the suggestion that metastable hematite might exist on Venus. Heating experiments at 475 C when f(sub O2) approximately 10(exp -24) demonstrated that the hematite to magnetite conversion is rapid indicating metastable hematite is not present on Venus. In addition to hematite, several other ferric oxide and silicate minerals have been proposed to occur on Venus, including laihunite or ferrifayalite, Fe(3+)-bearing tephroite, oxyamphiboles, and oxybiotites. Heating experiments performed on these Fe(3+)-bearing minerals under temperature-f(sub O2) conditions existing on Venus suggest that only oxyamphiboles and oxybiotites may be stable on the surface of Venus.

  2. Characterization of load bearing metrological parameters in reptilian exuviae in comparison to precision-finished cylinder liner surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; El Mansori, M.

    2014-10-01

    Design of precise functional surfaces is essential for many future applications. In the technological realm, the accumulated experience with construction of such surfaces is not sufficient. Nature provides many examples of dynamic surfaces worthy of study and adoption, at least in concept, within human engineering. This work probes the load-bearing metrological features of the ventral skin in snakes. We examine the structure of two snake species that mainly move by rectilinear locomotion. These are Python regius (Pythonidae) and Bitis gabonica (Vipridae). To this end, we focus on the load-bearing characteristics of the ventral skin surface (i.e., the Sk family of parameters). Therefore, detailed comparison is drawn between the metrological structure of the reptilian surfaces and two sets of technological data. The first set pertains to an actual commercial cylinder liner, whereas the second set is a summary of recommended surface finish metrological values for several commercial cylinder liner manufacturers. The results highlight several similarities between the two types of surfaces. In particular, it is shown that there is a striking correspondence between the sense of texture morphology within both surfaces (although their construction evolved along entirely different paths). It is also shown that reptilian surfaces manifest a high degree of specialization with respect to habitat constraints on wear resistance and adhesive effects. In particular, their surface displays a high degree of pre-conditioning to functional requirements, which eliminates the need for a running-in period.

  3. Global Distribution and Variability of Surface Skin and Surface Air Temperatures as Depicted in the AIRS Version-6 Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2014-01-01

    In this presentation, we will briefly describe the significant improvements made in the AIRS Version-6 retrieval algorithm, especially as to how they affect retrieved surface skin and surface air temperatures. The global distribution of seasonal 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM local time 12 year climatologies of Ts,a will be presented for the first time. We will also present the spatial distribution of short term 12 year anomaly trends of Ts,a at 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM, as well as the spatial distribution of temporal correlations of Ts,a with the El Nino Index. It will be shown that there are significant differences between the behavior of 1:30 AM and 1:30 PM Ts,a anomalies in some arid land areas.

  4. Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These bearings are non-linear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method, a rule-of-thumb, to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current paper extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced Oil-Free machines operating on foil gas bearings

  5. Stiffness and Damping Coefficient Estimation of Compliant Surface Gas Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Della-Corte, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are a key technology in many commercial and emerging oilfree turbomachinery systems. These bearings are nonlinear and have been difficult to analytically model in terms of performance characteristics such as load capacity, power loss, stiffness, and damping. Previous investigations led to an empirically derived method to estimate load capacity. This method has been a valuable tool in system development. The current work extends this tool concept to include rules for stiffness and damping coefficient estimation. It is expected that these rules will further accelerate the development and deployment of advanced oil-free machines operating on foil gas bearings.

  6. High temperature self-lubricating coatings for air lubricated foil bearings for the automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.

    1980-01-01

    coating combinations were developed for compliant surface bearings and journals to be used in an automotive gas turbine engine. The coatings were able to withstand the sliding start/stops during rotor liftoff and touchdown and occasional short time, high speed rubs under representative loading of the engine. Some dozen coating variations of CdO-graphite, Cr2O3 (by sputtering) and CaF2 (plasma sprayed) were identified. The coatings were optimized and they were examined for stoichiometry, metallurgical condition, and adhesion. Sputtered Cr2O3 was most adherent when optimum parameters were used and it was applied on an annealed (soft) substrate. Metallic binders and interlayers were used to improve the ductility and the adherence.

  7. Identification of water-bearing zones by the use of geophysical logs and borehole television surveys, collected February to September 1997, at the Former Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.

    1998-01-01

    Between February 1997 and September 1997, 10 monitor wells were drilled near the site of the former Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, Bucks County, Pa., to monitor water levels and sample ground-water contaminants in the shallow, intermediate, and deep water-bearing zones. The sampling will determine the horizontal and vertical distribution of contaminated ground water migrating from known or suspected contaminant sources. Four wells were drilled north of the property adjacent to Area A, three wells along strike located on Lewis Drive, and three wells directly down dip on Ivyland Road. Well depths range from 69 feet to 300 feet below land surface. Borehole-geophysical logging and television surveys were used to identify water-bearing zones so that appropriate intervals could be screened in each monitor well. Geophysical logs were obtained at the 10 monitor wells. Borehole television surveys were obtained at the four monitor wells adjacent to Area A. Caliper and borehole television surveys were used to locate fractures, inflections on fluidtemperature and fluid-resistivity logs were used to locate possible water-bearing fractures, and heatpulse- flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy. After interpretation of geophysical logs, borehole television surveys, and driller?s logs, all wells were screened such that water-level fluctuations could be monitored and water samples collected from discrete water-bearing zones in each borehole.

  8. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  9. Surface-slip equations for multicomponent nonequilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Scott, C. D.; Moss, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Equations are presented for the surface-slip (or jump) values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature in the low-Reynolds number, high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. The equations are obtained from closed form solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy flux equations using the Chapman-Enskog velocity distribution function. This function represents a solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Navier-Stokes approximation. The analysis, obtained for nonequilibrium multicomponent air flow, includes the finite-rate surface catalytic recombination and changes in the internal energy during reflection from the surface. Expressions for the various slip quantities were obtained in a form which can be employed in flowfield computations. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures. Expression is also provided for the finite-rate, species-concentration boundary condition for a multicomponent mixture in absence of slip.

  10. Surface-slip equations for multicomponent, nonequilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Scott, Carl D.; Moss, James N.; Goglia, Gene

    1985-01-01

    Equations are presented for the surface slip (or jump) values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature in the low-Reynolds-number, high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. These are obtained from closed-form solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy flux equations using the Chapman-Enskog velocity distribution function. This function represents a solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Navier-Stokes approximation. The analysis, obtained for nonequilibrium multicomponent air flow, includes the finite-rate surface catalytic recombination and changes in the internal energy during reflection from the surface. Expressions for the various slip quantities have been obtained in a form which can readily be employed in flow-field computations. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures. Expression is also provided for the finite-rate species-concentration boundary condition for a multicomponent mixture in absence of slip.

  11. AirSWOT: An Airborne Platform for Surface Water Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Moller, D.; Smith, L. C.; Pavelsky, T. M.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The SWOT mission, expected to launch in 2020, will provide global measurements of surface water extent and elevation from which storage change and discharge can be derived. SWOT-like measurements are not routinely used by the hydrology community, and their optimal use and associated errors are areas of active research. The purpose of AirSWOT, a system that has been proposed to NASA’s Instrument Incubator Program, is to provide SWOT-like measurements to the hydrology and ocean community to be used to advance the understanding and use of SWOT data in the pre-launch phase. In the post-launch phase, AirSWOT will be used as the SWOT calibration/validation platform. The AirSWOT payload will consist of Kaspar, a multi-beam Ka-band radar interferometer able to produce elevations over a 5 km swath with centimetric precision. The absolute elevation accuracy of the AirSWOT system will be achieved with a combination of high precision Inertial Motion Units (IMUs), ground calibration points, and advanced calibration techniques utilizing a priori knowledge. It is expected that the accuracy of AirSWOT will exceed or match SWOT’s accuracy requirements. In addition to elevation measurements, the AirSWOT payload will include a near-infrared camera able to provide coincident high-resolution optical imagery of the water bodies imaged by the radar. In its initial hydrology deployments, AirSWOT will investigate four field sites: the Ohio-Mississippi confluence, the lower Atchafalaya River on the Mississippi River Delta, the Yukon River basin near Fairbanks, and the Sacramento River, California. The Ohio-Mississippi confluence is targeted for its large discharge, modest slope, and control structures that modulate Ohio but not Mississippi River slopes and elevations. The lower Atchafalaya River includes low slopes, wetlands with differing vegetation types, and some open lakes. Vegetation includes Cyprus forests, floating macrophytes, and grass marshes, all of which impact radar returns

  12. Bearing surfaces for hip arthroplasty - is metal-on-metal a passing fancy?

    PubMed

    Lee, Reginald K; Nevelos, Jim; Vigdorchik, Jonathan; Markel, David C

    2012-12-01

    Metal-on-metal bearings have had popularity that has waxed and waned over the years. The advantages realized relative to wear resistance and strength had been offset by early failures, manufacturing difficulty, and most recently by adverse soft tissue responses to the metallic debris. The bearing's history, evolution, advantages and disadvantages will be discussed in attempt to answer the question: is metal-on-metal a passing fancy? PMID:23065801

  13. Ceramic bearings. (Latest citations from the Aerospace database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, fabrication, and evaluation of ceramic bearings. Citations discuss roller, ball, fuel-lubricated, and dry-lubricated bearings. Applications in machinery, automobiles, rails, and air transport are examined. References to surface hardness, wear, and fatigue tests are presented. (Contains a minimum of 125 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  15. The influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings: Experimental analysis of the lubricant film and surface wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, William; Van Hooreweder, Brecht; Boonen, Rene; Sas, Paul; Moens, David

    2016-06-01

    Precise prediction of the lifetime of rolling element bearings is a crucial step towards a reliable design of many rotating machines. For bearings subjected to highly varying loads, recent research emphasises a strong reduction of the actual bearing lifetime w.r.t. the classically calculated bearing lifetime. This paper experimentally analyses the influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings. A novel bearing test rig is introduced. The test rig is able to apply a fully controlled multi-axial static and dynamic load on a single test bearing. Also, different types and sizes of bearings can be tested. Two separate investigations are conducted. First, the behaviour of the lubricant film between the rolling elements and raceways is analysed. Increased metallic contact or breakdown of the film during dynamic excitation is investigated based on the measured electrical resistance through the bearing. The study shows that the lubricant film thickness follows the imposed variations of the load. Variations of the lubricant film thickness are similar to the variations when the magnitude of the static bearing load is changed. Second, wear of the raceway surfaces is analysed. Surface wear is investigated after a series of accelerated lifetime tests under high dynamic load. Due to sliding motion between asperities of the contacting surfaces in the bearing, polishing of the raceway honing structure occurs. This polishing is clearly observed on SEM images of the inner raceway after a test duration of only 0.5% of the calculated L10 life. Polishing wear of the surfaces, such as surface induced cracks and material delamination, is expected when the bearing is further exposed to the high dynamic load.

  16. Dynamic behavior of air lubricated pivoted-pad journal-bearing, rotor system. 2: Pivot consideration and pad mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1972-01-01

    Rotor bearing dynamic tests were conducted with tilting-pad journal bearings having three different pad masses and two different pivot geometries. The rotor was vertically mounted and supported by two three-pad tilting-pad gas journal bearings and a simple externally pressurized thrust bearing. The bearing pads were 5.1 cm (2.02 in.) in diameter and 2.8 cm (1.5 in.) long. The length to diameter ratio was 0.75. One pad was mounted on a flexible diaphragm. The bearing supply pressure ranged from 0 to 690 kilonewtons per square meter (0 to 100 psig), and speeds ranged to 38,500 rpm. Heavy mass pad tilting-pad assemblies produced three rotor-bearing resonances above the first two rotor critical speeds. Lower supply pressure eliminated the resonances. The resonances were oriented primarily in the direction normal to the diaphragm.

  17. Is Air Temperature Enough to Predict Lake Surface Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolroaz, S.; Toffolon, M.; Majone, B.

    2014-12-01

    Lake surface water (LST) is a key factor that controls most of the physical and ecological processes occurring in lakes. Reliable estimates are especially important in the light of recent studies, which revealed that inland water bodies are highly sensitive to climate, and are rapidly warming throughout the world. However, an accurate estimation of LST usually requires a significant amount of information that is not always available. In this work, we present an application of air2water, a lumped model that simulates LST as a function of air temperature only. In addition, air2water allows for a qualitative evaluation of the depth of the epilimnion during the annual stratification cycle. The model consists in a simplification of the complete heat budget of the well-mixed surface layer, and has a few parameters (from 4 to 8 depending on the version) that summarize the role of the different heat flux components. Model calibration requires only air and water temperature data, possibly covering sufficiently long historical periods in order to capture inter-annual variability and long-term trends. During the calibration procedure, the information included in input data is retrieved to directly inform model parameters, which can be used to classify the thermal behavior of the lake. In order to investigate how thermal dynamics are related to morphological features, the model has been applied to 14 temperate lakes characterized by different morphological and hydrological conditions, by different sources of temperature data (buoys, satellite), and by variable frequency of acquisition. A good agreement between observed and simulated LST has been achieved, with a RMSE in the order of 1°C, which is fully comparable to the performances of more complex process-based models. This application allowed for a deeper understanding of the thermal response of lakes as a function of their morphology, as well as for specific analyses as for example the investigation of the exceptional

  18. Design, development and evaluation of a precision air bearing rotary table with large diameter through-hole

    SciTech Connect

    Accatino, M.R.

    1991-11-01

    A large diameter precision air bearing rotary table with a 16.0 inch diameter through-hole was designed, fabricated and tested in the course of this research. The rotary table will be used in conjunction with a specialized, computer controlled precision inspection machine being designed for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The design process included a complete engineering analysis to predict the final performance of the rotary table, and to ensure that the rotary table meets the required accuracy of 4.0 microinches of total radial (3.5 microinches average radial) and 4.0 microinches total axial (3.5 microinches average axial) errors. The engineering analysis included structural deformation, thermal sensitivity and dynamic analyses using finite element methods in some cases, as well as other analytic solutions. Comparisons are made between predicted and tested values, which are listed in the rotary table error budget. The rotary table performed as predicted with measured axial and radial stiffnesses of 1.1E06 lbf/inch and 2.9E06 lbf/inch, respectively, as well as average radial, axial and tilt errors of 2.5 microinches, 1.5 microinches, and less than 0.05 arcseconds, respectively.

  19. Study the effect of surface texturing on the stress distribution of UHMWPE as a bearing material during rolling motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamari, J.; Ismail, R.; Anwar, I. B.; Saputra, E.; Tauviqirrahman, M.; Heide, E. V. D.

    2016-04-01

    Tribological properties of materials used in biomedical implants will critically affect the performance of the implant. Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) material is popular due to its great properties. Surface texturing is one of the methods to minimize friction and wear. In this study, the effect of surface texturing on the stress distribution of UHMWPE as a bearing material has been investigated for rolling motion. The study was performed by finite element analysis. Several three-dimensional surfaces were created by varying its texture. The texture consists of several cylindrical cavities for certain separation. These surfaces were then rolled by a hard ball indenter. The stress distribution due to the rolling contact for each surface was analyzed. Results show that the surface demonstrates a higher stress distribution for the lower separation between the cylindrical cavities.

  20. Front surface thermal property measurements of air plasma spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Ted; Kakuda, Tyler; Kulkarni, Anand

    2009-04-15

    A front-surface measurement for determining the thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings has been applied to air plasma spray coatings. The measurement is used to determine all independent thermal properties of the coating simultaneously. Furthermore, with minimal requirements placed on the sample and zero sample preparation, measurements can be made under previously impossible conditions, such as on serviceable engine parts. Previous application of this technique was limited to relatively thin coatings, where a one-dimensional heat transfer model is applied. In this paper, the influence of heat spreading on the measurement of thicker coatings is investigated with the development of a two-dimensional heat transfer model.

  1. Design and experimental investigations of high power piezoelectric transducers for a novel squeeze film journal bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Su; Twiefel, Jens; Wallaschek, Joerg

    2009-03-01

    A novel active squeeze film journal air bearing actuated by high power piezoelectric transducers is presented. The proposed bearing uses in-air squeeze film levitation to suspend the rotating spindle without contact. Unlike conventional journal bearings, the presented bearing journal is formed by multiple independently vibrating surfaces driven individually by piezoelectric transducers. Langevin type piezoelectric transducers with a special radiation surface are developed. Detailed design procedures to develop the ultrasonic transducers are presented. A complete spindle-bearing system is constructed to test the proposed squeeze film bearing. Load carrying forces are measured at different vibration amplitude and compared with the calculated results. The proposed squeeze film journal bearing is operated in ultrasonic frequency range. The achieved load capacity is about 50N, which is five times of the load capacity achieved by the previous squeeze film bearings reported in the literatures.

  2. Linking geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppala, Annika

    ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature (SAT) data sets from 1957 to 2006 were used to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the Ap index. Previous modelling work has suggested that NOx produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in polar SATs. We find that during winter months, ERA-40 and ECMWF polar SATs in years with high Ap index are different than in years with low Ap index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, de-pending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings are excluded. Solar irradiance variations were taken into account in the analysis. Although using the re-analysis and operational data sets it was not possible to conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating polar wintertime surface air temperature patterns. The SAT results were tested against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Annular Mode n (SAM). The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and we could not robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature (SST) variability and geomagnetic activity. Examining the physical link between geomagnetic activity and polar surface temperature variability patterns using atmospheric models is an ongoing task.

  3. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing assembly (10) has an intermediate rotatable section (33) having an outer cylindrical member (30) coaxially suspended by a torsion wire (72) around an axially polarized cylindrical magnet (32). Axial alignment between the pole faces (40-43) of the intermediate section (33) and end surfaces (50-53) of opposed end bells (20, 22) provides a path of least reluctance across intervening air gaps (60-63) for the magnetic flux emanating from magnet (32). Radial dislocation increases the reluctance and creates a radial restoring force. Substitution of radially polarized magnets 107 fixed to a magnetically permeable cylinder (32') and insertion of pairs of armature coil windings (109-112) between the cylinder pair (33') provides an integral magnetic bearing and torsion motor (100) able to provide arcuately limited rotational drive.

  4. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, L.; Lunelli, N.; Paschuk, S.; Oliveira, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Schelin, H.; Miguel, C.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.; Tilly, J.; Khoury, H.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography. An evaluation of 301 radiographical examinations in anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) (166 examinations) and lateral (LAT) (135 examinations) projections was performed. The analyses were performed on patients grouped by age; the groups included ages 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. The entrance surface air kerma was determined with DoseCal software (Radiological Protection Center of Saint George's Hospital, London) and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Two different exposure techniques were compared. The doses received by patients who had undergone LAT examinations were 40% higher, on average, those in AP/PA examinations because of the difference in tube voltage. A large high-dose “tail” was observed for children up to 5 y old. An increase in tube potential and corresponding decrease in current lead to a significant dose reduction. The difference between the average dose values for different age ranges was not practically observed, implying that the exposure techniques are still not optimal. Exposure doses received using the higher tube voltage and lower current-time product correspond to the international diagnostic reference levels.

  5. Supersonic moist air jet impingements on flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Miah Md. Ashraful; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2010-02-01

    Pronounced aeroacoustic resonances are exhibited in the flowfield where a jet emerges from an orifice or a nozzle and impinges on a solid surface. One instance where such resonances are produced is in a high speed jet impingement, such as in the space launch vehicle systems, jet-engine exhaust impingement, and in the short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft, etc. A highly unsteady flowfield leading to a drastic increase of noise level with very high dynamic pressure and thermal loads are noticed on nearby surfaces results dramatic lift loss, severe ground erosion and hot gas ingestion to the inlet in the jet engines. This highly unsteady behavior of the impinging jets is due to a feedback loop between the fluid and acoustic fields. In actual jet flow, the working gas may contain condensable gas such as steam or moist air. In these cases, the non-equilibrium condensation may occur at the region between nozzle exit and an object. The jet flow with non-equilibrium condensation may be quite different from that without condensation. Therefore, in this study, the effect of the non-equilibrium condensation of moist air on the axisymmetric under-expanded supersonic impinging jet on a vertical flat plate was investigated numerically.

  6. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term highspeed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the Ir shaft to support big speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  7. Blood Pump Bearing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a blood pump bearing system within a pump housing to support long-term high-speed rotation of a rotor with an impeller blade having a plurality of individual magnets disposed thereon to provide a small radial air gap between the magnets and a stator of less than 0.025 inches. The bearing system may be mounted within a flow straightener, diffuser, or other pump element to support the shaft of a pump rotor. The bearing system includes a zirconia shaft having a radiused end. The radiused end has a first radius selected to be about three times greater than the radius of the zirconia shaft. The radiused end of the zirconia shaft engages a flat sapphire endstone. Due to the relative hardness of these materials a flat is quickly produced during break-in on the zirconia radiused end of precisely the size necessary to support thrust loads whereupon wear substantially ceases. Due to the selection of the first radius, the change in shaft end-play during pump break-in is limited to a total desired end-play of less than about 0.010 inches. Radial loads are supported by an olive hole ring jewel that makes near line contact around the circumference of the shaft to support high speed rotation with little friction. The width of olive hole ring jewel is small to allow heat to conduct through to thereby prevent heat build-up in the bearing. A void defined by the bearing elements may fill with blood that then coagulates within the void. The coagulated blood is then conformed to the shape of the bearing surfaces.

  8. Diatom attachment inhibition: limiting surface accessibility through air entrapment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Alex H-F; Nakanishi, Kenichi; Cho, K L; Lamb, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Surfaces consisting of sub micron holes (0.420-0.765 μm) engineered into nanoparticle (12 nm) coatings were examined for marine antifouling behaviour that defines early stage settlement. Immersed surfaces were found to be resistant to a 5-hour attachment assay of Amphora coffeaeformis, a marine organism commonly found in abundance on fouled substrates such as foul-releasing paints and self-polishing coatings. Attachment inhibition was attributed to the accessibility of diatoms to the surface. This was governed by the size and morphology of trapped interfacial air pockets measured in-situ using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering. Surfaces containing larger pores (0.765 μm) exhibited the highest resistance. Macroscopic wettability via contact angle measurements however remained at 160° and sliding angle of < 5° and was found to be independent of pore size and not indicative of early stage fouling behaviour. The balance of hierarchical nano/micro length scales was critical in defining the early stage stability of biofouling character of the interface. PMID:24706117

  9. Mechanical spin bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spin bearing assembly including, a pair of mutually opposing complementary bearing support members having mutually spaced apart bearing support surfaces which may be, for example, bearing races and a set of spin bearings located therebetween. Each spin bearing includes a pair of end faces, a central rotational axis passing through the end faces, a waist region substantially mid-way between the end faces and having a first thickness dimension, and discrete side surface regions located between the waist region and the end faces and having a second thickness dimension different from the first thickness dimension of the waist region and wherein the side surface regions further have respective curvilinear contact surfaces adapted to provide a plurality of bearing contact points on the bearing support members.

  10. Prediction of scratch resistance of cobalt chromium alloy bearing surface, articulating against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, due to third-body wear particles.

    PubMed

    Mirghany, M; Jin, Z M

    2004-01-01

    The entrapment of abrasive particles within the articulation between a cobalt chromium alloy (CoCrMo) femoral component and an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cup of artificial hip joints or tibial inserts of artificial knee joints usually scratches the metallic bearing surface and consequently increases the surface roughness. This has been recognized as one of the main causes of excessive polyethylene wear, leading to osteolysis and loosening of the prosthetic components. The purpose of this study was to use the finite element method to investigate the resistance of the cobalt chromium alloy bearing surface to plastic deformation, as a first approximation to causing scratches, due to various entrapped debris such as bone, CoCrMo and ZrO2 (contained in radiopaque polymethyl methacrylate cement). A simple axisymmetric micro contact mechanics model was developed, where a spherical third-body wear particle was indented between the two bearing surfaces, modelled as two solid cylinders of a given diameter, under the contact pressure determined from macro-models representing either hip or knee implants. The deformation of both the wear particle and the bearing surfaces was modelled and was treated as elastic-plastic. The indented peak-to-valley height on the CoCrMo bearing surface from the finite element model was found to be in good agreement with that reported in a previous study when the third-body wear particle was assumed to be rigid. Under the physiological contact pressure experienced in both hip and knee implants, ZrO2 wear particles were found to be fully embedded within the UHMWPE bearing surface, and the maximum von Mises stresses within the CoCrMo bearing surface reached the corresponding yield strength. Consequently, the CoCrMo bearing surface was deformed plastically and the corresponding peak-to-valley height (surface roughness) was found to increase with both the hardness and the size of the wear particle. Even in the case of CoCrMo wear

  11. Using Satellite Aerosol Retrievals to Monitor Surface Particulate Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Holben, Brent N.; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS and MISR aerosol products were designed nearly two decades ago for the purpose of climate applications. Since launch of Terra in 1999, these two sensors have provided global, quantitative information about column-integrated aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and relative aerosol type parameters (such as Angstrom exponent). Although primarily designed for climate, the air quality (AQ) community quickly recognized that passive satellite products could be used for particulate air quality monitoring and forecasting. However, AOD and particulate matter (PM) concentrations have different units, and represent aerosol conditions in different layers of the atmosphere. Also, due to low visible contrast over brighter surface conditions, satellite-derived aerosol retrievals tend to have larger uncertainty in urban or populated regions. Nonetheless, the AQ community has made significant progress in relating column-integrated AOD at ambient relative humidity (RH) to surface PM concentrations at dried RH. Knowledge of aerosol optical and microphysical properties, ambient meteorological conditions, and especially vertical profile, are critical for physically relating AOD and PM. To make urban-scale maps of PM, we also must account for spatial variability. Since surface PM may vary on a finer spatial scale than the resolution of standard MODIS (10 km) and MISR (17km) products, we test higher-resolution versions of MODIS (3km) and MISR (1km research mode) retrievals. The recent (July 2011) DISCOVER-AQ campaign in the mid-Atlantic offers a comprehensive network of sun photometers (DRAGON) and other data that we use for validating the higher resolution satellite data. In the future, we expect that the wealth of aircraft and ground-based measurements, collected during DISCOVER-AQ, will help us quantitatively link remote sensed and ground-based measurements in the urban region.

  12. Precipitating auroral electron flux characteristics based on UV data obtained by the AIRS experiment onboard the polar BEAR satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, D. J.; Cox, R. J.

    1992-03-01

    The AIRS instrument on satellite Polar BEAR is the first to obtain narrow band UV images for more than one band at a time. This provides the opportunity to do serious quantitative analysis of the data in terms of composition and the energy sources producing the emission (aurora and dayglow). Analysis of auroral imaging data from two passes will be presented. On one of these, simultaneous images were obtained at 1356 A (OI 1356 A plus N sub 2 LBH), 1596 A (LBH), and 3914 A (N2(+) 1N). On the other, the observed bands were centered at 1304 A (OI 1304 A), 1544 A (LBH), and 3914 A. Variations in data ratios among the three bands for either pass exceeded a factor of three over the portion of the auroral oval seen within the images. The possible causes of these variations are changes in the hardness of the precipitating particle spectrum (here the particles are assumed to be electrons), changes in the abundance of O relative to N2, changes in the albedo at 3914 A, and statistical fluctuations where signals were low. To interpret the data, yields (Rayleighs/(erg cm(exp -2)s(exp -1))) and yield ratios appropriate to the band centers and their widths were calculated versus hardness of the precipitating electron spectrum. The calculations used MSIS model atmospheres with O density scalings of 1.0 and 0.5. The input parameters were appropriate to the times at which the data were collected to the regions observed. Incident electron spectra were characterized by modified Gaussian and Maxwellian energy distributions defined in terms of characteristic energy E sub o (in keV) and energy flux Q (in ergs cm(-2)s(-1)).

  13. Electron beam seals outer surfaces of porous bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herz, W. H.; Kurtz, A. D.; Kurtz, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Porous tungsten plugs provide even airflow for frictionless bearings used in air bearing supported gyros. The plugs have their outer cylindrical surface sealed by an electron beam process to ensure unidirectional airflow through their exit ends.

  14. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1982-05-04

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

  15. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    1982-01-01

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  16. Magnetically-controlled bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed magnetic-lubricant ball-bearing assembly has permanently-magnetized bearing retainer fabricated of porous material. Pores of retainer are filled with ferrolubricant. Surface tension causes retainer to deliver sufficient lubricant to nonmagnetic ball bearings.

  17. Wear of surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings for hip prostheses under adverse conditions with the head loading on the rim of the cup.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Ian; Williams, Sophie; Isaac, Graham; Hatto, Peter; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2013-04-01

    Clinical studies have found high wear rates, elevated ion levels and high revision rates of large-diameter metal-on-metal surface replacement bearings in some patients, which have been associated with edge loading of the head on the rim of the cup. We have simulated increased wear and ion levels in metal-on-metal bearings in vitro by introducing variations in translational and rotational positioning of the components, which reproduces stripe wear on the femoral head, cup rim wear and clinically relevant large as well as small wear particles. There is interest in technologies such as surface engineering, which might reduce metal wear and the release of wear particles and ions. Reduced wear with surface-engineered surface replacements compared to metal-on-metal controls has been reported under standard walking conditions with correctly aligned and concentric components. In this in vitro study, the wear of chromium nitride surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings under conditions of microseparation associated with translational and rotational malpositioning of the components was investigated and the results were compared with a previously reported study of metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. Simulations were conducted using our unique hip simulation microseparation methodologies, which reproduce accelerated wear in metal-on-metal bearings and have previously been clinically validated with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings had evidence of head contact on the rim of the cup, which produced stripe wear on the femoral head. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings (two without stripe and two with stripe wear) had lower wear than the previously reported high wearing metal-on-metal bearings. At 2 million cycles, two of the surface-engineered bearings had substantially increased wear rates, four times higher than the high wear rates previously reported for metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. There was

  18. Air Surface Temperature Correlation with Greenhouse Gases by Using Airs Data Over Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim Mohammed; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.

    2014-08-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop algorithms for calculating the air surface temperature (AST). This study also aims to analyze and investigate the effects of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the AST value in Peninsular Malaysia. Multiple linear regression is used to achieve the objectives of the study. Peninsular Malaysia has been selected as the research area because it is among the regions of tropical Southeast Asia with the greatest humidity, pockets of heavy pollution, rapid economic growth, and industrialization. The predicted AST was highly correlated ( R = 0.783) with GHGs for the 6-year data (2003-2008). Comparisons of five stations in 2009 showed close agreement between the predicted AST and the observed AST from AIRS, especially in the wet season (within 1.3 K). The in situ data ranged from 1 to 2 K. Validation results showed that AST ( R = 0.776-0.878) has values nearly the same as the observed AST from AIRS. We found that O3 during the wet season was indicated by a strongly positive beta coefficient (0.264-0.992) with AST. The CO2 yields a reasonable relationship with temperature with low to moderate beta coefficient (-0.065 to 0.238). The O3, CO2, and environmental variables experienced different seasonal fluctuations that depend on weather conditions and topography. The concentration of gases and pollution were the highest over industrial zones and overcrowded cities, and the dry season was more polluted compared with the wet season. These results indicate the advantage of using the satellite AIRS data and a correlation analysis to investigate the effect of atmospheric GHGs on AST over Peninsular Malaysia. An algorithm that is capable of retrieving Peninsular Malaysian AST in all weather conditions with total uncertainties ranging from 1 to 2 K was developed.

  19. Air bubble-shock wave interaction adjacent to gelantine surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lush, P. A.; Tomita, Y.; Onodera, O.; Takayama, K.; Sanada, N.; Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kitayama, O.

    1990-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and an air bubble-adjacent to a gelatine surface is investigated in order to simulate human tissue damage resulting from extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Using high speed cine photography it is found that a shock wave of strength 11 MPa causes 1-3 mm diameter bubbles to produce high velocity microjets with penetration rates of approximately 110 m/s and penetration depths approximately equal to twice the initial bubble diameter. Theoretical considerations for liquid impact on soft solid of similar density indicate that microjet velocities will be twice the penetration rate, i.e. 220 m/s in the present case. Such events are the probable cause of observed renal tissue damage.

  20. Impacts of wind farms on surface air temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Baidya Roy, Somnath; Traiteur, Justin J.

    2010-01-01

    Utility-scale large wind farms are rapidly growing in size and numbers all over the world. Data from a meteorological field campaign show that such wind farms can significantly affect near-surface air temperatures. These effects result from enhanced vertical mixing due to turbulence generated by wind turbine rotors. The impacts of wind farms on local weather can be minimized by changing rotor design or by siting wind farms in regions with high natural turbulence. Using a 25-y-long climate dataset, we identified such regions in the world. Many of these regions, such as the Midwest and Great Plains in the United States, are also rich in wind resources, making them ideal candidates for low-impact wind farms. PMID:20921371

  1. Evidence of Lunar Phase Influence on Global Surface Air Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyamba, Ebby; Susskind, Joel

    2000-01-01

    Intraseasonal oscillations appearing in a newly available 20-year record of satellite-derived surface air temperature are composited with respect to the lunar phase. Polar regions exhibit strong lunar phase modulation with higher temperatures occurs near full moon and lower temperatures at new moon, in agreement with previous studies. The polar response to the apparent lunar forcing is shown to be most robust in the winter months when solar influence is minimum. In addition, the response appears to be influenced by ENSO events. The highest mean temperature range between full moon and new moon in the polar region between 60 deg and 90 deg latitude was recorded in 1983, 1986/87, and 1990/91. Although the largest lunar phase signal is in the polar regions, there is a tendency for meridional equatorward progression of anomalies in both hemispheres so that the warning in the tropics occurs at the time of the new moon.

  2. Subseasonal variability of North American wintertime surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai

    2015-09-01

    Using observational pentad data of the recent 34 Northern Hemisphere extended winters, subseasonal variability of surface air temperature (SAT) over North America is analyzed. The four leading modes of subseasonal SAT variability, that are identified with an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, account for about 60% of the total variance. The first (EOF1) and second (EOF2) modes are independent of other modes, and thus are likely controlled by distinct processes. The third (EOF3) and fourth (EOF4) modes, however, tend to have a phase shift to each other in space and time, indicating that part of their variability is related to a common process and represent a propagating pattern over North America. Lagged regression analysis is conducted to identify the precursors of large-scale atmospheric circulation for each mode a few pentads in advance, and to understand the processes that influence the subseasonal SAT variability and the predictability signal sources. EOF1 is found to be closely related to the Pacific-North American (PNA) circulation pattern and at least part of its variability is preceded by the East Asian cold surge. The cold surge leads to low-level convergence and enhanced convection in the tropical central Pacific which in turn induces the PNA. EOF2 tends to oscillate at a period of about 70 days, and is influenced by the low-frequency component of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). On the other hand, EOF3 and EOF4 are connected to the high-frequency part of the MJO which has a period range of 30-50 days. These findings would help understanding the mechanisms of subseasonal surface air temperature variability in North America and improving weather predictions on a subseasonal time scale.

  3. Surface metallurgical and tribological characteristics of TiN-coated bearing steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdemir, A.; Hochman, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    The rolling contact fatigue (RCF) characteristics of an aerospace bearing steel 440C coated with TiN films of various thicknesses are studied. The wear and corrosion properties of the film-substrate system are examined as well as how these properties correlate with the RCF behavior. It is found that TiN coatings with thicknesses below 1 micron resulted in significant improvements in the RCF lives of base steel substrates under both mild and heavy loading conditions.

  4. COMETARY SCIENCE. CHO-bearing organic compounds at the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko revealed by Ptolemy.

    PubMed

    Wright, I P; Sheridan, S; Barber, S J; Morgan, G H; Andrews, D J; Morse, A D

    2015-07-31

    The surface and subsurface of comets preserve material from the formation of the solar system. The properties of cometary material thus provide insight into the physical and chemical conditions during their formation. We present mass spectra taken by the Ptolemy instrument 20 minutes after the initial touchdown of the Philae lander on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Regular mass distributions indicate the presence of a sequence of compounds with additional -CH2- and -O- groups (mass/charge ratios 14 and 16, respectively). Similarities with the detected coma species of comet Halley suggest the presence of a radiation-induced polymer at the surface. Ptolemy measurements also indicate an apparent absence of aromatic compounds such as benzene, a lack of sulfur-bearing species, and very low concentrations of nitrogenous material. PMID:26228155

  5. CHO-bearing organic compounds at the surface of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko revealed by Ptolemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Sheridan, S.; Barber, S. J.; Morgan, G. H.; Andrews, D. J.; Morse, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    The surface and subsurface of comets preserve material from the formation of the solar system. The properties of cometary material thus provide insight into the physical and chemical conditions during their formation. We present mass spectra taken by the Ptolemy instrument 20 minutes after the initial touchdown of the Philae lander on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Regular mass distributions indicate the presence of a sequence of compounds with additional -CH2- and -O- groups (mass/charge ratios 14 and 16, respectively). Similarities with the detected coma species of comet Halley suggest the presence of a radiation-induced polymer at the surface. Ptolemy measurements also indicate an apparent absence of aromatic compounds such as benzene, a lack of sulfur-bearing species, and very low concentrations of nitrogenous material.

  6. Measuring air layer volumes retained by submerged floating-ferns Salvinia and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Matthias J; Bohn, Holger F; Reker, Meike; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Some plants and animals feature superhydrophobic surfaces capable of retaining a layer of air when submerged under water. Long-term air retaining surfaces (Salvinia-effect) are of high interest for biomimetic applications like drag reduction in ship coatings of up to 30%. Here we present a novel method for measuring air volumes and air loss under water. We recorded the buoyancy force of the air layer on leaf surfaces of four different Salvinia species and on one biomimetic surface using a highly sensitive custom made strain gauge force transducer setup. The volume of air held by a surface was quantified by comparing the buoyancy force of the specimen with and then without an air layer. Air volumes retained by the Salvinia-surfaces ranged between 0.15 and 1 L/m(2) depending on differences in surface architecture. We verified the precision of the method by comparing the measured air volumes with theoretical volume calculations and could find a good agreement between both values. In this context we present techniques to calculate air volumes on surfaces with complex microstructures. The introduced method also allows to measure decrease or increase of air layers with high accuracy in real-time to understand dynamic processes. PMID:24991518

  7. Microbial Diversity in Hydrate-bearing and -free Seafloor Surface Sediments in the Shenhu Area, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, X.

    2015-12-01

    In 2007, the China's first gas hydrate drilling expedition GMGS-1 in the Shenhu area on the northern continental slope of the South China Sea was performed (Zhang et al., 2007). Six holes (namely Sites SH1B, SH2B, SH3B, SH5B, SH5C and SH7B) were drilled, and gas hydrate samples were recovered at three sites: Sites SH2B, SH3B and SH7B. In order to investigate microbial diversity and community features in correlation to gas hydrate-bearing sediments, a study on microbial diversity in the surface sediments at hydrate-bearing sites (SH3B and SH7B) and -free sites (SH1B, SH5B, SH5C) was carried out by using 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis. The phylogenetic results indicated difference in microbial communities between hydrate-bearing and -free sediments. At the gas hydrate-bearing sites, bacterial communities were dominated by Deltaproteobacteria (30.5%), and archaeal communities were dominated by Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group (33.8%); In contrast, Planctomycetes was the major group (43.9%) in bacterial communities, while Marine Benthic Group-D (MBG-D) (32.4%) took up the largest proportion in the archaeal communities. Moreover, the microbial communities have characteristics different from those in other hydrate-related sediments around the world, indicating that the presence of hydrates could affect the microbial distribution and community composition. In addition, the microbial community composition in the studied sediments has its own uniqueness, which may be resulted by co-effect of geochemical characteristics and presence/absence of gas hydrates.

  8. Radioisotope Deposition on Interior Building Surfaces: Air Flow and Surface Roughness Influences

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Bobby E

    2005-12-15

    Interior surface deposition effects of vaporized radioactive aerosols are important in understanding their behavior in accident conditions such as the Japanese nuclear laboratory accident in 1999 and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in 1986, where entire communities had to be abandoned because of surface contamination, and the hopefully unlikelihood of a terrorist dirty nuclear bomb attack. Airborne radon progeny offers an opportunity to study radioisotope surface deposition. A significant annual lung cancer rate is also attributed to airborne radon progeny in the interior domestic environment. Surface deposition rates influence the airborne progeny levels. Here, we report extensive {sup 218}Po deposition rates over typical air change rates (ACHs) from 0.02 to 1.0 h{sup -1} for interior furnishings surfaces in a 0.283-m{sup 3} test chamber to supplement earlier reported deposition rates for interior wall, ceiling, and floor surfaces. In analyzing the deposition results from the different materials, it is found that they correlate in terms of roughness with relative static friction and aerodynamic shear stress. Extrapolation to perfectly smooth surfaces provides a good estimate of the Fick's law value. Contrary to prior radon analysis at higher air flow, where the Crump and Seinfeld (CS) turbulent deposition models seemed to fit, at low ACH below 0.5 h{sup -1} the deposition data found excellent agreement with a new Brownian diffusive deposition model for laminar flow. A composite model using the Brownian diffusive laminar flow and the CS turbulent flow models provides an excellent fit to all data. These results provide insight into contamination issues relative to other airborne radioisotopes, with the relative effects being dependent on the airborne contaminant particle sizes and their respective diffusion coefficients as seen in the two deposition models.

  9. A Comprehensive Analysis of AIRS Near Surface Air Temperature and Water Vapor Over Land and Tropical Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. V. T.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Manning, E. M.; Fetzer, E. J.; Wong, S.; Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    Version 6 (V6) of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder's (AIRS) combined infrared and microwave (IR+MW) retrieval of near surface air temperature (NSAT) and water vapor (NSWV) is validated over the United States with the densely populated MESONET data. MESONET data is a collection of surface/near surface meteorological data from many federal and state agencies. The ones used for this analysis are measured from instruments maintained by the National Weather Service (NWS), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the Interagency Remote Automatic Weather Stations (RAWS), resulting in a little more than four thousand locations throughout the US. Over the Tropical oceans, NSAT and NSWV are compared to a network of moored buoys from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean/Triangle Trans-Ocean Buoy Network (TAO/TRITON), and the Pilot Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA). With the analysis of AIRS surface and near surface products over ocean, we glean information on how retrieval of NSAT and NSWV over land can be improved and why it needs some adjustments. We also compare AIRS initial guess of near surface products that are trained on fifty days of ECMWF along with AIRS calibrated radiances, to ECMWF analysis data. The comparison is done to show the differing characteristics of AIRS initial guesses from ECMWF.

  10. Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castro, V. A.; Ott, C. M.; Pierson, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of risk from infectious disease during spaceflight missions is composed of several factors including both the concentration and characteristics of the microorganisms to which the crew are exposed. Thus, having a good understanding of the microbial ecology aboard spacecraft provides the necessary information to mitigate health risks to the crew. While preventive measures are taken to minimize the presence of pathogens on spacecraft, medically significant organisms have been isolated from both the Mir and International Space Station (ISS). Historically, the method for isolation and identification of microorganisms from spacecraft environmental samples depended upon their growth on culture media. Unfortunately, only a fraction of the organisms may grow on a specific culture medium, potentially omitting those microorganisms whose nutritional and physical requirements for growth are not met. To address this bias in our understanding of the ISS environment, the Surface, Water, and Air Biocharacterization (SWAB) Flight Experiment was designed to investigate and develop monitoring technology to provide better microbial characterization. For the SWAB flight experiment, we hypothesized that environmental analysis using non-culture-based technologies would reveal microorganisms, allergens, and microbial toxins not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. Key findings during this experiment included: a) Generally, advanced molecular techniques were able to reveal a few organisms not recovered using culture-based methods; however, there is no indication that current monitoring is "missing" any medically significant bacteria or fungi. b) Molecular techniques have tremendous potential for microbial monitoring, however, sample preparation and data analysis present challenges for spaceflight hardware. c) Analytical results indicate that some molecular techniques, such as denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), can

  11. Rolling Bearing Vibrations—The Effects of Surface Waviness and Radial Internal Clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsha, S. P.

    This paper presents the nonlinear dynamic analysis of a balanced rotor supported by roller bearings. The mathematical formulation accounted for tangential motions of rolling elements as well as inner and outer races with the sources of non-linearity such as Hertzian contact force and radial internal clearance resulting transition from no-contact to contact state between rolling elements and the races. In the formulation the contacts between the rolling elements and the races are considered as nonlinear springs, whose stiffnesses are obtained by using Hertzian elastic contact deformation theory. The implicit type numerical integration technique Newmark-β with Newton-Raphson method is used to solve the nonlinear differential equations iteratively. The results show the appearance of instability and chaos in the dynamic response as the speed of the rotor-bearing system is changed. Period doubling and mechanism of intermittency have been observed, which lead to chaos. The appearance of regions of periodic, subharmonic and chaotic behavior is seen to be strongly dependent on these imperfections. Poincarè maps, phase plots and frequency spectra are used to elucidate and to illustrate the diversity of the system behavior.

  12. NEAR-SURFACE AIR PARCEL TRAJECTORIES - ST. LOUIS, 1975

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utility of air parcel trajectories is described for the diagnosis of mesometeorological and urban air pollution problems. A technique is described that uses the St. Louis Regional Air Monitoring System (RAMS) to provide wind measurements for the local urban scale. A computeri...

  13. Sensate composite calcaneal flap in leg amputation: a full terminal weight-bearing surface-experience in eight adult patients.

    PubMed

    Livani, Bruno; Castro, Gabriel; Filho, Jose Roberto Tonelli; Morgatho, Tâmara Ramos; Mongon, Mauricio Leal Dias; Belangero, William Dias; Davitt, Michael; Carvalho, Jose André

    2011-08-01

    Despite modern reconstruction techniques and replantation, the preservation of a severely traumatised limb, or even a limb affected by a congenital malformation, usually gives poorer functional results compared with amputation and prosthetisation. The aim of this study was to describe a hind foot (including the calcaneum and fat pad) sensate flap with a surface that allows full terminal weight bearing in transtibial amputations in adults. Between June 2007 and September 2008, eight patients underwent leg amputations with a sensate composite calcaneal flap reconstruction of the stump. Patients consisted of four men and four women with a mean age of 46.5 (26-66) years. All amputations were unilateral. The mean follow-up was 28.3 (25-42) months. There were no complications. Calcaneum tibial fusion was observed in all patients in a mean time of 3.5 (3-4) months. A below-knee prosthesis was adapted at 16 weeks postoperatively in all cases, and no need for stump revision occurred in this series during the entire follow-up period. A transtibial amputation covered with a sensate plantar flap preserving the calcaneum was proposed. In theory, the anatomic structures spared in this technique provide a strong, full, weight-bearing terminal surface of the stump that will last a lifetime. PMID:21789589

  14. Assessing surface air temperature variability using quantile regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. A.; Sterin, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Many researches in climate change currently involve linear trends, based on measured variables. And many of them only consider trends in mean values, whereas it is clear, that not only means, but also whole shape of distribution changes over time and requires careful assessment. For example extreme values including outliers may get bigger, while median has zero slope.Quantile regression provides a convenient tool, that enables detailed analysis of changes in full range of distribution by producing a vector of quantile trends for any given set of quantiles.We have applied quantile regression to surface air temperature observations made at over 600 weather stations across Russian Federation during last four decades. The results demonstrate well pronounced regions with similar values of significant trends in different parts of temperature value distribution (left tail, middle part, right tail). The uncertainties of quantile trend estimations for several spatial patterns of trends over Russia are estimated and analyzed for each of four seasons.For temperature trend estimation over vast territories, quantile regression is an effort consuming approach, but is more informative than traditional instrument, to assess decadal evolution of temperature values, including evolution of extremes.Partial support of ERA NET RUS ACPCA joint project between EU and RBRF 12-05-91656-ЭРА-А is highly appreciated.

  15. Elastohydrodynamic film thickness measurements of artificially produced surface dents and grooves. [on fatigue failure of bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedeven, L. D.; Cusano, C.

    1978-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness measurements using optical interferometry have been made of artificially produced dents and grooves under rolling and sliding conditions. These measurements are compared to stylus traces of the dent and groove profiles to determine the local deformation associated with micro-EHD pressure generation. The surface geometry associated with the dents and grooves is seen to become intimately involved in the lubrication process itself, creating local pressure variations that substantially deform the local surface geometry, particularly under sliding conditions. The rolling results have implications concerning surface initiated fatigue and the sliding results show clearly the EHD surface interactions that must occur prior to scuffing failure.

  16. ToF-SIMS analysis of anti-fretting films generated on the surface of ball bearings containing dithiocarbamate and dithiophosphate grease additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duque, Ricardo G.; Wang, Zhiyu; Duell, Dave; Fowler, David E.

    2004-06-01

    During transport of hard drives from the factory to the end customer, vibrations can induce small repetitive displacements of the ball bearings giving rise to fretting corrosion at the metal surfaces. On the other hand, it has been found that some particular types of grease additives can form thin layers on steel surfaces and thus protect against fretting corrosion. ToF-SIMS has been used to study the chemical nature of layers formed on bearing surfaces containing greases with dithiocarbamates, dithiophosphates, and metal sulfonate additives. In cases where fretting was prevented, the presence of MoS 2-, FeS - and ion fragments containing Mo-Fe-S - were observed, whereas none of these ions were detected on the surfaces of fretted bearings. Finally, it is inferred that the action of metal sulfonates may have an antagonist effect on the anti-fretting activity of the dithiocarbamate and dithiophosphate compounds studied.

  17. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived surface skin temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) 2003-2014 were investigated and the three data sets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. The AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically warmer up to 1.65 K at the sea ice boundary and colder down to -2.04 K in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three data sets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~ 2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  18. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived Surface Skin Temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) of 2003-2014 were investigated and the three datasets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically up to 1.65 K warmer at the sea ice boundary and up to 2.04 K colder in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a~less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally-varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three datasets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high latitude regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  19. Dry under water: comparative morphology and functional aspects of air-retaining insect surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balmert, Alexander; Florian Bohn, Holger; Ditsche-Kuru, Petra; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2011-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces prevent certain body parts of semiaquatic and aquatic insects from getting wet while submerged in water. The air layer on these surfaces can serve the insects as a physical gill. Using scanning electron microscopy, we investigated the morphology of air-retaining surfaces in five insect species with different levels of adaptation to aquatic habitats. We found surfaces with either large and sparse hairs (setae), small and dense hairs (microtrichia), or hierarchically structured surfaces with both types of hairs. The structural parameters and air-film persistence of these surfaces were compared. Air-film persistence varied between 2 days in the beetle Galerucella nymphaea possessing only sparse setae and more than 120 days in the bugs Notonecta glauca and Ilyocoris cimicoides possessing dense microtrichia (up to 6.6 × 10(6) microtrichia per millimeter square). From our results, we conclude that the density of the surface structures is the most important factor that affects the persistence of air films. Combinations of setae and microtrichia are not decisive for the overall persistence of the air film but might provide a thick air store for a short time and a thin but mechanically more stable air film for a long time. Thus, we assume that a dense cover of microtrichia acts as a "backup system" preventing wetting of the body surface in case the air-water interface is pressed toward the surface. Our findings might be beneficial for the development of biomimetic surfaces for long-term air retention and drag reduction under water. In addition, the biological functions of the different air retention capabilities are discussed. PMID:21290417

  20. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  1. Colonization by Cladosporium spp. of painted metal surfaces associated with heating and air conditioning systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, D. G.; Simmons, R. B.; Switzer, K. F.; Ajello, L.; Pierson, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Cladosporium cladosporioides and C. hebarum colonized painted metal surfaces of covering panels and register vents of heating, air conditioning and ventilation systems. Hyphae penetrated the paint film and developed characteristic conidiophores and conidia. The colonies were tightly appressed to the metal surface and conidia were not readily detectable via standard air sampling procedures.

  2. Room temperature freezing and orientational control of surface-immobilized peptides in air.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaoxin; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Myers, John; Abbott, Nicholas L; Chen, Zhan

    2015-07-14

    Sugar coatings can stabilize the "native" structure and control the orientation of surface-immobilized peptides in air, providing a potential approach to retain biological functions of surface-immobilized biomolecules in air. This method is general and applicable to complex enzymes. PMID:26068205

  3. Bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Kapich, Davorin D.

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  4. Cooling system for a bearing of a turbine rotor

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Mark Christopher

    2002-01-01

    In a gas turbine, a bore tube assembly radially inwardly of an aft bearing conveys cooling steam to the buckets of the turbine and returns the cooling steam to a return. To cool the bearing and thermally insulate the bearing from the cooling steam paths, a radiation shield is spaced from the bore tube assembly by a dead air gap. Additionally, an air passageway is provided between the radiation shield and the inner surface of an aft shaft forming part of the rotor. Air is supplied from an inlet for flow along the passage and radially outwardly through bores in the aft shaft disk to cool the bearing and insulate it from transfer of heat from the cooling steam.

  5. Diamond-like carbon coatings enhance the hardness and resilience of bearing surfaces for use in joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Roy, M E; Whiteside, L A; Xu, J; Katerberg, B J

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of a hard diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating to enhance the hardness and resilience of a bearing surface in joint replacement. The greater hardness of a magnesium-stabilized zirconium (Mg-PSZ) substrate was expected to provide a harder coating-substrate composite microhardness than the cobalt-chromium alloy (CoCr) also used in arthroplasty. Three femoral heads of each type (CoCr, Mg-PSZ, DLC-CoCr and DLC-Mg-PSZ) were examined. Baseline (non-coated) and composite coating/substrate hardness was measured by Vickers microhardness tests, while nanoindentation tests measured the hardness and elastic modulus of the DLC coating independent of the Mg-PSZ and CoCr substrates. Non-coated Mg-PSZ heads were considerably harder than non-coated CoCr heads, while DLC coating greatly increased the microhardness of the CoCr and Mg-PSZ substrates. On the nanoscale the non-coated heads were much harder than on the microscale, with CoCr exhibiting twice as much plastic deformation as Mg-PSZ. The mechanical properties of the DLC coatings were not significantly different for both the CoCr and Mg-PSZ substrates, producing similar moduli of resilience and plastic resistance ratios. DLC coatings greatly increased hardness on both the micro and nano levels and significantly improved resilience and resistance to plastic deformation compared with non-coated heads. Because Mg-PSZ allows less plastic deformation than CoCr and provides a greater composite microhardness, DLC-Mg-PSZ will likely be more durable for use as a bearing surface in vivo. PMID:19861184

  6. The EUSTACE project: delivering global, daily information on surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morice, C. P.; Rayner, N. A.; Auchmann, R.; Bessembinder, J.; Bronnimann, S.; Brugnara, Y.; Conway, E. A.; Ghent, D.; Good, E.; Herring, K.; Kennedy, J.; Lindgren, F.; Madsen, K. S.; Merchant, C. J.; van der Schrier, G.; Stephens, A.; Tonboe, R. T.; Waterfall, A. M.; Mitchelson, J.; Woolway, I.

    2015-12-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional (land and marine) surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. These relationships can be derived either empirically or with the help of a physical model.Here we discuss the science needed to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types. Information contained in the satellite retrievals would be used to create globally-complete fields in the past, using statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. As the data volumes involved are considerable, such work needs to include development of new "Big Data" analysis methods.We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018), i.e.: • providing new, consistent, multi-component estimates of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; • identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; • estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; • using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras.Information will also be given on how interested users can become

  7. Tribological performance of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures on titanium and a high toughness bearing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonse, J.; Koter, R.; Hartelt, M.; Spaltmann, D.; Pentzien, S.; Höhm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.

    2015-05-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS, ripples) were processed on steel (X30CrMoN15-1) and titanium (Ti) surfaces by irradiation in air with linear polarized femtosecond laser pulses with a pulse duration of 30 fs at 790 nm wavelength. For the processing of large LIPSS covered surface areas (5 mm × 5 mm), the laser fluence and the spatial spot overlap were optimized in a sample-scanning geometry. The laser-processed surfaces were characterized by optical microscopy (OM), white light interference microscopy (WLIM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Spatial LIPSS periods between 450 and 600 nm were determined. The nanostructured surface regions were tribologically tested under reciprocal sliding conditions against a 10-mm diameter ball of hardened 100Cr6 steel. Paraffin oil and engine oil were used as lubricants for 1000 sliding cycles at 1 Hz with a normal load of 1.0 N. The corresponding wear tracks were analyzed by OM and SEM. In particular cases, the laser-generated nanostructures endured the tribological treatment. Simultaneously, a significant reduction of the friction coefficient and the wear was observed in the laser-irradiated (LIPSS-covered) areas when compared to the non-irradiated surface. The experiments reveal the potential benefit of laser surface structuring for tribological applications.

  8. Bearing material. [composite material with low friction surface for rolling or sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A composite material is described which will provide low friction surfaces for materials in rolling or sliding contact and is self-lubricating and oxidation resistant up to and in excess of about 930 C. The composite is comprised of a metal component which lends strength and elasticity to the structure, a fluoride salt component which provides lubrication and, lastly, a glass component which not only provides oxidation protection to the metal but may also enhance the lubrication qualities of the composite.

  9. Static SIMS Analysis of Carbonate on Basic Alkali-bearing Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Cortez, Marnie Michelle; Appelhans, Anthony David; Olsen, J.E.; Shaw, A. D.; Karahan, C.; Avci, R.

    2003-02-01

    Carbonate is a somewhat enigmatic anion in static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) because abundant ions containing intact CO32- are not detected when analyzing alkaline-earth carbonate minerals common to the geochemical environment. In contrast, carbonate can be observed as an adduct ion when it is bound with alkali cations. In this study, carbonate was detected as the adduct Na2CO3·Na+ in the spectra of sodium carbonate, bicarbonate, hydroxide, oxalate, formate and nitrite and to a lesser extent nitrate. The appearance of the adduct Na2CO3·Na+ on hydroxide, oxalate, formate and nitrite surfaces was interpreted in terms of these basic surfaces fixing CO2 from the ambient atmosphere. The low abundance of Na2CO3·Na+ in the static SIMS spectrum of sodium nitrate, compared with a significantly higher abundance in salts having stronger conjugate bases, suggested that the basicity of the conjugate anions correlated with aggressive CO2 fixation; however, the appearance of Na2CO3·Na+ could not be explained simply in terms of solution basicity constants. The oxide molecular ion Na2O+ and adducts NaOH·Na+ and Na2O·Na+ also constituted part of the carbonate spectral signature, and were observed in spectra from all the salts studied. In addition to the carbonate and oxide ions, a low-abundance oxalate ion series was observed that had the general formula Na2-xHxC2O4·Na+, where 0 < x < 2. Oxalate adsorption from the laboratory atmosphere was demonstrated but the oxalate ion series also was likely to be formed from reductive coupling occurring during the static SIMS bombardment event. The remarkable spectral similarity observed when comparing the sodium salts indicated that their surfaces shared common chemical speciation and that the chemistry of the surfaces was very different from the bulk of the particle. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Grease selection for sealed roll neck bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Schrama, R.C.; Vickerman, R.T.; Bender, C.P.

    1995-09-01

    During the 1990`s, a revolution took place in the steel industry with respect to lubricant usage, maintenance costs and the environment. The 4-row taper roller bearings that are used in rolling mills on the work roll necks have been historically lubricated with grease from a centralized grease system, pre-packed with grease at each roll change, or fed with oil from mist or air-oil system. Steel mills are being forced to reduce lubricant consumption to reduce maintenance costs, decrease the costs for the disposal of sludges created from the spent greases and reduce the amount of sludge that was created. The sealed bearing became an avenue for accomplishing these objectives. The open 4-row taper roller bearing was redesigned to accommodate seals. The bearing was pre-packed with grease and put into service without any grease replenishment for up to 22 months operation time. The selection of the grease to provide optimum operating characteristics for the lubricant and the bearing is one of the critical elements to the success of the bearing design. This paper reviews the critical properties that are necessary in the grease for the lubricant to provide the correct tribological functions in the bearing. This includes wear of the rollers and raceways, seal lip and surface wear, heat generation during rotation and under load, corrosion resistance, resistance to shearing during the working life of the grease and resistance to water contamination.

  11. Distillation and Air Stripping Designs for the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boul, Peter J.; Lange, Kevin E.; Conger, Bruce; Anderson, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Air stripping and distillation are two different gravity-based methods, which may be applied to the purification of wastewater on the lunar base. These gravity-based solutions to water processing are robust physical separation techniques, which may be advantageous to many other techniques for their simplicity in design and operation. The two techniques can be used in conjunction with each other to obtain high purity water. The components and feed compositions for modeling waste water streams are presented in conjunction with the Aspen property system for traditional stage distillation models and air stripping models. While the individual components for each of the waste streams will vary naturally within certain bounds, an analog model for waste water processing is suggested based on typical concentration ranges for these components. Target purity levels for the for recycled water are determined for each individual component based on NASA s required maximum contaminant levels for potable water Distillation processes are modeled separately and in tandem with air stripping to demonstrate the potential effectiveness and utility of these methods in recycling wastewater on the Moon. Optimum parameters such as reflux ratio, feed stage location, and processing rates are determined with respect to the power consumption of the process. Multistage distillation is evaluated for components in wastewater to determine the minimum number of stages necessary for each of 65 components in humidity condensate and urine wastewater mixed streams. Components of the wastewater streams are ranked by Henry s Law Constant and the suitability of air stripping in the purification of wastewater in terms of component removal is evaluated. Scaling factors for distillation and air stripping columns are presented to account for the difference in the lunar gravitation environment. Commercially available distillation and air stripping units which are considered suitable for Exploration Life Support

  12. Wettability-independent bouncing on flat surfaces mediated by thin air films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Lagraauw, Rudy; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of drops onto solid surfaces plays a crucial role in a variety of processes, including inkjet printing, fog harvesting, anti-icing, dropwise condensation and spray coating. Recent efforts in understanding and controlling drop impact behaviour focused on superhydrophobic surfaces with specific surface structures enabling drop bouncing with reduced contact time. Here, we report a different universal bouncing mechanism that occurs on both wetting and non-wetting flat surfaces for both high and low surface tension liquids. Using high-speed multiple-wavelength interferometry, we show that this bouncing mechanism is based on the continuous presence of an air film for moderate drop impact velocities. This submicrometre `air cushion' slows down the incoming drop and reverses its momentum. Viscous forces in the air film play a key role in this process: they provide transient stability of the air cushion against squeeze-out, mediate momentum transfer, and contribute a substantial part of the energy dissipation during bouncing.

  13. Load-bearing ability of the mosquito tarsus on water surfaces arising from its flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X. Q.; Liu, J. L.; Zhang, W. J.; Qu, Y. D.

    2015-03-01

    Mosquitoes possess a remarkable ability to stand effortlessly and walk freely on water surfaces because their six legs provide a large force to support the body weight. This study is focused on the role of the tarsus (the distal segment of the mosquito leg) because it was observed that normally only the tarsi make contact with water. The maximum value of the supporting force of the tarsus (6 mm long) in contact with water is estimated as 492 ± 5 μN, nearly 20 times the body weight of the mosquito, whereas the value for the whole leg (11 mm) is about 23 times the body weight. We demonstrate that the huge force provided by the tarsus originates from its flexibility, which ensures that the leg does not easily pierce the water. Adjustment of the initial stepping angle of the tarsus assists the mosquito to control the supporting force. These findings help to illustrate how mosquitoes stand or walk on water with only their tarsi in nearly horizontal contact with the water surface. Besides enhancing our understanding of mechanisms underlying "walking on water" by semi-aquatic insects, these investigations could provide inspiration for the biomimetic design of miniature robotics.

  14. Impact of surface treatment of different reinforced glass-ceramic anterior crowns on load bearing capacity.

    PubMed

    Emslander, Angela; Reise, Michael; Eichberger, Marlis; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of different surface treatments on fracture load (FL) of canine crowns fabricated from two different pressable lithium-disilicate ceramics: A (HS10PC, estetic ceram, n=180) and B (IPS e.max Press, IvoclarVivadent, n=120). The standardized specimens were divided into groups of six different surface treatments and two glazing temperatures. A-group specimens were additionally assigned two glazing pastes with various thermal expansion coefficients (TEC). FL was measured and TECs were determined. Data were analyzed using three/one-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Scheffe's test. B showed comparable or higher FL than A (B: 503-876 N; A: 375-734 N). Lithium-disilicate crowns show higher FL when not grinded but only polished or glazed. Glazing pastes affected FL depending on their TECs, firing temperature and crown treatment. TEC of A and B was 10 ppm/K, glazing pastes for A presented TECs of 7.5 ppm/K and 10 ppm/K and for B of 9 ppm/K. PMID:26438982

  15. Land Surface Process and Air Quality Research and Applications at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale; Khan, Maudood

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of land surface process and air quality research at MSFC including atmospheric modeling and ongoing research whose objective is to undertake a comprehensive spatiotemporal analysis of the effects of accurate land surface characterization on atmospheric modeling results, and public health applications. Land use maps as well as 10 meter air temperature, surface wind, PBL mean difference heights, NOx, ozone, and O3+NO2 plots as well as spatial growth model outputs are included. Emissions and general air quality modeling are also discussed.

  16. Evaluation of the Surface Roughness using AE method with Air Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, T.; Takata, S.; Hino, T.; Yoshida, K.

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to find the development for the evaluation of the surface roughness by the Acoustic Emission (AE) method with air blowing. We paid attention to the AE wave due to air blowing on the specimen plate with different surface roughness. The relationship between the AE wave and surface roughness of specimen plates was investigated. As the result, there is large and continuous difference in the Root Mean Square (RMS) value of their AE waveform. The RMS value decreases by increasing of the surface roughness of specimen plates. It suggested that this characteristic has the possibility to establish a new method of nondestructive surface roughness testing.

  17. Air-sea interaction and spatial variability of the surface evaporation duct in a coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Ian M.

    Aircraft observations are presented of the horizontal variability in the depth of the surface evaporation duct and the relationship with the mesoscale structure of air-sea interaction processes. The 2-dimensional fields of near-surface wind, stress, wind-stress curl, air and sea-surface temperature are measured directly for flow around a headland. The sea surface temperature field indicates cold upwelling driven by the wind-stress curl. Boundary-layer stability responds rapidly to the spatial changes in surface temperature. These changes result in modification of the evaporation duct, which decreases significantly in depth over the cooler upwelling water.

  18. Optical and other property changes of M-50 bearing steel surfaces for different lubricants and additive prior to scuffing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Marxer, N.

    1984-01-01

    An ester lubricant base oil containing one or more standard additives to protect against wear, corrosion, and oxidation was used in an experimental ball/plate elastohydrodynamic contact under load and speed conditions such as to induce scuffing failure in short times. Both the ball and the plate were of identically treated M-50 steel. After various periods of operating time the wear track on the plate was examined with an interference microscope of plus or minus 30 A depth resolution and sometimes also with a scanning ellipsometer and an Auger spectrometer. The optically deduced surface profiles varied with wavelength, indicating the presence of surface coatings, which were confirmed by the other instruments. As scuffing was approached, a thin (approximately A) oxide layer and a carbide layer formed in the wear track in particular when tricresylphosphate antiwear additive was present in the lubricant. The rates of the formation of these layers and their reactivity toward dilute alcholic HCl depended strongly on the lubricant and additives. Based on these results suggestions for improved formulations and a test method for bearing reliability could be proposed.

  19. Optical and other properties changes of M-50 bearing steel surfaces for different lubricants and additives prior to scuffing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Marxer, N.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An ester lubricant base oil containing one or more standard additives to protect against wear, corrosion, and oxidation was used in an experimental ball/plate elastohydrodynamic contact under load and speed conditions such as to induce scuffing failure in short times. Both the ball and the plate were of identically treated M-50 steel. After various periods of operating time the wear track on the plate was examined with an interference microscope of plus or minus 30 A depth resolution and sometimes also with a scanning ellipsometer and an Auger spectrometer. The optically deduced surface profiles varied with wavelength, indicating the presence of surface coatings, which were confirmed by the other instruments. As scuffing was approached, a thin (approximately A) oxide layer and a carbide layer formed in the wear track in particular when tricresylphosphate antiwear additive was present in the lubricant. The rates of the formation of these layers and their reactivity toward dilute alcoholic HCl depended strongly on the lubricant and additives. Based on these results suggestions for improved formulations and a test method for bearing reliability could be proposed.

  20. 29 CFR 1910.425 - Surface-supplied air diving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-supplied air diving shall not be conducted at depths deeper than 190 fsw, except that dives with bottom times of 30 minutes or less may be conducted to depths of 220 fsw. (2) A decompression chamber shall be... fsw. (3) A bell shall be used for dives with an inwater decompression time greater than 120...

  1. Charging of moving surfaces by corona discharges sustained in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Chieh; Zhang, Daihua; Leoni, Napoleon; Birecki, Henryk; Gila, Omer; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharges are used in electrophotographic (EP) printing technologies for charging imaging surfaces such as photoconductors. A typical corona discharge consists of a wire (or wire array) biased with a few hundred volts of dc plus a few kV of ac voltage. An electric discharge is produced around the corona wire from which electrons drift towards and charge the underlying dielectric surface. The surface charging reduces the voltage drop across the gap between the corona wire and the dielectric surface, which then terminates the discharge, as in a dielectric barrier discharge. In printing applications, this underlying surface is continuously moving throughout the charging process. For example, previously charged surfaces, which had reduced the local electric field and terminated the local discharge, are translated out of the field of view and are replaced with uncharged surface. The uncharged surface produces a rebound in the electric field in the vicinity of the corona wire which in turn results in re-ignition of the discharge. The discharge, so reignited, is then asymmetric. We found that in the idealized corona charging system we investigated, a negatively dc biased corona blade with a dielectric covered ground electrode, the discharge is initially sustained by electron impact ionization from the bulk plasma and then dominated by ionization from sheath accelerated secondary electrons. Depending on the speed of the underlying surface, the periodic re-ignition of the discharge can produce an oscillatory charging pattern on the moving surface.

  2. Charging of moving surfaces by corona discharges sustained in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun-Chieh Kushner, Mark J.; Zhang, Daihua; Leoni, Napoleon Birecki, Henryk Gila, Omer

    2014-07-28

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharges are used in electrophotographic (EP) printing technologies for charging imaging surfaces such as photoconductors. A typical corona discharge consists of a wire (or wire array) biased with a few hundred volts of dc plus a few kV of ac voltage. An electric discharge is produced around the corona wire from which electrons drift towards and charge the underlying dielectric surface. The surface charging reduces the voltage drop across the gap between the corona wire and the dielectric surface, which then terminates the discharge, as in a dielectric barrier discharge. In printing applications, this underlying surface is continuously moving throughout the charging process. For example, previously charged surfaces, which had reduced the local electric field and terminated the local discharge, are translated out of the field of view and are replaced with uncharged surface. The uncharged surface produces a rebound in the electric field in the vicinity of the corona wire which in turn results in re-ignition of the discharge. The discharge, so reignited, is then asymmetric. We found that in the idealized corona charging system we investigated, a negatively dc biased corona blade with a dielectric covered ground electrode, the discharge is initially sustained by electron impact ionization from the bulk plasma and then dominated by ionization from sheath accelerated secondary electrons. Depending on the speed of the underlying surface, the periodic re-ignition of the discharge can produce an oscillatory charging pattern on the moving surface.

  3. Wear reduction in ceramic bearings by surface generated pyrolytic carbon continuously replenished by ethylene gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Davis, L. C.

    1993-01-01

    Sliding tests with a pin-on-disc tribometer and both sliding and rolling tests with a modified four-ball tester at bulk temperatures of about 500 C and contact pressures of about 2.2 GPa have demonstrated up to 80% reductions of friction and wear with silicon nitride surfaces when a stream of ethylene is directed into the conjunction region. The effects are even more pronounced when the ethylene is prenucleated by a flow over a coil of nichrome wire electrically heated to about 800 C and located about 30 cm upstream of the exit nozzle. Steel and Ni-plated steel are lubricated by this method even more efficiently at lower temperatures.

  4. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature. PMID:26988392

  5. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-03-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature.

  6. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 10(10) tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called "natural way", to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin's natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature. PMID:26988392

  7. A Comparison of Statistical Techniques for Combining Modeled and Observed Concentrations to Create High-Resolution Ozone Air Quality Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality surfaces representing pollutant concentrations across space and time are needed for many applications, including tracking trends and relating air quality to human and ecosystem health. The spatial and temporal characteristics of these surfaces may reveal new informat...

  8. Estimation of Surface Air Temperature Over Central and Eastern Eurasia from MODIS Land Surface Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Suhung; Leptoukh, Gregory G.

    2011-01-01

    Surface air temperature (T(sub a)) is a critical variable in the energy and water cycle of the Earth.atmosphere system and is a key input element for hydrology and land surface models. This is a preliminary study to evaluate estimation of T(sub a) from satellite remotely sensed land surface temperature (T(sub s)) by using MODIS-Terra data over two Eurasia regions: northern China and fUSSR. High correlations are observed in both regions between station-measured T(sub a) and MODIS T(sub s). The relationships between the maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) depend significantly on land cover types, but the minimum T(sub a) and nighttime T(sub s) have little dependence on the land cover types. The largest difference between maximum T(sub a) and daytime T(sub s) appears over the barren and sparsely vegetated area during the summer time. Using a linear regression method, the daily maximum T(sub a) were estimated from 1 km resolution MODIS T(sub s) under clear-sky conditions with coefficients calculated based on land cover types, while the minimum T(sub a) were estimated without considering land cover types. The uncertainty, mean absolute error (MAE), of the estimated maximum T(sub a) varies from 2.4 C over closed shrublands to 3.2 C over grasslands, and the MAE of the estimated minimum Ta is about 3.0 C.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterovirus D68 Detected in Classroom Air and on Environmental Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Tania S.; Morris, J. Glenn; Loeb, Julia C.

    2016-01-01

    We amplified and sequenced the complete genome of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) that had been collected from classroom air using a filter-based air sampling method and by swab sampling of environmental surfaces. Relatively high levels of EV-D68 genome equivalents were found per cubic meter of air by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). PMID:27313311

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Enterovirus D68 Detected in Classroom Air and on Environmental Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lednicky, John A; Bonny, Tania S; Morris, J Glenn; Loeb, Julia C

    2016-01-01

    We amplified and sequenced the complete genome of enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) that had been collected from classroom air using a filter-based air sampling method and by swab sampling of environmental surfaces. Relatively high levels of EV-D68 genome equivalents were found per cubic meter of air by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). PMID:27313311

  11. Forces of Interaction between Surfaces Bearing Looped Polymer Brushes in Good Solvent.

    SciTech Connect

    Alonzo, Jose; Mays, Jimmy; Kilbey, II, S Michael

    2009-01-01

    In a previous publication we suggested [Huang et al., Macromolecules, 2008, 41, 1745-1752] that looped polymer brushes formed by tethering chains by both ends to a surface may exhibit a polydispersity-like effect due to a distribution of distances between tethering points, leading to segment density profiles dominated by a long and diffuse exponentially-decaying tail. To study this issue in more detail, the force profiles (forces of interaction as a function of separation distance) of a series of looped polymer brushes made by preferential adsorption of poly(2-vinylpyridine)-polystyrene-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PVP-b-PS-b-PVP) triblock copolymers of varying molecular weight and asymmetry ratio are measured using the surface forces apparatus. The force profiles are analyzed using an equivalent diblock model, which considers the triblock copolymer brushes as being comprised of two diblock copolymers of half the PS molecular weight. While scaling the dependencies of the interaction energy and distance on molecular weight, the tethering density and segment size coalesce the measured force profiles to the universal profile, it is necessary to include polydispersity in the description of the equilibrium structure. This is done using the self-consistent field model of Milner et al. [Macromolecules, 1988, 21, 2610-2619]. For looped brushes formed from the symmetric and moderately symmetric triblock copolymers we find that the polydispersity due to molecular weight distribution effectively accounts for the observed force profiles. On the other hand, agreement between the measured and predicted force profiles of looped brushes formed from highly asymmetric copolymers at low degrees-of-compression is achieved only if a much smaller value of the polydispersity index is used in the fitting. The implication of these results is that the shape of the segment density profiles is not due to the previously proposed anchor-induced polydispersity arising due to loop formation; however in

  12. Reservoir compaction and surface subsidence in the Central Luconia gas bearing carbonates, offshore Sarawak, East Malaysia

    SciTech Connect

    vanDitzhunzen, P.J.D.; de Waai, J.A.

    1984-02-01

    In the Central Luconia area, offshore Sarawak, substantial gas reserves are present in Miocene carbonate buildups. The carbonates consist of limestones and dolomites with porosities ranging from 0 to 40 percent. From core analysis it became evident that there exists a potential problem with regard to the compaction of the carbonate reservoir matrix as a result of effective stress increase as the reservoirs are depleted. Triaxial compaction tests were carried out on core samples from several carbonte reservoirs. It was found that highly porous mouldic limestones show pore collapse at relatively low effective stresses. After pore collapse the uniaxial compressibility coefficient increases significantly. Reservoir compressibility parameters can be derived from core data, for collapsing as well as non-collapsing rocks. These can be used to calculate reservoir compaction from well logs for a particular pressure decline. An estimate of the expected surface subsidence can be made based on the theory of poro-elasticity and the nucleus of strain concept as described by Geertsma. Predicted subsidence figures have been taken into account in platform design. The gas reservoirs have large aquifers within the carbonate buildups. As these aquifers have not all been fully appraised, there exists some uncertainty concerning their actual compaction behaviour.

  13. Robust comparison of climate models with observations using blended land air and ocean sea surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowtan, Kevin; Hausfather, Zeke; Hawkins, Ed; Jacobs, Peter; Mann, Michael E.; Miller, Sonya K.; Steinman, Byron A.; Stolpe, Martin B.; Way, Robert G.

    2015-08-01

    The level of agreement between climate model simulations and observed surface temperature change is a topic of scientific and policy concern. While the Earth system continues to accumulate energy due to anthropogenic and other radiative forcings, estimates of recent surface temperature evolution fall at the lower end of climate model projections. Global mean temperatures from climate model simulations are typically calculated using surface air temperatures, while the corresponding observations are based on a blend of air and sea surface temperatures. This work quantifies a systematic bias in model-observation comparisons arising from differential warming rates between sea surface temperatures and surface air temperatures over oceans. A further bias arises from the treatment of temperatures in regions where the sea ice boundary has changed. Applying the methodology of the HadCRUT4 record to climate model temperature fields accounts for 38% of the discrepancy in trend between models and observations over the period 1975-2014.

  14. Rough surface improves stability of air- sounding balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.

    1965-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability of balloons used for measuring the intensity and direction of atmospheric winds at various elevations is improved by incorporating a rough surface on the balloons. The rough-surfaced balloon is useful for collecting wind profiles and other meteorological data.

  15. Processes of Ammonia Air-Surface Exchange in a Fertilized Zea Mays Canopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent incorporation of coupled soil biogeochemical and bi-directional NH3 air-surface exchange algorithms into regional air quality models holds promise for further reducing uncertainty in estimates of NH3 emissions from fertilized soils. While this advancement represents a sig...

  16. 30 CFR 57.5006 - Air Quality-Surface Only [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air Quality-Surface Only 57.5006 Section 57.5006 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Air Quality, Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel...

  17. Deformable bearing seat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreman, O. S., III (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A deformable bearing seat is described for seating a bearing assembly in a housing. The seat includes a seating surface in the housing having a first predetermined spheroidal contour when the housing is in an undeformed mode. The seating surface is deformable to a second predetermined spherically contoured surface when the housing is in a deformed mode. The seat is particularly adaptable for application to a rotating blade and mounting ring assembly in a gas turbine engine.

  18. In vivo macroscopic HPD fluorescence reflectance imaging on small animals bearing surface ARO/NPA tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria C.; Riccio, Patrizia; Russo, Paolo; Roberti, Giuseppe

    2005-08-01

    Recently multimodal imaging systems have been devised because the combination of different imaging modalities results in the complementarity and integration of the techniques and in a consequent improvement of the diagnostic capabilities of the multimodal system with respect to each separate imaging modality. We developed a simple and reliable HematoPorphyrin (HP) mediated Fluorescence Reflectance Imaging (FRI) system that allows for in vivo real time imaging of surface tumors with a large field of view. The tumor cells are anaplastic human thyroid carcinoma-derived ARO cells, or human papillary thyroid carcinoma-derived NPA cells. Our measurements show that the optical contrast of the tumor region image is increased by a simple digital subtraction of the background fluorescence and that HP fluorescence emissivity of ARO tumors is about 2 times greater than that of NPA tumors, and about 4 times greater than that of healthy tissues. This is also confirmed by spectroscopic measurements on histological sections of tumor and healthy tissues. It was shown also the capability of this system to distinguish the tumor type on the basis of the different intensity of the fluorescence emission, probably related to the malignancy degree. The features of this system are complementary with those ones of a pixel radionuclide detection system, which allows for relatively time expensive, narrow field of view measurements, and applicability to tumors also deeply imbedded in tissues. The fluorescence detection could be used as a large scale and quick analysis tool and could be followed by narrow field, higher resolution radionuclide measurements on previously determined highly fluorescent regions.

  19. Lubricant effects on bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1986-01-01

    Lubricant considerations for rolling-element bearings have within the last two decades taken on added importance in the design and operation of mechanical systems. The phenomenon which limits the useful life of bearings is rolling-element or surface pitting fatigue. The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness which separates the ball or roller surface from those of the raceways of the bearing directly affects bearing life. Chemical additives added to the lubricant can also significantly affect bearings life and reliability. The interaction of these physical and chemical effects is important to the design engineer and user of these systems. Design methods and lubricant selection for rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed.

  20. Liquid-Infused Surfaces with Trapped Air (LISTA) for Drag Force Reduction.

    PubMed

    Hemeda, A A; Tafreshi, H Vahedi

    2016-03-29

    Superhydrophobic (SHP) surfaces are known for their drag-reducing attributes thanks to their ability to trap air in their surface pores and thereby reduce the contact between water and the frictional solid area. SHP surfaces are prone to failure under elevated pressures or because of air-layer dissolution into the surrounding water. Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) or liquid-infused surfaces (LIS) in which the trapped air is replaced with a lubricant have been proposed in the literature as a way of eliminating the air dissolution problem as well as improving the surface stability under pressure. While an LIS surface has been shown to reduce drag for flow of water-glycerol mixture (ref 18), no significant drag reduction has yet been reported for the flow of water (a lower viscosity fluid) over LIS. In this concern, we have designed a new surface in which a layer of air is trapped underneath the infused lubricant to reduce the frictional forces preventing the LIS to provide drag reduction for water or any fluid with a viscosity less than that of the lubricant. Drag reduction performance of such surfaces, referred to here as liquid-infused surfaces with trapped air (LISTA), is predicted by solving the biharmonic equation for the water-oil-air three-phase system in transverse grooves with enhanced meniscus stability thanks to double-reentry designs. For the arbitrary dimensions considered in our proof-of-concept study, LISTA designs showed 20-37% advantage over their LIS counterparts. PMID:26977775

  1. Superhydrophobic surfaces of the water bug Notonecta glauca: a model for friction reduction and air retention.

    PubMed

    Ditsche-Kuru, Petra; Schneider, Erik S; Melskotte, Jan-Erik; Brede, Martin; Leder, Alfred; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2011-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces of plants and animals are of great interest for biomimetic applications. Whereas the self-cleaning properties of superhydrophobic surfaces have been extensively investigated, their ability to retain an air film while submerged under water has not, in the past, received much attention. Nevertheless, air retaining surfaces are of great economic and ecological interest because an air film can reduce friction of solid bodies sliding through the water. This opens perspectives for biomimetic applications such as low friction fluid transport or friction reduction on ship hulls. For such applications the durability of the air film is most important. While the air film on most superhydrophobic surfaces usually lasts no longer than a few days, a few semi-aquatic plants and insects are able to hold an air film over a longer time period. Currently, we found high air film persistence under hydrostatic conditions for the elytra of the backswimmer Notonecta glauca which we therefore have chosen for further investigations. In this study, we compare the micro- and nanostructure of selected body parts (sternites, upper side of elytra, underside of elytra) in reference to their air retaining properties. Our investigations demonstrate outstanding air film persistence of the upper side of the elytra of Notonecta glauca under hydrostatic and hydrodynamic conditions. This hierarchically structured surface was able to hold a complete air film under hydrostatic conditions for longer than 130 days while on other body parts with simple structures the air film showed gaps (underside of elytra) or even vanished completely after a few days (sternites). Moreover, the upper side of the elytra was able to keep an air film up to flow velocities of 5 m/s. Obviously the complex surface structure with tiny dense microtrichia and two types of larger specially shaped setae is relevant for this outstanding ability. Besides high air film persistence, the observation of a

  2. Bonding of copper surface in ambient air using propylene carbonate as passivation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Yu, Min; Phillips, Oluwadamilola; Liu, Lisha; Jin, Yufeng

    2015-07-01

    Bonding of a copper surface in a nonvacuum environment has been studied for the purpose of reducing manufacturing costs. Cu-Cu bonding in ambient air is demonstrated by using propylene carbonate (PPC) as a passivation layer. The decomposition of the PPC passivation layer during bonding would protect the copper surface from oxidation by providing a shielding gas atmosphere between the copper surface and the air. Further, the PPC passivation layer would also overcome the degradation of copper surface during storage in the atmosphere.

  3. Validation of AIRS V6 Surface Temperature over Greenland with GCN and NOAA Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Hearty, Thomas; Cullather, Richard; Nowicki, Sophie; Susskind, Joel

    2016-01-01

    This work compares the temporal and spatial characteristics of the AIRSAMSU (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A) Version 6 and MODIS (Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Collection 5 derived surface temperatures over Greenland. To estimate uncertainties in space-based surface temperature measurements, we re-projected the MODIS Ice Surface Temperature (IST) to 0.5 by 0.5 degree spatial resolution. We also re-gridded AIRS Skin Temperature (Ts) into the same grid but classified with different cloud conditions and surface types. These co-located data sets make intercomparison between the two instruments relatively straightforward. Using this approach, the spatial comparison between the monthly mean AIRS Ts and MODIS IST is in good agreement with RMS 2K for May 2012. This approach also allows the detection of any long-term calibration drift and the careful examination of calibration consistency in the MODIS and AIRS temperature data record. The temporal correlations between temperature data are also compared with those from in-situ measurements from GC-Net (GCN) and NOAA stations. The coherent time series of surface temperature evident in the correlation between AIRS Ts and GCN temperatures suggest that at monthly time scales both observations capture the same climate signal over Greenland. It is also suggested that AIRS surface air temperature (Ta) can be used to estimate the boundary layer inversion.

  4. Impact of the equivalent center of mass separating from the sliding surface on the isolation performance of friction pendulum bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Junyong; Ning, Xiangliang; Tan, Ping; Hao, Hongxiao; Chen, Guoping

    2015-12-01

    A new equivalent center of mass model of FPBs (friction pendulum bearings) is introduced, and based on this model, coefficient j of the equivalent center of mass separating from the sliding surface is defined. It is thought in theory that j has a significant impact on the isolation parameter of FPBs, since the equivalent post-yielding stiffness and friction coefficients are not simply determined by sliding radius and sliding friction pairs. The results of numerical simulation analysis using ABAQUS conducted on two groups of FPBs support this viewpoint. For FPBs with the same sliding radius and sliding friction pairs, the FPB modules of structural analysis software such as ETABS could only distinguish the equivalent transformation using j one by one. The seismic response data obtained in a base isolation calculation example of FPBs are very different, which reveals that j's impact on the isolation effectiveness of FPBs cannot be ignored. The introduction of j will help improve the classical structural theory of FPBs and the weak points of structural analysis software based on this theory, which is important in achieving more accurate analyses in structural design.

  5. Cost effectiveness of total hip arthroplasty in osteoarthritis: comparison of devices with differing bearing surfaces and modes of fixation.

    PubMed

    Pulikottil-Jacob, R; Connock, M; Kandala, N-B; Mistry, H; Grove, A; Freeman, K; Costa, M; Sutcliffe, P; Clarke, A

    2015-04-01

    Many different designs of total hip arthroplasty (THA) with varying performance and cost are available. The identification of those which are the most cost-effective could allow significant cost-savings. We used an established Markov model to examine the cost effectiveness of five frequently used categories of THA which differed according to bearing surface and mode of fixation, using data from the National Joint Registry for England and Wales. Kaplan-Meier analyses of rates of revision for men and women were modelled with parametric distributions. Costs of devices were provided by the NHS Supply Chain and associated costs were taken from existing studies. Lifetime costs, lifetime quality-adjusted-life-years (QALYs) and the probability of a device being cost effective at a willingness to pay £20 000/QALY were included in the models. The differences in QALYs between different categories of implant were extremely small (< 0.0039 QALYs for men or women over the patient's lifetime) and differences in cost were also marginal (£2500 to £3000 in the same time period). As a result, the probability of any particular device being the most cost effective was very sensitive to small, plausible changes in quality of life estimates and cost. Our results suggest that available evidence does not support recommending a particular device on cost effectiveness grounds alone. We would recommend that the choice of prosthesis should be determined by the rate of revision, local costs and the preferences of the surgeon and patient. PMID:25820881

  6. Observations of northern latitude ground-surface and surface-air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbury, Allan D.; Bhuiyan, A. K. M. H.; Hanesiak, John; Akinremi, O. O.

    2009-04-01

    Note that the magnitude of temperature increases reconstructed from borehole records seems to contrast with some proxy based reconstructions of surface air temperature (SAT) that indicate lower amounts of warming over the same period. We present data suggesting that ground and snow cover may bias climate reconstructions based on BT in portions of the Canadian northwest. Eight sites west of the Canadian cordillera, were examined for long-term SAT and GST changes. At seven of these sites precise borehole temperature profiles are used for the first time since the 1960s, thereby exploring the linkage between GST and SAT. New readings were made at four of these locations. All sites showed significant increasing SAT trends, in terms of annual mean minimum and maximum temperatures. Over a 54 year period, the minimum temperatures increased between 1.1°C and 1.5°C while the maximum increased between 0.8°C and 1.5°C, among those eight stations. Observations of GST at those sites, however, showed no obvious climate induced perturbations. Therefore, we believe that a trend in our area towards an increase in SAT temperatures only over the winter and spring is being masked by freeze thaw and latent energy effects. These results are important, particularly in northern locations where ground and snow cover may play an important role in creating a seasonal bias in GST reconstructions from borehole surveys.

  7. Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, J.R.

    1980-05-02

    A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

  8. OTV bearing deflection investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, B. L.; Diepenbrock, R. T.; Millis, M. G.

    1993-04-01

    The primary goal of the Bearing Deflectometer Investigation was to gain experience in the use of fiber optic displacement probe technology for bearing health monitoring in a liquid hydrogen turbo pump. The work specified in this Task Order was conducted in conjunction with Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory Contract F04611-86-C-0010. APD conducted the analysis and design coordination to provide a displacement probe design compatible with the XLR-134 liquid hydrogen turbo pump assembly (TPA). Specifications and requirements of the bearing deflectometer were established working with Mechanical Technology Instruments, Inc. (MTI). The TPA design accommodated positioning of the probe to measure outer race cyclic deflections of the pump inlet bearing. The fiber optic sensor was installed as required in the TPA and sensor output was recorded during the TPA testing. Data review indicated that no bearing deflection signature could be differentiated from the inherent system noise. Alternate sensor installations were not investigated, but might yield different results.

  9. Robust Comparison of Climate Models with Observations Using Blended Land Air and Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausfather, Z.; Jacobs, P.; Cowtan, K.; Hawkins, E.; Mann, M. E.; Miller, S. K.; Steinman, B. A.; Way, R. G.; Stolpe, M.

    2015-12-01

    Model-observation comparisons provide an important test of climate models' ability to realistically simulate the transient evolution of the system. A great deal of attention has recently focused on the so-called "hiatus" period of the past ~15 years, when estimates of recent surface temperature evolution fall at the lower end of climate model projections. This work quantifies a systematic bias in model-observation comparisons arising from differential warming rates between sea surface temperatures and surface air temperatures over oceans. Global mean temperatures from climate model simulations are typically calculated using surface air temperatures, while the corresponding observations are based on a blend of air and sea surface temperatures. A further bias arises from the treatment of temperatures in regions where the sea ice boundary has changed. We discuss the magnitude of these biases, and their implications for the evaluation of climate model performance over the "hiatus" period and the full instrumental record.

  10. Comparison of MODIS Land Surface Temperature and Air Temperature over the Continental USA Meteorological Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ping; Bounoua, Lahouari; Imhoff, Marc L.; Wolfe, Robert E.; Thome, Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) Impervious Surface Area (ISA) and MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) are used in a spatial analysis to assess the surface-temperature-based urban heat island's (UHIS) signature on LST amplitude over the continental USA and to make comparisons to local air temperatures. Air-temperature-based UHIs (UHIA), calculated using the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) daily air temperatures, are compared with UHIS for urban areas in different biomes during different seasons. NLCD ISA is used to define urban and rural temperatures and to stratify the sampling for LST and air temperatures. We find that the MODIS LST agrees well with observed air temperature during the nighttime, but tends to overestimate it during the daytime, especially during summer and in nonforested areas. The minimum air temperature analyses show that UHIs in forests have an average UHIA of 1 C during the summer. The UHIS, calculated from nighttime LST, has similar magnitude of 1-2 C. By contrast, the LSTs show a midday summer UHIS of 3-4 C for cities in forests, whereas the average summer UHIA calculated from maximum air temperature is close to 0 C. In addition, the LSTs and air temperatures difference between 2006 and 2011 are in agreement, albeit with different magnitude.

  11. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify themore » particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.« less

  12. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  13. Bearings: Technology and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A brief status report on bearing technology and present and near-term future problems that warrant research support is presented. For rolling element bearings a material with improved fracture toughness, life data in the low Lambda region, a comprehensive failure theory verified by life data and incorporated into dynamic analyses, and an improved corrosion resistant alloy are perceived as important needs. For hydrodynamic bearings better definition of cavitation boundaries and pressure distributions for squeeze film dampers, and geometry optimization for minimum power loss in turbulent film bearings are needed. For gas film bearings, foil bearing geometries that form more nearly optimum film shapes for maximum load capacity, and more effective surface protective coatings for high temperature operation are needed.

  14. Compressor ported shroud for foil bearing cooling

    DOEpatents

    Elpern, David G.; McCabe, Niall; Gee, Mark

    2011-08-02

    A compressor ported shroud takes compressed air from the shroud of the compressor before it is completely compressed and delivers it to foil bearings. The compressed air has a lower pressure and temperature than compressed outlet air. The lower temperature of the air means that less air needs to be bled off from the compressor to cool the foil bearings. This increases the overall system efficiency due to the reduced mass flow requirements of the lower temperature air. By taking the air at a lower pressure, less work is lost compressing the bearing cooling air.

  15. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma from exposure index in computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A. M.; Pelegrino, M. S.

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to establish an indirect method to calculate the values of entrance surface air kerma in patients undergoing diagnostic examinations in X-ray systems with computed radiography based on the exposure index. The entrance surface air kerma values were compared with values obtained also indirectly based on measurements of X-ray tube output. The mean±standard deviation (1σ) and third quartile for entrance surface air kerma calculated from the exposure index were 2.1±1.0 mGy and 3.0 mGy, respectively. For entrance surface air kerma based on measurements of the X-ray tube output, the mean±standard deviation (1σ) and third quartile were respectively 3.1±1.9 mGy and 5.5 mGy. The observed values of entrance surface air kerma are smaller than the reference level adopted in Brazil (10 mGy). The results obtained with both methods were similar when taking into account the estimated uncertainties in the determination of air kerma values, although the reproducibility of the determinations based on the exposure index is better.

  16. Surface Coordination of Black Phosphorus for Robust Air and Water Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuetao; Wang, Huaiyu; Huang, Hao; Xiao, Quanlan; Xu, Yanhua; Guo, Zhinan; Xie, Hanhan; Shao, Jundong; Sun, Zhengbo; Han, Weijia; Yu, Xue-Feng; Li, Penghui; Chu, Paul K

    2016-04-11

    A titanium sulfonate ligand is synthesized for surface coordination of black phosphorus (BP). In contrast to serious degradation observed from the bare BP, the BP after surface coordination exhibits excellent stability during dispersion in water and exposure to air for a long period of time, thereby significantly extending the lifetime and spurring broader application of BP. PMID:26968443

  17. Predictable surface ablation of dielectrics with few-cycle laser pulse even beyond air ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquier, C.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O.; Sanner, N.

    2016-08-01

    We study surface ablation of dielectrics with single-shot few-cycle optical pulse (˜10 fs) in air, at intensities below and above the onset of air ionization. We perform 3D analysis and careful calibration of the fluence distribution at the laser focus, spanning from linear- to nonlinear- focusing regimes, enabling to thoroughly characterize the severe limitation of the fluence delivered onto the sample surface upon increase of incident pulse energy. Despite significant beam reshaping taking place at high fluence, we demonstrate that it is nevertheless possible to confidently predict the resulting crater profiles on fused silica surface, even in the regime of filamentation.

  18. Nonpoint sources of volatile organic compounds in urban areas - Relative importance of land surfaces and air

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, T.J.; Bender, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly detected in urban waters across the United States include gasoline-related compounds (e.g. toluene, xylene) and chlorinated compounds (e.g. chloroform, tetrachloroethane [PCE], trichloroethene [TCE]). Statistical analysis of observational data and results of modeling the partitioning of VOCs between air and water suggest that urban land surfaces are the primary nonpoint source of most VOCs. Urban air is a secondary nonpoint source, but could be an important source of the gasoline oxygenate methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE). Surface waters in urban areas would most effectively be protected by controlling land-surface sources.

  19. Is there any difference in survivorship of total hip arthroplasty with different bearing surfaces? A systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Si; Zhang, Dangfeng; Du, Hui; Du, Heng; Yin, Zhanhai; Qiu, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although many total hip bearing implants are widely used all over the world, simultaneous comparisons across the numerous available bearing surfaces are rare. The purpose of this study was to compare the survivorship of total hip arthroplasty (THA) with six available bearing implants. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting survivorship or revision of ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC), ceramic-on-conventional polyethylene (CoPc), ceramic-on-highly-crosslinked polyethylene (CoPxl), metal-on-conventional polyethylene (MoPc), metal-on-highly-crosslinked polyethylene (MoPxl), or metal-on-metal (MoM) bearing implants. The synthesis of present evidence was performed by both the traditional direct-comparison meta-analysis and network meta-analysis. Results: In total, 40 RCTs involving a total of 5321 THAs were identified. The pooled data of network meta-analysis showed no difference in relative risk (RR) of revision across CoC, CoPc, CoPxl and MoPxl bearings. However, the MoM bearing was demonstrated with a significant higher risk of revision compared with CoC (RR 5.10; 95% CI=1.62 to 16.81), CoPc (RR 4.80; 95% CI=1.29 to 17.09), or MoPxl (RR 3.85; 95% CI=1.16 to 14.29), and the MoPc bearing was indicated with a higher risk of revision compared with CoC (RR 2.83; 95% CI=1.20 to 6.63). The ranking probabilities of the effective interventions also revealed the inferiority of the MoM and MoPc implants in survivorship (both 0%, 95% CI=0% to 0%) compared with CoC (39%, 95% CI=0% to 100%), CoPc (33%, 95% CI=0% to 100%), CoPxl (7%, 95% CI=0% to 100%) or MoPxl (21%, 95% CI=0% to 100%). Conclusions: The present evidence indicated the similar performance in survivorship among CoC, CoPc, CoPxl and MoPxl bearing implants, and that all likely have superiority compared with the MoM and MoPc bearing implants in THA procedures. Long-term RCT data are required to confirm these conclusions and better inform clinical decisions. PMID

  20. BOREAS AES Five-Day Averaged Surface Meteorological and Upper Air Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Strub, Richard; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) provided BOREAS with hourly and daily surface meteorological data from 23 of the AES meteorological stations located across Canada and upper air data from 1 station at The Pas, Manitoba. Due to copyright restrictions on the full resolution surface meteorological data, this data set contains 5-day average values for the surface parameters. The upper air data are provided in their full resolution form. The 5-day averaging was performed in order to create a data set that could be publicly distributed at no cost. Temporally, the surface meteorological data cover the period of January 1975 to December 1996 and the upper air data cover the period of January 1961 to November 1996. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-staff data. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  1. Variation of Local Surface Properties of an Air Bubble in Water Caused by Its Interaction with Another Surface.

    PubMed

    Del Castillo, Lorena A; Ohnishi, Satomi; Carnie, Steven L; Horn, Roger G

    2016-08-01

    Surface and hydrodynamic forces acting between an air bubble and a flat mica surface in surfactant-free water and in 1 mM KCl solution have been investigated by observing film drainage using a modified surface force apparatus (SFA). The bubble shapes observed with the SFA are compared to theoretical profiles computed from a model that considers hydrodynamic interactions, surface curvature, and disjoining pressure arising from electrical double layer and van der Waals interactions. It is shown that the bubble experiences double-layer forces, and a final equilibrium wetting film between the bubble and mica surfaces is formed by van der Waals repulsion. However, comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the double-layer forces are not simply a function of surface separation. Rather, they appear to be changed by one of more of the following: the bubble's dynamic deformation, its proximity to another surface, and/or hydrodynamic flow in the aqueous film that separate them. The same comments apply to the hydrodynamic mobility or immobility of the air-water interface. Together the results show that the bubble's surface is "soft" in two senses: in addition to its well-known deformability, its local properties are affected by weak external forces, in this case the electrical double-layer interactions with a nearby surface and hydrodynamic flow in the neighboring aqueous phase. PMID:27391417

  2. Comparison of Near-Surface Air Temperatures and MODIS Ice-Surface Temperatures at Summit, Greenland (2008-2013)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuman, Christopher A.; Hall, Dorothy K.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo E.; Mefford, Thomas K.; Schnaubelt, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the stability of the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared-derived ice surface temperature (IST) data from Terra for use as a climate quality data record. The availability of climate quality air temperature data (TA) from a NOAA Global Monitoring Division observatory at Greenlands Summit station has enabled this high temporal resolution study of MODIS ISTs. During a 5 year period (July 2008 to August 2013), more than 2500 IST values were compared with 3-minute average TA values derived from the 1-minute data from NOAAs primary 2 m air temperature sensor. These data enabled an expected small offset between air and surface temperatures at this the ice sheet location to be investigated over multiple annual cycles.

  3. Oxidation Behavior of Germanium- and/or Silicon-Bearing Near-α Titanium Alloys in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitashima, Tomonori; Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko

    2015-06-01

    The effect of germanium (Ge) and/or silicon (Si) addition on the oxidation behavior of the near-α alloy Ti-5Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo was investigated in air at 973 K (700 °C). Ge addition decreased the oxidation resistance because of the formation of a Ge-rich layer in the substrate at the TiO2/substrate interface, enhancing Sn segregation at the interface. In addition, a small amount of Ge dissolved in the external Al2O3 layer. These results reduced the aluminum activity at the interface, suppressed the formation of Al2O3, and increased the diffusivity of oxygen in the oxide scales. The addition of 0.2 and 0.9 wt pct Si was beneficial for improving oxidation resistance. The effect of germanide and silicide precipitates in the matrix on the oxide growth process was also discussed.

  4. Sensitivity of coastal meteorology and air quality to urban surface characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Surface characteristics play an important role in shaping the local meteorological conditions in urban areas, and subsequently affect the generation and transport of pollutants. A basic understanding of this relationship in urban climates has led researchers to explore surface modification strategies for cooling cities, saving energy, and reducing pollution. These strategies include planting of urban vegetation and increasing urban albedo, both of which represent a significant modification to the urban surface. The air temperature reductions resulting from enhanced evapotranspiration (from increasing vegetation), and reduced solar gain (from increasing albedo) have positive energy use and air quality implications. Research has shown that decreasing air temperature by 1{degrees}C in the Los Angeles Basin could save consumers $50,000 per hour in avoided energy use and reduce peak ozone levels by 5 to 10 parts per billion. Driven by these figures, this study is part of a larger research effort focusing on air quality in the Los Angeles Basin. Prior to conducting full three-dimensional meteorological simulations and the corresponding photochemical smog simulations, two-dimensional simulations were designed to isolate each surface characteristic and examine its role in a developing mesoscale coastal flow. The air temperature and mixing height impacts, having the most air quality significance, were then investigated through a preliminary photochemical sensitivity study.

  5. Variations of 210Pb concentrations in surface air at Thessaloniki, Greece (40°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, A.; Kotsopoulou, E.; Karanatsiou, A.; Papastefanou, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of 210Pb were measured over the year 2009 in ground level air at Thessaloniki, Northern Greece (40°62' N, 22°95'E). The mean activity concentrations of 210Pb in surface air have been found to be 671 ± 213 μBq m-3. The highest values of monthly atmospheric concentrations of 210Pb were observed in the autumn and the lowest in the spring period. The higher values of 210Pb during autumn were attributed to frequent inversion conditions of the surface layers, resulting in an enrichment of radon and its decay products in surface air. The lower values during the winter months might be due to the low emanation of radon from the frozen or snow-covered soil. The minima of 210Pb concentrations during spring might reflect on higher washout during this period, which results in less emanation of radon from saturated with water soil, resulting in less production of 210Pb near ground-level air. The relative high values during summer are probably due to the higher 222Rn exhalation from the ground and due to the higher air mixing within the troposphere, which has as a result to carry down to the surface layer 210Pb whose origin is older air masses which entered into the free troposphere.

  6. Properties of impurity-bearing ferrihydrite II: Insights into the surface structure and composition of pure, Al- and Si-bearing ferrihydrite from Zn(II) sorption experiments and Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cismasu, A. Cristina; Levard, Clément; Michel, F. Marc; Brown, Gordon E.

    2013-10-01

    Naturally occurring ferrihydrite often contains impurities such as Al and Si, which can impact its chemical reactivity with respect to metal(loid) adsorption and (in)organic or microbially induced reductive dissolution. However, the surface composition of impure ferrihydrites is not well constrained, and this hinders our understanding of the factors controlling the surface reactivity of these nanophases. In this study, we conducted Zn(II) adsorption experiments combined with Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements on pure ferrihydrite (Fh) and Al- or Si-bearing ferrihydrites containing 10 and 20 mol% Al or Si (referred to as 10AlFh, 20AlFh and 10SiFh, 20SiFh) to evaluate Zn(II) uptake in relation to Zn(II) speciation at their surfaces. Overall, Zn(II) uptake at the surface of AlFh is similar to that of pure Fh, and based on Zn K-edge EXAFS data, Zn(II) speciation at the surface of Fh and AlFh also appears similar. Binuclear bidentate IVZn-VIFe complexes (at ∼3.46 Å (2C[1]) and ∼3.25 Å (2C[2])) were identified at low Zn(II) surface coverages from Zn K-edge EXAFS fits. With increasing Zn(II) surface coverage, the number of second-neighbor Fe ions decreased, which was interpreted as indicating the formation of IVZn polymers at the ferrihydrite surface, and a deviation from Langmuir uptake behavior. Zn(II) uptake at the surface of SiFh samples was more significant than at Fh and AlFh surfaces, and was attributed to the formation of outer-sphere complexes (on average 24% of sorbed Zn). Although similar Zn-Fe/Zn distances were obtained for the Zn-sorbed SiFh samples, the number of Fe second neighbors was lower in comparison with Fh. The decrease in second-neighbor Fe is most pronounced for sample 20SiFh, suggesting that the amount of reactive surface Fe sites diminishes with increasing Si content. Although our EXAFS results shown here do not provide evidence for the existence of Zn-Al or Zn-Si complexes, their presence is not excluded for Zn-sorbed Al

  7. Asphaltene Erosion Process in Air Plasma: Emission Spectroscopy and Surface Analysis for Air-Plasma Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, H.; Flores, O.; C. Poveda, J.; Campillo, B.

    2012-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was applied for plasma characterization during the erosion of asphaltene substrates. An amount of 100 mg of asphaltene was carefully applied to an electrode and exposed to air-plasma glow discharge at a pressure of 1.0 Torr. The plasma was generated in a stainless steel discharge chamber by an ac generator at a frequency of 60 Hz, output power of 50 W and a gas flow rate of 1.8 L/min. The electron temperature and ion density were estimated to be 2.15±0.11 eV and (1.24±0.05) × 1016 m-3, respectively, using a double Langmuir probe. OES was employed to observe the emission from the asphaltene exposed to air plasma. Both molecular band emission from N2, N+2, OH, CH, NH, O2 as well as CN, and atomic light emission from V and Hγ were observed and used to monitor the evolution of asphaltene erosion. The asphaltene erosion was analyzed with the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector. The EDX analysis showed that the time evolution of elements C, O, S and V were similar; and the chemical composition of the exposed asphaltenes remained constant. Particle size evolution was measured, showing a maximum size of 2307 μm after 60 min. This behavior is most likely related to particle agglomeration as a function of time.

  8. Diamond-like carbon coatings enhance scratch resistance of bearing surfaces for use in joint arthroplasty: hard substrates outperform soft.

    PubMed

    Roy, Marcel E; Whiteside, Leo A; Katerberg, Brian J

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypotheses that diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings will enhance the scratch resistance of a bearing surface in joint arthroplasty, and that a hard ceramic substrate will further enhance scratch resistance by reducing plastic deformation. We tested these hypotheses by applying a hard DLC coating to medical-grade cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr) and magnesia-stabilized zirconia (Mg-PSZ) femoral heads and performing scratch tests to determine the loads required to cause cohesive and adhesive fracture of the coating. Scratch tracks of DLC-coated and noncoated heads were then scanned by optical profilometry to determine scratch depth, width, and pile-up (raised edges), as measures of susceptibility to scratching. DLC-coated CoCr specimens exhibited cohesive coating fracture as wedge spallation at an average load of 9.74 N, whereas DLC-coated Mg-PSZ exhibited cohesive fracture as arc-tensile cracks and chipping at a significantly higher average load of 41.3 N (p < 0.0001). At adhesive coating fracture, DLC-CoCr delaminated at an average load of 35.2 N, whereas DLC-Mg-PSZ fractured by recovery spallation at a significantly higher average load of 46.8 N (p < 0.05). Both DLC-CoCr and DLC-Mg-PSZ specimens exhibited significantly shallower scratches and less pile-up than did uncoated specimens (p < 0.005 and p < 0.01, respectively). However, the harder ceramic substrate of DLC-Mg-PSZ better resisted plastic deformation, requiring significantly higher loads for cohesive and adhesive coating fracture. These findings supported both of our hypotheses. PMID:18985791

  9. Effect on vehicle and track interaction of installation faults in the concrete bearing surface of a direct-fixation track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. C.; Kim, E.

    2012-01-01

    Various installation faults can occur in fasteners in the construction of a direct-fixation track using the top-down method. In extreme cases, these faults may cause excessive interaction between the train and track, compromise the running safety of the train, and cause damage to the track components. Therefore, these faults need to be kept within the allowable level through an investigation of their effects on the interactions between the train and track. In this study, the vertical dynamic stiffness of fasteners in installation faults was measured based on a dynamic stiffness test by means of an experimental apparatus that was devised to feasibly reproduce installation faults with an arbitrary shape. This study proposes an effective analytical model for a train-track interaction system in which most elements, except the nonlinear wheel-rail contact and some components that behave bilinearly, exhibit linear behavior. To investigate the effect of the behavior of fasteners in installation faults in a direct-fixation track on the vehicle and track, vehicle-track interaction analyses were carried out, targeting key review parameters such as the wheel load reduction factor, vertical rail displacement, wheel load, and mean stress of the elastomer. From the results, it was noted that it is more important for the installation faults in the concrete bearing surface of a direct-fixation track to be limited for the sake of the long-term durability of the elastomer rather than for the running safety of the train or the structural safety of the track.

  10. Frictionless Bearing Uses Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The purpose of this innovation was to develop a frictionless bearing for high speed, light load applications. The device involves the incorporation of permanent magnets in the bearing design. The repulsion of like magnetic poles provides concentric support of the inner member so that no metallic contact occurs between the bearing surfaces.

  11. Flow visualization study of grooved surface/surfactant/air sheet interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason C.; Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1989-03-01

    The effects of groove geometry, surfactants, and airflow rate have been ascertained by a flow-visualization study of grooved-surface models which addresses the possible conditions for skin friction-reduction in marine vehicles. It is found that the grooved surface geometry holds the injected bubble stream near the wall and, in some cases, results in a 'tube' of air which remains attached to the wall. It is noted that groove dimension and the use of surfactants can substantially affect the stability of this air tube; deeper grooves, surfactants with high contact angles, and angled air injection, are all found to increase the stability of the attached air tube, while convected disturbances and high shear increase interfacial instability.

  12. Flow visualization study of grooved surface/surfactant/air sheet interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Jason C.; Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of groove geometry, surfactants, and airflow rate have been ascertained by a flow-visualization study of grooved-surface models which addresses the possible conditions for skin friction-reduction in marine vehicles. It is found that the grooved surface geometry holds the injected bubble stream near the wall and, in some cases, results in a 'tube' of air which remains attached to the wall. It is noted that groove dimension and the use of surfactants can substantially affect the stability of this air tube; deeper grooves, surfactants with high contact angles, and angled air injection, are all found to increase the stability of the attached air tube, while convected disturbances and high shear increase interfacial instability.

  13. Detection and Identification: Instrumentation and Calibration for Air/Liquid/Surface-borne Nanoscale Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Tsz Yan; Zuo, Zhili; Pui, David Y. H.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoscale particles can be found in the air-borne, liquid-borne and surface-borne dispersed phases. Measurement techniques for nanoscale particles in all three dispersed phases are needed for the environmental, health and safety studies of nanomaterials. We present our studies on connecting the nanoparticle measurements in different phases to enhance the characterization capability. Microscopy analysis for particle morphology can be performed by depositing air-borne or liquid-borne nanoparticles on surfaces. Detection limit and measurement resolution of the liquid-borne nanoparticles can be enhanced by aerosolizing them and taking advantage of the well-developed air-borne particle analyzers. Sampling electrically classified air-borne virus particles with a gelatin filter provides higher collection efficiency than a liquid impinger.

  14. Permanent hydrophilization of outer and inner surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes using ambient air plasma generated by surface dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Pavliňák, D.; Galmiz, O.; Zemánek, M.; Brablec, A.; Čech, J.; Černák, M.

    2014-10-13

    We present an atmospheric pressure ambient air plasma technique developed for technically simple treatment of inner and/or outer surfaces of plastic tubes and other hollow dielectric bodies. It is based on surface dielectric barrier discharge generating visually diffuse plasma layers along the treated dielectric surfaces using water-solution electrodes. The observed visual uniformity and measured plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures of 333 K and 2350 K indicate that the discharge can be readily applied to material surface treatment without significant thermal effect. This is exemplified by the obtained permanent surface hydrophilization of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes related to the replacement of a high fraction (more than 80%) of the surface fluorine determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A tentative explanation of the discharge mechanism based on high-speed camera observations and the discharge current and voltage of measurements is outlined.

  15. Air coupled ultrasonic detection of surface defects in food cans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Fernando; Ramón Jiménez, Antonio; del Castillo, María Dolores

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we describe an ultrasonic inspection system used for detection of surface defects in food cans. The system operates in the pulse-echo mode and analyses the 220 kHz ultrasonic signal backscattered by the object. The classification of samples into valid or defective is achieved with χ2 statistics and the k nearest neighbour method, applied to features computed from the envelope of the ultrasonic echo. The performance of the system is demonstrated empirically in detection of the presence of the pull tab on the removable lid of easy-open food cans, in a production line. It is found that three factors limit the performance of the classification: the misalignment of the samples, their separation of the ultrasonic transducer, and the vibration of the conveyor belt. When these factors are controlled, classification success rates between 94% and 99% are achieved.

  16. Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: Concomitant Contamination of Air and Environmental Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shimose, Luis A; Masuda, Eriko; Sfeir, Maroun; Berbel Caban, Ana; Bueno, Maria X; dePascale, Dennise; Spychala, Caressa N; Cleary, Timothy; Namias, Nicholas; Kett, Daniel H; Doi, Yohei; Munoz-Price, L Silvia

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To concomitantly determine the differential degrees of air and environmental contamination by Acinetobacter baumannii based on anatomic source of colonization and type of ICU layout (single-occupancy vs open layout). DESIGN Longitudinal prospective surveillance study of air and environmental surfaces in patient rooms. SETTING A 1,500-bed public teaching hospital in Miami, Florida. PATIENTS Consecutive A. baumannii-colonized patients admitted to our ICUs between October 2013 and February 2014. METHODS Air and environmental surfaces of the rooms of A. baumannii-colonized patients were sampled daily for up to 10 days. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to type and match the matching air, environmental, and clinical A. baumannii isolates. RESULTS A total of 25 A. baumannii-colonized patients were identified during the study period; 17 were colonized in the respiratory tract and 8 were colonized in the rectum. In rooms with rectally colonized patients, 38.3% of air samples were positive for A. baumannii; in rooms of patients with respiratory colonization, 13.1% of air samples were positive (P=.0001). In rooms with rectally colonized patients, 15.5% of environmental samples were positive for A. baumannii; in rooms of patients with respiratory colonization, 9.5% of environmental samples were positive (P=.02). The rates of air contamination in the open-layout and single-occupancy ICUs were 17.9% and 21.8%, respectively (P=.5). Environmental surfaces were positive in 9.5% of instances in open-layout ICUs versus 13.4% in single-occupancy ICUs (P=.09). CONCLUSIONS Air and environmental surface contaminations were significantly greater among rectally colonized patients; however, ICU layout did not influence the rate of contamination. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:777-781. PMID:27045768

  17. The role of subsurface soil temperature feedbacks in summer surface air temperature variability over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil temperature, an important component of land surface, can influence the climate through its effects on surface energy and water budgets and resulted changes in regional atmospheric circulation. However, the effects of soil temperature on climate variations have been less discussed. This study investigates the role of subsurface soil temperature feedbacks in influencing summer surface air temperature variability over East Asia by means of regional climate model (RCM) simulations. For this aim, two long-term simulations with and without subsurface soil temperature feedbacks are performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. From our investigation, it is evident that subsurface soil temperature feedbacks make a dominant contribution to amplifying summer surface air temperature variability over the arid/semi-arid regions. Further analysis reveals that subsurface soil temperature exhibits an asymmetric effect on summer daytime and nighttime surface air temperature variability, with a stronger effect on daily minimum temperature variability than that of daily maximum temperature variability. This study provides the first RCM-based demonstration that subsurface soil temperature feedbacks play an important role in influencing climate variability over East Asia, such as summer surface air temperature. In the meanwhile, the model bias should be recognized. The results achieved by this study thus need to be further confirmed in a multi-model framework to eliminate the model dependence.

  18. Air, water, and surface bacterial contamination in a university-hospital autopsy room.

    PubMed

    Maujean, Géraldine; Malicier, Daniel; Fanton, Laurent

    2012-03-01

    Today, little is known about the bacteriological environment of the autopsy room and its potential interest for medico-legal practices. Seven hundred fifty microbiological samples were taken from surface (n = 660), air (n = 48), and water (n = 42) to evaluate it in a French University Forensic Department. Median bacterial counts were compared before and during autopsy for air samples, and before and after autopsy for surface samples, using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed ranks test. Bacterial identification relied on traditional phenotypic methods. Bacterial counts in the air were low before autopsy, increased significantly during procedure, and seemed more linked to the number of people in the room than to an important production of aerosol-containing bacteria. Despite cleaning, human fecal flora was omnipresent on surfaces, which revealed insufficient disinfection. Bacteriological sampling is an easy way to monitor cleaning practices in postmortem rooms, but chiefly a way to improve the reliability of medico-legal proofs of infectious deaths. PMID:22309163

  19. Mathematical Estimation of the Level of Microbial Contamination on Spacecraft Surfaces by Volumetric Air Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Roark, A. L.; Fields, N. D.; Puleo, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiological sampling methods presently used for enumeration of microorganisms on spacecraft surfaces require contact with easily damaged components. Estimation of viable particles on surfaces using air sampling methods in conjunction with a mathematical model would be desirable. Parameters necessary for the mathematical model are the effect of angled surfaces on viable particle collection and the number of viable cells per viable particle. Deposition of viable particles on angled surfaces closely followed a cosine function, and the number of viable cells per viable particle was consistent with a Poisson distribution. Other parameters considered by the mathematical model included deposition rate and fractional removal per unit time. A close nonlinear correlation between volumetric air sampling and airborne fallout on surfaces was established with all fallout data points falling within the 95% confidence limits as determined by the mathematical model. PMID:4151118

  20. Mathematical estimation of the level of microbial contamination on spacecraft surfaces by volumetric air sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Roark, A. L.; Fields, N. D.; Puleo, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Microbiological sampling methods presently used for enumeration of microorganisms on spacecraft surfaces require contact with easily damaged components. Estimation of viable particles on surfaces using air sampling methods in conjunction with a mathematical model would be desirable. Parameters necessary for the mathematical model are the effect of angled surfaces on viable particle collection and the number of viable cells per viable particle. Deposition of viable particles on angled surfaces closely followed a cosine function, and the number of viable cells per viable particle was consistent with a Poisson distribution. Other parameters considered by the mathematical model included deposition rate and fractional removal per unit time. A close nonlinear correlation between volumetric air sampling and airborne fallout on surfaces was established with all fallout data points falling within the 95% confidence limits as determined by the mathematical model.

  1. Impact of Bay-Breeze Circulations on Surface Air Quality and Boundary Layer Export

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Follette-Cook, Melanie; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Goldberg, Daniel; Satam, Chinmay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Crawford, James H.; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Meteorological and air-quality model simulations are analyzed alongside observations to investigate the role of the Chesapeake Bay breeze on surface air quality, pollutant transport, and boundary layer venting. A case study was conducted to understand why a particular day was the only one during an 11-day ship-based field campaign on which surface ozone was not elevated in concentration over the Chesapeake Bay relative to the closest upwind site and why high ozone concentrations were observed aloft by in situ aircraft observations. Results show that southerly winds during the overnight and early-morning hours prevented the advection of air pollutants from the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan areas over the surface waters of the bay. A strong and prolonged bay breeze developed during the late morning and early afternoon along the western coastline of the bay. The strength and duration of the bay breeze allowed pollutants to converge, resulting in high concentrations locally near the bay-breeze front within the Baltimore metropolitan area, where they were then lofted to the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Near the top of the PBL, these pollutants were horizontally advected to a region with lower PBL heights, resulting in pollution transport out of the boundary layer and into the free troposphere. This elevated layer of air pollution aloft was transported downwind into New England by early the following morning where it likely mixed down to the surface, affecting air quality as the boundary layer grew.

  2. Effects of different surfaces on the transport and deposition of ruthenium oxides in high temperature air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vér, N.; Matus, L.; Pintér, A.; Osán, J.; Hózer, Z.

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the behaviour of ruthenium oxides in the reactor coolant system during an air ingress accident, new tests were performed in the frame of the RUSET (RUthenium Separate Effect Test) experimental program. These aimed to ascertain the effects of different surfaces (quartz, stainless steel (SS), zirconium alloy, alumina, oxidised metal, and surfaces with Mo or Cs deposits) on the transport and decomposition of ruthenium oxides in air stream along the temperature gradient zone (1100-100 °C). The results demonstrated that the heterogeneous phase decomposition of RuO 3 and RuO 4 to RuO 2 is catalysed more efficiently by the quartz surface than by the SS or alumina surfaces. The presence of MoO 3 layers decreased the RuO x precipitation extent on all investigated surfaces. The trapping effect of Cs deposit on Ru in the temperature gradient zone was proved in the case of the SS surface. On the contrary, presence of Cs precipitate on alumina and especially on quartz surfaces was found to decrease their catalytic effect on the decomposition of ruthenium oxides, and thus increased the RuO 4 concentration in the outlet air. Similarly to the effect observed for Cs deposition, the presence of other fission products in the evaporation area (at 1100 °C) decreased the partial pressure of RuO 4 in the outlet air at the SS surface and increased it at quartz and alumina surfaces. When zirconium (E110) cladding material was placed in the temperature gradient zone, no Ru transmittance occurred until the high temperature end of the zirconium tube was completely oxidised. After the intense oxidation of E110, Ru release occurred only in the presence of other fission product species. Pre-oxidation of SS surfaces in steam had no significant effect on the Ru passage.

  3. 3-D Surface Depression Profiling Using High Frequency Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Kautz, Harold E.; Abel, Phillip B.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. This article shows quantitative surface topography profiles as obtained using only high-frequency focused air-coupled ultrasonic pulses. The profiles were obtained using a profiling system developed by NASA Glenn Research Center and Sonix, Inc (via a formal cooperative agreement). (The air transducers are available as off-the-shelf items from several companies.) The method is simple and reproducible because it relies mainly on knowledge and constancy of the sound velocity through the air. The air transducer is scanned across the surface and sends pulses to the sample surface where they are reflected back from the surface along the same path as the incident wave. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface are acquired and converted to depth/surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in air (V). The system has the ability to resolve surface depression variations as small as 25 microns, is useable over a 1.4 mm vertical depth range, and can profile large areas only limited by the scan limits of the particular ultrasonic system. (Best-case depth resolution is 0.25 microns which may be achievable with improved isolation from vibration and air currents.) The method using an optimized configuration is reasonably rapid and has all quantitative analysis facilities on-line including 2-D and 3-D visualization capability, extreme value filtering (for faulty data), and leveling capability. Air-coupled surface profilometry is applicable to plate-like and curved samples. In this article, results are shown for several proof-of-concept samples, plastic samples burned in microgravity on the STS-54 space shuttle mission, and a partially-coated cylindrical ceramic

  4. Air moisture control on ocean surface temperature, hidden key to the warm bias enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourdin, Frédéric; Gǎinusǎ-Bogdan, Alina; Braconnot, Pascale; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Traore, Aboul-Khadre; Rio, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    The systematic overestimation by climate models of the surface temperature over the eastern tropical oceans is generally attributed to an insufficient oceanic cooling or to an underestimation of stratocumulus clouds. We show that surface evaporation contributes as much as clouds to the dispersion of the warm bias intensity in a multimodel simulations ensemble. The models with the largest warm biases are those with the highest surface heating by radiation and lowest evaporative cooling in atmospheric simulations with prescribed sea surface temperatures. Surface evaporation also controls the amplitude of the surface temperature response to this overestimated heating, when the atmosphere is coupled to an ocean. Evaporation increases with temperature both because of increasing saturation humidity and of an unexpected drying of the near-surface air. Both the origin of the bias and this temperature adjustment point to the key role of near-surface relative humidity and its control by the atmospheric model.

  5. Structural finite-element modeling strategies for conformal load-bearing antenna structure (CLAS) (Air Force contract F33615-C-93-3200)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockyer, Allen J.; Alt, Kevin H.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Kinslow, Robert W.; Goetz, Allan C.

    1997-06-01

    As the Wright Lab Air Force military contrast `Smart Skin Structures Technology Demonstration' (S3TD) Contract No. F33615-C-93-3200 draws toward conclusion, pertinent features of the program finite element modeling are presented. Analysis was performed to predict the structural performance of a complex multilayered composite panel that will be tested structurally (and electrically) for the final program deliverable. Application of finite element modeling to predict component load path and strain distribution in sandwich panel construction has been reported elsewhere in the literature for more standard applications. However, the unauthordox sandwich configuration lay-up posed by the quite revolutionary S3TD CLAS aircraft fuselage panel demonstration article merits further discussion. Difficulties with material selection, the stumbling block for many programs, are further exacerbated by conflicting material properties required to support simultaneous electrical and structural performance roles. The structural analysis challenge derives from S3TD's unique program goal, namely, to investigate load bearing antennas structural configurations, rather than conventional structurally inefficient `bolt in' installations, that have been the modus operandi for tactical aircraft antenna installations to date. Discussed below is a cost saving strategy where use of linear finite element analysis has been employed in the prediction of key structural parameters, and validated with risk reduction sub panel measurements, before proceeding to the final fabrication of a full scale 36 by 36 inch CLAS panel demonstration article.

  6. Environmental survey to assess viral contamination of air and surfaces in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Carducci, A; Verani, M; Lombardi, R; Casini, B; Privitera, G

    2011-03-01

    The presence of pathogenic viruses in healthcare settings represents a serious risk for both staff and patients. Direct viral detection in the environment poses significant technical problems and the indirect indicators currently in use suffer from serious limitations. The aim of this study was to monitor surfaces and air in hospital settings to reveal the presence of hepatitis C virus, human adenovirus, norovirus, human rotavirus and torque teno virus by nucleic acid assays, in parallel with measurements of total bacterial count and haemoglobin presence. In total, 114 surface and 62 air samples were collected. Bacterial contamination was very low (<1 cfu/cm(2)) on surfaces, whereas the 'medium' detected value in air was 282 cfu/m(3). Overall, 19 (16.7%) surface samples tested positive for viral nucleic acids: one for norovirus, one for human adenovirus and 17 (14.9%) for torque teno virus (TTV). Only this latter virus was directly detected in 10 air samples (16.1%). Haemoglobin was found on two surfaces. No relationship was found between viral, biochemical or bacterial indicators. The data obtained confirm the difficulty of assessing viral contamination using bacterial indicators. The frequent detection of TTV suggests its possible use as an indicator for general viral contamination of the environment. PMID:21277649

  7. Concentrations of Reactive Trace Gases In The Interstitial Air of Surface Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, H.-W.; Honrath, R. E.; Peterson, M. C.; Lu, Y.; Dibb, J. E.; Arsenault, M. A.; Swanson, A. L.; Blake, N. J.; Bales, R. C.; Schrems, O.

    Several measurements at Arctic and Antarctic sites have demonstrated that unexpected photochemical reactions occur in irradiated surface snow influencing the composi- tion of the boundary layer over snow-covered areas. The results of these reactions are probably most obvious in the interstitial air of the surface snow since it constitutes the interface between the surface snow and the boundary layer. Therefore, measurements of concentrations of nitrogen oxide and dioxide, nitrous acid, formaldehyde, hydro- gen peroxide, formic acid, acetic acid, and other organic compounds were performed in the interstitial air of the surface snow of the Greenland ice sheet. Concentrations were measured at variable depths between - 10 cm and - 50 cm during the summer field season in 2000 at the Summit Environmental Observatory. At shallow depths, the system NO-NO2-O3 exhibits large deviations from the calculated photostationary state. Using steady-state analyses applied to OH-HO2-CH3O2 cycling indicated the presence of high concentrations of OH and peroxy radicals in the firn air. Maximum concentrations calculated for a depth of - 10 cm are in the order of 6 105 molecules cm-3 and 1.4 * 107 molecules cm-3 for OH and HO2, respectively, although radia- tion levels at - 10 cm are reduced by approximately 50 % compared to levels above the snow surface. By far the most important OH source is the photolysis of HONO while the photolysis of ozone contributes less than 2 % to the overall production of OH in the firn air.

  8. Surface treatment of aramid fiber by air dielectric barrier discharge plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Caixia; Chen, Ping; Liu, Wei; Li, Bin; Wang, Qian

    2011-02-01

    Aramid fiber samples are treated by air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure; the plasma treatment time is investigated as the major parameter. The effects of this treatment on the fiber surface physical and chemical properties are studied by using surface characterization techniques. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is performed to determine the surface morphology changes, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is analyzed to reveal the surface chemical composition variations and dynamic contact angle analysis (DCAA) is used to examine the changes of the fiber surface wettability. In addition, the wetting behavior of a kind of thermoplastic resin, poly(phthalazinone ether sulfone ketone) (PPESK), on aramid fiber surface is also observed by SEM photos. The study shows that there seems to be an optimum treatment condition for surface modification of aramid fiber by the air DBD plasma. In this paper, after the 12 s, 27.6 W/cm3 plasma treatment the aramid fiber surface roughness is significantly improved, some new oxygen-containing groups such as C-O, Cdbnd O and Odbnd C-O are generated on the fiber surface and the fiber surface wettability is greatly enhanced, which results in the better wetting behavior of PPESK resin on the plasma-treated aramid fiber.

  9. Load responsive hydrodynamic bearing

    DOEpatents

    Kalsi, Manmohan S.; Somogyi, Dezso; Dietle, Lannie L.

    2002-01-01

    A load responsive hydrodynamic bearing is provided in the form of a thrust bearing or journal bearing for supporting, guiding and lubricating a relatively rotatable member to minimize wear thereof responsive to relative rotation under severe load. In the space between spaced relatively rotatable members and in the presence of a liquid or grease lubricant, one or more continuous ring shaped integral generally circular bearing bodies each define at least one dynamic surface and a plurality of support regions. Each of the support regions defines a static surface which is oriented in generally opposed relation with the dynamic surface for contact with one of the relatively rotatable members. A plurality of flexing regions are defined by the generally circular body of the bearing and are integral with and located between adjacent support regions. Each of the flexing regions has a first beam-like element being connected by an integral flexible hinge with one of the support regions and a second beam-like element having an integral flexible hinge connection with an adjacent support region. A least one local weakening geometry of the flexing region is located intermediate the first and second beam-like elements. In response to application of load from one of the relatively rotatable elements to the bearing, the beam-like elements and the local weakening geometry become flexed, causing the dynamic surface to deform and establish a hydrodynamic geometry for wedging lubricant into the dynamic interface.

  10. Evaluation of outer race tilt and lubrication on ball wear and SSME bearing life reductions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Merriman, T. L.; Stockwell, R. D.; Dufrane, K. F.

    1983-01-01

    Several aspects of the SSME bearing operation were evaluated. The possibility of elastohydrodynamics (EHD) lubrication with a cryogenic fluid was analyzed. Films as thick as .61 microns were predicted with one theory which may be thick enough to provide hydrodynamic support. The film formation, however, is heavily dependent on good surface finish and a low bulk bearing temperature. Bearing dynamics to determine if the radial stiffness of a bearing which are dependent on bearing misalignment were analyzed. Four ball tests were conducted at several environmental conditions from an LN2 bath to 426 C in air. Surface coatings and ball materials are evaluated. Severe wear and high friction are measured for all ball materials except when the balls have surface lubricant coatings.

  11. High efficiency magnetic bearing for a rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chen, H M; Smith, W A; Walton, J F

    1998-01-01

    Mohawk Innovative Technology, Inc. (MiTi; Albany, NY) and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (Cleveland, OH) have been engaged in a joint project to develop a new, high efficiency magnetic bearing for use in a rotary blood pump. Such a bearing would have some advantages with respect to permitting large, low shear clearances and avoiding crevice-like pivot interfaces and surface wear related issues. While magnetically suspended blood pumps have been demonstrated, other prototypes reported in the literature consume 5-15 W of power to energize the bearing. The MiTi bearing has been prototyped and tested. The design is a hybrid configuration, radially passive and axially active. The rotor-and-bearing system has been run in air and in blood analog solution, in all orientations. Measurements show a bearing power consumption below 0.5 W. Vibration peaked at 0.2 g in blood analog solution; frequency analysis indicated that this was primarily related to motor design features. Measured displacements from the equilibrium position were less than 0.005 cm. Based on this highly successful bearing prototype, an integrated pump/bearing system is now being developed. PMID:9804532

  12. Impact of Asian Dust on Global Surface Air Quality and Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Ginoux, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Dust originating from Asian deserts and desertification areas can be transported regionally and globally to affect surface air quality, visibility, and radiation budget not only at immediate downwind locations (e.g., eastern Asia) but also regions far away from the sources (e.g., North America). Deposition of Asian dust to the North Pacific Ocean basin influences the ocean productivity. In this study, we will use the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model, remote sensing data form satellite and from the ground-based network, and in-situ data from aircraft and surface observations to address the following questions: - What are the effects of Asian dust on the surface air quality and visibility over Asia and North America? - What are the seasonal and spatial variations of dust deposition to the North Pacific Ocean? How does the Asian dust affect surface radiation budget?

  13. Grizzly bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  14. THE MAGIC SIMULATION OF SURFACE WATER ACIDIFICATION AT, AND FIRST YEAR RESULTS FROM, BEAR BROOK WATERSHED MANIPULATION, MAINE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The catchments of East and West Bear Brooks, Maine, USA, with similar stream chemistries and hydrographs, have been hydrologically and chemically monitored for 3.5 years. hese clear water streams are low in ANC (0-70 ueq litre-1), with variations caused by changing concentrations...

  15. Mesh skin graft and digital pad transfer to reconstruct the weight-bearing surface in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Sheila C.; Mortari, Ana C.; Morishin Filho, Milton M.

    2007-01-01

    A 2-month-old dog was presented with injuries involving both hind paws. Only the 5th digit and its digital pad were present on the right paw. Following a full-thickness skin graft, the 5th digital pad was transferred distal to the metatarsal bones. The transferred pad permitted weight-bearing on the limb. PMID:18189047

  16. Improving the indoor air quality by using a surface emissions trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowicz, Pawel; Larsson, Lennart

    2015-04-01

    The surface emissions trap, an adsorption cloth developed for reducing emissions of volatile organic compounds and particulate matter from surfaces while allowing evaporation of moisture, was used to improve the indoor air quality of a school building with elevated air concentrations of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol. An improvement of the perceived air quality was noticed a few days after the device had been attached on the PVC flooring. In parallel, decreased air concentrations of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were found as well as a linear increase of the amounts of the same compound adsorbed on the installed cloth as observed up to 13 months after installation. Laboratory studies revealed that the performance of the device is not affected by differences in RH (35-85%), temperature (30-40 °C) or by accelerated aging simulating up to 10 years product lifetime, and, from a blinded exposure test, that the device efficiently blocks chemical odors. This study suggests that the device may represent a fast and efficient means of restoring the indoor air quality in a building e.g. after water damage leading to irritating and potentially harmful emissions from building material surfaces indoors.

  17. Analysis of bacterial detachment from substratum surfaces by the passage of air-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Suárez, C; Busscher, H J; van der Mei, H C

    2001-06-01

    A theoretical analysis of the detachment of bacteria adhering to substratum surfaces upon the passage of an air-liquid interface is given, together with experimental results for bacterial detachment in the absence and presence of a conditioning film on different substratum surfaces. Bacteria (Streptococcus sobrinus HG1025, Streptococcus oralis J22, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V-J1, Bacteroides fragilis 793E, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 974K) were first allowed to adhere to hydrophilic glass and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass in a parallel-plate flow chamber until a density of 4 x 10(6) cells cm(-2) was reached. For S. sobrinus HG1025, S. oralis J22, and A. naeslundii T14V-J1, the conditioning film consisted of adsorbed salivary components, while for B. fragilis 793E and P. aeruginosa 974K, the film consisted of adsorbed human plasma components. Subsequently, air bubbles were passed through the flow chamber and the bacterial detachment percentages were measured. For some experimental conditions, like with P. aeruginosa 974K adhering to DDS-coated glass and an air bubble moving at high velocity (i.e., 13.6 mm s(-1)), no bacteria detached upon passage of an air-liquid interface, while for others, detachment percentages between 80 and 90% were observed. The detachment percentage increased when the velocity of the passing air bubble decreased, regardless of the bacterial strain and substratum surface hydrophobicity involved. However, the variation in percentages of detachment by a passing air bubble depended greatly upon the strain and substratum surface involved. At low air bubble velocities the hydrophobicity of the substratum had no influence on the detachment, but at high air bubble velocities all bacterial strains were more efficiently detached from hydrophilic glass substrata. Furthermore, the presence of a conditioning film could either inhibit or stimulate detachment. The shape of the bacterial cell played a major role in detachment at high

  18. Analysis of Bacterial Detachment from Substratum Surfaces by the Passage of Air-Liquid Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Suárez, Cristina; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the detachment of bacteria adhering to substratum surfaces upon the passage of an air-liquid interface is given, together with experimental results for bacterial detachment in the absence and presence of a conditioning film on different substratum surfaces. Bacteria (Streptococcus sobrinus HG1025, Streptococcus oralis J22, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V-J1, Bacteroides fragilis 793E, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 974K) were first allowed to adhere to hydrophilic glass and hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass in a parallel-plate flow chamber until a density of 4 × 106 cells cm−2 was reached. For S. sobrinus HG1025, S. oralis J22, and A. naeslundii T14V-J1, the conditioning film consisted of adsorbed salivary components, while for B. fragilis 793E and P. aeruginosa 974K, the film consisted of adsorbed human plasma components. Subsequently, air bubbles were passed through the flow chamber and the bacterial detachment percentages were measured. For some experimental conditions, like with P. aeruginosa 974K adhering to DDS-coated glass and an air bubble moving at high velocity (i.e., 13.6 mm s−1), no bacteria detached upon passage of an air-liquid interface, while for others, detachment percentages between 80 and 90% were observed. The detachment percentage increased when the velocity of the passing air bubble decreased, regardless of the bacterial strain and substratum surface hydrophobicity involved. However, the variation in percentages of detachment by a passing air bubble depended greatly upon the strain and substratum surface involved. At low air bubble velocities the hydrophobicity of the substratum had no influence on the detachment, but at high air bubble velocities all bacterial strains were more efficiently detached from hydrophilic glass substrata. Furthermore, the presence of a conditioning film could either inhibit or stimulate detachment. The shape of the bacterial cell played a major role in detachment at high

  19. Surface air temperature anomalies for the Northern Hemisphere: The Russian dataset

    SciTech Connect

    Robock, A.; Borzenkova, I.I.; Gurza, G.V.; Vinnikov, K.Ya.

    1988-03-01

    The existence of a Russian surface temperature dataset became known to Western scientists when Budyko (1969) showed the secular variation of temperature and direct radiation for the Northern Hemisphere. His results were derived from maps of monthly mean surface air temperature anomalies compiled at the Main Geophysical Observatory. These maps covered the period 1881 to 1960 and were prepared for the purpose of monthly and seasonal forecasting, with a goal of finding patterns in monthly departures from normal temperatures.

  20. Relating surface chemistry and oxygen surface exchange in LnBaCo2O(5+δ) air electrodes.

    PubMed

    Téllez, Helena; Druce, John; Kilner, John A; Ishihara, Tatsumi

    2015-01-01

    The surface and near-surface chemical composition of electroceramic materials often shows significant deviations from that of the bulk. In particular, layered materials, such as cation-ordered LnBaCo2O(5+δ) perovskites (Ln = lanthanide), undergo surface and sub-surface restructuring due to the segregation of the divalent alkaline-earth cation. These processes can take place during synthesis and processing steps (e.g. deposition, sintering or annealing), as well as at temperatures relevant for the operation of these materials as air electrodes in solid oxide fuel cells and electrolysers. Furthermore, the surface segregation in these double perovskites shows fast kinetics, starting at temperatures as low as 400 °C over short periods of time and leading to a decrease in the transition metal surface coverage exposed to the gas phase. In this work, we use a combination of stable isotope tracer labeling and surface-sensitive ion beam techniques to study the oxygen transport properties and their relationship with the surface chemistry in ordered LnBaCo2O(5+δ) perovskites. Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) combined with (18)O isotope exchange was used to determine the oxygen tracer diffusion (D*) and surface exchange (k*) coefficients. Furthermore, Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS) was used for the analysis of the surface and near surface chemistry as it provides information from the first mono-atomic layer of the materials. In this way, we could relate the compositional modifications (e.g. cation segregation) taking place at the electrochemically-active surface during the exchange at high temperatures and the oxygen transport properties in double perovskite electrode materials to further our understanding of the mechanism of the surface exchange process. PMID:26212446

  1. Measurement of air refractive index based on surface plasmon resonance and phase detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qianghua; Luo, Huifu; Wang, Sumei; Wang, Feng

    2012-07-15

    A method for refractive index of air measurement is presented based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and phase detection using a dual-frequency laser interferometer. Theoretical analyses indicate that the phase-difference variation of the measurement signal versus the reference signal is linear with refractive index of air (RIA) fluctuation, and the calculation formula of RIA is derived. The structure design of the self-adaptive SPR sensor greatly reduces the measurement error resulting from the incident angle shift and improves the sensitivity. The experiments show that measurement uncertainty of 10(-6) order has been achieved when phase detection precision is 0.1°. The phenomenon of sudden phase variation during air pumping and air filling, which is caused by temperature fluctuation, is discussed. PMID:22825177

  2. Atmospheric effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Luna García, R.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, A.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-09-01

    Atmospheric parameters, such as pressure (P), temperature (T) and density (ρ∝P/T), affect the development of extensive air showers initiated by energetic cosmic rays. We have studied the impact of atmospheric variations on extensive air showers by means of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The rate of events shows a ˜10% seasonal modulation and ˜2% diurnal one. We find that the observed behaviour is explained by a model including the effects associated with the variations of P and ρ. The former affects the longitudinal development of air showers while the latter influences the Molière radius and hence the lateral distribution of the shower particles. The model is validated with full simulations of extensive air showers using atmospheric profiles measured at the site of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  3. Novel thiol-based histone deacetylase inhibitors bearing 3-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide scaffold as surface recognition motif: Design, synthesis and SAR study.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiachen; Niu, Qun; Liu, Jiang; Bao, Yu; Yang, Jinyu; Luan, Shenglin; Fan, Yinbo; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Linxiang

    2016-01-15

    A series of novel thiol-based histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors bearing 3-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide scaffold as surface recognition motif was designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their HDAC inhibition activity. Among them, 15j (IC50=0.08μM) was identified as a better inhibitor than Vorinostat (IC50=0.25μM) against total HDACs. In addition, Structure-activity relationships (SAR) analyses indicated that (i) compounds with different substituents on pyrazole N-1 position exhibited superior activities than those on pyrazole N-2 position, (ii) variation of functional groups on N-1'-alkyl chain terminus followed the trends of carboxyl group>hydroxyl group≫alkyl group, and (iii) methylation on pyrazole C-4 position diminished the HDAC inhibition activity. The SAR will guide us to further refine compounds bearing 3-phenyl-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxamide scaffold to achieve better HDAC inhibitors. PMID:26706171

  4. Morphing Surfaces Enable Acoustophoretic Contactless Transport of Ultrahigh-Density Matter in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresti, Daniele; Sambatakakis, Giorgio; Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-11-01

    The controlled contactless transport of heavy drops and particles in air is of fundamental interest and has significant application potential. Acoustic forces do not rely on special material properties, but their utility in transporting heavy matter in air has been restricted by low power and poor controllability. Here we present a new concept of acoustophoresis, based on the morphing of a deformable reflector, which exploits the low reaction forces and low relaxation time of a liquid with enhanced surface tension through the use of thin overlaid membrane. An acoustically induced, mobile deformation (dimple) on the reflector surface enhances the acoustic field emitted by a line of discretized emitters and enables the countinuos motion of heavy levitated samples. With such interplay of emitters and reflecting soft-structure, a 5 mm steel sphere (0.5 grams) was contactlessly transported in air solely by acoustophoresis.

  5. Morphing Surfaces Enable Acoustophoretic Contactless Transport of Ultrahigh-Density Matter in Air

    PubMed Central

    Foresti, Daniele; Sambatakakis, Giorgio; Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-01-01

    The controlled contactless transport of heavy drops and particles in air is of fundamental interest and has significant application potential. Acoustic forces do not rely on special material properties, but their utility in transporting heavy matter in air has been restricted by low power and poor controllability. Here we present a new concept of acoustophoresis, based on the morphing of a deformable reflector, which exploits the low reaction forces and low relaxation time of a liquid with enhanced surface tension through the use of thin overlaid membrane. An acoustically induced, mobile deformation (dimple) on the reflector surface enhances the acoustic field emitted by a line of discretized emitters and enables the countinuos motion of heavy levitated samples. With such interplay of emitters and reflecting soft-structure, a 5 mm steel sphere (0.5 grams) was contactlessly transported in air solely by acoustophoresis. PMID:24212104

  6. Degassing pathways of Cl-, F-, H-, and S-bearing magmas near the lunar surface: Implications for the composition and Cl isotopic values of lunar apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustunisik, G. K.; Nekvasil, H.; Lindsley, D. H.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental degassing of H-, F-, Cl-, C-, and S-bearing species from volatile-bearing magma of lunar composition at low P and fO2 close to quartz-iron-fayalite indicates that the composition of the fluid/vapor phase that is lost changes over time. A highly H-rich vapor phase is exsolved within the first 10 min. of degassing leaving behind a melt that is effectively dehydrated. Some Cl, F, and S is also lost during this time, presumably as HCl, HF, and H2S gaseous species; however much of the original inventory of Cl, F, and S components are retained in the melt. After 10 min., the exsolved vapor is dry and dominated by S- and halogen-bearing phases, presumably consisting of metal halides and sulfides, which evolves over time towards F enrichment. This vapor evolution provides important constraints on the geochemistry of volatile-bearing lunar phases that form subsequent to or during degassing. The rapidity of H loss suggests that little if any OH-bearing apatite will crystallize from surface or near surface (≈7m) melts and that degassing of lunar magmas will cause the compositions of apatites to evolve first towards the F-Cl apatite binary and eventually towards end member fluorapatite during crystallization. During the stage of loss of primarily H component from the melt, Cl would have been lost primarily as HCl, which is reported not to fractionate Cl isotopes at magmatic temperatures. After the loss of H-bearing species, continued loss of Cl would result in the degassing of metal chlorides, as a mechanism to fractionate Cl isotopes. After the onset of metal chloride degassing, the δ37Cl of the melt would increase to +6 (82% Cl loss), +8 (85% Cl loss), and +20‰ (95% Cl loss) at 1, 4, and 6 hours, respectively, approximated in a computed trajectory of δ37Cl values in basalt during degassing of FeCl2. This strong enrichment of 37Cl in the melt after metal chloride volatilization is fully consistent with values measured for the non-leachates of a variety of

  7. Hydrostatic bearing support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A hydrostatic bearing support system is provided which comprises a bearing housing having a polygonally configured outer surface which defines at least three symmetrically disposed working faces and a plurality of pressure plates, each of which is disposed relatively opposite a corresponding working face and spaced therefrom to define a gap therebetween. A hydrostatic support film is created in the gap for supporting the housing in spaced relationship to the pressure plates.

  8. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  9. Laser ablation of liquid surface in air induced by laser irradiation through liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2010-10-01

    The pulse laser ablation of a liquid surface in air when induced by laser irradiation through a liquid medium has been experimentally investigated. A supersonic liquid jet is observed at the liquid-air interface. The liquid surface layer is driven by a plasma plume that is produced by laser ablation at the layer, resulting in a liquid jet. This phenomenon occurs only when an Nd:YAG laser pulse (wavelength: 1064 nm) is focused from the liquid onto air at a low fluence of 20 J/cm2. In this case, as Fresnel’s law shows, the incident and reflected electric fields near the liquid surface layer are superposed constructively. In contrast, when the incident laser is focused from air onto the liquid, a liquid jet is produced only at an extremely high fluence, several times larger than that in the former case. The similarities and differences in the liquid jets and atomization processes are studied for several liquid samples, including water, ethanol, and vacuum oil. The laser ablation of the liquid surface is found to depend on the incident laser energy and laser fluence. A pulse laser light source and high-resolution film are required to observe the detailed structure of a liquid jet.

  10. Superhydrophobic metallic surfaces functionalized via femtosecond laser surface processing for long term air film retention when submerged in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhlke, Craig A.; Anderson, Troy P.; Li, Pengbo; Lucis, Michael J.; Roth, Nick; Shield, Jeffrey E.; Terry, Benjamin; Alexander, Dennis R.

    2015-03-01

    Femtosecond laser surface processing (FLSP) is a powerful technique used to create self-organized microstructures with nanoscale features on metallic surfaces. By combining FLSP surface texturing with surface chemistry changes, either induced by the femtosecond laser during processing or introduced through post processing techniques, the wetting properties of metals can be altered. In this work, FLSP is demonstrated as a technique to create superhydrophobic surfaces on grade 2 titanium and 304 stainless steel that can retain an air film (plastron) between the surface and a surrounding liquid when completely submerged. It is shown that the plastron lifetime when submerged in distilled water or synthetic stomach acid is critically dependent on the specific degree of surface micro- and nano-roughness, which can be tuned by controlling various FLSP parameters. The longest plastron lifetime was on a 304 stainless steel sample that was submerged in distilled water and maintained a plastron for 41 days, the length of time of the study, with no signs of degradation. Also demonstrated for the first time is the precise control of pulse fluence and pulse count to produce three unique classes of surface micron/nano-structuring on titanium.

  11. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; DeMaster

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  12. Liquid droplet coalescence and fragmentation at the aqueous-air surface.

    PubMed

    Paneru, Govind; Law, Bruce M; Ibi, Koki; Ushijima, Baku; Flanders, Bret N; Aratono, Makoto; Matsubara, Hiroki

    2015-01-13

    For hexadecane oil droplets at an aqueous-air surface, the surface film in coexistence with the droplets exhibits two-dimensional gaseous (G), liquid (L), or solid (S) behavior depending upon the temperature and concentration of the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide. In the G (L) phase, oil droplets are observed to coalesce (fragment) as a function of time. In the coalescence region, droplets coalesce on all length scales, and the final state is a single oil droplet at the aqueous-air surface. The fragmentation regime is complex. Large oil droplets spread as oil films; hole nucleation breaks up this film into much smaller fluctuating and fragmenting or metastable droplets. Metastable droplets are small contact angle spherical caps and do not fluctuate in time; however, they are unstable over long time periods and eventually sink into the bulk water phase. Buoyancy forces provide a counterbalancing force where the net result is that small oil droplets (radius r < 80 μm) are mostly submerged in the bulk aqueous medium with only a small fraction protruding above the liquid surface. In the G phase, a mechanical stability theory for droplets at liquid surfaces indicates that droplet coalesce is primarily driven by surface tension effects. This theory, which only considers spherical cap shaped surface droplets, qualitatively suggests that in the L phase the sinking of metastable surface droplets into the bulk aqueous medium is driven by a negative line tension and a very small spreading coefficient. PMID:25477297

  13. Air Temperature estimation from Land Surface temperature and solar Radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzarini, Michele; Eissa, Yehia; Marpu, Prashanth; Ghedira, Hosni

    2013-04-01

    Air Temperature (AirT) is a fundamental parameter in a wide range of applications such as climate change studies, weather forecast, energy balance modeling, efficiency of Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells, etc. Air temperature data are generally obtained through regular measurements from meteorological stations. The distribution of these stations is normally sparse, so the spatial pattern of this parameter cannot be accurately estimated by interpolation methods. This work investigated the relationship between Air Temperature measured at meteorological stations and spatially contiguous measurements derived from Remote Sensing techniques, such as Land Surface Temperature (LST) maps, emissivity maps and shortwave radiation maps with the aim of creating a continuous map of AirT. For LST and emissivity, MSG-SEVIRI LST product from Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA-SAF) has been used. For shortwave radiation maps, an Artificial Neural Networks ensemble model has been developed and previously tested to create continuous maps from Global Horizontal Irradiance (GHI) point measurements, utilizing six thermal channels of MSG-SEVIRI. The testing sites corresponded to three meteorological stations located in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where in situ measurements of Air Temperature were available. From the starting parameters, energy fluxes and net radiation have been calculated, in order to have information on the incoming and outgoing long-wave radiation and the incoming short-wave radiation. The preliminary analysis (day and Night measurements, cloud free) showed a strong negative correlation (0.92) between Outgoing long-wave radiation - GHI and LST- AirT, with a RMSE of 1.84 K in the AirT estimation from the initial parameters. Regression coefficients have been determined and tested on all the ground stations. The analysis also demonstrated the predominant impact of the incoming short-wave radiation in the AirT hourly variation, while the incoming

  14. Lead-free bearing alloys for engine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratke, Lorenz; Ågren, John; Ludwig, Andreas; Tonn, Babette; Gránásy, László; Mathiesen, Ragnvald; Arnberg, Lars; Anger, Gerd; Reifenhäuser, Bernd; Lauer, Michael; Garen, Rune; Gust, Edgar

    2005-10-01

    Recent developments to reduce the fuel consumption, emission and air pollution, size and weight of engines for automotive, truck, ship propulsion and electrical power generation lead to temperature and load conditions within the engines that cannot be borne by conventional bearings. Presently, only costly multilayer bearings with electroplated or sputtered surface coatings can cope with the load/speed combinations required. Ecological considerations in recent years led to a ban by the European Commission on the use of lead in cars a problem for the standard bronze-lead bearing material. This MAP project is therefore developing an aluminium-based lead-free bearing material with sufficient hardness, wear and friction properties and good corrosion resistance. Only alloys made of components immiscible in the molten state can meet the demanding requirements. Space experimentation plays a crucial role in optimising the cast microstructure for such applications.

  15. Anti-backlash gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission. One preferred embodiment discloses and describes an anti-backlash feature to counter ''dead zones'' in the gear bearing movement.

  16. Air-sea boundary layer dynamics in the presence of mesoscale surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooth, Claes; Xie, Lian

    1992-09-01

    In the presence of surface currents, a shear stress at the air-sea interface is induced by the surface currents. In the case of a unidirectional current, a quadratic stress law leads to a stress curl proportional to and opposing the surface current vorticity even with a uniform wind. This causes a spindown effect on the surface vorticity field at a rate proportional to the wind speed. In the steady state, or in slowly varying processes which can be treated as parametrically developing quasi-steady states, the surface-layer potential vorticity modulation causes upwelling and downwelling patterns associated with the surface-current vorticity. These effects are analyzed for an idealized jet current, and for a physical situation characteristic of a Gulf Stream boundary ring along the Florida Keys, where the induced transport patterns may be important for onshore transport of fish and spiny lobster larvae, as well as for onshore transport to the Florida Keys of general flotsam transported past them by the Gulf Stream. The spindown time scale (t*) for a 1.5-layer system is H/( ρ'cdVa) for a surface jet on the deformation radius scale (where H is the thickness of the surface layer, Va the surface wind speed, ρ' the air to water density ratio and cd the surface drag coefficient) and increases for large horizontal scales in proportion to the current width squared. For a typical wind speed of 5 m/s and a density normalized drag coefficient ρ'cd= 2 × 10-6, t* is on the order of 1 month for a 30-m surface layer. In the more general case of a stratified interior water column, the vorticity spindown directly affects only the potential vorticity of the surface layer and generally leads to subsurface velocity and vorticity maxima for mesoscale eddies and jets.

  17. Adsorption of air pollutants on the grain surface of Japanese cedar pollen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Yuji; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Okochi, Hiroshi; Igawa, Manabu

    The contaminants adsorbed on the surface of pollen may affect the development of hay fever, because the patients of the fever are larger in areas with much air pollution than in nonpolluted areas and the fine particles and gases are susceptible to deposit on the nasal cavities and eyes by their transfer on the pollen. Since Japanese cedar pollinosis is the most common hay fever in Japan, we analyzed the air pollutants adsorbed on the surface of dispersed Japanese cedar pollen in the urban and mountainous districts. Fine anthropogenic particles were significantly adsorbed and many elements were concentrated on the surface of the pollen in the urban site of Yokohama, while they were not concentrated on the surface of the pollen collected at a mountainous site. The acid gases are also adsorbed and acidify the surface, and their amounts increase with their concentrations in the ambient air. The high adsorption of nitric acid on the pollen determined by an exposure experiment of nitric acid gas suggests that nitric acid is dissolved in the inner part of the pollen. The adsorption amounts of the gases on the pollen were especially greater than those on other natural particles, humic acid and yellow sand.

  18. Precision Position Control of Pneumatic Servo Table Embedded with Aerostatic Bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Hung; Hsu, Tzu-Yung; Pai, Kei-Ren; Shih, Ming-Chang

    This paper treats the control of a pneumatic servo table combining the air cylinders and sliding guides embedded with aerostatic bearing. Since compressed air flows into the small gap between the bearing and the sliding guide, the cylinder floats around the air film and on the guide surface of the table. The friction forces of the pneumatic servo table are measured, and the relation of frictional force and speed is plotted. The hybrid self-tuning fuzzy controller with the velocity compensators and dead-zone are proposed in this paper. From the experimental results, in case of different position, the positioning accuracy can reach the 0.04μm.

  19. Spatially-varying surface roughness and ground-level air quality in an operational dispersion model.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M J; Brade, T K; MacKenzie, A R; Whyatt, J D; Carruthers, D J; Stocker, J; Cai, X; Hewitt, C N

    2014-02-01

    Urban form controls the overall aerodynamic roughness of a city, and hence plays a significant role in how air flow interacts with the urban landscape. This paper reports improved model performance resulting from the introduction of variable surface roughness in the operational air-quality model ADMS-Urban (v3.1). We then assess to what extent pollutant concentrations can be reduced solely through local reductions in roughness. The model results suggest that reducing surface roughness in a city centre can increase ground-level pollutant concentrations, both locally in the area of reduced roughness and downwind of that area. The unexpected simulation of increased ground-level pollutant concentrations implies that this type of modelling should be used with caution for urban planning and design studies looking at ventilation of pollution. We expect the results from this study to be relevant for all atmospheric dispersion models with urban-surface parameterisations based on roughness. PMID:24212233

  20. Determining Land Surface Temperature Relations with Land Use-Land Cover and Air Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahya, Ceyhan; Bektas Balcik, Filiz; Burak Oztaner, Yasar; Guney, Burcu

    2016-04-01

    Rapid population growth in conjunction with unplanned urbanization, expansion, and encroachment into the limited agricultural fields and green areas have negative impacts on vegetated areas. Land Surface Temperature (LST), Urban Heat Islands (UHI) and air pollution are the most important environmental problems that the extensive part of the world suffers from. The main objective of this research is to investigate the relationship between LST, air pollution and Land Use-Land Cover (LULC) in Istanbul, using Landsat 8 OLI satellite image. Mono-window algorithm is used to compute LST from Landsat 8 TIR data. In order to determine the air pollution, in-situ measurements of particulate matter (PM10) of the same day as the Landsat 8 OLI satellite image are obtained. The results of this data are interpolated using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) method and LULC categories of Istanbul were determined by using remote sensing indices. Error matrix was created for accuracy assessment. The relationship between LST, air pollution and LULC categories are determined by using regression analysis method. Keywords: Land Surface Temperature (LST), air pollution, Land Use-Land Cover (LULC), Istanbul

  1. Magnetic bearing and motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A magnetic bearing for passively suspending a rotatable element subjected to axial and radial thrust forces is disclosed. The magnetic bearing employs a taut wire stretched along the longitudinal axis of the bearing between opposed end pieces and an intermediate magnetic section. The intermediate section is segmented to provide oppositely directed magnetic flux paths between the end pieces and may include either an axially polarized magnets interposed between the segments. The end pieces, separated from the intermediate section by air gaps, control distribution of magnetic flux between the intermediate section segments. Coaxial alignment of the end pieces with the intermediate section minimizes magnetic reluctance in the flux paths endowing the bearing with self-centering characteristics when subjected to radial loads. In an alternative embodiment, pairs of oppositely wound armature coils are concentrically interposed between segments of the intermediate section in concentric arcs adjacent to radially polarized magnets to equip a magnetic bearing as a torsion drive motor. The magnetic suspension bearing disclosed provides long term reliability without maintenance with application to long term space missions such as the VISSR/VAS scanning mirror instrument in the GOES program.

  2. Precipitating auroral electron flux characteristics based on uv data obtained by the airs experiment onboard the polar bear satellite. Final report, August 1988-July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, D.J.; Cox, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    The AIRS instrument on satellite Polar BEAR is the first to obtain narrow band UV images for more than one band at a time. This provides the opportunity to do serious quantitative analysis of the data in terms of composition and the energy sources producing the emission (aurora and dayglow). Analysis of auroral imaging data from two passes will be presented. On one of these, simultaneous images were obtained at 1356 A (OI 1356 A + N[sub 2] LBH), 1596 A (LBH), and 3914 A (N[sub 2](+) 1N). On the other, the observed bands were centered at 1304 A (OI 1304 A), 1544 A (LBH), and 3914 A. Variations in data ratios among the three bands for either pass exceeded a factor of three over the portion of the auroral oval seen within the images. The possible causes of these variations are changes in the hardness of the precipitating particle spectrum (here the particles are assumed to be electrons), changes in the abundance of O relative to N[sub 2], changes in the albedo at 3914 A, and statistical fluctuations where signals were low. To interpret the data, yields (Rayleighs/(erg cm(-2)s(-1))) and yield ratios appropriate to the band centers and their widths were calculated versus hardness of the precipitating electron spectrum. The calculations used MSIS model atmospheres with O density scalings of 1.0 and 0.5. The input parameters were appropriate to the times at which the data were collected to the regions observed. Incident electron spectra were characterized by modified Gaussian and Maxwellian energy distributions defined in terms of characteristic energy E[sub o] (in keV) and energy flux Q (in ergs cm(-2)s(-1)).

  3. Effect of the fluorination degree of hydrophobic chains on the monolayer behavior of unsaturated diacylphosphatidylcholines bearing partially fluorinated 9-octadecynoyl (stearoloyl) groups at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Baba, Teruhiko; Takai, Katsuki; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kanamori, Toshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    The effect of the fluorination degree of hydrophobic chains on the monolayer behavior of unsaturated diacylphosphatidylcholines (PCs) was examined by employing a series of PCs bearing partially fluorinated 9-octadecynoyl (stearoloyl) groups (DFnStPCs, n: the number of fluorinated carbon atoms in a stearoloyl group; n=1, 2, 4, 8), including their hydrophobic parts--partially fluorinated stearolic acids (FnStAs)--at the air-water interface. π-A isotherm measurements and Brewster angle microscope observations revealed: (i) all DFnStPCs including FnStAs form monolayers of liquid character at 25 °C; (ii) they form more expanded monolayers than their non-fluorinated counterparts, distearoloyl-PC (DStPC) and stearolic acid, while the monolayer stability increases with n; (iii) compared with DStPC and DF8StPC, DFnStPCs (n=1, 2, 4) in the low-π region tend to show a weakening in their self-aggregation property and an increase in the work required for monolayer compression; (iv) although DF8StPC forms the most expanded monolayer, the behavior of DF8StPC resembles that of DStPC rather than that of DFnStPCs (n=1, 2, 4). The monolayer behavior of DFnStPCs (n=1, 2, 4) is explained by postulating a flatly-lying conformation of hydrophobic chains, in which three polar parts (ester group, triple bond, CF2-CH2 linkage) in chains are immersed in the subphase at large areas. DStPC and DF8StPC lacking a CF2-CH2 linkage, however, do not likely adopt such a conformation. PMID:25264284

  4. Decontamination of room air and adjoining wall surfaces by nebulizing hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Koburger, Torsten; Below, Harald; Dornquast, Tina; Kramer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Aim: In 2010, the ASP GLOSAIRTM 400 was introduced in Germany for nebulizing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Since there were no results of practical experience, the new method was to be checked under practical conditions for its effectiveness in decontaminating air in rooms, infested with mold after water damage and, at the same time, under experimentally controlled conditions, test surfaces, contaminated with Aspergillus brasiliensis. Method: After the nebulizer was used in two rooms with a massive mold infestation, the air colony count was determined (MAS-100® Zinsser Analytik) and, at the same time, the mold infestation in samples of wall plaster. As part of this controlled study, test surfaces contaminated with Aspergillus brasiliensis were positioned vertically and horizontally in a test room. The effectiveness of the nebulization (5–6% H2O2 for 2 hours) was tested on these surfaces according to EN 13697. Results: In a massive mold infestation resulting from water damage (worst case), an approximately 9-fold decrease in the mold content and an approximately 13-fold decrease in the number of colony-forming units (sum of the bacteria + fungi) could be detected in the room air immediately after the nebulizing was finished. Even in samples of wall and joint plaster, the molds were reduced, although to a distinctly lesser extent. By indoor nebulization of 5–6% H2O2, A. brasiliensis was reduced >4 log on vertical and horizontal surfaces. Discussion: In rooms with a massive mold infestation, the ASP GLOSAIRTM 400 system is suitable for attaining a clear reduction in the fungal and bacterial room air load, lasting for a week. On vertical and horizontal surfaces, contaminated experimentally with A. brasiliensis, a reduction of >4 lg is achieved. As a load of 104 to 105 fungal spores is unlikely to occur on pre-cleaned surfaces, the GLOSAIRTM 400 can be considered a suitable complementary process for the substantial reduction of fungal contamination. PMID:22242090

  5. Effect of Air-Polishing on Titanium Surfaces, Biofilm Removal, and Biocompatibility: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bennani, Vincent; Hwang, Linda; Tawse-Smith, Andrew; Dias, George J.; Cannon, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aims of this in vitro study were to evaluate morphological changes induced by glycine powder air-polishing on titanium surfaces, biofilm removal, and biocompatibility. Material and Methods. Titanium grade IV discs were allocated into two groups: (1) discs without biofilm and (2) discs for Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation. Discs in each group were further subdivided into (a) no treatment and (b) air-polishing treatment with glycine powder. Discs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and confocal microscopy. Bacterial biofilms were quantified using a crystal violet dye-binding assay. Biocompatibility was evaluated by measuring the coverage and viability of L929 fibroblast cells cultured on the discs. Results. Air-polishing increased the roughness of treated discs (P < 0.05). EDS analysis did not show significant differences in the chemical composition of treated and nontreated discs. The amount of residual biofilm on treated discs was 8.6-fold lower than untreated controls (P < 0.05). Coverage of treated discs by fibroblasts was half that of untreated discs (P < 0.05) although both groups had the same cell viability. Conclusions. Air-polishing removed a significant amount of biofilm from titanium surfaces. The “polishing” was accompanied by increased surface roughness, but there were no changes in chemical and elemental compositions, nor the biocompatibility. PMID:26881198

  6. Surface tension of ab initio liquid water at the water-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Bonn, Mischa; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-05-01

    We report calculations on the surface tension of the water-air interface using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. We investigate the influence of the cell size on surface tension of water from force field molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the calculated surface tension increases with increasing simulation cell size, thereby illustrating that a correction for finite size effects is essential for small systems that are customary in AIMD simulations. Moreover, AIMD simulations reveal that the use of a double-ζ basis set overestimates the experimentally measured surface tension due to the Pulay stress while more accurate triple and quadruple-ζ basis sets give converged results. We further demonstrate that van der Waals corrections critically affect the surface tension. AIMD simulations without the van der Waals correction substantially underestimate the surface tension while the van der Waals correction with the Grimme's D2 technique results in a value for the surface tension that is too high. The Grimme's D3 van der Waals correction provides a surface tension close to the experimental value. Whereas the specific choices for the van der Waals correction and basis sets critically affect the calculated surface tension, the surface tension is remarkably insensitive to the details of the exchange and correlation functionals, which highlights the impact of long-range interactions on the surface tension. Our simulated values provide important benchmarks, both for improving van der Waals corrections and AIMD simulations of aqueous interfaces.

  7. Optimization of microwave-assisted hot air drying conditions of okra using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Prasad, Suresh; Murthy, Ganti S

    2014-02-01

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) was dried to a moisture level of 0.1 g water/g dry matter using a microwave-assisted hot air dryer. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the drying conditions based on specific energy consumption and quality of dried okra. The drying experiments were performed using a central composite rotatable design for three variables: air temperature (40-70 °C), air velocity (1-2 m/s) and microwave power level (0.5-2.5 W/g). The quality of dried okra was determined in terms of color change, rehydration ratio and hardness of texture. A second-order polynomial model was well fitted to all responses and high R(2) values (>0.8) were observed in all cases. The color change of dried okra was found higher at high microwave power and air temperatures. Rehydration properties were better for okra samples dried at higher microwave power levels. Specific energy consumption decreased with increase in microwave power due to decrease in drying time. The drying conditions of 1.51 m/s air velocity, 52.09 °C air temperature and 2.41 W/g microwave power were found optimum for product quality and minimum energy consumption for microwave-convective drying of okra. PMID:24493879

  8. Multitechnique characterisation of 304L surface states oxidised at high temperature in steam and air atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamede, Anne-Sophie; Nuns, Nicolas; Cristol, Anne-Lise; Cantrel, Laurent; Souvi, Sidi; Cristol, Sylvain; Paul, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In case of a severe accident occurring in a nuclear reactor, surfaces of the reactor coolant system (RCS), made of stainless steel (304L) rich in Cr (>10%) and Ni (8-12%), are oxidised. Fission products (FPs) are released from melt fuel and flow through the RCS. A part of them is deposited onto surfaces either by vapour condensation or by aerosol deposition mechanisms. To be able to understand the nature of interactions between these FPs and the RCS surfaces, a preliminary step is to characterize the RSC surface states in steam and air atmosphere at high temperatures. Pieces of 304L stainless steel have been treated in a flow reactor at two different temperatures (750 °C and 950 °C) for two different exposition times (24 h and 72 h). After surfaces analysing by a unique combination of surface analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS and LEIS), for 304L, the results show a deep oxide scale with multi layers and the outer layer is composed of chromium and manganese oxides. Oxide profiles differ in air or steam atmosphere. Fe2O3 oxide is observed but in minor proportion and in all cases no nickel is detected near the surface. Results obtained are discussed and compared with the literature data.

  9. A theoretical remark about waves on a static water surface beneath a layer of moving air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kida, T.; Hayashi, R.; Yasutomi, Z.

    1990-12-01

    Grundy and Tuck (1987) treat the problem of large-amplitude waves on an air-water interface where the air is a steady nonuniform flow and the water is stationary. Both periodic nonlinear Stokes-like waves far downstream and a configuration of the water surface from the edge region of a hovercraft were computed. However, there is no work that treats the existence of such Stokes-like waves theoretically. The present work aims to prove the existence of such solutions in the case where the cushion pressure is low, that is, the depression at the upstream stagnation point from the mean water level is small.

  10. Effects of sensor locations on air-coupled surface wave transmission measurements across a surface-breaking crack.

    PubMed

    Kee, Seong-Hoon; Zhu, Jinying

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies show that the surface wave transmission (SWT) method is effective to determine the depth of a surface-breaking crack in solid materials. However, nearfield wave scattering caused by the crack affects the reliability and consistency of surface wave transmission measurements. Prior studies on near-field scattering have focused on the case where crack depth h is greater than wavelength λ of surface waves (i.e., h/λ > 1). Near-field scattering of surface waves remains not completely understood in the range of h/λ for the SWT method (i.e., 0 ≤ h/λ ≤ 1/3), where the transmission coefficient is sensitive to crack depth change and monotonically decreases with increasing h/λ. In this study, the authors thoroughly investigated the near-field scattering of surface waves caused by a surface-breaking crack using experimental tests and numerical simulations for 0 ≤ h/λ ≤ 1/3. First, the effects of sensor locations on surface wave transmission coefficients across a surface-breaking crack are studied experimentally. Data are collected from Plexiglas and concrete specimens using air-coupled sensors. As a result, the variation of transmission coefficients is expressed in terms of the normalized crack depth (h/λ) as well as the normalized sensor location (x/λ). The validity of finite element models is also verified by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations (finite element method). Second, a series of parametric studies is performed using the verified finite element model to obtain more complete understanding of near-field scattering of surface waves propagating in various solid materials with different mechanical properties and geometric conditions. Finally, a guideline for selecting appropriate sensor arrangements to reliably obtain the crack depth using the SWT method is suggested. PMID:21342828

  11. The cold and atmospheric-pressure air surface barrier discharge plasma for large-area sterilization applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dacheng; Zhao Di; Feng Kecheng; Zhang Xianhui; Liu Dongping; Yang Size

    2011-04-18

    This letter reports a stable air surface barrier discharge device for large-area sterilization applications at room temperature. This design may result in visually uniform plasmas with the electrode area scaled up (or down) to the required size. A comparison for the survival rates of Escherichia coli from air, N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} surface barrier discharge plasmas is presented, and the air surface plasma consisting of strong filamentary discharges can efficiently kill Escherichia coli. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH generated in the room temperature air plasmas play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  12. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  13. Air and Ground Surface Temperature Relations in a Mountainous Basin, Wolf Creek, Yukon Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roadhouse, Emily A.

    The links between climate and permafrost are well known, but the precise nature of the relationship between air and ground temperatures remains poorly understood, particularly in complex mountain environments. Although previous studies indicate that elevation and potential incoming solar radiation (PISR) are the two leading factors contributing to the existence of permafrost at a given location, additional factors may also contribute significantly to the existence of mountain permafrost, including vegetation cover, snow accumulation and the degree to which individual mountain landscapes are prone to air temperature inversions. Current mountain permafrost models consider only elevation and aspect, and have not been able to deal with inversion effects in a systematic fashion. This thesis explores the relationship between air and ground surface temperatures and the presence of surface-based inversions at 27 sites within the Wolf Creek basin and surrounding area between 2001 and 2006, as a first step in developing an improved permafrost distribution TTOP model. The TTOP model describes the relationship between the mean annual air temperature and the temperature at the top of permafrost in terms of the surface and thermal offsets (Smith and Riseborough, 2002). Key components of this model are n-factors which relate air and ground climate by establishing the ratio between air and surface freezing (winter) and thawing (summer) degree-days, thus summarizing the surface energy balance on a seasonal basis. Here we examine (1) surface offsets and (2) freezing and thawing n-factor variability at a number of sites through altitudinal treeline in the southern Yukon. Thawing n-factors (nt) measured at individual sites remained relatively constant from one year to the next and may be related to land cover. During the winter, the insulating effect of a thick snow cover results in higher surface temperatures, while thin snow cover results in low surface temperatures more closely

  14. Surface modification of a biomedical poly(ether)urethane by a remote air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, J. E.; Norton, P. R.; Griffiths, K.

    2003-07-01

    Plasma modification of polymer surfaces is widely used, but the plasma/polymer interaction is very complex and still not fully understood. In this paper, the interaction of a biomedical poly(ether)urethane with a remote air plasma treatment has been studied. Atomic force microscopy studies show the domain structure of the polymer as well as the absence of any surface roughening due to plasma treatment. Contact angle goniometry shows an improved wettability of the surface after plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates an increase in CO and CC at the surface, as well as the presence of new functional groups such as alcohols, ketones, aldehydes and imines. There is also evidence that the energy imparted to the polymer during plasma treatment causes surface segregation of polyol segments.

  15. Transition States for Submerged Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Partially-Pinned Air-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafreshi, Hooman; Hemeda, Ahmed; VCU Team

    2015-11-01

    The pressure at which a superhydrophobic surface transitions from the Cassie state to the Wenzel state is often referred to as the critical pressure. Our mathematical simulations have shown that the Cassie-to-Wenzel transition is a gradual process that takes place over a range of pressures as oppose to an event that happens at a certain pressure. During the transition period, the air-water interface may go through a series pinned, partially-pinned, and de-pinned states that depend on the geometry of the surface asperities. This in turn indicates that the drag-reduction effect produced by a submerged superhydrophobic surface can vary with the hydrostatic pressure, and is highly dependent on sharpness of the surface asperities. The study reported here reviews our recent discoveries in simulating the wetted area and drag reduction effect of superhydrophobic surfaces with different microstructures. National Science Foundation CMM 1029924 and CBET 1402655 programs.

  16. Near-surface turbulence for evaporative convection at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, K. A.; Saylor, J. R.; Smith, G. B.

    2001-11-01

    Turbulence measurements are reported for the flow beneath an air/water interface undergoing evaporative convection. Measurements were obtained using a two component laser Doppler velocimeter system. Two hydrodynamic boundary conditions were considered for the free surface: a shear free surface, which is the case when surfactants are absent, and a constant elasticity surface, created by depositing a monolayer of oleyl alcohol. The shear free boundary condition case results in significantly higher levels of near surface turbulence than the constant elasticity case. This difference between the two cases decreases with distance from the free surface. Profiles of the turbulent fluctuations were obtained for the horizontal and vertical velocity components and are compared with the somewhat analogous case of a heated solid wall.

  17. Surface modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) fibers induced by radio frequency air plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, Claudia; Barni, Ruggero; Selli, Elena; Mazzone, Giovanni; Massafra, Maria Rosaria; Marcandalli, Bruno; Poletti, Giulio

    2003-04-01

    The surface chemical and physical modifications of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fibers induced by radiofrequency air plasma treatments were correlated with the characteristics of the discharge parameters and the chemical composition of the plasma itself, to identify the plasma-induced surface processes prevailing under different operating conditions. Treated polymer surfaces were characterized by water droplet absorption time measurements and XPS analysis, as a function of the aging time in different media, and by AFM analysis. They exhibited a remarkable increase in hydrophilicity, accompanied by extensive etching and by the implantation of both oxygen- and nitrogen-containing polar groups. Etching was mainly a consequence of ion bombardment, yielding low molecular weight, water soluble oxidation products, while surface chemical modifications were mainly due to the action of neutral species on the plasma-activated polymer surface.

  18. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  19. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  1. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  2. 33 CFR 334.1180 - Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. 334.1180 Section 334.1180 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1180 Strait of Juan de Fuca, Wash.; air-to-surface weapon range, restricted area. (a)...

  3. Microbial Air Quality and Bacterial Surface Contamination in Ambulances During Patient Services

    PubMed Central

    Luksamijarulkul, Pipat; Pipitsangjan, Sirikun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We sought to assess microbial air quality and bacterial surface contamination on medical instruments and the surrounding areas among 30 ambulance runs during service. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 106 air samples collected from 30 ambulances before patient services and 212 air samples collected during patient services to assess the bacterial and fungal counts at the two time points. Additionally, 226 surface swab samples were collected from medical instrument surfaces and the surrounding areas before and after ambulance runs. Groups or genus of isolated bacteria and fungi were preliminarily identified by Gram’s stain and lactophenol cotton blue. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient with a p-value of less than 0.050 considered significant. Results The mean and standard deviation of bacterial and fungal counts at the start of ambulance runs were 318±485cfu/m3 and 522±581cfu/m3, respectively. Bacterial counts during patient services were 468±607cfu/m3 and fungal counts were 656±612cfu/m3. Mean bacterial and fungal counts during patient services were significantly higher than those at the start of ambulance runs, p=0.005 and p=0.030, respectively. For surface contamination, the overall bacterial counts before and after patient services were 0.8±0.7cfu/cm2 and 1.3±1.1cfu/cm2, respectively (p<0.001). The predominant isolated bacteria and fungi were Staphylococcus spp. and Aspergillus spp., respectively. Additionally, there was a significantly positive correlation between bacterial (r=0.3, p<0.010) and fungal counts (r=0.2, p=0.020) in air samples and bacterial counts on medical instruments and allocated areas. Conclusions This study revealed high microbial contamination (bacterial and fungal) in ambulance air during services and higher bacterial contamination on medical instrument surfaces and allocated areas after ambulance services compared to the start of ambulance runs

  4. Magnetically levitated superconducting bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, B.R.; Lynds, L. Jr.

    1993-10-26

    A magnetically levitated superconducting bearing includes a magnet mounted on a shaft that is rotatable around an axis of rotation and a Type II superconductor supported on a stator in proximity to the magnet. The superconductor is positioned so that when it is cooled to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field, it interacts with the magnet to produce an attractive force that levitates the magnet and supports a load on the shaft. The interaction between the superconductor and magnet also produces surface screening currents that generate a repulsive force perpendicular to the load. The bearing also has means for maintaining the superconductor at a temperature below its critical temperature. The bearing could also be constructed so the magnet is supported on the stator and the superconductor is mounted on the shaft. The bearing can be operated by cooling the superconductor to its superconducting state in the presence of a magnetic field. 6 figures.

  5. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems. PMID:25675101

  6. Air-directed attachment of coccoid bacteria to the surface of superhydrophobic lotus-like titanium.

    PubMed

    Truong, V K; Webb, H K; Fadeeva, E; Chichkov, B N; Wu, A H F; Lamb, R; Wang, J Y; Crawford, R J; Ivanova, E P

    2012-01-01

    Superhydrophobic titanium surfaces fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation to mimic the structure of lotus leaves were assessed for their ability to retain coccoid bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus CIP 65.8T, S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. epidermidis ATCC 14990T and Planococcus maritimus KMM 3738 were retained by the surface, to varying degrees. However, each strain was found to preferentially attach to the crevices located between the microscale surface features. The upper regions of the microscale features remained essentially cell-free. It was hypothesised that air entrapped by the topographical features inhibited contact between the cells and the titanium substratum. Synchrotron SAXS revealed that even after immersion for 50 min, nano-sized air bubbles covered 45% of the titanium surface. After 1 h the number of cells of S. aureus CIP 65.8T attached to the lotus-like titanium increased to 1.27×10(5) mm(-2), coinciding with the replacement of trapped air by the incubation medium. PMID:22686938

  7. Estimating Regional Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes above Prairie Cropland from Surface and Upper-Air Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Alan G.; Strong, G. S.

    1996-10-01

    Upper-air budget methods can be used to estimate the surface sensible and latent heat flux densities on a regional scale. This study assesses the application of radiosonde-based budget methods above homogeneous cropland. Serial daytime soundings were released from Kenaston and Saskatoon, Canada, on fair-weather days between 24 June and 31 July 1991.Two independent methods were used to establish ground truth: surface-layer Bowen ratio-energy balance and Priestley-Taylor. This study was the fist to extend the surface-layer Bowen ratio method to conventional upper-air soundings. The two ground-truth methods agreed to within 20% at both locations and gave mean daytime Bowen ratios of 0.33.The upper-air budget surface flux estimates agreed most consistently with ground truth when the budget was integrated over the atmospheric boundary layer (BL) and used parameterized entrainment with a value for the entrainment parameter AR of 0.4. The BL budget with AR of 0.4 closed the daytime surface energy balance to within 4% at Kenaston and 7% at Saskatoon and gave a mean estimate for the Bowen ratio that agreed to within 20% of the mean ground-truth estimates. However, the BL budget estimates for 2-3-h periods were quite variable, and it was necessary to average the budget estimates over periods of 12 days or longer to produce credible values. Random sampling errors and uncertainty in horizontal advection were partly responsible for the high variability of the budget estimates, but these terms averaged to zero over extended periods. More seriously, the BL budget estimates for the surface latent heat flux were quite sensitive to the method for estimating entrainment. Because the authors were unable to establish a preferred entrainment estimate a priori, the BL budget estimates for the surface latent heat flux were considered to be unreliable. Further study is needed to develop a reliable and independent method for specifying the value for AR.

  8. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  9. Surface-chemistry-sensitive spectral features of In-Ga-Zn-O thin film: Cleaned, air-passivated, and sputter-phase-separated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Se Jun; Baik, Jae Yoon; Thakur, Anup; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Chung, JaeGwan; Lee, Jaecheol; Lee, JaeHak

    2011-07-01

    The photoelectron spectral features and corresponding energy band diagrams of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide ( a-IGZO) thin films were investigated for different surface chemistries. Cleaned-IGZO surface had a deep subgap state (DSS), the binding energy (BE) of which expanded to ˜1.5 eV. When stored in air, IGZO surface became contaminant passivated and DSS became negligible. Sputtering resulted in phase separation of surface into metallic In and lesser In and Zn containing IGZO. Compared with IGZO, the air-passivated surface and phase-separated surface, respectively, had a more weakly conducting environment and a higher BE spectral shift.

  10. Global fields of soil moisture and land surface evapotranspiration derived from observed precipitation and surface air temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Y.; Walker, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    The global fields of normal monthly soil moisture and land surface evapotranspiration are derived with a simple water budget model that has precipitation and potential evapotranspiration as inputs. The precipitation is observed and the potential evapotranspiration is derived from the observed surface air temperature with the empirical regression equation of Thornthwaite (1954). It is shown that at locations where the net surface radiation flux has been measured, the potential evapotranspiration given by the Thornthwaite equation is in good agreement with those obtained with the radiation-based formulations of Priestley and Taylor (1972), Penman (1948), and Budyko (1956-1974), and this provides the justification for the use of the Thornthwaite equation. After deriving the global fields of soil moisture and evapotranspiration, the assumption is made that the potential evapotranspiration given by the Thornthwaite equation and by the Priestley-Taylor equation will everywhere be about the same; the inverse of the Priestley-Taylor equation is used to obtain the normal monthly global fields of net surface radiation flux minus ground heat storage. This and the derived evapotranspiration are then used in the equation for energy conservation at the surface of the earth to obtain the global fields of normal monthly sensible heat flux from the land surface to the atmosphere.

  11. Evaluation Of Calendar Year 1997 Groundwater and surface Water Quality Data For the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.

    1998-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1997. The monitoring data were obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the Bear Creek Regime and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, and are reported ixx Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater A40nitoringReport for the Bear Creek Hydrogeolo@"c Regime at the US. Department ofEnergy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (AJA Technical Services, Inc. 1998a). This report provides an evaluation of the monitoring data with respect to historical results for each sampling location, the regime-wide extent of groundwater and surface water contamination, and long-term concentration trends for selected groundwater and surface water contaminants.

  12. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent stably stratified air flow above a wavy water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O. A.; Troitskaya, Yu. I.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the roughness of the underlaying water surface on turbulence is studied in a stably stratified boundary layer (SSBL). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is conducted at various Reynolds (Re) and Richardson (Ri) numbers and the wave steepness ka. It is shown that, at constant Re, the stationary turbulent regime is set in at Ri below the threshold value Ri c depending on Re. At Ri > Ri c , in the absence of turbulent fluctuations near the wave water surface, three-dimensional quasiperiodical structures are identified and their threshold of origin depends on the steepness of the surface wave on the water surface. This regime is called a wave pumping regime. The formation of three-dimensional structures is explained by the development of parametric instability of the disturbances induced by the surface water in the air flow. The DNS results are quite consistent with prediction of the theoretical model of the SSBL flow, in which solutions for the disturbances of the fields of velocity and temperature in the wave pumping regime are found to be a solution of a two-dimensional linearized system with the heterogeneous boundary condition, which is caused by the presence of the surface wave. In addition to the turbulent fluctuations, the three-dimensional structures in the wave pumping regime provide for the transfer of impulse and heat, i.e., the increase in the roughness of the water-air boundary caused by the presence of waves intensifies the exchange in the SSBL.

  13. Understanding the Differences Between AIRS, MODIS and ASTER Land Surface Emissivity Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, S.; Hulley, G.

    2008-12-01

    One of the key Earth Science Data Records identified by NASA is Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity (LST&E). LST&E data are key parameters in global climate change studies that involve climate modeling, ice dynamic analyses, surface-atmosphere interactions and land use, land cover change. The errors in retrievals of atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles from hyperspectral infrared radiances, such as those from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite, are strongly dependent on using constant or inaccurate surface emissivities, particularly over arid and semi-arid regions where the variation in emissivity is large, both spatially and spectrally. LST&E standard products are available from spaceborne sensors such as AIRS, MODIS and ASTER at varying spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions. Although these emissivity products represent the same measure, there are frequently discrepancies between the products associated with different scientific approaches used that need to be better understood. For example, ASTER provides LST&E data with the highest spatial resolution (90 m), compared with AIRS (50 km) and MODIS (1 and 5 km). AIRS has the highest spectral sampling and both AIRS and MODIS acquire data at much higher temporal frequencies (every 2-3 days) compared with ASTER (16 days). In this paper we present validation and intercomparisons of AIRS, MODIS and ASTER gridded emissivity products over North America. MODIS and ASTER data will be upsampled to the AIRS spatial resolution, and then compared to laboratory measured emissivities of in-situ rock/sand samples collected at ten validation sites in the Western USA during 2008. The directional hemispherical reflectance of the in-situ samples are measured in the laboratory using a Nicolet Fourier Transform Interferometer (FTIR), converted to emissivity using Kirchoff's law, and convolving to the appropriate sensor's spectral response functions. We present here some of the first

  14. Improved Determination of Surface and Atmospheric Temperatures Using Only Shortwave AIRS Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind,Joel

    2009-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. AIRS is a grating spectrometer with a number of linear arrays of detectors with each detector sensitive to outgoing radiation in a characteristic frequency v(sub i) with a spectral band pass delta v(sub i) of roughly v(sub i) /1200. AIRS contains 2378 spectral channels covering portions of the spectral region 650 cm(exp -1) (15.38 gm) - 2665 cm(exp -1)' (3.752 micrometers). These spectral regions contain significant absorption features from two CO2 absorption bands, the 15 micrometer (longwave) CO2 band, and the 4.3 micrometer (shortwave) CO, absorption band. There are also two atmospheric window regions, the 12 micrometerm - 8 micrometer (longwave) window, and the 4.17 micrometer - 3.75 micrometer (shortwave) window. Historically, determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures from satellite observations was performed using primarily observations in the longwave window and CO2 absorption regions. One reason for this was concerns about the effects, during the day, of reflected sunlight and non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (non-LTE) on the observed radiances in the shortwave portion of the spectrum. According to cloud clearing theory, more accurate soundings of both surface skin and atmospheric temperatures can be obtained under partial cloud cover conditions if one uses the longwave channels to determine cloud cleared radiances R(sub i) for all channels, and uses R(sub i) only from shortwave channels in the determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures. This procedure is now being used by the AIRS Science Team in preparation for the AIRS Version 6 Retrieval Algorithm. This paper describes how the effects on the radiances of solar radiation reflected by clouds and the Earth's surface, and also of non-LTE, are accounted for in the analysis of the data. Results are presented for both

  15. Combined land/sea surface-air-temperature trends, 1949-1972

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.S.

    1982-04-01

    A major deficiency in most previous studies of fluctuations in the earth's climate based on air temperature records has been the dearth of data from oceanic areas and the Southern Hemisphere. This study analyzes a unique collection of ship-based observations of surface air temperature assembled by the UK Meteorological Office in parallel with the station-based dataset developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research from the publications World Weather Records and Monthly Climatic Data for the World. Based on this much more geographically comprehensive database, it is concluded that, during the 24-year period 1949 to 1972, no statistically significant warming or cooling trends were evident in the time series of globally averaged surface air temperature measurements. However, temperature trends did vary latitudinally, with significant cooling in northern extra-tropical latitudes, no trend in equatorial latitudes, and significant but not homogeneous warming in southern extra-tropical latitudes. Time series of air temperatures over land and sea exhibited qualitatively similar behavior over the period 1949 to 1972, indicative of both the comparable quality of the two datasets and the probable lack of significant widespread bias in the land-based measurements due to urban development. The results of this study underscore the need for dense and geographically comprehensive measurements from both land and ocean areas and from both hemispheres in analyzing the global behavior of the earth's climate.

  16. Retrieval of Atmospheric and Surface Parameters from AIRS/AMSU/HSB Data Under Cloudy Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Barnet, Chris; Blaisdell, John; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    New state of the art methodology is described to analyze AIRS/AMSU/HSB data in the presence of multiple cloud formations. The methodology forms the basis for the AIRS Science Team algorithm which will be used to analyze AIRS/AMSU/HSB data on EOS Aqua. The cloud clearing methodology requires no knowledge of the spectral properties of the clouds. The basic retrieval methodology is general and extracts the maximum information from the radiances, consistent with the channel noise covariance matrix. The retrieval methodology minimizes the dependence of the solution on the first guess field and the first guess error characteristics. Results are shown for AIRS Science Team simulation studies with multiple cloud formations. These simulation studies imply that clear column radiances can be reconstructed under partial cloud cover with an accuracy comparable to single spot channel noise in the temperature and water vapor sounding regions, temperature soundings can be produced under partial cloud cover with RMS errors on the order of, or better than, 1deg K in 1 km thick layers from the surface to 700 mb, 1 km layers from 700 mb to 300 mb, 3 km layers from 300 mb to 30 mb, and 5 km layers from 30 mb to 1 mb, and moisture profiles can be obtained with an accuracy better than 20% absolute errors in 1 km layers from the surface to nearly 200 mb.

  17. Evolution of steel surface composition with heating in vacuum and in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Colin S.; Seal, Christopher K.; James, Bryony J.

    2011-09-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been used to investigate the changes in surface composition of three steels as they have undergone heating. The steels were mild steel, and two austenitic stainless steels, commonly designated 304 and 316 stainless steels. XPS measurements were made on the untreated samples, and then following heating for 30 min in vacuo and in a 1 × 10-6 Torr partial pressure of air, at temperatures between 100 °C and 600 °C. Mild steel behaves differently to the two stainless steels under the heating conditions. In mild steel the iron content of the surface increased, with oxygen and carbon decreasing, as a function of increasing temperature. The chemical state of the iron also changed from oxide at low temperatures, to metallic at temperatures above 450 °C. In both stainless steels the amount of iron present in the surface decreased with increasing temperature. The decrease in iron at the surface was accompanied by an increase in the amount of chromium at the steel surface. At temperatures above 450 °C the iron in both 304 and 316 stainless steels showed significant contributions from metallic iron, whilst the chromium present was in an oxide state. In 316 stainless steel heated to 600 °C there was some metallic chromium present in the surface layer. The surfaces heated in air showed the least variation in composition, with the major change being the loss of carbon from the surfaces following heating above 300 °C. There was also a minor increase in the concentration of chromium present on both the stainless steels heated under these conditions. There was also little change in the oxidation state of the iron and chromium present on the surface of these steels. There was some evidence of the thickening of the surface oxides as seen by the loss of the lower binding energy signal in the iron or chromium core level scans. The surfaces heated in vacuum showed a similar trend in the concentration of carbon on the surfaces, however the

  18. Airborne measurements of surface layer turbulence over the ocean during cold air outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Shien; Yeh, Eueng-Nan

    1987-01-01

    The spectral characteristics of surface layer turbulence for the near-shore cloud street regions over the Atlantic Ocean were examined using 50-m level data of airborne measurements of atmospheric turbulence spectra above the western Atlantic Ocean during cold air outbreaks. The present study, performed for the Mesoscale Air-Sea Exchange (MASEX) experiment, extends and completes the preliminary analyses of Chou and Yeh (1987). In the inertial subrange, a near 4/3 ratio was observed between velocity spectra normal to and those along the aircraft heading. A comparison of the turbulent kinetic energy budgets with those of Wyngaard and Cote (1971) and Caughey and Wyngaard (1979) data indicates that the turbulent kinetic energy in the surface layer is dissipated less in the MASEX data than in data obtained by the previous groups.

  19. Regression analysis in modeling of air surface temperature and factors affecting its value in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Jasim Mohammed; Jafri, Mohd. Zubir Mat; Lim, Hwee San; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2012-10-01

    This study encompasses air surface temperature (AST) modeling in the lower atmosphere. Data of four atmosphere pollutant gases (CO, O3, CH4, and H2O) dataset, retrieved from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), from 2003 to 2008 was employed to develop a model to predict AST value in the Malaysian peninsula using the multiple regression method. For the entire period, the pollutants were highly correlated (R=0.821) with predicted AST. Comparisons among five stations in 2009 showed close agreement between the predicted AST and the observed AST from AIRS, especially in the southwest monsoon (SWM) season, within 1.3 K, and for in situ data, within 1 to 2 K. The validation results of AST with AST from AIRS showed high correlation coefficient (R=0.845 to 0.918), indicating the model's efficiency and accuracy. Statistical analysis in terms of β showed that H2O (0.565 to 1.746) tended to contribute significantly to high AST values during the northeast monsoon season. Generally, these results clearly indicate the advantage of using the satellite AIRS data and a correlation analysis study to investigate the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases on AST over the Malaysian peninsula. A model was developed that is capable of retrieving the Malaysian peninsulan AST in all weather conditions, with total uncertainties ranging between 1 and 2 K.

  20. Monitoring of (7)Be in surface air of varying PM(10) concentrations.

    PubMed

    Chao, J H; Liu, C C; Cho, I C; Niu, H

    2014-07-01

    In this study, beryllium-7 ((7)Be) concentrations of surface air were monitored throughout a span of 23 years (1992-2012) in the Taiwanese cities Yilan, Taipei, Taichung, and Kaohsiung. During this period, particulate matter (PM) concentrations, in terms of PM10, were collected monthly from the nearest air-quality pollutant monitoring stations and compared against (7)Be concentrations. Seasonal monsoons influenced (7)Be concentrations in all cities, resulting in high winter and low summer concentrations. In addition, the meteorological conditions caused seasonal PM10 variations, yielding distinct patterns among the cities. There was no correlation between (7)Be and PM10 in the case cities. The average annual (7)Be concentrations varied little among the cities, ranging from 2.9 to 3.5 mBq/m(3), while the PM10 concentrations varied significantly from 38 μg/m(3) in Yilan to 92 μg/m(3) in Kaohsiung depending on the degree of air pollution and meteorological conditions. The correlation between the (7)Be concentration and gross-beta activities (Aβ) in air implied that the (7)Be was mainly attached to crustal PM and its concentration varied little among the cities, regardless of the increase in anthropogenic PM in air-polluted areas. PMID:24607534

  1. Particles at Oil-Air Surfaces: Powdered Oil, Liquid Oil Marbles, and Oil Foam.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Johnston, Shaun K; Sekine, Tomoko; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2015-07-01

    The type of material stabilized by four kinds of fluorinated particles (sericite and bentonite platelet clays and spherical zinc oxide) in air-oil mixtures has been investigated. It depends on the particle wettability and the degree of shear. Upon vigorous agitation, oil dispersions are formed in all the oils containing relatively large bentonite particles and in oils of relatively low surface tension (γla < 26 mN m(-1)) like dodecane, 20 cS silicone, and cyclomethicone containing the other fluorinated particles. Particle-stabilized oil foams were obtained in oils having γla > 26 mN m(-1) where the advancing air-oil-solid contact angle θ lies between ca. 90° and 120°. Gentle shaking, however, gives oil-in-air liquid marbles with all the oil-particle systems except for cases where θ is <60°. For oils of tension >24 mN m(-1) with omniphobic zinc oxide and sericite particles for which advancing θ ≥ 90°, dry oil powders consisting of oil drops in air which do not leak oil could be made upon gentle agitation up to a critical oil:particle ratio (COPR). Above the COPR, catastrophic phase inversion of the dry oil powders to air-in-oil foams was observed. When sheared on a substrate, the dry oil powders containing at least 60 wt % of oil release the encapsulated oil, making these materials attractive formulations in the cosmetic and food industries. PMID:26107421

  2. Surface air temperature and its changes over the past 150 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. D.; New, M.; Parker, D. E.; Martin, S.; Rigor, I. G.

    1999-05-01

    We review the surface air temperature record of the past 150 years, considering the homogeneity of the basic data and the standard errors of estimation of the average hemispheric and global estimates. We present global fields of surface temperature change over the two 20-year periods of greatest warming this century, 1925-1944 and 1978-1997. Over these periods, global temperatures rose by 0.37° and 0.32°C, respectively. The twentieth-century warming has been accompanied by a decrease in those areas of the world affected by exceptionally cool temperatures and to a lesser extent by increases in areas affected by exceptionally warm temperatures. In recent decades there have been much greater increases in night minimum temperatures than in day maximum temperatures, so that over 1950-1993 the diurnal temperature range has decreased by 0.08°C per decade. We discuss the recent divergence of surface and satellite temperature measurements of the lower troposphere and consider the last 150 years in the context of the last millennium. We then provide a globally complete absolute surface air temperature climatology on a 1° × 1° grid. This is primarily based on data for 1961-1990. Extensive interpolation had to be undertaken over both polar regions and in a few other regions where basic data are scarce, but we believe the climatology is the most consistent and reliable of absolute surface air temperature conditions over the world. The climatology indicates that the annual average surface temperature of the world is 14.0°C (14.6°C in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and 13.4°C for the Southern Hemisphere). The annual cycle of global mean temperatures follows that of the land-dominated NH, with a maximum in July of 15.9°C and a minimum in January of 12.2°C.

  3. Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption by a natural aluminum- and iron-bearing surface coating on an aquifer sand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coston, J.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption was studied in batch experiments with material collected from a shallow, unconfined aquifer of glacial outwash sand and gravel in Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA. The aquifer solids contain primarily quartz with minor amounts of alkali feldspars and ferromagnetic minerals. Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption experiments with various grain size and mineral fractions of the aquifer solids showed that: 1) Zn2+ adsorption was independent of grain size, but Pb2+ was preferentially adsorbed by the <64 ??m size fraction and 2) Pb2+ adsorption decreased after removal of the paramagnetic, Fe-bearing mineral fraction, but Zn2+ adsorption was unaffected. Pb2+ and Zn2+ adsorption on mineral separates from the aquifer material compared with metal adsorption on a purified quartz powder indicated that adsorption of both metal ions was dominated by coatings on the quartz fraction of the sediment. Characterization of the coatings by AES, SEM-EDS, and TOF-SIMS demonstrated that the natural quartz grains were extensively coated with Al- and Fe-bearing minerals of variable composition. -from Authors

  4. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure air plasma source for polymer surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shujun; Tang, Jiansheng

    2013-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure air plasma source was generated through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It was used to modify polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces with very high throughput. An equivalent circuit model was used to calculate the peak average electron density. The emission spectrum from the plasma was taken and the main peaks in the spectrum were identified. The ozone density in the down plasma region was estimated by Absorption Spectroscopy. NSF and ARC-ODU

  5. The EUSTACE project: combining different components of the observing system to deliver global, daily information on surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Day-to-day variations in surface air temperature affect society in many ways and are fundamental information for many climate services; however, daily surface air temperature measurements are not available everywhere. A global daily analysis cannot be achieved with measurements made in situ alone, so incorporation of satellite retrievals is needed. To achieve this, we must develop an understanding of the relationships between traditional surface air temperature measurements and retrievals of surface skin temperature from satellite measurements, i.e. Land Surface Temperature, Ice Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Temperature and Lake Surface Water Temperature. Here we reflect on our experience so far within the Horizon 2020 project EUSTACE of using satellite skin temperature retrievals to help us to produce a fully-global daily analysis (or ensemble of analyses) of surface air temperature on the centennial scale, integrating different ground-based and satellite-borne data types and developing new statistical models of how surface air temperature varies in a connected way from place to place. We will present plans and progress along this road in the EUSTACE project (2015-June 2018): - providing new, consistent, multi-component estimation of uncertainty in surface skin temperature retrievals from satellites; - identifying inhomogeneities in daily surface air temperature measurement series from weather stations and correcting for these over Europe; - estimating surface air temperature over all surfaces of Earth from surface skin temperature retrievals; - using new statistical techniques to provide information on higher spatial and temporal scales than currently available, making optimum use of information in data-rich eras. Information will also be given on how interested users can become involved.

  6. Experimental investigations into capability of terahertz surface plasmons to bridge macroscopic air gaps.

    PubMed

    Gerasimov, V V; Knyazev, B A; Nikitin, A K; Zhizhin, G N

    2015-12-28

    Results of experimental and theoretical studies of the capability of terahertz surface plasmons (SPs) to cross macroscopic air gaps in a substrate (or between substrates) with admissible losses are presented. SPs were launched with quasi-cw free-electron laser radiation with 130 μm wavelength (λ). We managed to detect SPs passing across gaps as wide as 100 mm (or about 10(3)⋅λ), which is very promising for development of terahertz SP circuitry. The phenomenon was harnessed for splitting an SP beam into two new ones, guided by their own individual plane-surface substrates. PMID:26832009

  7. Modification of the surface layers of copper by a diffuse discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulepov, Mikhail A.; Erofeev, Mikhail V.; Oskomov, Konstantin V.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the results of examination of copper samples exposed to a diffuse discharge initiated by a runaway electron beam in air under normal pressure. The changes in the chemical composition of the surface layers of copper caused by the action of the discharge were investigated. It has been found that the oxygen and carbon concentrations in the surface layers depend on the number of discharge pulses. The study was aimed at finding possible ways of using this type of discharge in research and industry.

  8. Determination of surface density of nonporous membranes with air-coupled ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, T. P.

    2015-03-01

    The surface density or mass per unit area of a membrane is an important material property often used in acoustics and ultrasonics. In this paper, a new measurement and analysis technique for estimating the surface density as a function of frequency for a nonporous membrane or foil is introduced. This new, broadband technique is derived from the Thompson-Gray measurement model which can be simplified to the fluid layer transfer function commonly used in acoustics. The fluid layer transfer function can be further simplified to the limp-wall mass law for acoustically 'thin' membranes whose thickness is much less than a wavelength. The transfer function of the membrane can be efficiently measured with commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers from which the surface density can be computed. Surface density estimates are presented for four membrane-like materials: aluminum foil, brass shim, polyester and polyethylene sheets.

  9. Surface Pressure Study of Lipid Aggregates at the Air Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Woody; Ploplis Andrews, Anna

    1996-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the growth of fatty acid aggregates on a water/air interface were made by analyzing surface pressure measurements taken with a Langmuir Balance. High concentrations of palmitic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, and also phosphatidylethanolamine in solution with chloroform were applied with a syringe to the surface of the Langmuir Balance and surface pressure was monitored as aggregates assembled spontaneously. The aggregation process for palmitic acid was determined to consist of three distinct parts. Exponential curves were fit to the individual regions of the data and growth and decay constants were determined. Surface pressure varied in very complex ways for lauric acid, myristic acid, and phosphatidylethanolamine yet kinetic measurements yield qualitative information about assembly of those aggregates. This research was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-93-22301.

  10. Microbial Air and Surface Monitoring Results from International Space Station Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Bruce, Rebekah J.; Castro, Victoria A.; Novikova, Natalia D.; Pierson, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Over the course of long-duration spaceflight, spacecraft develop a microbial ecology that directly interacts with the crew of the vehicle. While most microorganisms are harmless or beneficial to the inhabitants of the vehicle, the presence of medically significant organisms appearing in this semi-closed environment could adversely affect crew health and performance. The risk of exposure of the crew to medically significant organisms during a mission is estimated using information gathered during nominal and contingency environmental monitoring. Analysis of the air and surface microbiota in the habitable compartments of the International Space Station (ISS) over the last four years indicate a high presence of Staphylococcus species reflecting the human inhabitants of the vehicle. Generally, air and surface microbial concentrations are below system design specifications, suggesting a lower risk of contact infection or biodegradation. An evaluation of sample frequency indicates a decrease in the identification of new species, suggesting a lower potential for unknown microorganisms to be identified. However, the opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, has been identified in 3 of the last 5 air samples and 5 of the last 9 surface samples. In addition, 47% of the coagulase negative Staphylococcus species that were isolated from the crew, ISS, and its hardware were found to be methicillin resistance. In combination, these observations suggest the potential of methicillin resistant infectious agents over time.

  11. Surface-dependent inactivation of model microorganisms with shielded sliding plasma discharges and applied air flow.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Malik, Muhammad A; Heller, Loree C

    2015-06-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma inactivates bacteria through reactive species produced from the applied gas. The use of cold plasma clinically has gained recent interest, as the need for alternative or supplementary strategies are necessary for preventing multi-drug resistant infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of a novel shielded sliding discharge based cold plasma reactor operated by nanosecond voltage pulses in atmospheric air on both biotic and inanimate surfaces. Bacterial inactivation was determined by direct quantification of colony forming units. The plasma activated air (afterglow) was bactericidal against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus epidermidis seeded on culture media, laminate, and linoleum vinyl. In general, E. coli was more susceptible to plasma exposure. A bacterial reduction was observed with the application of air alone on a laminate surface. Whole-cell real-time PCR revealed a decrease in the presence of E. coli genomic DNA on exposed samples. These findings suggest that plasma-induced bacterial inactivation is surface-dependent. PMID:25200988

  12. Mesoscale climatic simulation of surface air temperature cooling by highly reflective greenhouses in SE Spain.

    PubMed

    Campra, Pablo; Millstein, Dev

    2013-01-01

    A long-term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world, at the Province of Almeria, SE Spain, associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area. The availability of reliable long-term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, we have run a sensitivity experiment to simulate the impact of the observed surface albedo change on monthly and annual surface air temperatures. The model output showed a mean annual cooling of 0.25 °C associated with a 0.09 albedo increase, and a reduction of 22.8 W m(-2) of net incoming solar radiation at surface. Mean reduction of summer daily maximum temperatures was 0.49 °C, with the largest single-day decrease equal to 1.3 °C. WRF output was evaluated and compared with observations. A mean annual warm bias (MBE) of 0.42 °C was estimated. High correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.9) were found between modeled and observed values. This study has particular interest in the assessment of the potential for urban temperature cooling by cool roofs deployment projects, as well as in the evaluation of mesoscale climatic models performance. PMID:24074145

  13. Fabrication of dense α-alumina layer on Ti-6Al-4V alloy hybrid for bearing surfaces of artificial hip joint.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Rohit; Kokubo, Tadashi; Matsushita, Tomiharu; Takadama, Hiroaki

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in hip replacements are focused towards producing reliable bearing surfaces to enhance their longevity. In this perspective, progressive attempts have been made to improve the wear resistance of polyethylene to eliminate osteolysis and mechanical reliability of brittle alumina ceramics, but in vain. It is proposed that both high wear resistance and mechanical reliability can be retained if a thin layer of dense alumina is formed onto high toughness Ti-6Al-4V alloy. For this purpose, we devised a unique methodology in which a layer of Al metal was deposited onto the Ti alloy substrate by cold spraying (CS), followed by a heat treatment to form Al3Ti reaction layer at their interface to improve adhesion and subsequent micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment to transform Al to alumina layer. An optimal MAO treatment of cold sprayed Al formed an adherent and dense α-alumina layer with high Vickers hardness matching with that of sintered alumina used as a femoral head. Structure-phase-property relationships in dense α-alumina layer have been revealed and discussed in the light of our research findings. The designed alumina/Ti alloy hybrid might be a potential candidate for reliable bearing surfaces of artificial hip joint. PMID:27612821

  14. Seismic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Dennis

    2009-05-01

    Textron Systems (Textron) has been using geophones for target detection for many years. This sensing capability was utilized for detection and classification purposes only. Recently Textron has been evaluating multiaxis geophones to calculate bearings and track targets more specifically personnel. This capability will not only aid the system in locating personnel in bearing space or cartesian space but also enhance detection and reduce false alarms. Textron has been involved in the testing and evaluation of several sensors at multiple sites. One of the challenges of calculating seismic bearing is an adequate signal to noise ratio. The sensor signal to noise ratio is a function of sensor coupling to the ground, seismic propagation and range to target. The goals of testing at multiple sites are to gain a good understanding of the maximum and minimum ranges for bearing and detection and to exploit that information to tailor sensor system emplacement to achieve desired performance. Test sites include 10A Site Devens, MA, McKenna Airfield Ft. Benning, GA and Yuma Proving Ground Yuma, AZ. Geophone sensors evaluated include a 28 Hz triax spike, a 15 Hz triax spike and a hybrid triax spike consisting of a 10 Hz vertical geophone and two 28 Hz horizontal geophones. The algorithm uses raw seismic data to calculate the bearings. All evaluated sensors have triaxial geophone configuration mounted to a spike housing/fixture. The suite of sensors also compares various types of geophones to evaluate benefits in lower bandwidth. The data products of these tests include raw geophone signals, seismic features, seismic bearings, seismic detection and GPS position truth data. The analyses produce Probability of Detection vs range, bearing accuracy vs range, and seismic feature level vs range. These analysis products are compared across test sites and sensor types.

  15. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and 0) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and 02 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  16. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and O2 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  17. Repetitively pulsed atmospheric pressure discharge treatment of rough polymer surfaces: I. Humid air discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoj, Ananth N.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2008-08-01

    Plasmas generated at atmospheric pressure are used to functionalize the surfaces of polymers by creating new surface-resident chemical groups. The polymers used in textiles and biomedical applications often have non-planar surfaces whose functionalization requires penetration of plasma generated species into sometimes complex surface features. In this regard, the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of a rough polypropylene surface was computationally investigated using a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model integrated with a surface kinetics model. Repetitively pulsed discharges produced in a dielectric barrier-corona configuration in humid air were considered to affix O. Macroscopic non-uniformities in treatment result from the spatial variations in radical densities which depend on the polarity of the discharge. Microscopic non-uniformities arise due to the higher reactivity of plasma produced species, such as OH radicals, which are consumed before they can diffuse deeper into surface features. The consequences of applied voltage magnitude and polarity, and the relative humidity on discharge dynamics and radical generation leading to surface functionalization, are discussed.

  18. Efficiency of air/liquid interfaces in detaching bacteria from a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaparast, Sepideh; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    Gas/liquid interfaces are known to be significantly more effective than shear stress in detaching microscale colloids from substrates by inducing surface tension forces. Providing that a three-phase contact at the interface of a gas bubble, the liquid phase and the particle occurs, the magnitude of the surface tension force can potentially exceed by orders of magnitude the adhesion force, which keeps the micro particles on the surface. We investigate the ability of a moving air/liquid interface to stimulate the detachment of bacteria from a surface. Bacteria are micron-sized living organisms with strong tendency to attach to almost any substrate that they come into contact with. Attachment of bacteria on the surface is a complex process regulated by diverse characteristics of their growth medium, substrate, and cell surface. Moreover, once fixed on the surface, the microorganisms evolve in time to create intricate biofilm structures, which are highly challenging to be removed. The objective of this study to characterise the efficiency of this detachment process as a function of bacterial attachment as well as hydrodynamic parameters such the surface tension and the interface velocity. Swiss National Science Foundation P2ELP2-158896.

  19. Mercury emission from terrestrial background surfaces in the eastern USA. Part I: Air/surface exchange of mercury within a southeastern deciduous forest (Tennessee) over one year

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Todd; Zhang, Hong; Gustin, Mae S.; Lindberg, Steven Eric

    2008-03-01

    This study focused on the development of a seasonal data set of the Hg air/surface exchange over soils associated with low Hg containing surfaces in a deciduous forest in the southern USA. Data were collected every month for 11 months in 2004 within Standing Stone State Forest in Tennessee using the dynamic flux chamber method. Mercury air/surface exchange associated with the litter covered forest floor was very low with the annual mean daytime flux being 0.4 0.5 ng m-2 h-1 (n = 301). The daytime Hg air/surface exchange over the year oscillated between emission (81% of samples with positive flux) and deposition (19% of samples with negative flux). A seasonal trend of lower emission in the spring and summer (closed canopy) relative to the fall and winter (open canopy) was observed. Correlations were found between the air/surface exchange and certain environmental factors on specific days sampled but not collectively over the entire year. The very low magnitude of Hg air/surface exchange as observed in this study suggests that an improved methodology for determining and reporting emission fluxes is needed when the values of fluxes and chamber blanks are both very low and comparable. This study raises questions and points to a need for more research regarding how to scale the Hg air/surface exchange for surfaces with very low emissions.

  20. Unravelling air-sea interactions driven by photochemistry in the sea-surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Christian; Alpert, Peter; Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Perrier, Sébastien; Bernard, Francois; Ciuraru, Raluca; Hayeck, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Interfaces are ubiquitous in the environment, and in addition many atmospheric key processes, such as gas deposition, aerosol and cloud formation are, at one stage or the other, strongly impacted by physical- and chemical processes occurring at interfaces. Unfortunately, these processes have only been suggested and discussed but never fully addressed because they were beyond reach. We suggest now that photochemistry or photosensitized reactions exist at interfaces, and we will present and discuss their possible atmospheric implications. Obviously, one of the largest interface is the sea-surface microlayer (SML), which is a region lying at the uppermost tens to hundreds of micrometres of the water surface, with physical, chemical and biological properties that differ from those of the underlying sub-surface water. Organic film formation at the sea surface is made possible in the presence of an excess of surface-active material. Hydrophobic surfactant films are typically believed to play the role of a physical barrier to air-sea exchanges, especially at low wind speed. We will show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) can trigger photochemistry at the air-sea interface, releasing unsaturated, functionalized volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including isoprene,... acting as precursors for the formation of organic aerosols, that were thought, up to now, to be solely of biological origin! In addition, we suggest that when arranged at an air/water interface, hydrophobic surfactant can have weak chemical interactions among them, which can trigger the absorption of sunlight and can consequently induce photochemistry at such interfaces. A major question arises from such observations, namely: can the existence of such weak intra- or intermolecular interactions and the subsequent photochemistry be generalized to many other atmospheric objects such as aerosols? This topic will be presented and discussed.

  1. Effects of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants on surface ozone concentrations over Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Walters, Stacy; Horowitz, Larry W.; Tao, Shu

    2014-11-01

    Due to a lack of industrialization in Western China, surface air there was, until recently, believed to be relatively unpolluted. However, recent measurements and modeling studies have found high levels of ozone (O3) there. Based on the state-of-the-science global chemical transport model MOZART-4, we identify the origin, pathway, and mechanism of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants to Western China in 2000. MOZART-4 generally simulates well the observed surface O3 over inland areas of China. Simulations find surface ozone concentrations over Western China on average to be about 10 ppbv higher than Eastern China. Using sensitivity studies, we find that anthropogenic emissions from all Eurasian regions except China contribute 10-15 ppbv surface O3 over Western China, superimposed upon a 35-40 ppbv natural background. Transport from European anthropogenic sources to Northwestern China results in 2-6 ppbv O3 enhancements in spring and summer. Indian anthropogenic sources strongly influence O3 over the Tibetan Plateau during the summer monsoon. Transport of O3 originating from emissions in the Middle East occasionally reach Western China and increase surface ozone there by about 1-4 ppbv. These influences are of similar magnitude as trans-Pacific and transatlantic transport of O3 and its precursors, indicating the significance of trans-Eurasian ozone transport in hemispheric transport of air pollution. Our study further indicates that mitigation of anthropogenic emissions from Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East could benefit public health and agricultural productivity in Western China.

  2. Identification of Iron-Bearing Phases on the Martian Surface and in Martian Meteorites and Analogue Samples by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingelhoefer, G.; Agresti, D. G.; Schroeder, C.; Rodionov, D.; Yen, A.; Ming, Doug; Morris, Richard V.

    2007-01-01

    The Moessbauer spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) Spirit (Gusev Crater) and Opportunity (Meridiani Planum) have each analyzed more than 100 targets during their ongoing missions (>1050 sols). Here we summarize the Fe-bearing phases identified to date and compare the results to Moessbauer analyses of martian meteorites and lunar samples. We use lunar samples as martian analogues because some, particularly the low-Ti Apollo 15 mare basalts, have bulk chemical compositions that are comparable to basaltic martian meteorites [1,2]. The lunar samples also provide a way to study pigeonite-rich samples. Pigeonite is a pyroxene that is not common in terrestrial basalts, but does often occur on the Moon and is present in basaltic martian meteorites

  3. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man; Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-01

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H2O), glycerol (C3H8O3) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  4. Evaluation of a bisphosphonate enriched ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene for enhanced total joint replacement bearing surface functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright-Walker, Cassandra Jane

    Each year in the United States there is an increasing trend of patients receiving total joint replacement (TJR) procedures. Approximately a half million total knee replacements (TKRs) are performed annually in the United States with increasing prevalence attributed to baby-boomers, obesity, older, and younger patients. This trend is also seen for total hip replacements (THRs) as well. The use of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) inserts in TJRs results in wear particle-induced osteolysis, which is the predominant cause for prosthesis failure and revision surgery. Sub-micron size particle generation is inevitable despite the numerous efforts in improving this bearing material. Work by others has shown that the use of oral and intravenous systemic bisphosphonates (BP) can significantly minimize periprosthetic osteolysis. However, the systemic delivery and the high solubility of BPs results in a predominant portion of the drug being excreted via the kidney without reaching its target, bone. This doctoral research project is focused on the development and evaluation of a novel method to administer BPs locally using the inherent wear of UHMWPE for possible use as an anti-osteolysis treatment. For new materials to be considered, they must be mechanically and tribologically comparable to the current gold standard, UHMWPE. In order to evaluate this material, mechanical, drug elution and tribological experiments were performed to allow assessment of material properties. Tensile tests showed comparable yield stress and pin-on-disk testing showed comparable wear to standard virgin UHMWPE. Further, drug elution tests have shown that BP was released from the enriched material both in static and dynamic conditions. Additionally, an aggressive 2 million cycle total knee simulator experiment has shown statistically similar wear results for the two materials. Overall, this research has provided the groundwork for further characterization and development of a new

  5. Improved transducer for squeeze-film bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoogenbloom, L.

    1971-01-01

    Transducer amplifies vibrations produced by piezoelectric drivers, creating greater amplitudes than were possible with direct drive devices. Drivers isolated from bearing surfaces result in bearings with high axial load capacity and stiffness, thus, wear on ceramic cylinders is reduced.

  6. TOOL ASSEMBLY WITH BI-DIRECTIONAL BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Longhurst, G.E.

    1961-07-11

    A two-direction motion bearing which is incorporated in a refueling nuclear fuel element trsnsfer tool assembly is described. A plurality of bi- directional bearing assembliesare fixed equi-distantly about the circumference of the transfer tool assembly to provide the tool assembly with a bearing surface- for both axial and rotational motion. Each bi-directional bearing assembly contains a plurality of circumferentially bulged rollers mounted in a unique arrangement which will provide a bearing surface for rotational movement of the tool assembly within a bore. The bi-direc tional bearing assembly itself is capable of rational motion and thus provides for longitudinal movement of the tool assembly.

  7. Investigation of drop impact on dry and wet surfaces with consideration of surrounding air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yisen; Lian, Yongsheng; Sussman, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations were conducted to investigate drop impingement and splashing on both dry and wet surfaces at impact velocities greater than 50 m/s with the consideration of the effect of surrounding air. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the variable density pressure projection method on a dynamic block structured adaptive grid. The moment of fluid method was used to reconstruct interfaces separating different phases. A dynamic contact angle model was used to define the boundary condition at the moving contact line. Simulations showed that lowering the ambient gas density can suppress dry surface splashing, which is in agreement with the experiments. A recirculation zone was observed inside the drop after contact: a larger recirculation zone was formed earlier in the higher gas density case than in the lower gas density case. Increasing gas density also enhances the creation of secondary droplets from the lamella breakup. For high speed impact on a dry surface, lowering ambient gas density attenuates splashing. However, ambient air does not significantly affect splashing on a wet surface. Simulations showed that the splashed droplets are primarily from the exiting liquid film.

  8. Fluid lubricated bearing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.; Menke, John R.

    1976-01-01

    1. A support for a loaded rotatable shaft comprising in combination on a housing having a fluid-tight cavity encasing an end portion of said shaft, a thrust bearing near the open end of said cavity for supporting the axial thrust of said shaft, said thrust bearing comprising a thrust plate mounted in said housing and a thrust collar mounted on said shaft, said thrust plate having a central opening the peripheral portion of which is hermetically sealed to said housing at the open end of said cavity, and means for supplying a fluid lubricant to said thrust bearing, said thrust bearing having a lubricant-conducting path connecting said lubricant supplying means with the space between said thrust plate and collar intermediate the peripheries thereof, the surfaces of said plate and collar being constructed and arranged to inhibit radial flow of lubricant and, on rotation of said thrust collar, to draw lubricant through said path between the bearing surfaces and to increase the pressure therebetween and in said cavity and thereby exert a supporting force on said end portion of said shaft.

  9. Active-Controlled Fluid Film Based on Wave-Bearing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    It has been known since 1967 that the steady-state and dynamic performance, including the stability of a wave bearing, are highly dependent on the wave amplitude. A wave-bearing profile can be readily obtained by elastically distorting the stationary bearing sleeve surface. The force that distorts the elastic sleeve surface could be an applied force or pressure. The magnitude and response of the distorting force would be defined by the relation between the bearing surface stiffness and the bearing pressure, or load, in a feedback loop controller. Using such devices as piezoelectric or other electromechanical elements, one could step control or fully control the bearing. The selection between these systems depends on the manner in which the distortion forces are applied, the running speed, and the reaction time of the feedback loop. With these techniques, both liquid- (oil-) or gas- (air-) lubricated wave bearings could be controlled. This report gives some examples of the dependency of the bearing's performance on the wave amplitude. The analysis also was proven experimentally.

  10. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. X.; Liu, Z. C.; Chen, C.; Yang, A. J.; Li, D.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2016-04-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H+, nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2‑ and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios.

  11. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, D X; Liu, Z C; Chen, C; Yang, A J; Li, D; Rong, M Z; Chen, H L; Kong, M G

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H(+), nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2(-) and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios. PMID:27033381

  12. Aqueous reactive species induced by a surface air discharge: Heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D. X.; Liu, Z. C.; Chen, C.; Yang, A. J.; Li, D.; Rong, M. Z.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-liquid interaction is a critical area of plasma science and a knowledge bottleneck for many promising applications. In this paper, the interaction between a surface air discharge and its downstream sample of deionized water is studied with a system-level computational model, which has previously reached good agreement with experimental results. Our computational results reveal that the plasma-induced aqueous species are mainly H+, nitrate, nitrite, H2O2 and O3. In addition, various short-lived aqueous species are also induced, regardless whether they are generated in the gas phase first. The production/loss pathways for aqueous species are quantified for an air gap width ranging from 0.1 to 2 cm, of which heterogeneous mass transfer and liquid chemistry are found to play a dominant role. The short-lived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are strongly coupled in liquid-phase reactions: NO3 is an important precursor for short-lived ROS, and in turn OH, O2− and HO2 play a crucial role for the production of short-lived RNS. Also, heterogeneous mass transfer depends strongly on the air gap width, resulting in two distinct scenarios separated by a critical air gap of 0.5 cm. The liquid chemistry is significantly different in these two scenarios. PMID:27033381

  13. Cold Air Plasma To Decontaminate Inanimate Surfaces of the Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Claro, Tânia; O'Connor, Niall; Cafolla, Anthony A.; Stevens, Niall T.; Daniels, Stephen; Humphreys, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The hospital environment harbors bacteria that may cause health care-associated infections. Microorganisms, such as multiresistant bacteria, can spread around the patient's inanimate environment. Some recently introduced biodecontamination approaches in hospitals have significant limitations due to the toxic nature of the gases and the length of time required for aeration. This study evaluated the in vitro use of cold air plasma as an efficient alternative to traditional methods of biodecontamination of hospital surfaces. Cultures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter baumannii were applied to different materials similar to those found in the hospital environment. Artificially contaminated sections of marmoleum, mattress, polypropylene, powder-coated mild steel, and stainless steel were then exposed to a cold air pressure plasma single jet for 30 s, 60 s, and 90 s, operating at approximately 25 W and 12 liters/min flow rate. Direct plasma exposure successfully reduced the bacterial load by log 3 for MRSA, log 2.7 for VRE, log 2 for ESBL-producing E. coli, and log 1.7 for A. baumannii. The present report confirms the efficient antibacterial activity of a cold air plasma single-jet plume on nosocomial bacterially contaminated surfaces over a short period of time and highlights its potential for routine biodecontamination in the clinical environment. PMID:24441156

  14. Keeping warm with fur in cold water: entrainment of air in hairy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasto, Alice; Regli, Marianne; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Clanet, Christophe; Hosoi, Anette

    2015-11-01

    Instead of relying on a thick layer of body fat for insulation as many aquatic mammals do, fur seals and otters trap air in their dense fur for insulation in cold water. Using a combination of model experiments and theory, we rationalize this mechanism of air trapping underwater for thermoregulation. For the model experiments, hairy surfaces are fabricated using laser cut molds and casting samples with PDMS. Modeling the hairy texture as a network of capillary tubes, the imbibition speed of water into the hairs is obtained through a balance of hydrostatic pressure and viscous stress. In this scenario, the bending of the hairs and capillary forces are negligible. The maximum diving depth that can be achieved before the hairs are wetted to the roots is predicted from a comparison of the diving speed and imbibition speed. The amount of air that is entrained in hairy surfaces is greater than what is expected for classic Landau-Levich-Derjaguin plate plunging. A phase diagram with the parameters from experiments and biological data allows a comparison of the model system and animals.

  15. Permanent-Magnet Meissner Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    1994-01-01

    Permanent-magnet meissner bearing features inherently stable, self-centering conical configuration. Bearing made stiffer or less stiff by selection of magnets, springs, and spring adjustments. Cylindrical permanent magnets with axial magnetization stacked coaxially on rotor with alternating polarity. Typically, rare-earth magnets used. Magnets machined and fitted together to form conical outer surface.

  16. Surface modification of air plasma spraying WC-12%Co cermet coating by laser melting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, M.; Ajmal, M.; Nusair Khan, A.; Hussain, A.; Akhter, R.

    2014-03-01

    Tungsten carbide cermet powder with 12%Co was deposited on stainless steel substrate by air plasma spraying method. Two types of coatings were produced i.e. thick (430 µm) and thin (260 µm) with varying porosity and splat morphology. The coated samples were treated with CO2 laser under the shroud of inert atmosphere. A series of experimentation was done in this regard, to optimize the laser parameters. The plasma sprayed coated surfaces were then laser treated on the same parameters. After laser melting the treated surfaces were characterized and compared with as-sprayed surfaces. It was observed that the thickness of the sprayed coatings affected the melt depth and the achieved microstructures. It was noted that phases like Co3W3C, Co3W9C4 and W were formed during the laser melting in both samples. The increase in hardness was attributed to the formation of these phases.

  17. Instability of a confined jet impinging on a water/air free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, G.; Climent, E.; Maurel, A.

    2002-09-01

    Self-sustained oscillations in sinuous mode occur when a water jet impinges from below on a water/air free surface. Confined jet instability is experimentally investigated by image processing and velocity measurements. Despite small deformations of the surface, dynamic response of the jet provides unusual behaviour with comparable configurations (hole-tone, jet edge ...). The central feature is a bounded evolution of the oscillation frequency. Modal transitions are observed when physical parameters are varied. Each frequency jump is related to wavelength modification of the spatial pattern. Atypical evolution of the predominant length scale has to be connected to strong coupling with the weak deformations induced by the impinging jet on the free surface.

  18. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  19. Diffusion welding in air. [solid state welding of butt joint by fusion welding, surface cleaning, and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Holko, K. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Solid state welding a butt joint by fusion welding the peripheral surfaces to form a seal is described along with, autogenetically cleaning the faying or mating surfaces of the joint by heating the abutting surfaces to 1,200 C and heating to the diffusion welding temperature in air.

  20. The effect of the partial pressure of water vapor on the surface tension of the liquid water-air interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, José L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, Marco A; García-Prada, Juan C

    2012-09-01

    Precise measurements of the surface tension of water in air vs. humidity at 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C are shown. For constant temperature, surface tension decreases linearly for increasing humidity in air. These experimental data are in good agreement with a simple model based on Newton's laws here proposed. It is assumed that evaporating molecules of water are ejected from liquid to gas with a mean normal component of the speed of "ejection" greater than zero. A high humidity in the air reduces the net flow of evaporating water molecules lowering the effective surface tension on the drop. Therefore, just steam in air acts as an effective surfactant for the water-air interface. It can partially substitute chemical surfactants helping to reduce their environmental impact. PMID:22717083

  1. Sea surface temperature anomalies, planetary waves, and air-sea feedback in the middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankignoul, C.

    1985-01-01

    Current analytical models for large-scale air-sea interactions in the middle latitudes are reviewed in terms of known sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies. The scales and strength of different atmospheric forcing mechanisms are discussed, along with the damping and feedback processes controlling the evolution of the SST. Difficulties with effective SST modeling are described in terms of the techniques and results of case studies, numerical simulations of mixed-layer variability and statistical modeling. The relationship between SST and diabatic heating anomalies is considered and a linear model is developed for the response of the stationary atmosphere to the air-sea feedback. The results obtained with linear wave models are compared with the linear model results. Finally, sample data are presented from experiments with general circulation models into which specific SST anomaly data for the middle latitudes were introduced.

  2. Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in an ultrathin air film causes drop splashing on smooth surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Tan, Peng; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    When a fast-moving drop impacts onto a smooth substrate, splashing will be produced at the edge of the expanding liquid sheet. This ubiquitous phenomenon lacks a fundamental understanding. Combining experiment with model, we illustrate that the ultrathin air film trapped under the expanding liquid front triggers splashing. Because this film is thinner than the mean free path of air molecules, the interior airflow transfers momentum with an unusually high velocity comparable to the speed of sound and generates a stress 10 times stronger than the airflow in common situations. Such a large stress initiates Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities at small length scales and effectively produces splashing. Our model agrees quantitatively with experimental verifications and brings a fundamental understanding to the ubiquitous phenomenon of drop splashing on smooth surfaces. PMID:25713350

  3. Normal Mastoid Air Cell System Geometry: Has Surface Area Been Overestimated?

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Sung Wan; Lee, Seung-Sin; Park, Jin Young; Yoo, Jeong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to emphasize the necessity of a standard in segmentation threshold and algorithm for measuring volume and surface area of mastoid air cell system (MACS). Methods First, we obtained axial computed tomography scans of 54 normal temporal bones from 27 subjects. Then, we manipulated Hounsfield units (HU) image data in DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) files directly using our program. The volume and surface area of MACS were computed and compared at segmentation thresholds (HU) from –700 to 0 at intervals of 50 using 2 algorithms; square pixel based (SP) algorithm and marching square (MS) algorithm. Results No significant difference was found between the volumes computed by SP and MS algorithms at each segmentation threshold. The surface area computed by SP algorithm, however, was significantly larger than that by MS algorithm. We could minimize this significant difference through a modification of the SP algorithm. As the lower HU threshold value was set, the smaller volume was measured. The surface area showed a plateau at a threshold of approximately –200 HU. The segmentation threshold had greater influence on the measured volume of MACS than the algorithm did. Conclusion A standard method for measuring volume and surface area of MACS is thought to be necessary. We suggest that the MS algorithm and –200 HU of the threshold could be a standard in the measurement of volume and surface area of MACS. PMID:26976023

  4. Validation of AIRS version 6 temperature profiles and surface-based inversions over Antarctica using Concordiasi dropsonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan, Patrick; Wang, Junhong; Cohn, Stephen A.; Fetzer, Eric; Maddy, Eric S.; Wong, Sun

    2015-02-01

    During the 2010 Concordiasi field experiment, 635 dropsondes were released from the lower stratosphere providing in situ atmospheric profiles from the release height (~60 hPa) to the surface over Antarctica. They provide a unique data set of high vertical resolution temperature profiles over the entire Antarctic continent and surrounding ocean. This study uses temperature profiles and derived surface-based inversion (SBI) properties from the sonde data set to evaluate Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) versions 5 (v5) and 6 (v6) temperature profiles. A total of 1486 matched pairs of profiles are available for analysis. The AIRS averaging kernel, representing the AIRS measurement sensitivity, is applied to the dropsonde profiles. The AIRS data are compared to kernel-averaged dropsonde profiles and found, on average, to have a small cold bias (~0.5°C) (for v6) in the troposphere. AIRS v6 is improved over v5 with both profile-averaged bias and root-mean-square errors reduced by over 25%. Compared to the kernel-averaged dropsonde profiles, AIRS v6 accurately detects the existence of SBIs in 79% of the profiles and agrees on the inversion depth 79% of the time. AIRS correctly identifies SBIs in 59% of cases when compared to the full-resolution sonde. AIRS systematically underestimates the SBI intensity. This is due to warmer reported AIRS surface air temperatures (Ta) than Ta measured with the dropsonde. Replacement of AIRS Ta with that measured by the dropsonde improves the agreement in both SBI detection and intensity. If AIRS Ta could be improved, AIRS has the potential to be a stand-alone SBI detection tool over Antarctica.

  5. Centrifugal Compressor Surge Margin Improved With Diffuser Hub Surface Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability is an important parameter in the design of compressors for aircraft gas turbine engines. Compression system instabilities can cause compressor surge, which may lead to the loss of an aircraft. As a result, engine designers include a margin of safety between the operating line of the engine and the stability limit line of the compressor. The margin of safety is typically referred to as "surge margin." Achieving the highest possible level of surge margin while meeting design point performance objectives is the goal of the compressor designer. However, performance goals often must be compromised in order to achieve adequate levels of surge margin. Techniques to improve surge margin will permit more aggressive compressor designs. Centrifugal compressor surge margin improvement was demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center by injecting air into the vaned diffuser of a 4:1-pressure-ratio centrifugal compressor. Tests were performed using injector nozzles located on the diffuser hub surface of a vane-island diffuser in the vaneless region between the impeller trailing edge and the diffuser-vane leading edge. The nozzle flow path and discharge shape were designed to produce an air stream that remained tangent to the hub surface as it traveled into the diffuser passage. Injector nozzles were located near the leading edge of 23 of the 24 diffuser vanes. One passage did not contain an injector so that instrumentation located in that passage would be preserved. Several orientations of the injected stream relative to the diffuser vane leading edge were tested over a range of injected flow rates. Only steady flow (nonpulsed) air injection was tested. At 100 percent of the design speed, a 15-percent improvement in the baseline surge margin was achieved with a nozzle orientation that produced a jet that was bisected by the diffuser vane leading edge. Other orientations also improved the baseline surge margin. Tests were conducted at speeds below the

  6. Diagnosis of surface damage induced by air pollution on 20th-century concrete buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozga, I.; Bonazza, A.; Bernardi, E.; Tittarelli, F.; Favoni, O.; Ghedini, N.; Morselli, L.; Sabbioni, C.

    2011-09-01

    The present work focuses on the impact of anthropogenic multi-pollutants on modern concrete buildings exposed in two different European urban areas: Centennial Hall in Wroclaw (Poland) and Casa Galleria Vichi in Florence (Italy). Through a range of analytical techniques the complete characterization of the damage layer collected from the buildings under study has been achieved for the first time, including quantitative measurements of the carbon content. The experimental results allow the identification and prioritization of the air pollutants responsible for the surface deterioration, finding gypsum to be the main damage product on surfaces sheltered from rain runoff, with embedded particulate matter, especially carbonaceous particles, responsible for darkening of the building walls. The discrimination of carbon fractions shows different concentrations of elemental and organic carbon within the damage layers, depending on the location of the buildings. This step is essential for identifying the anthropogenic sources causing deterioration on the buildings, including the aesthetic impairment of surfaces. The contribution of air pollutants is also reflected by the elements found in the damage layers, while the evaluation of the enrichment factors is useful for identifying the elements of anthropogenic origin.

  7. Investigations of Air Perfusion through Porous Media and Super-Hydrophobic Surface Active Gas Replenishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlin, Marc; Gose, James W.; Golovin, Kevin; Ceccio, Steven L.; Tuteja, Anish

    2015-11-01

    Super-hydrophobic (SH) materials have been used successfully to generate reduced skin-friction in laminar flows. Success in the laminar regime has led researchers to try SH materials in turbulent flows. More often than not, this has been unsuccessful at providing meaningful skin-friction drag reduction, and has even generated increased drag. This failure is frequently attributed to the wetting of an SH surface or equivalently the transition from the Cassie-Baxter to the Wenzel state. The result is fluid flow over an essentially roughened surface. In this investigation the researchers aim to perfuse small amounts of gas through porous media, including sintered and foam metals, to attain skin-friction drag reduction in a fully-developed turbulent channel flow. As air is perfused through porous media, the solid - liquid interaction at the interface transitions to a solid - liquid - gas interaction. This can result in an interface that functions similarly to SH materials. Controlled air perfusion that provides the necessary replenishment of lost gas at the interface might prevent wetting, and thus eliminate or reduce the effect of the roughness on the flow. This latter possibility is investigated by perfusing small amounts of gas through porous media with and without SH coatings. To quantify the effectiveness of this method, pressure drop is used to infer friction drag along the surface in a fully-developed turbulent channel flow. The authors recognize the support of ONR.

  8. BOREAS AFM-08 ECMWF Hourly Surface and Upper Air Data for the SSA and NSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viterbo, Pedro; Betts, Alan; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-8 team focused on modeling efforts to improve the understanding of the diurnal evolution of the convective boundary layer over the boreal forest. This data set contains hourly data from the European Center for for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational model from below the surface to the top of the atmosphere, including the model fluxes at the surface. Spatially, the data cover a pair of the points that enclose the rawinsonde sites at Candle Lake, Saskatchewan, in the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Thompson, Manitoba, in the Northern Study Area (NSA). Temporally, the data include the two time periods of 13 May 1994 to 30 Sept 1994 and 01 Mar 1996 to 31 Mar 1997. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The number of records in the upper air data files may exceed 20,000, causing a problem for some software packages. The ECMWF hourly surface and upper air data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  9. Daily Cycle of Air Temperature and Surface Temperature in Stone Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Li, Y.; Wang, X.; Yuan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization is one of the most profound human activities that impact on climate change. In cities, where are highly artificial areas, the conflict between human activity and natural climate is particularly prominent. Urban areas always have the larger area of impervious land, the higher consumption of greenhouse gases, more emissions of anthropogenic heat and air pollution, all contribute to the urban warming phenomena. Understanding the mechanisms causing a variety of phenomena involved in the urban warming is critical to distinguish the anthropogenic effect and natural variation in the climate change. However, the exact dynamics of urban warming were poorly understood, and effective control strategies are not available. Here we present a study of the daily cycle of air temperature and surface temperature in Stone Forest. The specific heat of the stones in the Stone Forest and concrete of the man-made structures within the cities are approximate. Besides, the height of the Stone Forest and the height of buildings within the city are also similar. As a scenic area, the Stone Forest is being preserved and only opened for sightseeing. There is no anthropogenic heat, as well air pollution within the Stone Forest. The thermal environment in Stone Forest can be considered to be a simulation of thermal environment in the city, which can reveal the effect of man-made structures on urban thermal environment. We conducted the field studies and numerical analysis in the Stone Forest for 4 typical urban morphology and environment scenarios, including high-rise compact cities, low-rise sparse cities, garden cities and isolated single stone. Air temperature and relative humidity were measured every half an hour in 15 different locations, which within different spatial distribution of stones and can represent the four urban scenarios respectively. At the same time, an infrared camera was used to take thermal images and get the hourly surface temperatures of stones and

  10. Nanowell-Trapped Charged Ligand-Bearing Nanoparticle Surfaces – A Novel Method of Enhancing Flow-Resistant Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phat L.; Gamboa, Jessica R.; McCracken, Katherine E.; Riley, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Assuring cell adhesion to an underlying biomaterial surface is vital in implant device design and tissue engineering, particularly under circumstances where cells are subjected to potential detachment from overriding fluid flow. Cell-substrate adhesion is a highly regulated process involving the interplay of mechanical properties, surface topographic features, electrostatic charge, and biochemical mechanisms. At the nanoscale level the physical properties of the underlying substrate are of particular importance in cell adhesion. Conventionally, natural, pro-adhesive, and often thrombogenic, protein biomaterials are frequently utilized to facilitate adhesion. In the present study nanofabrication techniques are utilized to enhance the biological functionality of a synthetic polymer surface, polymethymethacrylate, with respect to cell adhesion. Specifically we examine the effect on cell adhesion of combining: 1. optimized surface texturing, 2. electrostatic charge and 3. cell adhesive ligands, uniquely assembled on the substrata surface, as an ensemble of nanoparticles trapped in nanowells. Our results reveal that the ensemble strategy leads to enhanced, more than simply additive, endothelial cell adhesion under both static and flow conditions. This strategy may be of particular utility for enhancing flow-resistant endothelialization of blood-contacting surfaces of cardiovascular devices subjected to flow-mediated shear. PMID:23225491

  11. CO2-Brine-Iron-bearing Clay Mineral Interactions: Surface Area Changes and Fracture-Filling Potentials in Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Y.; Hu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCS) is a promising option to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emission from coal-fired power plants. The injected CO2 in GCS sites can induce dissolution of rocks and secondary mineral formation, potentially change the physical properties of the geological formations, and thus influence the transport and injectivity of CO2. However, most of the relevant studies are based on hydrological transport, using simulation models rather than studying actual interfacial chemical reactions. The mechanisms and kinetics of interfacial reactions among supercritical CO2 (scCO2)-saline water-rock surfaces at the molecular scale and their impacts on CO2 leakage have not been well understood. This research investigated the effects of various environmental factors (such as temperature, pressure, salinity, and different metal ion and organic-containing brine) on the dissolution and surface morphological changes of clay minerals. In this work, iron-bearing clay mineral, biotite [K(Mg,Fe)3AlSi3O10(OH,F)2], was used for model clay minerals in potential GCS sites. Both fluid/solid chemistry analysis and interfacial topographic studies were conducted to investigate the dissolution/precipitation on clay mineral surfaces under GCS conditions in high salinity systems. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the interfacial surface morphology changes were observed. Shortly after a CO2 pressure of 102 atm is applied at 95oC, in situ pH of solutions was 3.15 ± 0.10. The early intrinsic dissolution rates of biotite were 8.4 ± 2.8 × 10-13 and 11.2 ± 3.0 × 10-13 mol Si m-2s-1 in water and NaCl solution, respectively. At the early stage of reaction, fast growth of fibrous illite on biotite basal planes was observed. After 22-70 h reaction, the biotite basal surface cracked, resulting in illite detaching from the surfaced. Later, the cracked surface layer was released into solution, thus the inner layer was exposed as a renewed

  12. An Autosampler and Field Sample Carrier for Maximizing Throughput Using an Open-Air, Surface Sampling Ion Source for MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently developed, commercially available, open-air, surface sampling ion source for mass spectrometers provides individual analyses in several seconds. To realize its full throughput potential, an autosampler and field sample carrier were designed and built. The autosampler ...

  13. LASER PLASMA: Experimental confirmation of the erosion origin of pulsed low-threshold surface optical breakdown of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min'ko, L. Ya; Chumakou, A. N.; Chivel', Yu A.

    1988-08-01

    Nanosecond kinetic spectroscopy techniques were used to identify the erosion origin of pulsed low-threshold surface optical breakdown of air as a result of interaction of microsecond neodymium and CO2 laser pulses with some metals (indium, lead).

  14. Influence of baseline ozone on surface air quality in the western U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, D. A.; Downey, N.

    2011-12-01

    As the ozone air quality standard is made more stringent, cities, counties and states will need a better understanding of the sources of ozone. While Eulerian models can provide important indications of the sources, they are often challenged by episodic emissions (eg wildfires), interannual variability and/or coarse model resolution. These challenges are especially problematic in the western United States. Thus we need improved tools to directly use available observations to better understand and identify ozone sources. In this study we examine the relationship between measured free tropospheric/baseline ozone and surface ozone at several receptor sites in the western U.S. Our focus is on air quality sites in the Pacific Northwest and Rocky Mtn region that exceed current or new air quality standards that have been proposed. Elevated sites in the Rocky Mtns are exposed to high ozone from the free troposphere. Significant interannual variations occur in spring, due to variations in baseline ozone, and in summer, due to variations in wildfires. In the Rocky Mtn region there are significant correlations between the surface and free tropospheric mixing ratios using both daily and monthly means for spring and summer months (see Jaffe 2011; DOI: 10.1021/es1028102). This implies that free tropospheric ozone mixes down and frequently contributes to elevated ozone at the surface. In the Pacific Northwest, we are using data from suburban and rural monitoring locations to identify ozone from local and non-local sources. The approach for both the Rocky Mtn and Pacific Northwest sites is to develop a statistical model for ozone using all available observations, (e.g. PM, meteorology, satellite data and trajectories) to quantify the variable contribution from baseline ozone. The statistical model can then be evaluated against actual observations of baseline ozone. The statistical model can also be useful to help identify "exceptional events" as defined by the US EPA.

  15. Wave Journal Bearing. Part 1: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1995-01-01

    A wave journal bearing concept features a waved inner bearing diameter of the non-rotating bearing side and it is an alternative to the plain journal bearing. The wave journal bearing has a significantly increased load capacity in comparison to the plain journal bearing operating at the same eccentricity. It also offers greater stability than the plain circular bearing under all operating conditions. The wave bearing's design is relatively simple and allows the shaft to rotate in either direction. Three wave bearings are sensitive to the direction of an applied stationary side load. Increasing the number of waves reduces the wave bearing's sensitivity to the direction of the applied load relative to the wave. However, the range in which the bearing performance can be varied decreases as the number of waves increases. Therefore, both the number and the amplitude of the waves must be properly selected to optimize the wave bearing design for a specific application. It is concluded that the stiffness of an air journal bearing, due to hydrodynamic effect, could be doubled and made to run stably by using a six or eight wave geometry with a wave amplitude approximately half of the bearing radial clearance.

  16. 10 ns pulsed atmospheric air plasma for uniform treatment of polymeric surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2007-12-17

    This letter reports an experimental study of a 10 ns pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric air, excited with a train of 65 ns voltage pulses at a repetition frequency of 5 kHz. It is shown that these ultrashort pulses produce a homogenous discharge with very high electron density in excess of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} and low gas temperature, which are particularly desirable for uniform treatment of thermally sensitive polymer films. Their treatment of polypropylene films is found to introduce microscale surface patterns as well as various carbon-oxygen bonds, both useful for improving the hydrophilic properties of polymeric materials.

  17. Pipeline rehabilitation -- conclusion: Two projects highlight water, air processes for reconditioning pipeline surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.A.; Werner, D.P. )

    1994-02-14

    In jobs for United Texas Transmission Co. and Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America, a proprietary system of high-pressure water jet blasting for cleaning and air abrasive or mechanical-wheel blasting for surface preparation increased productivity and decreased time required for long-line pipelines rehabilitation projects. This second of two articles presents field results of the process' use for cleaning, conditioning, and coating pipelines by line-travel equipment. The first article detailed the procedure and notes tests of the process for asbestos-containing coatings.

  18. Propagation of detonation wave in hydrogen-air mixture in channels with sound-absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bivol, G. Yu.; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.

    2015-12-01

    The possibility of using sound-absorbing surfaces for attenuating the intensity of detonation waves propagating in hydrogen-air mixtures has been experimentally studied in a cylindrical detonation tube open at one end, with an explosive initiated by spark discharge at the closed end. Sound-absorbing elements were made of an acoustic-grade foamed rubber with density of 0.035 g/cm3 containing open pores with an average diameter of 0.5 mm. The degree of attenuation of the detonation wave front velocity was determined as dependent on the volume fraction of hydrogen in the gas mixture.

  19. The Air-Sea Interface and Surface Stress under Tropical Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Alexander; Lukas, Roger; Donelan, Mark; Ginis, Isaac

    2013-04-01

    of the drag coefficient wind speed dependence around 65 m/s. This minimum may contribute to the rapid intensification of storms to major tropical cyclones. The subsequent slow increase of the drag coefficient with wind above 65 m/s serves as an obstacle for further intensification of tropical cyclones. Such dependence may explain the observed bi-modal distribution of tropical cyclone intensity. Implementation of the new parameterization into operational models is expected to improve predictions of tropical cyclone intensity and the associated wave field. References: Donelan, M. A., B. K. Haus, N. Reul, W. Plant, M. Stiassnie, H. Graber, O. Brown, and E. Saltzman, 2004: On the limiting aerodynamic roughness of the ocean in very strong winds, Farrell, B.F, and P.J. Ioannou, 2008: The stochastic parametric mechanism for growth of wind-driven surface water waves. Journal of Physical Oceanography 38, 862-879. Kelly, R.E., 1965: The stability of an unsteady Kelvin-Helmholtz flow. J. Fluid Mech. 22, 547-560. Koga, M., 1981: Direct production of droplets from breaking wind-waves-Its observation by a multi-colored overlapping exposure technique, Tellus 33, 552-563. Miles, J.W., 1959: On the generation of surface waves by shear flows, part 3. J. Fluid. Mech. 6, 583-598. Soloviev, A.V. and R. Lukas, 2010: Effects of bubbles and sea spray on air-sea exchanges in hurricane conditions. Boundary-Layer Meteorology 136, 365-376. Soloviev, A., A. Fujimura, and S. Matt, 2012: Air-sea interface in hurricane conditions. J. Geophys. Res. 117, C00J34.

  20. Influence of near-surface stratigraphy on coastal landslides at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Lake Michigan, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Jaffe, B.E.; Kayen, R.E.; Cochrane, G.R.

    2004-01-01

    Lake-level change and landslides are primary controls on the development of coastal environments along the coast of northeastern Lake Michigan. The late Quaternary geology of Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore was examined with high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and boreholes. Based on sequence-stratigraphic principles, this study recognizes ten stratigraphic units and three major unconformities that were formed by late Pleistocene glaciation and postglacial lake-level changes. Locally high sediment supply, and reworking by two regressions and a transgression have produced a complex stratigraphy that is prone to episodic failure. In 1995, a large landslide deposited approximately 1 million m3 of sediment on the lake floor. The highly deformed landslide deposits, up to 18 m thick, extend 3-4 km offshore and unconformably overlie well-stratified glacial and lacustrine sediment. The landslide-prone bluff is underlain by channel-fill deposits that are oriented nearly perpendicular to the shoreline. The paleochannels are at least 10 m deep and 400 m wide and probably represent stream incision during a lake-level lowstand about 10.3 ka B.P. The channels filled with sediment during the subsequent transgression and lake-level highstand, which climaxed about 4.5 ka B.P. As lake level fell from the highstand, the formation of beach ridges and sand dunes sealed off the channel and isolated a small inland lake (Glen Lake), which lies 5 m above the level of Lake Michigan and may be a source of piped groundwater. Our hypothesis is that the paleochannels act as conduits for pore water flow, and thereby locally reduce soil strength and promote slope failure.

  1. Effect of surface reactions on ignition delay of methanol/air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, J. P.; Yang, H. L.; Jiang, L. Q.; Wang, X. H.; Zhao, D. Q.

    2014-11-01

    A surface reaction kinetic model for the combustion of methanol/air mixture was developed in order to investigate the ignition inhibitory mechanism of wall on the premixed gas in a micro closed volume. In this model, except for H, O, OH and CH3 radicals, the absorption of hydrogen peroxide and hydroperoxyl on the surface were also considered. By applying CHEMKIN-Pro software, the model was integrated into the calculation of homogeneous combustion process of gas mixture. Surface reactions were found resulting in the increase of ignition delay time. The sensitivity analysis showed that the loss of hydrogen peroxide on the wall was the main reason, due to the direct suppression effect on the generation and accumulation of OH in the radical pool. However, the loss of hydroperoxyl would take the place of hydrogen peroxide as the main inhibitory factor when the sticking coefficient became as large as the order of 10-3. In addition, the ignition delay time increased with sticking coefficient or surface-area-to-volume ratio. Enhancing the initial temperature of premixed gas was able to reduce the inhibitory effect of surface reactions.

  2. An experimental investigation on the effects of surface gravity waves on the water evaporation rate in different air flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodat, Amin; Moghiman, Mohammad; Shirkhani, Golshad

    2013-12-01

    Estimating rate of evaporation from undisturbed water surfaces to moving and quiet air has been the topic a vast number of research activities. The obvious presence of various shapes of gravity waves on the water body surfaces was the motivation of this experimental investigation. In this investigation experimental measurements have been done to quantify evaporation rate from wavy water surfaces in free, mixed and forced convection regimes. The effects of a wide range of surface gravity waves from low steepness, round shaped crest with slow celerity, to steep and very slight spilling crest waves, on the water evaporation rate have been investigated. A wide range of was achieved by applying different air flow velocities on a large heated wave flume equipped with a wind tunnel. Results reveal that wave motion on the water surface increase the rate of evaporation for all air flow regimes. For free convection, due to the effect of wave motion for pumping rotational airflows at the wave troughs and the dominant effect of natural convection for the air flow advection, the maximum evaporation increment percentage from wavy water surface is about 70 %. For mixed and forced convection, water evaporation rate increment is more sensitive to the air flow velocity for the appearance of very slight spilling on the steep wave crests and the leeward air flow structures.

  3. System for testing bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, John C.

    1993-07-01

    Disclosed here is a system for testing bearings wherein a pair of spaced bearings provides support for a shaft on which is mounted a bearing to be tested, this bearing being mounted in a bearing holder spaced from and in alignment with the pair of bearings. The bearing holder is provided with an annular collar positioned in an opening in the bearing holder for holding the bearing to be tested. A screw threaded through the bearing holder into engagement with the annular collar can be turned to force the collar radially out of alignment with the pair of bearings to apply a radial load to the bearing.

  4. Air stable colloidal copper nanoparticles: Synthesis, characterization and their surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramani, Thekkathu; Leon Prasanth, K.; Sreedhar, Bojja

    2016-03-01

    Air stable colloidal copper nanoparticles are synthesized by a simple chemical reduction method using octadecylsilane as a reducing agent and octadecylamine as a stabilizing agent in toluene without any inert gas. The formation of nanosized copper was confirmed by its characteristic surface plasmon absorption peaks in UV-visible spectra. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images show that the resulting copper nanoparticles are distributed uniformly with a narrow size distribution. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrated that the obtained copper nanoparticles are single crystalline nanoparticles. Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopic data suggested that the silane Si-H is responsible for the reduction of copper ions. And also the resulting colloidal copper nanoparticles exhibit large surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals.

  5. Near-surface physics during convection affecting air-water gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The gas flux at the water surface is affected by physical processes including turbulence from wind shear, microscale wave breaking, large-scale breaking, and convection due to heat loss at the surface. The main route in the parameterizations of the gas flux has been to use the wind speed as a proxy for the gas flux velocity, indirectly taking into account the dependency of the wind shear and the wave processes. The interest in the contributions from convection processes has increased as the gas flux from inland waters (with typically lower wind and sheltered conditions) now is believed to play a substantial role in the air-water gas flux budget. The gas flux is enhanced by convection through the mixing of the mixed layer as well as by decreasing the diffusive boundary layer thickness. The direct numerical simulations performed in this study are shown to be a valuable tool to enhance the understanding of this flow configuration often present in nature.

  6. TOF-SIMS measurements for toxic air pollutants adsorbed on the surface of airborne particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyasu, Bunbunoshin; Hoshi, Takahiro; Owari, Masanori; Nihei, Yoshimasa

    2003-01-01

    Three kinds of particulate matter were collected: diesel and gasoline exhaust particles emitted directly from exhaust nozzle, and suspended particulate matter (SPM) near the traffic route. Soxhlet extraction was performed on each sample. By gas-chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis of these extracts, di-ethyl phthalate and di- n-butyl phthalate were detected from the extract of SPM and diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). Because these phthalates were sometimes suspected as contamination, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) measurements were also performed on the samples collected at the same environment. By comparing obtained spectra, it is clear that these environmental endocrine disrupters (EEDs) were adsorbed on DEP surface. Thus, we concluded that the combination of conventional method and TOF-SIMS measurement is one of the most powerful techniques for analyzing the toxic air pollutants adsorbed on SPM surface.

  7. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3364, Pasaband (417) and Markaz-e Kajiran (418) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3266, Uruzgan (519) and Moqur (520) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3770, Faizabad (217) and Parkhaw (218) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3362, Shindand (415) and Tulak (416) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3562, Khawja-Jir (403) and Murghab (404) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  12. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3568, Pul-e Khumri (503) and Charikar (504) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  13. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3366, Gizab (513) and Nawer (514) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  14. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3564, Jowand (405) and Gurziwan (406) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  15. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3570, Tagab-e-Munjan (505) and Asmar-Kamdesh (506) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  16. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3264, Naw Zad-Musa Qala (423) and Dihrawud (424) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  17. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3368, Ghazni (515) and Gardez (516) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  18. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3162, Chakhansur (603) and Kotalak (604) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  19. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3566, Sangcharak (501) and Sayghan-o-Kamard (502) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  20. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3260, Dasht-e-Chah-e-Mazar (419) and Anar Darah (420) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  1. Hyperspectral Surface Materials Map of Quadrangle 3268, Khayr Kot (521) and Urgun (522) Quadrangles, Afghanistan, Showing Iron-bearing Minerals and Other Materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  2. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-e-pur-Chaman (422) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  3. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3166, Jaldak (701) and Maruf-Nawa (702) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  4. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3164, Lashkar Gah (605) and Kandahar (606) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  5. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3462, Herat (409) and Chishti Sharif (410) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  6. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3464, Shahrak (411) and Kasi (412) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  7. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3466, La`l wa Sar Jangal (507) and Bamyan (508) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  8. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3468, Chak-e Wardak-Siyahgird (509) and Kabul (510) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  9. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3670, Jurm-Kishim (223) and Zebak (224) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  10. Hyperspectral surface materials map of quadrangle 3470, Jalalabad (511) and Chaghasaray (512) quadrangles, Afghanistan, showing iron-bearing minerals and other materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, Trude V.V.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Livo, Keith E.; Giles, Stuart A.; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the spatial distribution of selected iron-bearing minerals and other materials derived from analysis of airborne HyMap™ imaging spectrometer (hyperspectral) data of Afghanistan collected in late 2007. This map is one in a series of U.S. Geological Survey/Afghanistan Geological Survey quadrangle maps covering Afghanistan. Flown at an altitude of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters (m)), the HyMap™ imaging spectrometer measured reflected sunlight in 128 channels, covering wavelengths between 0.4 and 2.5 μm. The data were georeferenced, atmospherically corrected and converted to apparent surface reflectance, empirically adjusted using ground-based reflectance measurements, and combined into a mosaic with 23-m pixel spacing. Variations in water vapor and dust content of the atmosphere, in solar angle, and in surface elevation complicated correction; therefore, some classification differences may be present between adjacent flight lines. The reflectance spectrum of each pixel of HyMap™ imaging spectrometer data was compared to the reference materials in a spectral library of minerals, vegetation, water, and other materials. Minerals occurring abundantly at the surface and those having unique spectral features were easily detected and discriminated, while minerals having slightly different compositions but similar spectral features were less easily discriminated; thus, some map classes consist of several minerals having similar spectra, such as “Goethite and jarosite.” A designation of “Not classified” was assigned to the pixel when there was no match with reference spectra.

  11. CUSHIONED BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping device effective to dampen vibrations occurring at the several critical speeds encountered in the operation of a high-speed centrifuge is described. A self-centering bearing mechanism is used to protect both the centrifuge shaft and the damping mechanism. The damping mechanism comprises spaced-apant, movable, and stationary sleeve members arranged concentrically of a rotating shaft with a fluid maintained between the members. The movable sleeve member is connected to the shaft for radial movement therewith.

  12. An approach estimating bidirectional air-surface exchange for gaseous elemental mercury at AMNet sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, L. Paige; Zhang, Leiming

    2015-03-01

    The bidirectional air-surface exchange for gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and existing measurements of the compensation points over a variety of canopy types are reviewed. Deposition and emission of GEM are dependent on several factors such as the type of canopy, temperature, season, atmospheric GEM concentrations, and meteorological conditions, with compensation points varying between 0.5 and 33 ng m-3. Emissions tend to increase from the spring to summer seasons, as the GEM accumulates in the foliage of the vegetation. A strong dependence on solar radiation has been observed, with higher emissions under light conditions. A bidirectional air-surface exchange flux model is proposed for estimating GEM fluxes at a two-hourly time resolution for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program's, Atmospheric Mercury Network (AMNet) sites. Compared to the unidirectional dry deposition model used in Zhang et al. (2012), two additional parameters, stomatal and soil emission potential, were needed in the bidirectional model and were chosen based on knowledge gained in the literature review and model sensitivity test results. Application of this bidirectional model to AMNet sites have produced annual net deposition fluxes comparable to those estimated in Zhang et al. (2012) at the majority of the sites. In this study, the net GEM dry deposition has been estimated separately for each dominant land use type surrounding each site, and this approach is also recommended for future calculations for easy application of the results to assessments of the mercury effects on various ecosystems.

  13. Biodegradable polyester films from renewable aleuritic acid: surface modifications induced by melt-polycondensation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesús Benítez, José; Alejandro Heredia-Guerrero, José; Inmaculada de Vargas-Parody, María; Cruz-Carrillo, Miguel Antonio; Morales-Flórez, Victor; de la Rosa-Fox, Nicolás; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Good water barrier properties and biocompatibility of long-chain biopolyesters like cutin and suberin have inspired the design of synthetic mimetic materials. Most of these biopolymers are made from esterified mid-chain functionalized ω-long chain hydroxyacids. Aleuritic (9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic) acid is such a polyhydroxylated fatty acid and is also the major constituent of natural lac resin, a relatively abundant and renewable resource. Insoluble and thermostable films have been prepared from aleuritic acid by melt-condensation polymerization in air without catalysts, an easy and attractive procedure for large scale production. Intended to be used as a protective coating, the barrier's performance is expected to be conditioned by physical and chemical modifications induced by oxygen on the air-exposed side. Hence, the chemical composition, texture, mechanical behavior, hydrophobicity, chemical resistance and biodegradation of the film surface have been studied by attenuated total reflection–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR–FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindentation and water contact angle (WCA). It has been demonstrated that the occurrence of side oxidation reactions conditions the surface physical and chemical properties of these polyhydroxyester films. Additionally, the addition of palmitic acid to reduce the presence of hydrophilic free hydroxyl groups was found to have a strong influence on these parameters.

  14. Temporal and spatial assessments of minimum air temperature using satellite surface temperature measurements in Massachusetts, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Although meteorological stations provide accurate air temperature observations, their spatial coverage is limited and thus often insufficient for epidemiological studies. Satellite data expand spatial coverage, enhancing our ability to estimate near surface air temperature (Ta). However, the derivation of Ta from surface temperature (Ts) measured by satellites is far from being straightforward. In this study, we present a novel approach that incorporates land use regression, meteorological variables and spatial smoothing to first calibrate between Ts and Ta on a daily basis and then predict Ta for days when satellite Ts data were not available. We applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to calibrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Ts data with monitored Ta measurements for 2003. Then, we used a generalized additive mixed model with spatial smoothing to estimate Ta in days with missing Ts. Out-of-sample tenfold cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with available Ts and days without Ts observations (mean out-of-sample R2=0.946 and R2=0.941 respectively). Furthermore, based on the high quality predictions we investigated the spatial patterns of Ta within the study domain as they relate to urban vs. non-urban land uses. PMID:22721687

  15. Surface properties of turbulent premixed propane/air flames at various Lewis numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.W.; North, G.L.; Santavicca, D.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Surface properties of turbulent premixed flames including the wrinkled flame perimeter, fraction of the flame pocket perimeter, flame curvature, and orientation distributions have been measured for propane-air flames at Lewis numbers ranging from 0.98 to 1.86 and u[prime]/S[sub L] = 1.42-5.71. The wrinkled flame perimeter is found to be greater for the thermodiffusively unstable Lewis number (Le < 1) by up to 30% in comparison to the most stable condition (Le = 1.86) tested, while the fraction of the flame pocket perimeter shows a similar tendency to be greater for Le < 1. The flame curvature probability density functions are nearly symmetric with respect to the zero mean at all Lewis numbers throughout the range of u[prime]/S[sub L] tested, and show a much stronger dependence on the turbulence condition than on the Lewis number. Similarly, the flame orientation distributions show a trend from anisotropy toward a more uniform distribution with increasing u[prime]/S[sub L] at a similar rate for all Lewis numbers. Thus, for turbulent premixed propane/air flames for a practical range of Lewis number from 0.98 to 1.86, the effect of Lewis number is primarily to affect the flame structures and thereby flame surface areas and flame pocket areas, while the flame curvature and orientation statistics are essentially determined by the turbulence properties.

  16. Frontal vitrification of PDMS using air plasma and consequences for surface wrinkling.

    PubMed

    Nania, Manuela; Matar, Omar K; Cabral, João T

    2015-04-21

    We study the surface oxidation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by air plasma exposure and its implications for the mechanically-induced surface wrinkling of the resulting glass-elastomer bilayers. The effect of plasma frequency (kHz and MHz), oxygen content (from O2 to air), pressure (0.5 ≤ P ≤ 1.5 mbar), as well as exposure time and power, is quantified in terms of the resulting glassy skin thickness h, inferred from wrinkling experiments. The glassy skin thickness is found to increase logarithmically with an exposure time t, for different induction powers p, and all data collapse in terms of a plasma dose, D ≡ p × t. The kinetics of film propagation are found to increase with the oxygen molar fraction yO2 and decrease with the gas pressure P, allowing both the wrinkling wavelength λ and amplitude A to be effectively controlled by gas pressure and composition. A generalised relationship for frontal vitrification is obtained by re-scaling all λ and h data by D/P. A coarse-grained wave propagation model effectively describes and quantifies the process stages (induction, skin formation and propagation) under all the conditions studied. Equipped with this knowledge, we further expand the capabilities of plasma oxidation for PDMS wrinkling, and a wavelength of λ ≈ 100 nm is readily attained with a modest strain εprestrain ≈ 20%. PMID:25742777

  17. An updated global grid point surface air temperature anomaly data set: 1851--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Sepanski, R.J.; Boden, T.A.; Daniels, R.C.

    1991-10-01

    This document presents land-based monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1951--1970 reference period mean) on a 5{degree} latitude by 10{degree} longitude global grid. Monthly surface air temperature anomalies (departures from a 1957--1975 reference period mean) for the Antarctic (grid points from 65{degree}S to 85{degree}S) are presented in a similar way as a separate data set. The data were derived primarily from the World Weather Records and the archives of the United Kingdom Meteorological Office. This long-term record of temperature anomalies may be used in studies addressing possible greenhouse-gas-induced climate changes. To date, the data have been employed in generating regional, hemispheric, and global time series for determining whether recent (i.e., post-1900) warming trends have taken place. This document also presents the monthly mean temperature records for the individual stations that were used to generate the set of gridded anomalies. The periods of record vary by station. Northern Hemisphere station data have been corrected for inhomogeneities, while Southern Hemisphere data are presented in uncorrected form. 14 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Sea surface microlayers: A unified physicochemical and biological perspective of the air-ocean interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunliffe, Michael; Engel, Anja; Frka, Sanja; Gašparović, Blaženka; Guitart, Carlos; Murrell, J. Colin; Salter, Matthew; Stolle, Christian; Upstill-Goddard, Robert; Wurl, Oliver

    2013-02-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) covers more than 70% of the Earth's surface and is the boundary layer interface between the ocean and the atmosphere. This important biogeochemical and ecological system is critical to a diverse range of Earth system processes, including the synthesis, transformation and cycling of organic material, and the air-sea exchange of gases, particles and aerosols. In this review we discuss the SML paradigm, taking into account physicochemical and biological characteristics that define SML structure and function. These include enrichments in biogenic molecules such as carbohydrates, lipids and proteinaceous material that contribute to organic carbon cycling, distinct microbial assemblages that participate in air-sea gas exchange, the generation of climate-active aerosols and the accumulation of anthropogenic pollutants with potentially serious implications for the health of the ocean. Characteristically large physical, chemical and biological gradients thus separate the SML from the underlying water and the available evidence implies that the SML retains its integrity over wide ranging environmental conditions. In support of this we present previously unpublished time series data on bacterioneuston composition and SML surfactant activity immediately following physical SML disruption; these imply timescales of the order of minutes for the reestablishment of the SML following disruption. A progressive approach to understanding the SML and hence its role in global biogeochemistry can only be achieved by considering as an integrated whole, all the key components of this complex environment.

  19. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7 kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  20. Tooling Converts Stock Bearings To Custom Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleenor, E. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for reworking stock bearings saves time and produces helicopter-rotor bearings ground more precisely. Split tapered ring at one end of threaded bolt expands to hold inside of inner race bearing assembly; nut, at other end of bolt, adjusts amount of spring tension. Piece of hardware grasps bearing firmly without interfering with grinding operation. Operation produces bearing of higher quality than commercially available bearings.

  1. Further investigations of automated surface observing system (ASOS) winds used in air quality modeling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, R.P.; Jones, W.B.; Sherwell, J.

    1999-07-01

    Since 1992, a significant shift in the way standard surface meteorological data are observed and collected has occurred across the country. The National Weather Service, the Federal Aviation Administration, and the Department of Defense have been deploying the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) at nearly one thousand sites. Prior to ASOS, manual observation and recordation were the norm. With the advent of ASOS, an unprecedented level of meteorological data is now available; observations of standard meteorological variables are available almost real-time at more sites. However, with ASOS, meteorological data are being gathered in a fundamentally different way. New automated instruments sample, analyze, and record meteorological observations without human intervention. Many of these meteorological observations are key inputs to predictive air quality models. Reliable estimates of plume transport and dispersion require reliable and available meteorological data. The effect of the ASOS method of data collection on the dispersion modeling community is not clear. Because the hourly data now being reported at most stations across the country are being gathered in a fundamentally different way than previously, it is prudent to examine the differences between hourly meteorological observations gathered before and after ASOS. A preliminary analysis1 of pre-ASOS and ASOS data suggested that the differences in the observations could impact the data's application to air quality models. This expanded study examines more thoroughly the differences between wind data gathered before and after ASOS implementation in order to identify potential ramifications for air quality modeling. Pre-ASOS and ASOS data, from five stations in and around Maryland that represent the diversity of urbanization and topography of the region and that have a reasonably long record of ASOS observations, are examined.

  2. Selective Growth and Structural Analysis of Regular MnO Nanooctapods Bearing Multiple High-Index Surface Facets.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongwoo; Kim, Mijong; Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-08-01

    Although numerous morphologies of MnO nanostructures have been reported, an exact structural analysis and mechanistic study has been lacking. In the present study, the formation of regular MnO octapods was demonstrated in a simple procedure, comprising the thermal decomposition of manganese oleate. Because of their structural uniformity, an ideal three-dimensional model was successfully constructed. The eight arms protruded from the cubic center with tip angles of 38° and surface facets of {311} and {533} with rounded edges. The concentrations of oleate and chloride ions were the determining factors for the octapod formation. Selective coordination of the oleate ions to the {100} faces led to edge growth along the <111> direction, which was then limited by the chloride ions bound to the high-index surface facets. These structural and mechanistic analyses should be helpful for understanding the complex nanostructures and for tuning their structure-related properties. PMID:26096978

  3. Passive Thermal Management of Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for passive thermal management of foil bearing systems are disclosed herein. The flow of the hydrodynamic film across the surface of bearing compliant foils may be disrupted to provide passive cooling and to improve the performance and reliability of the foil bearing system.

  4. Ultrafast laser induced periodic sub-wavelength aluminum surface structures and nanoparticles in air and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Dar, Mudasir H.; Rao, D. Narayana E-mail: dnr-laserlab@yahoo.com; Deepak, K. L. N.

    2014-09-21

    In this communication, we demonstrate the generation of laser-induced periodic sub-wavelength surface structures (LIPSS) or ripples on a bulk aluminum (Al) and Al nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Al surface at normal incidence in air and by immersing in ethanol (C₂H₅OH) and water (H₂O) using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ~110 fs pulse duration and ~800 nm wavelength. Field emission scanning electron microscope is utilized for imaging surface morphology of laser written structures and it reveals that the spatial periodicity as well as the surface morphology of the LIPSS depends on the surrounding dielectric medium and also on the various laser irradiation parameters. The observed LIPSS have been classified as low spatial frequency LIPSS which are perpendicularly oriented to the laser polarization with a periodicity from 460 to 620 nm and high spatial frequency LIPSS which spectacles a periodicity less than 100 nm with the orientation parallel to the polarization of the incident laser beam. Fabricated colloidal solutions, which contain the Al NPs, were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM results reveal the formation of internal cavities in Al NPs both in ethanol and water. Formation mechanism of LIPSS and cavities inside the nanoparticles are discussed in detail.

  5. The variability of California summertime marine stratus: Impacts on surface air temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobellis, Sam F.; Cayan, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    study investigates the variability of clouds, primarily marine stratus clouds, and how they are associated with surface temperature anomalies over California, especially along the coastal margin. We focus on the summer months of June to September when marine stratus are the dominant cloud type. Data used include satellite cloud reflectivity (cloud albedo) measurements, hourly surface observations of cloud cover and air temperature at coastal airports, and observed values of daily surface temperature at stations throughout California and Nevada. Much of the anomalous variability of summer clouds is organized over regional patterns that affect considerable portions of the coast, often extend hundreds of kilometers to the west and southwest over the North Pacific, and are bounded to the east by coastal mountains. The occurrence of marine stratus is positively correlated with both the strength and height of the thermal inversion that caps the marine boundary layer, with inversion base height being a key factor in determining their inland penetration. Cloud cover is strongly associated with surface temperature variations. In general, increased presence of cloud (higher cloud albedo) produces cooler daytime temperatures and warmer nighttime temperatures. Summer daytime temperature fluctuations associated with cloud cover variations typically exceed 1°C. The inversion-cloud albedo-temperature associations that occur at daily timescales are also found at seasonal timescales.

  6. Surface modification of polyelectrolyte multilayers by high radio frequency air plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Tiago Dias; Bataglioli, Rogério Aparecido; Taketa, Thiago Bezerra; Vasconcellos, Fernando da Cruz; Beppu, Marisa Masumi

    2015-02-01

    Low-temperature plasma treatments are used to perform surface modification on polymers, aiming to improve the surface properties according to the desired application. In this work, polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs), built by layer-by-layer deposition technique, were treated using high frequency low-temperature air plasma. We evaluated the effect of the exposure time (20 and 300 s) and its effects on PEMs with two different top layers: alginate and carboxymethylcellulose. Chitosan was used as the cationic polymer to build the LbL films with the oppositely charged anionic polymers, alginate and carboxymethylcellulose. Our results showed that the surface topology, wettability and free charges within layers are highly correlated to the polymer pair used. PEMs of the chitosan/alginate system are thinner and hydrophilic, and present a surface with wider peaks. We found that plasma treatment promotes substantial changes on the PEMs and that 20 s of exposure time is enough to perform these changes. In all cases, after plasma treatment, PEMs' thickness and free charge distribution were reduced and wettability was enhanced.

  7. Ultrafast laser induced periodic sub-wavelength aluminum surface structures and nanoparticles in air and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Dar, Mudasir H.; Deepak, K. L. N.; Rao, D. Narayana

    2014-09-01

    In this communication, we demonstrate the generation of laser-induced periodic sub-wavelength surface structures (LIPSS) or ripples on a bulk aluminum (Al) and Al nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Al surface at normal incidence in air and by immersing in ethanol (C2H5OH) and water (H2O) using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ˜110 fs pulse duration and ˜800 nm wavelength. Field emission scanning electron microscope is utilized for imaging surface morphology of laser written structures and it reveals that the spatial periodicity as well as the surface morphology of the LIPSS depends on the surrounding dielectric medium and also on the various laser irradiation parameters. The observed LIPSS have been classified as low spatial frequency LIPSS which are perpendicularly oriented to the laser polarization with a periodicity from 460 to 620 nm and high spatial frequency LIPSS which spectacles a periodicity less than 100 nm with the orientation parallel to the polarization of the incident laser beam. Fabricated colloidal solutions, which contain the Al NPs, were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM results reveal the formation of internal cavities in Al NPs both in ethanol and water. Formation mechanism of LIPSS and cavities inside the nanoparticles are discussed in detail.

  8. The variability of California summertime marine stratus: impacts on surface air temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iacobellis, Sam F.; Cayan, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the variability of clouds, primarily marine stratus clouds, and how they are associated with surface temperature anomalies over California, especially along the coastal margin. We focus on the summer months of June to September when marine stratus are the dominant cloud type. Data used include satellite cloud reflectivity (cloud albedo) measurements, hourly surface observations of cloud cover and air temperature at coastal airports, and observed values of daily surface temperature at stations throughout California and Nevada. Much of the anomalous variability of summer clouds is organized over regional patterns that affect considerable portions of the coast, often extend hundreds of kilometers to the west and southwest over the North Pacific, and are bounded to the east by coastal mountains. The occurrence of marine stratus is positively correlated with both the strength and height of the thermal inversion that caps the marine boundary layer, with inversion base height being a key factor in determining their inland penetration. Cloud cover is strongly associated with surface temperature variations. In general, increased presence of cloud (higher cloud albedo) produces cooler daytime temperatures and warmer nighttime temperatures. Summer daytime temperature fluctuations associated with cloud cover variations typically exceed 1°C. The inversion-cloud albedo-temperature associations that occur at daily timescales are also found at seasonal timescales.

  9. Biases in the air-sea flux of CO2 resulting from ocean surface temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B.; Wanninkhof, R.; McGillis, W. R.; Jessup, A. T.; Degrandpre, M. D.; Hare, J. E.; Edson, J. B.

    2004-08-01

    The difference in the fugacities of CO2 across the diffusive sublayer at the ocean surface is the driving force behind the air-sea flux of CO2. Bulk seawater fugacity is normally measured several meters below the surface, while the fugacity at the water surface, assumed to be in equilibrium with the atmosphere, is measured several meters above the surface. Implied in these measurements is that the fugacity values are the same as those across the diffusive boundary layer. However, temperature gradients exist at the interface due to molecular transfer processes, resulting in a cool surface temperature, known as the skin effect. A warm layer from solar radiation can also result in a heterogeneous temperature profile within the upper few meters of the ocean. Here we describe measurements carried out during a 14-day study in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (GasEx-2001) aimed at estimating the gradients of CO2 near the surface and resulting flux anomalies. The fugacity measurements were corrected for temperature effects using data from the ship's thermosalinograph, a high-resolution profiler (SkinDeEP), an infrared radiometer (CIRIMS), and several point measurements at different depths on various platforms. Results from SkinDeEP show that the largest cool skin and warm layer biases occur at low winds, with maximum biases of -4% and +4%, respectively. Time series ship data show an average CO2 flux cool skin retardation of about 2%. Ship and drifter data show significant CO2 flux enhancement due to the warm layer, with maximums occurring in the afternoon. Temperature measurements were compared to predictions based on available cool skin parameterizations to predict the skin-bulk temperature difference, along with a warm layer model.

  10. Integration of surface and upper air measurements for determining evapotranspiration at a high mountain site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Bernadette Helen

    An integrated approach using surface and upper air measurements was used to estimate evapotranspiration in a high mountain area. The first part of this work focused on identifying potential errors introduced into the results due to the characteristics of the sonde instrument and the dynamic environment it was used in. The second part of this work focused on estimating the evapotranspiration. Sources of error were reviewed for radiosonde measurements in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and focusing on two radiosonde models manufactured by Atmospheric Instrumentation Research, Inc. Temperature and humidity lag errors and wind errors were analyzed. Errors in measurement of azimuth and elevation angles and pressure over short time intervals and at higher altitudes introduced wind vector errors greater than 5 m s-1. Mean temperature and humidity lag errors were small, but individual large lag errors occurred with dramatic changes in the environment, such as near the surface or at the top of the boundary layer. Dual sonde flights showed mean instrument error comparable to lag error. Vertical profiles of potential temperature and specific humidity measured by radiosondes within the surface boundary layer were used to estimate Bowen Ratio at a high elevation alpine site for 2 cases representing moist/windy and dry/calm conditions. The Bowen Ratio was combined with surface global radiation measurements to estimate evaporation (ET) through an energy balance approach. Weather modified vegetation characteristics and their spatial distribution reflect the large local differences in the latent (ET) and sensible heat fluxes measured a 2 surface stations close by. The sonde estimates correlated well (R2 = 0.90) with a weighted average of the surface measured ET in both an undisturbed high pressure ridge system characterized by a dry deep convective boundary layer and during the passage of a weak frontal system characterized by a shallower mechanically mixed moist boundary layer.

  11. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    minimizing it on the opposite side. The advantage of this configuration is that it makes it possible to approach the theoretical maximum force per unit area that could be exerted by a given amount of permanent-magnet material. The configuration is named after physicist Klaus Halbach, who conceived it for use in particle accelerators. Halbach arrays have also been studied for use in magnetic-levitation ("maglev") railroad trains. In a radial Halbach magnetic bearing, the basic Halbach arrangement is modified into a symmetrical arrangement of sector-shaped permanent magnets mounted on the outer cylindrical surface of a drum rotor (see Figure 2). The magnets are oriented to concentrate the magnetic field on their radially outermost surface. The stator coils are mounted in a stator shell surrounding the rotor.

  12. Near-surface air temperature and snow skin temperature comparison from CREST-SAFE station data with MODIS land surface temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Díaz, C. L.; Lakhankar, T.; Romanov, P.; Muñoz, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Yu, Y.

    2015-08-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key variable (commonly studied to understand the hydrological cycle) that helps drive the energy balance and water exchange between the Earth's surface and its atmosphere. One observable constituent of much importance in the land surface water balance model is snow. Snow cover plays a critical role in the regional to global scale hydrological cycle because rain-on-snow with warm air temperatures accelerates rapid snow-melt, which is responsible for the majority of the spring floods. Accurate information on near-surface air temperature (T-air) and snow skin temperature (T-skin) helps us comprehend the energy and water balances in the Earth's hydrological cycle. T-skin is critical in estimating latent and sensible heat fluxes over snow covered areas because incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes from the snow mass and the air temperature above make it different from the average snowpack temperature. This study investigates the correlation between MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST data and observed T-air and T-skin data from NOAA-CREST-Snow Analysis and Field Experiment (CREST-SAFE) for the winters of 2013 and 2014. LST satellite validation is imperative because high-latitude regions are significantly affected by climate warming and there is a need to aid existing meteorological station networks with the spatially continuous measurements provided by satellites. Results indicate that near-surface air temperature correlates better than snow skin temperature with MODIS LST data. Additional findings show that there is a negative trend demonstrating that the air minus snow skin temperature difference is inversely proportional to cloud cover. To a lesser extent, it will be examined whether the surface properties at the site are representative for the LST properties within the instrument field of view.

  13. Yttrium Siloxide Complexes Bearing Terminal Methyl Ligands: Molecular Models for Ln-CH3 Terminated Silica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dettenrieder, Nicole; Dietrich, H Martin; Maichle-Mössmer, Cäcilia; Anwander, Reiner

    2016-09-01

    Surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) on silica materials is a prominent approach for the generation of highly active heterogenized polymerization catalysts. Despite advanced methods of characterization, the elucidation of the catalytically active surface species remains a challenging task. Alkylated rare-earth metal siloxide complexes can be regarded as molecular models of respective covalently bonded alkylated surface species, primarily used for 1,3-diene polymerization. Here, we performed both salt metathesis reactions of [Y(MMe4 )3 ] (M = Al, Ga) with [K{OSi(OtBu)3 }] and alkylation reactions of [Y{OSi(OtBu)3 }3 ]2 with AlMe3 . The obtained complexes [Y(CH3 )[(AlMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ](AlMe4 )]2 , [Y(CH3 )[(AlMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ]-{OSi(OtBu)3 }], [Y{OSi(OtBu)3 }3 (μ-Me)Y(μ-Me)2 Y{OSi(OtBu)3 }2 (AlMe4 )], and [Y(CH3 )(GaMe4 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }]2 represent rare examples of organoyttrium species with terminal methyl groups. The formation and purity of the mixed methyl/siloxy yttrium complexes could be enhanced by treating [Y(MMe4 )3 ] with [K(MMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ]n (M=Al: n=2; M=Ga: n=∞). Complexes [K(MMe2 ){OSi(OtBu)3 }2 ]n were obtained by addition of [K{OSi(OtBu)3 }] to [Me2 M{OSi(OtBu)3 }]2 . Deeper insight into the fluxional behavior of the mixed methyl/siloxy yttrium complexes in solution was gained by (1) H and (13) C NMR spectroscopic studies at variable temperature and (1) H-(89) Y HSQC NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27492852

  14. Can you help create the next generation of Land Surface Air Temperature products?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Peter; Venema, Victor

    2013-04-01

    The International Surface Temperature Initiative comprises a group of multi-disciplinary researchers constituted in 2010 with the remit of creating a suite of open, transparent Land Surface Air Temperature products suitable for meeting 21st Century science and societal needs and expectations. Since instigation significant progress has been made in the creation of an improved set of 'raw' Land Surface Air Temperature data holdings (to be released in first version in February 2013), constituting in excess of 30,000 stations many going back over a Century, and towards the creation of a rigorous benchmarking framework. What is now requested is that multiple independent groups take up the challenge of creating global and regional products from the databank and submit their algorithms to the benchmarking framework. Key here is to rigorously assess structural uncertainty - it is not sufficient to assume because one group has tackled the problem it is in any meaningful sense mission accomplished. There undoubtedly exist a myriad of issues in the raw data and it is of vital importance to see how sensitive data homogenization is to the set of processing choices independent groups will undertake. This uncertainty will almost certainly be larger at the station or regional level - yet as we move into the 21st Century it is these scales that are of increasing import to end users. It is essential that we serve the right data in the right way with the correct caveats. This can only be achieved if a sufficient number of groups take up the challenge of creating new products from the raw databank. This poster will outline progress to date in the creation of the databank and global benchmarks and outline how investigators and groups can now get involved in creating products from the databank and participate in the benchmarking exercise. Further details upon the Initiative and its aims can be found at www.surfacetemperatures.org and http://surfacetemperatures.blogspot.com/

  15. Solar Cycle and Anthropogenic Forcing of Surface-Air Temperature at Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of 10-yr moving average (yma) values of Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland) surface-air temperatures with selected solar cycle indices (sunspot number (SSN) and the Aa geomagnetic index (Aa)), sea-surface temperatures in the Nino 3.4 region, and Mauna Loa carbon dioxide (CO2) (MLCO2) atmospheric concentration measurements reveals a strong correlation (r = 0.686) between the Armagh temperatures and Aa, especially, prior to about 1980 (r = 0.762 over the interval of 1873-1980). For the more recent interval 1963-2003, the strongest correlation (r = 0.877) is between Armagh temperatures and MLCO2 measurements. A bivariate fit using both Aa and Mauna Loa values results in a very strong fit (r = 0.948) for the interval 1963-2003, and a trivariate fit using Aa, SSN, and Mauna Loa values results in a slightly stronger fit (r = 0.952). Atmospheric CO2 concentration now appears to be the stronger driver of Armagh surface-air temperatures. An increase of 2 C above the long-term mean (9.2 C) at Armagh seems inevitable unless unabated increases in anthropogenic atmospheric gases can be curtailed. The present growth in 10-yma Armagh temperatures is about 0.05 C per yr since 1982. The present growth in MLCO2 is about 0.002 ppmv, based on an exponential fit using 10-yma values, although the growth appears to be steepening, thus, increasing the likelihood of deleterious effects attributed to global warming.

  16. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Glenn C.

    1999-12-01

    {sup {minus}7}, 10{sup {minus}5}, and 10{sup {minus}5} respectively. To understand how internal surface area influences the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet, a model of ozone diffusion into and reaction with internal carpet components was developed. This was then used to predict apparent reaction probabilities for carpet. He combines this with a modified model of turbulent mass transfer developed by Liu, et al. to predict deposition rates and indoor ozone concentrations. The model predicts that carpet should have an equivalent reaction probability of about 10{sup {minus}5}, matching laboratory measurements of the reaction probability. For both carpet and duct materials, surfaces become progressively quenched (aging), losing the ability to react or otherwise take up ozone. He evaluated the functional form of aging and find that the reaction probability follows a power function with respect to the cumulative uptake of ozone. To understand ozone aging of surfaces, he developed several mathematical descriptions of aging based on two different mechanisms. The observed functional form of aging is mimicked by a model which describes ozone diffusion with internal reaction in a solid. He shows that the fleecy nature of carpet materials in combination with the model of ozone diffusion below a fiber surface and internal reaction may explain the functional form and the magnitude of power function parameters observed due to ozone interactions with carpet. The ozone induced aldehyde emissions, measured from duct materials, were combined with an indoor air quality model to show that concentrations of aldehydes indoors may approach odorous levels. He shows that ducts are unlikely to be a significant sink for ozone due to the low reaction probability in combination with the short residence time of air in ducts.

  17. Effects of surface texturing on the performance of biocompatible UHMWPE as a bearing material during in vitro lubricated sliding/rolling motion.

    PubMed

    López-Cervantes, Adrián; Domínguez-López, Iván; Barceinas-Sánchez, José Dolores Oscar; García-García, Adrián Luis

    2013-04-01

    The effect of surface texturing on the performance of biocompatible ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) as a bearing material has been investigated using the kinematic range of motions reported for a knee-joint replacement. An experimental apparatus consisting of a ball and a disk rotating independently from each other was used to compare the performance of UHMWPE textured versus plain surfaces, under different combinations of sliding and rolling motion, better known as sliding-to-rolling ratio (SRR). Performance was evaluated through the coefficient of traction of a tribosystem comprising a steel ball on a flat UHMWPE disk and distilled water at 36°C, acting as lubricant. A square array of cavities with diameter D=0.397mm and center-to-center spacing of 1.5D was machined on UHMWPE disks. The experimental design considered two levels for cavity depth, D and D/2, and two for the applied load, 17 and 25N. The SRR was varied from 1 to 11% and the mean speed range was set from 5 to 55mm/s, covering the kinematics and contact pressure conditions of a sauntering cycle on a knee-joint replacement. Stribeck curves of the plain and textured surfaces were obtained and compared against one another. The results demonstrate that the proposed surface pattern reduces the coefficient of traction of the tribological system for the 17N load in the entire kinematic range explored, while for the 25N load the effects were more noticeable at low mean speed and SRR, corresponding to the beginning of motion. PMID:23455163

  18. Design of gas bearing systems for precision applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junming

    Research to provide the up to date knowledge and efficient tools to design better Externally Pressurized Gas (EPG) bearing systems, including the design of individual bearings, and to arrange all the bearings used in an optimal way is reported. Both circular and rectangular EPG pads with rigid bearing surfaces and rigid inlet restrictors were used. The following topics closely related to the applications in precision engineering are discussed: influences of gap shape on the bearing performance; effects of bearing body tilt on the bearing performance; influences of bearing surface imperfections on bearing performance; temperature drops in EPG bearings in quasistationary conditions; the optimal use of multiple bearings in a mechanical system; the use of EPG bearing damping characteristics in the design; and the effects of motion velocity.

  19. Design of aerostatic bearing restrictor with multi-loop coupling pocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Fang, Bo; Guo, Tiantai; Li, Dongsheng; Zhang, Wen

    2010-08-01

    The shape and size of a pocket influences the pressure distribution on the working face of an aerostatic bearing and causes the vibration in normal direction of air gap. In order to analyze the pressure distribution on the working face of an aerostatic bearing caused by the shape of a pocket, an aerostatic bearing restrictor with multi-loop coupling pocket is proposed and double-loop and tricycle forms are taken as examples to illustrate the arrangements of a pocket and analyze the pressure-impedance relationship of a throttle system in different situations. Simulation is done using FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, to obtain the pressure distribution on the working face of an aerostatic bearing and the static performance curve with respect to the diameter of an orifice. The comparison between restrictors of aerostatic bearing with or without double-loop coupling pocket shows that the addition of a multi-loop pocket on the working face of an aerostatic bearing contributes to the improvement of surface pressure-averaging effect and static load carrying capability, and the reduction of air film vibration, thereby improving the measurement accuracy. These results are of practical significance for the design of key aerostatic bearing components.

  20. Contact Sensors on Ceramic Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jia; Just-Agosto, Frederick; Romero, Edwar

    2002-01-01

    Integration of micro contact sensors onto a ball bearing is a critical technology necessary for on-line bearing health monitoring in an industrial harsh environment and evaluation of the bearing performance and design. The current planner fabrication methods offered by the MEMS technology restrict the possibility of integrating micro sensor onto a double contoured bearing surface in a more traditional manufacturing environment. We have developed an unique technique to directly fabricate micron-sized pressure and temperature sensors onto a miniature ceramic ball bearing. A complete fabrication process, based on sensor design, surface preparation, optimized sputtering parameters, photolithographic techniques and sensor post-treatment, is described. Pressure and temperature measurement results on a miniature ceramic ball bearing show good correlation with numerical thermal-EHL analysis and good wear resistance. Keywords: Ball Bearing, Thin film Sensor, Pressure sensor, Temperature Sensor, adhesion, wear resistance, Non-developable surface, and thermal-EHL.