Science.gov

Sample records for air breakdown threshold

  1. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane

    2012-04-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 {mu}m radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10{sup 8} nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then

  2. LASER PLASMA: Experimental confirmation of the erosion origin of pulsed low-threshold surface optical breakdown of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min'ko, L. Ya; Chumakou, A. N.; Chivel', Yu A.

    1988-08-01

    Nanosecond kinetic spectroscopy techniques were used to identify the erosion origin of pulsed low-threshold surface optical breakdown of air as a result of interaction of microsecond neodymium and CO2 laser pulses with some metals (indium, lead).

  3. The optical breakdown threshold of air on a polished metal surface for radiation at lambda=10.6 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, Iu. V.; Belashkov, I. N.; Datskevich, N. P.; Egorov, V. N.; Iziumov, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Threshold conditions for the formation of a plasma due to optical breakdown of air on the polished surfaces of Al, Co, Mi, and W samples have been investigated experimentally. The optical breakdown was initiated by pulsed radiation from two CO2 lasers having pulse powers 0.5 and 1.0 kJ, respectively. The thresholds for the formation of the plasma were determined for two exposure spots of o/14 sq mm and 46 sq cm, respectively. A metallographic study was carried out in order to identify the specific types of defects corresponding to the lowest optical breakdown thresholds. Before-and-after photographs of the metal surfaces are provided.

  4. Experimental establishment of the erosion nature of the pulsed low-threshold optical breakdown of air near the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min'ko, L. Ia.; Chumakov, A. N.; Chivel', Iu. A.

    1988-08-01

    Nanosecond kinetic spectroscopy methods are used to establish the erosion nature of the pulsed low-threshold optical breakdown of air near the surface upon exposure of certain metals (indium, lead) to microsecond neodymium and CO2 laser radiation. It is shown that this optical breakdown of air by CO2 laser radiation is accompanied by the formation of a plasma spectrum which is optically thin in the visible range.

  5. Oxidation of metals by a plasma formed as a result of low-threshold breakdown of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, I. N.; Goncharov, Yu N.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Minaev, I. M.; Skvortsov, Yu A.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1981-12-01

    The characteristics of the oxidation of copper, aluminum, and titanium were determined in the case when breakdown of air was initiated by CO2 laser pulses incident on targets made of these metals. A study was made of the influence of surface oxide films on the threshold radiation intensity necessary to produce a plasma. The dependence of the efficiency of the thermal interaction of an optical-breakdown plasma on the magnitude and sign of the charge carried by the surface of a metal target was investigated for the first time in the specific case of titanium.

  6. On the measurement of laser-induced plasma breakdown thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Brieschenk, Stefan; Kleine, Harald; O'Byrne, Sean

    2013-09-07

    The breakdown threshold of a gas exposed to intense laser-radiation is a function of gas and laser properties. Breakdown thresholds reported in the literature often vary greatly and these differences can partially be traced back to the method that is typically used to determine breakdown thresholds. This paper discusses the traditional method used to determine breakdown thresholds and the potential errors that can arise using this approach, and presents an alternative method which can yield more accurate data especially when determining breakdown thresholds as functions of gas pressure.

  7. Micron-sized droplets irradiated with a pulsed carbon dioxide laser: Measurement of explosion and breakdown thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. L.; Biswas, A.; Pinnick, R. G.; Pendleton, J. D.

    1995-03-01

    We present the results of measurements of explosive vaporization and plasma breakdown thresholds of micron-sized droplets irradiated by a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 microns. Well-defined explosion and breakdown patterns are observed when the incident laser intensity exceeds the threshold value. In the infrared region, the breakdown threshold is larger than the vaporization threshold by a factor of approximately 10(exp 2). Although, to the authors knowledge, no analogous measurements of vaporization and breakdown thresholds of individual aerosol particles exist in the microwave region, scaling of our infrared measurements to deduce the corresponding microwave properties is possible using available theoretical models. When this scaling is performed, it suggests that a dramatic reversal of explosion and breakdown thresholds occurs in the microwave region. In this region, the microwave vaporization threshold is larger than the corresponding breakdown threshold by a factor of greater than 10(exp 4). Recent measurements of breakdown thresholds in aerosol-laden air provide indirect evidence that this reversal has, in fact, taken place.

  8. Possibility of increasing the optical breakdown threshold in KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bredikhin, V I; Ershov, V P; Burenina, V N; Mal'shakov, A N; Potemkin, A K

    2007-05-31

    The effect of various technological factors like the direction of crystal growth [(100) or (101)], acidity of the mother solution, growth rate, degree of filtration of the mother solution, purity of the starting raw material, specially introduced impurity (Pb), as well as after-growth thermal annealing, on the optical breakdown threshold of KDP crystals grown by the technique of rapid growth of profiled crystals is studied. It is shown that by using initial high-purity salts and fine filtration of solutions followed by after-growth annealing, it is possible to increase the optical breakdown threshold of profiled rapidly grown KDP crystals to values corresponding to the requirements of modern laser designs. (laser devices and elements)

  9. Breakdowns in Coordination Between Air Traffic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Chris; Orasanu, Judith; Miller, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    This talk outlines the complexity of coordination in air traffic control, introduces the NextGen technologies, identifies common causes for coordination breakdowns in air traffic control and examines whether these causes are likely to be reduced with the introduction of NextGen technologies. While some of the common causes of breakdowns will be reduced in a NextGen environment this conclusion should be drawn carefully given the current stage of development of the technologies and the observation that new technologies often shift problems rather than reduce them.

  10. Effects of polarization and absorption on laser induced optical breakdown threshold for skin rejuvenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Babu; Bonito, Valentina; Turco, Simona; Verhagen, Rieko

    2016-03-01

    Laser induced optical breakdown (LIOB) is a non-linear absorption process leading to plasma formation at locations where the threshold irradiance for breakdown is surpassed. In this paper we experimentally demonstrate the influence of polarization and absorption on laser induced breakdown threshold in transparent, absorbing and scattering phantoms made from water suspensions of polystyrene microspheres. We demonstrate that radially polarized light yields a lower irradiance threshold for creating optical breakdown compared to linearly polarized light. We also demonstrate that the thermal initiation pathway used for generating seed electrons results in a lower irradiance threshold compared to multiphoton initiation pathway used for optical breakdown.

  11. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-15

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are {approx}0.1-2 {mu}s over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  12. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-01

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are ˜0.1-2 μs over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  13. Kinetic theory of runaway air-breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Gurevich, A.V.; Tunnell, T.; Milikh, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    The kinetic theory for a new air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuming a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms.

  14. Kinetic theory of runaway air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A. ); Gurevich, A.V. ); Tunnell, T. ); Milikh, G.M. )

    1994-03-01

    The kinetic theory for an air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper [Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992)] is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuming a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms.

  15. Influence of absorption induced thermal initiation pathway on irradiance threshold for laser induced breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Babu; Bonito, Valentina; Jurna, Martin; Palero, Jonathan; Verhagen, Margaret Hortonand Rieko

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the influence of thermal initiation pathway on the irradiance threshold for laser induced breakdown in transparent, absorbing and scattering phantoms. We observed a transition from laser-induced optical breakdown to laser-induced thermal breakdown as the absorption coefficient of the medium is increased. We found that the irradiance threshold after correction for the path length dependent absorption and scattering losses in the medium is lower due to the thermal pathway for the generation of seed electrons compared to the laser-induced optical breakdown. Furthermore, irradiance threshold gradually decreases with the increase in the absorption properties of the medium. Creating breakdown with lower irradiance threshold that is specific at the target chromophore can provide intrinsic target selectivity and improve safety and efficacy of skin treatment methods that use laser induced breakdown. PMID:25909007

  16. Review of recent theories and experiments for improving high-power microwave window breakdown thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Chao; Liu Guozhi; Tang Chuanxiang; Chen Changhua; Fang Jinyong

    2011-05-15

    Dielectric window breakdown is a serious challenge in high-power microwave (HPM) transmission and radiation. Breakdown at the vacuum/dielectric interface is triggered by multipactor and finally realized by plasma avalanche in the ambient desorbed or evaporated gas layer above the dielectric. Methods of improving breakdown thresholds are key challenges in HPM systems. First, the main theoretical and experimental progress is reviewed. Next, the mechanisms of multipactor suppression for periodic rectangular and triangular surface profiles by dynamic analysis and particle-in-cell simulations are surveyed. Improved HPM breakdown thresholds are demonstrated by proof-of-principle and multigigawatt experiments. The current theories and experiments of using dc magnetic field to resonantly accelerate electrons to suppress multipactor are also synthesized. These methods of periodic profiles and magnetic field may solve the key issues of HPM vacuum dielectric breakdown.

  17. Effect of laser pulse repetition frequency on the optical breakdown threshold of quartz glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, T V; Konov, V I; Schöneseiffen, S; Dausinger, F

    2013-08-31

    The thresholds of optical breakdown in the volume of quartz glass were measured in relation to the number of pulses under irradiation by ultrashort laser pulses with different pulse repetition frequencies (1 – 400 kHz). Increasing this frequency from 10 to 400 kHz was found to substantially lower the breakdown threshold for 500-fs long pulses (at a wavelength of 1030 nm) and to lower to a smaller degree for 5-ps long pulses (515 nm). A strong frequency dependence of the breakdown threshold is observed under the same conditions as a manifold decrease of the breakdown threshold with increase in the number of pulses in a pulse train. The dependence of the optical breakdown on the number of pulses is attributable to the accumulation of point defects under multiple subthreshold irradiation, which affects the mechanism of collisional ionisation. In this case, the frequency dependence of the breakdown threshold of quartz glass is determined by the engagement of shortlived defects in the ionisation mechanism. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  18. The inception of pulsed discharges in air: simulations in background fields above and below breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Anbang; Teunissen, Jannis; Ebert, Ute

    2014-11-01

    We investigate discharge inception in air, in uniform background electric fields above and below the breakdown threshold. We perform 3D particle simulations that include a natural level of background ionization in the form of positive and \\text{O}2- ions. In background fields below breakdown, we use a strongly ionized seed of electrons and positive ions to enhance the field locally. In the region of enhanced field, we observe the growth of positive streamers, as in previous simulations with 2D plasma fluid models. The inclusion of background ionization has little effect in this case. When the background field is above the breakdown threshold, the situation is very different. Electrons can then detach from \\text{O}2- and start ionization avalanches in the whole volume. These avalanches together create one extended discharge, in contrast to the ‘double-headed’ streamers found in many fluid simulations.

  19. Experimental measurements of multiphoton enhanced air breakdown by a subthreshold intensity excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Jesse; Hummelt, Jason; Scharer, John

    2009-10-01

    This work presents density, spectroscopic temperature, and shockwave measurements of laser induced breakdown plasma in atmospheric air by subthreshold intensity (5.5×109 W/cm2) 193 nm laser radiation. Using molecular spectroscopy and two-wavelength interferometry, it is shown that substantial ionization (>1016 cm-3) occurs that is not predicted by collisional cascade (CC) breakdown theory. While the focused laser irradiance is three orders of magnitude below the theoretical collisional breakdown threshold, the substantial photon energy at 193 nm (6.42 eV/photon) compared with the ionization potential of air (15.6 eV) significantly increases the probability of multiphoton ionization effects. By spectroscopically monitoring the intensity of the N2+ first negative system (B Σu+2-X Σg+2) vibrational bandhead (v'=0,v″=0) at low pressure (20 Torr) where multiphoton effects are dominant, it is shown that two photon excitation, resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization is the primary mechanism for quantized ionization of N2 to the N2+(B Σu+2) state. This multiphoton effect then serves to amplify the collisional breakdown process at higher pressures by electron seeding, thereby reducing the threshold intensity from that required via CC processes for breakdown and producing high density laser formed plasmas.

  20. Low-threshold bidirectional air lasing.

    PubMed

    Laurain, Alexandre; Scheller, Maik; Polynkin, Pavel

    2014-12-19

    Air lasing refers to the remote optical pumping of the constituents of ambient air that results in a directional laserlike emission from the pumped region. Intense current investigations of this concept are motivated by the potential applications in remote atmospheric sensing. Different approaches to air lasing are being investigated, but, so far, only the approach based on dissociation and resonant two-photon pumping of air molecules by deep-UV laser pulses has produced measurable lasing energies in real air and in the backward direction, which is of the most relevance for applications. However, the emission had a high pumping threshold, in hundreds of GW/cm^{2}. We demonstrate that the threshold can be virtually eliminated through predissociation of air molecules with an additional nanosecond laser. We use a single tunable pump laser system to generate backward-propagating lasing in both oxygen and nitrogen in air, with energies of up to 1  μJ per pulse.

  1. Laser frequency upshift and self-defocusing under avalanche breakdown of air

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Updesh; Sharma, A. K.

    2010-12-15

    A theoretical model of avalanche breakdown of air by a Gaussian laser beam and frequency upshift is developed. The laser beam, below the threshold for tunnel ionization, heats the seed electrons to high energy and initiates avalanche ionization of the air. The ensuing plasma density profile that has maximum on axis and falls off radially causes refraction divergence of the beam. The temporal evolution of plasma density causes self-phase modulation of the laser, causing frequency broadening and spectral emission in the visible.

  2. Optical characteristics of red sprites produced by runaway air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimuk, V.; Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Symbalisty, E.M.; Taranenko, Y.

    1998-05-01

    The results of numerical calculations of intensity and spectra of optical emissions from red sprites produced by runaway air breakdown in the atmosphere are presented. It is shown that the optical emissions from red sprites consist of two components: (1) short-term (t{approx}0.3{endash}2thinspms) emissions produced as a result of dissipation of an energetic electron beam in air; (2) long-term (t{approx}2{endash}10thinspms) emissions produced by a population of low-energy electrons in an electric field. The long-term optical emissions are calculated for all low-energy electrons, including the secondary low-energy electrons produced by the relativistic electron beam, ambient background electrons, and electrons produced as a result of regular breakdown. The theoretical results are compared with observational data. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  3. Effect of ozone on the breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Amirov, R.H.; Asinovsky, E.I.; Bortnik, I.M.

    1995-12-31

    Electrical breakdown in air under the influence of electric fields demands the condition that the rate constant of ionization of gas molecules by electron impact exceeds the rate constant of electron attachment to a molecule. Elementary processes in the atmosphere involving ozone which lead to a reduction of the electric strength are considered. The oxygen dissociation by electron impacts leads to the ozone formation in the atmosphere. Ozone causes a decay of negative oxygen ions and thereby influence on the electrical breakdown. The critical reaction is: O{sub 3} + O{sup -} {implies} e + 20{sub 2}. In the presented paper we report the results of investigation on the influence of ozone impurity on the breakdown in air. The original power system to produce ozone consists of a pulse supply and a pulse-forming circuit. Power supply produces a voltage pulse with a rise time t{sub r} = 3-20 ns, half width t{sub h} 25-40 ns, peak voltage Vp = {+-}50 kV (max), and a frequency fp 100 Hz (max).

  4. Modeling and Numerical Simulation of Microwave Pulse Propagation in Air Breakdown Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Kim, J.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulation is used to investigate the extent of the electron density at a distant altitude location which can be generated by a high-power ground-transmitted microwave pulse. This is done by varying the power, width, shape, and carrier frequency of the pulse. The results show that once the breakdown threshold field is exceeded in the region below the desired altitude location, electron density starts to build up in that region through cascading breakdown. The generated plasma attenuates the pulse energy (tail erosion) and thus deteriorates the energy transmission to the destined altitude. The electron density saturates at a level limited by the pulse width and the tail erosion process. As the pulse continues to travel upward, though the breakdown threshold field of the background air decreases, the pulse energy (width) is reduced more severely by the tail erosion process. Thus, the electron density grows more quickly at the higher altitude, but saturates at a lower level. Consequently, the maximum electron density produced by a single pulse at 50 km altitude, for instance, is limited to a value below 10(exp 6) cm(exp -3). Three different approaches are examined to determine if the ionization at the destined location can be improved: a repetitive pulse approach, a focused pulse approach, and two intersecting beams. Only the intersecting beam approach is found to be practical for generating the desired density level.

  5. Femtosecond-Laser-Induced Nanocavitation in Water: Implications for Optical Breakdown Threshold and Cell Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Alfred; Linz, Norbert; Freidank, Sebastian; Paltauf, Guenther

    2008-01-25

    We determined the bubble radius R{sub max} for femtosecond optical breakdown in water at 347, 520, and 1040 nm with an unprecedented accuracy ({+-}10 nm). At threshold, R{sub max} was smaller than the diffraction-limited focus radius and ranged from 190 nm to 320 nm. The increase of R{sub max} with laser energy E{sub L} is slowest at 347 nm, providing optimum control of cell surgery. Experimental results agree with a model of bubble formation in heated and thermoelastically stretched liquids. Theory predicts a threshold temperature T{sub th}{approx_equal}168 deg. C. For T>300 deg. C, a phase explosion sets in, and R{sub max} increases rapidly with E{sub L}.

  6. Breakdown of air pockets in downwardly inclined sewerage pressure mains.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, C L; Clemens, F H L R

    2006-01-01

    In the Netherlands, wastewater is collected in municipal areas and transported to centralised WWTPs by an extensive system of pressure mains. Over the last decades these pressure mains did not receive much attention in terms of monitoring of performance or maintenance. A recent inventory showed that half of the pressure mains show an increased pressure loss for no directly obvious reason. One of the many causes that account for the reduction of the flow capacity is the occurrence of free gas in the pipeline. During dry weather periods with low flow velocities, gas may accumulate at high points in the system. Once the velocity increases during storm weather flow, the air pockets may be broken down and transported to the end of the system. A research study is started focussing on the description of the gas-water phenomena in wastewater pressure mains with respect to transportation of gas. An experimental facility is constructed for the study of multi-phase flow. This paper describes the preliminary results of experiments on breakdown rates of gas pockets as a function of inclination angle and water flow rate. The results show an increasing breakdown rate with increasing inclination angle.

  7. Adaptive optics for reduced threshold energy in femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in water based eye model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anja; Krueger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-03-01

    In ophthalmic microsurgery tissue dissection is achieved using femtosecond laser pulses to create an optical breakdown. For vitreo-retinal applications the irradiance distribution in the focal volume is distorted by the anterior components of the eye causing a raised threshold energy for breakdown. In this work, an adaptive optics system enables spatial beam shaping for compensation of aberrations and investigation of wave front influence on optical breakdown. An eye model was designed to allow for aberration correction as well as detection of optical breakdown. The eye model consists of an achromatic lens for modeling the eye's refractive power, a water chamber for modeling the tissue properties, and a PTFE sample for modeling the retina's scattering properties. Aberration correction was performed using a deformable mirror in combination with a Hartmann-Shack-sensor. The influence of an adaptive optics aberration correction on the pulse energy required for photodisruption was investigated using transmission measurements for determination of the breakdown threshold and video imaging of the focal region for study of the gas bubble dynamics. The threshold energy is considerably reduced when correcting for the aberrations of the system and the model eye. Also, a raise in irradiance at constant pulse energy was shown for the aberration corrected case. The reduced pulse energy lowers the potential risk of collateral damage which is especially important for retinal safety. This offers new possibilities for vitreo-retinal surgery using femtosecond laser pulses.

  8. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Threshold for gas breakdown initiated by an interaction of laser light with aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1993-03-01

    A model constructed previously for plasma production through the laser heating, evaporation, and ionization of a microscopic surface defect is refined in an effort to determine the breakdown conditions in an aerosol. Simple analytic expressions are derived for the threshold laser intensity as a function of the wavelength of the laser light, the dimensions and material of the aerosol particles, the shape of the laser pulse, and the evaporated volume of the particle. The results are compared with experiments on the laser breakdown of air caused by beams from CO2 and Nd lasers in the presence of an aerosol consisting of carbon particles 0.1-25 μm in radius. The results are also compared with the predictions of the explosion model.

  9. Investigation of the threshold intensity versus gas pressure in the breakdown of helium by 248 nm laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abdellatif, Galila

    2014-10-01

    An investigation of the unexpectedly strong dependence of the threshold intensity on the gas pressure in the experimental study on the breakdown of He by short laser wavelength (Turcu et al., in Opt Commun, 134:66-68, 1997) is presented. A modified electron cascade model is applied (Evans and Gamal, in J Phys D Appl Phys, 13:1447-1458, 1980). Computations revealed reasonable agreement between the calculated thresholds and the measured ones. Moreover, the calculated electron energy distribution function and its parameters proved that multiphoton ionization of ground and excited atoms is the main source for the seed electrons, which contributes to the breakdown of helium. The effect of diffusion losses over pressures <1,000 Torr elucidated the origin of the strong dependence of the threshold intensity on the gas pressure. Collisional ionization dominates only at high pressures. No evidence for recombination losses is observed for pressures up to 3,000 Torr.

  10. Effect of the three-dimensional structure of laser emission on the dynamics of low-threshold optical breakdown plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Arutiunian, R. V.; Bol'Shov, L. A.; Derkach, O. N.; Kanevskii, M. F.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of the transverse structure of pulsed CO2 laser emission on the dynamics of laser-induced detonation waves propagating from a metal surface and on plasma transparency recovery is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Particular attention is given to breakdown initiation near the surface. It is suggested that the inclusion of refraction in the plasma into a self-consistent numerical mode is essential for the adequate quantitative description of experimental data on the interaction of laser emission with low-threshold optical breakdown plasmas.

  11. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  12. Simulation study on nitrogen vibrational and translational temperature in air breakdown plasma generated by 110 GHz focused microwave pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    We report a simulation study on nitrogen vibrational and translational temperature in 3 μs pulse 110 GHz microwave air breakdown at pressure from 1 Torr to 100 Torr. The one-dimensional model is based on a self-consistent solution to Helmholtz equation for microwave field, electron density equation, and the average energy equation for electrons, nitrogen vibrational, and translational degrees. The breakdown threshold is calculated from the transmitted microwave profile, and it agrees well with that from experiment. The spatio-temporal characteristics of vibrational and translational temperature are shown, and the peak values at the end of pulse are compared to the results fitted from optical emission spectroscopy. The dependences of vibrational and translational temperature on normalized microwave fields and gas pressure are investigated, and the underlying mechanisms are unveiled.

  13. Convergence of detrital stoichiometry predicts thresholds of nutrient-stimulated breakdown in streams.

    PubMed

    Manning, David W P; Rosemond, Amy D; Gulis, Vladislav; Benstead, Jonathan P; Kominoski, John S; Maerz, John C

    2016-09-01

    Nutrient enrichment of detritus-based streams increases detrital resource quality for consumers and stimulates breakdown rates of particulate organic carbon (C). The relative importance of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (N) vs. phosphorus (P) for detrital quality and their effects on microbial- vs. detritivore-mediated detrital breakdown are poorly understood. We tested effects of experimental N and P additions on detrital stoichiometry (C:N, C:P) and total and microbial breakdown (i.e., with and without detritivorous shredders, respectively) of five detritus types (four leaf litter species and wood) with different initial C : nutrient content. We enriched five headwater streams continuously for two years at different relative availabilities of N and P and compared breakdown rates and detrital stoichiometry to pretreatment conditions. Total breakdown rates increased with nutrient enrichment and were predicted by altered detrital stoichiometry. Streamwater N and P, fungal biomass, and their interactions affected stoichiometry of detritus. Streamwater N and P decreased detrital C:N, whereas streamwater P had stronger negative effects on detrital C:P. Nutrient addition and fungal biomass reduced C:N by 70% and C:P by 83% on average after conditioning, compared to only 26% for C:N and 10% for C:P under pretreatment conditions. Detritus with lowest initial nutrient content changed the most and had greatest increases in total breakdown rates. Detrital stoichiometry was reduced and differences among detritus types were homogenized by nutrient enrichment. With enrichment, detrital nutrient content approached detritivore nutritional requirements and stimulated greater detritivore vs. microbial litter breakdown. We used breakpoint regression to estimate values of detrital stoichiometry that can potentially be used to indicate elevated breakdown rates. Breakpoint ratios for total breakdown were 41 (C:N) and 1518 (C:P), coinciding with total breakdown rates that were ~1.9

  14. Study of threshold intensity dependence on the physical processes in the breakdown of N2 by CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E-D Gamal, Yosr E.; Jaabour, Laila H.; Hamam, Kholoud A.

    2014-05-01

    A modified numerical electron cascade model of Gamal and Abdel Moneim (1987 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 20 757), previously developed by Evans and Gamal (1980 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 3 1447), is used to calculate the breakdown threshold irradiance as a function of gas pressure when irradiating molecular nitrogen with a CO2 laser source under two different experimental conditions, namely, the presence and the absence of initial electron density in the focal volume before laser ignition (Camacho J J et al 2007 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 40 4573). The model solves numerically the time-dependent Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and a set of rate equations that describe the rate of change of the population of excited states. The model is incorporated into a computer program to obtain the threshold irradiance, which is then compared with the measured ones given by Camacho et al. The comparison showed a reasonable agreement for the two experimental conditions. In addition, the study of the EEDF and its parameters revealed different influences on the physical processes in determining the threshold irradiance for nitrogen breakdown in the two selected gas pressure regimes.

  15. Ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dielectrics: Thresholds, mechanisms, role of breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Inam; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Tomáštík, Jan; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, Ondřej; Fekete, Ladislav; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we establish connections between the thresholds and mechanisms of the damage and white-light generation upon femtosecond laser irradiation of wide-bandgap transparent materials. On the example of Corning Willow glass, evolution of ablation craters, their quality, and white-light emission were studied experimentally for 130-fs, 800-nm laser pulses. The experimental results indicate co-existence of several ablation mechanisms which can be separated in time. Suppression of the phase explosion mechanism of ablation was revealed at the middle of the irradiation spots. At high laser fluences, air ionization was found to strongly influence ablation rate and quality and the main mechanisms of the influence are analysed. To gain insight into the processes triggered by laser radiation in glass, numerical simulations have been performed with accounting for the balance of laser energy absorption and its distribution/redistribution in the sample, including bremsstrahlung emission from excited free-electron plasma. The simulations have shown an insignificant role of avalanche ionization at such short durations of laser pulses while pointing to high average energy of electrons up to several dozens of eV. At multi-pulse ablation regimes, improvement of crater quality was found as compared to single/few pulses. PMID:27991543

  16. Ultrashort pulse laser ablation of dielectrics: Thresholds, mechanisms, role of breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Inam; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Tomáštík, Jan; Michálek, Václav; Haderka, Ondřej; Fekete, Ladislav; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we establish connections between the thresholds and mechanisms of the damage and white-light generation upon femtosecond laser irradiation of wide-bandgap transparent materials. On the example of Corning Willow glass, evolution of ablation craters, their quality, and white-light emission were studied experimentally for 130-fs, 800-nm laser pulses. The experimental results indicate co-existence of several ablation mechanisms which can be separated in time. Suppression of the phase explosion mechanism of ablation was revealed at the middle of the irradiation spots. At high laser fluences, air ionization was found to strongly influence ablation rate and quality and the main mechanisms of the influence are analysed. To gain insight into the processes triggered by laser radiation in glass, numerical simulations have been performed with accounting for the balance of laser energy absorption and its distribution/redistribution in the sample, including bremsstrahlung emission from excited free-electron plasma. The simulations have shown an insignificant role of avalanche ionization at such short durations of laser pulses while pointing to high average energy of electrons up to several dozens of eV. At multi-pulse ablation regimes, improvement of crater quality was found as compared to single/few pulses.

  17. [Spectroscopic study of laser induced breakdown plasma spectroscopy in air and semi-empirical simulation].

    PubMed

    Sun, Dui-xiong; Su, Mao-gen; Dong, Chen-zhong; Ma, Yun-yun; Yang, Feng; Cao, Shi-quan

    2014-12-01

    A laser induced breakdown spectroscopy experiment was carried out using Nd:YAG laser in air, and time-resolved spectra were measured. Based on local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption, a method used to simulate LIBS spectra is proposed. A LIBS spectrum of air in the wavelength range of 700~900 nm was simulated using this method. A good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained, and moreover, the relative concentrations of the N, O and Ar in air were obtained.

  18. Effects of load voltage on voltage breakdown modes of electrical exploding aluminum wires in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen Yang, Zefeng; Wang, Kun; Chao, Youchuang; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2015-06-15

    The effects of the load voltage on the breakdown modes are investigated in exploding aluminum wires driven by a 1 kA, 0.1 kA/ns pulsed current in air. From laser probing images taken by laser shadowgraphy, schlieren imaging, and interferometry, the position of the shockwave front, the plasma channel, and the wire core edge of the exploding product can be determined. The breakdown mode makes a transition from the internal mode, which involves breakdown inside the wire core, to the shunting mode, which involves breakdown in the compressed air, with decreasing charging voltage. The breakdown electrical field for a gaseous aluminum wire core of nearly solid density is estimated to be more than 20 kV/cm, while the value for gaseous aluminum of approximately 0.2% solid density decreases to 15–20 kV/cm. The breakdown field in shunting mode is less than 20 kV/cm and is strongly affected by the vaporized aluminum, the desorbed gas, and the electrons emitted from the wire core during the current pause. Ohmic heating during voltage collapses will induce further energy deposition in the current channel and thus will result in different expansion speeds for both the wire core and the shockwave front in the different modes.

  19. Hazards and Possibilities of Optical Breakdown Effects Below the Threshold for Shockwave and Bubble Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    PROJECT NUMBER 5d. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Alfred Vogel 5e. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...has been made in models of optical breakdown in biomaterials from this project , specifically from the understanding of specific absorption properties...bubble formation AFOSR International Research Initiative Project SPC 024047 Grant FA8655-02-1-3047 Final Report July 2006 Primary

  20. Enhancement of RF Breakdown Threshold of Microwave Cavities by Magnetic Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Gallardo, J.; Palmer, R.B.

    2011-03-28

    Limitations on the maximum achievable accelerating gradient of microwave cavities can influence the performance, length, and cost of particle accelerators. Gradient limitations are believed to be initiated by electron emission from the cavity surfaces. Here, we show that field emission is effectively suppressed by applying a tangential magnetic field to the cavity walls, so higher gradients can be achieved. Numerical simulations indicate that the magnetic field prevents electrons leaving these surfaces and subsequently picking up energy from the electric field. Our results agree with current experimental data. Two specific examples illustrate the implementation of magnetic insulation into prospective particle accelerator applications. The ultimate goal of several research efforts is to integrate high-gradient radio-frequency (rf) structures into next generation particle accelerators. For instance, the Muon Accelerator Program is looking at developing low-frequency cavities for muon cooling, and the International Linear Collider is optimizing the performance of 1.3 GHz rf structures aimed at designing a 1 TeV electron-positron collider. Furthermore, the High Gradient RF Collaboration is examining high frequency (f > 10 GHz) structures intended for an electron-positron collider operating at energies in the TeV range. In all this research, the accelerating gradient will be one of the crucial parameters affecting their design, construction, and cost. Limitations from rf breakdown strongly influence the development of accelerators since it limits the machine's maximum gradient. The emission of electrons from the cavity surfaces seemingly is a necessary stage in the breakdown process, acting either as a direct cause of breakdown or as precursor for other secondary effects. Typically, electron currents arise from sharp edges or cracks on the cavities surfaces, where the strength of the electric field is strongly enhanced compared to that of the nominal field when the

  1. Optical breakdown of air triggered by femtosecond laser filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polynkin, Pavel; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2011-10-01

    We report experiments on the generation of dense plasma channels in ambient air using a dual laser pulse excitation scheme. The dilute plasma produced through the filamentation of an ultraintense femtosecond laser pulse is densified via avalanche ionization driven by a co-propagating multi-Joule nanosecond pulse.

  2. Lowered threshold energy for femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in a water based eye model by aberration correction with adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anja; Géneaux, Romain; Günther, Axel; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-06-01

    In femtosecond laser ophthalmic surgery tissue dissection is achieved by photodisruption based on laser induced optical breakdown. In order to minimize collateral damage to the eye laser surgery systems should be optimized towards the lowest possible energy threshold for photodisruption. However, optical aberrations of the eye and the laser system distort the irradiance distribution from an ideal profile which causes a rise in breakdown threshold energy even if great care is taken to minimize the aberrations of the system during design and alignment. In this study we used a water chamber with an achromatic focusing lens and a scattering sample as eye model and determined breakdown threshold in single pulse plasma transmission loss measurements. Due to aberrations, the precise lower limit for breakdown threshold irradiance in water is still unknown. Here we show that the threshold energy can be substantially reduced when using adaptive optics to improve the irradiance distribution by spatial beam shaping. We found that for initial aberrations with a root-mean-square wave front error of only one third of the wavelength the threshold energy can still be reduced by a factor of three if the aberrations are corrected to the diffraction limit by adaptive optics. The transmitted pulse energy is reduced by 17% at twice the threshold. Furthermore, the gas bubble motions after breakdown for pulse trains at 5 kilohertz repetition rate show a more transverse direction in the corrected case compared to the more spherical distribution without correction. Our results demonstrate how both applied and transmitted pulse energy could be reduced during ophthalmic surgery when correcting for aberrations. As a consequence, the risk of retinal damage by transmitted energy and the extent of collateral damage to the focal volume could be minimized accordingly when using adaptive optics in fs-laser surgery.

  3. Quantitative Determination of the Breakdown Field of Air from Van de Graaff Generator Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, John; Chartrand, Bridget; Gallagher, Hugh

    2016-03-01

    The Van de Graaff generator (VG) is ubiquitous in electrostatic demonstrations because of the large static charge and dramatic sparks produced. We have developed a novel technique for determining the breakdown field of air using the VG. When a spark occurs, the force of attraction between the VG and a discharge sphere suspended above it is measured by a Pasco force sensor. At this time the charge is not symmetric but pulled towards the near side of the spheres by mutual attraction. In order to interpret the measured force in terms of the breakdown field, an accurate model of the charge distribution is needed. Using the method of images for a spherical conductor in an iterative fashion we can provide this model. The electric field in the vicinity of the spheres is then calculated from the charge distribution and its maximum value is the breakdown field. In preliminary work, we determined the breakdown field to be 3.1x106 N/C at 24.9 C and 18% relative humidity. We will report our most recent determination of the breakdown field using this method and discuss the validity of the results in terms of accepted values, experimental limitations and sensitivity to the charge distribution model.

  4. A one-dimensional study of the evolution of the microwave breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E. I.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2015-09-15

    The microwave breakdown in air is simulated numerically within a simple 1D model taking into account a perturbation of electromagnetic field by plasma. The simulations were performed using two qualitatively different codes. One of these codes is based on computation of Maxwell equations, whereas the other one utilizes an approximation of quasi-monochromatic electromagnetic field. There is a good agreement between simulation results obtained by using both codes. Calculations have been carried out in a wide range of air pressures and field frequencies; also varied were initial spatial distributions of plasma density. The results reveal strong dependence of the breakdown evolution on the relation between the field frequency and the gas pressure as well as on the presence of extended rarefied background plasma. At relatively low gas pressures (or high field frequencies), the breakdown process is accompanied by the stationary ionization wave propagating towards the incident electromagnetic wave. In the case of a high gas pressure (or a relatively low field frequency), the peculiarities of the breakdown are associated with a formation of plasma filament array. The extended background plasma can suppress formation of the plasma filament array completely even at high pressures (or low frequencies)

  5. ELF/VLF radio from runaway breakdown and cosmic ray air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullekrug, M.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Rodger, C. J.; Falcke, H.; Huege, T.

    2005-12-01

    The natural electromagnetic environment at low radio frequencies from 10 Hz to 30 kHz (ELF/VLF) is dominated by impulsive bursts from lightning discharges in the troposphere. Particularly intense positive lightning discharges can cause transient luminous events (TLEs) in the mesosphere, denoted sprites, which mainly result from the quasi-static heating of the neutral gas in the mesosphere. The most spectacular 20 % of sprites produce radio signals at extremely-low frequencies from 10 Hz to 3 kHz (ELF), which are currently believed to result mainly from conventional mesospheric breakdown. Alternatively, the observed radio signals may be dominated by relativistic runaway breakdown in the mesosphere. The respective current source functions of conventional and relativistic breakdown are connected to an ELF/VLF propagation model to calculate the electromagnetic fields of both physical processes at a distance and to determine the most appropriate method to discriminate between the two different physical processes. Extensive cosmic ray air showers from ultra-high energy extra-galactic cosmic rays >100 EeV similarly produce radio signals up to the high frequency range from 3-300 MHz (HF/VHF). The ELF/VLF radio signals from this cosmic ray current source function is calculated by using the same ELF/VLF propagation model. The prospects for the detection of the radio signals from relativistic runaway breakdown and cosmic rays are discussed in the light of reported instrumental sensitivities.

  6. Initial Testing of a Two-Dimensional Computer Code for Microwave-Induced Surface Breakdown in Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    operation of high- voltage electrical equipment are electron emission and surface flashover . As a step toward further understanding of these phenomena in gas...INITIAL TESTING OF A TWO-DIMENSIONAL COMPUTER CODE FOR MICROWAVE-INDUCED SURFACE BREAKDOWN IN AIR* D.J. Mayhall and J.H. Yee Lawrence Livermore...computer code for microwave-induced surface breakdown in air is developed. This code is based on finite difference approximations to Maxwell’s curl

  7. Kinetic theory of runaway air breakdown and the implications for lightning initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Gurevich, A.V.; Tunnell, T.; Milikh, G.M.

    1993-11-01

    The kinetic theory for a new air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuring a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms and are examined in the context of lightning initiation.

  8. Accumulation of air in polymeric materials investigated by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, W. L.; Hermann, J.; Mothe, E.; Beldjilali, S.

    2012-03-15

    We report on spectroscopic analyses of plasmas produced by laser irradiation of nitrogen-free and nitrogen-containing polymer materials. Ultraviolet laser pulses of 5 ns duration and 4 mJ energy were focused onto the samples with a fluence of about 20 Jcm{sup -2}. The plasma emission was analyzed with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with a gated detector. Comparing the spectra recorded during ablation in air and argon, it is shown that the spectral line emission of atomic nitrogen originates from the excitation of the ambient air, whereas the CN molecular bands are essentially emitted from the ablation plume. Furthermore, the measurements demonstrate an additional contribution of nitrogen emission from the air molecules accumulated in the polymer. Storage under vacuum over a duration of the order of one day leads to the release of the absorbed air. As a consequence of the air absorption, the measurement of elemental composition of polymers via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is particularly difficult. Here, we quantify the atmospheric contribution to the plume emission during polymer analysis.

  9. STUDENT AWARD FINALIST: Study of Self-Absorbed Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation during Pulsed Atmospheric Breakdown in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laity, George; Fierro, Andrew; Hatfield, Lynn; Neuber, Andreas

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes recent experiments to investigate the role of self-produced vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in the physics of pulsed atmospheric breakdown. A unique apparatus was constructed which enables the detailed exploration of VUV light in the range 115-135 nm, which is emitted from breakdown between two point-point electrodes in an air environment at atmospheric pressure. Time-resolved diagnostics include VUV sensitive photomultipliers, intensified CCD imaging, optically isolated high voltage probes, and fast rise-time Rogowski current monitors. Temporally resolved spectroscopy from air breakdowns revealed VUV emission is released during the initial streamer phase before voltage collapse, with the majority of the emission lines identified from various atmospheric gases or surface impurities. Imaging of VUV radiation was performed which conserved the spatial emission profile, and distinct differences between nitrogen and oxygen VUV emission during onset of breakdown have been observed. Specifically, the self-absorption of HI, OI, and NI lines is addressed which elucidates the role of radiation transport during the photon-dominated streamer breakdown process. Supported by AFOSR, NASA / TSGC, DEPS, and IEEE DEIS.

  10. Laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and their alloys in air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starinskiy, Sergey V.; Shukhov, Yuri G.; Bulgakov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    The nanosecond-laser-induced damage thresholds of gold, silver and gold-silver alloys of various compositions in air and water have been measured for single-shot irradiation conditions. The experimental results are analyzed theoretically by solving the heat flow equation for the samples irradiated in air and in water taking into account vapor nucleation at the solid-water interface. The damage thresholds of Au-Ag alloys are systematically lower than those for pure metals, both in air and water that is explained by lower thermal conductivities of the alloys. The thresholds measured in air agree well with the calculated melting thresholds for all samples. The damage thresholds in water are found to be considerably higher, by a factor of ∼1.5, than the corresponding thresholds in air. This cannot be explained, in the framework of the used model, neither by the conductive heat transfer to water nor by the vapor pressure effect. Possible reasons for the high damage thresholds in water such as scattering of the incident laser light by the vapor-liquid interface and the critical opalescence in the superheated water are suggested. Optical pump-probe measurements have been performed to study the reflectance dynamics of the surface irradiated in air and water. Comparison of the transient reflectance signal with the calculated nucleation dynamics provides evidence that the both suggested scattering mechanisms are likely to occur during metal ablation in water.

  11. Experiment and theoretical study of the propagation of high power microwave pulse in air breakdown environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Ren, A.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1991-01-01

    In the study of the propagation of high power microwave pulse, one of the main concerns is how to minimize the energy loss of the pulse before reaching the destination. In the very high power region, one has to prevent the cutoff reflection caused by the excessive ionization in the background air. A frequency auto-conversion process which can lead to reflectionless propagation of powerful EM pulses in self-generated plasmas is studied. The theory shows that under the proper conditions the carrier frequency, omega, of the pulse will indeed shift upward with the growth of plasma frequency, omega(sub pe). Thus, the plasma during breakdown will always remain transparent to the pulse (i.e., omega greater than omega(sub pe)). A chamber experiment to demonstrate the frequency auto-conversion during the pulse propagation through the self-generated plasma is then conducted in a chamber. The detected frequency shift is compared with the theoretical result calculated y using the measured electron density distribution along the propagation path of the pulse. Good agreement between the theory and the experiment results is obtained.

  12. Optical, radio and x-ray radiation of red sprites produced by runaway air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimuk, V.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Symbalisty, E.; Taranenko, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The authors use the runaway air breakdown model of upward discharges to calculate optical, radio, and X-ray radiation generated by red sprites. Red sprites are high altitude (up to 90 km) lightning discharges. Aircraft based observations show that sprites are predominantly red in color at altitudes above {approximately}55 km with faint blue tendrils, which extend downward to an altitude of 40 km; the duration of a single sprite is less than 17 ms, their maximum brightness is about 600 kR, and estimated total optical energy is about 1--5 kJ per event. The ground based observations show similar results, and provide some additional information on spatial and temporal structure of sprites, and on sprite locations. One difference between aircraft and ground-based observations is that blue tendrils are rarely observed from the ground. Sprites usually occur above the anvils of large mesoscale convective systems and correlate with strong positive cloud to ground discharge. Upward discharges are the most probable source of X-ray emission observed above large thunderstorm complexes by the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory. To escape the atmosphere these {gamma}-rays must originate above 25 km altitude. Red sprites are usually observed at altitudes higher than 50 km, and are therefore a likely source of this x-ray emission.

  13. High altitude atmospheric discharges according to the runaway air breakdown mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Symbalisty, E.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Yukhimuk, V.; Taranenko, Y.

    1997-04-01

    High altitude optical transients - red sprites, blue jets, and elves - are modeled in the context of the relativistic electron runaway air breakdown mechanism. These emissions are usually associated with large mesoscale convective systems (hereafter MCS). In thunderstorms cloud electrification proceeds over a time scale long enough to permit the conducting atmosphere above the cloud to polarize and short out the thunderstorm electric field. When a lightning strike rapidly neutralizes a cloud charge layer runaway driving fields can develop in the stratosphere and mesosphere. According to present simulations of the full runaway process the variety of observed optical emissions are due to the nature of the normal lightning event in the MCS that kick starts the runaway avalanche. In this paper the authors describe some details of the model, present the results of the evolution of the primary electron population, and summarize the initial conditions necessary for different types of discharges. Two companion papers present (a) the predicted optical, gamma ray, and radio emissions caused by these electrical discharges, and (b) the time evolution of the secondary electron population and its implications in terms of observables.

  14. Long-distance remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmaszczyk, Kamil; Rohwetter, Philipp; Méjean, Guillaume; Yu, Jin; Salmon, Estelle; Kasparian, Jérôme; Ackermann, Roland; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Wöste, Ludger

    2004-11-01

    We demonstrate remote elemental analysis at distances up to 90m, using a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy scheme based on filamentation induced by the nonlinear propagation of unfocused ultrashort laser pulses. A detailed signal analysis suggests that this technique, remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy, can be extended up to the kilometer range.

  15. Masked hearing thresholds of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in air.

    PubMed

    Renouf, D

    1980-10-01

    Two wild seals, maintained in captivity in good health, were trained to swim on verbal command to a spot 27 cm above the water, and subsequently to make a L or R turn to a pure tone vs no tone. White noise was present at 80, 70, or 60 db SPL. Masked thresholds were determined by a staircase method in 2-db steps at 2, 4, 8.6, and 15 kc/s (at 15 kc/s only noise at 60 db SPL was presented). Critical bandwidths in db were calculated, all of the order of 25 db (range of to 28 db). These values are close to those reported by Terhune and Ronald (J. Acoust.Soc.Am., 1975, 58, 515-516) for seals' aerial hearing but are unexplainably lower (i.e., worse) than for seals underwater. It was calculated that in their often noisy and visually restricted natural environment, a mother would not be able to hear her pup if separated by more than 8 m. This situation was generally corroborated by field observation on the breeding grounds.

  16. Setting limits: Using air pollution thresholds to protect and restore US ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenn, Mark E.; Lambert, Kathleen F.; Blett, Tamara F.; Burns, Douglas A.; Pardo, Linda H.; Lovett, Gary M.; Haeuber, Richard A.; Evers, David C.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Jeffries, Dean S.

    2011-01-01

    More than four decades of research provide unequivocal evidence that sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury pollution have altered, and will continue to alter, our nation's lands and waters. The emission and deposition of air pollutants harm native plants and animals, degrade water quality, affect forest productivity, and are damaging to human health. Many air quality policies limit emissions at the source but these control measures do not always consider ecosystem impacts. Air pollution thresholds at which ecological effects are observed, such as critical loads, are effective tools for assessing the impacts of air pollution on essential ecosystem services and for informing public policy. U.S. ecosystems can be more effectively protected and restored by using a combination of emissions-based approaches and science-based thresholds of ecosystem damage.

  17. [Research on accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in air environment].

    PubMed

    Yin, Wang-bao; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Le; Dong, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Jia, Suo-tang

    2012-01-01

    A technique about accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal in air environment using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is introduced in the present paper. Coal samples were excited by the laser, and plasma spectra were obtained. Combining internal standard method, temperature correction method and multi-line methods, the oxygen content of coal samples was precisely measured. The measurement precision is not less than 1.37% for oxygen content in coal analysis, so is satisfied for the requirement of coal-fired power plants in coal analysis. This method can be used in surveying, environmental protection, medicine, materials, archaeological and food safety, biochemical and metallurgy application.

  18. Setting limits: Using air pollution thresholds to protect and restore U.S. ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenn, M.E.; Lambert, K.F.; Blett, T.F.; Burns, Douglas A.; Pardo, L.H.; Lovett, Gary M.; Haeuber, R. A.; Evers, D.C.; Driscoll, C.T.; Jeffries, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    More than four decades of research provide unequivocal evidence that sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury pollution have altered, and will continue to alter, our nation's lands and waters. The emission and deposition of air pollutants harm native plants and animals, degrade water quality, affect forest productivity, and are damaging to human health. Many air quality policies limit emissions at the source but these control measures do not always consider ecosystem impacts. Air pollution thresholds at which ecological effects are observed, such as critical loads, are effective tools for assessing the impacts of air pollution on essential ecosystem services and for informing public policy. U.S. ecosystems can be more effectively protected and restored by using a combination of emissions-based approaches and science-based thresholds of ecosystem damage. Based on the results of a comprehensive review of air pollution thresholds, we conclude: ??? Ecosystem services such as air and water purification, decomposition and detoxification of waste materials, climate regulation, regeneration of soil fertility, production and biodiversity maintenance, as well as crop, timber and fish supplies are impacted by deposition of nitrogen, sulfur, mercury and other pollutants. The consequences of these changes may be difficult or impossible to reverse as impacts cascade throughout affected ecosystems. ??? The effects of too much nitrogen are common across the U.S. and include altered plant and lichen communities, enhanced growth of invasive species, eutrophication and acidification of lands and waters, and habitat deterioration for native species, including endangered species. ??? Lake, stream and soil acidification is widespread across the eastern United States. Up to 65% of lakes within sensitive areas receive acid deposition that exceeds critical loads. ??? Mercury contamination adversely affects fish in many inland and coastal waters. Fish consumption advisories for mercury exist in all 50

  19. Thermal Blooming and Air Breakdown Interaction for Pulsed High Energy Lasers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    illustrates the exoerimental arrangement. A single shot Lumonics 602A CO2 Transversely Excited Atmospheric (TEA) laser beam, 45 3 energy output, with...BREAKDOWN INTERACTION (~~~~ Jf~fl fl~~~~ThFOR PULSED HIGH ENERGY LASERS fl ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~,; JUN~~~ U JUL 12 1918 j ’ *~OBERF $ / I~QHDE,~~~ RUDOLF G... Laser pulse transmission as related to Army high energy laser systems involves many interacting effects which generally degrade the performance of the

  20. High-Power Microwave Breakdown of Dielectric Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calico, Steve Eugene

    A project to study the electrical breakdown of microwave windows due to high-power pulsed microwave fields was undertaken at Texas Tech University. The pulsed power equipment was acquired from the Air Force Weapons Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, refurbished and redesigned as necessary, and serves as the high-power microwave source. The microwaves are used to test various vacuum to atmosphere interfaces (windows) in an attempt to isolate the mechanisms governing the electrical breakdown at the window. Windows made of three different materials and of three basic geometrical designs were tested in this experiment. Additionally, the surfaces of two windows were sanded with different grit sandpapers to determine the effect the surface texture has on the breakdown. The windows were tested in atmospheric pressure air, argon, helium, and to a lesser extent sulfur-hexafluoride. Estimates of the breakdown threshold in air and argon on a Lexan window were obtained as a consequence of these tests and were found to be considerably lower than that reported for pulsed microwave breakdown in gases. A hypothesis is presented in an attempt to explain the lower breakdown phenomena. A discussion of the comparative performance of the windows and an explanation as to the enhanced performance of some windows is given.

  1. Interaction Of CO2 Laser Nanosecond Pulse Train With The Metallic Targets In Optical Breakdown Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Firsov, K. N.; Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Silenok, A. S.; Sorochenko, V. R.

    1986-11-01

    In the present paper the electric field and currents in the air-breakdown plasma, produced by the train of nanosecond pulses of TEA-002 - regenerative amplifier near the un-charged targets are studied. The breakdown thresholds and the efficiency of plasma-target heat transmission are also measured. The results of numerical calculations made for increasing of the pulse train contrast with respect to the background in a regenerative amplifier are advanced.

  2. Methods for detecting and estimating population threshold concentrations for air pollution-related mortality with exposure measurement error

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak, S.; Burnett, R.T.; Krewski, D.

    1999-06-01

    The association between daily fluctuations in ambient particulate matter and daily variations in nonaccidental mortality have been extensively investigated. Although it is now widely recognized that such an association exists, the form of the concentration-response model is still in question. Linear, no threshold and linear threshold models have been most commonly examined. In this paper the authors considered methods to detect and estimate threshold concentrations using time series data of daily mortality rates and air pollution concentrations. Because exposure is measured with error, they also considered the influence of measurement error in distinguishing between these two completing model specifications. The methods were illustrated on a 15-year daily time series of nonaccidental mortality and particulate air pollution data in Toronto, Canada. Nonparametric smoothed representations of the association between mortality and air pollution were adequate to graphically distinguish between these two forms. Weighted nonlinear regression methods for relative risk models were adequate to give nearly unbiased estimates of threshold concentrations even under conditions of extreme exposure measurement error. The uncertainty in the threshold estimates increased with the degree of exposure error. Regression models incorporating threshold concentrations could be clearly distinguished from linear relative risk models in the presence of exposure measurement error. The assumption of a linear model given that a threshold model was the correct form usually resulted in overestimates in the number of averted premature deaths, except for low threshold concentrations and large measurement error.

  3. Effect of pulse duration on the acoustic frequency emissions during the laser-induced breakdown of atmospheric air.

    PubMed

    Manikanta, E; Vinoth Kumar, L; Venkateshwarlu, P; Leela, Ch; Kiran, P Prem

    2016-01-20

    Acoustic shock waves (ASWs) in the frequency range of 30-120 kHz generated during laser-induced breakdown (LIB) of ambient air using 7 ns and 30 ps pulse durations are studied. The specific frequency range and peak amplitudes are observed to be different for nanosecond (ns) and picosecond (ps) LIB. The ASW frequencies for ps-LIB lie between 90 and 120 kHz with one dominant peak, whereas for ns-LIB, two dominant peaks with frequencies in the 30-70 kHz and 80-120 kHz range are observed. These frequencies are observed to be laser pulse intensity dependent. With increasing energy of ns laser pulses, acoustic frequencies move toward the audible frequency range. The variation in the acoustic parameters, such as peak-to-peak pressures, signal energy, frequency and acoustic pulse widths as a function of laser energy, for two different pulse durations are presented in detail and compared. The acoustic emissions are observed to be higher for ns-LIB than ps-LIB, indicating higher conversion efficiency of optical energy into mechanical energy.

  4. Odor as an aid to chemical safety: odor thresholds compared with threshold limit values and volatilities for 214 industrial chemicals in air and water dilution.

    PubMed

    Amoore, J E; Hautala, E

    1983-12-01

    The body of information in this paper is directed to specialists in industrial health and safety, and air and water pollution, who need quantitative data on the odor thresholds of potentially hazardous chemical vapors and gases. The literature, largely unorganized, has been reviewed for 214 compounds and condensed into tables based on consistent units. Data on the volatility, solubility, ionization and water-air distribution ratio at 25 degrees C are included. From the currently recommended threshold limit value (TLV), a safe dilution factor and an odor safety factor are calculated for each compound. The equivalent data are presented for both air and water dilutions of the chemicals. Available data are summarized on the variability of odor sensitivities in the population, and the increased odor concentrations that are required to elicit responses from persons whose attention is distracted, or who are sleeping. This information is reduced to calibration charts that may be used to estimate the relative detectability, warning potential and rousing capacity of the odorous vapors. Each compound has been assigned a letter classification, from A to E, to indicate the margin of safety, if any, that may be afforded by the odor of the compound as a warning that its threshold limit value is being exceeded.

  5. System for time-discretized vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy of spark breakdown in air.

    PubMed

    Ryberg, D; Fierro, A; Dickens, J; Neuber, A

    2014-10-01

    A system for time-discretized spectroscopic measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission from spark discharges in the 60-160 nm range has been developed for the study of early plasma-forming phenomena. The system induces a spark discharge in an environment close to atmospheric conditions created using a high speed puff value, but is otherwise kept at high vacuum to allow for the propagation of VUV light. Using a vertical slit placed 1.5 mm from the discharge the emission from a small cross section of the discharge is allowed to pass into the selection chamber consisting of a spherical grating, with 1200 grooves/mm, and an exit slit set to 100 μm. Following the exit slit is a photomultiplier tube with a sodium salicylate scintillator that is used for the time discretized measurement of the VUV signal with a temporal resolution limit of 10 ns. Results from discharges studied in dry air, Nitrogen, SF6, and Argon indicate the emission of light with wavelengths shorter than 120 nm where the photon energy begins to approach the regime of direct photoionization.

  6. System for time-discretized vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy of spark breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ryberg, D.; Fierro, A.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2014-10-15

    A system for time-discretized spectroscopic measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission from spark discharges in the 60-160 nm range has been developed for the study of early plasma-forming phenomena. The system induces a spark discharge in an environment close to atmospheric conditions created using a high speed puff value, but is otherwise kept at high vacuum to allow for the propagation of VUV light. Using a vertical slit placed 1.5 mm from the discharge the emission from a small cross section of the discharge is allowed to pass into the selection chamber consisting of a spherical grating, with 1200 grooves/mm, and an exit slit set to 100 μm. Following the exit slit is a photomultiplier tube with a sodium salicylate scintillator that is used for the time discretized measurement of the VUV signal with a temporal resolution limit of 10 ns. Results from discharges studied in dry air, Nitrogen, SF{sub 6}, and Argon indicate the emission of light with wavelengths shorter than 120 nm where the photon energy begins to approach the regime of direct photoionization.

  7. Atmospheric pressure He-air plasma jet: Breakdown process and propagation phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Begum, Asma; Laroussi, Mounir; Pervez, Mohammad Rasel

    2013-06-15

    In this paper He-discharge (plasma jet/bullet) in atmospheric pressure air and its progression phenomenon has been studied experimentally using ICCD camera, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and calibrated dielectric probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse has applied to a plasma pencil to generate discharge in the helium gas channel. The discharge propagation speed was measured from the ICCD images. The axial electric field distribution in the plasma jet is inferred from the optical emission spectroscopic data and from the probe measurement. The correlation between the jet velocities, jet length with the pulse duration is established. It shows that the plasma jet is not isolated from the input voltage along its propagation path. The discharge propagation speed, the electron density and the local and average electric field distribution along the plasma jet axis predicted from the experimental results are in good agreement with the data predicted by numerical simulation of the streamer propagation presented in different literatures. The ionization phenomenon of the discharge predicts the key ionization parameters, such as speed, peak electric field in the front, and electron density. The maximum local electric field measured by OES is 95 kV/cm at 1.3 cm of the jet axis, and average EF measured by probe is 24 kV/cm at the same place of the jet. The average and local electron density estimated are in the order of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and it reaches to the maximum of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}.

  8. Air Traffic Controller Acceptability of Unmanned Aircraft System Detect-and-Avoid Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Eric R.; Isaacson, Douglas R.; Stevens, Derek

    2016-01-01

    A human-in-the-loop experiment was conducted with 15 retired air traffic controllers to investigate two research questions: (a) what procedures are appropriate for the use of unmanned aircraft system (UAS) detect-and-avoid systems, and (b) how long in advance of a predicted close encounter should pilots request or execute a separation maneuver. The controller participants managed a busy Oakland air route traffic control sector with mixed commercial/general aviation and manned/UAS traffic, providing separation services, miles-in-trail restrictions and issuing traffic advisories. Controllers filled out post-scenario and post-simulation questionnaires, and metrics were collected on the acceptability of procedural options and temporal thresholds. The states of aircraft were also recorded when controllers issued traffic advisories. Subjective feedback indicated a strong preference for pilots to request maneuvers to remain well clear from intruder aircraft rather than deviate from their IFR clearance. Controllers also reported that maneuvering at 120 seconds until closest point of approach (CPA) was too early; maneuvers executed with less than 90 seconds until CPA were more acceptable. The magnitudes of the requested maneuvers were frequently judged to be too large, indicating a possible discrepancy between the quantitative UAS well clear standard and the one employed subjectively by manned pilots. The ranges between pairs of aircraft and the times to CPA at which traffic advisories were issued were used to construct empirical probability distributions of those metrics. Given these distributions, we propose that UAS pilots wait until an intruder aircraft is approximately 80 seconds to CPA or 6 nmi away before requesting a maneuver, and maneuver immediately if the intruder is within 60 seconds and 4 nmi. These thresholds should make the use of UAS detect and avoid systems compatible with current airspace procedures and controller expectations.

  9. Laser-induced electric breakdown in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1974-01-01

    A review is given of recent experimental results on laser-induced electric breakdown in transparent optical solid materials. A fundamental breakdown threshold exists characteristic for each material. The threshold is determined by the same physical process as dc breakdown, namely, avalanche ionization. The dependence of the threshold on laser pulse duration and frequency is consistent with this process. The implication of this breakdown mechanism for laser bulk and surface damage to optical components is discussed. It also determines physical properties of self-focused filaments.

  10. Characteristics of edge breakdowns on Teflon samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yadlowsky, E. J.; Hazelton, R. C.; Churchill, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of electrical discharges induced on silverbacked Teflon samples irradiated by a monoenergetic electron beam have been studied under controlled laboratory conditions. Measurements of breakdown threshold voltages indicate a marked anisotropy in the electrical breakdown properties of Teflon: differences of up to 10 kV in breakdown threshold voltage are observed depending on the sample orientation. The material anisotropy can be utilized in spacecraft construction to reduce the magnitude of discharge currents.

  11. Subnanosecond Breakdown of Insulating Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-29

    50so O0 PRESSURE Itorr] Fig. 6. Breakdown voltage for argon and air with 100 kV pulser amplitude Breakdown voltages for surface flashover differ from the...developments in the field of high speed/high power electromagnetics applica- tions, such as Ultrawideband (UWB) radar, plasma limiters, and fast general...voltages for short pulses is of relevance for many switching and insulation tasks, for both volume breakdown in differ- ent media as well as for surface

  12. Auditory Brainstem Response Thresholds to Air- and Bone-Conducted CE-Chirps in Neonates and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Kensi M.; Stuart, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds to air- and bone-conducted CE-Chirps in neonates and adults. Method Thirty-two neonates with no physical or neurologic challenges and 20 adults with normal hearing participated. ABRs were acquired with a starting intensity of 30 dB normal hearing level…

  13. In-air hearing of a diving duck: A comparison of psychoacoustic and auditory brainstem response thresholds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowell, Sara E.; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M.; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Carr, Catherine E

    2016-01-01

    Auditory sensitivity was measured in a species of diving duck that is not often kept in captivity, the lesser scaup. Behavioral (psychoacoustics) and electrophysiological [the auditory brainstem response (ABR)] methods were used to measure in-air auditory sensitivity, and the resulting audiograms were compared. Both approaches yielded audiograms with similar U-shapes and regions of greatest sensitivity (2000−3000 Hz). However, ABR thresholds were higher than psychoacoustic thresholds at all frequencies. This difference was least at the highest frequency tested using both methods (5700 Hz) and greatest at 1000 Hz, where the ABR threshold was 26.8 dB higher than the behavioral measure of threshold. This difference is commonly reported in studies involving many different species. These results highlight the usefulness of each method, depending on the testing conditions and availability of the animals.

  14. Estimation of the lactate threshold using an electro acoustic sensor system analysing the respiratory air.

    PubMed

    Folke, M

    2008-09-01

    The lactate threshold is used by athletes to optimise the intensity during exercise. It is of interest to measure the threshold on the very day and during the present sport activity. Steady state ergometer tests have been performed on 40 individuals to compare the threshold found by an electro acoustic sensor system to the lactate threshold established by blood analyses evaluated with the Dmax method. The correlation coefficient between the threshold found by the sensor system and the one established by blood analyses regarding workload (Watt), heart rate (beats/min), and lactate level (mmol lactate/l blood) at the thresholds were 0.87 (p < 0.001), 0.74 (p < 0.001), and 0.65 (p < 0.001), respectively. The findings in this study indicates that the thresholds of individuals measured by the sensor system show good correlations to the threshold established with the Dmax method from lactate levels in blood samples.

  15. Air and Bone Conduction Thresholds of Deaf and Normal Hearing Subjects before and during the Elimination of Cutaneous-Tactile Interference with Anesthesia. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nober, E. Harris

    The study investigated whether low frequency air and bone thresholds elicited at high intensity levels from deaf children with a sensory-neural diagnosis reflect valid auditory sensitivity or are mediated through cutaneous-tactile receptors. Subjects were five totally deaf (mean age 17.0) yielding vibrotactile thresholds but with no air and bone…

  16. Surface breakdown of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, R. J.; Senitzky, B.

    1991-07-01

    The surface electrical breakdown of n(+)nn(+) rectangular solid blocks of silicon was investigated. Studies were performed in air at pressures of 10 to the -6th torr and 1 atm, and in transformer oil, ethylene glycol, and deionized water, under pulsed electrical excitation. The breakdown voltage (BV) of these devices was found to increase as the dielectric constant of the ambient increased. Glow discharge cleaning of the surface in vacuum was found to have no effect on the BV. A theory of surface charging leading to field enhancement along the surface is developed on the basis of these findings.

  17. Cumulative effects and threshold levels in air pollution mortality: data analysis of nine large US cities using the NMMAPS dataset.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Mario; Nicolich, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    We examined the existence of thresholds, cumulative effects and the homogeneity of five air pollutants on the relative risk of three mortality outcomes using data from nine major US cities using data from NMMAPS. Overall, PM(10) (usually 200-day accumulation) and ozone (3-day accumulation) were the two important predictors of outcome but their effect was not uniform across the nine cities. Many models exhibited thresholds (25-45 microm g/m(3) for PM(10), and 10-45 ppb for O(3)). Our preliminary exploratory analyses suggest that the use of a linear, no threshold, model for pollution studies is not consistent with the observed data. The heterogeneity in the risk estimates across the nine cities suggests combining the local risk estimates to obtain a national risk estimate may not be justifiable and the estimate is likely to be confounded.

  18. Prevalence of permanent threshold shifts in the United States Air Force hearing conservation program by career field, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Soderlund, Laurel; McKenna, Elizabeth A; Tastad, Katie; Paul, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in hearing, using the permanent threshold shift metric, among United States Air Force servicemembers, including active duty, Reserve and Air National Guard components, for demographics, job categories, and career fields. In the United States Air Force, only servicemembers who are occupationally exposed routinely to hazardous noise are monitored. Audiogram records and demographic variables were analyzed for servicemembers from 2005-2011 using data from the Department of Defense system that captures occupational hearing tests worldwide. Results suggest that occupational hearing loss was larger in males than females, in officers than enlisted populations, and in Reserve and Air National Guard than in active duty. Compared to similar civilian career fields, active duty has lower prevalence rates for occupational hearing loss overall, although Reserve and Air National Guard prevalence rates were more similar to the civilian reported rates. The proportion of personnel with permanent threshold shifts varied between 4.6-16.7% within active duty career fields, which includes 76% of the population for study timeframe. Permanent threshold shift was larger in small job categories, and in jobs that are not considered exposed to hazardous noise routinely which is comparative with results from civilian data analysis of occupational hearing loss. Further investigation into testing practices for Air Force specific groups, use of the system for nonoccupational hearing testing, and challenges to follow-up compliance is warranted. Increased surveillance procedures for occupational hearing loss are needed to address concerns on the prevalence of servicemember hearing loss, the role of recreational and lifestyle factors to contribute the high reported hearing loss prevalence of veterans compared to nonveterans.

  19. Numerical modeling of high power breakdown in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Pederson, Dylan; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials consist of sub-wavelength structural inclusions layered in a periodic fashion, which provide an effective response to electromagnetic (EM) radiation. The electric or magnetic responses of these materials are based on the resonant nature of their constitutive micro-structures. Under high power EM radiation, these resonances can result in the production of high amplitude currents and field amplification. Depending on the background gas and supporting pressure, breakdown can occur. The formation of plasma can strongly modify the EM response of the metamaterial and thus a detailed study on the breakdown threshold, plasma localization and EM response modification is necessary. Here, we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of high power - high frequency air breakdown in metamaterials. We use a self-consistent fluid description of the plasma formation and dynamics coupled with Maxwell's equations via the electron momentum equation. We study two typical (for metamaterials) micro-structures: The Split Ring Resonator and the Cut Wire pairs. Breakdown threshold is identified for both configurations. Calculations of transmittance and retrieval of the metamaterials' effective parameters help us quantify the effect of plasma formation on the EM response of these metamaterials.

  20. Task breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlich, Jane

    1990-01-01

    The topics concerning the Center for Space Construction (CSC) space construction breakdown structure are presented in viewgraph form. It is concluded that four components describe a task -- effecting, information gathering, analysis, and regulation; uncertainties effect the relative amount of information gathering and analysis that occurs; and that task timing requirements drive the 'location in time' of cognition.

  1. Amplitude-temporal characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated during subnanosecond breakdown in air and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    The amplitude-temporal characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with an amplitude of up to 100 A, as well as of the breakdown voltage and discharge current, are studied experimentally with a picosecond time resolution. The waveforms of discharge and SAEB currents are synchronized with those of the voltage pulses. It is shown that the amplitude-temporal characteristics of the SAEB depend on the gap length and the designs of the gas diode and cathode. The mechanism for the generation of runaway electron beams in atmospheric-pressure gases is analyzed on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  2. Influence of the angular scattering of electrons on the runaway threshold in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanrion, O.; Bonaventura, Z.; Bourdon, A.; Neubert, T.

    2016-04-01

    The runaway electron mechanism is of great importance for the understanding of the generation of x- and gamma rays in atmospheric discharges. In 1991, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. Those emissions are bremsstrahlung from high energy electrons that run away in electric fields associated with thunderstorms. In this paper, we discuss the runaway threshold definition with a particular interest in the influence of the angular scattering for electron energy close to the threshold. In order to understand the mechanism of runaway, we compare the outcome of different Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo models with increasing complexity in the description of the scattering. The results show that the inclusion of the stochastic nature of collisions smooths the probability to run away around the threshold. Furthermore, we observe that a significant number of electrons diffuse out of the runaway regime when we take into account the diffusion in angle due to the scattering. Those results suggest using a runaway threshold energy based on the Fokker-Planck model assuming the angular equilibrium that is 1.6 to 1.8 times higher than the one proposed by [1, 2], depending on the magnitude of the ambient electric field. The threshold also is found to be 5 to 26 times higher than the one assuming forward scattering. We give a fitted formula for the threshold field valid over a large range of electric fields. Furthermore, we have shown that the assumption of forward scattering is not valid below 1 MeV where the runaway threshold usually is defined. These results are important for the thermal runaway and the runaway electron avalanche discharge mechanisms suggested to participate in the TGF generation.

  3. Threshold velocities for input of soil particles into the air by desert soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.A.; Adams, J.; Endo, A.; Smith, D.; Kihl, R.

    1980-10-20

    Desert soils mostly from the Mojave Desert were tested for threshold friction velocity (the friction velocity above which soil erosion takes place) with an open-bottomed portable wind tunnel. Several geomorphological settings were chosen to be representative of much of the surface of the Mojave Desert, for example, playas, alluvial fans, and aeolian features. Variables which increase threshold velocity are decreasing proportion of sand, increasing size of dry aggregates of the soil, and increasing fraction of the soil mass larger than 1 mm. Threshold velocity increases with different types of soil surfaces in the following order: disturbed soils (except disturbed heavy clay soils), sand dunes, alluvial and aeolian sand deposits, disturbed playa soils, skirts of playas, playa centers, and desert pavement (alluvial deposits). 21 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  4. Threshold velocities for input of soil particles into the air by desert soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Dale A.; Adams, John; Endo, Albert; Smith, Dudley; Kihl, Rolf

    1980-10-01

    Desert soils mostly from the Mojave Desert were tested for threshold friction velocity (the friction velocity above which soil erosion takes place) with an open-bottomed portable wind tunnel. Several geomorphological settings were chosen to be representative of much of the surface of the Mojave Desert, for example, playas, alluvial fans, and aeolian features. Variables which increase threshold velocity are decreasing proportion of sand, increasing size of dry aggregates of the soil, and increasing fraction of the soil mass larger than 1 mm. Threshold velocity increases with different types of soil surfaces in the following order: distrubed soils (except disturbed heavy clay soils), sand dunes, alluvial and aeolian sand deposits, disturbed playa soils, skirts of playas, playa centers, and desert pavements (alluvial deposits).

  5. Dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF{sub 6} during a subnanosecond breakdown initiated by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F. Beloplotov, D. V.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF{sub 6} during breakdown of a gap with a nonuniform distribution of the electric field by nanosecond high-voltage pulses was studied experimentally. Measurements of the amplitude and temporal characteristics of a diffuse discharge and its radiation with a subnanosecond time resolution have shown that, at any polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius, breakdown of the gap occurs via two ionization waves, the first of which is initiated by runaway electrons. For a voltage pulse with an ∼500-ps front, UV radiation from different zones of a diffuse discharge is measured with a subnanosecond time resolution. It is shown that the propagation velocity of the first ionization wave increases after its front has passed one-half of the gap, as well as when the pressure in the discharge chamber is reduced and/or when SF{sub 6} is replaced with air or nitrogen. It is found that, at nitrogen pressures of 0.4 and 0.7 MPa and the positive polarity of the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, the ionization wave forms with a larger (∼30 ps) time delay with respect to applying the voltage pulse to the gap than at the negative polarity. The velocity of the second ionization wave propagating from the plane electrode is measured. In a discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.7 MPa, this velocity is found to be ∼10 cm/ns. It is shown that, as the nitrogen pressure increases to 0.7 MPa, the propagation velocity of the front of the first ionization wave at the positive polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius becomes lower than that at the negative polarity.

  6. Dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF6 during a subnanosecond breakdown initiated by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF6 during breakdown of a gap with a nonuniform distribution of the electric field by nanosecond high-voltage pulses was studied experimentally. Measurements of the amplitude and temporal characteristics of a diffuse discharge and its radiation with a subnanosecond time resolution have shown that, at any polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius, breakdown of the gap occurs via two ionization waves, the first of which is initiated by runaway electrons. For a voltage pulse with an ˜500-ps front, UV radiation from different zones of a diffuse discharge is measured with a subnanosecond time resolution. It is shown that the propagation velocity of the first ionization wave increases after its front has passed one-half of the gap, as well as when the pressure in the discharge chamber is reduced and/or when SF6 is replaced with air or nitrogen. It is found that, at nitrogen pressures of 0.4 and 0.7 MPa and the positive polarity of the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, the ionization wave forms with a larger (˜30 ps) time delay with respect to applying the voltage pulse to the gap than at the negative polarity. The velocity of the second ionization wave propagating from the plane electrode is measured. In a discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.7 MPa, this velocity is found to be ˜10 cm/ns. It is shown that, as the nitrogen pressure increases to 0.7 MPa, the propagation velocity of the front of the first ionization wave at the positive polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius becomes lower than that at the negative polarity.

  7. Air and Bone Conduction Click and Tone-burst Auditory Brainstem Thresholds using Kalman Adaptive Processing in Non-sedated Normal Hearing Infants

    PubMed Central

    Elsayed, Alaaeldin M.; Hunter, Lisa L.; Keefe, Douglas H.; Feeney, M. Patrick; Brown, David K.; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen K.; Baroch, Kelly; Sullivan-Mahoney, Maureen; Francis, Kara; Schaid, Leigh G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study normative thresholds and latencies for click and tone-burst auditory brainstem response (TB-ABR) for air and bone conduction in normal infants and those discharged from neonatal intensive care units (NICU), who passed newborn hearing screening and follow-up DPOAE. An evoked potential system (Vivosonic Integrity™) that incorporates Bluetooth electrical isolation and Kalman-weighted adaptive processing to improve signal to noise ratios was employed for this study. Results were compared with other published data. Research Design One hundred forty-five infants who passed two-stage hearing screening with transient-evoked otoacoustic emission (OAE) or automated ABR were assessed with clicks at 70 dB nHL and threshold TB-ABR. Tone-bursts at frequencies between 500 to 4000 Hz were employed for air and bone conduction ABR testing using a specified staircase threshold search to establish threshold levels and Wave V peak latencies. Results Median air conduction hearing thresholds using TB-ABR ranged from 0-20 dB nHL, depending on stimulus frequency. Median bone conduction thresholds were 10 dB nHL across all frequencies, and median air-bone gaps were 0 dB across all frequencies. There was no significant threshold difference between left and right ears and no significant relationship between thresholds and hearing loss risk factors, ethnicity or gender. Older age was related to decreased latency for air conduction. Compared to previous studies, mean air conduction thresholds were found at slightly lower (better) levels, while bone conduction levels were better at 2000 Hz and higher at 500 Hz. Latency values were longer at 500 Hz than previous studies using other instrumentation. Sleep state did not affect air or bone conduction thresholds. Conclusions This study demonstrated slightly better Wave V thresholds for air conduction than previous infant studies. The differences found in the current study, while statistically significant, were within the test

  8. Air pollution and children: neural and tight junction antibodies and combustion metals, the role of barrier breakdown and brain immunity in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Vojdani, Aristo; Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette; Friedle, Albrecht; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Sarathi-Mukherjee, Partha; Martínez-Aguirre, Xavier; Park, Su-Bin; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children are exposed to concentrations of air pollutants, including fine particulate matter (PM2.5), above safety standards. In the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) megacity, children show an early brain imbalance in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune response-associated genes, and blood-brain barrier breakdown. We investigated serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) antibodies to neural and tight junction proteins and environmental pollutants in 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 y with high versus low air pollution exposures. We also measured metals in serum and CSF. MCMA children showed significantly higher serum actin IgG, occludin/zonulin 1 IgA, IgG, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein IgG and IgM (p < 0.01), myelin basic protein IgA and IgG, S-100 IgG and IgM, and cerebellar IgG (p < 0.001). Serum IgG antibodies to formaldehyde, benzene, and bisphenol A, and concentrations of Ni and Cd were significantly higher in exposed children (p < 0.001). CSF MBP antibodies and nickel concentrations were higher in MCMA children (p = 0.03). Air pollution exposure damages epithelial and endothelial barriers and is a robust trigger of tight junction and neural antibodies. Cryptic 'self' tight junction antigens can trigger an autoimmune response potentially contributing to the neuroinflammatory and Alzheimer and Parkinson's pathology hallmarks present in megacity children. The major factor determining the impact of neural antibodies is the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Defining the air pollution linkage of the brain/immune system interactions and damage to physical and immunological barriers with short and long term neural detrimental effects to children's brains ought to be of pressing importance for public health.

  9. Quantification of fluorine traces in solid samples using CaF molecular emission bands in atmospheric air Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Llamas, C.; Pisonero, J.; Bordel, N.

    2016-09-01

    Direct solid determination of trace amounts of fluorine using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a challenging task due to the low excitation efficiency of this element. Several strategies have been developed to improve the detection capabilities, including the use of LIBS in a He atmosphere to enhance the signal to background ratios of F atomic emission lines. An alternative method is based on the detection of the molecular compounds that are formed with fluorine in the LIBS plasma. In this work, the detection of CaF molecular emission bands is investigated to improve the analytical capabilities of atmospheric air LIBS for the determination of fluorine traces in solid samples. In particular, Cu matrix samples containing different fluorine concentration (between 50 and 600 μg/g), and variable amounts of Ca, are used to demonstrate the linear relationships between CaF emission signal and F concentration. Limits of detection for fluorine are improved by more than 1 order of magnitude using CaF emission bands versus F atomic lines, in atmospheric-air LIBS. Furthermore, a toothpaste powder sample is used to validate this analytical method. Good agreement is observed between the nominal and the predicted fluorine mass-content.

  10. The Threshold of Space: The Air Force in the National Space Program, 1945-1959

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-09-01

    turtber pl.ezmiaa the Air Fore~ announced on 16 June 19;8 its selection ot tbe Boeiaa and Martin caapanies as dual contractors -ror tbe D.vna Soar 76...contractual. difficulties, and oil 9 Kovember 1959 tbe Secretaey ot tbe Air F~ce &DDOUDced once more tbe choice of Boe1Dg and Martin as contractors...1Dtroauction of’ RASC , BASA.1 ARPA1 and other agencies. ~ to these cca.pUcations vas the apparent UDW1ll.ingne~s of’ the Governraent to accelerate tbe

  11. Spatial characterization of red and white skin potatoes using nano-second laser induced breakdown in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehan, Imran; Rehan, Kamran; Sultana, S.; Haq, M. Oun ul; Niazi, Muhammad Zubair Khan; Muhammad, Riaz

    2016-01-01

    We presents spectroscopic study of the plasma generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser irradiation of the flesh of red and white skin potatoes. From the spectra recorded with spectrometer (LIBS2500+, Ocean Optics, USA) 11 elements were identified in red skin potato, whereas, the white skin potato was found to have nine elements. Their relative concentrations were estimated using CF-LIBS method for the plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The target was placed in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The electron temperature and number density were calculated from Boltzmann plot and stark broadened line profile methods, respectively using Fe I spectral lines. The spatial distribution of plasma parameters were also studied which show a decreasing trend of 6770 K-4266 K and (3-2.0) × 1016 cm-3. Concentrations of the detected elements were monitored as a function of depth of the potatoes. Our study reveals a decreasing tendency in concentration of iron from top to the centre of potato's flesh, whereas, the concentrations of other elements vary randomly.

  12. Dielectric breakdown induced by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1976-01-01

    The damage thresholds of transparent optical materials were investigated. Single picosecond pulses at 1.06 microns, 0.53 microns and 0.35 microns were obtained from a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator-amplifier-frequency multiplier system. The pulses were Gaussian in space and time and permitted the determination of breakdown thresholds with a reproducibility of 15%. It was shown that the breakdown thresholds are characteristic of the bulk material, which included nine alkali halides, five different laser host materials, KDP, quartz, sapphire and calcium fluoride. The extension of the damage data to the ultraviolet is significant, because some indication was obtained that two- and three-photon absorption processes begin to play a role in determining the threshold. Throughout the visible region of the spectrum the threshold is still an increasing function of frequency, indicating that avalanche ionization is the dominant factor in determining the breakdown threshold. This was confirmed by a detailed study of the damage morphology with a high resolution microscope just above the threshold. The influence of self focusing is discussed, and evidence for beam distortion below the power threshold for complete self focusing is presented, confirming the theory of Marburger.

  13. Threshold curves obtained under various gaseous conditions for free radical generation by burst ultrasound - Effects of dissolved gas, microbubbles and gas transport from the air.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kengo; Kudo, Nobuki; Hassan, Mariame A; Kondo, Takashi; Yamamoto, Katsuyuki

    2009-04-01

    To understand the underlying concepts required for the determination of thresholds for free radical generation, effects of gas dissolution in and microbubble addition to sonicated solutions were investigated. Four solutions with different gaseous conditions, air-saturated and degassed solutions with and without microbubbles of 20 microm in diameter with shells, were studied in the presence of an air-liquid interface. These test solutions were exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound of 0.06 MPa(p-p) at various pulse durations (PDs) from 0.1 to 5 ms and pulse repetition frequencies from 0.1 to 2 kHz. Generation of free radicals was evaluated using the electron spin resonance (ESR) spin trapping method and starch-iodine method. Thresholds of duty ratio (DR) corresponding to temporal average intensity of ultrasound for free radical generation were significantly greater in degassed solutions than in air-saturated solutions. Microbubbles had no significant effects in air-saturated solutions but caused a slight decrease in the threshold in degassed solutions. In all of these results, the DR of a threshold curve against pulse repetition period (PRP) was not constant but linearly decreased with it, suggesting that a balance between bubble growth and shrinkage during the ON and OFF times of burst ultrasound is the primary parameter for the interpretation of thresholds. The effect of an air-liquid interface of the solution was also examined, and it was revealed that gas transport from the air is a predominant factor determining the amount of free radicals.

  14. DC Breakdown Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Calatroni, S.; Descoeudres, A.; Levinsen, Y.; Taborelli, M.; Wuensch, W.

    2009-01-22

    In the context of the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project investigations of DC breakdown in ultra high vacuum are carried out in parallel with high power RF tests. From the point of view of saturation breakdown field the best material tested so far is stainless steel, followed by titanium. Copper shows a four times weaker breakdown field than stainless steel. The results indicate clearly that the breakdown events are initiated by field emission current and that the breakdown field is limited by the cathode. In analogy to RF, the breakdown probability has been measured in DC and the data show similar behaviour as a function of electric field.

  15. Measuring H, O, li, B, and BE on Planetary Surfaces: Calibration of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (libs) Data Under Air, Vacuum, and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Nelms, M.; Breves, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (LIBS), as implemented on the ChemCam instrument on Mars Science Lab and the proposed New Frontiers SAGE mission to Venus, can analyze elements from H to Pb from up to 7m standoff. This study examines the capabilities of LIBS to analyze H, O, B, Be, and Li under conditions simulating Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Of these, H is a major constituent of clay minerals and a key indicator of the presence of water. Its abundance in terrestrial materials ranges from 0 ppm up to 10's of wt.% H2O in hydrated sulfates and clays, with prominent emission lines occurring ca. 656.4 nm. O is an important indicator of atmospheric and magmatic coevolution, and has lines ca. 615.8, 656.2, 777.6, and 844.8 nm. Unfortunately there are very few geological samples from which O has been directly measured, but stoichiometry suggests that O varies from ca. 0 wt.% in sulfides to 21% in ferberite, 32% in ilmenite, 42% in amphiboles, 53% in quartz, 63% in melanterite, and 71% in epsomite. Li (lines at 413.3, 460.4, and 670.9 nm in vacuum), B (412.3 nm), and Be (313.1 nm) are highly mobile elements and key indicators of interaction with water. Local atmospheric composition and pressure significantly influence LIBS plasma intensity because the local atmosphere and the breakdown products from the atmospheric species interact with the ablated surface material in the plasma. Measurement of light elements with LIBS requires that spectra be acquired under conditions matching the remote environment. LIBS is critically dependent on the availability of well characterized, homogeneous reference materials that are closely matched in matrix (composition and structure) to the sample being studied. In modern geochemistry, analyses of most major, minor, and trace elements are routinely made. However, quantitative determination of light element concentrations in geological specimens still represents a major analytical challenge. Thus standards for which hydrogen, oxygen, and

  16. Temperature Dependence of Laser Induced Breakdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    consistent dependence on the temperature of the medium. The theory of the temperature dependence of LIB and experimental observations for all pulse...durations and their implications for retinal damage are discussed. Laser Induced Breakdown, Temperature dependence , Threshold valve, Nanosecond, Picosecond, Femtosecond, laser pulses.

  17. The modified SRRS threshold criteria for high peak power laser pulses in long air-path transmission considering the near-field beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C. Y.; Lin, D. Y.; Lu, Z. W.; Wang, Y. X.; Wang, Z.; Liang, L. X.; Ba, D. X.

    2016-11-01

    This paper demonstrates that the stimulated rotational Raman scattering (SRRS) threshold for high peak power laser pulses propagating through a long air path can be influenced strongly by the near-field quality of the laser beams, and the relationship between the SRRS threshold and the near-field beam quality (i.e., spatial intensity modulation index and contrast ratio) can be evaluated quantitatively. By using our three-dimensional numerical model, which can describe the spatial-temporal evolution behaviors of SRRS and is verified by previously published SRRS experimental data, the criteria of the safe transmission distance for high peak power nanosecond laser pulses are obtained, and the modified SRRS threshold criterion formulas considering the near-field beam conditions are presented.

  18. Generation of runaway electrons and X-ray emission during breakdown of atmospheric-pressure air by voltage pulses with an ∼0.5-μs front duration

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-03-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the generation of runaway electron beams and X-ray emission in atmospheric-pressure air by using voltage pulses with an ∼0.5-μs front duration. It is shown that the use of small-curvature-radius spherical cathodes (or other cathodes with small curvature radii) decreases the intensity of the runaway electron beam and X-ray emission. It is found that, at sufficiently high voltages at the electrode gap (U{sub m} ∼ 100 kV), the gap breakdown, the formation of a spark channel, and the generation of a runaway electron beam occur over less than 10 ns. At high values of U{sub m} behind the anode that were reached by increasing the cathode size and the electrode gap length, a supershort avalanche electron beam with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of up to ∼100 ps was detected. At voltages of ∼50 kV, the second breakdown regime was revealed in which a runaway electron beam with an FWHM of ∼2 ns was generated, whereas the FWHM of the X-ray pulse increased to ∼100 ns. It is established that the energy of the bulk of runaway electrons decreases with increasing voltage front duration and is ⩽30 keV in the first regime and ⩽10 keV in the second regime.

  19. Effects of void size and gas content on electrical breakdown in lightweight, mechanically compliant, void-filled dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. A.; Lagasse, R. R.; Russick, E. M.; Schroeder, J. L.

    2002-03-01

    Dielectric potting materials (encapsulants) are used to prevent air breakdown in high-voltage electrical devices. We report breakdown strengths in void-filled encapsulants, stressed with unipolar voltage pulses of the order of 10 μs duration. High strengths, on the order of 100 kV mm-1, are measured under these test conditions. The materials studied include low-density open celled gel-derived foams with cell sizes of 4 μm or less, closed celled CO2-blown polystyrene and urethane foams, and epoxies containing 48 vol % of hollow glass microballoon (GMB) fillers. These last specimens varied the void gas (N2 or SO2) and also the void diameters (tens to hundreds of μm). Our measurements are thought to be directly sensitive to the rate of field-induced ionization events in the void gas; however, the breakdown strengths of the materials tested appeared to vary in direct proportion with the conventional Paschen-law gas-discharge inception threshold, the electric stress at which gas-ionization avalanches become possible. The GMB-epoxy specimens displayed this type of dependence of breakdown strength on the void-gas density and void size, but the measurements were an order of magnitude above the conventional predictions. Small-celled foams also showed increased breakdown strengths with decreased cell size, although their irregular void geometry prevented a direct comparison with the more uniformly structured microballoon-filled encapsulants. The experimental observations are consistent with a breakdown mechanism in which the discharge of a few voids can launch a full breakdown in the composite material.

  20. Intense microwave pulse propagation through gas breakdown plasmas in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, D.P.

    1986-10-08

    High-power microwave pulse-compression techniques are used to generate 2.856 GHz pulses which are propagated in a TE/sub 10/ mode through a gas filled section of waveguide, where the pulses interact with self-generated gas-breakdown plasmas. Pulse envelopes transmitted through the plasmas, with duration varying from 2 ns to greater than 1 ..mu..s, and peak powers of a few kW to nearly 100 MW, are measured as a function of incident pulse and gas pressure for air, nitrogen, and helium. In addition, the spatial and temporal development of the optical radiation emitted by the breakdown plasmas are measured. For transmitted pulse durations greater than or equal to 100 ns, good agreement is found with both theory and existing measurements. For transmitted pulse duration as short as 2 ns (less than 10 rf cycles), a two-dimensional model is used in which the electrons in the plasma are treated as a fluid whose interactions with the microwave pulse are governed by a self-consistent set of fluid equations and Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field. The predictions of this model for air are compared with the experimental results over a pressure range of 0.8 torr to 300 torr. Good agreement is obtained above about 1 torr pressure, demonstrating that microwave pulse propagation above the breakdown threshold can be accurately modeled on this time scale. 63 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  2. Laser-induced gas breakdown - Spectroscopic and chemical studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Montgolfier, PH.; Dumont, P.; Mille, Y.; Villermaux, J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the results of several experimental investigations on laser-induced gas breakdown. The experiments included time-resolved spectroscopy, direct detection of H atoms with a TiO2 probe, and chemical reactions; each of them provided insight into the behavior of the medium at different times. Chemical reactions and explosions have been initiated by the laser beam when a plasma was created. No primary multiphotonic absorption and no macroscopic chemical reactions were observed below the breakdown threshold.

  3. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  4. A new multipollutant, no-threshold air quality health index based on short-term associations observed in daily time-series analyses.

    PubMed

    Stieb, David M; Burnett, Richard T; Smith-Doiron, Marc; Brion, Orly; Shin, Hwashin Hyun; Economou, Vanita

    2008-03-01

    Air quality indices currently in use have been criticized because they do not capture additive effects of multiple pollutants, or reflect the apparent no-threshold concentration-response relationship between air pollution and health. We propose a new air quality health index (AQHI), constructed as the sum of excess mortality risk associated with individual pollutants from a time-series analysis of air pollution and mortality in Canadian cities, adjusted to a 0-10 scale, and calculated hourly on the basis of trailing 3-hr average pollutant concentrations. Extensive sensitivity analyses were conducted using alternative combinations of pollutants from single and multipollutant models. All formulations considered produced frequency distributions of the daily maximum AQHI that were right-skewed, with modal values of 3 or 4, and less than 10% of values at 7 or above on the 10-point scale. In the absence of a gold standard and given the uncertainty in how to best reflect the mix of pollutants, we recommend a formulation based on associations of nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulate matter of median aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microm with mortality from single-pollutant models. Further sensitivity analyses revealed good agreement of this formulation with others based on alternative sources of coefficients drawn from published studies of mortality and morbidity. These analyses provide evidence that the AQHI represents a valid approach to formulating an index with the objective of allowing people to judge the relative probability of experiencing adverse health effects from day to day. Together with health messages and a graphic display, the AQHI scale appears promising as an air quality risk communication tool.

  5. Intrinsic laser-induced breakdown of silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, Leonid B.

    2002-03-01

    This paper is a survey of experimental results in laser- induced damage observed mainly at State Optical Institute (St. Petersburg, Russia; at School of Optics/CREOL (Orlando, FL) which expounds conditions of observation of an intrinsic breakdown of high-purity silicate glasses and proposes the general idea of its mechanism. It is shown that the surface laser-induced breakdown of dielectrics is resulted from photo- and thermo-ionization of surface defects but not from interaction of laser radiation with dielectric material itself. Conditions of thermal ionization of the volume of dielectric materials are determined in dependence on features of absorption of material and temporal features of laser radiation. Statistical properties of laser-induced breakdown of high-purity glasses are caused by statistical properties of laser radiation while the breakdown itself is a deterministic process. Elimination of impact of self-focusing on the results of the breakdown threshold measurements is observed if the spot size of laser radiation in focal plane is less than the wavelength. No photoionization of glass matrix is detected before laser- induced breakdown, and there is no effect of photoionization of impurities and defects on intrinsic breakdown. A mechanism of intrinsic laser-induced breakdown is proposed which is a spasmodic transformation of the electronic level structure in a wide-bandgap dielectric caused by the electric field of laser radiation. This is a collective process converting a transparent material to the opaque state but not an individual process of any type of ionization.

  6. Analysis of Laser Breakdown Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Experiments on laser breakdown for ns pulses of 532 nm or 1064 nm light in water and dozens of simple hydrocarbon liquids are analyzed and compared to widely-used models and other laser breakdown experiments reported in the literature. Particular attention is given to the curve for the probability of breakdown as a function of the laser fluence at the beam focus. Criticism is made of the na"ive forms of both ``avalanche'' breakdown and multi-photon breakdown. It appears that the process is complex and is intimately tied to the chemical group of the material. Difficulties with developing an accurate model of laser breakdown in liquids are outlined.

  7. Direct measurements of sample heating by a laser-induced air plasma in pre-ablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    PubMed

    Register, Janna; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Angel, S Michael

    2012-08-01

    Direct measurements of temperature changes were made using small thermocouples (TC), placed near a laser-induced air plasma. Temperature changes up to ~500 °C were observed. From the measured temperature changes, estimates were made of the amount of heat absorbed per unit area. This allowed calculations to be made of the surface temperature, as a function of time, of a sample heated by the air plasma that is generated during orthogonal pre-ablation spark dual-pulse (DP) LIBS measurements. In separate experiments, single-pulse (SP) LIBS emission and sample ablation rate measurements were performed on nickel at sample temperatures ranging from room temperature to the maximum surface temperature that was calculated using the TC measurement results (500 °C). A small, but real sample temperature-dependent increase in both SP LIBS emission and the rate of sample ablation was found for nickel samples heated up to 500 °C. Comparison of DP LIBS emission enhancement values for bulk nickel samples at room temperature versus the enhanced SP LIBS emission and sample ablation rates observed as a function of increasing sample temperature suggests that sample heating by the laser-induced air plasma plays only a minor role in DP LIBS emission enhancement.

  8. Breakdown of interdependent directed networks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xueming; Stanley, H. Eugene; Gao, Jianxi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that real-world systems interact with one another via dependency connectivities. Failing connectivities are the mechanism behind the breakdown of interacting complex systems, e.g., blackouts caused by the interdependence of power grids and communication networks. Previous research analyzing the robustness of interdependent networks has been limited to undirected networks. However, most real-world networks are directed, their in-degrees and out-degrees may be correlated, and they are often coupled to one another as interdependent directed networks. To understand the breakdown and robustness of interdependent directed networks, we develop a theoretical framework based on generating functions and percolation theory. We find that for interdependent Erdős–Rényi networks the directionality within each network increases their vulnerability and exhibits hybrid phase transitions. We also find that the percolation behavior of interdependent directed scale-free networks with and without degree correlations is so complex that two criteria are needed to quantify and compare their robustness: the percolation threshold and the integrated size of the giant component during an entire attack process. Interestingly, we find that the in-degree and out-degree correlations in each network layer increase the robustness of interdependent degree heterogeneous networks that most real networks are, but decrease the robustness of interdependent networks with homogeneous degree distribution and with strong coupling strengths. Moreover, by applying our theoretical analysis to real interdependent international trade networks, we find that the robustness of these real-world systems increases with the in-degree and out-degree correlations, confirming our theoretical analysis. PMID:26787907

  9. Beauty in the Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Most human beings look at erosion as the destruction of a surface, but artists can see that erosion often creates indefinable beauty. Where do you see beauty in the breakdown? In this article, the author presents an innovative lesson that would allow students to observe both human and physical nature. In this activity students will create a work…

  10. Measuring Breakdown Voltage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auer, Herbert J.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses an aspect of conductivity, one of the electrical properties subdivisions, and describes a tester that can be shop-built. Breakdown voltage of an insulation material is specifically examined. Test procedures, parts lists, diagrams, and test data form are included. (MF)

  11. Threshold Conditions for Terahertz Laser Discharge in Atmospheric Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubarev, V. V.; Getmanov, Ya. V.; Shevchenko, O. A.; Koshlyakov, P. V.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we accurately measured the breakdown thresholds in four atmospheric gases using the high-power terahertz radiation of the Novosibirsk free electron laser (NovoFEL). The breakdown intensities of the 130-μm radiation in a form of 74-ps pulses were equal to 1.1-1.4 GW/cm2. These data have been compared with calculations based on a phenomenological criterion for a breakdown and the classical theory of stochastic microwave heating of electrons. Presented are threshold conditions for a quasi-continuous plasma discharge that is maintained by means of a sequence of pulses of the NovoFEL. At a pulse repetition rate of 5.6 MHz, the discharge quenching thresholds are 15-60% lower than the breakdown thresholds depending on the amount of plasma emerging.

  12. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, L. F.; Gollapinni, S.; James, C. C.; Jones, B. J.P.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Naples, D.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Schukraft, A.; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.; Wolbers, S. A.

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  13. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  14. Metal/dendrimer nanocomposites for enhanced optical breakdown: acoustic characterization and initial targeted cell uptake study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Christine; Lesniak, Wojciech; Balogh, Lajos P.; Ye, Jing Yong; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2007-02-01

    Metal/dendrimer nanocomposites (DNCs) uniquely combine the properties of metallic clusters and the biofriendly polymer host in a nanosized hybrid particle. DNCs can biochemically target tissues and locally reduce femtosecond optical breakdown thresholds, making highly precise and selective photodisruption possible. In this study, we have used high-frequency acoustic monitoring of bubble production dynamics to investigate how DNC properties, solution concentration, and optical parameters affect threshold reduction, actual waiting time, and mechanical characteristics of breakdown. Breakdown is defined here as bubble production with an onset of less than 20 seconds after laser exposure. DNC properties varied include metal content (silver, gold) and terminal group (amino-NH II, glycidol-OH, and carboxyl- COOH) which determine pH values. Results indicate that DNC metal content markedly influences solution threshold reduction, while DNC terminal group (and thus net surface charge) and solution concentration influence the details of breakdown at these reduced threshold fluences. {Ag(0)} DNCs reduce breakdown threshold fluence 1-2 orders of magnitude more than {Au(0)} DNCs. Furthermore, concentrated DNC solutions and DNCs carrying a net negative charge (carboxyl terminal groups) increase bubble production up to four times and shorten waiting time for breakdown from seconds to milliseconds. Increasing laser fluence for a given DNC solution concentration also shortens breakdown waiting time. Lastly, utilizing the fluorescence properties of silver nanocomposites, we use confocal microscopy to examine KB cell uptake of folate targeted silver DNCs. Cells incubated with folate targeted silver DNCs exhibit a measurable increase of intracellular fluorescence compared to control cells (no DNC incubation). However, while we observe a threshold reduction in KB cells incubated with 500nM folate-targeted DNC solution, there is no threshold reduction in cells incubated with 50nM folate

  15. Experimental Study on Electrical Breakdown for Devices with Micrometer Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guodong; Cheng, Yonghong; Dong, Chengye; Wu, Kai

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of electrical breakdown in atmospheric air across micrometer gaps is critically important for the insulation design of micro & nano electronic devices. In this paper, planar aluminum electrodes with gaps ranging from 2 μm to 40 μm were fabricated by microelectromechanical system technology. The influence factors including gap width and surface dielectric states were experimentally investigated using the home-built test and measurement system. Results showed that for SiO2 layers the current sustained at 2-3 nA during most of the pre-breakdown period, and then rose rapidly to 10-30 nA just before breakdown due to field electron emission, followed by the breakdown. The breakdown voltage curves demonstrated three stages: (1) a constantly decreasing region (the gap width d < 5 μm), where the field emission effect played an important role just near breakdown, supplying enough initial electrons for the breakdown process; (2) a plateau region with a near constant breakdown potential (5 μm < d < 10 μm) (3) a region for large gaps that adhered to Paschen's curve (d > 10 μm). And the surface dielectric states including the surface resistivity and secondary electron yield were verified to be related to the propagation of discharge due to the interaction between initial electrons and dielectrics.

  16. VUV Radiation and Breakdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-28

    ultraviolet light on surface breakdown. The first experimental setup was designed so that VUV emission from an excited surface flashover event is focused onto...name attached. Garrett Rogers An experimental setup used to study pulsed dielectric surface flashover in various gases at atmospheric pressure...radiation on streamer propagation. A significant amount of VUV emission was observed from excited surface flashover events, and most of this

  17. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  18. Electrical Breakdown in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarson, Harold; Zutavern, Fred; Kambour, Kenneth; Moore, Chris; Mar, Alan

    During electron breakdown of a solid subjected to a large electric field, impact ionization causes growth of an electron-hole plasma. This growth process is opposed by Auger recombination of the electron-hole pairs. In our work, such breakdown is investigated by obtaining steady-state solutions to the Boltzmann equation. In these calculations, the carriers are heated by the electric field and cooled by phonon emission. Our results imply that breakdown may lead to high carrier-density current filaments. Conductive filaments have been observed in optically-triggered, high-power photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices being developed at Sandia Labs. The relationship between the steady-state computed solutions to the observed filaments will be discussed in the presentation. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Methods to Increase Electrical Breakdown Threshold of Polystyrene Insulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    in applications where high voltage is applied to dielectric insulators . Results in [2] have shown that flashover on or near the surface of the...Studies conducted in [9] have shown a direct correlation between shape of the insulator and surface flashover . Changing the angle of the...and vacuum technologies to modify the microscale structures on the surface of the polymer insulators in an effort to increase the electrical strength

  20. The Magnification of Atomic Lines Intensity Originated by laser Breakdown in Ultrasound Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, A. V.; Nagorny, I. G.

    Atomic lines of some chemical elements like sodium and magnesium were investigated for laser breakdown of water with the ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of these atomic lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained. It is shown that the method of registration of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone allows to investigate thresholds and dynamics of laser breakdown which will be in accord with high-speed optical methods. The study revealed important practical applications of acoustic emission for breakdown and diagnostics of cavitation in opaque environments.

  1. Research into vortex breakdown control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Anthony M.; Délery, Jean

    2001-05-01

    Vortex breakdown remains a significant and intriguing phenomenon that can have detrimental or beneficial effects, depending on the application. Thus there is a strong need to both better understand the phenomenon and to control it, either to prevent breakdown or to promote it. For the past 50 years, multiple flow control techniques have demonstrated the ability to manipulate the vortex breakdown location over slender delta wings at high angles of attack. An extensive historical review of these diverse control methods, mechanical and pneumatic, steady or periodic, is presented and discussed; however, none of these techniques has clearly demonstrated a superior efficiency or effectiveness in controlling either the vortical flow structure or the vortex breakdown location. Each technique, does, on the other hand, provide a unique approach to the control of the vortex breakdown depending on the desired outcome. There are still major obstacles to overcome before the control of vortex breakdown is implemented in flight. For example, oscillations of the vortex breakdown locations are difficult to quantify and to identify. The often poor effectiveness of control techniques can be in great part attributed to insufficient knowledge of breakdown and in an inability to accurately predict breakdown. When considering the large quantity of studies aimed at vortex breakdown control and their relative success, it is clear that decisive progress in this domain will require further basic investigations to clearly elucidate the physics of the phenomenon and to improve the predictive capability.

  2. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-12-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as Hw varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small Hw, the AMF effect dominates. As Hw increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  3. Picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 5321 and 5347 A - Observation of frequency-dependent behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented of picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 3547 and 5321 A of several materials. The thresholds obtained for breakdown at 5321 A are compared to previous results obtained at 1.064 microns using the same laser system. This comparison illustrates the transition of bulk laser-induced breakdown as it becomes increasingly frequency dependent. UV picosecond pulses are obtained by mixing 5321 A and 1.064 micron pulses in a KH2PO4 crystal. Upper and lower bounds on the 3547 A breakdown threshold are defined, although some effects of walk-off distortion and self-focusing are observed. The results are discussed with reference to models for the intrinsic processes involved in the breakdown, i.e., avalanche and multiphoton ionization.

  4. Microwave assisted laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljanen, Jan; Sun, Zhiwei; Alwahabi, Zeyad T.

    2016-04-01

    Signal enhancements in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using external microwave power are demonstrated in ambient air. Pulsed microwave at 2.45 GHz and of 1 millisecond duration was delivered via a simple near field applicator (NFA), with which an external electric field is generated and coupled into laser induced plasma. The external microwave power can significantly increase the signal lifetime from a few microseconds to hundreds of microseconds, resulting in a great enhancement on LIBS signals with the use of a long integration time. The dependence of signal enhancement on laser energy and microwave power is experimentally assessed. With the assistance of microwave source, a significant enhancement of ~ 100 was achieved at relatively low laser energy that is only slightly above the ablation threshold. A limit of detection (LOD) of 8.1 ppm was estimated for copper detection in Cu/Al2O3 solid samples. This LOD corresponds to a 93-fold improvement compared with conventional single-pulse LIBS. Additionally, in the microwave assisted LIBS, the self-reversal effect was greatly reduced, which is beneficial in measuring elements of high concentration. Temporal measurements have been performed and the results revealed the evolution of the emission process in microwave-enhanced LIBS. The optimal position of the NFA related to the ablation point has also been investigated.

  5. On Preliminary Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, W. H.; Petersen, D.

    2013-12-01

    The preliminary breakdown phase of a negative cloud-to-ground lightning flash was observed in detail. Observations were made with a Photron SA1.1 high-speed video camera operating at 9,000 frames per second, fast optical sensors, a flat-plate electric field antenna covering the SLF to MF band, and VHF and UHF radio receivers with bandwidths of 20 MHz. Bright stepwise extensions of a negative leader were observed at an altitude of 8 km during the first few milliseconds of the flash, and were coincident with bipolar electric field pulses called 'characteristic pulses'. The 2-D step lengths of the preliminary processes were in excess of 100 meters, with some 2-D step lengths in excess of 200 meters. Smaller and shorter unipolar electric field pulses were superposed onto the bipolar electric field pulses, and were coincident with VHF and UHF radio pulses. After a few milliseconds, the emerging negative stepped leader system showed a marked decrease in luminosity, step length, and propagation velocity. Details of these events will be discussed, including the possibility that the preliminary breakdown phase consists not of a single developing lightning leader system, but of multiple smaller lightning leader systems that eventually join together into a single system.

  6. Control of vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, H.; Shtern, F.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    The paper develops means of vortex breakdown (VB) control with the help of Controlling Vortex Generators (CVGs). Vortex breakdown plays the crucial role in many practical swirling flows, e.g. (a) leading-edge vortices above delta wings create a strong lift and (b) trailing vortices behind large aircraft disturbances are potentially dangerous to subsequent aircraft. It is useful to prevent VB in case (a) and to stimulate VB in case (b). We have recently obtained significant theoretical and experimental results related to swirling flow prediction and control. Firstly, a theory has been developed which models jump transitions in swirling flow (e.g. jumps in VB locations) and predicts ranges of control parameters where multiple stable states occur. Secondly, our experiments have revealed that effective control (enhancement and suppression) of VB can be achieved using CVGs. In our experiments we have used a thin rotaing rod as a CVG, placed along the axis of the basic swirling flow in a sealed cylinder driven by the rotating bottom disc. The effect of the rod depends on the direction of the rotation. With increasing rod co-rotational speed, the VB 'bubble' (VBB) becomes smaller and then disappear, and a cone-shaped wake forms. Counter-rotation of the rod causes increases VBBs' diameter and makes the flow unsteady. The VBBs begin to advect downstream, undergo tearing and pairing, and, hence, enhance mixing.

  7. Breakdown of organic insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells and their associated electrical interconnects and leads were encapsulated in transparent elastomeric materials. Their purpose in a photovoltaic module, one of the most important for these elastomeric encapsulation materials, is to function as electrical insulation. This includes internal insulation between adjacent solar cells, between other encapsulated electrical parts, and between the total internal electrical circuitry and external metal frames, grounded areas, and module surfaces. Catastrophic electrical breakdown of the encapsulant insulation materials or electrical current through these materials or module edges to external locations can lead to module failure and can create hazards to humans. Electrical insulation stability, advanced elastomeric encapsulation materials are developed which are intended to be intrinsically free of in-situ ionic impurities, have ultralow water absorption, be weather-stable (UV, oxygen), and have high mechanical flexibility. Efforts to develop a method of assessing the life potential of organic insulation materials in photovoltaic modules are described.

  8. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    Microwave breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps was studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  9. Breakdown in the pretext tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Benesch, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    Data are presented on the application of ion cyclotron resonance RF power to preionization in tokamaks. We applied 0.3-3 kW at 12 MHz to hydrogen and obtained a visible discharge, but found no scaling of breakdown voltage with any parameter we were able to vary. A possible explanation for this, which implies that higher RF power would have been much more effective, is discussed. Finally, we present our investigation of the dV/dt dependence of breakdown voltage in PRETEXT, a phenomenon also seen in JFT-2. The breakdown is discussed in terms of the physics of Townsend discharges.

  10. Basic study of transient breakdown voltage in solid dielectric cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahder, G.; Sosnowski, M.; Katz, C.

    1980-09-01

    A comprehensive review of the technical and scientific publications relating to crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) and ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) insulated cables revealed that there is very little known with respect to the life expectancy, the final factory voltage test background and the mechanism of voltage breakdown of these cables. A new methodology for the investigation of breakdown voltages of XLPE and EPR insulated cables was developed which is based on the investigation of breakdown voltages at various voltage transients such as unipolarity pulses and dual-polarity pulses, and a.c. voltage at power and high frequency. Also, a new approach to statistical testing was developed which allows one to establish a correlation among the breakdown voltages obtained with various voltage transients. Finally, a method for the determination of threshold voltage regardless of the magnitude of apparent charge was developed. A model of breakdown and electrical aging of XLPE and EPR insulated cables was developed as well as life expectancy characteristics for high voltage stress XLPE insulated cables operated in a dry environment at room temperature and at 900 C.

  11. Acoustic localization of breakdown in radio frequency accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Peter

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  12. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Peter Gwin

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  13. Nonlinear Theory and Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The main points of recent theoretical and computational studies on boundary-layer transition and turbulence are to be highlighted. The work is based on high Reynolds numbers and attention is drawn to nonlinear interactions, breakdowns and scales. The research focuses in particular on truly nonlinear theories, i.e. those for which the mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original state. There appear to be three such theories dealing with unsteady nonlinear pressure-displacement interactions (I), with vortex/wave interactions (II), and with Euler-scale flows (III). Specific recent findings noted for these three, and in quantitative agreement with experiments, are the following. Nonlinear finite-time break-ups occur in I, leading to sublayer eruption and vortex formation; here the theory agrees with experiments (Nishioka) regarding the first spike. II gives rise to finite-distance blowup of displacement thickness, then interaction and break-up as above; this theory agrees with experiments (Klebanoff, Nishioka) on the formation of three-dimensional streets. III leads to the prediction of turbulent boundary-layer micro-scale, displacement-and stress-sublayer-thicknesses.

  14. Fully kinetic model of breakdown during sheath expansion after interruption of vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Wang, Haoran; Zhou, Zhipeng; Tian, Yunbo; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-01

    Research on sheath expansion is critical to the understanding of the dielectric recovery process in a vacuum interrupter after interruption of vacuum arcs. In this paper, we investigated how residual plasma affects breakdown in the sheath expansion period after the current zero. To simulate sheath expansion and breakdown, we developed a fully kinetic particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision model with one spatial dimension and three velocity dimensions. The model accounted for various collisions, including ionization, excitation, elastic collisions, charge exchange, and momentum exchange, and we added an external circuit to the model to make the calculations self-consistent. The existence of metal vapor slowed the sheath expansion in the gap and caused high electric field formation in front of the cathode surface. The initial residual plasma, which was at sufficiently low density, seemed to have a limited impact on breakdown, and the metal vapor dominated the breakdown in this case. Additionally, the breakdown probability was sensitive to the initial plasma density if the value exceeded a specific threshold, and plasma at sufficiently high density could mean that breakdown would occur more easily. We found that if the simulation does not take the residual plasma into account, it could overestimate the critical value of the metal vapor density, which is always used to describe the boundary of breakdown after interruption of vacuum arcs. We discussed the breakdown mechanism in sheath expansion, and the breakdown is determined by a combination of metal vapor, residual plasma, and the electric field in front of the cathode surface.

  15. Dark current related breakdown mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Faya; Ge, Lixin

    2012-12-01

    High power tests of an 805 MHz pillbox cavity for the Muon Collider program have shown that the breakdown related damage increases and the sustainable gradient decreases with the application of a strong external magnetic field. To try to explain these results, a model of dark current associated breakdown was formulated and simulated with the Track3P code. The results show in general how the gradient could be reduced as function of magnetic field. This paper summarizes these studies to date.

  16. Femtosecond laser induced breakdown for combustion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzagianni, M.; Couris, S.

    2012-06-25

    The focused beam of a 100 fs, 800 nm laser is used to induce a spark in some laminar premixed air-methane flames operating with variable fuel content (equivalence ratio). The analysis of the light escaping from the plasma revealed that the Balmer hydrogen lines, H{sub {alpha}} and H{sub {beta}}, and some molecular origin emissions were the most prominent spectral features, while the CN ({Beta}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}-{Chi}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}) band intensity was found to depend linearly with methane content, suggesting that femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be a useful tool for the in-situ determination and local mapping of fuel content in hydrocarbon-air combustible mixtures.

  17. Generalized Chapman-Enskog continuum breakdown parameters for chemically reacting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Subramaniam, Sharanya; Stephani, Kelly A.

    2016-12-01

    The generalized Chapman-Enskog (GCE) method for rapid and slow thermochemical processes is employed to formulate a set of continuum breakdown parameters for chemically reacting flows. These GCE breakdown parameters are derived for one-temperature, two-temperature, and three-temperature models, through classification of the relevant thermochemical time scales relative to fast elastic collisional processes and slow flow processes associated with changes in macroscopic observables. Continuum breakdown mechanisms owing to multicomponent diffusion, thermal diffusion, normal and shear stresses, Fourier-type heat fluxes based on translational, rotational, and vibrational temperatures, bulk viscosity, and relaxation pressure are presented for chemically reacting flows. The GCE breakdown parameters, derived from rigorous kinetic theory, capture the proper physical mechanism leading to continuum breakdown. These breakdown parameters are used to analyze continuum breakdown in a Mach 24 reacting air flow over a sphere and continuum breakdown is observed in the shock and close to the sphere surface. The flow field near the sphere surface is found to be characterized by sharp species concentration gradients due to gas-phase and surface reactions. Chemical reactions thus lead indirectly to the distortion of the velocity distribution function (VDF), providing a pathway to continuum breakdown that is captured by the GCE specieswise diffusion breakdown parameter.

  18. Fast shut-down protection system for radio frequency breakdown and multipactor testing.

    PubMed

    Graves, T P; Hanson, P; Michaelson, J M; Farkas, A D; Hubble, A A

    2014-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) breakdown such as multipactor or ionization breakdown is a device-limiting phenomenon for on-orbit spacecraft used for communication, navigation, or other RF payloads. Ground testing is therefore part of the qualification process for all high power components used in these space systems. This paper illustrates a shut-down protection system to be incorporated into multipactor/ionization breakdown ground testing for susceptible RF devices. This 8 channel system allows simultaneous use of different diagnostic classes and different noise floors. With initiation of a breakdown event, diagnostic signals increase above a user-specified level, which then opens an RF switch to eliminate RF power from the high power amplifier. Examples of this system in use are shown for a typical setup, illustrating the reproducibility of breakdown threshold voltages and the lack of multipactor conditioning. This system can also be utilized to prevent excessive damage to RF components in tests with sensitive or flight hardware.

  19. Study of radio frequency breakdown in pressurized L-band waveguide for the International Linear Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Faya; Adolphsen, Chris; Nantista, Christopher

    2013-09-01

    An L-band (1.3 GHz) radio frequency (rf) waveguide system was assembled at SLAC to test components of a high power distribution scheme proposed for the International Linear Collider (ILC). All parts were made of aluminum and pressurized with dry nitrogen. The rf breakdown rate measured in this resonantly powered system is presented as a function of field level at different gas pressures and rf pulse widths (typically, only breakdown thresholds are reported.). The data are compared to predictions of a simple model which relates the breakdown phenomenon to the rate at which the free electron density builds in the gas.

  20. The role of morphology and coupling of gold nanoparticles in optical breakdown during picosecond pulse exposures

    PubMed Central

    Davletshin, Yevgeniy R

    2016-01-01

    Summary This paper presents a theoretical study of the interaction of a 6 ps laser pulse with uncoupled and plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles. We show how the one-dimensional assembly of particles affects the optical breakdown threshold of its surroundings. For this purpose we used a fully coupled electromagnetic, thermodynamic and plasma dynamics model for a laser pulse interaction with gold nanospheres, nanorods and assemblies, which was solved using the finite element method. The thresholds of optical breakdown for off- and on-resonance irradiated gold nanosphere monomers were compared against nanosphere dimers, trimers, and gold nanorods with the same overall size and aspect ratio. The optical breakdown thresholds had a stronger dependence on the optical near-field enhancement than on the mass or absorption cross-section of the nanostructure. These findings can be used to advance the nanoparticle-based nanoscale manipulation of matter. PMID:27547604

  1. Dramatically enhanced electrical breakdown strength in cellulose nanopaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianwen; Zhou, Yuanxiang; Zhou, Zhongliu; Liu, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Electrical breakdown behaviors of nanopaper prepared from nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) were investigated. Compared to conventional insulating paper made from micro softwood fibers, nanopaper has a dramatically enhanced breakdown strength. Breakdown field of nanopaper is 67.7 kV/mm, whereas that of conventional paper is only 20 kV/mm. Air voids in the surface of conventional paper are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Further analyses using mercury intrusion show that pore diameter of conventional paper is around 1.7 μ m , while that of nanopaper is below 3 nm. Specific pore size of nanopaper is determined to be approximately 2.8 nm by the gas adsorption technique. In addition, theoretical breakdown strengths of nanopaper and conventional paper are also calculated to evaluate the effect of pore size. It turns out that theoretical values agree well with experimental data, indicating that the improved strength in nanopaper is mainly attributed to the decreased pore size. Due to its outstanding breakdown strength, this study indicates the suitability of nanopaper for electrical insulation in ultra-high voltage convert transformers and other electrical devices.

  2. Electrical breakdown in tissue electroporation.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Mikus, Paul; Stehling, Michael K; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-11-27

    Electroporation, the permeabilization of the cell membrane by brief, high electric fields, has become an important technology in medicine for diverse application ranging from gene transfection to tissue ablation. There is ample anecdotal evidence that the clinical application of electroporation is often associated with loud sounds and extremely high currents that exceed the devices design limit after which the devices cease to function. The goal of this paper is to elucidate and quantify the biophysical and biochemical basis for this phenomenon. Using an experimental design that includes clinical data, a tissue phantom, sound, optical, ultrasound and MRI measurements, we show that the phenomenon is caused by electrical breakdown across ionized electrolysis produced gases near the electrodes. The breakdown occurs primarily near the cathode. Electrical breakdown during electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon of substantial importance to the outcome of clinical applications. It was ignored, until now.

  3. Breakdown properties of epoxy nanodielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Cantoni, Claudia; More, Karren Leslie; James, David Randy; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in polymeric dielectric nanocomposites have shown that these novel materials can improve design of high voltage (hv) components and systems. Some of the improvements can be listed as reduction in size (compact hv systems), better reliability, high energy density, voltage endurance, and multifunctionality. Nanodielectric systems demonstrated specific improvements that have been published in the literature by different groups working with electrical insulation materials. In this paper we focus on the influence of in-situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles on the dielectric breakdown characteristics of an epoxy-based nanocomposite system. The in-situ synthesis of the particles creates small nanoparticles on the order of 10 nm with narrow size distribution and uniform particle dispersion in the matrix. The breakdown strength of the nanocomposite was studied as a function of TiO{sub 2} concentration at cryogenic temperatures. It was observed that between 2 and 6wt% yields high breakdown values for the nanodielectric.

  4. Electrical Breakdown in Water Vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Skoro, N.; Maric, D.; Malovic, G.; Petrovic, Z. Lj.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-11-15

    In this paper investigations of the voltage required to break down water vapor are reported for the region around the Paschen minimum and to the left of it. In spite of numerous applications of discharges in biomedicine, and recent studies of discharges in water and vapor bubbles and discharges with liquid water electrodes, studies of the basic parameters of breakdown are lacking. Paschen curves have been measured by recording voltages and currents in the low-current Townsend regime and extrapolating them to zero current. The minimum electrical breakdown voltage for water vapor was found to be 480 V at a pressure times electrode distance (pd) value of around 0.6 Torr cm ({approx}0.8 Pa m). The present measurements are also interpreted using (and add additional insight into) the developing understanding of relevant atomic and particularly surface processes associated with electrical breakdown.

  5. Solvable models of material breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leath, P. L.; Duxbury, P. M.

    The history of the study of fracture of materials is briefly reviewed. Then the importance of analytically solvable models in understanding material breakdown is illustrated by a review of the work of Duxbury, Leath and Beale on simple analytically solvable models of fuse network breakdown in brittle systems. We then review recent work extending this analytically to include close pairs of clusters of defects or double clusters, which also exhibit the double-exponential failure distribution. Finally, a new analytic recursion method is presented for breakdown of systems with linear cracks, but a continuous distribution of breaking strengths. Remarkably, these systems exhibit an optimum sample size where the failure probability can, at low stress, be reduced by many orders of magnitude below that of a single bond.

  6. Electrostatic Breakdown Analysis using EMsolve and BEMSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B; White, D

    2005-05-27

    Computer simulations modeling electrostatic behavior were used to simulate dielectric breakdown problems. These simulations modeled composite dielectric and conducting structures to see how much voltage difference or charge accumulation could occur before dielectric breakdown occurred in an air region. Two different computer codes were used for the analysis; EMSolve and BEMSTER. EMSolve, an existing LLNL internal finite element code, requires that a complete volume mesh of the problem be constructed. BEMSTER, a boundary-element code, was developed from an extension of the FEMSTER libraries which power EMSolve. The boundary-integral code offers the advantages of solving for accumulated charge and maximum electric field directly, and of only requiring a surface mesh. However, because it does not automatically solve for the voltage and electric field everywhere in space, post-processing and visualization are slightly more difficult than with EMSolve. Both codes were compared to several analytical solutions, and then applied to the structures of interest. Both codes showed good agreement with the analytic solution and with each other.

  7. Threshold Graph Limits and Random Threshold Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2010-01-01

    We study the limit theory of large threshold graphs and apply this to a variety of models for random threshold graphs. The results give a nice set of examples for the emerging theory of graph limits. PMID:20811581

  8. Required thermal thresholds during transport of animals.

    PubMed

    Schrama, J W; van der Hel, W; Gorssen, J; Henken, A M; Verstegen, M W; Noordhuizen, J P

    1996-09-01

    Conditions (total complex of stressors) during the transport of animals vary strongly between and within transports. Adverse climatic conditions are stressors that animals have to face during transport. The thermoregulation of animals id discussed with respect to threshold values for optimal climatic conditions. These thermal thresholds depend on animal related factors and environmental conditions. The specific impact of transport conditions, such as food and water deprivation, high stocking density, high humidity and high air velocity, on thermal thresholds are described.

  9. The structure of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibovich, S.

    1978-01-01

    The term 'vortex breakdown', as used in the reported investigation, refers to a disturbance characterized by the formation of an internal stagnation point on the vortex axis, followed by reversed flow in a region of limited axial extent. Two forms of vortex breakdown, which predominate, are shown in photographs. One form is called 'near-axisymmetric' (sometimes 'axisymmetric'), and the other is called 'spiral'. A survey is presented of work published since the 1972 review by Hall. Most experimental data taken since Hall's review have been in tubes, and the survey deals primarily with such cases. It is found that the assumption of axial-symmetry has produced useful results. The classification of flows as supercritical or subcritical, a step that assumes symmetry, has proved universally useful. Experiments show that vortex breakdown is always preceded by an upstream supercritical flow and followed by a subcritical wake. However, a comparison between experiments and attempts at prediction is less than encouraging. For a satisfactory understanding of the structure of vortex breakdown it is apparently necessary to take into account also aspects of asymmetry.

  10. 40 CFR 98.221 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.221 Section 98.221 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Nitric Acid Production § 98.221 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  11. 40 CFR 98.251 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.251 Section 98.251 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum Refineries § 98.251 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  12. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  13. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  14. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  15. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  16. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  17. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  18. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  19. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  20. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  1. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  2. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  3. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  4. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  5. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  6. RF breakdown studies in X-Band klystron cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.

    1997-05-01

    RF breakdown studies are presently being carried out at SLAC with klystron cavities in a traveling wave resonator (TWR). Different kinds of fabrication methods and several kinds of semiconducting and insulating coatings have been applied to X-Band TM{sub 010} cavities. RF breakdown thresholds up to 250 MV/m have been obtained. Dark current levels were found to be depressed on TiN-coated and single-point diamond turned cavities. A new TM{sub 020} cavity with demountable electrodes has been designed and will be used to test a variety of materials, coatings, and processes. Recent tests of klystron output windows at 119 MW are also presented in this paper.

  7. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for the Measurement of Spatial Structures and Fuel Distribution in Flames.

    PubMed

    Kotzagianni, Maria; Kakkava, Eirini; Couris, Stelios

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the mapping of local structures (i.e., reactants and products zones) and for the determination of fuel distribution by means of the local equivalence ratio ϕ in laminar, premixed air-hydrocarbon flames. The determination of laser threshold energy to induce breakdown in the different zones of flames is employed for the identification and demarcation of the local structures of a premixed laminar flame, while complementary results about fuel concentration were obtained from measurements of the cyanogen (CN) band Β(2)Σ(+)--Χ(2)Σ(+), (Δυ = 0) at 388.3 nm and the ratio of the atomic lines of hydrogen (Hα) and oxygen (O(I)), Hα/O. The combination of these LIBS-based methods provides a relatively simple to use, rapid, and accurate tool for online and in situ combustion diagnostics, providing valuable information about the fuel distribution and the spatial variations of the local structures of a flame.

  8. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  9. Effect of surface-breakdown plasma on metal drilling by pulsed CO2-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutiunian, P. V.; Baranov, V. Iu.; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'Shakov, L. A.; Dolgov, V. A.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of low-threshold surface breakdown produced by short (5-microsec) CO2-laser pulses on the metal drilling process is investigated. Data on the interaction of metals with laser pulses having the same duration but different shape are shown to be different. The effect of the ambient atmospheric pressure on the laser drilling process is investigated.

  10. Second Harmonic Breakdown in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y. S.; England, A. C.; Kwon, M.; Lee, G. S.

    2007-09-28

    An 84-GHz electron cyclotron heating (ECH) system is being installed on the KSTAR tokamak. KSTAR adopts ECH-assisted start-up for the flexibility and reliability of the KSTAR operation with the plasma breakdown voltage reduced. The available maximum power of the 84 GHz ECH system is presently 500 kW with maximum duration of 2 s. Currently, the second harmonic ECH-assisted start-up is under consideration because a low toroidal field of B{sub T}{approx}1.5 T is desirable for safety and also for the high-beta experiments in the initial operation phase. The studies in this paper are on the effectiveness of the second harmonic breakdown using a 0-D time dependent plasma evolution code and the comparison with the recent DIII-D experimental results on the second harmonic pre-ionization.

  11. Dielectric breakdown and avalanches at nonequilibrium metal-insulator transitions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Zapperi, Stefano; Sethna, James P

    2011-12-30

    Motivated by recent experiments on the finite temperature Mott transition in VO(2) films, we propose a classical coarse-grained dielectric breakdown model where each degree of freedom represents a nanograin which transitions from insulator to metal with increasing temperature and voltage at random thresholds due to quenched disorder. We describe the properties of the resulting nonequilibrium metal-insulator transition and explain the universal characteristics of the resistance jump distribution. We predict that by tuning voltage, another critical point is approached, which separates a phase of boltlike avalanches from percolationlike ones.

  12. Near-critical phase explosion promoting breakdown plasma ignition during laser ablation of graphite.

    PubMed

    Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Seleznev, L V

    2010-07-01

    Removal rate, air shock, and ablative recoil pressure parameters were measured as a function of laser intensity I(peak) during nanosecond laser ablation of graphite. Surface vaporization of molten graphite at low intensities I(peak)<0.15 GW/cm(2) was observed to transform into its near-critical phase explosion (intense homogeneous boiling) at the threshold intensity I(PE)≈0.15 GW/cm(2) in the form of a drastic, correlated rise of removal rate, air shock, and ablative recoil pressure magnitudes. Just above this threshold (I(peak)≥0.25 GW/cm(2)), the explosive mass removal ended up with saturation of the removal rate, much slower increase of the air and recoil pressure magnitudes, and appearance of a visible surface plasma spark. In this regime, the measured far-field air shock pressure amplitude exhibits a sublinear dependence on laser intensity (∝I(peak)(4/9)), while the source plasma shock pressure demonstrates a sublinear trend (∝I(peak)(3/4)), both indicating the subcritical character of the plasma. Against expectations, in this regime the plasma recoil pressure increases versus I(peak) superlinearly (∝I(peak)(1.1)), rather than sublinearly (∝I(peak)(3/4)), with the mentioned difference related to the intensity-dependent initial spatial plasma dimensions within the laser waist on the graphite surface and to the plasma formation time during the heating laser pulse (overall, the pressure source effect). The strict coincidence of the phase explosion, providing high (kbar) hydrodynamic pressures of ablation products, and the ignition of ablative laser plasma in the carbon plume may indicate the ablative pressure-dependent character of the underlying optical breakdown at the high plume pressures, initiating the plasma formation. The experimental data evidence that the spatiotemporal extension of the plasma in the laser plume and ambient air during the heating laser pulse is supported by fast lateral electron and radiative heat conduction (laser

  13. Breakdown mechanisms in electrostatic deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, M.; Cuttone, G.; Zappalà, E.; Passarello, S.

    2001-12-01

    The Electrostatic Beam Deflectors for the K800 Superconducting Cyclotron are the most critical elements of the beam extraction system. It has been carried out an accurate investigation from the microscopic point of view, leading to a better comprehension of the complex phenomena taking part in the breakdown process. The environmental conditions are high electric field (up to 130 kV/cm), high magnetic field (up to 5 T) in addition with high energy (70 MeV/u) and high power ion beam. It has been found that all the materials constituent the electrostatic deflector, and not only the electrodes, give an important contribute to the mechanism of breakdown that occurs in two main ways: insulator metalization and enhanced electrodes electron emission. These two effects are involved in a positive feedback process which amplifies the effects leading to a fast breakdown. These phenomena are here shown and some possible solutions are at the moment under test using several bulk (Mo, Ti, Cu) and coating materials (TiN, Diamond Like Carbon).

  14. Initiation of breakdown in slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.; Menne, S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The initiation of the breakdown process for axially symmetric compressible flows is investigated using a numerical solution of the conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy. The vortex is isolated, with its axis parallel to the direction of the main stream, and the core radius is small compared to the breakdown length. Computations for several flowfields indicate that the breakdown of the solution is shifted further downstream with increasing Mach number until breakdown is no longer observed. In the subsonic case, the influence of the initial temperature distribution on the breakdown length of the solution is more pronounced than in the supersonic case, with heating of the core enhancing breakdown, and cooling delaying it. The breakdown of the solution is seen to always occur for nonvanishing axial velocity components.

  15. Proposed RF Breakdown Studies at the AWA

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Spentzouris, L.; Yusof, Z.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    A study of breakdown mechanism has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. We plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV) to determine the role of explosive electron emission in the breakdown process. Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector [1] that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after the breakdown can shed some light on a number of observations such as the crater formation process.

  16. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  17. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  18. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  19. 1D PIC-DSMC simulations of breakdown in microscale gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Chris H.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Crozier, Paul S.; Boerner, Jeremiah J.; Musson, Lawrence C.; Hooper, Russell W.; Bettencourt, Matthew T.

    2012-11-01

    An explicit electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) code with complex boundary conditions and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) particle collisions is utilized to investigate one dimensional direct current breakdown between two electrodes separated by air at STP. The simulation model includes Auger neutralization and cold field electron emission from the cathode as well as electron-neutral elastic, ionization, and excitation interactions. The simulated breakdown voltages at various electrode gap sizes are compared to experimental data and the Paschen curve. It is found that cold field electron emission can explain the breakdown voltage deviation from the Paschen curve measured for small gaps. Breakdown in large gaps proceeds over multiple ion transit timescales as electrons created via Auger neutralization of ions at the cathode quickly stream across the gap, creating new ions which accelerate towards the cathode and release another "pulse" of electrons. If the resultant pulse of electrons is larger than the initial pulse, then this process can build up a significant quasi-neutral plasma in the gap and the voltage drop across the gap will occur primarily across the (thin) sheath. Breakdown is accelerated if the electric field at the cathode surface is large enough for significant cold field emission flux, which increases the plasma density and decreases the Debye length and thus the sheath size, further increasing the electric field and cold field emission flux from the cathode surface. Breakdown in air pressure gaps was found to be sensitive to the differential scattering cross section for electron-neutral interactions. Isotropic scattering of elastic collisions results in lower breakdown voltages at moderate gaps (several mean free paths) and higher breakdown voltages for large gap sizes compared to when more accurate forward-biased scattering distributions are used. The dependence of breakdown voltage on the scattering distribution is due to a competition

  20. Potential of tetracyclines to modify cartilage breakdown in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M E; Greenwald, R A; Golub, L M

    1996-05-01

    For several decades, it has been recognized that an imbalance between activated matrix metalloproteinases, generated locally by both infiltrating and resident cells, and their endogenous inhibitors may play a role in the pathologic breakdown of the joint extracellular matrix in osteoarthritis. This understanding has stimulated the search for a number of synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors that could serve as potential therapeutic agents. Tetracycline analogues are currently on the threshold of approval as anti-matrix metalloproteinases for another extracellular matrix-destructive disease, periodontitis, and this application could be extended to osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis therapy. In this regard, specially formulated low-dose regimens of a commercially available tetracycline, doxycycline, have been used in long-term clinical trials and were found to reduce extracellular matrix breakdown, including bone loss, in adult periodontitis. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition by tetracycline analogues is now recognized as complex, and multiple mechanisms have been proposed. A series of recently discovered nonantimicrobial chemically modified tetracyclines are potent inhibitors of several classes of matrix metalloproteinases, preventing collagen breakdown and bone loss in a variety of animal models, although these analogues have not yet been approved for human use. Various tetracyclines have reduced the severity of osteoarthritis in animal models, indicating therapeutic potential for this class of compounds in the future.

  1. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Bubbston-cluster structure under conditions of optical breakdown in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkin, N. F.; Lobeev, Alexander V.

    1994-04-01

    Earlier information on the bubbston-cluster structure of a liquid ('bubbston' is a stable microscopic gas bubble) is used in an analysis of two regimes of the optical breakdown of transparent liquids: steady-state and sporadic. Characteristic features of the sporadic breakdown regime are used to propose a new concept and to carry out measurements of the threshold intensity for the optical breakdown of a transparent liquid. It is shown that the temperature dependence of this intensity has a maximum and its dependence on the concentration of the dissolved electrolyte has a minimum.

  2. Physical mechanisms for reduction of the breakdown voltage in the circuit of a rod lightning protector with an opening microswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, Yu. K.; Zhuravkov, I. V.; Ostapenko, E. I.; Starikov, V. V.; Yurgelenas, Yu. V.

    2010-12-15

    The effect of air gap breakdown voltage reduction in the circuit with an opening microswitch is substantiated from the physical point of view. This effect can be used to increase the efficiency of lightning protection system with a rod lightning protector. The processes which take place in the electric circuit of a lightning protector with a microswitch during a voltage breakdown are investigated. Openings of the microswitch are shown to lead to resonance overvoltages in the dc circuit and, as a result, efficient reduction in the breakdown voltage in a lightning protector-thundercloud air gap.

  3. Static and Transient Cavitation Threshold Measurements for Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Moraga, F.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    Transient and static cavitation thresholds for mercury as a function of the cover gas (helium or air), and pressure are reported. Both static and transient cavitation onset pressure thresholds increase linearly with cover gas pressure. Additionally, the cavitation thresholds as a function of dissolved gases were also measured and are reported.

  4. High Voltage Water Breakdown Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Terman [20] gives the following equation for a rectangle that has sides that are S1 by S2 and is made up of a rectangular bar that is b by c, L = 0.02339...Dielectrics," Proc. Tenth IEEE Pulsed Power Confer- ence, June, 1995, p. 574. (UNCLASSIFIED) 86 (20) Terman , F. E., Radio Engineers’ Handbook, McGraw-Hill Book...34 Conference Rec- ord, Eighth International Conference on Conduction and Breakdown in Dielectric Liquids, pp. 176-179, July, 1984. Lewis , T. J., High

  5. Internal structure of a vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    An axisymmetric vortex breakdown was well simulated by the vortex filament method. The agreement with the experiment was qualitatively good. In particular, the structure in the interior of the vortex breakdown was ensured to a great degree by the present simulation. The second breakdown, or spiral type, which occurs downstream of the first axisymmetric breakdown, was simulated more similarly to the experiment than before. It shows a kink of the vortex filaments and strong three-dimensionality. Furthermore, a relatively low velocity region was observed near the second breakdown. It was also found that it takes some time for this physical phenomenon to attain its final stage. The comparison with the experiment is getting better as time goes on. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the comparison of the simulated results with the experiment. The present results help to make clear the mechanism of a vortex breakdown.

  6. On a criterion for vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, R. E.; Gatski, T. B.; Grosch, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    A criterion for the onset of vortex breakdown is proposed. Based upon previous experimental, computational, and theoretical studies, an appropriately defined local Rossby number is used to delineate the region where breakdown occurs. In addition, new numerical results are presented which further validate this criterion. A number of previous theoretical studies concentrating on inviscid standing-wave analyses for trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and reinterpreted in terms of the Rossby number criterion. Consistent with previous studies, the physical basis for the onset of breakdown is identified as the ability of the flow to sustain such waves. Previous computational results are reviewed and re-evaluated in terms of the proposed breakdown criterion. As a result, the cause of breakdown occurring near the inflow computational boundary, common to several numerical studies, is identified. Finally, previous experimental studies of vortex breakdown for both leading edge and trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and quantified in terms of the Rossby number criterion.

  7. In vivo laser-induced breakdown in the rabbit eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Roach, William P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for femtosecond laser pulsewidths have been made for retinal minimum visible lesions (MVLs) in Dutch Belted rabbit and rhesus monkey eyes. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water have been measured and reported using an artificial eye. We have recorded on video the first LIB causing bubble formation in any eye in vivo using albino rabbit eyes (New Zealand white) with 120- femtosecond (fs) pulses and pulse energies as low as 5 microjoules ((mu) J). These bubbles were clearly formed anterior to the retina within the vitreous humor and, with 60 (mu) J of energy, they lasted for several seconds before disappearing and leaving no apparent damage to the retina. We believe this to be true LIB because of the lack of pigmentation or melanin granules within the albino rabbit eye (thus no absorptive elements) and because of the extremely high peak powers within the 5-(mu) J, 120-fs laser pulse. These high peak powers produce self-focusing of the pulse within the vitreous. The bubble formation at the breakdown site acts as a limiting mechanism for energy transmission and may explain why high-energy femotsecond pulses at energies up to 100 (mu) J sometimes do not cause severe damage in the pigmented rabbit eye. This fact may also explain why it is so difficult to produce hemorrhagic lesions in either the rabbit or primate eye with 100-fs laser pulses.

  8. RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-07

    RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview May 7, 2015 Preston T. Partridge Antenna Systems Department Communication Systems Implementation...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 Product Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8802-14-C...5 - 7, 2015 RF Breakdown Prevention, Part 2 James Farrell, Boeing Satellite Systems Dr. Jeffrey P. Tate, Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems Preston

  9. Bulk optical damage thresholds for doped and undoped, crystalline and ceramic yttrium aluminum garnet.

    PubMed

    Do, Binh T; Smith, Arlee V

    2009-06-20

    We measured the bulk optical damage thresholds of pure and Nd-doped ceramic yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG), and of pure, Nd-doped, Cr-doped, and Yb-doped crystalline YAG. We used 9.9 ns, 1064 nm, single-longitudinal mode, TEM00 pulses, to determine that the breakdown thresholds are deterministic, with multiple-pulse thresholds ranging from 1.1 to 2.2 kJ/cm2.

  10. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2016-03-22

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of high voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.

  11. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    DOE PAGES

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2016-03-22

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of highmore » voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.« less

  12. Relativistic breakdown in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2007-04-15

    In 2003, a new electrical breakdown mechanism involving the production of runaway avalanches by positive feedback from runaway positrons and energetic photons was introduced. This mechanism, which shall be referred to as 'relativistic feedback', allows runaway discharges in gases to become self-sustaining, dramatically increasing the flux of runaway electrons, the accompanying high-energy radiation, and resulting ionization. Using detailed Monte Carlo calculations, properties of relativistic feedback are investigated. It is found that once relativistic feedback fully commences, electrical breakdown will occur and the ambient electric field, extending over cubic kilometers, will be discharged in as little as 2x10{sup -5} s. Furthermore, it is found that the flux of energetic electrons and x rays generated by this mechanism can exceed the flux generated by the standard relativistic runaway electron model by a factor of 10{sup 13}, making relativistic feedback a good candidate for explaining terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and other high-energy phenomena observed in the Earth's atmosphere.

  13. Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements. The WBS and WBS dictionary are effective management processes for planning, organizing, and administering NASA programs and projects. The guidance contained in this document is applicable to both in-house, NASA-led effort and contracted effort. It assists management teams from both entities in fulfilling necessary responsibilities for successful accomplishment of project cost, schedule, and technical goals. Benefits resulting from the use of an effective WBS include, but are not limited to: providing a basis for assigned project responsibilities, providing a basis for project schedule development, simplifying a project by dividing the total work scope into manageable units, and providing a common reference for all project communication.

  14. Hybrid Breakdown in Cichlid Fish

    PubMed Central

    Stelkens, Rike Bahati; Schmid, Corinne; Seehausen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Studies from a wide diversity of taxa have shown a negative relationship between genetic compatibility and the divergence time of hybridizing genomes. Theory predicts the main breakdown of fitness to happen after the F1 hybrid generation, when heterosis subsides and recessive allelic (Dobzhansky-Muller) incompatibilities are increasingly unmasked. We measured the fitness of F2 hybrids of African haplochromine cichlid fish bred from species pairs spanning several thousand to several million years divergence time. F2 hybrids consistently showed the lowest viability compared to F1 hybrids and non-hybrid crosses (crosses within the grandparental species), in agreement with hybrid breakdown. Especially the short- and long-term survival (2 weeks to 6 months) of F2 hybrids was significantly reduced. Overall, F2 hybrids showed a fitness reduction of 21% compared to F1 hybrids, and a reduction of 43% compared to the grandparental, non-hybrid crosses. We further observed a decrease of F2 hybrid viability with the genetic distance between grandparental lineages, suggesting an important role for negative epistatic interactions in cichlid fish postzygotic isolation. The estimated time window for successful production of F2 hybrids resulting from our data is consistent with the estimated divergence time between the multiple ancestral lineages that presumably hybridized in three major adaptive radiations of African cichlids. PMID:25996870

  15. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  16. The effect of gas bubbles on electrical breakdown in transformer oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Sargsyan, M. A.; Akimov, P. L.; Demirov, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    To study the breakdown of transformer oil with gas bubbles an experimental setup was created that allows to determine electrical and optical properties of the discharge. Oil was sparged with air and sulfur hexafluoride gas. It was found that sparging oil with gas lowers the breakdown voltage of the oil. When a gas bubble is present between the electrodes at a considerable distance from the electrodes at first there is a spherically shape flash observed, resulting in the discharge gap overlapping by a conductive channel. These leads to discharges forming in the discharge gap with the frequency of hundreds Hz and higher. Despite the slightly lower breakdown voltage of oil sparged with sulfur hexafluoride the advantage of this medium to clean oil can serve as a two-phase medium damping properties, which may be sufficient to prevent the destruction of the body in the breakdown of oil-filled equipment.

  17. Note: A novel technique for analysis of aqueous solutions by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rusak, D. A.; Bell, Z. T.; Anthony, T. P.

    2015-11-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates typically consist of gold or silver nanoparticles deposited on a non-conductive substrate. In Raman spectroscopy, the nanoparticles produce an enhancement of the electromagnetic field which, in turn, leads to greater electronic excitation of molecules in the local environment. Here, we show that these same surfaces can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio obtained in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aqueous solutions. In this case, the SERS substrates not only lower breakdown thresholds and lead to more efficient plasma initiation but also provide an appropriately wettable surface for the deposition of the liquid. We refer to this technique as surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  18. Single and repetitive short-pulse high-power microwave window breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Tang, C. X.; Shao, H.; Chen, C. H.; Huang, W. H.

    2010-05-15

    The mechanisms of high-power microwave breakdown for single and repetitive short pulses are analyzed. By calculation, multipactor saturation with electron density much higher than the critical plasma density is found not to result in microwave cutoff. It is local high pressure about Torr class that rapid plasma avalanche and final breakdown are realized in a 10-20 ns short pulse. It is found by calculation that the power deposited by saturated multipactor and the rf loss of protrusions are sufficient to induce vaporizing surface material and enhancing the ambient pressure in a single short pulse. For repetitive pulses, the accumulation of heat and plasma may respectively carbonize the surface material and lower the repetitive breakdown threshold.

  19. Quasiresonant laser-produced plasma: An efficient mechanism for localized breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, A.C.

    1980-09-01

    This paper deals semiquantitatively with the phenomenon of quasiresonant laser-produced plasma (QRLPP) generation, i.e., breakdown of an atomic vapor when a laser beam couples a resonant excited state with a high excited state. The origin of the breakdown, threshold conditions for the breakdown, and the the effect of inducible absorption are discussed. Furthermore, the QRLPP may exhibit an unusual asymmetrical behavior (observed for a Cs plasma) when the single mode cw dye laser is tuned near the quasiresonant absorption line: on the low-frequency wing, ''noise-reduction'' effect for the transmitted beam is observed, while on the high-frequency wing, ''self-oscillation'' of the plasma is observed. The self-oscillation seems to result from a periodic plasma diffusion from the laser focus. The QRLPP, produced by cw or pulsed lasers, is a very efficient plasma generation mechanism which appears to be useful for many atomic vapors, and the potential applications are discussed.

  20. Effect of viscosity on thermocapillary breakdown of a falling liquid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, D. V.; Semenov, A. A.; Kabov, O. A.

    2016-07-01

    Thermocapillary breakdown of a liquid film flowing due to gravity over a vertical plate with a heater of 150×150 mm is studied in a wide range of liquid properties (in particular, dynamic viscosity at the initial temperature varies from 0.91·10-3 to 16.9·10-3 Pa·s) and film Reynolds number (Re = 0.15-53.5). It is found that liquid viscosity has a significant effect on the threshold heat flux corresponding to film breakdown. To take into account the effect of liquid properties, the breakdown criterion traditionally used in literature was modified. This allowed successful generalization of all data obtained.

  1. Breakdown Limits on Gigavolt-per-Meter Electron-Beam-Driven Wakefields in Dielectric Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. C.; Badakov, H.; Cook, A. M.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Tikhoplav, R.; Travish, G.; Blumenfeld, I.; Hogan, M. J.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R. B.

    2008-05-01

    First measurements of the breakdown threshold in a dielectric subjected to GV/m wakefields produced by short (30 330 fs), 28.5 GeV electron bunches have been made. Fused silica tubes of 100μm inner diameter were exposed to a range of bunch lengths, allowing surface dielectric fields up to 27GV/m to be generated. The onset of breakdown, detected through light emission from the tube ends, is observed to occur when the peak electric field at the dielectric surface reaches 13.8±0.7GV/m. The correlation of structure damage to beam-induced breakdown is established using an array of postexposure inspection techniques.

  2. Breakdown Limits on Gigavolt-per-Meter Electron-Beam-Driven Wakefields in Dielectric Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Cook, A.M.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Tikhoplav, R.; Travish, G.; Blumenfeld, I.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.B.; /Manhattan Coll., Riverdale

    2008-06-17

    First measurements of the breakdown threshold in a dielectric subjected to GV/m wakefields produced by short (30-330 fs), 28.5 GeV electron bunches have been made. Fused silica tubes of 100 {micro}m inner diameter were exposed to a range of bunch lengths, allowing surface dielectric fields up to 27 GV/m to be generated. The onset of breakdown, detected through light emission from the tube ends, is observed to occur when the peak electric field at the dielectric surface reaches 13.8 {+-} 0.7 GV/m. The correlation of structure damage to beam-induced breakdown is established using an array of postexposure inspection techniques.

  3. Measurements of Intense Femtosecond Laser Pulse Propagation in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    Intense femtosecond pulses generated from chirped pulse amplification (CPA) lasers can deliver laser powers many times above the critical power for self-focusing in air. Catastrophic collapse of the laser pulse is usually prevented by the defocusing of the plasma column formed when the laser intensity gets above the threshold for multiphoton ionization. The resultant laser/plasma filament can extend many meters as the laser pulse propagates in the atmosphere. We have carried out a series of experiments both for understanding the formation mechanisms of the filaments and the nonlinear effects such as white light and harmonics generation associated with them. Many applications of these filaments such as remote atmospheric breakdown, laser induced electrical discharge and femtosecond laser material interactions require direct measurements of their characteristics. Direct measurements of these filaments had been difficult because the high laser intensity ( ˜10^13 W/cm^2) can damage practically any optical diagnostics. A novel technique was invented to obtain the first absolute measurements of laser energy, transverse profile, fluence and spectral content of the filaments. We are investigating a ``remote atmospheric breakdown'' concept of remotely sensing chemical and biological compounds. A short intense laser pulse can be generated at a remote position by using the group velocity dispersion (GVD) of the air to compress an initially long, frequency negatively chirped laser pulse to generate the air breakdown and filaments. We have observed that nonlinear contributions to the laser spectrum through self-phase modulation can lead to modification of the linear GVD compression. We have also observed the generation of ultraviolet (UV) radiations from these filaments in air and the induced fluorescence by the UV radiation of a surrogate biological agent. These and other results such as laser induced electrical discharges will be presented.

  4. Characterizing plasma mirrors near breakdown.

    PubMed

    Geissel, Matthias; Schollmeier, Marius S; Kimmel, Mark W; Rambo, Patrick K; Schwarz, Jens; Atherton, Briggs W; Brambrink, Erik

    2011-05-01

    Experiments dedicated to the characterization of plasma mirrors with a high energy, single shot short-pulse laser were performed at the 100 TW target area of the Z-Backlighter Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. A suite of beam diagnostics was used to characterize a high energy laser pulse with a large aperture through focus imaging setup. By varying the fluence on the plasma mirror around the plasma ignition threshold, critical performance parameters were determined and a more detailed understanding of the way in which a plasma mirror works could be deduced. It was found, that very subtle variations in the laser near field profile will have strong effects on the reflected pulse if the maximum fluence on the plasma mirror approaches the plasma ignition threshold.

  5. HRS Threshold Adjustment Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1991-07-01

    This test will determine the optimal, non-standard discriminator thresholds for the few anomalous channels on each HRS detector. A 15 second flat field observation followed by a 210 second dark count is performed at each of 10 discriminator threshold values for each detector. The result of the test will be the optimal threshold values to be entered into the PDB. Edited 4/30/91 to add comments to disable/re-enable cross-talk tables.

  6. Threshold-Switchable Particles (TSP) to Control Internal Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    concentration should exceed the clotting threshold and restore hemostasis. Our continuing approaches include the development and application of chemistries...catalyze the conversion of the zymogen Factor V to its active form and slow the breakdown of fibrin clots [2, 3]. With its role now clearly established...Microfluidic chamber assay for determining clotting in response to local activator concentration. (A) The formation of fibrin in < 5 μl of plasma is

  7. Scintillation Breakdowns in Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Scintillations in solid tantalum capacitors are momentarily local breakdowns terminated by a self-healing or conversion to a high-resistive state of the manganese oxide cathode. This conversion effectively caps the defective area of the tantalum pentoxide dielectric and prevents short-circuit failures. Typically, this type of breakdown has no immediate catastrophic consequences and is often considered as nuisance rather than a failure. Scintillation breakdowns likely do not affect failures of parts under surge current conditions, and so-called "proofing" of tantalum chip capacitors, which is a controllable exposure of the part after soldering to voltages slightly higher than the operating voltage to verify that possible scintillations are self-healed, has been shown to improve the quality of the parts. However, no in-depth studies of the effect of scintillations on reliability of tantalum capacitors have been performed so far. KEMET is using scintillation breakdown testing as a tool for assessing process improvements and to compare quality of different manufacturing lots. Nevertheless, the relationship between failures and scintillation breakdowns is not clear, and this test is not considered as suitable for lot acceptance testing. In this work, scintillation breakdowns in different military-graded and commercial tantalum capacitors were characterized and related to the rated voltages and to life test failures. A model for assessment of times to failure, based on distributions of breakdown voltages, and accelerating factors of life testing are discussed.

  8. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  9. Calculations of Second Breakdown in Silicon Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Diodes Area I ’ x 10-4 cm 2 *****~*... ... *.*. 35 "Mai" 1. INTRODUCTION The phenomenon of second breakdown was first reported in diodes by Tauc ...written for study of electrical breakdown in gases, 8 modified for study of 1 J. Tauc and A . Abraham, Thermal Breakdown in Silicon P-N Junctions...this plot was chosen to be the first time that VB, (80 V) was attained. Both figures 13 and 14 110 , 0 loI --- - - 1 0 100 10 1 ,0 Figure 13. Dynamic

  10. Electrodynamic thermal breakdown of a capacitor insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'Yanov, O. A.

    2011-11-01

    A mechanism of the electrical breakdown is proposed for modern metal-field capacitors with the well-known property of self-healing of the breakdown strength. Upon an increase in the working voltage, the self-healing time increases to tens of microseconds, and the heating of adjacent insulator layers becomes significant. The propagating thermally activated conduction wave facilitates the enhancement of the electric field up to breakdown values. Analysis of the dynamics of electric field increase is carried out for capacitors based on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) dielectric.

  11. RF Breakdown in High Frequency Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Doebert, S

    2004-05-27

    RF breakdown in high-frequency accelerators appears to limit the maximum achievable gradient as well as the reliability of such devices. Experimental results from high power tests, obtained mostly in the framework of the NLC/GLC project at 11 GHz and from the CLIC study at 30 GHz, will be used to illustrate the important issues. The dependence of the breakdown phenomena on rf pulse length, operating frequency and fabrication material will be described. Since reliability is extremely important for large scale accelerators such as a linear collider, the measurements of breakdown rate as a function of the operating gradient will be highlighted.

  12. Influence of pulse duration on mechanical effects after laser-induced breakdown in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, Joachim; Hammer, Daniel X.; Noojin, Gary D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Vogel, Alfred

    1998-06-01

    The influence of the pulse duration on the mechanical effects following laser-induced breakdown in water was studied at pulse durations between 100 fs and 100 ns. Breakdown was generated by focusing laser pulses into a cuvette containing distilled water. The pulse energy corresponded to 6-times breakdown threshold energy. Plasma formation and shock wave emission were studied photographically. The plasma photographs show a strong influence of self-focusing on the plasma geometry for femtosecond pulses. Streak photographic recording of the shock propagation in the immediate vicinity of the breakdown region allowed the measurement of the near-field shock pressure. At the plasma rim, shock pressures between 3 and 9 GPa were observed for most pulse durations. The shock pressure rapidly decays proportionally to r-(2⋯3) with increasing distance r from the optical axis. At a 6 mm distance of the shock pressure has dropped to (8.5±0.6) MPa for 76 ns and to <0.1 MPa for femtosecond pulses. The radius of the cavitation bubble is reduced from 2.5 mm (76 ns pulses) to less than 50 μm for femtosecond pulses. Mechanical effects such as shock wave emission and cavitation bubble expansion are greatly reduced for shorter laser pulses, because the energy required to produce breakdown decreases with decreasing pulse duration, and because a larger fraction of energy is required to overcome the heat of vaporization with femtosecond pulses.

  13. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  14. Optimization of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for coal powder analysis with different particle flow diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shunchun; Xu, Jialong; Dong, Xuan; Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Jianping; Lu, Jidong

    2015-08-01

    The on-line measurement of coal is extremely useful for emission control and combustion process optimization in coal-fired plant. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy was employed to directly analyze coal particle flow. A set of tapered tubes were proposed for beam-focusing the coal particle flow to different diameters. For optimizing the measurement of coal particle flow, the characteristics of laser-induced plasma, including optical breakdown, the relative standard deviation of repeated measurement, partial breakdown spectra ratio and line intensity, were carefully analyzed. The comparison of the plasma characteristics among coal particle flow with different diameters showed that air breakdown and the random change in plasma position relative to the collection optics could significantly influence on the line intensity and the reproducibility of measurement. It is demonstrated that the tapered tube with a diameter of 5.5 mm was particularly useful to enrich the coal particles in laser focus spot as well as to reduce the influence of air breakdown and random changes of plasma in the experiment.

  15. Construction of a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Joseph; Palmer, Andria; Amos, James; Dynka, Tom; Ujj, Lazlo

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical and atomic composition of materials. The third harmonic output of a Nd:YAG Q-switched laser generating 5ns pulses with 10Hz repetition rate was used to ablate the sample and create a micro-plasma. The emission of the radiating plasma was focused into an optical fiber with 0.22 numerical aperture. The spectra was measured with an Ocean Optics micro spectrometer. A synchronized shutter was used to select single laser pulses. In order to reach the breakdown threshold of the sample using the available energy of the laser pulses (<5 mJ) a beam expander and a parabolic mirror was used for tight focusing. The optical and technical details including the characterization of the system will be presented. LIBS spectra taken from a variety of metal and organic samples show appropriate selectivity for quantitative and qualitative analysis for materials. UWF NIH MARC U-STAR 1T34GM110517-01, UWF Office of Undergraduate Research.

  16. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  17. Breakdown in a bulk of transparent solids under irradiation of a nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Z. U.; Grigorov, Y. V.; Tran, K. A.; Janulewicz, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    A single pulse of a nanosecond laser was tightly focused in the bulk of transparent materials (soda lime glass, borosilicate glass, fused silica , sapphire and Gorilla Glass) to a beam spot diameter of ~ 2.1μm. A value of the total energy absorbed in the materials was measured with corrections for the transmitted, scattered and reflected components of the incident energy. It was found that 3-11% of the incident radiation was scattered but the total absorption still achieved a very high level of up to 88%. Absorptance dependence on the incident fluence was reasonably approximated by the sigmoidal Hill function. Here we suggest using this analytical description to identify empirical intrinsic laser-induced breakdown threshold (LIBT). Optical damage threshold (ODT) was identified by optical inspection. The results for some materials suggest significantly lower breakdown threshold than that reported earlier for more loosely focused beams. A study of the damage area morphology with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high resolution transmission microscope (HRTEM) revealed existence of the shock waves-affected area with a localized nano-crystallization. Spectroscopic study of the light emission accompanying breakdown showed typical quasi-continuum emission with temperature as high as 8917K (0.8 eV).

  18. Breakdown Voltage of Thermoplastics with Clay Nanometer-Sized Fillers (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    surface flashover (without insulating gas or liquid immersion), and enable bulk breakdown. Sixty Hz ac voltage was applied from a Biddle 582040KV-3 KVA...Lawrence F. Drummy, John C. Horwath, Daniel L. Schweickart, and Richard A. Vaia Electrical Technology & Plasma Physics Branch Power Division... Plasma Physics Branch (AFRL/RZPE) Power Division Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433-7251

  19. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.431 Section 98.431 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Importers and Exporters of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Contained in...

  20. Edge overload breakdown in evolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter

    2002-09-01

    We investigate growing networks based on Barabási and Albert's algorithm for generating scale-free networks, but with edges sensitive to overload breakdown. The load is defined through edge betweenness centrality. We focus on the situation where the average number of connections per vertex is, like the number of vertices, linearly increasing in time. After an initial stage of growth, the network undergoes avalanching breakdowns to a fragmented state from which it never recovers. This breakdown is much less violent if the growth is by random rather than by preferential attachment (as defines the Barabási and Albert model). We briefly discuss the case where the average number of connections per vertex is constant. In this case no breakdown avalanches occur. Implications to the growth of real-world communication networks are discussed.

  1. Microwave cavity diagnostics of microwave breakdown plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eckstrom, D.J.; Williams, M.S.

    1989-08-01

    We have performed microwave cavity perturbation measurements in the LLNL AIM facility using a 329-MHz cavity that allow us to examine in detail the plasma formation and decay processes for electron densities between approximately 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7}/cm{sup 3}. We believe these to be the lowest density plasmas ever studied in microwave breakdown experiments, and as such they allow us to determine the power and energy required to produce plasmas suitable for HF radar reflection as well as the effective lifetimes of these plasmas before re-ionization is required. Analyses of these results leads to the following conclusions. (1) For microwave breakdown pulses varying from 0.6 to 2.4 {mu}s, the threshold power required to produce measurable plasmas is 30 to 12 MW/m{sup 2} at 0.01 torr, decreasing to 3.5 to 1.8 MW/m{sup 2} at 1 to 3 torr, and then increasing to 5 to 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} at 30 torr. The threshold power in each case decreases with increasing pulse length, but the required pulse energy increases with decreasing power or increasing pulse length. (2) The effective electron density decay rates are approximately 100/s for 0.1 to 1 torr, after which they increase linearly with pressure. Thus, the useful plasma lifetimes are in the range of 20 to 40 ms at the lower pressures and decrease to about 1 ms at 30 torr. These decay rates and lifetimes are comparable to those that would exist for artificially ionized regions in the upper atmosphere. (3) The collision frequencies measured at pressures of 1 torr and above correspond to electron temperatures of 800 K or less. In fact, the inferred temperatures for p > 3 torr are below room temperature. This may be due to a contribution to the measured conductivity by negative ions.

  2. Initiation of breakdown in slender compressible vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.; Menne, S.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    The onset of vortex breakdown in compressible flows is investigated analytically for the case in which the flow is axially symmetric, the vortex is isolated, its axis is parallel to the main flow, and the vortex radius is small compared to the breakdown length. The conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy are formulated and solved numerically using a finite-difference scheme, as described by Krause (1985); numerical results are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  3. Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

  4. Breakdown phenomena in high power klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoyt, E.W.; Lebacqz, J.V.; Lee, T.G.

    1988-03-01

    In the course of developing new high peak power klystrons at SLAC, high electric fields in several regions of these devices have become an important source of vacuum breakdown phenomena. In addition, a renewed interest in breakdown phenomena for nanosecond pulse, multi-megavolt per centimeter fields has been sparked by recent R and D work in the area of gigawatt RF sources. The most important regions of electrical breakdown are in the output cavity gap area, the RF ceramic windows, and the gun ceramic insulator. The details of the observed breakdown in these regions, experiments performed to understand the phenomena and solutions found to alleviate the problems will be discussed. Recently experiments have been performed on a new prototype R and D klystron. Peak electric fields across the output cavity gaps of this klystron exceed 2 MV/cm. The effect of peak field duration (i.e. pulse width) on the onset of breakdown have been measured. The pulse widths varied from tens of nanoseconds to microseconds. Results from these experiments will be presented. The failure of ceramic RF windows due to multipactor and puncturing was an important problem to overcome in order that our high power klystrons would have a useful life expectancy. Consequently many studies and tests were made to understand and alleviate window breakdown phenomena. Some of the results in this area, especially the effects of surface coatings, window materials and processing techniques and their effects on breakdown will be discussed. Another important source of klystron failure in the recent past at SLAC has been the puncturing of the high voltage ceramic insulator in the gun region. A way of alleviating this problem has been found although the actual cause of the puncturing is not yet clear. The ''practical'' solution to this breakdown process will be described and a possible mechanism for the puncturing will be presented. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lucia, Frank C.; Harmon, Russell S.; McNesby, Kevin L.; Winkel, Raymond J.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2003-10-01

    A number of energetic materials and explosives have been studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). They include black powder, neat explosives such as TNT, PETN, HMX, and RDX (in various forms), propellants such as M43 and JA2, and military explosives such as C4 and LX-14. Each of these materials gives a unique spectrum, and generally the spectra are reproducible shot to shot. We observed that the laser-produced microplasma did not initiate any of the energetic materials studied. Extensive studies of black powder and its ingredients by use of a reference spectral library have demonstrated excellent accuracy for unknown identification. Finally, we observed that these nitrogen- and oxygen-rich materials yield LIBS spectra in air that have correspondingly different O:N peak ratios compared with air. This difference can help in the detection and identification of such energetic materials.

  6. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  7. DC-driven plasma gun: self-oscillatory operation mode of atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet comprised of repetitive streamer breakdowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingxing; Shashurin, Alexey

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents and studies helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet comprised of a series of repetitive streamer breakdowns, which is driven by pure DC high voltage (self-oscillatory behavior). The repetition frequency of the breakdowns is governed by the geometry of discharge electrodes/surroundings and gas flow rate. Each next streamer is initiated when the electric field on the anode tip recovers after the previous breakdown and reaches the breakdown threshold value of about 2.5 kV cm-1. One type of the helium plasma gun designed using this operational principle is demonstrated. The gun operates on about 3 kV DC high voltage and is comprised of the series of the repetitive streamer breakdowns at a frequency of about 13 kHz.

  8. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown. Stylar end breakdown is a physiological breakdown starting at the base...

  9. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown. Stylar end breakdown is a physiological breakdown starting at the base of the nipple as a grayish...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury, scald, or other injury....

  11. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563....1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury....

  12. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563....1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury....

  13. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury, scald, or other injury....

  14. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  15. A computational study of the topology of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations has been performed. Solutions to four distinct types of breakdown are identified and compared with experimental results. The computed solutions include weak helical, double helix, spiral, and bubble-type breakdowns. The topological structure of the various breakdowns as well as their interrelationship are studied. The data reveal that the asymmetric modes of breakdown may be subject to additional breakdowns as the vortex core evolves in the streamwise direction. The solutions also show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown.

  16. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Optical breakdown of quartz glass by XeF laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosov, A. V.; Barabanov, V. S.; Gerasimov, S. Yu; Morozov, Nikolai V.; Sergeev, P. B.; Stepanchuk, V. N.

    1994-04-01

    The bulk optical strengths of KU1 and KUVI quartz glasses were determined for pulses of 85 ns duration at the wavelength of 353 nm. The damage thresholds of these materials were the same and amounted to 280 GW cm-2. The optical breakdown thresholds of KU1 at λ = 248 nm and λ = 193 nm, obtained earlier for the same samples under otherwise identical conditions, were used together with the present results to plot the wavelength dependence of the damage threshold of this material. These results showed that nonlinear absorption is the main mechanism responsible for damage to quartz glass in high-intensity ultraviolet laser radiation fields.

  17. Numerical analysis of excimer laser-induced breakdown of Kr gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamam, Kholoud A.; Elsayed, Khaled A.; Gamal, Yosr E. E.

    2017-03-01

    The present paper displays a numerical study on the role of electron dynamics in relation to the dependence of the threshold intensity on the pressure in the breakdown of gases by laser radiation. The analysis aimed to find out the origin of the steep slope observed in the measurements of threshold intensity against gas pressure in the breakdown of Kr induced by an excimer laser source (Opt. Commun. 13:66-68, 1). The experiment was carried out using wavelength 248 nm and pulse width of 18 ns for a gas pressure range 4.5-300 torr. The investigation centered on an adaptation of our previously developed electron cascade model given in Evans and Gamal (J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 13:1447-1458, 2). This model solves numerically a time-dependent energy equation simultaneously with a set of rate equations that describe the change of the population of the formed excited states. The modifications introduced into the model the realistic structure of the krypton gas atom as well as electron diffusion as a loss process to inspect the experimentally tested low-pressure regime. A computer program is undertaken to determine the breakdown threshold intensity as a function of gas pressure. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the calculated thresholds and measured ones, corresponding to the examined pressure range. This agreement validates the applicability of the model. The relationship between the role of the physical mechanisms and gas pressure is studied by analyzing the EEDF and its parameters at selected pressure values that cover the experimentally tested range. The result of this study clarified that electron diffusion out of the focal region is responsible for the steep slope of the threshold intensities for pressures <75 torr. For higher pressures (75-300 torr), collisional excitation of ground-state atoms followed by their ionization via multiphoton and collisional processes acts to convert the Kr gas in the interaction region into the state of breakdown. Investigation of

  18. Propagation of long, high-power microwave pulses through the air

    SciTech Connect

    Khanaka, G.H.; Yee, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    The passage of long, high-power microwave pulses in the atmosphere was studied using a one-dimensional computer code. The objective of this study was to obtain a time history of the electron conductivity and peak density, as well as the peak plasma density. The results are summarized as follows: (1) the threshold level depends on pulse frequency and length; (2) electron avalanche occurs only when the pulse intensity exceeds the threshold level for air break-down, and this results in tail erosion; (3) for higher pulse intensities, it requires less time to initiate electron avalanche, which results in transmitting smaller portions of the pulse; (4) the general characteristics of the electron density, conductivity, and plasma frequency are quite similar for both cases; and (5) as the pulse amplitude rises, the electron conductivity and density and the plasma frequency also rise. 10 figs.

  19. Picosecond electric-field-induced threshold switching in phase-change materials [THz-induced threshold switching and crystallization of phase-change materials

    DOE PAGES

    Zalden, Peter; Shu, Michael J.; Chen, Frank; ...

    2016-08-05

    Many chalcogenide glasses undergo a breakdown in electronic resistance above a critical field strength. Known as threshold switching, this mechanism enables field-induced crystallization in emerging phase-change memory. Purely electronic as well as crystal nucleation assisted models have been employed to explain the electronic breakdown. Here, picosecond electric pulses are used to excite amorphous Ag4In3Sb67Te26. Field-dependent reversible changes in conductivity and pulse-driven crystallization are observed. The present results show that threshold switching can take place within the electric pulse on subpicosecond time scales—faster than crystals can nucleate. As a result, this supports purely electronic models of threshold switching and reveals potentialmore » applications as an ultrafast electronic switch.« less

  20. Picosecond electric-field-induced threshold switching in phase-change materials [THz-induced threshold switching and crystallization of phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zalden, Peter; Shu, Michael J.; Chen, Frank; Wu, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Yi; Wen, Haidan; Johnston, Scott; Shen, Zhi -Xun; Landreman, Patrick; Brongersma, Mark; Fong, Scott W.; Wong, H. -S. Philip; Sher, Meng -Ju; Jost, Peter; Kaes, Matthias; Salinga, Martin; von Hoegen, Alexander; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2016-08-05

    Many chalcogenide glasses undergo a breakdown in electronic resistance above a critical field strength. Known as threshold switching, this mechanism enables field-induced crystallization in emerging phase-change memory. Purely electronic as well as crystal nucleation assisted models have been employed to explain the electronic breakdown. Here, picosecond electric pulses are used to excite amorphous Ag4In3Sb67Te26. Field-dependent reversible changes in conductivity and pulse-driven crystallization are observed. The present results show that threshold switching can take place within the electric pulse on subpicosecond time scales—faster than crystals can nucleate. As a result, this supports purely electronic models of threshold switching and reveals potential applications as an ultrafast electronic switch.

  1. Basic study of transient breakdown voltage in solid dielectric cables. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bahder, G.; Sosnowski, M.; Katz, C.

    1980-09-01

    A comprehensive review of the technical and scientific publications relating to crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) and ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) insulated cables revealed that there is very little known with respect to the life expectancy, the final factory voltage test background and the mechanism of voltage breakdown of these cables. In this study a new methodology for the investigation of breakdown voltages of XLPE and EPR insulated cables was developed which is based on the investigation of breakdown voltages at various voltage transients such as unipolarity pulses and dual-polarity pulses, and a.c. voltage at power and high frequency. Also, a new approach to statistical testing was developed which allows one to establish a correlation among the breakdown voltages obtained with various voltage transients. Finally, a method for the determination of threshold voltage regardless of the magnitude of apparent charge was developed. Extensive statistical testing of breakdown voltages was conducted using: impulses with front durations from approximately 1.5 to 1000 ..mu..s and times to half-values from 40 to 3000 ..mu..s; dual-polarity pulses consisting of d.c. voltage and standard impulse of opposite polarity; combined a.c. and d.c. voltages; and a.c. voltages at power and high frequencies. Based on the results of this testing, a model of breakdown and electrical aging of XLPE and EPR insulated cables was developed as well as life expectancy characteristics for high voltage stress XLPE insulated cables operated in a dry environment at room temperature and at 90/sup 0/C. Life expectancy characteristics for EPR insulated cables are approximated. A test procedure including requirements for full-reel factory voltage withstand and partial discharge testing of finished XLPE and EPR insulated cables is proposed. Cables that pass the proposed tests will exhibit a smaller rate of failure in service than cables tested in accordance with present practices.

  2. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-12-21

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  3. Conformal mapping analysis of multipactor breakdown in waveguide irises

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E.; Udiljak, R.; Anderson, D.; Lisak, M.; Puech, J.

    2008-03-15

    Multipactor breakdown in a single waveguide iris is analyzed using the quasistatic approximation for the spatial distribution of the rf field in the iris. Based on the conformal mapping approach, an analytical description is given of the rf field structure in the iris. It is shown that in the central part of any iris with a length to height ratio greater than approximately 0.5, the rf field structure is close to that between two parallel plates. The multipactor threshold for the iris is determined mainly by electron losses from the central part of the iris where the losses are due to the tangential component of the emission velocity of secondary electrons. The effective length of the iris central part is determined and an estimate of the multipactor threshold for the iris is found in terms of the conventional parameters: Applied rf voltage, product of rf frequency and iris height, and iris length to height ratio. Numerical simulations are also carried out using the exact analytical description of the quasistatic rf field and taking into account a spread of electron emission velocities.

  4. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  5. Wavelength dependence of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown in water and implications for laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Norbert; Freidank, Sebastian; Liang, Xiao-Xuan; Vogel, Alfred

    2016-07-01

    The wavelength dependence of the threshold for femtosecond optical breakdown in water provides information on the interplay of multiphoton, tunneling, and avalanche ionization and is of interest for parameter selection in laser surgery. We measured the bubble threshold from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths and found a continuous decrease of the irradiance threshold with increasing wavelength λ . Results are compared to the predictions of a numerical model that assumes a band gap of 9.5 eV and considers the existence of a separate initiation channel via excitation of valence band electrons into a solvated state followed by rapid upconversion into the conduction band. Fits to experimental data yield an electron collision time of ≈1 fs and an estimate for the capacity of the initiation channel. Using that collision time, the breakdown dynamics were explored up to λ = 2 μ m . The irradiance threshold first continues to decrease but levels out for wavelengths longer than 1.3 μ m . This opens promising perspectives for laser surgery at wavelengths around 1.3 and 1.7 μ m , which are attractive because of their large penetration depth into scattering tissues.

  6. Study on statistical breakdown delay time in argon gas using a W-band millimeter-wave gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongsung; Kim, Sung Gug; Sawant, Ashwini; Yu, Dongho; Choe, MunSeok; Choi, EunMi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigated plasma initiation delay times for argon volume breakdown at the W-band frequency regime. The threshold electric field is defined as the minimum electric field amplitude needed for plasma breakdown at various pressures. The measured statistical delay time showed an excellent agreement with the theoretical Gaussian distribution and the theoretically estimated formative delay time. Also, we demonstrated that the normalized effective electric field as a function of the product of pressure and formative time shows an outstanding agreement to that of 1D particle-in-cell simulation coupled with a Monte Carlo collision model [H. C. Kim and J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Plasmas 13, 123506 (2006)].

  7. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  8. Investigating Electrical Breakdown in Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouman, Nathaniel; SNS nEDM Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The SNS nEDM experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory aims to search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron (nEDM) at the 3x10-28 level. The experiment is currently in the critical component demonstration phase. The design of the experiment calls for an electric field of 75 kV/cm across the experimental cells between electrodes within a bath of liquid helium (LHe). However, the electric breakdown phenomenon in LHe is poorly understood. Experiments investigating the breakdown of LHe were carried out at Los Alamos National Laboratory using a small-scale high voltage (SSHV) test apparatus at temperatures from 1.7K to 4K. Effects of varying temperature, pressure, and electrode surface conditions on LHe breakdown were investigated. Results and their implications to the SNS nEDM experiment will be presented.

  9. Spectrometers for RF breakdown studies for CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacewicz, M.; Ziemann, V.; Ekelöf, T.; Dubrovskiy, A.; Ruber, R.

    2016-08-01

    An e+e- collider of several TeV energy will be needed for the precision studies of any new physics discovered at the LHC collider at CERN. One promising candidate is CLIC, a linear collider which is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme that efficiently solves the problem of power distribution to the acceleration structures. The phenomenon that currently prevents achieving high accelerating gradients in high energy accelerators such as the CLIC is the electrical breakdown at very high electrical field. The ongoing experimental work within the CLIC collaboration is trying to benchmark the theoretical models focusing on the physics of vacuum breakdown which is responsible for the discharges. In order to validate the feasibility of accelerating structures and observe the characteristics of the vacuum discharges and their eroding effects on the structure two dedicated spectrometers are now commissioned at the high-power test-stands at CERN. First, the so called Flashbox has opened up a possibility for non-invasive studies of the emitted breakdown currents during two-beam acceleration experiments. It gives a unique possibility to measure the energy of electrons and ions in combination with the arrival time spectra and to put that in context with accelerated beam, which is not possible at any of the other existing test-stands. The second instrument, a spectrometer for detection of the dark and breakdown currents, is operated at one of the 12 GHz stand-alone test-stands at CERN. Built for high repetition rate operation it can measure the spatial and energy distributions of the electrons emitted from the acceleration structure during a single RF pulse. Two new analysis tools: discharge impedance tracking and tomographic image reconstruction, applied to the data from the spectrometer make possible for the first time to obtain the location of the breakdown inside the structure both in the transversal and longitudinal direction thus giving a more complete picture of the

  10. Single-shot measurements of laser-induced avalanche breakdown demonstrating spatial and temporal control by an external source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbury, Daniel; Wahlstrand, Jared; Goers, Andy; Feder, Linus; Miao, Bo; Hine, George; Salehi, Fatholah; Milchberg, Howard

    2016-10-01

    We report on the use of single-shot supercontinuum spectral interferometry (SSSI) to make temporally and spatially resolved measurements of laser-induced avalanche breakdown in ambient air by a 200 ps pulse. By seeding the breakdown using an external 100 fs pulse, we demonstrate control over the timing and spatial characteristics of the avalanche. In addition, we calculate the collisional ionization rates at various laser intensities and demonstrate seeding of the avalanche breakdown both by multiphoton ionization and by photodetaching ions produced from a radioactive source. These observations provide proof-of-concept support for recent proposals to remotely measure radioactivity using laser-induced avalanche breakdown. This work supported by a DTRA, C-WMD Basic Research Program, and by the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship, provided under Grant Number DE-NA0002135.

  11. Breakdown Behavior of a Wireless Communication Network Under UWB Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohe, M.; Koch, M.

    Systems with high priority to safety and reliability such as monitoring systems on airports have to work properly. Fast information transmission, continuous access to databases, as well as the management of air traffic are most important for effective and safe operation. Sources of Intentional Electromagnetic Interference can be manufactured relatively easy using commercially available components by civilian persons with relevant expertise and can be used for sabotage or blackmail purposes. For analyzing the weak points of a system existing on airports, it is necessary to reproduce its setup. In this investigation a UHF transmitter of a wireless communication device is developed and its breakdown behavior to unipolar fast rise pulses (UWB) is determined. A breakdown is a non-permanent damage, but includes a type of upset, that requires manual reset or at least stops communications for some period of time. The transmitter consists of three main components connected by data cables: power supply, microcontroller, and loop antenna. The immunity tests are accomplished as a function of the electromagnetic field direction to the device using an open TEM waveguide.

  12. Elemental Analysis of Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Mohammed Ashraf; Dastageer, Mohamed A.

    The chemical and elemental composition of soil is very complex as it contains many constituents like minerals, organic matters, living organisms, fossils, air and water. Considering the diversity of soil contents, quality and usability, a systematic scientific study on the elemental and chemical composition of soil is very important. In order to study the chemical composition of soil, Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied recently. The important features of LIBS system and its applications for the measurement of nutrients in green house soil, on-line monitoring of remediation process of chromium polluted soil, determination of trace elements in volcanic erupted soil samples collected from ancient cenozoic lava eruption sites and detection of toxic metals in Gulf war oil spill contaminated soil using LIBS are described in this chapter.

  13. Factors affecting foster care breakdown in Spain.

    PubMed

    López López, Mónica; del Valle, Jorge F; Montserrat, Carme; Bravo, Amaia

    2011-05-01

    Breakdown of foster care has been defined as the situation in which one of the involved parties terminates the intervention before having achieved the goals established for the case plan. This work presents a study carried out with a Spanish sample of 318 closed cases of children who were placed in foster homes and kinship care. The data were collected through the exhaustive review of the child protection and foster placement files, complemented with interviews of the welfare workers in charge of each case. The rate of breakdown of the entire sample was 26.1%, although it was significantly different in kinship care (19.7%) and foster care (31.2%). The results of this study indicate that the variables related to breakdown depend on the placement modality, either in foster care or kinship care. In the first case, the variables related to the child's characteristics are noteworthy, especially behavior and academic problems, with special relevance in the 9-12-year-old group, and in children who were previously in residential care. In contrast, in kinship care, the parents' problems (prison, mental health) and having some measure of guardianship are the most important. The fact of undergoing foster placement after having lived in various residential homes is transcendental. Lastly, the availability of economic resources and even the foster carers' studies seem to be related to foster breakdown.

  14. Breakdown mechanism in buried silicon oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Santos; Suehle, John S.; Roitman, Peter

    1993-09-01

    Charge injection leading to catastrophic breakdown has been used to study the dielectric properties of the buried oxide layer in silicon implanted with high-energy oxygen ions. Current versus gate bias, current versus time, and capacitance versus gate bias were used to characterize, at various temperatures, MOS metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with areas in the 1×10-4-1×10-2 cm2 range fabricated with commercially available single- or triple-implant separation by implanted oxygen silicon wafers. The data show that injected charge accumulates in the buried oxide at donorlike oxide traps ultimately leading to catastrophic breakdown. Both Poole-Frenkel and Fowler-Nordheim conduction, as well as impact-ionization mechanisms, have been identified in the oxide. The charge and field to breakdown in the best buried oxides are, respectively, near 1 C cm-2 and 10 MV cm-1, similar to the thermally grown oxide parameters. Cumulative distributions of these parameters measured over a large number of capacitors show that the frequency of breakdown events caused by extrinsic defects is scaled with the capacitor area. Intrinsic and extrinsic defect distributions are broader than with thermally grown oxides.

  15. Electrical Breakdown Phenomena Involving Material Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    vol. 119, pp. 520-524, 1960. [14] H. P. Hjalmarson, R. L. Pease, and R. A. B. Devine, “Calculations of radiation dose-rate sensitivity of bipolar ... transistors ,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci., vol. 55, pp. 3009– 3015, 2008. [15] J. M. Meek and J. D. Craggs, Electrical Breakdown of Gases. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1953. 798

  16. Heme content and breakdown in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Plastid heme levels may be modulated by heme synthesis, breakdown and/or efflux. Heme breakdown may be catalyzed by a chloroplast localized heme oxygenase. Chloroplasts isolated from greening cucumber cotyledons were incubated in the presence or absence of various components thought to modulate heme breakdown. Following the incubations, the chloroplasts were broken (freeze-thaw) and then supplemented with horseradish peroxidase apoenzyme. The reconstituted peroxidase activity was used to determine the amount of free heme remaining (Thomas Weinstein (1989) Plant Physiol. 89S: 74). Chloroplasts, freshly isolated from seedlings greened for 16 hours, contained approximately 37 pmol heme/mg protein. When chloroplasts were incubated with 5 mM NADPH for 30 min, the endogenous heme dropped to unmeasurable levels. Exogenous heme was also broken down when NADPH was included in the incubation. Heme levels could be increased by the inclusion of 50 {mu}M ALA and/or p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The increase due to exogenous ALA was blocked by levulinic acid, an inhibitor of ALA utilization. NADPH-dependent heme breakdown acid was inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  17. RF Breakdown of Metallic Surfaces in Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    BastaniNejad, M.; Elmustafa, A.A.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Alsharo'a, M.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2009-05-01

    In earlier reports, microscopic images of the surfaces of metallic electrodes used in high-pressure gas-filled 805 MHz RF cavity experiments were used to investigate the mechanism of RF breakdown of tungsten, molybdenum, and beryllium electrode surfaces. Plots of remnants were consistent with the breakdown events being due to field emission, due to the quantum mechanical tunnelling of electrons through a barrier as described by Fowler and Nordheim. In the work described here, these studies have been extended to include tin, aluminium, and copper. Contamination of the surfaces, discovered after the experiments concluded, have cast some doubt on the proper qualities to assign to the metallic surfaces. However, two significant results are noted. First, the maximum stable RF gradient of contaminated copper electrodes is higher than for a clean surface. Second, the addition of as little as 0.01% of SF6 to the hydrogen gas increased the maximum stable gradient, which implies that models of RF breakdown in hydrogen gas will be important to the study of metallic breakdown.

  18. Numerical Borehole Breakdown Investigations using XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckhuis, Sven; Leonhart, Dirk; Meschke, Günther

    2016-04-01

    During pressurization of a wellbore a typical downhole pressure record shows the following regimes: first the applied wellbore pressure balances the reservoir pressure, then after the compressive circumferential hole stresses are overcome, tensile stresses are induced on the inside surface of the hole. When the magnitude of these stresses reach the tensile failure stress of the surrounding rock medium, a fracture is initiated and propagates into the reservoir. [1] In standard theories this pressure, the so called breakdown pressure, is the peak pressure in the down-hole pressure record. However experimental investigations [2] show that the breakdown did not occur even if a fracture was initiated at the borehole wall. Drilling muds had the tendency to seal and stabilize fractures and prevent fracture propagation. Also fracture mechanics analysis of breakdown process in mini-frac or leak off tests [3] show that the breakdown pressure could be either equal or larger than the fracture initiation pressure. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the breakdown process in reservoir rock, numerical investigations using the extended finite element method (XFEM) for hydraulic fracturing of porous materials [4] are discussed. The reservoir rock is assumed to be pre-fractured. During pressurization of the borehole, the injection pressure, the pressure distribution and the position of the highest flux along the fracture for different fracturing fluid viscosities are recorded and the influence of the aforementioned values on the stability of fracture propagation is discussed. [1] YEW, C. H. (1997), "Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracturing", Gulf Publishing Company [2] MORITA, N.; BLACK, A. D.; FUH, G.-F. (1996), "Borehole Breakdown Pressure with Drilling Fluids". International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 33, pp. 39-51 [3] DETOURNAY, E.; CARBONELL, R. (1996), "Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the Breakdown Process in Minifrac or Leakoff Test", Society of Petroleum

  19. Modeling High-Voltage Breakdown for Single- and Multi-stack Dielectric Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldan, Manuel; Verboncoeur, John; Lau, Y. Y.; Booske, John

    2010-11-01

    Breakdown from DC through microwave in dielectric-insulator configurations with one or more segments will be investigated using an improved 2D PIC simulation model [1]. The goal of this work is to develop the capability to predict and control the breakdown threshold under a wide range of parameters and geometries. Effects considered include secondary-emission [2], space-and surface-charge, ambient and desorbed gas, and surface-plasma generation for single- and multiple-layer [3] insulators with applied fields from DC to THz frequencies. Comparison between simulation and experiment will be conducted where possible. [4pt] [1] Taverniers, S., et al., ICOPS 2009 Proc., 2009.[0pt] [2] Vaughan, J.R.M., IEEE TED, Vol. 36, No. 9, 1989, pp.1963-1967.[0pt] [3] Leopold, J.G., et al., Proc. 2010 PMHVC.

  20. Electrical breakdown of carbon nanotube devices and the predictability of breakdown position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Gopal Krishna; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2012-06-01

    We have investigated electrical transport properties of long (>10 μm) multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NTs) by dividing individuals into several segments of identical length. Each segment has different resistance because of the random distribution of defect density in an NT and is corroborated by Raman studies. Higher is the resistance, lower is the current required to break the segments indicating that breakdown occurs at the highly resistive segment/site and not necessarily at the middle. This is consistent with the one-dimensional thermal transport model. We have demonstrated the healing of defects by annealing at moderate temperatures or by current annealing. To strengthen our mechanism, we have carried out electrical breakdown of nitrogen doped NTs (NNTs) with diameter variation from one end to the other. It reveals that the electrical breakdown occurs selectively at the narrower diameter region. Overall, we believe that our results will help to predict the breakdown position of both semiconducting and metallic NTs.

  1. RF Breakdown in High Vacuum Multimegawatt X-Band Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-06-15

    Increasing the power handling capabilities of rf components is an important issue for the design of rf accelerators and rf sources. RF breakdown is a phenomena that limit the high power performance. A major concern is the damage that can occur in rf components from breakdown. To better understand this damage, we have studied rf breakdown in a rectangular waveguide experimentally and theoretically. The breakdown process in a waveguide is both easier to measure and simulate than breakdown in a complex geometry such as an accelerating structure. We used a particle tracking code and a Particle-In-Cell code to model the breakdown behavior. Models developed for the waveguide were applied to the breakdown in accelerating structures. RF breakdown in traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures was simulated. We compare the experimental data with results of the simulations for the accelerating structures.

  2. The Latitude Dependence of Dielectric Breakdown on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Hayne, P. O.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Izenberg, N. R.

    2016-11-01

    Solar energetic particles may cause dielectric breakdown on the nightside of the Moon. We predict that breakdown weathering may have melted or vaporized about 4-11 wt% of impact gardened regolith on the Moon.

  3. Picosecond Electric-Field-Induced Threshold Switching in Phase-Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalden, Peter; Shu, Michael J.; Chen, Frank; Wu, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Yi; Wen, Haidan; Johnston, Scott; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Landreman, Patrick; Brongersma, Mark; Fong, Scott W.; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Sher, Meng-Ju; Jost, Peter; Kaes, Matthias; Salinga, Martin; von Hoegen, Alexander; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2016-08-01

    Many chalcogenide glasses undergo a breakdown in electronic resistance above a critical field strength. Known as threshold switching, this mechanism enables field-induced crystallization in emerging phase-change memory. Purely electronic as well as crystal nucleation assisted models have been employed to explain the electronic breakdown. Here, picosecond electric pulses are used to excite amorphous Ag4In3Sb67Te26 . Field-dependent reversible changes in conductivity and pulse-driven crystallization are observed. The present results show that threshold switching can take place within the electric pulse on subpicosecond time scales—faster than crystals can nucleate. This supports purely electronic models of threshold switching and reveals potential applications as an ultrafast electronic switch.

  4. Picosecond Electric-Field-Induced Threshold Switching in Phase-Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Zalden, Peter; Shu, Michael J; Chen, Frank; Wu, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Yi; Wen, Haidan; Johnston, Scott; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Landreman, Patrick; Brongersma, Mark; Fong, Scott W; Wong, H-S Philip; Sher, Meng-Ju; Jost, Peter; Kaes, Matthias; Salinga, Martin; von Hoegen, Alexander; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M

    2016-08-05

    Many chalcogenide glasses undergo a breakdown in electronic resistance above a critical field strength. Known as threshold switching, this mechanism enables field-induced crystallization in emerging phase-change memory. Purely electronic as well as crystal nucleation assisted models have been employed to explain the electronic breakdown. Here, picosecond electric pulses are used to excite amorphous Ag_{4}In_{3}Sb_{67}Te_{26}. Field-dependent reversible changes in conductivity and pulse-driven crystallization are observed. The present results show that threshold switching can take place within the electric pulse on subpicosecond time scales-faster than crystals can nucleate. This supports purely electronic models of threshold switching and reveals potential applications as an ultrafast electronic switch.

  5. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-28

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ∼30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  6. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-01

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ˜30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  7. Application of dynamic displacement current for diagnostics of subnanosecond breakdowns in an inhomogeneous electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Zhang, Cheng; Burachenko, Alexandr G.; Rybka, Dmitry V.; Kostyrya, Igor'D.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Baksht, Evgeni Kh.; Yan, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The breakdown of different air gaps at high overvoltages in an inhomogeneous electric field was investigated with a time resolution of up to 100 ps. Dynamic displacement current was used for diagnostics of ionization processes between the ionization wave front and a plane anode. It is demonstrated that during the generation of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with amplitudes of ˜10 A and more, conductivity in the air gaps at the breakdown stage is ensured by the ionization wave, whose front propagates from the electrode of small curvature radius, and by the dynamic displacement current between the ionization wave front and the plane electrode. The amplitude of the dynamic displacement current measured by a current shunt is 100 times greater than the SAEB. It is shown that with small gaps and with a large cathode diameter, the amplitude of the dynamic displacement current during a subnanosecond rise time of applied pulse voltage can be higher than 4 kA.

  8. Remote atmospheric breakdown for standoff detection by using an intense short laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Ting, Antonio; Alexeev, Ilya; Gordon, Daniel; Briscoe, Eldridge; Peñano, Joseph; Hubbard, Richard; Sprangle, Phillip; Rubel, Glenn

    2005-09-01

    A remote atmospheric breakdown is a very rich source of UV and broadband visible light that could provide an early warning of the presence of chemical-biological warfare agents at extended standoff distances. A negatively chirped laser pulse propagating in air compresses in time and focuses transversely, which results in a rapid laser intensity increase and ionization near the focal region that can be located kilometers away from the laser system. Proof-of-principle laboratory experiments are performed on the generation of remote atmospheric breakdown and the spectroscopic detection of mock biological warfare agents. We have generated third harmonics at 267 nm and UV broadband radiation in air from the compression and focusing of femtosecond laser pulses. Fluorescence emission from albumin aerosols as they were illuminated by the femtosecond laser pulse has been observed.

  9. Electrical breakdown in a fuse network with random, continuously distributed breaking strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahng, B.; Batrouni, G. G.; Redner, S.; de Arcangelis, L.; Herrmann, H. J.

    1988-05-01

    We investigate the breakdown properties of a random resistor-fuse network in which each network element behaves as a linear resistor if the voltage drop is less than a threshold value, but then ``burns out'' and changes irreversibly to an insulator for larger voltages. We consider a fully occupied network in which each resistor has the same resistance (in the linear regime), and with the threshold voltage drop uniformly distributed over the range v-=1-w/2 to v+=1+w/2 (0breakdown properties of this model depend crucially on w, and also on L, the linear dimension of the network. For sufficiently small w, ``brittle'' fracture occurs, in which catastrophic breaking is triggered by the failure of a vanishingly small fraction of bonds in the network. In this regime, the average voltage drop per unit length required to break the network, , varies as v-+O(1/L2), and L-->∞, and the distribution of breakdown voltages decays exponentially in vb. By probabilistic arguments, we also establish the existence of a transition between this brittle regime and a ``ductile'' regime at a critical value of w=wc(L), which approaches 2, as L-->∞. This suggests that the fuse network fails by brittle fracture in the thermodynamic limit, except in the extreme case where the distribution of bond strengths includes the value zero. The ductile regime, w>wc(L), is characterized by crack growth which is driven by increases in the external potential, before the network reaches the breaking point. For this case, numerical simulations indicate that the average breaking potential decreases as 1/(lnL)y, with y<=0.8, and that the distribution of breakdown voltages has a double experimental form. Numerical simulations are also performed to provide a geometrical description of the details of the breaking process as a function of w.

  10. A computational study of the taxonomy of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are presented. The solutions show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown. Common features between bubble-type and spiral-type breakdown are identified and the role of flow stagnation and the critical state are discussed as complimentary ideas describing the initiation of breakdown.

  11. Bulk charging and breakdown in electron-irradiated polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    High energy electron irradiations were performed in an experimental and theoretical study of ten common polymers. Breakdowns were monitored by measuring currents between the electrodes on each side of the planar samples. Sample currents as a function of time during irradiation are compared with theory. Breakdowns are correlated with space charge electric field strength and polarity. Major findings include evidence that all polymers tested broke down, breakdowns remove negligible bulk charge and no breakdowns are seen below 20 million V/m.

  12. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  13. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  16. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  18. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  19. Elaborating on threshold concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account for both the important and the problematic characteristics of TCs in terms of the Knowledge/Strategies/Mental Models Framework defined in previous work.

  20. Vision thresholds revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstang, R. H.

    1999-05-01

    During and just after World War II there was intense interest in the threshold for seeing faint sources against illuminated backgrounds. Knoll, Tousey and Hulburt (1946, 1948) determined the threshold for (effectively) point sources seen against backgrounds ranging in brightness from darkness to subdued daylight. Blackwell (1946) gave contrast ratios for sources of various sizes ranging from point sources up to circular disks of 6 degrees diameter, all seen against the same range of brightnesses, and determined by a very large number of visual observations made by a team of observers. I have combined the two sets of results, and represented them by an improvement on the theoretical formula for threshold illuminance as a function of background brightness which was suggested by Hecht (1934). My formula agrees very well with the observations, and is very suitable for incorporation into computer programs. Applications have been made to problems where the background brightness is caused by light pollution, and the source size is determined by the seeing. These include the optimum magnification and limiting magnitude of telescopes, and the analysis of visual limiting magnitudes determined by Bowen (1947) to determine the night sky brightness at Mount Wilson in 1947.

  1. Breakdown-induced polarization buildup in porous fluoropolymer sandwiches: a thermally stable piezoelectret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z.; von Seggern, H.

    2006-01-01

    The buildup of air-breakdown-induced polarization in a one-side-metallized three-layer sandwich structure consisting of fluorinated ethylene propylene copolymer (FEP) / expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) / FEP has been studied utilizing a corona triode for voltage application. The FEP layers form structurally and electrically dense layers, whereas the ePTFE layer consists of 91% air and 9% fibrous PTFE. Upon negative corona charging, breakdown sets in within the pores of the ePTFE, as soon as the electric field strength exceeds the Paschen breakdown value of air. The resulting ion-plasma then separates in the strong electric field of the corona-deposited surface charges whereby ions of the two polarities drift towards opposite FEP layers, where they are trapped, and macroscopic dipoles are formed. These dipoles are responsible for a strong piezoelectricity. It will be demonstrated by thermally stimulated discharge currents that when poling is performed at elevated temperatures, for example, 150 °C, the polarization is temperature stable, and consequently so is the piezoelectric d33 coefficient. The d33 coefficients, however, decay from 800 to 400 pC/N under atmospheric pressures within six days, and repeated loading also shows a similar loss of piezoelectricity, related to mechanical relaxation of the highly porous ePTFE.

  2. Determination of threshold and maximum operating electric stresses for selected high voltage insulations: Investigation of aged polymeric dielectric cable. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eager, G.S. Jr.; Seman, G.W.; Fryszczyn, B.

    1995-11-01

    Based on the successful completion of the extensive research project DOE/ET/29303-1 February 1982 to develop a new method for the determination of threshold voltage in XLPE and EPR insulated cables, tests were initiated to establish the maximum safe operating voltage stresses of crosslinked polyethylene insulated cables that become wet when they operate in a moist environment. The present report covers the measurement of the threshold voltage, the a.c. breakdown voltage and the impulse breakdown voltage of XLPE cable after undergoing accelerated laboratory aging in water. Model and 15 kV XLPE cables were manufactured in commercial equipment using state-of-the-art semiconducting shields and XLPE insulation. The threshold voltage, a.c. voltage breakdown and impulse voltage breakdown of the model cables were determined before aging, after aging one week and after aging 26 weeks. The model cable, following 26 weeks aging, was dried by passing dry gas through the conductor interstices which removed moisture from the cable. The threshold voltage, the a.c. voltage breakdown and the impulse voltage breakdown of the XLPE model cable after drying was measured.

  3. Determination of threshold and maximum operating electric stresses for selected high voltage insulation. Task 3: Investigation of high voltage capacitor insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowski, M.; Eager, G. S., Jr.

    1984-03-01

    The threshold voltage of capacitor insulation was investigated. The experimental work was performed on samples prepared from commercial polypropylene insulated, liquid-filled capacitors. The samples were vacuum-impregnated with the original capacitor insulating liquid obtained from the manufacturer. A limited number of full-size capacitor elements also were tested. Impulse voltage breakdown tests with dc voltage prestressing were performed at room temperature and 75 C. From the results of these tests, the threshold voltage of the samples of the capacitor insulation was determined at both temperatures and that of the whole capacitor elements at room temperature. The threshold voltage of the capacitor insulation was found to be approximately equal to the impulse breakdown voltage. No difference was found between the threshold voltage at room temperature and at 75 C. The threshold voltage of the whole capacitor elements at room temperature was found to be equal to approximately 80% of the threshold voltage of the capacitor insulation samples.

  4. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-28

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  5. Threshold Concepts in Research Education and Evidence of Threshold Crossing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiley, Margaret; Wisker, Gina

    2009-01-01

    Most work on threshold concepts has hitherto related to discipline-specific undergraduate education, however, the idea of generic doctoral-level threshold concepts appeared to us to provide a strong and useful framework to support research learning and teaching at the graduate level. The early work regarding research-level threshold concepts is…

  6. Breakdown and partial discharges in magnetic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herchl, F.; Marton, K.; Tomčo, L.; Kopčanský, P.; Timko, M.; Koneracká, M.; Kolcunová, I.

    2008-05-01

    The dielectric properties (permittivity, loss factor, dielectric breakdown strength) of magnetic liquids were investigated. The magnetic liquids were composed of magnetite particles coated with oleic acid as surfactant and dispersed in transformer oil. To determine their dielectric properties they were subjected to a uniform magnetic field at high alternating electric fields up to 14 MV m-1. Nearly constant permittivity of magnetic liquid with particle volume concentration Φ = 0.0019 as a function of electric field was observed. Magnetic liquids with concentrations Φ = 0.019 and 0.032 showed significant changes of permittivity and loss factor dependent on electric and magnetic fields. The best concentration of magnetic fluid was found at which partial current impulse magnitudes were the lowest. The breakdown strength distribution of the magnetic liquid with Φ = 0.0025 was fitted with the Duxbury-Leath, Weibull and Gauss distribution functions.

  7. Franck-Condon breakdown from Cooper minima.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. M.; Poliakoff, E. D.; Wang, K.; McKoy, V.

    1996-05-01

    We report Cooper minima-induced Franck-Condon breakdown for N2 2σ_u-1 photoionization. The measurements are over an extended energy range (230 eV), and we find that the v^+= 2/v^+= 0 and v^+= 1/v^+= 0 vibrational branching ratios vary strongly over a 100 eV range. This is a dramatic deviation from Franck-Condon predictions, and calculations show that this coupling between vibrational and electronic motion arises from a dependence of Cooper minima on molecular bond length. To our knowledge, this is the only example of a broad-range Franck-Condon breakdown due to a non-resonant mechanism, and is the broadest deviation from Franck-Condon behavior observed to date. The ubiquitous nature of Cooper minima suggests this effect to be common in molecular systems.

  8. Electrical breakdown studies with Mycalex insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.; Greenway, W.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.

    2003-05-01

    Insulating materials such as alumina and glass-bonded mica (Mycalex) are used in accelerator systems for high voltage feedthroughs, structural supports, and barriers between high voltage insulating oil and the vacuum beam pipe in induction accelerator cells. Electric fields in the triple points should be minimized to prevent voltage breakdown. Mechanical stress can compromise seals and result in oil contamination of the insulator surface. We have tested various insulator cleaning procedures including ultrasonic cleaning with a variety of aqueous-based detergents, and manual scrubbing with various detergents. Water sheeting tests were used to determine the initial results of the cleaning methods. Ultimately, voltage breakdown tests will be used to quantify the benefits of these cleaning procedures.

  9. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-10-13

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  10. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  11. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 414) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  12. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 444) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14 ) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  13. Observations of stimulated Raman scattering and laser-induced breakdown in millimeter-sized droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Pinnick, R. G.; Xie, J.-G.; Ruekgauer, T. E.; Armstrong, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    We report the first observations, to our knowledge, of nonlinear optical effects in large (millimeter-sized) droplets. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser-induced breakdown (LIB) are simultaneously observed in acoustically levitated millimeter-sized glycerol droplets irradiated by either a frequency-doubled (532-nm) or a frequency-tripled (355-nm) Nd:YAG laser. The two processes, which occur above a nearby coincident irradiation threshold, are conjectured to arise from a common initiation mechanism: self-focusing. LIB generates vapor bubbles within the droplet, resulting in the quenching of SRS emission.

  14. Detection of operator performance breakdown in a multitask environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hyo-Sang

    The purpose of this dissertation work is: 1) to empirically demonstrate an extreme human operator's state, performance breakdown (PB), and 2) to develop an objective method for detecting such a state. PB has been anecdotally described as a state where the human operator "loses control of the context" and "cannot maintain the required task performance." Preventing such a decline in performance could be important to assure the safety and reliability of human-integrated systems, and therefore PB could be useful as a point at which automation can be applied to support human performance. However, PB has never been scientifically defined or empirically demonstrated. Moreover, there exists no method for detecting such a state or the transition to that state. Therefore, after symbolically defining PB, an objective method of potentially identifying PB is proposed. Next, three human-in-the-loop studies were conducted to empirically demonstrate PB and to evaluate the proposed PB detection method. Study 1 was conducted: 1) to demonstrate PB by increasing workload until the subject reports being in a state of PB, and 2) to identify possible parameters of the PB detection method for objectively identifying the subjectively-reported PB point, and determine if they are idiosyncratic. In the experiment, fifteen participants were asked to manage three concurrent tasks (one primary and two secondary tasks) for 18 minutes. The primary task's difficulty was manipulated over time to induce PB while the secondary tasks' difficulty remained static. Data on participants' task performance was collected. Three hypotheses were constructed: 1) increasing workload will induce subjectively-identified PB, 2) there exists criteria that identify the threshold parameters that best detect the performance characteristics that maps to the subjectively-identified PB point, and 3) the criteria for choosing the threshold parameters are consistent across individuals. The results show that increasing

  15. Three-dimensional simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, G.; Salas, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The integral form of the complete, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form, cast in generalized coordinate system, are solved, numerically, to simulate the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The inviscid fluxes are discretized using Roe's upwind-biased flux-difference splitting scheme and the viscous fluxes are discretized using central differencing. Time integration is performed using a backward Euler ADI (alternating direction implicit) scheme. A full approximation multigrid is used to accelerate the convergence to steady state.

  16. Runaway breakdown and electrical discharges in thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennady; Roussel-Dupré, Robert

    2010-12-01

    This review considers the precise role played by runaway breakdown (RB) in the initiation and development of lightning discharges. RB remains a fundamental research topic under intense investigation. The question of how lightning is initiated and subsequently evolves in the thunderstorm environment rests in part on a fundamental understanding of RB and cosmic rays and the potential coupling to thermal runaway (as a seed to RB) and conventional breakdown (as a source of thermal runaways). In this paper, we describe the basic mechanism of RB and the conditions required to initiate an observable avalanche. Feedback processes that fundamentally enhance RB are discussed, as are both conventional breakdown and thermal runaway. Observations that provide clear evidence for the presence of energetic particles in thunderstorms/lightning include γ-ray and X-ray flux intensifications over thunderstorms, γ-ray and X-ray bursts in conjunction with stepped leaders, terrestrial γ-ray flashes, and neutron production by lightning. Intense radio impulses termed narrow bipolar pulses (or NBPs) provide indirect evidence for RB particularly when measured in association with cosmic ray showers. Our present understanding of these phenomena and their enduring enigmatic character are touched upon briefly.

  17. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, H. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation and study of shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes are considered for bound (internal) and unbound (external) flow domains. The problem is formulated using the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. For the bound flow domain, a supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct and the problem is solved for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. For the unbound domain, a supersonic swirling flow issued from a nozzle into a uniform supersonic flow of lower Mach number is considered for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. The results show several modes of breakdown; e.g., no-breakdown, transient single-bubble breakdown, transient multi-bubble breakdown, periodic multi-bubble multi-frequency breakdown and helical breakdown.

  19. Optical thresholding and Max Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Thresholding and Max operations are essential elements in the implementation of neural networks. Although there have been several optical...implementations of neural networks, the thresholding functions are performed electronically. Optical thresholding and Max operations have the advantages of...we propose and study the properties of self-oscillation in nonlinear optical (NLO) four-wave mixing (FWM) and NLO resonators for parallel optical thresholding and Max operation.

  20. Competition between single and double helical vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaire, Francois; Meliga, Philippe; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2011-11-01

    The spiral vortex breakdown of nominally axisymmetric, swirling flows observed in the three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of Ruith, Chen, Meiburg & Maxworthy [JFM 2003, 486, p 331-378] is revisited and interpreted in terms of linearly unstable global modes. We show that increasing the swirl number, which compares the magnitude of the azimuthal and axial velocity components, results in successive Hopf bifurcations involving helical modes of azimuthal wave numbers m = - 1 and m = - 2. These modes develop in the lee of the axisymmetric bubble, and correspond to spiral perturbations rotating in time in the same direction as the swirling flow, but winding in space in the opposite direction. The global stability analysis is shown to yield an accurate frequency prediction. We further extend the range of swirl considered in the DNS, and show that the m = - 1 and m = - 2 Hopf bifurcations can occur simultaneously, both modes approaching a strong 2:1 resonance. We compute the normal form describing the leading-order nonlinear interaction between modes, and show that it accurately predicts the pattern and symmetries of the solutions observed in the DNS calculations, with satisfactory agreement on the bifurcation thresholds.

  1. Conditions for electron runaway under leader breakdown of long gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Ul'yanov, K. N.

    2008-04-15

    An original hydrodynamic model in which inelastic collisions in the equations of motion and energy balance play a decisive role is developed and applied to simulate electron avalanches in strong electric fields. The mean energy and drift velocity of electrons, as well as the ionization coefficient and electric field in a wide range of mean electron energies, are determined for helium and xenon. A criterion is derived for the runaway of the average electron in discharges with ionization multiplication. It is shown that runaway can take place at any value of E/p, provided that the momentum mean free path exceeds the gap length. The voltage corresponding to electron runaway is found for helium, xenon, and air as a function of the electric field, the electron mean energy, and the parameter pd. Conditions for the formation of a precursor in electronegative gases are analyzed. It is shown that the presence of a precursor with a high electric conductance is necessary for the formation of a new leader step. The voltage and time ranges corresponding to efficient electron runaway and X-ray generation during leader breakdown in air are determined.

  2. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  3. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  4. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  5. Acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB)

    DOEpatents

    O'Donnell, Matthew; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, Jr., James R.; Balogh, Lajos P.; Milas, Susanne M.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Hollman, Kyle W.

    2008-05-06

    An acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) provides information which characterize material which is broken down, microbubbles in the material, and/or the microenvironment of the microbubbles. In one embodiment of the invention, femtosecond laser pulses are focused just inside the surface of a volume of aqueous solution which may include dendrimer nanocomposite (DNC) particles. A tightly focused, high frequency, single-element ultrasonic transducer is positioned such that its focus coincides axially and laterally with this laser focus. When optical breakdown occurs, a microbubble forms and a shock or pressure wave is emitted (i.e., acoustic emission). In addition to this acoustic signal, the microbubble may be actively probed with pulse-echo measurements from the same transducer. After the microbubble forms, received pulse-echo signals have an extra pulse, describing the microbubble location and providing a measure of axial microbubble size. Wavefield plots of successive recordings illustrate the generation, growth, and collapse of microbubbles due to optical breakdown. These same plots can also be used to quantify LIOB thresholds.

  6. Insulator breakdown measurements in a poor vacuum and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Vogtlin, G.E.

    1990-06-01

    Breakdown measurements have been made on insulators with 0 and 45 degree angle surfaces. A technique of observing the electrons produced from the process has given some insight into the mechanisms involved. A three nanosecond pulse was used to induce breakdown. The electrons striking the anode were observed with a plastic fluor and open shutter camera. Two breakdown patterns were interpreted as cathode initiated and anode initiated breakdown. The breakdown process normally encountered was anode initiated with a positive 45 degree insulator. If the anode side was relieved with an internal electrode, the breakdown changed to cathode initiated at a higher level. If the cathode surface was then anodized, the breakdown switched back to the anode at an even higher level. Individual explosive emission sites on the cathode surface could be observed. Insulator breakdown was usually not associated with these sites. Multiple pulses allowed measurement of plasma expansion of the explosive emission sites. It is believed that breakdown with longer pulses is due to the expansion of the explosive emission site plasma to the insulator surface. Measurements were conducted with and without voltage conditioning. It appears that conditioning is achieved without explosive emission. It is believed that this is due to organic fibers that are removed by the conditioning. Organic fibers were used to induce both anode and cathode breakdown. Measurements of fiberous material have shown explosive emission a low as 100 kV on a three nanosecond time scale and below 20 kv/cm on a longer time scale. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Sky dancer: the threshold of the buckling instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cros, Anne; Ibarra Nuño, Rodolfo; Michon, Bastien

    2012-11-01

    The sky dancer is a fabric-made large vertical tube which may ``dance'' above an air blower. We reproduced in laboratory reduced models, with diameters between 2.2 and 3 cm, and lengths varying from 45 to 95 cm. We measured the air speed and the pressure at the tube basis for the lower threshold of the tube. This threshold separates two regimes: the first one which appears for the lower velocities, when the tube falls down because of its own weight, from the second one, which corresponds to the stable regime, for which the tube stands up. Our measurements show that the air pressure thresholds get values equal to the pressure performed by the tube weight. We discuss our results and compare them with previous studies which dealt with thicker-walled tubes.

  8. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    PubMed Central

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  9. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement in methane and biodiesel flames using an ungated detector

    SciTech Connect

    Eseller, Kemal E.; Yueh, Fang Y.; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to measure the equivalence ratio of CH4/air flames using gated detection. In this work, we have developed an ungated, miniature LIBS-based sensor for studying CH4/air and biodiesel flames. We have used this sensor to characterize the biodiesel flame. LIBS spectra of biodiesel flames were recorded with different ethanol concentrations in the biodiesel and also at different axial locations within the flame. The sensor performance was evaluated with a CH4/air flame. LIBS signals of N, O, and H from a CH4/air flame were used to determine the equivalence ratio. A linear relationship between the intensity ratio of H and O lines and the calculated equivalence ratio were obtained with this sensor.

  10. Human skeletal muscle protein breakdown during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Excretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) in the urine is a useful measurement of myofibrillar protein breakdown. Bed rest, particularly with 6 degrees head-down tilt, is an accepted ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this report were to compare 3-MH excretion from two Life Sciences shuttle missions (duration 9.5 and 15 days, n = 9) and from 17 days of bed rest (n = 7) with 6 degrees head-down tilt. The bed rest study was designed to mimic an actual Life Sciences spaceflight and so incorporated an extensive battery of physiological tests focused on the musculoskeletal system. Results showed that nitrogen retention, based on excretion of nitrogen in the urine, was reduced during both bed rest [from 22 +/- 1 to 1 +/- 5 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 7; P < 0.05)] and spaceflight [from 57 +/- 9 to 19 +/- 3 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 9; P < 0.05)]. 3-MH excretion was unchanged with either bed rest [pre-bed rest 5.30 +/- 0.29 vs. bed rest 5.71 +/- 0.30 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1), n = 7; P = not significant (NS)] or spaceflight [preflight 4.98 +/- 0.37 vs. 4.59 +/- 0.39 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1) in-flight, n = 9; P = NS]. We conclude that 1) 3-MH excretion was unaffected by spaceflight on the shuttle or with bed rest plus exercise, and 2) because protein breakdown (elevated 3-MH) was increased on Skylab but not on the shuttle, it follows that muscle protein breakdown is not an inevitable consequence of spaceflight.

  11. Comparison of baseline removal methods for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. Darby; Giguere, Stephen; Carey, CJ; Boucher, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    This project examines the causes, effects, and optimization of continuum removal in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to produce the best possible prediction accuracy of elemental composition in geological samples. We compare prediction accuracy resulting from several different techniques for baseline removal, including asymmetric least squares (ALS), adaptive iteratively reweighted penalized least squares (Air-PLS), fully automatic baseline correction (FABC), continuous wavelet transformation, median filtering, polynomial fitting, the iterative thresholding Dietrich method, convex hull/rubber band techniques, and a newly-developed technique for Custom baseline removal (BLR). We assess the predictive performance of these methods using partial least-squares analysis for 13 elements of geological interest, expressed as the weight percentages of SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, FeO, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O, and the parts per million concentrations of Ni, Cr, Zn, Mn, and Co. We find that previously published methods for baseline subtraction generally produce equivalent prediction accuracies for major elements. When those pre-existing methods are used, automated optimization of their adjustable parameters is always necessary to wring the best predictive accuracy out of a data set; ideally, it should be done for each individual variable. The new technique of Custom BLR produces significant improvements in prediction accuracy over existing methods across varying geological data sets, instruments, and varying analytical conditions. These results also demonstrate the dual objectives of the continuum removal problem: removing a smooth underlying signal to fit individual peaks (univariate analysis) versus using feature selection to select only those channels that contribute to best prediction accuracy for multivariate analyses. Overall, the current practice of using generalized, one-method-fits-all-spectra baseline removal results in poorer predictive performance for all methods. The

  12. How much North African dust emission is associated with breakdowns of nocturnal low-level jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Schepanski, K.; Heinold, B.; Knippertz, P.; Tegen, I.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol has important impacts on atmospheric radiation transfer, optical properties and precipitability of clouds, as well as human health and eco-systems. Time, location and amount of dust emission are key factors for simulating the atmospheric life cycle of dust and its effects accurately. Dust emission is a non-linear function of surface properties, and the momentum transfer from the atmosphere to the Earth's surface. A phenomenon capable of mobilizing dust is the Nocturnal Low-Level Jet (NLLJ), a wind speed maximum at night caused by air accelerating due to reduced dynamical friction in the nocturnal boundary layer. Momentum from the NLLJ is transferred downwards by turbulence, predominantly during the following morning when surface heating erodes the nocturnal temperature inversion. While this breakdown of NLLJs has been suggested to be a main driver for dust storms in North Africa, a quantitative investigation based on analysis data is lacking. As part of the European Research Council funded 'Desert Storms' project, this work presents the first statistical analysis of the importance of NLLJs for the mineral dust amount emitted in North Africa. A new automated detection algorithm for NLLJs has been developed for analyzing the spatio-temporal characteristics and associated mineral dust emission amounts. The algorithm is applied to the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim re-analysis for 1979-2010. Near-surface wind speed and soil moisture from ERA-interim drive an off-line dust model for calculating associated dust emission fluxes. Annually and spatially averaged, NLLJs form in 29 % of the nights in North Africa. The areal distribution of NLLJs highlights their frequent occurrence along the margins of the Saharan heat-low in summer, and in regions affected by mountain channeling like the Bodélé Depression, Chad, predominantly in winter. In these seasonally varying hotspots NLLJs are identified in 40-80 % of the nights

  13. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Zhang, Zhen-Zhen; Wang, Zhe; Zeng, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Jun-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an analytical detection technique based on atomic emission spectroscopy to measure the elemental composition. LIBS has been extensively studied and developed due to the non-contact, fast response, high sensitivity, real-time and multi-elemental detection features. The development and applications of LIBS technique in Asia are summarized and discussed in this review paper. The researchers in Asia work on different aspects of the LIBS study in fundamentals, data processing and modeling, applications and instrumentations. According to the current research status, the challenges, opportunities and further development of LIBS technique in Asia are also evaluated to promote LIBS research and its applications.

  14. Theoretical and experimental investigation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.

    1986-01-01

    The slender-vortex approximation was analyzed for incompressible and compressible flow. First the equations of motion were reduced in an order of magnitude analysis. Then compatibility conditions were formulated for the inflow conditions. Thereafter finite-difference-solutions were constructed for incompressible and compressible flow. Finally it was shown that these solutions can be used to describe the flow in slender vortices. The analysis of the breakdown process must, however, be excluded, since its upstream influence cannot be predicted with the slender vortex approximation. The investigaton of this problem is left for future work.

  15. Optimising threshold levels for information transmission in binary threshold networks: Independent multiplicative noise on each threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bingchang; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2015-02-01

    The problem of optimising the threshold levels in multilevel threshold system subject to multiplicative Gaussian and uniform noise is considered. Similar to previous results for additive noise, we find a bifurcation phenomenon in the optimal threshold values, as the noise intensity changes. This occurs when the number of threshold units is greater than one. We also study the optimal thresholds for combined additive and multiplicative Gaussian noise, and find that all threshold levels need to be identical to optimise the system when the additive noise intensity is a constant. However, this identical value is not equal to the signal mean, unlike the case of additive noise. When the multiplicative noise intensity is instead held constant, the optimal threshold levels are not all identical for small additive noise intensity but are all equal to zero for large additive noise intensity. The model and our results are potentially relevant for sensor network design and understanding neurobiological sensory neurons such as in the peripheral auditory system.

  16. Stoichiometric changes in KH2PO4 crystals during laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Kucheyev, S O; DeMange, P; Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Nelson, A J; Demos, S G

    2004-08-31

    The structure of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} single crystals (so-called KDP) irradiated with {approx} 3-ns, 355-nm laser pulses with fluences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold is studied by a combination of Raman scattering, photoluminescence, and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies. We compare spectra from the as-grown material, surface and bulk laser-induced damage sites, as well as from KPO{sub 3} references. Results show that irradiation with fluences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold leads to stoichiometric changes at surface damage sites but not at bulk damage sites. New spectroscopic features are attributed to dehydration products. For the laser irradiation conditions used in this study, the decomposed near-surface layer absorbs photons at {approx} 3.4 eV (364 nm). These results may explain the recently reported fact that surface laser damage sites in KDP crystals tend to grow with subsequent exposure to high-power laser pulses, while bulk damage sites do not.

  17. Interelectrode bridging of carbon nanotube fibrous assembly induced by gas discharge breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hideki; Mizushima, Yuuki; Komatsu, Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a fibrous assembly of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) induced by a gas discharge breakdown that bridge the distance between two planar electrodes. To achieve this, we placed the two planar electrodes, one of which was covered with a CNT film, in a chamber; a vacuum pump was used to evacuate the air from the chamber and replace it with inert gas. By then applying a voltage between the electrodes, we induced a discharge breakdown between them. This caused the CNTs coated on the electrode surface to detach and form fibrous assemblies. The assemblies elongated and reached the opposite electrode, thereby creating bridges between the electrodes. These bridges formed when the gas pressure was greater than ca. 1.0 × 103 Pa and in combination with the occurrence of a spark discharge. At lower pressures, a glow discharge occurred, and no bridge formation was observed, indicating that the discharge mode is critical for the bridge formation.

  18. Extended plasma channels created by UV laser in air and their application to control electric discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V. D. Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    Results are presented from a series of experimental and theoretical studies on creating weakly ionized extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by 248-nm UV laser radiation and their application to control long high-voltage discharges. The main mechanisms of air ionization by UV laser pulses with durations from 100 fs to 25 ns and intensities in the ranges of 3×10{sup 11}–1.5×10{sup 13} and 3×10{sup 6}–3×10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}, respectively, which are below the threshold for optical gas breakdown, as well as the main relaxation processes in plasma with a density of 10{sup 9}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, are considered. It is shown that plasma channels in air can be efficiently created by amplitude-modulated UV pulses consisting of a train of subpicosecond pulses producing primary photoelectrons and a long UV pulse suppressing electron attachment and sustaining the density of free electrons in plasma. Different modes of the generation and amplification of trains of subterawatt subpicosecond pulses and amplitude-modulated UV pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were implemented on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid Ti:sapphire-KrF laser facility. The filamentation of such UV laser beams during their propagation in air over distances of up to 100 m and the parameters of the corresponding plasma channels were studied experimentally and theoretically. Laser initiation of high-voltage electric discharges and control of their trajectories by means of amplitude-modulated UV pulses, as well as the spatiotemporal structure of breakdowns in air gaps with length of up to 80 cm, were studied.

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies of vortex breakdown in a lean, premixed swirl-stabilized combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeh, Chukwueloka O. U.

    Increasingly stringent emissions regulations on fossil fuel-burning combustors in land-based and aviation gas turbine engines has led engine manufacturers to turn to lean burning premixed combustors. In modern lean premixed gas turbine combustors, flame stabilization is achieved by the use of a high level of inlet swirl and an expansion into a larger chamber. This predisposes the inlet vortex flow to transition to a vortex breakdown state, which is characterized by a stagnation and recirculation zone near the exit plane of the inlet region. A compact, turbulent and highly mixed flame results. Although this breakdown phenomenon helps reduce emissions drastically compared to rich-burn engines, it also contributes to the formation of thermo-acoustic instabilities (or combustion dynamics), flashback and lean blow out, which hinder performance and in extreme cases, causes very expensive damage to the combustion system. Theoretical, computational and experimental studies of vortex breakdown in a finite length, axisymmetric chamber with a swirling inlet flow demonstrate that critical conditions for the first appearance of breakdown in the combustion chamber as well as in the combustor's inlet region govern the flow's behavior. These critical conditions are satisfied for both the average and the instantaneous behavior of the flow for ambient temperature, preheated and lean premixed reacting flows. Good agreement is found between the theoretical and numerical simulations, as well as the experimental results. Results show that these critical conditions, as well as the appearance, location, size and stability of the breakdown are affected by inlet airflow rate, inlet air temperature, flame temperature (in reacting flow), inlet tube length, dump plane configuration and chamber air leakage. In the presence of combustion, experimental results show that the existence of a breakdown zone, its shape, location and stability influence flame stabilization, combustion dynamics

  20. SIMULATION OF RF BREAKDOWN EFFECTS ON NLC BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-08-24

    The linacs of the Next Linear Collider / Global Linear Collider will contain several thousand traveling wave X-band accelerator structures operating at an input power of about 60 MW. At this input power, prototypes of NLC/GLC structures have breakdown rates lower than one breakdown in ten hours. RF breakdowns disrupt flow of energy inside the structure and create arcs with electron and ion currents. Electromagnetic fields of these currents interact with the NLC beam. The authors simulated the deflection of the NLC beam caused by breakdown currents using the particle-in-cell code MAGIC. In this paper they present modeling considerations and simulation results.

  1. Pre-breakdown evaluation of gas discharge mechanisms in microgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Semnani, Abbas; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2013-04-29

    The individual contributions of various gas discharge mechanisms to total pre-breakdown current in microgaps are quantified numerically. The variation of contributions of field emission and secondary electron emission with increasing electric field shows contrasting behavior even for a given gap size. The total current near breakdown decreases rapidly with gap size indicating that microscale discharges operate in a high-current, low-voltage regime. This study provides the first such analysis of breakdown mechanisms and aids in the formulation of physics-based theories for microscale breakdown.

  2. NASA Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Jon F.; Poole, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements. The WBS and WBS dictionary are effective management processes for planning, organizing, and administering NASA programs and projects. The guidance contained in this document is applicable to both in-house, NASA-led effort and contracted effort. It assists management teams from both entities in fulfilling necessary responsibilities for successful accomplishment of project cost, schedule, and technical goals. Benefits resulting from the use of an effective WBS include, but are not limited to: providing a basis for assigned project responsibilities, providing a basis for project schedule and budget development, simplifying a project by dividing the total work scope into manageable units, and providing a common reference for all project communication.

  3. Functions of Carotenoid Metabolites and Breakdown Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    It is not only intact carotenoids but also fragments of carotenoid molecules that have important natural functions and actions. The electron-rich polyene chain of the carotenoids is very susceptible to oxidative breakdown, which may be enzymic or non-enzymic. Central cleavage gives C20 compounds, retinoids, as described in Chapter 16. Cleavage at other positions gives smaller fragments, notably C10, C13 and C15 compounds that retain the carotenoid end group. The formation of these is described in Chapter 17 and in Volume 3, Chapter 4. Oxidative breakdown can also take place during storage, processing and curing of plant material, and the products contribute to the desired aroma/flavour properties of, for example, tea, wine and tobacco. The importance of vitamin A (C20) in animals is well known. Vitamin A deficiency is still a major concern in many parts of the world. It can lead to blindness and serious ill-health or death, especially in young children. Volatile smaller carotenoid fragments (`norisoprenoids') are widespread scent/flavour compounds in plants.

  4. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Hart, W.E.; Wilson, D.B.

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  5. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  6. [Threshold values for chemicals to prevent disease].

    PubMed

    Schweinsberg, F

    1990-05-01

    Proper interpretation of threshold limit values should always take into account that such limits are not absolute, but rather subject to change depending on advances in scientific knowledge. Threshold limit values derived from toxicologic study are best suited to evaluation of health risks of chemicals in the environment. Although more toxicologic information than is currently available would be desirable for the establishment of limit values, this should not prevent agreement on limits for more substances. "Better" threshold limit values would be forthcoming from epidemiologic studies, which are particularly rare in the FRG. Prospective studies measure current exposure; but appearance of detrimental health effects generally requires a lengthy latency period (e.g., decades in the case of cancer or cardiovascular disease). Threshold limit values permit monitoring and, if necessary, restriction of anthropogenic activity. Such restrictions are necessary, as shown by severe health damage which has occurred in the past (e.g., angiosarcoma due to vinyl chloride or neurogenic damage due to mercury in the workplace, tumors due to arsenic in drinking water, and methemoglobinemia in infants due to nitrite or renal damage due to cadmium in food). Evaluation of potential detrimental health effects for threshold limit values in environmental media is difficult because the effective dose cannot be determined. Monitoring of such limit values, which have already been incorporated into West German law, is relatively easy to implement, however (e.g. continuous outdoor air quality sampling and measurement, and periodic analysis of drinking water and foodstuffs). Since such monitoring may be performed close to the source, preventive measures should be easy to implement. Biological threshold limit values (biological monitoring) are essential to effective evaluation of the health effects of chemicals. Such limits should be established for more substances. When biological limit values

  7. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire—KrF laser. Part 2. Accumulation of plasma electrons and electric discharge control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    The problem of the production of extended (~1 m) plasma channels is studied in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated laser pulses of UV radiation, which are a superposition of a subpicosecond USP train amplified in a regenerative KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator and a quasi-stationary lasing pulse. The USPs possess a high (0.2-0.3 TW) peak power and efficiently ionise oxygen molecules due to multiphoton ionisation, and the quasi-stationary lasing pulse, which has a relatively long duration (~100 ns), maintains the electron density at a level ne = (3-5) × 1014 cm—3 by suppressing electron attachment to oxygen. Experiments in laser triggering of high-voltage electric discharges suggest that the use of combined pulses results in a significant lowering of the breakdown threshold and enables controlling the discharge trajectory with a higher efficiency in comparison with smooth pulses. It was shown that controlled breakdowns may develop with a delay of tens of microseconds relative to the laser pulse, which is many orders of magnitude greater than the lifetime of free electrons in the laser-induced plasma. We propose a mechanism for this breakdown, which involves speeding-up of the avalanche ionisation of the air by negative molecular oxygen ions with a low electron binding energy (~0.5 eV) and a long lifetime (~1 ms), which are produced upon cessation of the laser pulse.

  8. Investigation of hydrogen bonding in 3-methylindole · H 2O cluster by mass analyzed threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, S.; Neusser, H. J.

    2004-05-01

    The adiabatic ionization energies and the threshold ion vibrational spectra of 3-methylindole and the 3-methylindole · H 2O cluster and the hydrogen bonding energy of the latter have been measured with mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) technique. Dissociation of the cluster has been detected as a breakdown of the threshold ion signal at the parent mass channel and the simultaneous increase of the signal at the fragment mass channel. Comparison with our previous work on indole · H 2O shows that there is only a small influence of the methyl group on the ionization energy and the hydrogen bonding strength.

  9. Life below the threshold.

    PubMed

    Castro, C

    1991-01-01

    This article explains that malnutrition, poor health, and limited educational opportunities plague Philippine children -- especially female children -- from families living below the poverty threshold. Nearly 70% of households in the Philippines do not meet the required daily level of nutritional intake. Because it is often -- and incorrectly -- assumed that women's nutritional requirements are lower than men's, women suffer higher rates of malnutrition and poor health. A 1987 study revealed that 11.7% of all elementary students were underweight and 13.9% had stunted growths. Among elementary-school girls, 17% were malnourished and 40% suffered from anemia (among lactating mothers, more than 1/2 are anemic). A 1988 Program for Decentralized Educational Development study showed that grade VI students learn only about 1/2 of what they are supposed to learn. 30% of the children enrolled in grade school drop out before they reach their senior year. The Department of Education, Culture and Sports estimates that some 2.56 million students dropped out of school in l989. That same year, some 3.7 million children were counted as part of the labor force. In Manila alone, some 60,000 children work the streets, whether doing odd jobs or begging, or turning to crime or prostitution. the article tells the story of a 12 year-old girl named Ging, a 4th grader at a public school and the oldest child in a poor family of 6 children. The undernourished Ging dreams of a good future for her family and sees education as a way out of poverty; unfortunately, her time after school is spend working in the streets or looking after her family. She considers herself luckier than many of the other children working in the streets, since she at least has a family.

  10. Study of Bacterial Samples Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W, A. Farooq; M, Atif; W, Tawfik; M, S. Alsalhi; Z, A. Alahmed; M, Sarfraz; J, P. Singh

    2014-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to investigate two different types of bacteria, Escherichia coli (B1) and Micrococcus luteus (B2) deposited on glass slides using Spectrolaser 7000. LIBS spectra were analyzed using spectrolaser software. LIBS spectrum of glass substrate was compared with bacteria spectra. Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, S, Cl, Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, C, H and CN-band appeared in bacterial samples in air. Two carbon lines at 193.02 nm, 247.88 nm and one hydrogen line at 656.28 nm with intensity ratios of 1.9, 1.83 and 1.53 appeared in bacterial samples B1 and B2 respectively. Carbon and hydrogen are the important components of the bio-samples like bacteria and other cancer cells. Investigation on LIBS spectra of the samples in He and Ar atmospheres is also presented. Ni lines appeared only in B2 sample in Ar atmosphere. From the present experimental results we are able to show that LIBS technique has a potential in the identification and discrimination of different types of bacteria.

  11. Does speaker presentation affect auditory evoked potential thresholds in goldfish?

    PubMed

    Ladich, Friedrich; Wysocki, Lidia Eva

    2009-11-01

    The auditory evoked potential (AEP) recording technique has proved to be a very versatile and successful approach in studying auditory sensitivities in fishes. The AEP protocol introduced by Kenyon, Ladich and Yan in 1998 using an air speaker with the fish positioned at the water surface gave auditory thresholds in goldfish very close to behavioural values published before. This approach was subsequently modified by several laboratories, raising the question whether speaker choice (air vs. underwater) or the position of subjects affect auditory threshold determination. To answer these questions, the hearing specialist Carassius auratus was measured using an air speaker, an underwater speaker and alternately positioning the fish directly at or 5cm below the water surface. Mean hearing thresholds obtained using these 4 different setups varied by 5.6dB, 3.7dB and 4dB at 200Hz, 500Hz and 1000Hz, respectively. Accordingly, pronounced differences in AEP thresholds in goldfish measured in different laboratories reflect other factors than speaker used and depth of the test subjects, namely variations in threshold definition, background noise, population differences, or calibration errors.

  12. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  13. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  14. Detection of Operator Performance Breakdown as an Automation Triggering Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, Hyo-Sang; Lee, Paul U.; Landry, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Performance breakdown (PB) has been anecdotally described as a state where the human operator "loses control of context" and "cannot maintain required task performance." Preventing such a decline in performance is critical to assure the safety and reliability of human-integrated systems, and therefore PB could be useful as a point at which automation can be applied to support human performance. However, PB has never been scientifically defined or empirically demonstrated. Moreover, there is no validated objective way of detecting such a state or the transition to that state. The purpose of this work is: 1) to empirically demonstrate a PB state, and 2) to develop an objective way of detecting such a state. This paper defines PB and proposes an objective method for its detection. A human-in-the-loop study was conducted: 1) to demonstrate PB by increasing workload until the subject reported being in a state of PB, and 2) to identify possible parameters of a detection method for objectively identifying the subjectively-reported PB point, and 3) to determine if the parameters are idiosyncratic to an individual/context or are more generally applicable. In the experiment, fifteen participants were asked to manage three concurrent tasks (one primary and two secondary) for 18 minutes. The difficulty of the primary task was manipulated over time to induce PB while the difficulty of the secondary tasks remained static. The participants' task performance data was collected. Three hypotheses were constructed: 1) increasing workload will induce subjectively-identified PB, 2) there exists criteria that identifies the threshold parameters that best matches the subjectively-identified PB point, and 3) the criteria for choosing the threshold parameters is consistent across individuals. The results show that increasing workload can induce subjectively-identified PB, although it might not be generalizable-only 12 out of 15 participants declared PB. The PB detection method based on

  15. Streamer parameters and breakdown in CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, M.; Avaheden, J.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Votteler, T.

    2017-01-01

    CO2 is a promising gas for the replacement of SF6 in high-voltage transmission and distribution networks due to its lower environmental impact. The insulation properties of CO2 are, therefore, of great interest. For this, the properties of streamers are important, since they determine the initial discharge propagation and possibly the transition to a leader. The present experimental investigation addresses the streamer inception and propagation at ambient temperature in the pressure range 0.05-0.5 MPa at both polarities. Streamer parameters, namely the stability field, radius and velocity, were deduced in uniform and in strongly non-uniform background fields. The measured breakdown fields can then be understood by streamer propagation and streamer-to-leader transition.

  16. Storage Lesion. Role of Red Cell Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Lee, Janet; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    As stored blood ages intraerythrocytic energy sources are depleted resulting in reduced structural integrity of the membrane. Thus, stored red cells become less deformable and more fragile as they age. This fragility leads to release of cell-free hemoglobin and formation of microparticles, sub-micron hemoglobin-containing vesicles. Upon transfusion, it is likely that additional hemolysis and microparticle formation occurs due to breakdown of fragile red blood cells. Release of cell-free hemoglobin and microparticles leads to increased consumption of nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that modulates blood flow, and may promote inflammation. Stored blood may also be deficient in recently discovered blood nitric oxide synthase activity. We hypothesize that these factors play a potential role in the blood storage lesion. PMID:21496045

  17. State Regulation, Family Breakdown, and Lone Motherhood

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Using a range of parish records, records from the Registrar General of Scotland, charity organizations, and media reports, this article contributes to the historiography which evaluates the effects of World War I in Britain as well as the history of lone mothers and their children. It highlights how during the war, women, especially lone mothers, made significant gains through the welfare system, changing approaches to illegitimacy and the plentiful nature of women’s work but also how in doing so this brought them under greater surveillance by the state, local parishes, and charity organizations. Moreover, as this article will demonstrate, many of the gains made by women were short-lived and in fact the war contributed to high levels of family breakdown and gendered and intergenerational poverty endured by lone mothers and their children. PMID:26538794

  18. Vortex breakdown in simple pipe bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Jesse; Shin, Sangwoo; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Pipe bends and elbows are one of the most common fluid mechanics elements that exists. However, despite their ubiquity and the extensive amount of research related to these common, simple geometries, unexpected complexities still remain. We show that for a range of geometries and flow conditions, these simple flows experience unexpected fluid dynamical bifurcations resembling the bubble-type vortex breakdown phenomenon. Specifically, we show with simulations and experiments that recirculation zones develop within the bends under certain conditions. As a consequence, fluid and particles can remain trapped within these structures for unexpectedly-long time scales. We also present simple techniques to mitigate this recirculation effect which can potentially have impact across industries ranging from biomedical and chemical processing to food and health sciences.

  19. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown... affected area becomes darker and usually sinks below the healthy surface, but the area remains firm...

  20. Investigation of breakdown in porous ceramics initiated by nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punanov, I. F.; Emlin, R. V.; Morozov, P. A.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2012-07-01

    Breakdown delay times are measured and velocities of forming a conductive channel in aluminum oxide based porous ceramic materials impregnated with transformer oil are determined for pulsed electrical breakdown initiated by nanosecond pulses at a voltage of 140 kV. The breakdown delay times are also measured in monolithic aluminum oxide ceramics and leuco-sapphire single crystals. It is demonstrated that in porous ceramics, the average velocity of breakdown channel propagation decreases with increasing volume of the sample occupied by the liquid dielectric in comparison with single crystal and monolythic ceramics; it makes 50% of the velocity of breakdown channel propagation in leuco-sapphire and exceeds 3 times the corresponding value in transformer oil measured at the same voltage and pulse duration.

  1. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  2. Determining the mode of high voltage breakdowns in vacuum devices

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.; Furno, E.J.; Sturtz, J.P.

    1980-08-11

    Devices were constructed which were essentially vacuum diodes equipped with windows allowing observation of high voltage breakdowns. The waveform of the applied voltage was photographed, and the x-ray output was monitored to investigate electrical breakdown in these vacuum diodes. Results indicate that breakdowns may be divided into two types: (1) vacuum (interelectrode) breakdown - characterized by a diffuse moderately bright discharge, a relative slow and smooth voltage collapse, and a large burst of x-rays, and (2) surface (insulator) flashover - characterized by a bright discharge with a very bright filamentary core, a relatively fast and noisy voltage collapse and no x-ray burst. Useful information concerning the type of breakdown in a vacuum device can be obtained by monitoring the voltage (current) waveform and the x-ray output.

  3. Universal threshold for femtosecond laser ablation with oblique illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Cheng, Weibo; Petrarca, Massimo; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    We quantify the dependence of the single-shot ablation threshold on the angle of incidence and polarization of a femtosecond laser beam, for three dissimilar solid-state materials: a metal, a dielectric, and a semiconductor. Using the constant, linear value of the index of refraction, we calculate the laser fluence transmitted through the air-material interface at the point of ablation threshold. We show that, in spite of the highly nonlinear ionization dynamics involved in the ablation process, the so defined transmitted threshold fluence is universally independent of the angle of incidence and polarization of the laser beam for all three material types. We suggest that angular dependence of ablation threshold can be utilized for profiling fluence distributions in ultra-intense femtosecond laser beams.

  4. Development of Hybrid Product Breakdown Structure for NASA Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, Mark W.; Henry, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The Product Breakdown Structure is traditionally a method of identification of the products of a project in a tree structure. It is a tool used to assess, plan, document, and display the equipment requirements for a project. It is part of a product based planning technique, and attempts to break down all components of a project in as much detail as possible, so that nothing is overlooked. The PBS for ground systems at the Kennedy Space Center is being developed to encompass the traditional requirements including the alignment of facility, systems, and components to the organizational hierarchy. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure is a hybrid in nature in that some aspects of a work breakdown structure will be incorporated and merged with the Architecture Concept of Operations, Master Subsystem List, customer interface, and assigned management responsibility. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure needs to be able to identify the flexibility of support differing customers (internal and external) usage of ground support equipment within the Kennedy Space Center launch and processing complex. The development of the Product Breakdown Structure is an iterative activity Initially documenting the organization hierarchy structure and relationships. The Product Breakdown Structure identifies the linkage between the customer program requirements, allocation of system resources, development of design goals, and identification logistics products. As the Product Breakdown Structure progresses the incorporation of the results of requirement planning for the customer occurs identifying facility needs and systems. The mature Product Breakdown Structure is baselined with a hierarchical drawing, the Product Breakdown Structure database, and an associated document identifying the verification of the data through the life cycle of the program/product line. This paper will document, demonstrate, and identify key aspects of the life cycle of a Hybrid Product

  5. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  6. Gas Temperature Effects on Electrical Breakdown in Cylindrical Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han; Jung, She

    2002-11-01

    One of the most important applications of atmospheric pressure plasma is in the corona discharge system, for the potential reduction of NOx and SOx gas emissions from diesel engines. However, the conventional corona discharge system for the emission control application requires a high electrical voltage (typically 45 kV or higher), making its high voltage modulator heavy and bulky with insulating material. We, therefore, investigate the influence of the gas temperature on the electrical breakdown properties in the cylindrical electrode system. A theoretical model of the electrical breakdown in a cylindrical electrode system is briefly summarized, by making use of Paschen¡¯s law. The breakdown voltage increases, reaches its peak and decreases, as the aspect ratio a/b increases from 0.01 to unity, where a and b are radii of the inner and outer electrodes, respectively. The experimental data agree remarkably well with the theoretical predictions. The breakdown voltage V in a high gas temperature Tg is given by V = (Tr/Tg)V0, where V0 is the breakdown voltage at the room temperature Tr. Obviously, the breakdown voltage decreases as the gas temperature Tg increases. The experimental data agree well with the theoretical values. It is, therefore, concluded that the breakdown voltage is inversely proportional to the gas temperature Tg as predicted from the theoretical analysis.

  7. Dynamic avalanche breakdown of a p-n junction: Deterministic triggering of a plane streamer front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Pavel; Grekhov, Igor

    2005-06-01

    We discuss the dynamic impact ionization breakdown of a high voltage p-n junction which occurs when the electric field is increased above the threshold of avalanche impact ionization on a time scale smaller than the inverse thermogeneration rate. The avalanche-to-streamer transition characterized by generation of dense electron-hole plasma capable of screening the applied external electric field occurs in such regimes. We argue that the experimentally observed deterministic triggering of the plane streamer front at the electric-field strength above the threshold of avalanche impact ionization, yet below the threshold of band-to-band tunneling, is generally caused by field-enhanced ionization of deep-level centers. We suggest that the process-induced sulfur centers and native defects such as EL2, HB2, and HB5 centers initiate the front in Si and GaAs structures, respectively. In deep-level-free structures the plane streamer front is triggered by Zener band-to-band tunneling.

  8. Threshold photodissociation of Cr+2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessen, D. E.; Asher, R. L.; Brucat, P. J.

    1991-08-01

    A one-photon photodissociation threshold for supersonically cooled Cr+2 is determined to be 2.13 eV. This threshold provides a strict upper limit to the adiabatic binding energy of the ground state of chromium dimer cation if the initial internal energy of the parent ion may be neglected. From the difference in the IPs of chromium atom and dimer, an upper limit to the dissociation of Cr2 is placed at 1.77 eV.

  9. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  10. Reverse Bias Second Breakdown in Power Switching Transistors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    AD-All0 145 REVERSE BIAS SECOND BREAKDOWN IN POWER SWITCHING TRANSISTORSU) TEXAS TECH UNIV LUBBOCK W M PORTNOY MAY 83 AFWL-TR-82-139 F29601-81-K-0037...139 AFWL-TR-2 82-139 ADA1 O1 5 REVERSE BIAS SECOND BREAKDOWN IN POWER SWITCHING TRANSISTORS W. M. Portnoy Texas Tech University Lubbock, Texas 79409...BREAKDOWN IN POWER SWITCHING Final Report TRANSISTORS 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) a. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) W. M. Portnoy F29601

  11. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  12. Theoretical studies of breakdown in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    Failure initiates in local regions of a material microstructure which are either especially weak, or which carry an especially large field. The size and location of these weak or hotspots'' depends on the microstructure, and is especially sensitive to microstructural disorder. Using model random microstructures, we have developed analytic and numerical tools to predict where failure initiates, its initiation field, and how it propagates from the initiation sites. We have found it useful to divide the failure process into a nucleation stage, in which damage occurs quite randomly throughout the material, a localisation stage, where a critical crack nucleates, and a catastrophic failure stage during which an unstable crack propagates through the material. Results are being compared with experiments on: Highly porous materials (porous glass, and porous gold); dielectric breakdown of metal loaded insulators (e.g. aluminum in poly-ethyelene) and; the critical current of superconductors containing cracks (Nb and Nb[sub 3]Ge). This report summarises our efforts in these areas.

  13. Investigation of electrical breakdown in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo, J.M.; Moeny, W.M.

    1991-07-11

    The program objectives are focused on increasing the voltage applied across an electron beam diode. Two objectives were pursued during the program. The first was to increase the total voltage applied to anelectron gun anode--cathode (A-K) structure by suppressing electron emission from regions other than the electron source. The second objective was to prevent surface flashover from the cathode surface due to fiber contamination from the carbon felt used to enhance electron emission from the source. The primary approach consisted of using a dielectric coating (or a surface treatment), to suppress undesired electron emission from non-emission areas of the cathode. In addition to the dielectric coating, the electrode surfaces were profiled to eliminate field enhancements in the transition areas. The program objectives were met by demonstrating 300 kv/cm fields across the gap during current conduction with no breakdown or surface flashover. This field value was obtained with electrodes coated with a dielectric polymer on the surfaces around the electron source (carbon felt) and with electrodes without the coating. Total pulse width duration was 300 nsec for electrodes with no emitter (carbon felt) and 100 nsec for electrodes with the emitter.

  14. Electrical Breakdown in a Martian Gas Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, C. R.; Calle, C. I.; Nelson, E.

    2003-01-01

    The high probability for dust interactions during Martian dust storms and dust devils combined with the cold, dry climate of Mars most likely result in airborne dust that is highly charged. On Earth, potential gradients up to 5 kV/m have been recorded and in some cases resulted in lightning. Although the Martian atmosphere is not conducive to lightning generation, it is widely believed that electrical discharge in the form of a corona occurs. In order to understand the breakdown of gases, Paschen measurements are taken which relate the minimum potential required to spark across a gap between two electrodes. The minimum potential is plotted versus the pressure-distance value for electrodes of a given geometry. For most gases, the potential decreases as the pressure decreases. For CO2, the minimum in the curve happens to be at Mars atmospheric pressures (5-7 mm Hg) for many distances and geometries. However, a very small amount (<0.1%) of mixing gases radically changes the curve, as noted by Leach. Here, we present the first experimental results of a Paschen curve for a Mars gas mixture compared with 100% pure CO2.

  15. Fire Whirls, Vortex Breakdown(?), and Blue Whirls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oran, Elaine; Xiao, Huahua; Gollner, Michael

    2016-11-01

    As we were investigating the efficiency of fire-whirl burning on water, we observed the usual transformation of a pool fire to a fire whirl, and then suddenly, we saw the fire undergo a third transition. A blue cup appeared around the base of the fire whirl, surrounding the yellow flame, the yellow flame receded into the cup and finally disappeared. What remained was a small, rapidly spinning blue flame that burned until the fuel on the water was consumed. The blue whirl was shaped like a spinning cup, closed at the bottom near the water surface, and spreading in radius moving upwards towards the rim. Above the blue cup lip, there was a purple cone-shaped mist. The fuel was usually n-heptane, but at one point it was crude oil, and still the blue whirl formed naturally. The height of the fire whirl on the laboratory pan was larger than a half meter, and this evolved into a blue whirl about 4-8 cm high. Occasionally the blue whirl would become "unstable" and revert to a transitional state of blue cup holding a yellow flame. When the blue whirl formed, turbulence seemed to disappear, and the flame became quiet. We will show videos of how this happened and discuss the evolution of the fire whirl to the blue whirl in vortex-breakdown concepts. This work was supported by and EAGER award from NSF and Minta Martin Endowment Funds in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland.

  16. Rupture models with dynamically determined breakdown displacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The critical breakdown displacement, Dc, in which friction drops to its sliding value, can be made dependent on event size by specifying friction to be a function of variables other than slip. Two such friction laws are examined here. The first is designed to achieve accuracy and smoothness in discrete numerical calculations. Consistent resolution throughout an evolving rupture is achieved by specifying friction as a function of elapsed time after peak stress is reached. Such a time-weakening model produces Dc and fracture energy proportional to the square root of distance rupture has propagated in the case of uniform stress drop. The second friction law is more physically motivated. Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone has the effect of increasing Dc and limiting peak slip velocity (Andrews, 1976). This article demonstrates a converse effect, that artificially limiting slip velocity on a fault in an elastic medium has a toughening effect, increasing fracture energy and Dc proportionally to rupture propagation distance in the case of uniform stress drop. Both the time-weakening and the velocity-toughening models can be used in calculations with heterogeneous stress drop.

  17. Cloud-screening for Africa using a geographically and seasonally variable infrared threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Kalb, V. L.

    1991-01-01

    A spatially variable monthly, infrared cloud-threshold data base has been used to screen cloud-contaminated observations from radiances measured by the NOAA-9 AVHRR over Africa. Cloud-screening through a monthly average infrared threshold based on measured surface air temperature, which is geographically dependent, shows an improvement over using a seasonally and geographically independent thermal cloud threshold of 287 K. It is found that differences in cloud-screening for these two thresholds occur for cases of lower altitude clouds or subpixel clouds where the radiative temperature is higher than the 287 K infrared threshold, yet colder than the variable threshold developed by Stowe et al. (1988) for the Nimbus-7 global cloud climatology. The variable IR threshold is shown to be effective over persistently cloud-covered regions, such as the coastal region of the Gulf of Guinea, but may introduce some erroneous cloud identifications over mountains.

  18. Eye-safe infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei E.; Hömmerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton C.; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. Besides elemental emissions from conventional UV-Vis LIBS, molecular LIBS emission signatures of the target compounds were observed in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region in recent studies. Most current LIBS studies employ the fundamental Nd:YAG laser output at 1.064 μm, which has extremely low eye-damage threshold. In this work, comparative LWIR-LIBS emissions studies using traditional 1.064 μm pumping and eye-safe laser wavelength at 1.574 μm were performed on several energetic materials for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) sensing. A Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm and the 1.574 μm output of a pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator were employed as the excitation sources. The investigated energetic materials were studied for the appearance of LWIR-LIBS emissions (4-12 μm) that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species. The observed molecular IR LIBS emission bands showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the studied materials for 1.064 μm and 1.574 μm pump wavelengths.

  19. The effect of substrate wettability on the breakdown of a locally heated fluid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, D. V.; Kirichenko, D. P.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of the equilibrium contact angle of wetting on the dynamics of the dry patch propagation and on the critical heat flux upon the breakdown of a water film that is heated locally from the substrate side is studied experimentally. The equilibrium contact angle is varied from 27° ± 6° to 74° ± 9° (with no changes in the thermophysical properties of the system) through the use of different types of surface grinding. The studies are performed for three flow modes: (a) a fluid film that freely flows down along a substrate with an inclination of 5° to the horizon, (b) a film that moves along a horizontal substrate under the influence of hydrostatic pressure, and (c) a static film on a horizontal substrate. It is found that the substrate wettability has a significant effect on the dry patch propagation rate and its final size in all these cases, but has almost no effect on the threshold heat flux at which the breakdown of a film occurs.

  20. Application of Graph Theory to unsupervised classification of materials by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifoni, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present a new approach for unsupervised classification of materials from the spectra obtained using the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy technique. The method is based on the calculation of the correlation matrix between the LIBS spectra, which is interpreted as an Adjacency matrix in the framework of Graph theory. A threshold is applied on the edge values, which is determined through maximization of the Modularity of the Graph. The classification of the spectra is done automatically after the calculation of the Modularity parameter. An example of the application of the proposed method is given, based on the study of six bronze standards of known composition. The advantages of the proposed approach with respect to Principal Component Analysis are also discussed.

  1. Factors contributing to the breakdown of sodium beta-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Buechele, A.C.

    1982-05-01

    Clarification of the breakdown process occurring during charge transfer in sodium beta alumina solid electrolytes was derived from: (1) studying the effects of molten sodium contact at 350/sup 0/C on single crystal sodium beta alumina and polycrystalline sodium beta alumina; (2) determination of critical current density by monitoring acoustic emissions accompanying crack growth in sodium/sodium beta alumina/sodium cells subjected to linear current ramping at 1 mA cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/; (3) failure analysis conducted on cycled electrolytes, some from commercial sodium/sulfur cells, which had been subjected to up to 703 Ahr cm/sup -2/ of charge transfer. Gray coloration developing in beta aluminas in contact with molten sodium was found to be a consequence of formation, through reduction by sodium, of oxygen vacancies charge compensated by electrons. Electronic conductivity of the electrolyte increases as a result. No second phase formation was detected. Colored electrolytes from sodium/sulfur cells show evidence of a newly recognized degradation mechanism in which fracture occurs when sodium is reduced and deposited internally under pressure as metal in regions where an electronic conductivity gradient exists. Heating colored beta aluminas in air produces reoxidation and bleaching. Kinetics and other properties of the coloration and bleaching processes were determined. Critical current density was found to bear an inverse relation to average electrolyte grain size. Evidence was found in the cycled electrolytes for a slow crack growth mechanism and a progressive mode of degradation advancing from the sulfur electrode interface. Implications of the findings for the construction and operation of sodium/sulfur battery systems are discussed.

  2. Laser Induced Aluminum Surface Breakdown Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Sijun; Wang, Ten-See (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Laser powered propulsion systems involve complex fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer processes. Based on an unstructured grid, pressure-based computational aerothermodynamics; platform, several sub-models describing such underlying physics as laser ray tracing and focusing, thermal non-equilibrium, plasma radiation and air spark ignition have been developed. This proposed work shall extend the numerical platform and existing sub-models to include the aluminum wall surface Inverse Bremsstrahlung (IB) effect from which surface ablation and free-electron generation can be initiated without relying on the air spark ignition sub-model. The following tasks will be performed to accomplish the research objectives.

  3. Experimental studies on the power-frequency breakdown voltage of CF3I/N2/CO2 gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Tian, Shuangshuang; Xiao, Song; Li, Yi; Deng, Zaitao; Tang, Ju

    2017-03-01

    Trifluoroiodomethane is a promising alternative to SF6 because of its good insulation properties and much less serious greenhouse effect than SF6. Previous studies have shown that the insulation performance of CF3I mixed with CO2 or N2 can equal that of SF6. This study explored the frequency breakdown characteristics of CF3I and SF6 mixed with two buffer gases. The effects of air pressure and field strength were analyzed. The fixed mixing ratio of CF3I and SF6 was 30% in the experiment. The breakdown experiment was conducted by changing the mixing ratio of CO2 and N2. Results showed that the CO2/N2 mixture ratio did not exert a synergetic effect, and the CF3I/CO2 breakdown performance was better than that of CF3I/N2 in the quasi-uniform and highly non-uniform electric fields. CO2 possibly provided the C atoms for the entire system to maintain a certain balance in C, and this balance inhibited the decomposition of CF3I. The breakdown performance of SF6/N2 was good in quasi-uniform field, whereas that of SF6/CO2 was good in the highly non-uniform field.

  4. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Sucker, Kirsten; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60–350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  5. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Monsé, Christian; Sucker, Kirsten; Hoffmeyer, Frank; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Bünger, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60-350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals.

  6. Improved model for window breakdown at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Chen, H. B.; Liu, G. Z.; Zhu, X. X.; Fang, J. Y.

    2009-03-15

    An improved global model is proposed to analyze high power microwave dielectric window breakdown at low pressure. The effect of ionization on the average momentum and energy of electrons is taken into account and a Maxwellian electron energy distribution function is adopted. The plasma energy flow and density loss to dielectric, and partially secondary electrons returning plasma to compensate the density loss, have been analytically considered. Space charge potential drop and the generalized Bohm criterion are deduced analytically. After considering the energy and density loss as well as the secondary electron compensation, the breakdown time by using numerical calculation under low pressure gets shorter compared with that under no wall loss condition. In other words, the dielectric surface breakdown time is lower than plasma volume breakdown time.

  7. Electric field-free gas breakdown in explosively driven generators

    SciTech Connect

    Shkuratov, Sergey I.; Baird, Jason; Talantsev, Evgueni F.; Altgilbers, Larry L.

    2010-07-15

    All known types of gas discharges require an electric field to initiate them. We are reporting on a unique type of gas breakdown in explosively driven generators that does not require an electric field.

  8. Skin barrier breakdown: a renaissance in emollient therapy.

    PubMed

    Cork, Michael J; Danby, Simon

    Breakdown of the skin barrier is the first event in the development of atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis). Research over the past five years has indicated that this arises as a result of the interaction of environmental agents such as soap and other detergents with the products of changes in several genes. These genetic changes predispose to the breakdown of the skin barrier, which allows the penetration of allergens, triggering a flare of atopic eczema. This new understanding of how breakdown of the skin barrier is the first event in the development of atopic eczema provides a rationale for a renaissance in the use of a complete emollient therapy regimen in atopic eczema and related skin barrier breakdown diseases, such as asteatotic eczema and irritant contact dermatitis.

  9. Vortex breakdown in closed containers with polygonal cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, I. V. Dvoynishnikov, S. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Tsoy, M. A.

    2015-12-15

    The vortex breakdown bubble in the confined flow generated by a rotating lid in closed containers with polygonal cross sections was analysed both experimentally and numerically for the height/radius aspect ratio equal to 2. The stagnation point locations of the breakdown bubble emergence and the corresponding Reynolds number were determined experimentally and in addition computed numerically by STAR-CCM+ CFD software for square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and octagonal cross section configurations. The flow pattern and the velocity were observed and measured by combining the seeding particle visualization and the temporal accuracy of laser Doppler anemometry. The vortex breakdown size and position on the container axis were determined for Reynolds numbers, ranging from 1450 to 2400. The obtained results were compared with the flow structure in the closed container of cubical and cylindrical configurations. It is shown that the measured evolution of steady vortex breakdown is in close agreement with the numerical results.

  10. Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond-gated laser induced breakdown spectroscopy have been carried out in four different hydrocarbon gas mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) to investigate the effect of gas species on the laser induced breakdown kinetics and resulting the plasma emission. For this purpose, each mixture that consists of different species has the same atom composition. It is found that the temporal emission spectra and the decay rates of atomic line-intensities are almost identical for the breakdowns in the four different mixtures. This finding may indicate that the breakdown plasmas of these mixtures reach a similar thermodynamic and physiochemical state after its formation, resulting in a similar trend of quenching of excited species.

  11. Energetic initiators with narrow firing thresholds using Al/CuO Schottky junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Zhu, Peng; Li, Jie; Hu, Bo; Shen, Ruiqi; Ye, Yinghua

    2016-07-01

    We designed and prepared Schottky-junction-based Al/CuO energetic initiators with narrow firing thresholds according to Schottky barrier theory. Using various characterization methods, we preliminarily investigated the electrical breakdown property, withstand strike current ability, and multiple-firing performance of the energetic initiators. The breakdown voltage of the Al/CuO Schottky junction was ~8 V; and electrical breakdown in the initiators occurred one by one rather than simultaneously. The withstand strike current ability of the initiator mainly depended on the heat capacity of its ceramic plug when the electrical stimulus is more than ~8 V, its breakdown voltage. The ceramic plug can absorb heat from the initiator chip, letting the initiator withstand a constant current of 0.5 A for 20 s. More importantly, the initiators might be able to withstand hard electromagnetic interference by coupling the multiple-firing performance with an out-of-line slider in the explosive train. This knowledge of the characteristics of Schottky-junction-based Al/CuO energetic initiators will help in preparing highly insensitive, efficient initiating explosive devices for weapon systems.

  12. Remote monostatic detection of radioactive material by laser-induced breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, Joshua; Miao, Chenlong; Sprangle, Phillip

    2016-03-01

    This paper analyzes and evaluates a concept for remotely detecting the presence of radioactivity using electromagnetic signatures. The detection concept is based on the use of laser beams and the resulting electromagnetic signatures near the radioactive material. Free electrons, generated from ionizing radiation associated with the radioactive material, cascade down to low energies and attach to molecular oxygen. The resulting ion density depends on the level of radioactivity and can be readily photo-ionized by a low-intensity laser beam. This process provides a controllable source of seed electrons for the further collisional ionization (breakdown) of the air using a high-power, focused, CO2 laser pulse. When the air breakdown process saturates, the ionizing CO2 radiation reflects off the plasma region and can be detected. The time required for this to occur is a function of the level of radioactivity. This monostatic detection arrangement has the advantage that both the photo-ionizing and avalanche laser beams and the detector can be co-located.

  13. Large-area imager of hydrogen leaks in fuel cells using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Hayano, R S; Fukuta, M; Koyama, T; Nobusue, H; Tanaka, J

    2009-10-01

    We constructed a simple device, which utilized laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to image H2 gas leaking from the surfaces of hydrogen fuel cells to ambient air. Nanosecond laser pulses of wavelength lambda=532 nm emitted from a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser were first compressed to a pulse length Deltat<1 ns using a stimulated Brillouin backscattering cell. Relay-imaging optics then focused this beam onto the H(2) leak and initiated the breakdown plasma. The Balmer-alpha (H-alpha) emission that emerged from this was collected with a 2-m-long macrolens assembly with a 90-mm-diameter image area, which covered a solid angle of approximately 1 x 10(-3)pi steradians seen from the plasma. The H-alpha light was isolated by two 100-mm-diameter interference filters with a 2 nm bandpass, and imaged by a thermoelectrically cooled charge-coupled device camera. By scanning the position of the laser focus, the spatial distribution of H2 gas over a 90-mm-diameter area was photographed with a spatial resolution of < or = 5 mm. Photoionization of the water vapor in the air caused a strong H-alpha background. By using pure N2 as a buffer gas, H2 leaks with rates of <1 cc/min were imaged. We also studied the possibilities of detecting He, Ne, or Xe gas leaks.

  14. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  15. Effects of Excess Charge Density on Dielectric Breakdown in Solids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-10

    insulator , and the associated light emission is ther- 1 11 2 mal in character. No new conduction mechansim has to be hypothesized in thermal breakdown...breakdown in solid insulators . In Chapter II, a short review of earlier experimental observations and theoretical work will be given as background...the sample. Local removal of the electrode material does not isolate this path because surface flashover from one electrode to the gaseous channel

  16. Nanopore formation by controlled electrical breakdown: Efficient molecular-sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F. M.; Abdel-Daiem, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    A controlled electrical breakdown is used to produce efficient nanopore (NP) sensors. This phenomenon can be used to precisely fabricate these nanopore (NP) sensors through the membranes of the polydimethylsiloxane microarrays. This can be carried out, when localizing the electrical potential through a suitable microfluidic channel. Organic molecules, and other different protein-molecules, can be easily and precisely detected using this procedure referred to as controlled electrical breakdown technique.

  17. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  18. AVLIS Production Plant work breakdown structure and Dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    The work breakdown structure has been prepared for the AVLIS Production Plant to define, organize, and identify the work efforts and is summarized in Fig. 1-1 for the top three project levels. The work breakdown structure itself is intended to be the primary organizational tool of the AVLIS Production Plant and is consistent with the overall AVLIS Program Work Breakdown Structure. It is designed to provide a framework for definition and accounting of all of the elements that are required for the eventual design, procurement, and construction of the AVLIS Production Plant. During the present phase of the AVLIS Project, the conceptual engineering phase, the work breakdown structure is intended to be the master structure and project organizer of documents, designs, and cost estimates. As the master project organizer, the key role of the work breakdown structure is to provide the mechanism for developing completeness in AVLIS cost estimates and design development of all hardware and systems. The work breakdown structure provides the framework for tracking, on a one-to-one basis, the component design criteria, systems requirements, design concepts, design drawings, performance projections, and conceptual cost estimates. It also serves as a vehicle for contract reporting. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  20. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-07

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  1. Layer-by-layer dielectric breakdown of hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2015-01-27

    Hexagonal boron nitride (BN) is widely used as a substrate and gate insulator for two-dimensional (2D) electronic devices. The studies on insulating properties and electrical reliability of BN itself, however, are quite limited. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the dielectric breakdown characteristics of BN using conductive atomic force microscopy. The electric field strength was found to be ∼ 12 MV/cm, which is comparable to that of conventional SiO2 oxides because of the covalent bonding nature of BN. After the hard dielectric breakdown, the BN fractured like a flower into equilateral triangle fragments. However, when the applied voltage was terminated precisely in the middle of the dielectric breakdown, the formation of a hole that did not penetrate to the bottom metal electrode was clearly observed. Subsequent I-V measurements of the hole indicated that the BN layer remaining in the hole was still electrically inactive. On the basis of these observations, layer-by-layer breakdown was confirmed for BN with regard to both physical fracture and electrical breakdown. Moreover, statistical analysis of the breakdown voltages using a Weibull plot suggested the anisotropic formation of defects. These results are unique to layered materials and unlike the behavior observed for conventional 3D amorphous oxides.

  2. Air injection system diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzan, J.M.; Labus, G.E.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a method for diagnosing failures in an air control system that controls a quantity of air admitted into an exhaust path of an internal combustion engine. It comprises sensing the oxygen content of the exhaust gas of the engine at predetermined time intervals at a first predetermined point in the exhaust path of the engine, the oxygen content normally oscillating between a rich oxygen condition and a lean oxygen condition in the absence of air injected into the exhaust path above the first predetermined point; injecting a quantity of air into the exhaust path of the engine at a second predetermined point in the exhaust port, the second predetermined point being above the first predetermined point; counting the number of intervals at which the sensed oxygen content indicates a rich oxygen condition over a predetermined period of time; comparing the counted number of rich oxygen intervals to a predetermined threshold value, the threshold value being greater than a counted number of rich oxygen intervals over the predetermined period of time resulting from the normal oscillations between rich and lean oxygen conditions in the absence of air injected into the exhaust path; indicating the existence of a fault in the air control system when the number of rich oxygen intervals does not exceed the predetermined threshold value.

  3. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-03

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  4. On computational Gestalt detection thresholds.

    PubMed

    Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Jakubowicz, Jérémie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show some recent developments of computational Gestalt theory, as pioneered by Desolneux, Moisan and Morel. The new results allow to predict much more accurately the detection thresholds. This step is unavoidable if one wants to analyze visual detection thresholds in the light of computational Gestalt theory. The paper first recalls the main elements of computational Gestalt theory. It points out a precision issue in this theory, essentially due to the use of discrete probability distributions. It then proposes to overcome this issue by using continuous probability distributions and illustrates it on the meaningful alignment detector of Desolneux et al.

  5. Low Threshold Quantum Dot Lasers.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Veena Hariharan; Mahadevu, Rekha; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-04-07

    Semiconductor quantum dots have replaced conventional inorganic phosphors in numerous applications. Despite their overall successes as emitters, their impact as laser materials has been severely limited. Eliciting stimulated emission from quantum dots requires excitation by intense short pulses of light typically generated using other lasers. In this Letter, we develop a new class of quantum dots that exhibit gain under conditions of extremely low levels of continuous wave illumination. We observe thresholds as low as 74 mW/cm(2) in lasers made from these materials. Due to their strong optical absorption as well as low lasing threshold, these materials could possibly convert light from diffuse, polychromatic sources into a laser beam.

  6. A Test Study of 50% Lightning Impulse Breakdown Voltage on Rod-Plane Gap with Two-Phase Mixture of Gas and Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhenghao; Xu, Huaili; Bai, Jing; Yu, Fusheng; Hu, Feng; Li, Jin

    2007-12-01

    A test study on 50% lightning impulse breakdown voltage in two-phase mixture of gas and solid particles has been carried out in a specially designed discharge cabinet. A mechanical sieve is set up for sifting different solid particles into the discharge space uniformly. The lightning impulse voltage according with international electro-technical commission (IEC) standard is applied to the electrodes inside the discharge cabinet by the rule of up-down method in a total of 40 times. The results showed that the 50% lightning impulse breakdown voltage in two-phase mixture of gas and solid particles has its own features and is much different from that in air.

  7. Thermally induced stresses in boulders on airless body surfaces: Implications for breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, Jamie; Byrne, Shane

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the role of thermally induced rock breakdown in the evolution of airless body surfaces. This process is driven by the propagation of microcracks due to stress caused by changes in temperature. Here we model the thermomechanical response of spherical lunar boulders of varying size to diurnal thermal forcing. Exploring the magnitude and distribution of induced stresses reveals a bimodal response. During sunrise, high stresses occur in the boulders' interiors that are associated with large-scale temperature gradients (developed due to overnight cooling). During sunset, high stresses occur at the boulders' exteriors due to the cooling and contraction of the surface. Both kinds of stresses are on the order of 10 MPa in 1 m boulders and decrease for smaller radii, suggesting that larger boulders break down more quickly. Boulders ≤30 cm exhibit a weak response to thermal forcing, suggesting a boulder-size threshold below which crack propagation may not occur. Boulders of any size buried by regolith are shielded from thermal breakdown.As boulders increase in size (>1 m), stresses increase to several 10s of MPa as the behavior of their surfaces approaches that of an infinite halfspace. The rate of stress-increase is rapid until the boulder reaches ~5 times the skin depth (~4 m) in size. Above this size, stresses only slowly increase as the surface loses thermal contact with the boulder center. Boulders between 3 m and 7 m have less volume of material to erode than larger boulders (> 10 m) but only moderately lower stresses, suggesting they may be preferentially broken down by this process.Stress orientations can yield insight into how breakdown may occur. Interior stresses act on a plane perpendicular to the path of the sun, driving the propagation of surface-parallel cracks and contributing to exfoliation of planar fragments. Exterior stresses act parallel to the boulder surface driving the propagation of surface-perpendicular cracks and contributing to

  8. Experimental studies of breakdown characteristics in pulse-modulated radio-frequency atmospheric discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, W. G.; Zhang, X.; Gu, J. L.; Ding, Z. F.

    2016-12-01

    The influences of the pulse off-time on the breakdown voltage of the first pulse and the stable pulse discharge (having repeatedly undergone a process of ignition, maintenance, and extinction) are experimentally investigated in a pulse-modulated radio-frequency atmospheric pressure argon discharge. The experimental results show that the first pulse discharge breakdown voltage decreases, but the stable pulse discharge breakdown voltage increases with increasing the pulse off-time. In a large region of the pulse off-time, the luminescence property of the initial breakdown stage is studied using a high speed camera. The captured images at different pulse off-times demonstrate that the gas breakdown exhibits five key characteristics: single-point random breakdown, multi-point random breakdown, stable uniform breakdown, stable glow mixed with pattern breakdown, and stable nonuniform pattern breakdown. The physical reasons for these results are discussed.

  9. Measurement and modeling of ozone and nitrogen oxides produced by laser breakdown in oxygen-nitrogen atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Gornushkin, Igor B; Stevenson, Chris L; Galbács, Gábor; Smith, Ben W; Winefordner, James D

    2003-11-01

    The production of ozone nad nitrogen oxides was studied during multiple laser breakdown in oxygen-nitrogen mixtures at atmospheric pressure. About 2000 laser shots at 10(10) W cm-2 were delivered into a sealed reaction chamber. The chamber with a long capillary was designed to measure absorption of O3, NO, and NO2 as a function of the number of laser shots. The light source for absorption measurements was the continuum radiation emitted by the plasma during the first 0.2 microsecond of its evolution. A kinetic model was developed that encompassed the principal chemical reactions between the major atmospheric components and the products of laser breakdown. In the model, the laser plasma was treated as a source of nitric oxide and atomic oxygen, whose rates of production were calculated using measured absorption by NO, NO2, and O3. The calculated concentration profiles for NO, NO2, and O3 were in good agreement with measured profiles over a time scale of 0-200 s. The steady-state concentration of ozone was measured in a flow cell in air. For a single breakdown in air, the estimated steady-state yield of ozone was 2 x 10(12) molecules, which agreed with the model prediction. This study can be of importance for general understanding of laser plasma chemistry and for elucidating the nature of spectral interferences and matrix effects that may take place in applied spectrochemical analysis.

  10. Threshold Concepts and Pedagogic Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief exposure to the development of the threshold concepts framework (TCF), the intention being to illuminate for interested readers a broader landscape of research activity than that perhaps conveyed by the individual contributions to this special edition. Design/Methodology/Approach: There is…

  11. Microwave diagnostics of laser-induced avalanche ionization in air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhili; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2006-10-01

    This work presents a simplified model of microwave scattering during the avalanche ionization stage of laser breakdown and corresponding experimental results of microwave scattering from laser breakdown in room air. The model assumes and measurements confirm that the breakdown regime can be viewed as a point dipole scatterer of the microwave radiation and thus directly related to the time evolving number of electrons. The delay between the laser pulse and the rise of the microwave scattering signal is a direct measure of the avalanche ionization process.

  12. Stress intensity factor threshold in dental porcelains.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Humberto Naoyuki; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Soki, Fabiana Naomi; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2008-05-01

    The stress intensity factor threshold (KI0) is related to the stress level at which cracks start to grow stably, causing the weakening of porcelain prostheses during their use. The values of KI0 of seven dental porcelains (with and without reinforcing leucite crystal, KAlSi2O6) stored in air (22 degrees C, 60% relative humidity) and artificial saliva (37 degrees C) were determined by measuring the crack growth velocity of radial cracks generated at the corner of Vickers indentations. The results of KI0 were correlated with the leucite content, fracture toughness (KIc), and chemical composition of the porcelains. It was observed that KI0 increased with the increase of leucite content (only for the leucite-based porcelains) and with the increase of KIc. The increase in Al2O3 content or the decrease in the alkali oxide (K2O and Na2O) content of the material's glassy matrix tended to increase the KI0 values. Storage media (air and saliva) did not significantly affect the KI0 of porcelains tested, indicating that the control parameter of KI0 value was not the water content of the storage media.

  13. Field enhancement factor dependence on electric field and implications on microscale gas breakdown: Theory and experimental interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandro Buendia, Jose; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2015-12-01

    In this letter, we obtain a better understanding of effective field enhancement factors (β eff) in the context of microscale gas breakdown with specific emphasis on its dependence on applied electric field. The theoretical dependence of β eff on electric field for various hemi-ellipsoidal asperities indicates that the value of β eff decreases with increasing electric field. The interpretation of experimental data using a typical one-dimensional modified Paschen law indicates a qualitatively similar electric field dependence even though the data could not be completely explained using a single effective asperity size. The values of β eff extracted from seven independent experimental datasets for microscale breakdown of argon and air are shown to be consistent and an empirical dependence on electric field is determined.

  14. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Kurz, Heiko G.; Bergé, Luc; Skupin, Stefan; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of intense picosecond laser pulses in air in the presence of strong nonlinear self-action effects and air ionization is investigated experimentally and numerically. The model used for numerical analysis is based on the nonlinear propagator for the optical field coupled to the rate equations for the production of various ionic species and plasma temperature. Our results show that the phenomenon of plasma-driven intensity clamping, which has been paramount in femtosecond laser filamentation, holds for picosecond pulses. Furthermore, the temporal pulse distortions in the picosecond regime are limited and the pulse fluence is also clamped. In focused propagation geometry, a unique feature of picosecond filamentation is the production of a broad, fully ionized air channel, continuous both longitudinally and transversely, which may be instrumental for many applications including laser-guided electrical breakdown of air, channeling microwave beams and air lasing.

  15. Top predator absence enhances leaf breakdown in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2016-12-01

    Current biodiversity loss is characterized by the extinction of top predators, but small-bodied freshwater fish are often overlooked in research and conservation management even when threatened because they usually lack commercial value. Therefore, the ecosystem impacts of their possible loss remain mostly unknown. We assessed whether the presence/absence of an endangered predatory fish (Barbus meridionalis (A. Risso, 1827)) in an intermittent stream affects leaf fungal biomass and leaf quality (i.e. leaf carbon:nitrogen ratio and leaf toughness), macroinvertebrate assemblages colonizing leaf packs, and leaf breakdown rates. We conducted a leaf bag experiment comparing a control reach with a population of B. meridionalis with an adjacent upstream fishless reach. In the fishless reach, leaf fungal biomass and microbially mediated breakdown rate were lower compared to the control reach. This was probably caused by the lack of the bottom-up stimulation through nutrient recycling by fish. Shredders and scrapers were found at higher abundance and biomass in the fishless compared to the control reach, and the whole macroinvertebrate community composition changed with fish absence. Consequently, macroinvertebrate mediated leaf breakdown was faster in the fishless than in the control reach, not only compensating for the lower microbially mediated leaf breakdown in the fishless reach, but accelerating the overall leaf breakdown rate. Our study contributes to understand the potential cascading effects produced by the extirpation of endangered small-bodied fish.

  16. Study of the breakdown voltage of SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmill, V.; Garutti, E.; Klanner, R.; Nitschke, M.; Schwandt, J.

    2017-02-01

    The breakdown behaviour of SiPMs (Silicon PhotoMultiplier) with pixel sizes of 15 × 15 , 25 × 25 , 50 × 50, and 100 × 100 μm2, manufactured by KETEK, has been investigated. From the current-voltage characteristics measured with and without illumination by LED light of 470 nm wavelength, the current-breakdown voltage, VI, and from linear fits of the voltage dependence of the SiPM gain, measured by recording pulse-area spectra, the gain-breakdown voltage, VG, have been obtained. The voltage dependence of the Geiger-breakdown probability was determined from the fraction of zero photoelectron events with LED illumination. By comparing the results to a model calculation, the photodetection-breakdown voltage, VPD, has been determined. Within experimental uncertainties, VI and VPD are equal and independent of pixel size. For VG, a dependence on pixel size is observed. The difference VI -VG is about 1 V for the SiPM with 15 μm pixels, decreases with pixel size and is compatible with zero for the SiPM with 100 μm pixels.

  17. Pulsed electrical breakdown of a void-filled dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. A.; Lagasse, R. R.; Schroeder, J. L.

    2002-05-01

    We report breakdown strengths in a void-filled dielectric material, epoxy containing 48 vol % hollow glass microballoon filler, which is stressed with unipolar voltage pulses of the order of 10 μs duration. The microballoon voids had mean diameters of approximately 40 μm and contained SO2 gas at roughly 30% atmospheric pressure. This void-filled material displays good dielectric strength (of the order of 100 kV mm-1) under these short-pulse test conditions. Results from a variety of electrode geometries are reported, including arrangements in which the electric stress is highly nonuniform. Conventional breakdown criteria based on mean or peak electric stress do not account for these data. A statistics-based predictive breakdown model is developed, in which the dielectric is divided into independent, microballoon-sized "discharge cells" and the spontaneous discharge of a single cell is presumed to launch full breakdown of the composite. We obtain two empirical parameters, the mean and standard deviation of the spontaneous discharge field, by fitting breakdown data from two electrode geometries having roughly uniform fields but with greatly differing volumes of electrically stressed material. This model accounts for many aspects of our data, including the inherent statistical scatter and the dependence on the stressed volume, and it provides informative predictions with electrode geometries giving highly nonuniform fields. Issues related to computational spatial resolution and cutoff distance are also discussed.

  18. Communication breakdowns and diagnostic errors: a radiology perspective

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Daniel R.; Singh, Hardeep; Berlin, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Timely and accurate communication is essential to safe and effective health care. Despite increased awareness over the past decade of the frequency of medical errors and greater efforts directed towards improving patient safety, patient harm due to communication breakdowns remains a significant problem. Communication problems related to diagnostic testing may account for nearly half of all errors made by typical primary care physicians in their medical practices. This article provides an overview of communication breakdowns in the context of radiology related diagnostic errors. In radiology, communication breakdowns between radiologists, referring clinicians, and patients can lead to failure of critical information to be relayed, resulting in delayed or missed diagnosis. New technologies, such electronic health records (EHRs), contribute to the increasing complexity of communication in health care, but if used correctly, they can provide several benefits to safe and effective communication. To address the complexity of communication breakdowns, a multifaceted sociotechnical approach is needed to address both technical and non-technical aspects of health care delivery. The article also provides some future directions in reducing communication breakdowns related to diagnostic testing, including proactive risk assessment of communication practices using recently released SAFER self-assessment guides. PMID:27006890

  19. Suppression of vacuum breakdown using thin film coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Fleddermann, C.B.; Mayberry, C.S.; Wroblewski, B.; Schamiloglu, E.

    1993-12-01

    The use of thin film coatings for increasing the breakdown voltage in a parallel-plane high-voltage gap has been investigated. Both metallic and ceramic thin films were deposited at varying thicknesses and deposition conditions on a screen cathode using ion-beam sputtering. Improvements in breakdown voltage were observed for nearly any type of deposited film, with significant variations in breakdown voltage depending on film thickness and oxygen and partial pressure during ceramic film deposition. For 500 nm thick metallic or oxide films, breakdown voltage was nearly doubled compared to the bare stainless steel screen, which is attributed to the burying of surface imperfections on the cathode. For 200 nm thick films, the covering of imperfections is less effective; however, high breakdown voltages can still be obtained by choosing an appropriate oxygen partial pressure during film deposition. Electric fields as high as 60 kV/mm were sustained across a 1 mm gap for 10 {mu}sec pulses; lesser fields could be sustained for as long as 10 ms. These coatings allowed for the successful study of a planar liquid metal ion source.

  20. Extreme Sensitivity and the Practical Implications of Risk Assessment Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Bukowski, John; Nicolich, Mark; Lewis, R. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Traditional risk-assessment theory assumes the existence of a threshold for non-cancer health effects. However, a recent trend in environmental regulation rejects this assumption in favor of non-threshold linearity for these endpoints. This trend is driven largely by two related concepts: (1) a theoretical assumption of wide-ranging human sensitivity, and (2) inability to detect thresholds in epidemiologic models. Wide-ranging sensitivity assumes a subpopulation with extreme background vulnerability, so that even trivial environmental exposures are hazardous to someone somewhere. We use examples from the real world of clinical medicine to show that this theoretical assumption is inconsistent with the biology of mammalian systems and the realities of patient care. Using examples from particulate-matter air-pollution research, we further show that failure to reject linearity is usually driven by statistical rather than biological considerations, and that nonlinear/threshold models often have a similar or better fit than their linear counterparts. This evidence suggests the existence of practical, real-world thresholds for most chemical exposures. PMID:23930098

  1. Extreme sensitivity and the practical implications of risk assessment thresholds.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, John; Nicolich, Mark; Lewis, R Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Traditional risk-assessment theory assumes the existence of a threshold for non-cancer health effects. However, a recent trend in environmental regulation rejects this assumption in favor of non-threshold linearity for these endpoints. This trend is driven largely by two related concepts: (1) a theoretical assumption of wide-ranging human sensitivity, and (2) inability to detect thresholds in epidemiologic models. Wide-ranging sensitivity assumes a subpopulation with extreme background vulnerability, so that even trivial environmental exposures are hazardous to someone somewhere. We use examples from the real world of clinical medicine to show that this theoretical assumption is inconsistent with the biology of mammalian systems and the realities of patient care. Using examples from particulate-matter air-pollution research, we further show that failure to reject linearity is usually driven by statistical rather than biological considerations, and that nonlinear/threshold models often have a similar or better fit than their linear counterparts. This evidence suggests the existence of practical, real-world thresholds for most chemical exposures.

  2. Milagro: A low energy threshold extensive air shower array

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnis, C.

    1994-12-31

    Observations of high-energy gamma rays from astronomical sources have revolutionized our view of the cosmos. Gamma rays with energies up to {approximately}10 GeV can be observed directly with space-based instruments. Above 100 GeV the low flux of gamma rays requires one to utilize ground-based instruments. Milagro is a new type of gamma-ray detector based on water Cerenkov technology. This new design will enable to continuously observe the entire overhead sky, and be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above {approximately}250 GeV. These attributes make Milagro an ideal detector for the study of high-energy transient phenomenon.

  3. Effect of oxygen impurities on atmospheric-pressure surface streamer discharge in argon for large gap arc breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-10-01

    We report the results of a computational study that investigates the effect of impurities (molecular oxygen) on the development of argon surface streamers at atmospheric-pressure conditions. A continuous surface streamer has been proposed as a low-voltage mechanism to generate a conductive bridge for arc breakdown of a large interelectrode gap at high pressures. The streamer discharge model is based on the self-consistent, multispecies, continuum description of the plasma. Below a threshold voltage, no streamer discharge is observed and charge is localized only in the vicinity of the anode in the form of a localized corona. Above this voltage threshold in pure argon, a continuous conductive streamer successfully bridges the gap between two electrodes indicating high probability of transition to the arc. For small oxygen impurities (less than 5%), the threshold voltage is found to decrease by a few hundred volts compared to the threshold voltage in pure argon while the streamer induction time increases. No noticeable changes in the streamer conductivity is obtained for low impurities of oxygen in the above range. An increase of the oxygen density above the 5% impurity level causes a significant decrease in the continuous streamer conductivity and leads to a decrease in the probability of transition to arc.

  4. ISODATA: Thresholds for splitting clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, E. P. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The parameter AD (average distance) as used in the ISODATA program was critically examined. Thresholds of AD to decide on the splitting of clusters were obtained. For the univariate case, 0.84 was established as a sound choice, after examining several simple, as well as composite, distributions and also after investigating the probability of misclassification when points have to be reassigned to the newly identified clusters. For the multivariate case, the empirical threshold (N-0.16)/square root of N was extrapolated. A final criticism on AD was that AD would lose its effectiveness as a discriminative measure for the present purpose when N was large.

  5. Scaling behavior of threshold epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2012-05-01

    We study the classic Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model for the spread of an infectious disease. In this stochastic process, there are two competing mechanism: infection and recovery. Susceptible individuals may contract the disease from infected individuals, while infected ones recover from the disease at a constant rate and are never infected again. Our focus is the behavior at the epidemic threshold where the rates of the infection and recovery processes balance. In the infinite population limit, we establish analytically scaling rules for the time-dependent distribution functions that characterize the sizes of the infected and the recovered sub-populations. Using heuristic arguments, we also obtain scaling laws for the size and duration of the epidemic outbreaks as a function of the total population. We perform numerical simulations to verify the scaling predictions and discuss the consequences of these scaling laws for near-threshold epidemic outbreaks.

  6. Roots at the Percolation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodepositions. One component of rhizopdeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage was assumed to explain unexpectedly low rhizosphere rewetting rates during irrigation (Carminati et al. 2010) and temporarily water repellency in the rhizosphere after severe drying (Moradi et al. 2012).Here, we present an experimental and theoretical study for the rewetting behaviour of a soil mixed with mucilage, which was used as an analogue of the rhizosphere. Our samples were made of two layers of untreated soils separated by a thin layer (ca. 1 mm) of soil treated with mucilage. We prepared soil columns of varying particle size, mucilage concentration and height of the middle layer above the water table. The dry soil columns were re-wetted by capillary rise from the bottom.The rewetting of the middle layer showed a distinct dual behavior. For mucilage concentrations lower than a certain threshold, water could cross the thin layer almost immediately after rewetting of bulk soil. At slightly higher mucilage concentrations, the thin layer was almost impermeable. The mucilage concentration at the threshold strongly depended on particle size: the smaller the particle size the larger the soil specific surface and the more mucilage was needed to cover the entire particle surface and to induce water repellency.We applied a classic pore network model to simulate the experimental observations. In the model a certain fraction of nodes were randomly disconnected to reproduce the effect of mucilage in temporarily blocking the flow. The percolation model could qualitatively reproduce well the threshold characteristics of the experiments. Our experiments, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively

  7. Rf breakdown studies in a SLAC disk-loaded structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Loew, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Rf breakdown studies in an S-band standing-wave disk-loaded accelerator structure have been completed. An equivalent traveling-wave accelerating gradient as high as 147 MV/m and a peak field in excess of 300 MV/m have been obtained. At these high gradients, considerable amounts of field emission and x-ray radiation are observed. Some of the field-emitted electrons are captured and focused by the rf fields and can be extracted on the axis of the structure. Their current, energy distribution and the x-ray radiation they produce are given. Rf processing as measured by the frequency of breakdown and the reduction in field emitted electron currents inside the structure can be speeded up considerably by the presence of argon. Some conjectures on the causes of breakdown are presented.

  8. Electrical breakdown gas detector featuring carbon nanotube array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongyul; Pal, Sunil; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate here detection of dichloro-difluoro-methane and oxygen in mixtures with helium using a carbon nanotube electrical breakdown sensor device. The sensor is comprised of an aligned array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes deposited on a nickel based super-alloy (Inconel 600) as the anode; the counter electrode is a planar nickel sheet. By monitoring the electrical breakdown characteristics of oxygen and dichloro-difluoro-methane in a background of helium, we find that the detection limit for dichloro-difluoro-methane is approximately 0.1% and the corresponding limit for oxygen is approximately 1%. A phenomenologigal model is proposed to describe the trends observed in detection of the two mixtures. These results indicate that carbon nanotube based electrical breakdown sensors show potential as end detectors in gas-chromatography devices.

  9. Breakdown Limit Studies in High-Rate Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivaniouchenkov, Yu; Fonte, P.; Peskov, V.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    We report results from a systematic study of breakdown limits for novel high-rate gaseous detectors: MICROMEGAS, CAT and GEM, together with more conventional devices such as thin-gap parallel-mesh chambers and high-rate wire chambers. It was found that for all these detectors, the maximum achievable pin, before breakdown appears, drops dramatically with incident flux, and is sometimes inversely proportional to it. Further, in the presence of alpha particles, typical of the breakgrounds in high-energy experiments, additional gain drops of 1-2 orders of magnitude were observed for many detectors. It was found that breakdowns at high rates occur through what we have termed an "accumulative" mechanism, which does not seem to have been previously reported in the literature. Results of these studies may help in choosing the optimum detector for given experimental conditions.

  10. On sample preparation and dielectric breakdown in nanostructured epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reading, M.; Xu, Z.; Vaughan, A. S.; Lewin, P. L.

    2011-08-01

    There are many methods available to achieve a good dispersion of fillers within a polymeric matrix. This investigation considered several methods of dispersing three chosen fillers within an epoxy resin; the same processes were also performed on unfilled materials to investigate any effects they may have on the host material. For this investigation, the epoxy system (EP) was combined with sodium montmorillonite (MMT), micrometric silicon dioxide (SD) or nanometric silicon dioxide (NSD) as fillers. The effect of the different sample preparation routes on breakdown behaviour was then evaluated. While more thorough mixing protocols were found to lead to improved breakdown behaviour in the case of the various filled systems, surprisingly, an entirely equivalent form of behaviour was also seen in the unfilled epoxy. The influence of changes in sample geometry on the breakdown strength was established.

  11. High-voltage atmospheric breakdown across intervening rutile dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Simpson, Sean; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2013-09-01

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 on electrical discharge experiments performed to develop predictive computational models of the fundamental processes of surface breakdown in the vicinity of high-permittivity material interfaces. Further, experiments were conducted to determine if free carrier electrons could be excited into the conduction band thus lowering the effective breakdown voltage when UV photons (4.66 eV) from a high energy pulsed laser were incident on the rutile sample. This report documents the numerical approach, the experimental setup, and summarizes the data and simulations. Lastly, it describes the path forward and challenges that must be overcome in order to improve future experiments for characterizing the breakdown behavior for rutile.

  12. Breakdown Strength in Electrical and Elastic Random Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza Ortiz, Julio; Rajapakse, Chamith; Gunaratne, Gemunu

    2003-03-01

    Electrical or elastic networks provide a natural model to study transport processes such as dielectric breakdown to metal insulator transition in disordered inhomogeneous conductors. We present an expression for the mean breakdown strength of such networks. First, we introduce a method to evaluate the redistribution of current due to the removal of a finite number of elements from a hyper-cubic network of conductances. It is used to determine the reduction of breakdown strength due to a fracture of size κ. Numerical analysis is used to show that the analogous reduction due to random removal of elements from electrical and elastic networks follow a similar form. We discuss one possible application, namely the use of bone density as a diagnostic tools for osteoporosis.

  13. Exploration of Underwater Laser Breakdown Using Two Synchronized Gated Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwel, Lutz; Baumgart, Clayton; Betts, Susannah; Morgan, Thomas J.; Graham, William G.

    2014-10-01

    Using two synchronized intensified CCD cameras, we have studied spatial and temporal characteristics of optical breakdown in water created by a focused 10 ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. For three water samples with different impurity content (ultrapure, distilled, and tap water), the plasma evolution was monitored up to 1 ms after breakdown. Images taken by the two cameras, systematically delayed relative to each other, reveal that the center of emission intensity does not remain at a fixed location. In single plasma events, the center first moves, on average, toward the incoming laser beam. Then, at about 100 to 200 ns, the apparent direction of motion reverses and the center returns towards the focal point. On the other hand, in repetitive breakdown the time averaged center moves steadily downstream with each subsequent pulse. Details of this behavior depend on repetition frequency. We will also present shadowgraphy results revealing time resolved speeds of both shockwave and bubble expansion.

  14. New near-threshold mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Thomas D.; Gelman, Boris A.; Nussinov, Shmuel

    2004-01-01

    We show that under a number of rather plausible assumptions QCD spectrum may contain a number of mesons which have not been predicted or observed. Such states will have the quantum numbers of two existing mesons and masses very close to the dissociation threshold into the two mesons. Moreover, at least one of the two mesonic constituents itself must be very close to its dissociation threshold. In particular, one might expect the existence of loosely bound systems of D and D∗sJ(2317); similarly, K and f0(980), K¯ and f0(980), K and a0(980) and K¯ and a0(980) can be bound. The mechanism for binding in these cases is the S-wave kaon exchange. The nearness of one of the constituents to its decay threshold into a kaon plus a remainder, implies that the range of the kaon exchange force becomes abnormally long—significantly longer than 1/mK which greatly aids the binding.

  15. New phenomenology of gas breakdown in DC and RF fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, Zoran Lj; Sivoš, Jelena; Savić, Marija; Škoro, Nikola; Radmilović Radenović, Marija; Malović, Gordana; Gocić, Saša; Marić, Dragana

    2014-05-01

    This paper follows a review lecture on the new developments in the field of gas breakdown and low current discharges, usually covered by a form of Townsend's theory and phenomenology. It gives an overview of a new approach to identifying which feedback agents provide breakdown, how to model gas discharge conditions and reconcile the results with binary experiments and how to employ that knowledge in modelling gas discharges. The next step is an illustration on how to record volt-ampere characteristics and use them on one hand to obtain the breakdown voltage and, on the other, to identify the regime of operation and model the secondary electron yields. The second aspect of this section concerns understanding the different regimes, their anatomy, how those are generated and how free running oscillations occur. While temporal development is the most useful and interesting part of the new developments, the difficulty of presenting the data in a written form precludes an easy publication and discussion. Thus, we shall only mention some of the results that stem from these measurements. Most micro discharges operate in DC albeit with complex geometries. Thus, parallel plate micro discharge measurements were needed to establish that Townsend's theory, with all its recent extensions, is still valid until some very small gaps. We have shown, for example, how a long-path breakdown puts in jeopardy many experimental observations and why a flat left-hand side of the Paschen curve often does not represent good physics. We will also summarize a kinetic representation of the RF breakdown revealing a somewhat more complex picture than the standard model. Finally, we will address briefly the breakdown in radially inhomogeneous conditions and how that affects the measured properties of the discharge. This review has the goal of summarizing (rather than developing details of) the current status of the low-current DC discharges formation and operation as a discipline which, in spite of

  16. Modeling the Conductivity of a Subnanosecond Breakdown Gas Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinhui; Scott Tyo, J.; Jerald Buchenauer, C.

    We present two different modeling methods for understanding subnanosecond breakdown processes in gas plasma switches. The first method uses a finite element time domain method in order to understand experimental measurements of the remote electromagnetic (EM) fields. This method only models the EM fields and is good for analysis, but lacks a predictive capability for the full nonlinear plasma system. The second modeling method uses a PIC code, and is fully self consistent. We make comparisons with experimental measurements and conclude that the PIC model may provide a good understanding of the subnanosecond breakdown phenomena.

  17. Rf breakdown studies in copper electron linac structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    This paper presents a summary of rf breakdown-limited electric fields observed in experimental linac structures at SLAC and a discussion of how these experiments can be interpreted against the background of existing, yet incomplete, theories. The motivation of these studies, begun in 1984, is to determine the maximum accelerating field gradients that might be used safely in future e/sup /+-// colliders, to contribute to the basic understanding of the rf breakdown mechanism, and to discover if a special surface treatment might make it possible to supersede the field limits presently reachable in room temperature copper structures. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Breakdown voltage of discrete capacitors under single-pulse conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domingos, H.; Scaturro, J.; Hayes, L.

    1981-01-01

    For electrostatic capacitors the breakdown voltage is inherently related to the properties of the dielectric, with the important parameters being the dielectric field strength which is related to the dielectric constant and the dielectric thickness. These are not necessarily related to the capacitance value and the rated voltage, but generally the larger values of capacitance have lower breakdown voltages. Foil and wet slug electrolytics can withstand conduction currents pulses without apparent damage (in either direction for foil types). For solid tantalums, damage occurs whenever the capacitor charges to the forming voltage.

  19. Characterization of superconducting radiofrequency breakdown by two-mode excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory V.; Palczewski, Ari D.

    2014-01-14

    We show that thermal and magnetic contributions to the breakdown of superconductivity in radiofrequency (RF) fields can be separated by applying two RF modes simultaneously to a superconducting surface. We develop a simple model that illustrates how mode-mixing RF data can be related to properties of the superconductor. Within our model the data can be described by a single parameter, which can be derived either from RF or thermometry data. Our RF and thermometry data are in good agreement with the model. We propose to use mode-mixing technique to decouple thermal and magnetic effects on RF breakdown of superconductors.

  20. The dielectric breakdown limit of silicone dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Davide; Haus, Henry; Matysek, Marc; Frohnapfel, Bettina; Tropea, Cameron; Schlaak, Helmut F.

    2014-02-01

    Soft silicone elastomers are used in a generation of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) with improved actuation speed and durability compared to the commonly used, highly viscoelastic polyacrylate 3M VHB™ films. The maximum voltage-induced stretch of DEAs is ultimately limited by their dielectric breakdown field strength. We measure the dependence of dielectric breakdown field strength on thickness and stretch for a silicone elastomer, when voltage-induced deformation is prevented. The experimental results are combined with an analytic model of equi-biaxial actuation to show that accounting for variable dielectric field strength results in different values of optimal pre-stretch and thickness that maximize the DEA actuation.

  1. Bedding material affects mechanical thresholds, heat thresholds and texture preference

    PubMed Central

    Moehring, Francie; O’Hara, Crystal L.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that the bedding type animals are housed on can affect breeding behavior and cage environment. Yet little is known about its effects on evoked behavior responses or non-reflexive behaviors. C57BL/6 mice were housed for two weeks on one of five bedding types: Aspen Sani Chips® (standard bedding for our institute), ALPHA-Dri®, Cellu-Dri™, Pure-o’Cel™ or TEK-Fresh. Mice housed on Aspen exhibited the lowest (most sensitive) mechanical thresholds while those on TEK-Fresh exhibited 3-fold higher thresholds. While bedding type had no effect on responses to punctate or dynamic light touch stimuli, TEK-Fresh housed animals exhibited greater responsiveness in a noxious needle assay, than those housed on the other bedding types. Heat sensitivity was also affected by bedding as animals housed on Aspen exhibited the shortest (most sensitive) latencies to withdrawal whereas those housed on TEK-Fresh had the longest (least sensitive) latencies to response. Slight differences between bedding types were also seen in a moderate cold temperature preference assay. A modified tactile conditioned place preference chamber assay revealed that animals preferred TEK-Fresh to Aspen bedding. Bedding type had no effect in a non-reflexive wheel running assay. In both acute (two day) and chronic (5 week) inflammation induced by injection of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant in the hindpaw, mechanical thresholds were reduced in all groups regardless of bedding type, but TEK-Fresh and Pure-o’Cel™ groups exhibited a greater dynamic range between controls and inflamed cohorts than Aspen housed mice. PMID:26456764

  2. A relationship between statistical time to breakdown distributions and pre-breakdown negative differential resistance at nanometric scale

    SciTech Connect

    Foissac, R.; Blonkowski, S.; Delcroix, P.; Kogelschatz, M.

    2014-07-14

    Using an ultra-high vacuum Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) current voltage, pre-breakdown negative differential resistance (NDR) characteristics are measured together with the time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) distributions of Si/SiON (1.4 and 2.6 nm thick). Those experimental characteristics are systematically compared. The NDR effect is modelled by a conductive filament growth. It is showed that the Weibull TDDB statistic distribution scale factor is proportional to the growth rate of an individual filament and then has the same dependence on the electric field. The proportionality factor is a power law of the ratio between the surfaces of the CAFM tip and the filament's top. Moreover, it was found that, for the high fields used in those experiments, the TDDB acceleration factor as the growth rate characteristic is proportional to the Zener tunnelling probability. Those observations are discussed in the framework of possible breakdown or forming mechanism.

  3. Microwave window breakdown experiments and simulations on the UM/L-3 relativistic magnetron.

    PubMed

    Hoff, B W; Mardahl, P J; Gilgenbach, R M; Haworth, M D; French, D M; Lau, Y Y; Franzi, M

    2009-09-01

    Experiments have been performed on the UM/L-3 (6-vane, L-band) relativistic magnetron to test a new microwave window configuration designed to limit vacuum side breakdown. In the baseline case, acrylic microwave windows were mounted between three of the waveguide coupling cavities in the anode block vacuum housing and the output waveguides. Each of the six 3 cm deep coupling cavities is separated from its corresponding anode cavity by a 1.75 cm wide aperture. In the baseline case, vacuum side window breakdown was observed to initiate at single waveguide output powers close to 20 MW. In the new window configuration, three Air Force Research Laboratory-designed, vacuum-rated directional coupler waveguide segments were mounted between the coupling cavities and the microwave windows. The inclusion of the vacuum side power couplers moved the microwave windows an additional 30 cm away from the anode apertures. Additionally, the Lucite microwave windows were replaced with polycarbonate windows and the microwave window mounts were redesigned to better maintain waveguide continuity in the region around the microwave windows. No vacuum side window breakdown was observed in the new window configuration at single waveguide output powers of 120+MW (a factor of 3 increase in measured microwave pulse duration and factor of 3 increase in measured peak power over the baseline case). Simulations were performed to investigate likely causes for the window breakdown in the original configuration. Results from these simulations have shown that in the original configuration, at typical operating voltage and magnetic field ranges, electrons emitted from the anode block microwave apertures strike the windows with a mean kinetic energy of 33 keV with a standard deviation of 14 keV. Calculations performed using electron impact angle and energy data predict a first generation secondary electron yield of 65% of the primary electron population. The effects of the primary aperture electron

  4. Effect of atmosphere on collinear double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew J. Effenberger, Jr.; Jill R. Scott

    2010-09-01

    Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) has been shown to enhance LIBS spectra. Several researches have reported significant increases in signal-to-noise and or spectral intensity [1-4]. In addition to DP-LIBS, atmospheric conditions can also increase spectra intensity. For example, Iida [5] found that He and Ar both increase LIBS intensity compared to air at one 1 atm. It was also found that as the pressure was decreased to 100 Torr, LIBS intensity increased in Ar and air for single pulse (SP) LIBS. In this study, a collinear DP-LIBS scheme is used along with manipulation of the atmospheric conditions. The DP-LIBS scheme consists of a 355 nm ablative pulse fired into a sample contained in a vacuum chamber. A second analytical 1064 nm pulse is then fired 100 ns to 10 µs after and along the same path of the first pulse. Ar, He and air at pressures ranging from atmospheric pressure (630 Torr at elevation) to 10-5 Torr are introduced during DP-LIBS and SP-LIBS experiments. For a brass sample, a significant increase in spectral intensity of Cu and Zn lines were observed in DP-LIBS under Ar compared to DP-LIBS in air (Figure 1). It was also found that Cu and Zn lines acquired with SP-LIBS in Ar are nearly as intense as DP-LIBS in air. Signal-to-noise for lines from various samples will be reported for both DP-LIBS and SP-LIBS in Ar, He, and air at pressures ranging from 630 Torr to 10-5 Torr.

  5. Androstadienone odor thresholds in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas; Krone, Franziska; Lundström, Johan N; Bartsch, Oliver

    2005-03-01

    A sex-related difference in olfactory sensitivity to androstenone has been reported to occur during adolescence. More males than females exhibited anosmia to androstenone, or an increase in androstenone threshold with age. The current study addressed the question whether similar, sexually dimorphic effects of aging over puberty can also be found for androstadienone. A total of 102 subjects participated (36 females, 66 males). Similar to previous investigations, subjects were divided into a group of 47 individuals with a mean age of 13.3 years, defined as pre/peri-pubertal, and a group of 55 subjects with a mean age of 17.1 years, defined as post-pubertal. All subjects underwent tests for verbal abilities, general olfactory function, and measurements of androstadienone thresholds. The study provided the following major results: (1) Male subjects exhibited higher androstadienone sensitivity in the pre/peri-pubertal group as compared to the post-pubertal group. This difference was not observed in female subjects. Correspondingly, a negative correlation between age and androstadienone sensitivity was found for male subjects, but not for female subjects. (2) In contrast to this sex-specific change of the androstadienone odor threshold, verbal skills and odor identification abilities increased with age in all subjects regardless of their sex. In conclusion, the present observations confirm previous research on sex-differentiated effects of aging during puberty on sensitivity towards odorous steroids. While the underlying causes are unknown, it may be hypothesized that the decreased sensitivity could result from the increased endogenous levels of androstadienone in male subjects. Future studies should include both steroid and non-steroid odorants to further explore these age-related changes.

  6. Thresholds for impaired species recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, rrealized, a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (Nmax), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals. Articulation of a ‘recovering population paradigm’ would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  7. Ultra-low threshold polariton condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Mark; Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Snoke, David W.; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate condensation of microcavity polaritons with a very sharp threshold occuring at two orders of magnitude lower pump intensity than previous demonstrations of condensation. The long cavity-lifetime and trapping and pumping geometries are crucial to the realization of this low threshold. Polariton condensation, or "polariton lasing" has long been proposed as a promising source of coherent light at lower threshold than traditional lasing, and these results suggest methods to bring this threshold even lower.

  8. Ultra-low threshold polariton condensation.

    PubMed

    Steger, Mark; Fluegel, Brian; Alberi, Kirstin; Snoke, David W; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2017-03-15

    We demonstrate the condensation of microcavity polaritons with a very sharp threshold occurring at a two orders of magnitude pump intensity lower than previous demonstrations of condensation. The long cavity lifetime and trapping and pumping geometries are crucial to the realization of this low threshold. Polariton condensation, or "polariton lasing" has long been proposed as a promising source of coherent light at a lower threshold than traditional lasing, and these results indicate some considerations for optimizing designs for lower thresholds.

  9. RF breakdown of 805 MHz cavities in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D.; Stratakis, D.; Kochemirovskiy, A.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Peterson, D.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Lane, P.; Torun, Y.; Haase, A.

    2015-05-03

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We have measured the breakdown rate in several RF cavities operating at several frequencies. Cavities operating within solenoidal magnetic fields B > 0.25 T show an increased RF breakdown rate at lower gradients compared with similar operation when B = 0 T. Ultimately, this breakdown behavior limits the maximum safe operating gradient of the cavity. Beyond ionization cooling, this issue affects the design of photoinjectors and klystrons, among other applications. We have built an 805 MHz pillbox-type RF cavity to serve as an experimental testbed for this phenomenon. This cavity is designed to study the problem of RF breakdown in strong magnetic fields using various cavity materials and surface treatments, and with precise control over sources of systematic error. We present results from tests in which the cavity was run with all copper surfaces in a variety of magnetic fields.

  10. A numerical study of three-dimensional vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical simulation of bubble-type vortex breakdown using a unique discrete form of the full 3-D, unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations was performed. The Navier-Stokes equations were written in a vorticity-velocity form and the physical problem was not restricted to axisymmetric flow. The problem was parametized on a Rossby- Reynolds-number basis. Utilization of this parameter duo was shown to dictate the form of the free-field boundary condition specification and allowed control of axial breakdown location within the computational domain. The structure of the breakdown bubble was studied through time evolution plots of planar projected velocity vectors as well as through plots of particle traces and vortex lines. These results compared favorably with previous experimental studies. In addition, profiles of all three velocity components are presented at various axial stations and a Fourier analysis was performed to identify the dominant circumferential modes. The dynamics of the breakdown process were studied through plots of axial variation of rate of change of integrated total energy and rate of change of integrated enstrophy, as well as through contour plots of velocity, vorticity and pressure.

  11. Generalizing Microdischarge Breakdown Scaling Laws for Pressure and Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Amanda; Garner, Allen

    2016-10-01

    Shrinking device dimensions for micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems necessitates accurate breakdown voltage predictions for reliable operation. Additionally, one must accurately predict breakdown voltage to optimize system geometry for applications in microplasmas and micropropulsion. Traditional approaches use Paschen's law (PL) to predict breakdown, but PL fails at small gap distances ( 15 μm) where field emission dominates. Subsequent work derived scaling laws and analytic expressions for breakdown voltage in argon at atmospheric pressure. Applications at high (e.g. combustion) and low (e.g. vacuum nanoelectronics) pressures for various gases motivate the generalization of these models for pressure and gas. This work addresses these concerns by deriving scaling laws generalized for gap distance, pressure, and gas, while also specifically incorporating and exploring the impact of field enhancement and work function. We compare these analytic scaling laws to experimental data and particle-in-cell simulations. Funded by a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Education Program Faculty Development Grant Program at Purdue University.

  12. RF Breakdown in Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Nantista, C.D.; Tantawi, S.G.; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2006-02-22

    Operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The limit depends on multiple parameters, including input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Experimental and theoretical study of the effects of these parameters on the breakdown limit in full scale structures is difficult and costly. We use 11.4 GHz single-cell traveling wave and standing wave accelerating structures for experiments and modeling of rf breakdown behavior. These test structures are designed so that the electromagnetic fields in one cell mimic the fields in prototype multicell structures for the X-band linear collider. Fields elsewhere in the test structures are significantly lower than that of the single cell. The setup uses matched mode converters that launch the circular TM{sub 01} mode into short test structures. The test structures are connected to the mode launchers with vacuum rf flanges. This setup allows economic testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. Simple 2D geometry of the test structures simplifies modeling of the breakdown currents and their thermal effects.

  13. Structure of leading-edge vortex flows including vortex breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, F.M.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structure of leading-edge vortex flows on thin sharp-edged delta wings was carried out at low Reynolds numbers. Flow-visualization techniques were used to study the topology of the vortex and the phenomenon of vortex breakdown. Seven-hole probe-wake surveys and laser-doppler-anemometer measurements were obtained and compared. Delta wings with sweep angles of 70, 75, 80, and 85/sup 0/ were tested at angles of attack of 10, 20, 30, and 40/sup 0/. The test were conducted in a Reynolds number range of 8.5 x 10/sup 4/ to 6.4 x 10/sup 5/. Smoke-flow visualization revealed the presence of small Kelvin-Helmholtz type vortical structures in the shear layer of a leading-edge vortex. These shear-layer vortices follow a helical path and grow in the streamwise direction as they wind into the vortex core where the individual shear layers merge. The phenomenon of vortex breakdown was studied using high-speed cinema photography. The bubble and spiral types of breakdown were observed and appear to represent the extremes in a continuum of breakdown forms.

  14. Using Work Breakdown Structure Models to Develop Unit Treatment Costs

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article presents a new cost modeling approach called work breakdown structure (WBS), designed to develop unit costs for drinking water technologies. WBS involves breaking the technology into its discrete components for the purposes of estimating unit costs. The article dem...

  15. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51... progresses the color of the affected area becomes darker and usually sinks below the healthy surface, but...

  16. Marital Breakdown, Shame, and Suicidality in Men: A Direct Link?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolves, Kairi; Ide, Naoko; De Leo, Diego

    2011-01-01

    The influence of feelings of shame originating from marital breakdown on suicidality is examined. The role of mental health problems as probable mediating factors is also considered. Internalized shame, state (related to separation) shame, and mental health problems were significantly correlated with the score for suicidality during separation in…

  17. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy due to suture line breakdown after bladder operation.

    PubMed

    Boogerd, W; Zoetmulder, F A; Moffie, D

    1990-01-01

    A patient is described with a severe encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in absence of liver dysfunction, attributed to urine absorption into the systemic circulation due to suture line breakdown after bladder dome resection. At autopsy characteristic Alzheimer type II astrocytes were found in the basal ganglia.

  18. Inhibitory effects of ethanol on phosphatidylinositol breakdown in pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Towner, S.J.; Peppin, J.F.; Tsukamoto, H.

    1986-03-01

    Recently the physiological relationship between the phospholipid effect and secretagogue-induced cellular function has begun to be understood. In this study, the authors investigated acute and chronic effects of ethanol on phosphatidylinositol (PI) synthesis and breakdown in pancreatic acini. Five pairs of male Wistar rats were intragastrically infused for 30 days with high fat diet (25% total calories) plus ethanol or isocaloric dextrose. After intoxication, isolated in HEPES media, followed by 30 min incubation with CCK-8 (0, 100, 300 or 600 pM) and ethanol (0 or 100 mM). Acinar lipids were extracted and counted for labeled PI. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-inositol into alcoholic acinar PI was reduced to 38.2% of that in controls. A percent maximal PI break down by CCK-8 was similar in the two groups (13-24% of basal). However, the magnitude of PI breakdown was markedly lower in alcoholic acini (482 vs 1081 dpm) due to the decreased PI synthesis rate. The presence of 100 mM ethanol in the media further inhibited the breakdown by 50% in this group. These results strongly indicate that chronic ethanol intoxication inhibits PI synthesis and breakdown in pancreatic acini, and that this inhibition can be potentiated by acute ethanol administration.

  19. The electrical breakdown of thin dielectric elastomers: thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Shamsul; Morshuis, Peter H. F.; Benslimane, Mohamed Y.; Gernaey, Krist V.; Skov, Anne L.

    2014-03-01

    Dielectric elastomers are being developed for use in actuators, sensors and generators to be used in various applications, such as artificial eye lids, pressure sensors and human motion energy generators. In order to obtain maximum efficiency, the devices are operated at high electrical fields. This increases the likelihood for electrical breakdown significantly. Hence, for many applications the performance of the dielectric elastomers is limited by this risk of failure, which is triggered by several factors. Amongst others thermal effects may strongly influence the electrical breakdown strength. In this study, we model the electrothermal breakdown in thin PDMS based dielectric elastomers in order to evaluate the thermal mechanisms behind the electrical failures. The objective is to predict the operation range of PDMS based dielectric elastomers with respect to the temperature at given electric field. We performed numerical analysis with a quasi-steady state approximation to predict thermal runaway of dielectric elastomer films. We also studied experimentally the effect of temperature on dielectric properties of different PDMS dielectric elastomers. Different films with different percentages of silica and permittivity enhancing filler were selected for the measurements. From the modeling based on the fitting of experimental data, it is found that the electrothermal breakdown of the materials is strongly influenced by the increase in both dielectric permittivity and conductivity.

  20. Reducing bubbles in glass coatings improves electrical breakdown strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B.

    1968-01-01

    Helium reduces bubbles in glass coatings of accelerator grids for ion thrustors. Fusing the coating in a helium atmosphere creates helium bubbles in the glass. In an argon atmosphere, entrapped helium diffuses out of the glass and the bubbles collapse. The resultant coating has a substantially enhanced electrical breakdown strength.

  1. Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children Adopted after Early Care Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jonathan; Leadbitter, Kathy; Kay, Catherine; Sharma, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Syndromic autism has been described in children adopted after orphanage rearing. We investigated whether the same existed in children adopted after family breakdown. Families of 54/60 adopted children aged 6-11 years (mean 102 months; SD 20; 45% male) returned screening questionnaires for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); 21/54 (39%) screened…

  2. Localization of RF Breakdowns in a Standing Wave Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Faya; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    At SLAC, a 5-cell, normal-conducting, L-band (1.3 GHz), standing-wave (SW) cavity was built as a prototype positron capture accelerator for the ILC. The structure met the ILC gradient goal but required extensive rf processing. When rf breakdowns occurred, a large variation was observed in the decay rate of the stored energy in the cavity after the input power was shut off. It appeared that the breakdowns were isolating sections of the cavity, and that the trapped energy in those sections was then partitioned among its natural modes, producing a distinct beating pattern during the decay. To explore this phenomenon further, an equivalent circuit model of cavity was created that reproduces well its normal operating characteristics. The model was then used to compute the spectra of trapped energy for different numbers of isolated cells. The resulting modal patterns agree well with those of the breakdown data, and thus such a comparison appears to provide a means of identifying the irises on which the breakdowns occurred.

  3. Report on possible routes to breakdown products of mustard gas

    SciTech Connect

    Luman, F.M.

    1983-10-18

    This paper suggests possible routes to the formation of decontamination and breakdown products of the chemical agent Mustard Gas (HD). The terminal decontamination products, CaSO4 and CO2, are harmless to the environment. Oxathiane is formed by hydrolysis and dehydration reactions. Dithiane is formed with the application of heat in a low oxygen or nitrogen environment. (Author).

  4. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  5. Dielectric Barrier Discharges: Pulsed Breakdown, Electrical Characterization and Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    for pulsed driven Dielectric Barrier Discharges ( DBDs ) in particular. Fast electrical, optical and spectroscopic methods enable the study of...ignition, breakdown statistics and spatio- temporally resolved development of pulsed DBD microdischarges. The determination of electrical parameters such...equivalent circuit which is consistent with sinusoidal- voltage driven or miniature pulsed driven DBDs . The characterization of the dominant chemical

  6. Novel dielectric reduces corona breakdown in ac capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehner, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Dielectric system was developed which consists of two layers of 25-gage paper separated by one layer of 50-gage polypropylene to reduce corona breakdown in ac capacitors. System can be used in any alternating current application where constant voltage does not exceed 400 V rms. With a little research it could probably be increased to 700 to 800 V rms.

  7. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  8. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  9. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  10. Electric breakdowns of the "plasma capacitors" occurs on insulation coating of the ISS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homin, Taras; Korsun, Anatolii

    High electric fields and currents are occurred in the spacecrafts plasma environment by onboard electric generators. Thus the high voltage solar array (SA) of the American segment of International Space Station (ISS) generates potential 160 V. Its negative pole is shorted to the frames of all the ISS segments. There is electric current between the SA and the frame through the plasma environment, i.e. electric discharge occurs. As a result a potential drop exists between the frames of all the ISS segments and the environmental plasma [1], which is cathode drop potential varphi _{c} defined. When ISS orbiting, the φc varies greatly in the range 0-100 V. A large area of the ISS frames and SA surface is coated with a thin dielectric film. Because of cathode drop potential the frame surfaces accumulate ion charges and the SA surfaces accumulate electron charges. These surfaces become plasma capacitors, which accumulate much charge and energy. Micrometeorite impacts or buildup of potential drop in excess of breakdown threshold varphi_{b} (varphi _{c} > varphi _{b} = 60 V) may cause breakdowns of these capacitors. Following a breakdown, the charge collected at the surfaces disperses and transforms into a layer of dense plasma [2]. This plasma environment of the spacecraft produces great pulsed electric fields E at the frame surfaces as well as heavy currents between construction elements which in turn induce great magnetic fields H. Therefore the conductive frame and the environmental plasma is plasma inductors. We have calculated that the densities of these pulsing and high-frequency fields E and H generated in the plasma environment of the spacecraft may exceed values hazardous to human. Besides, these fields must induce large electromagnetic impulses in the space-suit and in the power supply and control circuits of onboard systems. During astronaut’s space-suit activity, these fields will penetrate the space-suit and the human body with possible hazardous effects

  11. Determining the lifetime of detectable amounts of gunshot residue on the hands of a shooter using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Matthew B; Dockery, Christopher R

    2008-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the period of time that a shooter will test positive for gunshot residue (GSR) after firing a revolver. Multiple rounds of primer were fired and samples collected at multiple hour intervals using an adhesive tape pressed against the skin. Samples were analyzed directly using a commercially available laser-induced breakdown spectrometer where barium emission (originating from barium nitrate in the primer) was observed. Population statistics were used to compare suspected GSR to a library of blank samples from which a threshold value was established. Statistically significant results, positive for GSR, are obtained 5.27 days after a firearm discharge using these techniques.

  12. Experimental study of vortex breakdown in a cylindrical, swirling flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J. L.; Celik, Z. Z.; Cantwell, B. J.; Lopez, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    The stability of a steady, vortical flow in a cylindrical container with one rotating endwall has been experimentally examined to gain insight into the process of vortex breakdowwn. The dynamics of the flow are governed by the Reynolds number (Re) and the aspect ratio of the cylinder. Re is given by Omega R(sup 2)/nu, where Omega is the speed of rotation of the endwall, R is the cylinder radius, and nu is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid filling the cylinder. The aspect ratio is H/R, where H is the height of the cylinder. Numerical simulation studies disagree whether or not the steady breakdown is stable beyond a critical Reynolds number, Re(sub c). Previous experimental researches have considered the steady and unsteady flows near Re(sub c), but have not explored the stability of the steady breakdown structures beyond this value. In this investigation, laser induced fluorescence was utilized to observe both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown at a fixed H/R of 2.5 with Re varying around Re(sub c). When the Re of a steady flow was slowly increased beyond Re(sub c), the breakdown structure remained steady even though unsteadiness was possible. In addition, a number of hysteresis events involving the oscillation periods of the unsteady flow were noted. The results show that both steady and unsteady vortex breakdown occur for a limited range of Re above Re(sub c). Also, with increasing Re, complex flow transformations take place that alter the period at which the unsteady flow oscillates.

  13. Leaf breakdown in streams differing in catchment land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, M.J.; Meyer, J.L.; Couch, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    1. The impact of changes in land use on stream ecosystem function is poorly understood. We studied leaf breakdown, a fundamental process of stream ecosystems, in streams that represent a range of catchment land use in the Piedmont physiographic province of the south-eastern United States. 2. We placed bags of chalk maple (Acer barbatum) leaves in similar-sized streams in 12 catchments of differing dominant land use: four forested, three agricultural, two suburban and three urban catchments. We measured leaf mass, invertebrate abundance and fungal biomass in leaf bags over time. 3. Leaves decayed significantly faster in agricultural (0.0465 day-1) and urban (0.0474 day-1) streams than in suburban (0.0173 day-1) and forested (0.0100 day-1) streams. Additionally, breakdown rates in the agricultural and urban streams were among the fastest reported for deciduous leaves in any stream. Nutrient concentrations in agricultural streams were significantly higher than in any other land-use type. Fungal biomass associated with leaves was significantly lower in urban streams; while shredder abundance in leaf bags was significantly higher in forested and agricultural streams than in suburban and urban streams. Storm runoff was significantly higher in urban and suburban catchments that had higher impervious surface cover than forested or agricultural catchments. 4. We propose that processes accelerating leaf breakdown in agricultural and urban streams were not the same: faster breakdown in agricultural streams was due to increased biological activity as a result of nutrient enrichment, whereas faster breakdown in urban streams was a result of physical fragmentation resulting from higher storm runoff. ?? 2006 The Authors.

  14. Threshold temperature optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiewicz, K. A.; Musial, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a new approach to manufacture a threshold temperature sensor based on a biconical optical fibre taper. The presented sensor employs the influence of variable state of concentration of some isotropic materials like wax or paraffin. Application of the above- mentioned materials is an attempt to prove that there is a possibility to obtain a low-cost, repeatable and smart sensor working as an in-line element. Optical fibre taper was obtained from a standard single mode fibre (SMF28®) by using a low pressure gas burner technique. The diameter of the manufactured tapers was 6.0 ± 0.5 μm with the length of elongation equal to 30.50 ± 0.16 mm. The applied technology allowed to produce tapers with the losses of 0.183 ± 0.015 dB. Application of materials with different temperature transition points made it possible to obtain the threshold work at the temperatures connected directly with their conversion temperature. External materials at the temperatures above their melting points do not influence the propagation losses. For each of them two types of the protection area and position of the optical fibre taper were applied.

  15. Computational gestalts and perception thresholds.

    PubMed

    Desolneux, Agnès; Moisan, Lionel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    In 1923, Max Wertheimer proposed a research programme and method in visual perception. He conjectured the existence of a small set of geometric grouping laws governing the perceptual synthesis of phenomenal objects, or "gestalt" from the atomic retina input. In this paper, we review this set of geometric grouping laws, using the works of Metzger, Kanizsa and their schools. In continuation, we explain why the Gestalt theory research programme can be translated into a Computer Vision programme. This translation is not straightforward, since Gestalt theory never addressed two fundamental matters: image sampling and image information measurements. Using these advances, we shall show that gestalt grouping laws can be translated into quantitative laws allowing the automatic computation of gestalts in digital images. From the psychophysical viewpoint, a main issue is raised: the computer vision gestalt detection methods deliver predictable perception thresholds. Thus, we are set in a position where we can build artificial images and check whether some kind of agreement can be found between the computationally predicted thresholds and the psychophysical ones. We describe and discuss two preliminary sets of experiments, where we compared the gestalt detection performance of several subjects with the predictable detection curve. In our opinion, the results of this experimental comparison support the idea of a much more systematic interaction between computational predictions in Computer Vision and psychophysical experiments.

  16. Threshold-avoiding proteomics pipeline.

    PubMed

    Suits, Frank; Hoekman, Berend; Rosenling, Therese; Bischoff, Rainer; Horvatovich, Peter

    2011-10-15

    We present a new proteomics analysis pipeline focused on maximizing the dynamic range of detected molecules in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data and accurately quantifying low-abundance peaks to identify those with biological relevance. Although there has been much work to improve the quality of data derived from LC-MS instruments, the goal of this study was to extend the dynamic range of analyzed compounds by making full use of the information available within each data set and across multiple related chromatograms in an experiment. Our aim was to distinguish low-abundance signal peaks from noise by noting their coherent behavior across multiple data sets, and central to this is the need to delay the culling of noise peaks until the final peak-matching stage of the pipeline, when peaks from a single sample appear in the context of all others. The application of thresholds that might discard signal peaks early is thereby avoided, hence the name TAPP: threshold-avoiding proteomics pipeline. TAPP focuses on quantitative low-level processing of raw LC-MS data and includes novel preprocessing, peak detection, time alignment, and cluster-based matching. We demonstrate the performance of TAPP on biologically relevant sample data consisting of porcine cerebrospinal fluid spiked over a wide range of concentrations with horse heart cytochrome c.

  17. Flow-field in a vortex with breakdown above sharp edged delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Nakaya, T.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of vortex-flow, accompanied with breakdown, formed above sharp-edged delta wings, was studied experimentally as well as theoretically. Emphasis is placed particularly on the criterion for the breakdown at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers

  18. Analysis of Carbon and Sulfur in Steel Samples Using Bench Top Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    sample chambers in order to avoid absorption of the plasma emission due to the O2 Schumann -Runge band system (19). Also, the optics need to transmit...The disadvantage of using these lines is air absorption in this region due to the O2 Schumann -Runge band system. The light collection pathway and the...Induced Breakdown Spectrometer. Appl. Opt. 2008, 47, G48–G57. 5. Balzer, H .; Hoehne, M.; Noll, R.; Sturm, V. New approach to Online Monitoring of

  19. Kinetic Model of C/H/N/O Emissions in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Organic Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    the excited, emitting C/H/N/O atomic levels. In previous work, we carried out similar studies of LIBS of metallic lead in air and argon atmospheres...assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium to derive the tem- perature as a function of time. In this analysis, the line intensities were computed as areas...induced breakdown spectroscopy plume from metallic lead,” Appl. Opt. 42, 5947–5962 (2003). 7. V. I. Babushok, F. C. DeLucia, Jr., P. J. Dagdigian

  20. Determination of threshold and maximum operating electric stresses for selected high voltage insulations. Task III. Investigation of high voltage capacitor insulation. Progress report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Sosnowski, M.; Eager, G.S. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    This report covers the investigation of threshold voltage of capacitor insulation. The experimental work was performed on samples prepared from commercial polypropylene insulated, liquid-filled capacitors. The samples were vacuum-impregnated with the original capacitor insulating liquid obtained from the manufacturer. A limited number of full-size capacitor elements also were tested. Impulse voltage breakdown tests with dc voltage prestressing were performed at room temperature and 75/sup 0/C. From the results of these tests, the threshold voltage of the samples of the capacitor insulation was determined at both temperatures and that of the whole capacitor elements at room temperature. The threshold voltage of the capacitor insulation was found to be approximately equal to the impulse breakdown voltage. No difference was found between the threshold voltage at room temperature and at 75/sup 0/C. The threshold voltage of the whole capacitor elements at room temperature was found to be equal to approximately 80% of the threshold voltage of the capacitor insulation samples.

  1. Analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flows and supersonic vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.

    1991-01-01

    Topics relative to the analysis and control of asymmetric vortex flow and supersonic vortex breakdown are discussed. Specific topics include the computation of compressible, quasi-axisymmetric slender vortex flow and breakdown; supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown; and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes asymmetric solutions for cones and cone-cylinder configurations.

  2. Threshold phenomena in soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhibin

    Although two different fields are covered, this thesis is mainly focused on some threshold behaviors in both liquid crystal field and fluid dynamic systems. A method of rubbed polyimide is used to obtain pretilt. Sufficiently strong rubbing of a polyimide (SE-1211) results in a large polar pretilt of liquid crystal director with respect to the homeotropic orientation. There exists a threshold rubbing strength required to induce nonzero pretilt. For the homologous liquid crystal series alkyl-cyanobyphenyl, we found that the threshold rubbing strength is a monotonic function of the number of methylene units. A dual easy axis model is then used to explain the results. Freedericksz transition measurements have been used to determine the quadratical and quartic coefficients associated with the molecules' tilt with respect to the layer normal in surface-induced smectic layers in the nematic phase above the smectic-A-nematic phase transition temperature. Both the quadratic and quartic coefficients are consistent with the scaling relationship as predicted in theory, and their ratio is approximately constant. A Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiment is performed by using a magnetic field gradient to draw down a low density but highly paramagnetic fluid below a more dense fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell. When turning off the magnetic field, the RT instability occurs in situ and the growth of the most unstable wavevector is measured as a function of time. The wavelength of the RT instability along with the growth rate was measured as a function of capillary number (which is related to the density difference and interfacial tension between two fluids). A theory for the instability that permits different viscosities for two immiscible fluids was developed, and good agreement was found with the experimental results. The technique of magnetic levitation promises to broaden significantly the accessible parameter space of gravitational interfacial instability experiments. A method is

  3. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.H. . Dept. of Physics); Lee, J.H. . Langley Research Center)

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the efficiencies and threshold pump intensities of various solid-state laser materials that have been estimated to compare their performance characteristics as direct solar-pumped CW lasers. Among the laser materials evaluated in this research, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6%; however, it does not seem to be practical for solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AMO) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12% when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  4. Epidemic thresholds for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D. G.; Risau-Gusman, S.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that sexually transmitted diseases (STD) spread across a network of human sexual contacts. This network is most often bipartite, as most STD are transmitted between men and women. Even though network models in epidemiology have quite a long history now, there are few general results about bipartite networks. One of them is the simple dependence, predicted using the mean field approximation, between the epidemic threshold and the average and variance of the degree distribution of the network. Here we show that going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results that are supported by numerical simulations. One of the new features, that can be relevant for applications, is the existence of a critical value for the infectivity of each population, below which no epidemics can arise, regardless of the value of the infectivity of the other population.

  5. Laser-induced breakdown emission in hydrocarbon fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kazunobu; Bak, Moon Soo; Tanaka, Hiroki; Carter, Campbell; Do, Hyungrok

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved emission measurements of laser-induced breakdown plasmas have been carried out to investigate the effect that gas species might have on the kinetics, particularly in excited states, and the resulting plasma properties. For this purpose, fuel-oxygen (O2)-carbon dioxide (CO2) mixtures with either helium (He) or nitrogen (N2) balance are prepared while maintaining their atomic compositions. The fuels tested in this study are methane (CH4), ethylene (C2H4), propane (C3H8), and butane (C4H10). The breakdown is produced in the mixtures (CH4/CO2/O2/He, C2H4/O2/He, C3H8/CO2/O2/He and C4H10/CO2/O2/He or CH4/CO2/O2/N2, C2H4/O2/N2, C3H8/CO2/O2/N2 and C4H10/CO2/O2/N2) at room conditions using the second harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (with pulse duration of 10 ns). The temporal evolution of plasma temperature is deduced from the ratio of two oxygen lines (777 nm and 823 nm) through Boltzmann analysis, while the evolution of electron number density is estimated based on Stark broadening of the Balmer-alpha (H α ) line at 656 nm and the measured plasma temperature. From the results, the temporal evolution of emission spectra and decay rates of atomic line-intensities are found to be almost identical between the breakdown plasma in the different mixtures given balancing gases. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of plasma temperature and electron number density are also found to be independent of the species compositions. Therefore, this behavior—of the breakdown emissions and plasma properties in the different mixtures with identical atomic composition—may be because the breakdown gases reach similar thermodynamic and physiochemical states immediately after the breakdown.

  6. Winter variability of aeolian sediment transport threshold on a cold-climate dune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchyn, Thomas E.; Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in surface conditions on cold-climate aeolian dunes are pronounced; during winter dunes are wet, snow covered, and/or frozen for extended periods of time. It is unknown how the critical wind speed for sediment transport (“threshold”) varies and how threshold may influence sediment transport predictions. Although the impact of surface conditions on threshold has been examined in synthetic experiments (wind tunnels), complicated feedbacks between threshold, sand transport, and surface conditions that occur in natural environments suggest that a ground-based empirical approach may provide enhanced insight. In this study we investigate threshold variability for 73 days during fall-winter-spring surface conditions from 18 November 2008 to 30 May 2009 in the Bigstick Sand Hills of Saskatchewan, Canada. Simultaneous measurements of threshold and atmospheric variables (air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, wind speed and direction) were used to examine the extent to which surface erodibility was regulated by meteorology. Time-lapse images of the surface from a co-located camera were used for quality control and interpreting changes in the surface affecting threshold. Results reveal that threshold varied throughout the deployment (25-75% quartiles: 6.92-8.28 m s- 1; mean: 7.79 m s- 1). Threshold variability was especially evident at two scales: (i) event timescale and (ii) seasonal timescale. Event-scale variability peaked during mid-winter; in one event the threshold varied by 6 m s- 1 in 2 h with freezing and re-freezing of the surface and relatively constant atmospheric conditions. The causes of event-scale variability are complex though qualitatively related to changes of wind direction, antecedent meteorological conditions, and vertical variations of grain-scale bonding agents such as pore ice and moisture. Seasonal-scale changes manifested as an increase in threshold during fall, peaking in mid-winter, and decreasing in spring. Increased

  7. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire-KrF laser. Part 2. Accumulation of plasma electrons and electric discharge control

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V D; Ionin, Andrei A; Levchenko, A O; Mesyats, Gennadii A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Smetanin, Igor V; Sunchugasheva, E S; Ustinovskii, N N; Shutov, A V

    2013-04-30

    The problem of the production of extended ({approx}1 m) plasma channels is studied in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated laser pulses of UV radiation, which are a superposition of a subpicosecond USP train amplified in a regenerative KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator and a quasi-stationary lasing pulse. The USPs possess a high (0.2-0.3 TW) peak power and efficiently ionise oxygen molecules due to multiphoton ionisation, and the quasi-stationary lasing pulse, which has a relatively long duration ({approx}100 ns), maintains the electron density at a level n{sub e} = (3-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} by suppressing electron attachment to oxygen. Experiments in laser triggering of high-voltage electric discharges suggest that the use of combined pulses results in a significant lowering of the breakdown threshold and enables controlling the discharge trajectory with a higher efficiency in comparison with smooth pulses. It was shown that controlled breakdowns may develop with a delay of tens of microseconds relative to the laser pulse, which is many orders of magnitude greater than the lifetime of free electrons in the laser-induced plasma. We propose a mechanism for this breakdown, which involves speeding-up of the avalanche ionisation of the air by negative molecular oxygen ions with a low electron binding energy ({approx}0.5 eV) and a long lifetime ({approx}1 ms), which are produced upon cessation of the laser pulse. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  8. Electrical Breakdown Physics in Photoconductive Semiconductor Switches (PCSS).

    SciTech Connect

    Mar, Alan; Zutavern, Fred J.; Vawter, Gregory A.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Gallegos, Richard Joseph; Bigman, Verle Howard

    2016-01-01

    of 200kV (DC) and 5kA current that can be stacked in parallel to achieve 100's of kA with 10e5 shot lifetime. The new vertical switch design configuration generates parallel filaments in the bulk GaAs (as opposed to just beneath the surface as in previous designs) to achieve breakdown fields close to the maximum for the bulk GaAs while operating in air, and with 2-D scalability of the number of current-sharing filaments. This design also may be highly compatible with 2-D VCSEL arrays for optical triggering. The demonstration of this design in this LDRD utilized standard thickness wafers to trigger 0.4kA at 35kV/cm (limited by 0.6mm wafer thickness), tested to 1e5 shots with no detectable degradation of switch performance. Higher fields, total current, and switching voltages would be achievable with thicker GaAs wafers. Another important application pursued in this LDRD is the use of PCSS for trigger generator applications. Conventional in-plane PCSS have achieved triggering of a 100kV sparkgap (Kinetech-type) switch of the type similar to switches being considered for accelerator upgrades. The trigger is also being developed for pulsed power for HPM applications that require miniaturization and robust performance in noisy compact environments. This has spawned new programs for developing this technology, including an STTR for VCSEL trigger laser integration, also pursuing other follow-on applications.

  9. Embracing thresholds for better environmental management

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan P.; Erickson, Ashley L.; Mease, Lindley A.; Battista, Willow; Kittinger, John N.; Fujita, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Three decades of study have revealed dozens of examples in which natural systems have crossed biophysical thresholds (‘tipping points’)—nonlinear changes in ecosystem structure and function—as a result of human-induced stressors, dramatically altering ecosystem function and services. Environmental management that avoids such thresholds could prevent severe social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we review management measures implemented in ecological systems that have thresholds. Using Ostrom's social–ecological systems framework, we analysed key biophysical and institutional factors associated with 51 social–ecological systems and associated management regimes, and related these to management success defined by ecological outcomes. We categorized cases as instances of prospective or retrospective management, based upon whether management aimed to avoid a threshold or to restore systems that have crossed a threshold. We find that smaller systems are more amenable to threshold-based management, that routine monitoring is associated with successful avoidance of thresholds and recovery after thresholds have been crossed, and that success is associated with the explicit threshold-based management. These findings are powerful evidence for the policy relevance of information on ecological thresholds across a wide range of ecosystems.

  10. Enhanced dynamics simulation and threshold analysis of multipaction in the ferrite microwave component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Cui, W. Z.; He, Y. N.; Wang, X. B.; Hu, T. C.; Wang, D.

    2017-02-01

    Multipactor discharge between dielectric and metal was investigated and experimentally verified for the first time. Moreover, multipaction electron evolution laws in the complex ferrite component were revealed, and discharge breakdown threshold was analyzed. Through reasonable approximation and by establishing the equivalent analytical model, the effects of the external static magnetic field and charge accumulation were investigated, and transient electronic trajectory was obtained. Based on the electromagnetic particle-in-cell technology, the three dimensional simulation method of electron evolution in complex ferromagnetic microwave components was implemented. The discharge threshold was obtained through the long term evolution of field to electron and electron to field interactions and verified by multipactor measurement on the circulator for the first time. Instead of the steady field condition, the steady particle condition was proposed for the threshold prediction, exhibiting great potential in the space industry application. It is demonstrated that for ferrite dielectric-metal multipaction, the phase focusing process was prolonged, and the traditional prediction criteria for the threshold analysis were invalid due to the existence of the external magnetic field and highly inhomogeneous field distribution.

  11. Grain-Scale Supercharging and Breakdown on Airless Regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Hartzell, C.M.; Wang, X.; Horanyi, M.; Hurley, D. M.; Hibbitts, K.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of the solar wind and emitted photoelectrons with airless bodies have been studied extensively. However, the details of how charged particles interact with the regolith at the scale of a single grain have remained largely uncharacterized. Recent efforts have focused upon determining total surface charge under photoemission and solar wind bombardment and the associated electric field and potential. In this work, theory and simulations are used to show that grain-grain charge differences can exceed classical sheath predictions by several orders of magnitude, sometimes reaching dielectric breakdown levels. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity works against supercharging by allowing current to leak through individual grains; the balance between internal conduction and surface charging controls the maximum possible grain-to-grain electric field. Understanding the finer details of regolith grain charging, conductive equilibrium, and dielectric breakdown will improve future numerical studies of space weathering and dust levitation on airless bodies.

  12. Unsteady three-dimensional marginal separation, including breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1990-01-01

    A situation involving a three-dimensional marginal separation is considered, where a (steady) boundary layer flow is on the verge of separating at a point (located along a line of symmetry/centerline). At this point, a triple-deck is included, thereby permitting a small amount of interaction to occur. Unsteadiness is included within this interaction region through some external means. It is shown that the problem reduces to the solution of a nonlinear, unsteady, partial-integro system, which is solved numerically by means of time-marching together with a pseudo-spectral method spatially. A number of solutions to this system are presented which strongly suggest a breakdown of this system may occur, at a finite spatial position, at a finite time. The structure and details of this breakdown are then described.

  13. Grain-scale supercharging and breakdown on airless regoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Hartzell, C. M.; Wang, X.; Horanyi, M.; Hurley, D. M.; Hibbitts, K.

    2016-10-01

    Interactions of the solar wind and emitted photoelectrons with airless bodies have been studied extensively. However, the details of how charged particles interact with the regolith at the scale of a single grain have remained largely uncharacterized. Recent efforts have focused upon determining total surface charge under photoemission and solar wind bombardment and the associated electric field and potential. In this work, theory and simulations are used to show that grain-grain charge differences can exceed classical sheath predictions by several orders of magnitude, sometimes reaching dielectric breakdown levels. Temperature-dependent electrical conductivity works against supercharging by allowing current to leak through individual grains; the balance between internal conduction and surface charging controls the maximum possible grain-to-grain electric field. Understanding the finer details of regolith grain charging, conductive equilibrium, and dielectric breakdown will improve future numerical studies of space weathering and dust levitation on airless bodies.

  14. Breakdown dynamics of electrically exploding thin metal wires in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Caplinger, J.; Parada, F.; Sotnikov, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Using a two-frame intensified charge coupled device (iCCD) imaging system with a 2 ns exposure time, we observed the dynamics of voltage breakdown and corona generation in experiments of fast ns-time exploding fine Ni and stainless-steel (SS) wires in a vacuum. These experiments show that corona generation along the wire surface is subjected to temporal-spatial inhomogeneity. For both metal wires, we observed an initial generation of a bright cathode spot before the ionization of the entire wire length. This cathode spot does not expand with time. For 25.4 μm diameter Ni and SS wire explosions with positive polarity, breakdown starts from the ground anode and propagates to the high voltage cathode with speeds approaching 3500 km/s or approximately one percent of light speed.

  15. Partial discharges and breakdown in C3F8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Traditional search processes of gases or gas mixtures for replacing SF6 involve time consuming measurements of partial discharges and breakdown behaviour for several voltage waveforms and different field configurations. Recently a model for prediction of this behaviour for SF6 was described in literature. The model only requires basic properties of the gas such as the critical field strength and the effective ionization coefficient, which can be obtained by swarm parameter measurements, and thermodynamic properties, which can be calculated. In this paper, we show for the well-known and electronegative gas octafluoropropane (C3F8) that it is possible to transfer the model developed for SF6 to this gas to describe the breakdown behaviour of C3F8. Thus the model can be beneficial in the screening process of new insulation gases.

  16. Boron nitride as two dimensional dielectric: Reliability and dielectric breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yanfeng; Pan, Chengbin; Hui, Fei; Shi, Yuanyuan; Lanza, Mario; Zhang, Meiyun; Long, Shibing; Lian, Xiaojuan; Miao, Feng; Larcher, Luca; Wu, Ernest

    2016-01-04

    Boron Nitride (BN) is a two dimensional insulator with excellent chemical, thermal, mechanical, and optical properties, which make it especially attractive for logic device applications. Nevertheless, its insulating properties and reliability as a dielectric material have never been analyzed in-depth. Here, we present the first thorough characterization of BN as dielectric film using nanoscale and device level experiments complementing with theoretical study. Our results reveal that BN is extremely stable against voltage stress, and it does not show the reliability problems related to conventional dielectrics like HfO{sub 2}, such as charge trapping and detrapping, stress induced leakage current, and untimely dielectric breakdown. Moreover, we observe a unique layer-by-layer dielectric breakdown, both at the nanoscale and device level. These findings may be of interest for many materials scientists and could open a new pathway towards two dimensional logic device applications.

  17. Development of microwave-enhanced spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Yuji; Moon, Ahsa; Kaneko, Masashi

    2010-05-01

    We propose microwave-enhanced spark-induced breakdown spectroscopy with the same measurement and analysis processes as in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, but with a different plasma generation mechanism. The size and lifetime of the plasma generated can contribute to increased measurement accuracy and expand its applicability to industrial measurement, such as an exhaust gas analyzer for automobile engine development and its regulation, which has been hard to operate by laser at an engineering evaluation site. The use of microwaves in this application helps lower the cost, reduce the system size, and increase the ease of operation to make it commercially viable. A microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz was used to enhance the volume and lifetime of the plasma at atmospheric condition even at elevated pressure.

  18. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Influence of surface breakdown on the process of drilling metals with pulsed CO2 laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunyan, R. V.; Baranov, V. Yu; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'shov, Leonid A.; Dolgov, V. A.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Malyuta, D. D.; Mezhevov, V. S.

    1988-03-01

    A report is given of the influence of low-threshold surface optical breakdown, occurring under the action of short (~ 5-μs) radiation pulses from a CO2 laser, on the process of the laser drilling of metals. Data are given on the difference between the interaction of radiation pulses having the same duration but differing in shape. A study was made of the influence of the pressure of the atmosphere surrounding a target on the results of laser drilling of metals. A theoretical explanation is given of the experimental results.

  19. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for specimen analysis

    DOEpatents

    Kumar, Akshaya; Yu-Yueh, Fang; Burgess, Shane C.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2006-08-15

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus, a system and a method for detecting the presence or absence of trace elements in a biological sample using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy. The trace elements are used to develop a signature profile which is analyzed directly or compared with the known profile of a standard. In one aspect of the invention, the apparatus, system and method are used to detect malignant cancer cells in vivo.

  20. Ionizing gas breakdown waves in strong electric fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbeil, R.; Tidman, D. A.; Fernsler, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A previous analysis by Albright and Tidman (1972) of the structure of an ionizing potential wave driven through a dense gas by a strong electric field is extended to include atomic structure details of the background atoms and radiative effects, especially, photoionization. It is found that photoionization plays an important role in avalanche propagation. Velocities, electron densities, and temperatures are presented as a function of electric field for both negative and positive breakdown waves in nitrogen.

  1. Breakdown of Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry for stochastic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. J.; Rákos, A.; Schütz, G. M.

    2006-07-01

    We consider the behaviour of current fluctuations in the one-dimensional partially asymmetric zero-range process with open boundaries. Significantly, we find that the distribution of large current fluctuations does not satisfy the Gallavotti-Cohen symmetry and that such a breakdown can generally occur in systems with unbounded state space. We also discuss the dependence of the asymptotic current distribution on the initial state of the system.

  2. Breakdown and discharges in dense gases governed by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L.P.

    1996-03-01

    The phenomenon of runaway electrons (REs) at high values of the ratio field intensity/gas number density {ital E}/{ital N} and {ital N} up to the Loshmidt number {ital N}{sub {ital L}}{approx_equal}2.7{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3} is described. REs are shown to govern the breakdown and discharges at such condition. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. The major stratospheric final warming in 2016: dispersal of vortex air and termination of Arctic chemical ozone loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manney, Gloria L.; Lawrence, Zachary D.

    2016-12-01

    The 2015/16 Northern Hemisphere winter stratosphere appeared to have the greatest potential yet seen for record Arctic ozone loss. Temperatures in the Arctic lower stratosphere were at record lows from December 2015 through early February 2016, with an unprecedented period of temperatures below ice polar stratospheric cloud thresholds. Trace gas measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) show that exceptional denitrification and dehydration, as well as extensive chlorine activation, occurred throughout the polar vortex. Ozone decreases in 2015/16 began earlier and proceeded more rapidly than those in 2010/11, a winter that saw unprecedented Arctic ozone loss. However, on 5-6 March 2016 a major final sudden stratospheric warming ("major final warming", MFW) began. By mid-March, the mid-stratospheric vortex split after being displaced far off the pole. The resulting offspring vortices decayed rapidly preceding the full breakdown of the vortex by early April. In the lower stratosphere, the period of temperatures low enough for chlorine activation ended nearly a month earlier than that in 2011 because of the MFW. Ozone loss rates were thus kept in check because there was less sunlight during the cold period. Although the winter mean volume of air in which chemical ozone loss could occur was as large as that in 2010/11, observed ozone values did not drop to the persistently low values reached in 2011.We use MLS trace gas measurements, as well as mixing and polar vortex diagnostics based on meteorological fields, to show how the timing and intensity of the MFW and its impact on transport and mixing halted chemical ozone loss. Our detailed characterization of the polar vortex breakdown includes investigations of individual offspring vortices and the origins and fate of air within them. Comparisons of mixing diagnostics with lower-stratospheric N2O and middle-stratospheric CO from MLS (long-lived tracers) show rapid vortex erosion and extensive mixing during

  4. The electrical breakdown characteristics of oil-paper insulation under steep front impulse voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Vandermaar, A.J.; Wang, M.; Neilson, J.B. ); Srivastava, K.D. )

    1994-10-01

    Disconnecting switch operations in gas insulated equipment cause transient voltages with rise times as steep as 5 to 20 nanoseconds and magnitudes as high as 2.5 pu. There is very little information on the effect of these transients on oil-paper insulated equipment. There have been reports, however of transformer and bushing failures caused by these transients. The electrical breakdown characteristics of oil-paper insulation under steep front impulse were studied in this project, which was co-sponsored by the Canadian Electrical Association and B.C. Hydro. V[sub 50] (50% breakdown probability voltage) breakdown data was obtained with steep front (10 ns/2500 [mu]s), lightning and switching impulse waveforms. Insulation breakdown voltage vs breakdown time (V-t) data and multiple impulse breakdown data were obtained with the steep front impulse waveform. The V[sub 50] results showed that the breakdown strengths were lower for steep front impulses than for lightning impulses. The multiple impulse breakdown results showed that oil-paper insulation breakdown strength can be lower than 100 kV/mm. These results are alarming, since they suggest that oil-paper insulated equipment subjected to steep front transients will fail at voltages below the lightning impulse design level (BIL). The Volt-time data had a discontinuity. The breakdown process at risetime below about 50 ns was different from the breakdown process at rise times above 50 ns.

  5. rf breakdown tests of mm-wave metallic accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-01-01

    We are exploring the physics and frequency-scaling of vacuum rf breakdowns at sub-THz frequencies. We present the experimental results of rf tests performed in metallic mm-wave accelerating structures. These experiments were carried out at the facility for advanced accelerator experimental tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultrarelativistic electron beam. We compared the performances of metal structures made with copper and stainless steel. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode, propagating in the structures at the speed of light, varies from 115 to 140 GHz. The traveling wave structures are 0.1 m long and composed of 125 coupled cavities each. We determined the peak electric field and pulse length where the structures were not damaged by rf breakdowns. We calculated the electric and magnetic field correlated with the rf breakdowns using the FACET bunch parameters. The wakefields were calculated by a frequency domain method using periodic eigensolutions. Such a method takes into account wall losses and is applicable to a large variety of geometries. The maximum achieved accelerating gradient is 0.3 GV /m with a peak surface electric field of 1.5 GV /m and a pulse length of about 2.4 ns.

  6. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupré, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene M. D.; Chanrion, Olivier; Odzimek, Anna; van der Velde, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which is characterized by consecutive broadband pulses in the low-frequency radio range from ˜10 to 300 kHz at a distance of ˜800 km. Experimental evidence for the existence of consecutive broadband pulses is provided by low-frequency radio observations of sprite-producing lightning discharges at a distance of ˜550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur ˜4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from ˜50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical ionospheric reflection of the first hop sky wave. Two consecutive pulses occur ˜4.5 ms and ˜3 ms after the causative lightning discharge and coincide with the sprite luminosity. It is concluded that relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere can emit broadband electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.

  7. Magnetic breakdown in an array of overlapping Fermi surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadigrobov, A. M.; Radić, D.; Bjeliš, A.

    2015-03-01

    We develop a theoretical framework for a magnetic breakdown in an array of circular two-dimensional bands with a finite overlap of neighboring Fermi surfaces due to the presence of a presumably weak periodic potential, and apply the obtained results to the electron bands in carbon honeycomb structures of doped graphene and intercalated graphite compounds. In contrast to the standard treatment, inaugurated more than fifty years ago by Slutskin and Kadigrobov, with electron semiclassical trajectories encircling significantly overlapping Fermi surfaces, we examine a configuration in which bands are related in a way that the Fermi surfaces only slightly overlap, forming internal band pockets with areas of the size comparable to the area of the quantum magnetic flux for a given external magnetic field. Such band configuration has to be treated quantum mechanically. The calculation leads to the results for magnetic breakdown coefficients comprising an additional large factor with respect to the standard results, proportional to the ratio of the Fermi energy and the cyclotron energy. Also, these coefficients show oscillating dependence on energy, as well as on the wave number of periodic potential. Both mentioned elements enable the adjustment of the preferred wave vector of possible magnetic breakdown induced density wave instability at the highest possible critical temperature.

  8. High Breakdown Strength, Multilayer Ceramics for Compact Pulsed Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, B.; Huebner, W.; Krogh, M.L.; Lundstrom, J.M.; Pate, R.C.; Rinehart, L.F.; Schultz, B.C.; Zhang, S.C.

    1999-07-20

    Advanced ceramics are being developed for use in large area, high voltage devices in order to achieve high specific energy densities (>10 6 J/m 3 ) and physical size reduction. Initial materials based on slip cast TiO2 exhibited a high bulk breakdown strength (BDS >300 kV/cm) and high permittivity with low dispersion (e�100). However, strong area and thickness dependencies were noted. To increase the BDS, multilayer dielectric compositions are being developed based on glass/TiO2 composites. The addition of glass increases the density (�99.8% theoretical), forms a continuous grain boundary phase, and also allows the use of high temperature processes to change the physical shape of the dielectric. The permittivity can also be manipulated since the volume fraction and connectivity of the glassy phase can be readily shifted. Results from this study on bulk breakdown of TiO2 multilayer structures with an area of 2cm 2 and 0.1cm thickness have measured 650 kV/cm. Furthermore, a strong dependence of breakdown strength and permittivity has been observed and correlated with microstructure and the glass composition. This paper presents the interactive effects of manipulation of these variables.

  9. Modeling of High-voltage Breakdown in Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liang; Khrabrov, Alexander; Kaganovich, Igor; Sommerer, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the breakdown in extremely high reduced electric fields (E/N) between parallel-plate electrodes in helium. The left branch of the Paschen curve in the voltage range of 20-350kV and inter-electrode gap range of 0.5-3.5cm is studied analytically and with Monte-Carlo/PIC simulations. The model incorporates electron, ion, and fast neutral species whose energy-dependent anisotropic scattering, as well as backscattering at the electrodes, is carefully taken into account. Our model demonstrates that (1) anisotropic scattering is indispensable for producing reliable results at such high voltage and (2) due to the heavy species backscattered at cathode, breakdown can occur even without electron- and ion-induced ionization of the background gas. Fast atoms dominate in the breakdown process more and more as the applied voltage is increased, due to their increasing ionization cross-section and to the copious flux of energetic fast atoms generated in charge-exchange collisions.

  10. Anisotropic Dielectric Breakdown Strength of Single Crystal Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Nagashio, Kosuke

    2016-10-11

    Dielectric breakdown has historically been of great interest from the perspectives of fundamental physics and electrical reliability. However, to date, the anisotropy in the dielectric breakdown has not been discussed. Here, we report an anisotropic dielectric breakdown strength (EBD) for h-BN, which is used as an ideal substrate for two-dimensional (2D) material devices. Under a well-controlled relative humidity, EBD values in the directions both normal and parallel to the c axis (EBD⊥c and EBD∥c) were measured to be 3 and 12 MV/cm, respectively. When the crystal structure is changed from sp(3) of cubic-BN (c-BN) to sp(2) of h-BN, EBD⊥c for h-BN becomes smaller than that for c-BN, while EBD∥c for h-BN drastically increases. Therefore, h-BN can possess a relatively high EBD concentrated only in the direction parallel to the c axis by conceding a weak bonding direction in the highly anisotropic crystal structure. This explains why the EBD∥c for h-BN is higher than that for diamond. Moreover, the presented EBD value obtained from the high quality bulk h-BN crystal can be regarded as the standard for qualifying the crystallinity of h-BN layers grown via chemical vapor deposition for future electronic applications.

  11. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-02

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  12. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  13. Numerical simulations of high power microwave dielectric interface breakdown involving outgassing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianguo; Cai Libing; Zhu Xiangqin; Wang Yue; Xuan Chun

    2010-06-15

    With the development of high power microwave (HPM) technology, the power and pulse duration of the HPM source increase substantially, the breakdown of the dielectric window of the HPM source feed has been becoming the major factor of limiting the transmission and radiation of HPM. This paper presents an electrostatic particle-in-cell and Monte Carlo collisions method for simulating the breakdown on HPM dielectric surface and establishes a physical model of HPM dielectric surface breakdown involving outgassing. The breakdown process including the main physical mechanisms, such as the field emission, multipactor, outgassing, and collision of gas ionization, is simulated. The influence of outgassing on the dielectric window breakdown is studied by simulating the breakdown with different outgassing speeds. The similarity between the dc and HPM dielectric surface breakdown is discussed.

  14. Development of Numerical Methods to Estimate the Ohmic Breakdown Scenarios of a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Min-Gu; Kim, Jayhyun; An, Younghwa; Hwang, Yong-Seok; Shim, Seung Bo; Lee, Hae June; Na, Yong-Su

    2011-10-01

    The ohmic breakdown is a fundamental method to initiate the plasma in a tokamak. For the robust breakdown, ohmic breakdown scenarios have to be carefully designed by optimizing the magnetic field configurations to minimize the stray magnetic fields. This research focuses on development of numerical methods to estimate the ohmic breakdown scenarios by precise analysis of the magnetic field configurations. This is essential for the robust and optimal breakdown and start-up of fusion devices especially for ITER and its beyond equipped with low toroidal electric field (ET <= 0.3 V/m). A field-line-following analysis code based on the Townsend avalanche theory and a particle simulation code are developed to analyze the breakdown characteristics of actual complex magnetic field configurations including the stray magnetic fields in tokamaks. They are applied to the ohmic breakdown scenarios of tokamaks such as KSTAR and VEST and compared with experiments.

  15. Optimizing Systems of Threshold Detection Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    mean of the "no event" distribution, we use mathematical nonlinear programming techniques to determine appropriate individual thresholds to maximize...decreases in all thresholds (less than five to ten percent) result in modest nonlinear percentage increases in detection performance (again, less than ten...level. In this thesis, we develop a model using nonlinear mathematical programming techniques to determine appropriate individual thresholds at

  16. GHRS Side 2 Threshold Adjustment - 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1994-01-01

    This test will determine the optimal, non-standard discriminator thresholds for the few anomalous channels on HRS detector 2. A 15 second flat field observation followed by a 210 second dark count is performed at each of 10 discriminator threshold values for each detector. The result of the test will be the optimal threshold values to be entered into the PDB. Edited 4/30/91 to add comments to disable/re-enable cross-talk tables.

  17. GHRS Side 1 Threshold Adjustment - 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1994-01-01

    This test will determine the optimal, non-standard discriminator thresholds for the few anomalous channels on HRS detector 1. A 15 second flat field observation followed by a 210 second dark count is performed at each of 10 discriminator threshold values for each detector. The result of the test will be the optimal threshold values to be entered into the PDB. Edited 4/30/91 to add comments to disable/re-enable cross-talk tables.

  18. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy microanalysis of trace elements in Homo sapiens teeth.

    PubMed

    Alvira, F C; Ramirez Rozzi, F; Bilmes, G M

    2010-03-01

    Two of the main items from which to retrieve data in anthropology are teeth and bones. Identification of trace elements in their composition allows valuable information to be obtained about alimentary habits and community life conditions of groups and individuals. Conventional methods used to determine the presence of trace elements require sample preparation, with partial or total destruction of the pieces, which in most cases are unique. In this work we show the possibilities of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a nearly nondestructive tool in anthropology and paleontology for the measurement of the presence and distribution of trace elements in teeth. We applied LIBS to the determination of strontium and magnesium in dentin and enamel of Neolithic, middle age, and modern Homo sapiens teeth. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca distribution maps of dentin and enamel in modern teeth were created using the data obtained. Ablation threshold fluences of dentin and enamel were also measured using the photoacoustic signal induced by laser ablation. Significant variations were found in the Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in the tooth dental tissue and between the teeth of the groups and individuals studied. These results can be useful for evolutionary anthropology studies as they can provide information regarding early nutrition, seasonality, and residential mobility.

  19. Characterization of the globular oxide inclusion ratings in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Jia, Yun-Hai; Yang, Chun; Li, Dong-Ling; Liu, Jia; Chen, Yong-Yan; Liu, Ying; Duan, Yi-Xiang

    2016-12-01

    Grade assessment of steel is generally performed via the metallographic method, which is timeconsuming and is not able to provide the elemental distribution information. In this paper, we present a method to measure the globular oxide inclusion ratings in steel using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The measurement is performed in two basic steps: steel samples are polished using metallographic sand paper and the Al2O3 inclusion number and size distribution in a marked area are observed using scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) for further LIBS scanning analysis. The threshold intensity that distinguishes soluble aluminum and insoluble aluminum inclusions is determined using LIBS combined with the SEM/EDS statistical data. Carbon steel (the sample number is S9256) and bearing steel (the sample number is GCr15) are analyzed in scanning mode, and the number of Al2O3 inclusions in different size ranges is obtained from the statistical information derived from the Al2O3 size calibration curve. According to heavy and thin series for globular oxide inclusions grade assessment, the method we propose is comparable to the traditional metallographic method in terms of accuracy; however, the process is simplified and the measurement speed is significantly improved.

  20. Stoichiometric changes to KH2PO4 during laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Negres, R A; Kucheyev, S O; DeMange, P; Carr, C W; Demos, S G

    2004-11-15

    The local structure of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} crystals (so-called KDP) at laser-induced damage sites created by irradiation with {approx} 3-ns, 355-nm laser pulses is studied by a combination of Raman scattering and photoluminescence spectroscopies. We compare spectra from pristine material, surface and bulk laser-induced damage sites, as well as from KPO{sub 3} references. Results show that irradiation with uences above the laser-induced breakdown threshold leads to stoichiometric changes at surface damage sites but not at bulk damage sites. New spectroscopic features are attributed to dehydration products. For the laser irradiation conditions used in this study, the decomposed near-surface layer absorbs photons at {approx} 3.4 eV (364 nm). These results may help explain the recently reported observation that surface laser damage sites in KDP crystals tend to grow with subsequent exposure to high-power laser pulses, while bulk damage sites do not.