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Sample records for air breakdown threshold

  1. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane

    2012-04-01

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 {mu}m radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10{sup 8} nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then

  2. LASER PLASMA: Experimental confirmation of the erosion origin of pulsed low-threshold surface optical breakdown of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min'ko, L. Ya; Chumakou, A. N.; Chivel', Yu A.

    1988-08-01

    Nanosecond kinetic spectroscopy techniques were used to identify the erosion origin of pulsed low-threshold surface optical breakdown of air as a result of interaction of microsecond neodymium and CO2 laser pulses with some metals (indium, lead).

  3. The optical breakdown threshold of air on a polished metal surface for radiation at lambda=10.6 microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, Iu. V.; Belashkov, I. N.; Datskevich, N. P.; Egorov, V. N.; Iziumov, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    Threshold conditions for the formation of a plasma due to optical breakdown of air on the polished surfaces of Al, Co, Mi, and W samples have been investigated experimentally. The optical breakdown was initiated by pulsed radiation from two CO2 lasers having pulse powers 0.5 and 1.0 kJ, respectively. The thresholds for the formation of the plasma were determined for two exposure spots of o/14 sq mm and 46 sq cm, respectively. A metallographic study was carried out in order to identify the specific types of defects corresponding to the lowest optical breakdown thresholds. Before-and-after photographs of the metal surfaces are provided.

  4. Experimental establishment of the erosion nature of the pulsed low-threshold optical breakdown of air near the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min'ko, L. Ia.; Chumakov, A. N.; Chivel', Iu. A.

    1988-08-01

    Nanosecond kinetic spectroscopy methods are used to establish the erosion nature of the pulsed low-threshold optical breakdown of air near the surface upon exposure of certain metals (indium, lead) to microsecond neodymium and CO2 laser radiation. It is shown that this optical breakdown of air by CO2 laser radiation is accompanied by the formation of a plasma spectrum which is optically thin in the visible range.

  5. Threshold criteria for undervoltage breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, James E.; Choueiri, Edgar Y.

    2008-05-01

    The conditions under which an externally supplied pulse of electrons will induce breakdown in an undervoltaged, low-gain discharge gap are experimentally and theoretically explored. The minimum number of injected electrons required to achieve breakdown in a parallel-plate gap is measured in argon at pd values of 3-10 Torr m using ultraviolet laser pulses to photoelectrically release electrons from the cathode. This value was found to scale inversely with voltage at constant pd and with pressure within the parameter range explored. A dimensionless theoretical description of the phenomenon is formulated and numerically solved. It is found that a significant fraction of the charge on the plates must be injected for breakdown to be achieved at low gain. It is also found that fewer electrons are required as the gain due to electron-impact ionization (α process) is increased, or as the sensitivity of the α process to electric field is enhanced by increasing the gas pressure. A predicted insensitivity to ion mobility implies that the breakdown is determined during the first electron avalanche when space-charge distortion is greatest.

  6. Reduction of breakdown threshold by metal nanoparticle seeding in a DC microdischarge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Jordan; Abboud, Jacques; Zhang, Zhili; Adams, Steven F.

    2015-01-01

    Significant reduction of the breakdown threshold in a DC microdischarge via seeding metal nanoparticles has been demonstrated. Compared to standard Paschen curves in dry air, reductions in the breakdown voltage of 5% to 25% were obtained for PD values (the product of pressure and electrode gap distance) ranging from 20 to 40 Torr-cm by seeding aluminum and iron nanoparticles with mean sizes of 75 nm and 80 nm, respectively. No secondary energy source was required to achieve this breakdown threshold reduction. From high-speed chemiluminescence imaging of the discharge evolution, breakdown was shown to be initiated at reduced voltages. Following breakdown, the increase in temperature ignited some of the nanoparticles near the cathode. Results suggest that possible charging of the nanoparticles within the gap may reduce the effective transient distance, leading to the threshold reduction.

  7. Microwave air breakdown enhanced with metallic initiators

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, G. C.; Popovic, S.

    2008-03-31

    We have determined X-band (9.4 GHz) electric field strengths required to obtain air breakdown at atmospheric pressure in the presence of metallic initiators, which are irradiated with repetitive (30 pulses/s) microwave pulses of 3 {mu}s duration and 200 kW peak power. Using a half-wavelength initiator, a factor of 40 reduction (compared to no initiator) was observed in the electric field required to achieve breakdown. The present measurements are compared to a previously published model for air breakdown, which was originally validated with S-band (3 GHz) frequencies and single 40 {mu}s pulses. We find good agreement between this previous model and our present measurements of breakdown with X-band frequencies and repetitive 3 {mu}s pulses.

  8. Breakdowns in Coordination Between Air Traffic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Chris; Orasanu, Judith; Miller, Ronald C.

    2011-01-01

    This talk outlines the complexity of coordination in air traffic control, introduces the NextGen technologies, identifies common causes for coordination breakdowns in air traffic control and examines whether these causes are likely to be reduced with the introduction of NextGen technologies. While some of the common causes of breakdowns will be reduced in a NextGen environment this conclusion should be drawn carefully given the current stage of development of the technologies and the observation that new technologies often shift problems rather than reduce them.

  9. Review theories and experiments of improving HPM window breakdown thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao

    2010-11-01

    Dielectric window breakdown is a seriously confronting challenge in HPM transmission and radiation. Breakdown at the vacuum/dielectric interface is triggered by multipactor and finally realized by plasma avalanche in the ambient desorbed or evaporated gas layer above the dielectric [1-4]. The methods of improving breakdown thresholds become key issues of HPM system. We review the main theoretical and experimental progress, and then, we further survey the mechanisms of multipactor suppression of the periodic rectangular [5] and triangular surface profiles [6-8] by dynamic analysis and particle-in-cell simulations, and the demonstration of improving HPM thresholds by proof-of-principle experiments and multi-GW experiments. We also synthesize the theory of using magnetic field [9] to suppress multipactor.[4pt] [1] C. Chang, et al., POP 15, 093508, 2008.[0pt] [2] C. Chang, et al., POP 16, 033505, 2009.[0pt] [3] C. Chang, et al., POP 16, 053506, 2009.[0pt] [4] C. Chang, et al., POP 17, 053301, 2010.[0pt] [5] C. Chang, et al., JAP 105, 123305, 2009.[0pt] [6] C. Chang, et al., POP 16, 083501, 2009.[0pt] [7] C. Chang, et al., LPB 28, 185, 2010.[0pt] [8] C. Chang, et al., PIER 101,157, 2010.[0pt] [9] C. Chang, et al., APL 96, 111502, 2010.

  10. Femtosecond laser threshold: retinal damage versus induced breakdown mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Stein, Cindy D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Roach, William P.

    1994-08-01

    Threshold measurements at 90 femtoseconds (fs) and 600 fs have been made for minimum visible lesions (MVLs) using Dutch Belted rabbit and Rhesus monkey eyes. Laser induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds on biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water are reported along with irradiance calculations utilizing nonlinear transmission properties including self-focusing. At both pulsewidths the ED50 dose required for the Rhesus monkey eye was less than half the value determined for the Dutch Belted rabbit eye, all thresholds being 1 microjoule ((mu) J) or less. Measurements on the Rhesus eye at 600 fs found the ED50 dose (0.26 (mu) J) to be much lower than the ED50 dose at 90 fs (0.43 (mu) J). But for these two pulsewidths, almost the same energy level was determined for the Dutch Belted rabbit eye (0.94 (mu) J vs. 1.0 (mu) J). LIB threshold measurements at 100 fs and 300 fs using a simulated eye with isolated vitreous found the ED50 dosages to be 3.5 and 6.0 (mu) J respectively. We found in all cases that the ED50 dosages required to produce MVLs in 24 hours for rabbit and monkey eyes were less than the ED50 values measured for LIB in vitreous or saline or any other breakdown values reported. Also observed was the fact that many of the threshold lesions did not appear in the 1-hour postexposure check but clearly showed up at the 24-hour reading which provided for a much lower threshold dose after 24 hours. We discuss the energy levels and peak powers at which nonlinear effects can begin to occur.

  11. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-15

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are {approx}0.1-2 {mu}s over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  12. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-01

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are ˜0.1-2 μs over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  13. Quantitative measurement of electron number in nanosecond and picosecond laser-induced air breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Sawyer, Jordan C.; Su, Liu; Zhang, Zhili

    2016-05-01

    Here we present quantitative measurements of total electron numbers in laser-induced air breakdown at pressures ranging from atmospheric to 40 barg by 10 ns and 100 ps laser pulses. A quantifiable definition for the laser-induced breakdown threshold is identified by a sharp increase in the measurable total electron numbers via dielectric-calibrated coherent microwave scattering. For the 10 ns laser pulse, the threshold of laser-induced breakdown in atmospheric air is defined as the total electron number of ˜106. This breakdown threshold decreases with an increase of pressure and laser photon energy (shorter wavelength), which is consistent with the theory of initial multiphoton ionization and subsequent avalanche processes. For the 100 ps laser pulse cases, a clear threshold is not present and only marginal pressure effects can be observed, which is due to the short pulse duration leading to stronger multiphoton ionization and minimal collisional avalanche ionization.

  14. Correlation among the laser-induced breakdown thresholds in solids, liquids, and gases.

    PubMed

    Bettis, J R

    1992-06-20

    A simple expression is developed that permits a correlation among laser-induced breakdown thresholds in solids, liquids, and gases. It is shown that the breakdown thresholds for the bulk of solid dielectrics, linear liquids, and gases all follow a linear fit to the expression N(2/3)/(n(2) - 1), where N is the atomic number density and n is the refractive index. The gas breakdown threshold versus pressure is compared with the predicted dependence. PMID:20725310

  15. On the accuracy of the rate coefficients used in plasma fluid models for breakdown in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-07-01

    The electrical breakdown of air depends on the balance between creation and loss of charged particles. In fluid models, datasets of the rate coefficients used are obtained either from fits to experimental data or by solutions of the Boltzmann equation. Here, we study the accuracy of the commonly used models for ionization and attachment frequencies and their impact on the prediction of the breakdown threshold for air. We show that large errors can occur depending on the model and propose the most accurate dataset available for modeling of air breakdown phenomena.

  16. Kinetic theory of runaway air-breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Gurevich, A.V.; Tunnell, T.; Milikh, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    The kinetic theory for a new air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuming a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms.

  17. Kinetic theory of runaway air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A. ); Gurevich, A.V. ); Tunnell, T. ); Milikh, G.M. )

    1994-03-01

    The kinetic theory for an air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper [Phys. Lett. A 165, 463 (1992)] is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuming a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms.

  18. Effect of laser pulse repetition frequency on the optical breakdown threshold of quartz glass

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, T V; Konov, V I; Schöneseiffen, S; Dausinger, F

    2013-08-31

    The thresholds of optical breakdown in the volume of quartz glass were measured in relation to the number of pulses under irradiation by ultrashort laser pulses with different pulse repetition frequencies (1 – 400 kHz). Increasing this frequency from 10 to 400 kHz was found to substantially lower the breakdown threshold for 500-fs long pulses (at a wavelength of 1030 nm) and to lower to a smaller degree for 5-ps long pulses (515 nm). A strong frequency dependence of the breakdown threshold is observed under the same conditions as a manifold decrease of the breakdown threshold with increase in the number of pulses in a pulse train. The dependence of the optical breakdown on the number of pulses is attributable to the accumulation of point defects under multiple subthreshold irradiation, which affects the mechanism of collisional ionisation. In this case, the frequency dependence of the breakdown threshold of quartz glass is determined by the engagement of shortlived defects in the ionisation mechanism. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  19. The inception of pulsed discharges in air: simulations in background fields above and below breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Anbang; Teunissen, Jannis; Ebert, Ute

    2014-11-01

    We investigate discharge inception in air, in uniform background electric fields above and below the breakdown threshold. We perform 3D particle simulations that include a natural level of background ionization in the form of positive and \\text{O}2- ions. In background fields below breakdown, we use a strongly ionized seed of electrons and positive ions to enhance the field locally. In the region of enhanced field, we observe the growth of positive streamers, as in previous simulations with 2D plasma fluid models. The inclusion of background ionization has little effect in this case. When the background field is above the breakdown threshold, the situation is very different. Electrons can then detach from \\text{O}2- and start ionization avalanches in the whole volume. These avalanches together create one extended discharge, in contrast to the ‘double-headed’ streamers found in many fluid simulations.

  20. Laser frequency upshift and self-defocusing under avalanche breakdown of air

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Updesh; Sharma, A. K.

    2010-12-15

    A theoretical model of avalanche breakdown of air by a Gaussian laser beam and frequency upshift is developed. The laser beam, below the threshold for tunnel ionization, heats the seed electrons to high energy and initiates avalanche ionization of the air. The ensuing plasma density profile that has maximum on axis and falls off radially causes refraction divergence of the beam. The temporal evolution of plasma density causes self-phase modulation of the laser, causing frequency broadening and spectral emission in the visible.

  1. Detecting excess ionizing radiation by electromagnetic breakdown of air

    SciTech Connect

    Granatstein, Victor L.; Nusinovich, Gregory S.

    2010-09-15

    A scheme is proposed for detecting a concealed source of ionizing radiation by observing the occurrence of breakdown in atmospheric air by an electromagnetic wave whose electric field surpasses the breakdown field in a limited volume. The volume is chosen to be smaller than the reciprocal of the naturally occurring concentration of free electrons. The pulse duration of the electromagnetic wave must exceed the avalanche breakdown time (10-200 ns) and could profitably be as long as the statistical lag time in ambient air (typically, microseconds). Candidate pulsed electromagnetic sources over a wavelength range, 3 mm>{lambda}>10.6 {mu}m, are evaluated. Suitable candidate sources are found to be a 670 GHz gyrotron oscillator with 200 kW, 10 {mu}s output pulses and a Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure (TEA) CO{sub 2} laser with 30 MW, 100 ns output pulses. A system based on 670 GHz gyrotron would have superior sensitivity. A system based on the TEA CO{sub 2} laser could have a longer range >100 m.

  2. Modeling and Numerical Simulation of Microwave Pulse Propagation in Air Breakdown Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Kim, J.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical simulation is used to investigate the extent of the electron density at a distant altitude location which can be generated by a high-power ground-transmitted microwave pulse. This is done by varying the power, width, shape, and carrier frequency of the pulse. The results show that once the breakdown threshold field is exceeded in the region below the desired altitude location, electron density starts to build up in that region through cascading breakdown. The generated plasma attenuates the pulse energy (tail erosion) and thus deteriorates the energy transmission to the destined altitude. The electron density saturates at a level limited by the pulse width and the tail erosion process. As the pulse continues to travel upward, though the breakdown threshold field of the background air decreases, the pulse energy (width) is reduced more severely by the tail erosion process. Thus, the electron density grows more quickly at the higher altitude, but saturates at a lower level. Consequently, the maximum electron density produced by a single pulse at 50 km altitude, for instance, is limited to a value below 10(exp 6) cm(exp -3). Three different approaches are examined to determine if the ionization at the destined location can be improved: a repetitive pulse approach, a focused pulse approach, and two intersecting beams. Only the intersecting beam approach is found to be practical for generating the desired density level.

  3. Simulation of intense microwave pulse propagation in air breakdown environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment is conducted to examine the tail erosion phenomenon which occurs to an intense microwave pulse propagating in air breakdown environment. In the experiment, a 1 MW microwave pulse (1.1 microsec) is transmitted through a large plexiglas chamber filled with dry air at about 1-2 torr pressure. Two different degrees of tail erosion caused by two different mechanisms are identified. This experimental effort leads to the understanding of the fundamental behavior of tail erosion and provides a data base for validating the theoretical model. A theoretical model based on two coupled partial differential equations is established to describe the propagation on an intense microwave pulse in air breakdown environment. One is derived from the Poynting theorem, and the other one is the rate equation of electron density. A semi-empirical formula of the ionization frequency is adopted for this model. A transformation of these two equations to local time frame of reference is introduced so that they can be solved numerically with considerably reduced computation time. This model is tested by using it to perform the computer simulation of the experiment. The numerical results are shown to agree well with the experimental results.

  4. Femtosecond-Laser-Induced Nanocavitation in Water: Implications for Optical Breakdown Threshold and Cell Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Alfred; Linz, Norbert; Freidank, Sebastian; Paltauf, Guenther

    2008-01-25

    We determined the bubble radius R{sub max} for femtosecond optical breakdown in water at 347, 520, and 1040 nm with an unprecedented accuracy ({+-}10 nm). At threshold, R{sub max} was smaller than the diffraction-limited focus radius and ranged from 190 nm to 320 nm. The increase of R{sub max} with laser energy E{sub L} is slowest at 347 nm, providing optimum control of cell surgery. Experimental results agree with a model of bubble formation in heated and thermoelastically stretched liquids. Theory predicts a threshold temperature T{sub th}{approx_equal}168 deg. C. For T>300 deg. C, a phase explosion sets in, and R{sub max} increases rapidly with E{sub L}.

  5. Electrical breakdown of transformer oil with sulfur hexafluoride and air bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadzhiev, M. Kh.; Isakaev, E. Kh.; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Akimov, P. L.; Yusupov, D. I.; Kulikov, Yu. M.; Panov, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of gas bubbles on the breakdown voltage of transformer oil is experimentally studied. The influence of the oil flow on the electrical characteristics of breakdown is analyzed. It is shown that sulfur hexafluoride and air bubbles decrease the breakdown voltage.

  6. Spectroscopic temperature measurements of air breakdown plasma using a 110 GHz megawatt gyrotron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hummelt, J. S.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2012-12-15

    Temperature measurements are presented of a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy. A plasma is created with a focused 110 GHz 3 {mu}s pulse gyrotron beam in air that produces power fluxes exceeding 1 MW/cm{sup 2}. Rotational and vibrational temperatures are spectroscopically measured over a pressure range of 1-100 Torr as the gyrotron power is varied above threshold. The temperature dependence on microwave field as well as pressure is examined. Rotational temperature measurements of the plasma reveal gas temperatures in the range of 300-500 K and vibrational temperatures in the range of 4200-6200 K. The vibrational and rotational temperatures increase slowly with increasing applied microwave field over the range of microwave fields investigated.

  7. Observation of Multi-GeV Breakdown Thresholds in Dielectric Wakefield Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.; Thompson, M.C.; Yoder, R.B.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Travish, G.; Scott, A.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.

    2008-01-30

    An experiment designed to test the breakdown threshold of a dielectric subjected to the GV/m-scale electric-fields of an intense electron-beam has been completed. In this experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) facility, the 28.5 GeV SLAC electron beam was focused down and propagated through short fused-silica capillary-tubes with internal diameters of as little as 100 {micro}m. The electric field at the inner surface of the tubes was varied from about 1 GV/m to 22 GV/m by adjusting the longitudinal compression of the electron bunch. We observed a sharp increase in optical emissions from the capillaries in the middle part of this surface field range which we believe indicates the transition between sustainable field levels and breakdown. If this initial interpretation is correct, the multi-GV/m surfaced fields that were sustained equate to on axis accelerating field of several GV/m.

  8. Experimental Studies of sub-THz Gyrotron with Pulsed Solenoid for Air Breakdown Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyn, Dmytro; Nusinovich, Gregory; Rodgers, John; Romero-Talamás, Carlos; Shkvarunets, Anatoly

    2012-10-01

    The development of sub-THz gyrotron for air breakdown studies is one of the research tasks under the Center of Applied Electromagnetics program in University of Maryland. The goal is to remotely detect concealed radioactive materials as described by V. L. Granatstein and G. S. Nusinovich (J. Appl. Phys 108 063304 (2010)). There it was proposed to focus high-power sub-THz radiation in a small volume where the wave field exceeds the breakdown threshold. The presence of the radioactive material in the vicinity (<= 20-40m) of such volume significantly increases the probability of the air breakdown. The gyrotron can serve as a source of sub THz radiation required for this scheme. We report our experimental activities on the sub-THz gyrotron operating at 670 GHz at TE 31,8 mode with 28T pulsed magnetic field. This tube was developed in collaboration with Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Science. Our team was responsible for the design of major components while our colleagues manufactured the tube. We achieved 80 kW of output power in 10μs pulses which corresponds to 0.2 J of energy. We introduced several improvements to the original design addressing the issues with discharges and multipactoring that were impeding the performance of the tube. Unfortunately we had a catastrophic failure which ruined the existing device. We are now working on the design of another gyrotron that will operate at 220 GHz and can be capable of delivering 250-350 kW of RF power.

  9. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Threshold for gas breakdown initiated by an interaction of laser light with aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1993-03-01

    A model constructed previously for plasma production through the laser heating, evaporation, and ionization of a microscopic surface defect is refined in an effort to determine the breakdown conditions in an aerosol. Simple analytic expressions are derived for the threshold laser intensity as a function of the wavelength of the laser light, the dimensions and material of the aerosol particles, the shape of the laser pulse, and the evaporated volume of the particle. The results are compared with experiments on the laser breakdown of air caused by beams from CO2 and Nd lasers in the presence of an aerosol consisting of carbon particles 0.1-25 μm in radius. The results are also compared with the predictions of the explosion model.

  10. Effect of the three-dimensional structure of laser emission on the dynamics of low-threshold optical breakdown plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Arutiunian, R. V.; Bol'Shov, L. A.; Derkach, O. N.; Kanevskii, M. F.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of the transverse structure of pulsed CO2 laser emission on the dynamics of laser-induced detonation waves propagating from a metal surface and on plasma transparency recovery is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Particular attention is given to breakdown initiation near the surface. It is suggested that the inclusion of refraction in the plasma into a self-consistent numerical mode is essential for the adequate quantitative description of experimental data on the interaction of laser emission with low-threshold optical breakdown plasmas.

  11. Voltage breakdown between closely spaced electrodes over polymeric insulator surfaces in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Eoin W.; Harrington, Daniel J.

    1982-01-01

    Voltage breakdowns of some narrow gap electrodes [2-10 mil (0.05-0.25 mm)] on polymeric insulator surfaces (epoxy-glass and triazine) have been examined over the pressure range from atmospheric pressure to 127 Torr and are shown to be an air breakdown modified by the presence of the insulator. Breakdown values as a function of the number of the breakdown and discharge energy level were also examined. In the worst case the breakdown voltage was observed to decrease by approximately 1300 V after about five successive breakdowns. The breakdown voltage between narrowly spaced metallic contacts on dielectric surfaces has been assumed to exhibit a Gaussian distribution. Non-Gaussian, bimodal distributions have been observed in the present work. These bimodal distributions, found on fine line epoxy-glass and triazine printed wiring boards, and attempts for explanation in terms of the flashover discharge initiating mechanisms, including the effects of ultraviolet radiation and a negative-ion flux on breakdown, are described. Negative ions appear to reduce the standard deviation but do not reduce the breakdown voltage. Ultraviolet radiation reduces both the standard deviation and the breakdown voltage. Increasing the conductor overlap distance (line length) reduced the breakdown voltage.

  12. Schlieren imaging investigation of successive laser-induced breakdowns in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Moon Soo; Wermer, Lydia; Im, Seong-kyun

    2015-12-01

    Fast Schlieren imaging was performed to visualize the interactions between previously produced laser breakdown and a subsequent laser pulse. A pair of laser pulses was used to generate successive breakdowns in the quiescent standard air, and the interval between the pulses was varied from 50 ns to 100 μs to experimentally simulate various laser repetition rates. The incident laser energies ranged from 5 mJ to 31 mJ, and the energy absorbed by the breakdown of the second laser pulse was quantified by measuring the energies before and after the breakdown. The results indicate that the second laser pulse coupled to the background gas and produced a second laser breakdown only when the pulse interval was shorter than 250 ns or longer than 15 μs. For the shorter pulse intervals, the second breakdown occurred at the edge of the first breakdown region along the laser beam path, and its effect on the perturbation of the density field was found to be small. On the other hand, for the longer pulse intervals, the second breakdown occurred at the lens focal point, and the density field perturbations caused by the first and second breakdowns seemed to interact with each other inducing the Richtmyer-Mechkov instability. As a result, more significant turbulence in the density field was observed after successive laser pulse breakdowns than was observed following a single breakdown.

  13. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  14. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein; Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  15. Effects of load voltage on voltage breakdown modes of electrical exploding aluminum wires in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen Yang, Zefeng; Wang, Kun; Chao, Youchuang; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2015-06-15

    The effects of the load voltage on the breakdown modes are investigated in exploding aluminum wires driven by a 1 kA, 0.1 kA/ns pulsed current in air. From laser probing images taken by laser shadowgraphy, schlieren imaging, and interferometry, the position of the shockwave front, the plasma channel, and the wire core edge of the exploding product can be determined. The breakdown mode makes a transition from the internal mode, which involves breakdown inside the wire core, to the shunting mode, which involves breakdown in the compressed air, with decreasing charging voltage. The breakdown electrical field for a gaseous aluminum wire core of nearly solid density is estimated to be more than 20 kV/cm, while the value for gaseous aluminum of approximately 0.2% solid density decreases to 15–20 kV/cm. The breakdown field in shunting mode is less than 20 kV/cm and is strongly affected by the vaporized aluminum, the desorbed gas, and the electrons emitted from the wire core during the current pause. Ohmic heating during voltage collapses will induce further energy deposition in the current channel and thus will result in different expansion speeds for both the wire core and the shockwave front in the different modes.

  16. Effects of load voltage on voltage breakdown modes of electrical exploding aluminum wires in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen; Yang, Zefeng; Wang, Kun; Chao, Youchuang; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2015-06-01

    The effects of the load voltage on the breakdown modes are investigated in exploding aluminum wires driven by a 1 kA, 0.1 kA/ns pulsed current in air. From laser probing images taken by laser shadowgraphy, schlieren imaging, and interferometry, the position of the shockwave front, the plasma channel, and the wire core edge of the exploding product can be determined. The breakdown mode makes a transition from the internal mode, which involves breakdown inside the wire core, to the shunting mode, which involves breakdown in the compressed air, with decreasing charging voltage. The breakdown electrical field for a gaseous aluminum wire core of nearly solid density is estimated to be more than 20 kV/cm, while the value for gaseous aluminum of approximately 0.2% solid density decreases to 15-20 kV/cm. The breakdown field in shunting mode is less than 20 kV/cm and is strongly affected by the vaporized aluminum, the desorbed gas, and the electrons emitted from the wire core during the current pause. Ohmic heating during voltage collapses will induce further energy deposition in the current channel and thus will result in different expansion speeds for both the wire core and the shockwave front in the different modes.

  17. Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and ablation threshold analysis using a megahertz Yb fiber laser oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Gregory J.; Parker, Daniel E.; Nie, Bai; Lozovoy, Vadim; Dantus, Marcos

    2015-05-01

    A LIBS system is demonstrated using a 100 m cavity Yb fiber oscillator producing ~ 70 ps, 320 nJ clusters of 50-100 fs sub-pulses at 2 MHz. A new empirical model for femtosecond ablation is presented to explain the LIBS signal intensity's non-linear dependence on pulse fluence by accounting for the Gaussian beam's spatial distribution. This model is compared to experimental data and found to be superior to linear threshold fits. This model is then used to measure the ablation threshold of Cu using a typical amplified Ti:sapphire system, and found to reproduce previously reported values to within ~ 20%. The ablation threshold of Cu using the Yb fiber oscillator system was measured to be five times lower than on the amplified Ti:sapphire system. This effect is attributed to the formation of nanostructures on the surface, which have previously been shown to decrease the ablation threshold. The plasma lifetime is found to be ~ 1 ns, much shorter than that of nanosecond ablation, further indicating that the decreased threshold results from surface effects rather than laser-plasma interaction. The low threshold and high pulse energy of the Yb fiber oscillator allows the acquisition of LIBS spectra at megahertz repetition rates. This system could potentially be developed into a compact, fiber-based portable LIBS device taking advantage of the benefits of ultrafast pulses and high repetition rates.

  18. Optical breakdown of air triggered by femtosecond laser filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polynkin, Pavel; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2011-10-01

    We report experiments on the generation of dense plasma channels in ambient air using a dual laser pulse excitation scheme. The dilute plasma produced through the filamentation of an ultraintense femtosecond laser pulse is densified via avalanche ionization driven by a co-propagating multi-Joule nanosecond pulse.

  19. Kinetic and fluid theory of microwave breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Murphy, T.; Johnson, A.

    1987-01-01

    We have developed time-dependent fluid and kinetic treatments of electron transport in air in the presence of a propagating microwave pulse. In both cases the HPM pulses are assumed to be of short enough duration so that electron spatial diffusion can be neglected. In addition, we limit our calculations to the non-relativistic regime where effects due to the ponderomotive force are negligible. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Enhancement of RF Breakdown Threshold of Microwave Cavities by Magnetic Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Gallardo, J.; Palmer, R.B.

    2011-03-28

    Limitations on the maximum achievable accelerating gradient of microwave cavities can influence the performance, length, and cost of particle accelerators. Gradient limitations are believed to be initiated by electron emission from the cavity surfaces. Here, we show that field emission is effectively suppressed by applying a tangential magnetic field to the cavity walls, so higher gradients can be achieved. Numerical simulations indicate that the magnetic field prevents electrons leaving these surfaces and subsequently picking up energy from the electric field. Our results agree with current experimental data. Two specific examples illustrate the implementation of magnetic insulation into prospective particle accelerator applications. The ultimate goal of several research efforts is to integrate high-gradient radio-frequency (rf) structures into next generation particle accelerators. For instance, the Muon Accelerator Program is looking at developing low-frequency cavities for muon cooling, and the International Linear Collider is optimizing the performance of 1.3 GHz rf structures aimed at designing a 1 TeV electron-positron collider. Furthermore, the High Gradient RF Collaboration is examining high frequency (f > 10 GHz) structures intended for an electron-positron collider operating at energies in the TeV range. In all this research, the accelerating gradient will be one of the crucial parameters affecting their design, construction, and cost. Limitations from rf breakdown strongly influence the development of accelerators since it limits the machine's maximum gradient. The emission of electrons from the cavity surfaces seemingly is a necessary stage in the breakdown process, acting either as a direct cause of breakdown or as precursor for other secondary effects. Typically, electron currents arise from sharp edges or cracks on the cavities surfaces, where the strength of the electric field is strongly enhanced compared to that of the nominal field when the

  1. Lowered threshold energy for femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in a water based eye model by aberration correction with adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anja; Géneaux, Romain; Günther, Axel; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-06-01

    In femtosecond laser ophthalmic surgery tissue dissection is achieved by photodisruption based on laser induced optical breakdown. In order to minimize collateral damage to the eye laser surgery systems should be optimized towards the lowest possible energy threshold for photodisruption. However, optical aberrations of the eye and the laser system distort the irradiance distribution from an ideal profile which causes a rise in breakdown threshold energy even if great care is taken to minimize the aberrations of the system during design and alignment. In this study we used a water chamber with an achromatic focusing lens and a scattering sample as eye model and determined breakdown threshold in single pulse plasma transmission loss measurements. Due to aberrations, the precise lower limit for breakdown threshold irradiance in water is still unknown. Here we show that the threshold energy can be substantially reduced when using adaptive optics to improve the irradiance distribution by spatial beam shaping. We found that for initial aberrations with a root-mean-square wave front error of only one third of the wavelength the threshold energy can still be reduced by a factor of three if the aberrations are corrected to the diffraction limit by adaptive optics. The transmitted pulse energy is reduced by 17% at twice the threshold. Furthermore, the gas bubble motions after breakdown for pulse trains at 5 kilohertz repetition rate show a more transverse direction in the corrected case compared to the more spherical distribution without correction. Our results demonstrate how both applied and transmitted pulse energy could be reduced during ophthalmic surgery when correcting for aberrations. As a consequence, the risk of retinal damage by transmitted energy and the extent of collateral damage to the focal volume could be minimized accordingly when using adaptive optics in fs-laser surgery. PMID:23761849

  2. Lowered threshold energy for femtosecond laser induced optical breakdown in a water based eye model by aberration correction with adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anja; Géneaux, Romain; Günther, Axel; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2013-01-01

    In femtosecond laser ophthalmic surgery tissue dissection is achieved by photodisruption based on laser induced optical breakdown. In order to minimize collateral damage to the eye laser surgery systems should be optimized towards the lowest possible energy threshold for photodisruption. However, optical aberrations of the eye and the laser system distort the irradiance distribution from an ideal profile which causes a rise in breakdown threshold energy even if great care is taken to minimize the aberrations of the system during design and alignment. In this study we used a water chamber with an achromatic focusing lens and a scattering sample as eye model and determined breakdown threshold in single pulse plasma transmission loss measurements. Due to aberrations, the precise lower limit for breakdown threshold irradiance in water is still unknown. Here we show that the threshold energy can be substantially reduced when using adaptive optics to improve the irradiance distribution by spatial beam shaping. We found that for initial aberrations with a root-mean-square wave front error of only one third of the wavelength the threshold energy can still be reduced by a factor of three if the aberrations are corrected to the diffraction limit by adaptive optics. The transmitted pulse energy is reduced by 17% at twice the threshold. Furthermore, the gas bubble motions after breakdown for pulse trains at 5 kilohertz repetition rate show a more transverse direction in the corrected case compared to the more spherical distribution without correction. Our results demonstrate how both applied and transmitted pulse energy could be reduced during ophthalmic surgery when correcting for aberrations. As a consequence, the risk of retinal damage by transmitted energy and the extent of collateral damage to the focal volume could be minimized accordingly when using adaptive optics in fs-laser surgery. PMID:23761849

  3. Quantitative Determination of the Breakdown Field of Air from Van de Graaff Generator Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, John; Chartrand, Bridget; Gallagher, Hugh

    2016-03-01

    The Van de Graaff generator (VG) is ubiquitous in electrostatic demonstrations because of the large static charge and dramatic sparks produced. We have developed a novel technique for determining the breakdown field of air using the VG. When a spark occurs, the force of attraction between the VG and a discharge sphere suspended above it is measured by a Pasco force sensor. At this time the charge is not symmetric but pulled towards the near side of the spheres by mutual attraction. In order to interpret the measured force in terms of the breakdown field, an accurate model of the charge distribution is needed. Using the method of images for a spherical conductor in an iterative fashion we can provide this model. The electric field in the vicinity of the spheres is then calculated from the charge distribution and its maximum value is the breakdown field. In preliminary work, we determined the breakdown field to be 3.1x106 N/C at 24.9 C and 18% relative humidity. We will report our most recent determination of the breakdown field using this method and discuss the validity of the results in terms of accepted values, experimental limitations and sensitivity to the charge distribution model.

  4. Rapid breakdown mechanisms of open air nanosecond dielectric barrier discharges.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Kanazawa, Tatsuya; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2011-08-01

    The discharge initiation mechanism of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharges in open air has been clarified with time-dependent measurement of the discharge electric field by electric-field-induced coherent Raman scattering and optical emission. Our experimental observations have revealed that, in the prebreakdown phase of a nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge, the externally applied fast-rising electric field is strongly enhanced near the cathode due to large accumulation of space charge, which then strongly enhances ionization near the cathode. Once a sufficiently large number of ionizations take place, the location of peak ionization forms a front and propagates toward the cathode with strong optical emission, which establishes the discharge. This process is essentially different from the well-known Townsend mechanism for slower discharges. PMID:21902331

  5. Rapid Breakdown Mechanisms of Open Air Nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Tsuyohito; Kanazawa, Tatsuya; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2011-08-01

    The discharge initiation mechanism of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharges in open air has been clarified with time-dependent measurement of the discharge electric field by electric-field-induced coherent Raman scattering and optical emission. Our experimental observations have revealed that, in the prebreakdown phase of a nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge, the externally applied fast-rising electric field is strongly enhanced near the cathode due to large accumulation of space charge, which then strongly enhances ionization near the cathode. Once a sufficiently large number of ionizations take place, the location of peak ionization forms a front and propagates toward the cathode with strong optical emission, which establishes the discharge. This process is essentially different from the well-known Townsend mechanism for slower discharges.

  6. A one-dimensional study of the evolution of the microwave breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E. I.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2015-09-15

    The microwave breakdown in air is simulated numerically within a simple 1D model taking into account a perturbation of electromagnetic field by plasma. The simulations were performed using two qualitatively different codes. One of these codes is based on computation of Maxwell equations, whereas the other one utilizes an approximation of quasi-monochromatic electromagnetic field. There is a good agreement between simulation results obtained by using both codes. Calculations have been carried out in a wide range of air pressures and field frequencies; also varied were initial spatial distributions of plasma density. The results reveal strong dependence of the breakdown evolution on the relation between the field frequency and the gas pressure as well as on the presence of extended rarefied background plasma. At relatively low gas pressures (or high field frequencies), the breakdown process is accompanied by the stationary ionization wave propagating towards the incident electromagnetic wave. In the case of a high gas pressure (or a relatively low field frequency), the peculiarities of the breakdown are associated with a formation of plasma filament array. The extended background plasma can suppress formation of the plasma filament array completely even at high pressures (or low frequencies)

  7. Effect of floating conducting objects on critical switching impulse breakdown of air insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rizk, F.A.M.

    1995-07-01

    The paper analyses the mechanism of breakdown of phase-to-ground and phase-to-phase air insulation in the presence of large conducting floating objects, under critical switching impulse stress. A new physical modeling approach is introduced which involves determination of the potential of the floating object by charge simulation technique, assessment of streamer breakdown and/or leader inception and propagation in the partial gaps and finally predicts the critical breakdown voltage of various configurations. As to phase-to-ground insulation, the investigation covers rod-plane, conductor-plane and conductor-tower leg configurations with different gap spacings as well as different shapes, dimensions and positions of the floating object. The phase-to-phase study additionally includes the effect of negative switching impulse content of the applied stress. The model is in excellent agreement with experiment and provides a novel tool for assessment of the effect of floating objects on switching impulse breakdown of some basic air gap configurations relevant to live line work.

  8. Millimeter wave scattering and diffraction in 110 GHz air breakdown plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-04-15

    We present measurements of the scattering, reflection, absorption, and transmission of a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz quasioptical gyrotron beam by a self-induced air breakdown plasma. The breakdown forms a periodic array of plasma filaments, oriented parallel to the incident electric field polarization that propagates toward the microwave source. For incident intensity of 3 MW/cm{sup 2}, calorimetric measurements show that as much as 45% of the full beam power is absorbed by the plasma, averaged over the pulse, 1% is reflected backward, and the remainder is transmitted and also scattered into a wide angular spread. We observe that approximately 10 times more power is scattered in the direction perpendicular to the filaments than parallel. The far-field angular distribution of transmitted power exhibits a diffraction pattern that changes throughout the 2-{mu}s life of the plasma.

  9. Femtosecond-laser-produced low-density plasmas in transparent biological media: a tool for the creation of chemical, thermal, and thermomechanical effects below the optical breakdown threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Alfred; Noack, Joachim; Huettmann, Gereon; Paltauf, Guenther

    2002-04-01

    The irradiance threshold for femtosecond optical breakdown in aqueous media is approximately equals 1.0x1013W cm-2. At the breakdown threshold, a plasma with a free electron density of about 1021cm-3 is generated, and the energy density in the breakdown region is sufficiently high to cause the formation of a bubble which can be experimentally observed. We found previously that plasmas with a free electron density <1021cm-3 are formed also in a fairly large irradiance range below the breakdown threshold. The present study investigates the chemical, thermal, and thermomechanical effects produced by these low-density plasmas. We use a rate equation model considering multiphoton ionization and produced by these low-density plasmas. We use a rate equation model considering multiphoton ionization and avalanche ionization to numerically simulate the temporal evolution of the free electron density during the laser pulse for a given irradiance, and to calculate the irradiance dependence of the free-electron density and volumetric energy density reached at the end of the laser pulse. The value of the energy density created by each laser pulse is then used to calculate the temperature distribution in the focal region after application of a single laser pulse and of series of pulses. The results of the temperature calculations yield, finally, the starting point for calculations of the thermoelastic stresses that are generated during the formation of the low-density plasmas. We found that, particularly for short wavelengths, a large 'tuning range' exists for the creation of spatially extremely confined chemical, thermal and mechanical effects via free electron generation through nonlinear absorption. Photochemical effects dominate at the lower end of this irradiance range, whereas at the upper end they are mixed with thermal effects and modified by thermoelastic stresses. Above the breakdown threshold, the spatial confinement is partly destroyed by cavitation bubble formation

  10. Kinetic theory of runaway air breakdown and the implications for lightning initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Gurevich, A.V.; Tunnell, T.; Milikh, G.M.

    1993-11-01

    The kinetic theory for a new air breakdown mechanism advanced in a previous paper is developed. The relevant form of the Boltzmann equation is derived and the particle orbits in both velocity space and configuration space are computed. A numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation, assuring a spatially uniform electric field, is obtained and the temporal evolution of the electron velocity distribution function is described. The results of our analysis are used to estimate the magnitude of potential x-ray emissions from discharges in thunderstorms and are examined in the context of lightning initiation.

  11. Reference guide to odor thresholds for hazardous air pollutants listed in the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, W.S.; Shoaf, C.R.; Velasquez, S.F.; Selevan, S.; Victery, W.

    1992-03-01

    In response to numerous requests for information related to odor thresholds, this document was prepared by the Air Risk Information Support Center in its role in providing technical assistance to State and Local government agencies on risk assessment of air pollutants. A discussion of basic concepts related to olfactory function and the measurement of odor thresholds is presented. A detailed discussion of criteria which are used to evaluate the quality of published odor threshold values is provided. The use of odor threshold information in risk assessment is discussed. The results of a literature search and review of odor threshold information for the chemicals listed as hazardous air pollutants in the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 is presented. The published odor threshold values are critically evaluated based on the criteria discussed and the values of acceptable quality are used to determine a geometric mean or best estimate.

  12. Accumulation of air in polymeric materials investigated by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, W. L.; Mothe, E.; Beldjilali, S.; Hermann, J.

    2012-03-01

    We report on spectroscopic analyses of plasmas produced by laser irradiation of nitrogen-free and nitrogen-containing polymer materials. Ultraviolet laser pulses of 5 ns duration and 4 mJ energy were focused onto the samples with a fluence of about 20 Jcm-2. The plasma emission was analyzed with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with a gated detector. Comparing the spectra recorded during ablation in air and argon, it is shown that the spectral line emission of atomic nitrogen originates from the excitation of the ambient air, whereas the CN molecular bands are essentially emitted from the ablation plume. Furthermore, the measurements demonstrate an additional contribution of nitrogen emission from the air molecules accumulated in the polymer. Storage under vacuum over a duration of the order of one day leads to the release of the absorbed air. As a consequence of the air absorption, the measurement of elemental composition of polymers via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is particularly difficult. Here, we quantify the atmospheric contribution to the plume emission during polymer analysis.

  13. Accumulation of air in polymeric materials investigated by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, W. L.; Hermann, J.; Mothe, E.; Beldjilali, S.

    2012-03-15

    We report on spectroscopic analyses of plasmas produced by laser irradiation of nitrogen-free and nitrogen-containing polymer materials. Ultraviolet laser pulses of 5 ns duration and 4 mJ energy were focused onto the samples with a fluence of about 20 Jcm{sup -2}. The plasma emission was analyzed with an Echelle spectrometer equipped with a gated detector. Comparing the spectra recorded during ablation in air and argon, it is shown that the spectral line emission of atomic nitrogen originates from the excitation of the ambient air, whereas the CN molecular bands are essentially emitted from the ablation plume. Furthermore, the measurements demonstrate an additional contribution of nitrogen emission from the air molecules accumulated in the polymer. Storage under vacuum over a duration of the order of one day leads to the release of the absorbed air. As a consequence of the air absorption, the measurement of elemental composition of polymers via laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is particularly difficult. Here, we quantify the atmospheric contribution to the plume emission during polymer analysis.

  14. Energy of electrons generated during a subnanosecond breakdown in atmospheric-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F. Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Kostyrya, I. D.; Rybka, D. V.

    2013-07-15

    The influence of the cathode design on the energy of the main group of electrons generated during a subnanosecond breakdown in atmospheric-pressure air was studied experimentally. The electron energy was measured using a time-of-flight spectrometer with a picosecond time resolution. It is shown that the energy of the main group of electrons increases with increasing cathode curvature radius. It is established using 400- to 650-{mu}m-thick aluminum foils that the electron energy reaches its maximum value in voltage pulses with abrupt trailing edges and amplitudes below the maximum amplitude. Electrons with maximum energies are generated with a stronger spatial and amplitude scatter than those with average energies.

  15. Effect of laser intensity on radio frequency emissions from laser induced breakdown of atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinoth Kumar, L.; Manikanta, E.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.

    2016-06-01

    The studies on the effect of input laser intensity, through the variation of laser focusing geometry, on radio frequency (RF) emissions, over 30-1000 MHz from nanosecond (ns) and picosecond (ps) laser induced breakdown (LIB) of atmospheric air are presented. The RF emissions from the ns and ps LIB were observed to be decreasing and increasing, respectively, when traversed from tight to loose focusing conditions. The angular and radial intensities of the RF emissions from the ns and ps LIB are found to be consistent with sin2θ/r2 dependence of the electric dipole radiation. The normalized RF emissions were observed to vary with incident laser intensity (Iλ2), indicating the increase in the induced dipole moment at moderate input laser intensities and the damping of radiation due to higher recombination rate of plasma at higher input laser intensities.

  16. Investigation of low frequency molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation from laser induced breakdown of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Lakshminarayanan, Vinoth Kumar; Elle, Manikanta; Chelikani, Leela; Acrhem Team

    2015-05-01

    Low frequency electromagnetic radiation (30-1000 MHz), due to molecular Bremsstrahlung, from ns and ps laser induced breakdown (LIB) of atmospheric air is studied. In the plasma formed by the LIB of atmospheric air, interaction of charged particles with neutral clusters of atoms and molecules result in the emission of low frequency radiation. With increasing laser intensity, the plasma frequency (ωP) comes closer to the laser frequency (ωL) , leading to higher degree of ionization. This is observed to reduce the electron-neutral interactions decreasing the low frequency emissions. Thus the emissions from ps LIB are 2-3 orders smaller than those from ns LIB. While traversing from the loose to tight focusing conditions, the emissions from ns LIB and ps LIB were observed to be increasing and decreasing, respectively. This confirms the role of the number of seed electrons and their interaction with neutrals on the low frequency emissions. The emissions were observed to be spectral selective, dependent on the polarization state of the input laser pulses and the detecting antenna. The work is supported by Defence Research and Developement Organization, India through Grants-in-Aid Program.

  17. REFERENCE GUIDE TO ODOR THRESHOLDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS LISTED IN THE CLEAN AIR ACT AMENDMENTS OF 1990.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to numerous requests for information related to odor thresholds, this document was prepared by the Air Risk Information Support Center in its role in providing technical assistance to State and Local government agencies on risk assessment of air pollutants. iscussion ...

  18. Milagro: A low energy threshold extensive air shower array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnis, Gus

    1995-07-01

    Observations of gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and radio pulsars by CGRO have revolutionized our view of the cosmos. Sources may pop into existence for a few milliseconds never to appear again and galaxies can change their luminosity by an order of magnitude within a few days. In addition to these space-based measurements, there have been at least 2 sources detected at even higher energies, ~1 TeV, using earth-bound detectors. To date, ground-based detectors of high-energy gamma rays with energy thresholds low enough to make credible detections have all had narrow fields of view and low duty factors. While these detectors are well suited to perform detailed studies of selected sources, they can not perform surveys of the entire sky with adequate sensitivity in a reasonable amount of time. We have designed a new type of ground-based gamma-ray detector with a low energy threshold, ~250 GeV, large aperture (~1 sr), and a duty factor greater than 90%-Milagro.

  19. Experiment and theoretical study of the propagation of high power microwave pulse in air breakdown environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Ren, A.; Zhang, Y. S.

    1991-01-01

    In the study of the propagation of high power microwave pulse, one of the main concerns is how to minimize the energy loss of the pulse before reaching the destination. In the very high power region, one has to prevent the cutoff reflection caused by the excessive ionization in the background air. A frequency auto-conversion process which can lead to reflectionless propagation of powerful EM pulses in self-generated plasmas is studied. The theory shows that under the proper conditions the carrier frequency, omega, of the pulse will indeed shift upward with the growth of plasma frequency, omega(sub pe). Thus, the plasma during breakdown will always remain transparent to the pulse (i.e., omega greater than omega(sub pe)). A chamber experiment to demonstrate the frequency auto-conversion during the pulse propagation through the self-generated plasma is then conducted in a chamber. The detected frequency shift is compared with the theoretical result calculated y using the measured electron density distribution along the propagation path of the pulse. Good agreement between the theory and the experiment results is obtained.

  20. Optical, radio and x-ray radiation of red sprites produced by runaway air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimuk, V.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Symbalisty, E.; Taranenko, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The authors use the runaway air breakdown model of upward discharges to calculate optical, radio, and X-ray radiation generated by red sprites. Red sprites are high altitude (up to 90 km) lightning discharges. Aircraft based observations show that sprites are predominantly red in color at altitudes above {approximately}55 km with faint blue tendrils, which extend downward to an altitude of 40 km; the duration of a single sprite is less than 17 ms, their maximum brightness is about 600 kR, and estimated total optical energy is about 1--5 kJ per event. The ground based observations show similar results, and provide some additional information on spatial and temporal structure of sprites, and on sprite locations. One difference between aircraft and ground-based observations is that blue tendrils are rarely observed from the ground. Sprites usually occur above the anvils of large mesoscale convective systems and correlate with strong positive cloud to ground discharge. Upward discharges are the most probable source of X-ray emission observed above large thunderstorm complexes by the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory. To escape the atmosphere these {gamma}-rays must originate above 25 km altitude. Red sprites are usually observed at altitudes higher than 50 km, and are therefore a likely source of this x-ray emission.

  1. High altitude atmospheric discharges according to the runaway air breakdown mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Symbalisty, E.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Yukhimuk, V.; Taranenko, Y.

    1997-04-01

    High altitude optical transients - red sprites, blue jets, and elves - are modeled in the context of the relativistic electron runaway air breakdown mechanism. These emissions are usually associated with large mesoscale convective systems (hereafter MCS). In thunderstorms cloud electrification proceeds over a time scale long enough to permit the conducting atmosphere above the cloud to polarize and short out the thunderstorm electric field. When a lightning strike rapidly neutralizes a cloud charge layer runaway driving fields can develop in the stratosphere and mesosphere. According to present simulations of the full runaway process the variety of observed optical emissions are due to the nature of the normal lightning event in the MCS that kick starts the runaway avalanche. In this paper the authors describe some details of the model, present the results of the evolution of the primary electron population, and summarize the initial conditions necessary for different types of discharges. Two companion papers present (a) the predicted optical, gamma ray, and radio emissions caused by these electrical discharges, and (b) the time evolution of the secondary electron population and its implications in terms of observables.

  2. Long-distance remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmaszczyk, Kamil; Rohwetter, Philipp; Méjean, Guillaume; Yu, Jin; Salmon, Estelle; Kasparian, Jérôme; Ackermann, Roland; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Wöste, Ludger

    2004-11-01

    We demonstrate remote elemental analysis at distances up to 90m, using a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy scheme based on filamentation induced by the nonlinear propagation of unfocused ultrashort laser pulses. A detailed signal analysis suggests that this technique, remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy, can be extended up to the kilometer range.

  3. The influence of the sand-dust environment on air-gap breakdown discharge characteristics of the plate-to-plate electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bo; Zhang, Gang; Chen, Bangfa; Gao, Naikui; Li, Yaozhong; Peng, Zongren; Jin, Haiyun

    2010-03-01

    The experiments of plane-plane gap discharge was carried out in an environment of artificial sandstorm. By comparing and analyzing the differences in gap breakdown voltage between the sand & dust environment and clean air, some problems were investigated, such as effects of wind speed and particle concentration on the breakdown voltage, differences of gap discharge characteristics between the dust & sand medium and the clean air medium. The results showed that compared with the clean air environment, the dust & sand environment had a decreased gap breakdown voltage. The longer the gap distance, the greater the voltage drop; the breakdown voltage decreased with the increase of particle concentration in flow. With the increase of wind speed, the breakdown voltage decreased at the beginning and rose afterwards. The results of the paper may helpful for further research regarding the unidentified flashover and external insulation characteristics of the HV power grid in the dust & sand environment.

  4. The validity of the one-dimensional fluid model of electrical breakdown in synthetic air at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, A. P.; Stankov, M. N.; Marković, V. Lj.; Stamenković, S. N.

    2013-12-01

    In this letter the validity of the fluid model used to simulate the electrical breakdown in air at low pressure is discussed. The new method for the determination of the ionization source term for the mixed gases is proposed. Paschen's curve obtained by the fluid model is compared to the available experimental data. The electron and ions density profiles calculated by the fluid model are presented. Based on Ohm's law, the current and voltage waveforms are calculated and compared to the ones measured by the oscilloscope in the synthetic-air filled tube with stainless-steel electrodes. It is shown that the one-dimensional fluid model can be used for modeling the electrical breakdown at pd values higher than Paschen's minimum and to determine stationary values of electron and ions densities.

  5. [Research on accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in air environment].

    PubMed

    Yin, Wang-bao; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Le; Dong, Lei; Ma, Wei-guang; Jia, Suo-tang

    2012-01-01

    A technique about accurate measurement of oxygen content in coal in air environment using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is introduced in the present paper. Coal samples were excited by the laser, and plasma spectra were obtained. Combining internal standard method, temperature correction method and multi-line methods, the oxygen content of coal samples was precisely measured. The measurement precision is not less than 1.37% for oxygen content in coal analysis, so is satisfied for the requirement of coal-fired power plants in coal analysis. This method can be used in surveying, environmental protection, medicine, materials, archaeological and food safety, biochemical and metallurgy application. PMID:22497159

  6. Excitational energy transfer enhancing ionization and spatial-temporal evolution of air breakdown with UV laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummelt, Jason S.; Scharer, John E.

    2010-11-01

    This paper examines the role multiphoton excitation of oxygen has on the ionization of nitrogen in laser air breakdown. Plasma is created by focusing a 193 nm ArF excimer laser using an 18 cm focal length lens, producing a cylindrical 540 μm wide spot of intensity 6.5 GW/cm2, well below the classical limit for collisional cascade (CC) breakdown. By spectroscopically monitoring the B Σ2u+ to X Σ2g+ transition at 391.4 nm of N2+ in N2 and O2 mixes, collisions between N2 and metastable O2 states that have undergone 1+1 absorption processes are shown to lower the degree of nonlinearity (i.e., the number of photons involved in the rate limiting multiphoton absorption process) in the ionization of N2. This process is also found to dominate the 2+1 resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization of N2 in air and be the primary source for ionization of N2 to the B Σ2u+ state. Plasma formation and evolution is also examined using a 1.3 cm focal length objective lens creating a 40 μm wide spot of intensity 1.25 TW/cm2, above the classical limit for breakdown. This plasma is imaged with a fast (1.2 ns) gating intensified charge coupled device camera. Early plasma formation is seen to be inhomogeneous in nature, and significant ion density is found to exist up to 20 μs after the laser pulse.

  7. Pulsed DF chain-laser breakdown induced by maritime aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amimoto, S. T.; Whittier, J. S.; Ronkowski, F. G.; Valenzuela, P. R.; Harper, G.

    1982-08-01

    Thresholds for breakdown induced by liquid and solid aerosols in room air have been measured for a 1 microsec-duration pulsed D2-F2 laser of 3.58 -4.78 micron bandwidth. The DF laser beam was directed into an aerosol chamber that simulated maritime atmospheres on the open sea. Both focus and collimated beams were studied. For a focused beam in which the largest encountered aerosol particles were of 1 to 4 micron diameter, pulsed DF breakdown thresholds were measured to lie in the range 0.6 to 1.8 GW/sq cm. Salt-water aerosol breakdown thresholds for micron-size particles were found to be 15 to 30% higher than the corresponding thresholds for fresh-water particles. For a collimated beam that encountered particle diameters as large as 100 microns, breakdown could not be induced using 0.5- microsec (FWHM) pulses at peak intensities of 59 MW/sq cm. Image converter camera measurements of the radial plasma growth rate of 1.3 cm/microsec (at 1.4 GW/sq cm) were consistent with measurements of the cutoff rate of the transmitted laser beam. Pulsed DF breakdown thresholds of 32 MW/sq cm for 30- micron diameter Al2O3 particles were also measured to permit comparison with the earlier pulsed-HF breakdown results of Lencioni, et al.; the solid-particle threshold measurements agree with the Lencioni data if one assumes that the thresholds for microsecond-duration pulses scales is 1/lambda. An approximate theoretical model of the water particle breakdown process is presented that permits the scaling of the present results to other laser pulse durations, aerosol distributions, and transmission path lengths.

  8. Gas breakdown driven by L band short-pulse high-power microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-Ming; Yuan, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Bao-Liang

    2012-12-01

    High power microwave (HPM) driven gas breakdown is a major factor in limiting the radiation and transmission of HPM. A method that HPM driven gas breakdown could be obtained by changing the aperture of horn antenna is studied in this paper. Changing the effective aperture of horn antenna can adjust the electric field in near field zone, leading to gas breakdown. With this method, measurements of air and SF6 breakdowns are carried out on a magnetically insulated transmission-line oscillators, which is capable of generating HPM with pulse duration of 30 ns, and frequency of 1.74 GHz. The typical breakdown waveforms of air and SF6 are presented. Besides, the breakdown field strengths of the two gases are derived at different pressures. It is found that the effects of air and SF6 breakdown on the transmission of HPM are different: air breakdown mainly shortens the pulse width of HPM while SF6 breakdown mainly reduces the peak output power of HPM. The electric field threshold of SF6 is about 2.4 times larger than that of air. These differences suggest that gas properties have a great effect on the transmission characteristic of HPM in gases.

  9. Gas breakdown driven by L band short-pulse high-power microwave

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yiming; Yuan Chengwei; Qian Baoliang

    2012-12-15

    High power microwave (HPM) driven gas breakdown is a major factor in limiting the radiation and transmission of HPM. A method that HPM driven gas breakdown could be obtained by changing the aperture of horn antenna is studied in this paper. Changing the effective aperture of horn antenna can adjust the electric field in near field zone, leading to gas breakdown. With this method, measurements of air and SF{sub 6} breakdowns are carried out on a magnetically insulated transmission-line oscillators, which is capable of generating HPM with pulse duration of 30 ns, and frequency of 1.74 GHz. The typical breakdown waveforms of air and SF{sub 6} are presented. Besides, the breakdown field strengths of the two gases are derived at different pressures. It is found that the effects of air and SF{sub 6} breakdown on the transmission of HPM are different: air breakdown mainly shortens the pulse width of HPM while SF{sub 6} breakdown mainly reduces the peak output power of HPM. The electric field threshold of SF{sub 6} is about 2.4 times larger than that of air. These differences suggest that gas properties have a great effect on the transmission characteristic of HPM in gases.

  10. Observation of large arrays of plasma filaments in air breakdown by 1.5-MW 110-GHz gyrotron pulses.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru; Choi, E M; Mastovsky, I; Shapiro, M A; Sirigiri, J R; Temkin, R J

    2008-01-25

    We report the observation of two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays with more than 100 elements generated during breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure by a focused Gaussian beam from a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron operating in 3-micros pulses. Each element is a plasma filament elongated in the electric field direction and regularly spaced about one-quarter wavelength apart in the plane perpendicular to the electric field. The development of the array is explained as a result of diffraction of the beam around the filaments, leading to the sequential generation of high intensity spots, at which new filaments are created, about a quarter wavelength upstream from each existing filament. Electromagnetic wave simulations corroborate this explanation and show very good correlation to the observed pattern of filaments. PMID:18232990

  11. Observation of Large Arrays of Plasma Filaments in Air Breakdown by 1.5-MW 110-GHz Gyrotron Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru; Choi, E. M.; Mastovsky, I.; Shapiro, M. A.; Sirigiri, J. R.; Temkin, R. J.

    2008-01-25

    We report the observation of two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays with more than 100 elements generated during breakdown of air at atmospheric pressure by a focused Gaussian beam from a 1.5-MW, 110-GHz gyrotron operating in 3-{mu}s pulses. Each element is a plasma filament elongated in the electric field direction and regularly spaced about one-quarter wavelength apart in the plane perpendicular to the electric field. The development of the array is explained as a result of diffraction of the beam around the filaments, leading to the sequential generation of high intensity spots, at which new filaments are created, about a quarter wavelength upstream from each existing filament. Electromagnetic wave simulations corroborate this explanation and show very good correlation to the observed pattern of filaments.

  12. Propagation of high-power microwave pulses in air breakdown environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, S. P.; Zhang, Y. S.; Kossey, Paul

    1990-01-01

    A chamber experiment is conducted to study the propagation of high-power microwave pulses through the air. Two mechanisms responsible for two different degrees of tail erosion have been identified experimentally. The optimum pulse amplitude for maximum energy transfer through the air has also been determined.

  13. Estimation of Minimal Breakdown Point in a GaP Plasma Structure and Discharge Features in Air and Argon Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, H. Hilal; Tanrıverdi, Evrim

    2016-08-01

    We present gas discharge phenomena in argon and air media using a gallium phosphide (GaP) semiconductor and metal electrodes. The system has a large-diameter ( D) semiconductor and a microscaled adjustable interelectrode gap ( d). Both theoretical and experimental findings are discussed for a direct-current (dc) electric field ( E) applied to this structure with parallel-plate geometry. As one of the main parameters, the pressure p takes an adjustable value from 0.26 kPa to 101 kPa. After collection of experimental data, a new theoretical formula is developed to estimate the minimal breakdown point of the system as a function of p and d. It is proven that the minimal breakdown point in the semiconductor and metal electrode system differs dramatically from that in metal and metal electrode systems. In addition, the surface charge density σ and spatial electron distribution n e are calculated theoretically. Current-voltage characteristics (CVCs) demonstrate that there exist certain negative differential resistance (NDR) regions for small interelectrode separations (i.e., d = 50 μm) and low and moderate pressures between 3.7 kPa and 13 kPa in Ar medium. From the difference of currents in CVCs, the bifurcation of the discharge current is clarified for an applied voltage U. Since the current differences in NDRs have various values from 1 μA to 7.24 μA for different pressures, the GaP semiconductor plasma structure can be used in microwave diode systems due to its clear NDR region.

  14. Evolution of shock waves formed by laser-induced breakdown in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Yu-Tong; Zheng, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Feng; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Lin Xiao, Xuan; Liu, Feng; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Jie

    2007-12-01

    The evolution of shock waves produced by 7 ns laser pulses in air is investigated by time-resolved shadowgraph. A nodular structure of the shock wave is observed. It is found that the origin of the structure is the multi-longitudinal-microfocus caused by the astigmatism of the laser beam. The spherical shock waves formed by each microfocus expand gradually and collide with each other, resulting in the nodular structure of the shock wave.

  15. Interaction Of CO2 Laser Nanosecond Pulse Train With The Metallic Targets In Optical Breakdown Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Firsov, K. N.; Konov, V. I.; Nikitin, P. I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Silenok, A. S.; Sorochenko, V. R.

    1986-11-01

    In the present paper the electric field and currents in the air-breakdown plasma, produced by the train of nanosecond pulses of TEA-002 - regenerative amplifier near the un-charged targets are studied. The breakdown thresholds and the efficiency of plasma-target heat transmission are also measured. The results of numerical calculations made for increasing of the pulse train contrast with respect to the background in a regenerative amplifier are advanced.

  16. High-Power Microwave Breakdown of Dielectric Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calico, Steve Eugene

    A project to study the electrical breakdown of microwave windows due to high-power pulsed microwave fields was undertaken at Texas Tech University. The pulsed power equipment was acquired from the Air Force Weapons Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, refurbished and redesigned as necessary, and serves as the high-power microwave source. The microwaves are used to test various vacuum to atmosphere interfaces (windows) in an attempt to isolate the mechanisms governing the electrical breakdown at the window. Windows made of three different materials and of three basic geometrical designs were tested in this experiment. Additionally, the surfaces of two windows were sanded with different grit sandpapers to determine the effect the surface texture has on the breakdown. The windows were tested in atmospheric pressure air, argon, helium, and to a lesser extent sulfur-hexafluoride. Estimates of the breakdown threshold in air and argon on a Lexan window were obtained as a consequence of these tests and were found to be considerably lower than that reported for pulsed microwave breakdown in gases. A hypothesis is presented in an attempt to explain the lower breakdown phenomena. A discussion of the comparative performance of the windows and an explanation as to the enhanced performance of some windows is given.

  17. System for time-discretized vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy of spark breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ryberg, D.; Fierro, A.; Dickens, J.; Neuber, A.

    2014-10-15

    A system for time-discretized spectroscopic measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission from spark discharges in the 60-160 nm range has been developed for the study of early plasma-forming phenomena. The system induces a spark discharge in an environment close to atmospheric conditions created using a high speed puff value, but is otherwise kept at high vacuum to allow for the propagation of VUV light. Using a vertical slit placed 1.5 mm from the discharge the emission from a small cross section of the discharge is allowed to pass into the selection chamber consisting of a spherical grating, with 1200 grooves/mm, and an exit slit set to 100 μm. Following the exit slit is a photomultiplier tube with a sodium salicylate scintillator that is used for the time discretized measurement of the VUV signal with a temporal resolution limit of 10 ns. Results from discharges studied in dry air, Nitrogen, SF{sub 6}, and Argon indicate the emission of light with wavelengths shorter than 120 nm where the photon energy begins to approach the regime of direct photoionization.

  18. In-air hearing of a diving duck: A comparison of psychoacoustic and auditory brainstem response thresholds.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Sara E; Wells-Berlin, Alicia M; Therrien, Ronald E; Yannuzzi, Sally E; Carr, Catherine E

    2016-05-01

    Auditory sensitivity was measured in a species of diving duck that is not often kept in captivity, the lesser scaup. Behavioral (psychoacoustics) and electrophysiological [the auditory brainstem response (ABR)] methods were used to measure in-air auditory sensitivity, and the resulting audiograms were compared. Both approaches yielded audiograms with similar U-shapes and regions of greatest sensitivity (2000-3000 Hz). However, ABR thresholds were higher than psychoacoustic thresholds at all frequencies. This difference was least at the highest frequency tested using both methods (5700 Hz) and greatest at 1000 Hz, where the ABR threshold was 26.8 dB higher than the behavioral measure of threshold. This difference is commonly reported in studies involving many different species. These results highlight the usefulness of each method, depending on the testing conditions and availability of the animals. PMID:27250191

  19. Laser-induced electric breakdown in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1974-01-01

    A review is given of recent experimental results on laser-induced electric breakdown in transparent optical solid materials. A fundamental breakdown threshold exists characteristic for each material. The threshold is determined by the same physical process as dc breakdown, namely, avalanche ionization. The dependence of the threshold on laser pulse duration and frequency is consistent with this process. The implication of this breakdown mechanism for laser bulk and surface damage to optical components is discussed. It also determines physical properties of self-focused filaments.

  20. 2-D Interferometric Measurements of Electron Density in an Air Breakdown Plasma Using a 124.5 GHz, 1 MW Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, S. C.; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    A 1 MW, 124.5 GHz gyrotron was used to produce a linearly polarized, quasioptical beam in 2.2 μs pulses. The beam was focused to a 2.6 mm spot size, producing a peak electric field of 70 kV/cm, after transmission losses. This electric field is great enough to produce a breakdown plasma in air at pressures ranging from a few Torr up to atmospheric pressure. The resulting breakdown plasma spontaneously forms a two-dimensional array of filaments, oriented parallel to the polarization of the beam, that propagate toward the microwave source. A needlepoint initiator was placed at the focal point of the beam, creating highly reproducible plasma arrays. An intensified CCD, with a minimum exposure of 2 ns, was combined with a two-wavelength laser interferometer, operating at 532 and 635 nm, to make spatially and temporally resolved electron density measurements of the plasma array.

  1. Air and Bone Conduction Thresholds of Deaf and Normal Hearing Subjects before and during the Elimination of Cutaneous-Tactile Interference with Anesthesia. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nober, E. Harris

    The study investigated whether low frequency air and bone thresholds elicited at high intensity levels from deaf children with a sensory-neural diagnosis reflect valid auditory sensitivity or are mediated through cutaneous-tactile receptors. Subjects were five totally deaf (mean age 17.0) yielding vibrotactile thresholds but with no air and bone…

  2. Microwave breakdown for the TE{sub 10} mode in a rectangular waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, Hitendra K.; Aria, Anil K.

    2013-08-15

    Microwave breakdown is studied for the lowest order TE{sub 10} mode in a rectangular waveguide with the help of direct variational approach via the continuity equation along with the use of ionisation and attachment frequency. We investigate the role of the ionisation, attachment of electron with neutral gas or air molecules and the diffusion on microwave breakdown threshold in the waveguide filled with air or Ar Gas. We examine the effect of different gases and microwave parameters on the diffusion length and the breakdown threshold of electric field of continuous microwave and pulsed microwave. We also employ numerical approach for obtaining the results and compare them with the ones of variational approach.

  3. Prevalence of permanent threshold shifts in the United States Air Force hearing conservation program by career field, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Soderlund, Laurel; McKenna, Elizabeth A; Tastad, Katie; Paul, Marika

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in hearing, using the permanent threshold shift metric, among United States Air Force servicemembers, including active duty, Reserve and Air National Guard components, for demographics, job categories, and career fields. In the United States Air Force, only servicemembers who are occupationally exposed routinely to hazardous noise are monitored. Audiogram records and demographic variables were analyzed for servicemembers from 2005-2011 using data from the Department of Defense system that captures occupational hearing tests worldwide. Results suggest that occupational hearing loss was larger in males than females, in officers than enlisted populations, and in Reserve and Air National Guard than in active duty. Compared to similar civilian career fields, active duty has lower prevalence rates for occupational hearing loss overall, although Reserve and Air National Guard prevalence rates were more similar to the civilian reported rates. The proportion of personnel with permanent threshold shifts varied between 4.6-16.7% within active duty career fields, which includes 76% of the population for study timeframe. Permanent threshold shift was larger in small job categories, and in jobs that are not considered exposed to hazardous noise routinely which is comparative with results from civilian data analysis of occupational hearing loss. Further investigation into testing practices for Air Force specific groups, use of the system for nonoccupational hearing testing, and challenges to follow-up compliance is warranted. Increased surveillance procedures for occupational hearing loss are needed to address concerns on the prevalence of servicemember hearing loss, the role of recreational and lifestyle factors to contribute the high reported hearing loss prevalence of veterans compared to nonveterans. PMID:26720128

  4. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal trigger for the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the primary site of thermal damage is not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions", as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (re)growth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as the cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater) nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. This provides a new standpoint to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  5. Influence of the angular scattering of electrons on the runaway threshold in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanrion, O.; Bonaventura, Z.; Bourdon, A.; Neubert, T.

    2016-04-01

    The runaway electron mechanism is of great importance for the understanding of the generation of x- and gamma rays in atmospheric discharges. In 1991, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. Those emissions are bremsstrahlung from high energy electrons that run away in electric fields associated with thunderstorms. In this paper, we discuss the runaway threshold definition with a particular interest in the influence of the angular scattering for electron energy close to the threshold. In order to understand the mechanism of runaway, we compare the outcome of different Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo models with increasing complexity in the description of the scattering. The results show that the inclusion of the stochastic nature of collisions smooths the probability to run away around the threshold. Furthermore, we observe that a significant number of electrons diffuse out of the runaway regime when we take into account the diffusion in angle due to the scattering. Those results suggest using a runaway threshold energy based on the Fokker-Planck model assuming the angular equilibrium that is 1.6 to 1.8 times higher than the one proposed by [1, 2], depending on the magnitude of the ambient electric field. The threshold also is found to be 5 to 26 times higher than the one assuming forward scattering. We give a fitted formula for the threshold field valid over a large range of electric fields. Furthermore, we have shown that the assumption of forward scattering is not valid below 1 MeV where the runaway threshold usually is defined. These results are important for the thermal runaway and the runaway electron avalanche discharge mechanisms suggested to participate in the TGF generation.

  6. Threshold velocities for input of soil particles into the air by desert soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, D.A.; Adams, J.; Endo, A.; Smith, D.; Kihl, R.

    1980-10-20

    Desert soils mostly from the Mojave Desert were tested for threshold friction velocity (the friction velocity above which soil erosion takes place) with an open-bottomed portable wind tunnel. Several geomorphological settings were chosen to be representative of much of the surface of the Mojave Desert, for example, playas, alluvial fans, and aeolian features. Variables which increase threshold velocity are decreasing proportion of sand, increasing size of dry aggregates of the soil, and increasing fraction of the soil mass larger than 1 mm. Threshold velocity increases with different types of soil surfaces in the following order: disturbed soils (except disturbed heavy clay soils), sand dunes, alluvial and aeolian sand deposits, disturbed playa soils, skirts of playas, playa centers, and desert pavement (alluvial deposits). 21 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  7. RF breakdown experiments at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, L.; Vlieks, A.; Pearson, C.; Caryotakis, G.; Luhmann, N.C.

    1999-05-01

    RF breakdown is a critical issue in the conditioning of klystrons, accelerator sections, and rf components for the next linear collider (NLC), as well as other high gradient accelerators and high power microwave sources. SLAC is conducting a series of experiments using an X-band traveling wave ring to characterize the processes and trigger mechanisms associated with rf breakdown. The goal of the research is to identify materials, processes, and manufacturing methods that will increase the breakdown threshold and minimize the time required for conditioning. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooldridge, S. A.

    2013-03-01

    Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions" as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (re)growth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as a strong contributing cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater) nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. Future experiments are suggested that can more formally test the linkage. If correct, the new cellular model delivers a valuable new perspective to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including: (i) the underpinning mechanics (and biological significance) of observed changes in resident zooxanthellae genotypes, and (ii) the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  9. Between-airport heterogeneity in air toxics emissions associated with individual cancer risk thresholds and population risks

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Airports represent a complex source type of increasing importance contributing to air toxics risks. Comprehensive atmospheric dispersion models are beyond the scope of many applications, so it would be valuable to rapidly but accurately characterize the risk-relevant exposure implications of emissions at an airport. Methods In this study, we apply a high resolution atmospheric dispersion model (AERMOD) to 32 airports across the United States, focusing on benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and benzo [a]pyrene. We estimate the emission rates required at these airports to exceed a 10-6 lifetime cancer risk for the maximally exposed individual (emission thresholds) and estimate the total population risk at these emission rates. Results The emission thresholds vary by two orders of magnitude across airports, with variability predicted by proximity of populations to the airport and mixing height (R2 = 0.74–0.75 across pollutants). At these emission thresholds, the population risk within 50 km of the airport varies by two orders of magnitude across airports, driven by substantial heterogeneity in total population exposure per unit emissions that is related to population density and uncorrelated with emission thresholds. Conclusion Our findings indicate that site characteristics can be used to accurately predict maximum individual risk and total population risk at a given level of emissions, but that optimizing on one endpoint will be non-optimal for the other. PMID:19426510

  10. Scaling law for direct current field emission-driven microscale gas breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2012-12-15

    The effects of field emission on direct current breakdown in microscale gaps filled with an ambient neutral gas are studied numerically and analytically. Fundamental numerical experiments using the particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions method are used to systematically quantify microscale ionization and space-charge enhancement of field emission. The numerical experiments are then used to validate a scaling law for the modified Paschen curve that bridges field emission-driven breakdown with the macroscale Paschen law. Analytical expressions are derived for the increase in cathode electric field, total steady state current density, and the ion-enhancement coefficient including a new breakdown criterion. It also includes the effect of all key parameters such as pressure, operating gas, and field-enhancement factor providing a better predictive capability than existing microscale breakdown models. The field-enhancement factor is shown to be the most sensitive parameter with its increase leading to a significant drop in the threshold breakdown electric field and also to a gradual merging with the Paschen law. The proposed scaling law is also shown to agree well with two independent sets of experimental data for microscale breakdown in air. The ability to accurately describe not just the breakdown voltage but the entire pre-breakdown process for given operating conditions makes the proposed model a suitable candidate for the design and analysis of electrostatic microscale devices.

  11. Scaling law for direct current field emission-driven microscale gas breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of field emission on direct current breakdown in microscale gaps filled with an ambient neutral gas are studied numerically and analytically. Fundamental numerical experiments using the particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions method are used to systematically quantify microscale ionization and space-charge enhancement of field emission. The numerical experiments are then used to validate a scaling law for the modified Paschen curve that bridges field emission-driven breakdown with the macroscale Paschen law. Analytical expressions are derived for the increase in cathode electric field, total steady state current density, and the ion-enhancement coefficient including a new breakdown criterion. It also includes the effect of all key parameters such as pressure, operating gas, and field-enhancement factor providing a better predictive capability than existing microscale breakdown models. The field-enhancement factor is shown to be the most sensitive parameter with its increase leading to a significant drop in the threshold breakdown electric field and also to a gradual merging with the Paschen law. The proposed scaling law is also shown to agree well with two independent sets of experimental data for microscale breakdown in air. The ability to accurately describe not just the breakdown voltage but the entire pre-breakdown process for given operating conditions makes the proposed model a suitable candidate for the design and analysis of electrostatic microscale devices.

  12. Amplitude-temporal characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam generated during subnanosecond breakdown in air and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2016-04-01

    The amplitude-temporal characteristics of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with an amplitude of up to 100 A, as well as of the breakdown voltage and discharge current, are studied experimentally with a picosecond time resolution. The waveforms of discharge and SAEB currents are synchronized with those of the voltage pulses. It is shown that the amplitude-temporal characteristics of the SAEB depend on the gap length and the designs of the gas diode and cathode. The mechanism for the generation of runaway electron beams in atmospheric-pressure gases is analyzed on the basis of the obtained experimental data.

  13. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of gas mixtures of air, CO2, N2, and C3H8 for simultaneous C, H, O, and N measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, Volker; Noll, Reinhard

    2003-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for simultaneous measurement of the elements C, H, N, and O in CO2-air, C3H8-CO2, and C3H8-N2 gas mixtures at atmospheric pressure. A single 7-mm-diameter aperture at the sample chamber was used for 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser irradiation and plasma signal output to an echelle spectrometer. Double-pulse laser bursts of ~8-ns pulse width (FWHM) and 250-ns interpulse separation were applied to increase the plasma signal. Calibration curves of the LIBS signal versus the partial pressure or the atomic abundance ratios were taken by dilution series in intervals that are relevant in the combustion of heptane (C7H16) near an equivalence ratio of 1.

  14. Dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF{sub 6} during a subnanosecond breakdown initiated by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F. Beloplotov, D. V.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF{sub 6} during breakdown of a gap with a nonuniform distribution of the electric field by nanosecond high-voltage pulses was studied experimentally. Measurements of the amplitude and temporal characteristics of a diffuse discharge and its radiation with a subnanosecond time resolution have shown that, at any polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius, breakdown of the gap occurs via two ionization waves, the first of which is initiated by runaway electrons. For a voltage pulse with an ∼500-ps front, UV radiation from different zones of a diffuse discharge is measured with a subnanosecond time resolution. It is shown that the propagation velocity of the first ionization wave increases after its front has passed one-half of the gap, as well as when the pressure in the discharge chamber is reduced and/or when SF{sub 6} is replaced with air or nitrogen. It is found that, at nitrogen pressures of 0.4 and 0.7 MPa and the positive polarity of the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, the ionization wave forms with a larger (∼30 ps) time delay with respect to applying the voltage pulse to the gap than at the negative polarity. The velocity of the second ionization wave propagating from the plane electrode is measured. In a discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.7 MPa, this velocity is found to be ∼10 cm/ns. It is shown that, as the nitrogen pressure increases to 0.7 MPa, the propagation velocity of the front of the first ionization wave at the positive polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius becomes lower than that at the negative polarity.

  15. Dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF6 during a subnanosecond breakdown initiated by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of ionization processes in high-pressure nitrogen, air, and SF6 during breakdown of a gap with a nonuniform distribution of the electric field by nanosecond high-voltage pulses was studied experimentally. Measurements of the amplitude and temporal characteristics of a diffuse discharge and its radiation with a subnanosecond time resolution have shown that, at any polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius, breakdown of the gap occurs via two ionization waves, the first of which is initiated by runaway electrons. For a voltage pulse with an ˜500-ps front, UV radiation from different zones of a diffuse discharge is measured with a subnanosecond time resolution. It is shown that the propagation velocity of the first ionization wave increases after its front has passed one-half of the gap, as well as when the pressure in the discharge chamber is reduced and/or when SF6 is replaced with air or nitrogen. It is found that, at nitrogen pressures of 0.4 and 0.7 MPa and the positive polarity of the high-voltage electrode with a small curvature radius, the ionization wave forms with a larger (˜30 ps) time delay with respect to applying the voltage pulse to the gap than at the negative polarity. The velocity of the second ionization wave propagating from the plane electrode is measured. In a discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.7 MPa, this velocity is found to be ˜10 cm/ns. It is shown that, as the nitrogen pressure increases to 0.7 MPa, the propagation velocity of the front of the first ionization wave at the positive polarity of the electrode with a small curvature radius becomes lower than that at the negative polarity.

  16. Hydrogen Balmer α line behavior in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy depth scans of Au, Cu, Mn, Pb targets in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesi, G. S.; Benedetti, P. A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2010-07-01

    The behavior of hydrogen spectral emission of the plasmas obtained by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) measurement of four metal targets (Au, Cu, Mn, Pb) in air was investigated. The plasma was produced by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser emitting in the fundamental wavelength. A systematic study of the spatial-integrated plasma emission obtained by an in-depth scanning of the target was performed for each metal, both in single pulse and collinear double-pulse configurations. Further, a spatial-resolved analysis of the emission of plasma produced on the Al target by a single laser pulse was performed, in order to describe the spatial distribution of emitters deriving from the target and air elements. The line intensities of the main plasma components (target metal, nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen) were measured in both experimental conditions. Results show that the hydrogen line intensity varies greatly as a function of the metal considered, and exhibits a marked decrease after the first laser shots. However, differently from emission lines due to surface impurities, the hydrogen line intensity reaches a constant level deep inside the target. The spatial-resolved measurements indicate that hydrogen atoms in the plasma mainly derive from the target surface and, only at a minor extent, from the dissociation of molecular hydrogen present in the surrounding air. These findings show that the calculation of plasma electron number density through the measurement of the Stark broadening of hydrogen Balmer α line is possible also in depth scanning measurements.

  17. 78 FR 37164 - Revisions to the Air Emissions Reporting Requirements: Revisions to Lead (Pb) Reporting Threshold...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT section. \\1\\ As prescribed by the Tribal Authority Rule (63 FR 7253, February 12, 1998... substitute language for your requested changes. Describe any assumptions and provide any technical... Lead (73 FR 66964, November 12, 2008) and the associated Revisions to Lead Ambient Air...

  18. Air pollution and children: neural and tight junction antibodies and combustion metals, the role of barrier breakdown and brain immunity in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Vojdani, Aristo; Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette; Friedle, Albrecht; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Sarathi-Mukherjee, Partha; Martínez-Aguirre, Xavier; Park, Su-Bin; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children are exposed to concentrations of air pollutants, including fine particulate matter (PM2.5), above safety standards. In the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) megacity, children show an early brain imbalance in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune response-associated genes, and blood-brain barrier breakdown. We investigated serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) antibodies to neural and tight junction proteins and environmental pollutants in 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 y with high versus low air pollution exposures. We also measured metals in serum and CSF. MCMA children showed significantly higher serum actin IgG, occludin/zonulin 1 IgA, IgG, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein IgG and IgM (p < 0.01), myelin basic protein IgA and IgG, S-100 IgG and IgM, and cerebellar IgG (p < 0.001). Serum IgG antibodies to formaldehyde, benzene, and bisphenol A, and concentrations of Ni and Cd were significantly higher in exposed children (p < 0.001). CSF MBP antibodies and nickel concentrations were higher in MCMA children (p = 0.03). Air pollution exposure damages epithelial and endothelial barriers and is a robust trigger of tight junction and neural antibodies. Cryptic 'self' tight junction antigens can trigger an autoimmune response potentially contributing to the neuroinflammatory and Alzheimer and Parkinson's pathology hallmarks present in megacity children. The major factor determining the impact of neural antibodies is the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Defining the air pollution linkage of the brain/immune system interactions and damage to physical and immunological barriers with short and long term neural detrimental effects to children's brains ought to be of pressing importance for public health. PMID:25147109

  19. Optical Damage Threshold of Silicon for Ultrafast Infrared Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder /SLAC

    2007-11-28

    We present measurements of the optical damage threshold of crystalline silicon in air for ultrafast pulses in the near infrared. The wavelengths tested span a range from the telecommunications band at 1550 nm, extending to 2260 nm. We discuss the motivation for the measurements and give theoretical context. We then describe the experimental setup, diagnostics, and procedure. The results show a breakdown threshold of 0.2J/cm{sup 2} at 1550 nm and 1.06 ps FWHM pulse duration, and a weak dependence on wavelength.

  20. High gradient RF breakdown studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Lisa Leanne

    Higher accelerating gradients are required by future demands for TeV electron linear colliders. With higher energy comes the challenge of handling stronger electromagnetic fields in the accelerator structures and in the microwave sources that supply the power. A limit on the maximum field gradient is imposed by rf electrical breakdown. Investigating methods to achieve higher gradients and to better understand the mechanisms involved in the rf breakdown process has been the focal point of this study. A systematic series of rf breakdown experiments have been conducted at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center utilizing a transmission cavity operating in the TM020 mode. A procedure was developed to examine the high gradient section of the cavity in an electron microscope. The results have revealed that breakdown asymmetry exists between opposing high gradient surfaces. During breakdown, a plasma formation is detected localized near the surface with no visible evidence of an arc traversing the gap. These findings support the theory that high frequency rf breakdown is a single surface phenomenon. Other results from this study have shown that breakdown can occur at relatively low voltages when surface irregularities exist and along grain boundaries. A series of steps have been developed through this study that have significantly reduced the number of breakdowns that occur along grain boundaries. Testing under various vacuum conditions (10-11--10 -5 Torr) have revealed that while the breakdown threshold remained the same, the field emitted current density increased by almost two orders of magnitude. This suggests that the total field emitted current density is not the critical parameter in the initiation of high frequency vacuum breakdown. In the course of this study, microparticles were carefully tracked before and after rf processing. The outcome of this research suggests that expensive cleanroom facilities may not offer any advantage over practicing good cleaning and

  1. [Quantitative Measurement of Equivalence Ratios of Methane/Air Mixture by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: the Effects of Detector Gated Mode and Laser Wavelength].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Peng; Li, Bo; Yan, Bei-bei; Li, Zhong-shan; Yao, Ming-fa

    2015-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been increasingly used in combustion diagnostics as a novel spectral analysis method in recent years. The quantitative local equivalence ratio of methane/air mixture is determined by LIBS using different emission intensity ratios of H/O and H/N. The comparison between calibration curves of H₆₅₆/O₇₇₇ and H₆₅₆/N₇₄₆ is performed in gated mode, which shows that H₆₅₆/O₇₇₇ can achieve better prediction accuracy and higher sensitivity. More spectral intensity ratios (H₆₅₆/O₇₇₇, H₆₅₆/N₅₀₀⁺, H₆₅₆/N₅₆₇ and H₆₅₆/N₇₄₆) can be used to make calibration measurements in ungated mode and H₆₅₆/O₇₇₇ is also tested best among them. The comparison between gated and ungated detection modes shows that gated mode offers better accuracy and precision. In addition, the effects of different laser wavelengths (1064, 532 and 355 nm) on LIBS spectra and calibration curves are investigated with laser focal point size and laser fluence kept constant. The results show that with longer laser wavelength, the peak intensity and SNR of H, O and N lines increase, as well as the slope of calibration curve of H₆₅₆/O₇₇₇. Among these three wavelengths, 1064 nm laser is best suited to measure the equivalence ratio of CH₄/air mixture by LIBS. The experimental results are explained in terms of plasma electron density and temperature, which have a significant impact on the emission intensity and the partition function of hydrogen and oxygen, respectively. PMID:26978894

  2. Effect of surface conditions affecting voltage breakdowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flauta, Randolph; Aghazarian, Maro; Caughman, John; Ruzic, David

    2008-11-01

    The maximum power transferred by ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennas is dependent on the breakdown threshold when operated at high voltages. The voltage that these antennas can withstand is lowered and hence breakdowns occur due to many factors. The Surface Plasma Arcs by Radiofrequency - Control Study or SPARCS facility has a 0-15kV DC power supply to deliver power to flat cathode surface and semi-spherical anode made of Cu and Al under 10-8-10-6 torr vacuum conditions. The effects of different surface conditions on the breakdown threshold were then investigated. Also, as the ICRF antennas used for heating plasmas may come into contact with contaminants from the plasma, Li was also deposited on the cathode surface through in-situ evaporation coating and its effect on the breakdown threshold was investigated. Results on surface roughness showed no significant dependence of the breakdown threshold on macroscopic surface roughness in the cathode arithmetic roughness range of ˜77-1139nm. Microscopic surface features such as grain boundaries, impurities and imperfections may play a more visible role in affecting the vacuum breakdown.

  3. Spatial characterization of red and white skin potatoes using nano-second laser induced breakdown in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehan, Imran; Rehan, Kamran; Sultana, S.; Haq, M. Oun ul; Niazi, Muhammad Zubair Khan; Muhammad, Riaz

    2016-01-01

    We presents spectroscopic study of the plasma generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG (1064 nm) laser irradiation of the flesh of red and white skin potatoes. From the spectra recorded with spectrometer (LIBS2500+, Ocean Optics, USA) 11 elements were identified in red skin potato, whereas, the white skin potato was found to have nine elements. Their relative concentrations were estimated using CF-LIBS method for the plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The target was placed in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. The electron temperature and number density were calculated from Boltzmann plot and stark broadened line profile methods, respectively using Fe I spectral lines. The spatial distribution of plasma parameters were also studied which show a decreasing trend of 6770 K-4266 K and (3-2.0) × 1016 cm-3. Concentrations of the detected elements were monitored as a function of depth of the potatoes. Our study reveals a decreasing tendency in concentration of iron from top to the centre of potato's flesh, whereas, the concentrations of other elements vary randomly.

  4. Quantitative measurement of odor detection thresholds using an air dilution olfactometer, and association with genetic variants in a sample of diverse ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gillian R.; Krithika, S; Edwards, Melissa; Kavanagh, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies require a quantitative and reliable method for odor threshold assessment in order to examine the contribution of genetic variants to complex olfactory phenotypes. Our main goal was to assess the feasibility of a portable Scentroid air dilution olfactometer for use in such studies. Using the Scentroid SM110C and the SK5 n-butanol Sensitivity Kit (IDES Canada Inc.), n-butanol odor thresholds were determined for 182 individuals of diverse ancestry (mean age: 20.4 ± 2.5 years; n = 128 female; n = 54 male). Threshold scores from repeat participants were used to calculate a test–retest reliability coefficient, which was statistically significant (r = 0.754, p < 0.001, n = 29), indicating that the Scentroid provides reliable estimates of odor thresholds. In addition, we performed a preliminary genetic analysis evaluating the potential association of n-butanol odor thresholds to six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) putatively involved in general olfactory sensitivity (GOS). The results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed no significant association between the SNPs tested and threshold scores. However, our sample size was relatively small, and our study was only powered to identify genetic markers with strong effects on olfactory sensitivity. Overall, we find that the Scentroid provides reliable quantitative measures of odor detection threshold and is well suited for genetic studies of olfactory sensitivity. PMID:25392755

  5. Air temperature thresholds to evaluate snow melting at the surface of Alpine glaciers by T-index models: the case study of Forni Glacier (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senese, A.; Maugeri, M.; Vuillermoz, E.; Smiraglia, C.; Diolaiuti, G.

    2014-03-01

    The glacier melt conditions (i.e.: null surface temperature and positive energy budget) can be assessed by analyzing meteorological and energy data acquired by a supraglacial Automatic Weather Station (AWS). In the case this latter is not present the assessment of actual melting conditions and the evaluation of the melt amount is difficult and simple methods based on T-index (or degree days) models are generally applied. These models require the choice of a correct temperature threshold. In fact, melt does not necessarily occur at daily air temperatures higher than 273.15 K. In this paper, to detect the most indicative threshold witnessing melt conditions in the April-June period, we have analyzed air temperature data recorded from 2006 to 2012 by a supraglacial AWS set up at 2631 m a.s.l. on the ablation tongue of the Forni Glacier (Italian Alps), and by a weather station located outside the studied glacier (at Bormio, a village at 1225 m a.s.l.). Moreover we have evaluated the glacier energy budget and the Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) values during this time-frame. Then the snow ablation amount was estimated both from the surface energy balance (from supraglacial AWS data) and from T-index method (from Bormio data, applying the mean tropospheric lapse rate and varying the air temperature threshold) and the results were compared. We found that the mean tropospheric lapse rate permits a good and reliable reconstruction of glacier air temperatures and the major uncertainty in the computation of snow melt is driven by the choice of an appropriate temperature threshold. From our study using a 5.0 K lower threshold value (with respect to the largely applied 273.15 K) permits the most reliable reconstruction of glacier melt.

  6. Dielectric breakdown induced by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1976-01-01

    The damage thresholds of transparent optical materials were investigated. Single picosecond pulses at 1.06 microns, 0.53 microns and 0.35 microns were obtained from a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator-amplifier-frequency multiplier system. The pulses were Gaussian in space and time and permitted the determination of breakdown thresholds with a reproducibility of 15%. It was shown that the breakdown thresholds are characteristic of the bulk material, which included nine alkali halides, five different laser host materials, KDP, quartz, sapphire and calcium fluoride. The extension of the damage data to the ultraviolet is significant, because some indication was obtained that two- and three-photon absorption processes begin to play a role in determining the threshold. Throughout the visible region of the spectrum the threshold is still an increasing function of frequency, indicating that avalanche ionization is the dominant factor in determining the breakdown threshold. This was confirmed by a detailed study of the damage morphology with a high resolution microscope just above the threshold. The influence of self focusing is discussed, and evidence for beam distortion below the power threshold for complete self focusing is presented, confirming the theory of Marburger.

  7. Energy distribution and quantum yield for photoemission from air-contaminated gold surfaces under ultraviolet illumination close to the threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hechenblaikner, Gerald; Ziegler, Tobias; Biswas, Indro; Seibel, Christoph; Schulze, Mathias; Brandt, Nico; Schöll, Achim; Bergner, Patrick; Reinert, Friedrich T.

    2012-06-01

    The kinetic energy distributions of photo-electrons emitted from gold surfaces under illumination by UV-light close to the threshold (photon energy in the order of the material work function) are measured and analyzed. Samples are prepared as chemically clean through Ar-ion sputtering and then exposed to atmosphere for variable durations before quantum yield measurements are performed after evacuation. During measurements, the bias voltage applied to the sample is varied and the resulting emission current measured. Taking the derivative of the current-voltage curve yields the energy distribution which is found to closely resemble the distribution of total energies derived by DuBridge for emission from a free electron gas. We investigate the dependence of distribution shape and width on electrode geometry and contaminant substances adsorbed from the atmosphere, in particular, to water and hydro-carbons. Emission efficiency increases initially during air exposure before diminishing to zero on a timescale of several hours, whilst subsequent annealing of the sample restores emissivity. A model fit function, in good quantitative agreement with the measured data, is introduced which accounts for the experiment-specific electrode geometry and an energy dependent transmission coefficient. The impact of large patch potential fields from contact potential drops between sample and sample holder is investigated. The total quantum yield is split into bulk and surface contributions which are tested for their sensitivity to light incidence angle and polarization. Our results are directly applicable to model parameters for the contact-free discharge system onboard the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder spacecraft.

  8. Measuring H, O, li, B, and BE on Planetary Surfaces: Calibration of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (libs) Data Under Air, Vacuum, and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Nelms, M.; Breves, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectrometer (LIBS), as implemented on the ChemCam instrument on Mars Science Lab and the proposed New Frontiers SAGE mission to Venus, can analyze elements from H to Pb from up to 7m standoff. This study examines the capabilities of LIBS to analyze H, O, B, Be, and Li under conditions simulating Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Of these, H is a major constituent of clay minerals and a key indicator of the presence of water. Its abundance in terrestrial materials ranges from 0 ppm up to 10's of wt.% H2O in hydrated sulfates and clays, with prominent emission lines occurring ca. 656.4 nm. O is an important indicator of atmospheric and magmatic coevolution, and has lines ca. 615.8, 656.2, 777.6, and 844.8 nm. Unfortunately there are very few geological samples from which O has been directly measured, but stoichiometry suggests that O varies from ca. 0 wt.% in sulfides to 21% in ferberite, 32% in ilmenite, 42% in amphiboles, 53% in quartz, 63% in melanterite, and 71% in epsomite. Li (lines at 413.3, 460.4, and 670.9 nm in vacuum), B (412.3 nm), and Be (313.1 nm) are highly mobile elements and key indicators of interaction with water. Local atmospheric composition and pressure significantly influence LIBS plasma intensity because the local atmosphere and the breakdown products from the atmospheric species interact with the ablated surface material in the plasma. Measurement of light elements with LIBS requires that spectra be acquired under conditions matching the remote environment. LIBS is critically dependent on the availability of well characterized, homogeneous reference materials that are closely matched in matrix (composition and structure) to the sample being studied. In modern geochemistry, analyses of most major, minor, and trace elements are routinely made. However, quantitative determination of light element concentrations in geological specimens still represents a major analytical challenge. Thus standards for which hydrogen, oxygen, and

  9. DC Breakdown Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Calatroni, S.; Descoeudres, A.; Levinsen, Y.; Taborelli, M.; Wuensch, W.

    2009-01-22

    In the context of the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) project investigations of DC breakdown in ultra high vacuum are carried out in parallel with high power RF tests. From the point of view of saturation breakdown field the best material tested so far is stainless steel, followed by titanium. Copper shows a four times weaker breakdown field than stainless steel. The results indicate clearly that the breakdown events are initiated by field emission current and that the breakdown field is limited by the cathode. In analogy to RF, the breakdown probability has been measured in DC and the data show similar behaviour as a function of electric field.

  10. Pulsed electric breakdown in adipose tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Juergen F.; Scully, Noah; Paithankar, Dilip

    2011-08-01

    High voltage pulses of sub-microsecond duration can instigate electrical breakdown in adipose tissue, which is followed by a spark discharge. Breakdown voltages are generally lower than observed for purified lipids but higher than for air. Development of breakdown for the repetitive application of pulses resembles a gradual and stochastic process as reported for partial discharges in solid dielectrics. The inflicted tissue damage itself is confined to the gap between electrodes, providing a method to use spark discharges as a precise surgical technique.

  11. Generation of runaway electrons and X-ray emission during breakdown of atmospheric-pressure air by voltage pulses with an ∼0.5-μs front duration

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-03-15

    Results are presented from experiments on the generation of runaway electron beams and X-ray emission in atmospheric-pressure air by using voltage pulses with an ∼0.5-μs front duration. It is shown that the use of small-curvature-radius spherical cathodes (or other cathodes with small curvature radii) decreases the intensity of the runaway electron beam and X-ray emission. It is found that, at sufficiently high voltages at the electrode gap (U{sub m} ∼ 100 kV), the gap breakdown, the formation of a spark channel, and the generation of a runaway electron beam occur over less than 10 ns. At high values of U{sub m} behind the anode that were reached by increasing the cathode size and the electrode gap length, a supershort avalanche electron beam with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of up to ∼100 ps was detected. At voltages of ∼50 kV, the second breakdown regime was revealed in which a runaway electron beam with an FWHM of ∼2 ns was generated, whereas the FWHM of the X-ray pulse increased to ∼100 ns. It is established that the energy of the bulk of runaway electrons decreases with increasing voltage front duration and is ⩽30 keV in the first regime and ⩽10 keV in the second regime.

  12. Generation of runaway electrons and X-ray emission during breakdown of atmospheric-pressure air by voltage pulses with an ˜0.5-μs front duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyrya, I. D.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-03-01

    Results are presented from experiments on the generation of runaway electron beams and X-ray emission in atmospheric-pressure air by using voltage pulses with an ˜0.5-μs front duration. It is shown that the use of small-curvature-radius spherical cathodes (or other cathodes with small curvature radii) decreases the intensity of the runaway electron beam and X-ray emission. It is found that, at sufficiently high voltages at the electrode gap ( U m ˜ 100 kV), the gap breakdown, the formation of a spark channel, and the generation of a runaway electron beam occur over less than 10 ns. At high values of U m behind the anode that were reached by increasing the cathode size and the electrode gap length, a supershort avalanche electron beam with a full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of up to ˜100 ps was detected. At voltages of ˜50 kV, the second breakdown regime was revealed in which a runaway electron beam with an FWHM of ˜2 ns was generated, whereas the FWHM of the X-ray pulse increased to ˜100 ns. It is established that the energy of the bulk of runaway electrons decreases with increasing voltage front duration and is ⩽30 keV in the first regime and ⩽10 keV in the second regime.

  13. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  14. Intense microwave pulse propagation through gas breakdown plasmas in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, D.P.

    1986-10-08

    High-power microwave pulse-compression techniques are used to generate 2.856 GHz pulses which are propagated in a TE/sub 10/ mode through a gas filled section of waveguide, where the pulses interact with self-generated gas-breakdown plasmas. Pulse envelopes transmitted through the plasmas, with duration varying from 2 ns to greater than 1 ..mu..s, and peak powers of a few kW to nearly 100 MW, are measured as a function of incident pulse and gas pressure for air, nitrogen, and helium. In addition, the spatial and temporal development of the optical radiation emitted by the breakdown plasmas are measured. For transmitted pulse durations greater than or equal to 100 ns, good agreement is found with both theory and existing measurements. For transmitted pulse duration as short as 2 ns (less than 10 rf cycles), a two-dimensional model is used in which the electrons in the plasma are treated as a fluid whose interactions with the microwave pulse are governed by a self-consistent set of fluid equations and Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field. The predictions of this model for air are compared with the experimental results over a pressure range of 0.8 torr to 300 torr. Good agreement is obtained above about 1 torr pressure, demonstrating that microwave pulse propagation above the breakdown threshold can be accurately modeled on this time scale. 63 refs., 44 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. [The modelling of the composition of the thermal oxidative breakdown products of aviation oils determined in the cabin air of aircraft].

    PubMed

    Belkin, B I; Filippov, A F; Kozlovskaia, N N

    1994-01-01

    The authors suggested a method to obtain a mixture of chemicals from splitting thermo-oxidation of aviation oil. The qualitative and quantitative aspects of the mixture correspond to the concentration of the chemicals in the air of aircraft cabins. The possibility to obtain such mixtures helps to assess in hygienic laboratory conditions a level of air pollution with aviation oil in aircraft cabins. PMID:7834229

  16. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  17. Vortex breakdown simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    A vortex breakdown was simulated by the vortex filament method, and detailed figures are presented based on the results. Deformations of the vortex filaments showed clear and large swelling at a particular axial station which implied the presence of a recirculation bubble at that station. The tendency for two breakdowns to occur experimentally was confirmed by the simulation, and the jet flow inside the bubble was well simulated. The particle paths spiralled with expansion, and the streamlines took spiral forms at the breakdown with expansion.

  18. Electrical breakdown of soil under nonlinear pulsed current spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyak, L. M.; Pecherkin, V. Ya; Vetchinin, S. P.; Panov, V. A.; Son, E. E.; Efimov, B. V.; Danilin, A. N.; Kolobov, V. V.; Selivanov, V. N.; Ivonin, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    Laboratory investigations on pulsed current spreading from spherical electrodes and evolution of electrical breakdown of silica sand with different water contents under a 15-20 kV voltage pulse were carried out. A sharp nonlinear decrease in the pulsed resistance of soil was observed when the current density exceeded a certain threshold value. Then ionization-overheating instability develops and leads to current contraction and plasma channel formation in the soil. The method for determination of the threshold electric field for ionization is proposed. Electrical discharge in wet sand was found to develop with a significant delay time for long discharge gaps similar to thermal breakdown.

  19. Modeling optical breakdown in dielectrics during ultrafast laser processing.

    PubMed

    Fan, C H; Longtin, J P

    2001-06-20

    Laser ablation is widely used in micromachining, manufacturing, thin-film formation, and bioengineering applications. During laser ablation the removal of material and quality of the features depend strongly on the optical breakdown region induced by the laser irradiance. The recent advent of amplified ultrafast lasers with pulse durations of less than 1 ps has generated considerable interest because of the ability of the lasers to process virtually all materials with high precision and minimal thermal damage. With ultrashort pulse widths, however, traditional breakdown models no longer accurately capture the laser-material interaction that leads to breakdown. A femtosecond breakdown model for dielectric solids and liquids is presented that characterizes the pulse behavior and predicts the time- and position-dependent breakdown region. The model includes the pulse propagation and small spatial extent of ultrashort laser pulses. Model results are presented and compared with classical breakdown models for 1-ns, 1-ps, and 150-fs pulses. The results show that the revised model is able to model breakdown accurately in the focal region for pulse durations of less than 10 ps. The model can also be of use in estimating the time- and position-resolved electron density in the interaction volume, the breakdown threshold of the material, shielding effects, and temperature distributions during ultrafast processing. PMID:18357333

  20. Obstacle-induced spiral vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasche, Simon; Gallaire, François; Dreyer, Matthieu; Farhat, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    An experimental investigation on vortex breakdown dynamics is performed. An adverse pressure gradient is created along the axis of a wing-tip vortex by introducing a sphere downstream of an elliptical hydrofoil. The instrumentation involves high-speed visualizations with air bubbles used as tracers and 2D Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). Two key parameters are identified and varied to control the onset of vortex breakdown: the swirl number, defined as the maximum azimuthal velocity divided by the free-stream velocity, and the adverse pressure gradient. They were controlled through the incidence angle of the elliptical hydrofoil, the free-stream velocity and the sphere diameter. A single helical breakdown of the vortex was systematically observed over a wide range of experimental parameters. The helical breakdown coiled around the sphere in the direction opposite to the vortex but rotated along the vortex direction. We have observed that the location of vortex breakdown moved upstream as the swirl number or the sphere diameter was increased. LDV measurements were corrected using a reconstruction procedure taking into account the so-called vortex wandering and the size of the LDV measurement volume. This allows us to investigate the spatio-temporal linear stability properties of the flow and demonstrate that the flow transition from columnar to single helical shape is due to a transition from convective to absolute instability.

  1. Analysis of Laser Breakdown Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Experiments on laser breakdown for ns pulses of 532 nm or 1064 nm light in water and dozens of simple hydrocarbon liquids are analyzed and compared to widely-used models and other laser breakdown experiments reported in the literature. Particular attention is given to the curve for the probability of breakdown as a function of the laser fluence at the beam focus. Criticism is made of the na"ive forms of both ``avalanche'' breakdown and multi-photon breakdown. It appears that the process is complex and is intimately tied to the chemical group of the material. Difficulties with developing an accurate model of laser breakdown in liquids are outlined.

  2. Diagnostics of the loss of stability of loaded constructions and the development of the sites of breakdown during the action of seismic explosion and air shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhmudov, Kh. F.; Menzhulin, M. G.; Zakharyan, M. V.; Sultonov, U.; Abdurakhmanov, Z. M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the challenging problems for mining enterprises, namely, predicting the decrease in the strength of the structure elements in guarded buildings and constructions during blasting, is solved in terms of a stress concentration factor, the time of exceeding the long-term tensile strength, and the crack growth rate. It is shown that the existence of stress concentrators in the form of natural heterogeneities or defects in the building materials of the building elements subjected to the action of seismic explosion and air shock waves results in crack growth. The distribution of cracks in samples of some materials and the ultimate tensile strength of these materials are determined to find the surface energy. The size distribution of cracks is used to calculate the effective crack length.

  3. Breakdown of interdependent directed networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueming; Stanley, H Eugene; Gao, Jianxi

    2016-02-01

    Increasing evidence shows that real-world systems interact with one another via dependency connectivities. Failing connectivities are the mechanism behind the breakdown of interacting complex systems, e.g., blackouts caused by the interdependence of power grids and communication networks. Previous research analyzing the robustness of interdependent networks has been limited to undirected networks. However, most real-world networks are directed, their in-degrees and out-degrees may be correlated, and they are often coupled to one another as interdependent directed networks. To understand the breakdown and robustness of interdependent directed networks, we develop a theoretical framework based on generating functions and percolation theory. We find that for interdependent Erdős-Rényi networks the directionality within each network increases their vulnerability and exhibits hybrid phase transitions. We also find that the percolation behavior of interdependent directed scale-free networks with and without degree correlations is so complex that two criteria are needed to quantify and compare their robustness: the percolation threshold and the integrated size of the giant component during an entire attack process. Interestingly, we find that the in-degree and out-degree correlations in each network layer increase the robustness of interdependent degree heterogeneous networks that most real networks are, but decrease the robustness of interdependent networks with homogeneous degree distribution and with strong coupling strengths. Moreover, by applying our theoretical analysis to real interdependent international trade networks, we find that the robustness of these real-world systems increases with the in-degree and out-degree correlations, confirming our theoretical analysis. PMID:26787907

  4. Beauty in the Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brisco, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Most human beings look at erosion as the destruction of a surface, but artists can see that erosion often creates indefinable beauty. Where do you see beauty in the breakdown? In this article, the author presents an innovative lesson that would allow students to observe both human and physical nature. In this activity students will create a work…

  5. Measuring Breakdown Voltage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auer, Herbert J.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses an aspect of conductivity, one of the electrical properties subdivisions, and describes a tester that can be shop-built. Breakdown voltage of an insulation material is specifically examined. Test procedures, parts lists, diagrams, and test data form are included. (MF)

  6. Breakdown voltage of metal-oxide resistors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, L. F.; Gollapinni, S.; James, C. C.; Jones, B. J.P.; Jostlein, H.; Lockwitz, S.; Naples, D.; Raaf, J. L.; Rameika, R.; Schukraft, A.; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.; Wolbers, S. A.

    2014-11-07

    We characterized a sample of metal-oxide resistors and measured their breakdown voltage in liquid argon by applying high voltage (HV) pulses over a 3 second period. This test mimics the situation in a HV-divider chain when a breakdown occurs and the voltage across resistors rapidly rise from the static value to much higher values. All resistors had higher breakdown voltages in liquid argon than their vendor ratings in air at room temperature. Failure modes range from full destruction to coating damage. In cases where breakdown was not catastrophic, subsequent breakdown voltages were lower in subsequent measuring runs. One resistor type withstands 131 kV pulses, the limit of the test setup.

  7. Multi-Harmonic Cavities for Increasing RF Breakdown Threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y.; Kazakov, S. Yu.; Kuzikov, S. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2010-11-04

    A multi-harmonic asymmetric cavity is predicted to sustain higher acceleration gradients than a conventional pillbox cavity, 55% higher in one example, when driven by external RF harmonic sources. Simulations of multi-harmonic excitation in such a cavity are described, either by a charged drive beam or by external RF sources. An accelerator structure based on multi-harmonic cavity is proposed.

  8. Experimental Study on Electrical Breakdown for Devices with Micrometer Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guodong; Cheng, Yonghong; Dong, Chengye; Wu, Kai

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of electrical breakdown in atmospheric air across micrometer gaps is critically important for the insulation design of micro & nano electronic devices. In this paper, planar aluminum electrodes with gaps ranging from 2 μm to 40 μm were fabricated by microelectromechanical system technology. The influence factors including gap width and surface dielectric states were experimentally investigated using the home-built test and measurement system. Results showed that for SiO2 layers the current sustained at 2-3 nA during most of the pre-breakdown period, and then rose rapidly to 10-30 nA just before breakdown due to field electron emission, followed by the breakdown. The breakdown voltage curves demonstrated three stages: (1) a constantly decreasing region (the gap width d < 5 μm), where the field emission effect played an important role just near breakdown, supplying enough initial electrons for the breakdown process; (2) a plateau region with a near constant breakdown potential (5 μm < d < 10 μm) (3) a region for large gaps that adhered to Paschen's curve (d > 10 μm). And the surface dielectric states including the surface resistivity and secondary electron yield were verified to be related to the propagation of discharge due to the interaction between initial electrons and dielectrics.

  9. Soft breakdown characteristics of ultralow-k time-dependent dielectric breakdown for advanced complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fen; Shinosky, Michael

    2010-09-01

    During technology development, the study of ultralow-k (ULK) time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) is important for assuring robust reliability. As the technology advances, the increase in ULK leakage current noise level and reversible current change induced by soft breakdown (SBD) during stress has been observed. In this paper, the physical origin of SBD and reversible breakdown, and its correlation to conventional hard breakdowns (HBDs) were extensively studied. Based on constant voltage stress (CVS) and constant current stress (CCS) results, it was concluded that SBD in ULK is an intrinsic characteristic for ULK material, and all first breakdown events most likely are soft instead of hard. Therefore, a unified understanding of SBD and HBD for low-k TDDB was established. Furthermore, the post-SBD and HBD breakdown conduction characteristics were explored and their impacts on circuit operation were discussed. Based on current limited constant voltage stress studies, it was found that the power dissipation, not the stored energy, determined the severity of ULK dielectric breakdown, and the postbreakdown conduction properties. A percolation-threshold controlled, variable-range-hopping (VRH) model was proposed to explain all postbreakdown aspects of SBD and HBD of ULK material.

  10. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20(th) century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  11. Space Charge Modulated Electrical Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengtao; Zhu, Yuanwei; Min, Daomin; Chen, George

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown is one of the most important physical phenomena in electrical and electronic engineering. Since the early 20th century, many theories and models of electrical breakdown have been proposed, but the origin of one key issue, that the explanation for dc breakdown strength being twice or higher than ac breakdown strength in insulating materials, remains unclear. Here, by employing a bipolar charge transport model, we investigate the space charge dynamics in both dc and ac breakdown processes. We demonstrate the differences in charge accumulations under both dc and ac stresses and estimate the breakdown strength, which is modulated by the electric field distortion induced by space charge. It is concluded that dc breakdown initializes in the bulk whereas ac breakdown initializes in the vicinity of the sample-electrode interface. Compared with dc breakdown, the lower breakdown strength under ac stress and the decreasing breakdown strength with an increase in applied frequency, are both attributed to the electric field distortion induced by space charges located in the vicinity of the electrodes. PMID:27599577

  12. Electrical Breakdown in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarson, Harold; Zutavern, Fred; Kambour, Kenneth; Moore, Chris; Mar, Alan

    During electron breakdown of a solid subjected to a large electric field, impact ionization causes growth of an electron-hole plasma. This growth process is opposed by Auger recombination of the electron-hole pairs. In our work, such breakdown is investigated by obtaining steady-state solutions to the Boltzmann equation. In these calculations, the carriers are heated by the electric field and cooled by phonon emission. Our results imply that breakdown may lead to high carrier-density current filaments. Conductive filaments have been observed in optically-triggered, high-power photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices being developed at Sandia Labs. The relationship between the steady-state computed solutions to the observed filaments will be discussed in the presentation. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Quantum chemical clarification of the alkyl chain length threshold of nonionic surfactants for monolayer formation at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Vysotsky, Yu B; Kartashynska, E S; Belyaeva, E A; Vollhardt, D; Fainerman, V B; Miller, R

    2016-03-21

    A theoretical basis is provided for the experimental fact that for various surfactant classes the alkyl chain length threshold varies for the formation of condensed monolayers. The existence of the alkyl chain length threshold for a surfactant enabling the formation of monolayers is determined by the entropy increment to the Gibbs' energy, assessed by using the quantum chemical semiempiric method PM3. The value of the clusterization threshold is not stipulated by the surfactant solubility in water, rather by the electron-donor and electron-seeking properties of the head groups. These properties in turn impact the value of the solubility threshold for surfactants. The value of the clusterization threshold depends quadratically on the substituent constants, i.e. it is independent of whether the functional group is a donor or an acceptor of electrons. Rather it depends only on the donor or the acceptor 'force' of the substituent. The square-law dependence of the surface clusterization threshold of the amphiphile on the solubility threshold is evidenced. PMID:26957020

  14. Picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 5321 and 5347 A - Observation of frequency-dependent behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented of picosecond laser-induced breakdown at 3547 and 5321 A of several materials. The thresholds obtained for breakdown at 5321 A are compared to previous results obtained at 1.064 microns using the same laser system. This comparison illustrates the transition of bulk laser-induced breakdown as it becomes increasingly frequency dependent. UV picosecond pulses are obtained by mixing 5321 A and 1.064 micron pulses in a KH2PO4 crystal. Upper and lower bounds on the 3547 A breakdown threshold are defined, although some effects of walk-off distortion and self-focusing are observed. The results are discussed with reference to models for the intrinsic processes involved in the breakdown, i.e., avalanche and multiphoton ionization.

  15. Microwave assisted laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljanen, Jan; Sun, Zhiwei; Alwahabi, Zeyad T.

    2016-04-01

    Signal enhancements in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using external microwave power are demonstrated in ambient air. Pulsed microwave at 2.45 GHz and of 1 millisecond duration was delivered via a simple near field applicator (NFA), with which an external electric field is generated and coupled into laser induced plasma. The external microwave power can significantly increase the signal lifetime from a few microseconds to hundreds of microseconds, resulting in a great enhancement on LIBS signals with the use of a long integration time. The dependence of signal enhancement on laser energy and microwave power is experimentally assessed. With the assistance of microwave source, a significant enhancement of ~ 100 was achieved at relatively low laser energy that is only slightly above the ablation threshold. A limit of detection (LOD) of 8.1 ppm was estimated for copper detection in Cu/Al2O3 solid samples. This LOD corresponds to a 93-fold improvement compared with conventional single-pulse LIBS. Additionally, in the microwave assisted LIBS, the self-reversal effect was greatly reduced, which is beneficial in measuring elements of high concentration. Temporal measurements have been performed and the results revealed the evolution of the emission process in microwave-enhanced LIBS. The optimal position of the NFA related to the ablation point has also been investigated.

  16. Laser Initiated, RF Sustained Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, John; Giar, Ryan; Hummelt, Jason; Way, Jesse

    2009-11-01

    Measurements and analysis of air breakdown processes by focusing 193 nm, 260 mJ, 10 MW high power UV laser radiation to 18 cm and 1.3 cm zones are examined. Quantum resonant multi-photon (REMPI) and collisional cascade ionization processes affect the breakdown and plasma formation. Our spectroscopic measurements show that REMPI (2+1) processes on nitrogen play a substantial role at lower pressures due to the high photon energy (6.4 eV). The REMPI process yields high density air plasmas (5 x 10^16/cc) for the 18 cm focus with the laser flux three orders of magnitude below the classical breakdown threshold intensity. Measurements of the f = 1.3 cm core laser plasma density (8x10^17/cc) and electron temperature decay via two color laser interferometry are made. The 18 cm focal length lens and its ionizing shock wave front are utilized to produce air seed plasma to initiate a large volume (500 cc) RF sustainment discharge coupled by means of a 6 cm diameter helical coil at up to 10 kW power levels.

  17. Vortex breakdown in a truncated conical bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-12-01

    This numerical study explains the eddy formation and disappearance in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow in a vertical truncated conical container, driven by the rotating top disk. Numerous topological metamorphoses occur as the water height, Hw, and the bottom-sidewall angle, α, vary. It is found that the sidewall convergence (divergence) from the top to the bottom stimulates (suppresses) the development of vortex breakdown (VB) in both water and air. At α = 60°, the flow topology changes eighteen times as Hw varies. The changes are due to (a) competing effects of AMF (the air meridional flow) and swirl, which drive meridional motions of opposite directions in water, and (b) feedback of water flow on AMF. For small Hw, the AMF effect dominates. As Hw increases, the swirl effect dominates and causes VB. The water flow feedback produces and modifies air eddies. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  18. Work breakdown structure guide

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-02-06

    Utilization of the work breakdown structure (WBS) technique is an effective aid in managing Department of Energy (DOE) programs and projects. The technique provides a framework for project management by focusing on the products that are being developed or constructed to solve technical problems. It assists both DOE and contractors in fulfilling their management responsibilities. This document provides guidance for use of the WBS technique for product oriented work identification and definition. It is one in a series of policy and guidance documents supporting DOE's project manaagement system.

  19. Nonequilibrium breakdown of a correlated insulator through pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Pedro; Antipov, Andrey E.; Rubtsov, Alexey N.

    2016-04-01

    We study the breakdown of an interaction-induced insulator under an imposed bias voltage. A rich voltage-temperature phase diagram is found that contains phases with a spatially patterned charge gap. Nonequilibrium conditions are shown to be able to change the antiferromagnetic nature of the equilibrium correlations. Above a threshold voltage, smaller than the charge gap, the formation of patterns occurs together with the emergence of midgap states yielding a finite conductance. We discuss the experimental implications of this proposed scenario for the breakdown of the insulating state.

  20. On Preliminary Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, W. H.; Petersen, D.

    2013-12-01

    The preliminary breakdown phase of a negative cloud-to-ground lightning flash was observed in detail. Observations were made with a Photron SA1.1 high-speed video camera operating at 9,000 frames per second, fast optical sensors, a flat-plate electric field antenna covering the SLF to MF band, and VHF and UHF radio receivers with bandwidths of 20 MHz. Bright stepwise extensions of a negative leader were observed at an altitude of 8 km during the first few milliseconds of the flash, and were coincident with bipolar electric field pulses called 'characteristic pulses'. The 2-D step lengths of the preliminary processes were in excess of 100 meters, with some 2-D step lengths in excess of 200 meters. Smaller and shorter unipolar electric field pulses were superposed onto the bipolar electric field pulses, and were coincident with VHF and UHF radio pulses. After a few milliseconds, the emerging negative stepped leader system showed a marked decrease in luminosity, step length, and propagation velocity. Details of these events will be discussed, including the possibility that the preliminary breakdown phase consists not of a single developing lightning leader system, but of multiple smaller lightning leader systems that eventually join together into a single system.

  1. Observations of fast VHF-bright positive breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, M.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Lapierre, J. L.; Edens, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    Positive breakdown during lightning discharges is generally considered to be weak and slowly propagating, as high speed video observations show it to be optically weak, and studies of the development of cloud-to-ground (CG) and intracloud (IC) flashes show development in the negative charge region to be slow. With the proper instrumentation, however, fast positive breakdown is a relatively common feature of both CG and IC flashes. The breakdown is bright at VHF, but is smoothly continuous so that time-of-arrival VHF mapping systems such as the Lightning Mapping Array are usually unable to detect or locate its occurrence. However, the breakdown is easily locatable using interferometric mapping techniques. Such an interferometer was developed at NM Tech in the 1980s and used in the CaPE studies at Kennedy Space Center in 1991, where it observed fast (1-6 × 107 m/s), VHF-bright positive leaders propagating away from the source region of negative CG return strokes (Shao et al., 1995). Here we report new observations of fast positive breakdown, obtained with Langmuir Laboratory's flash-continuous broadband VHF interferometer, that confirm and substantially expand our understanding of the phenomena. Numerous examples have been observed following return strokes of negative CG flashes, including bolt-from-blue discharges, and during K-processes of both IC and CG flashes. The breakdown typically propagates a few kilometers at speeds on the order of 107 m/s and frequently produces some of the brightest radiation of the flash. A particularly interesting feature of the breakdown is that it propagates into regions of previously un-ionized air. Then following the breakdown, frequently no further VHF emission is seen along or beyond its channel, indicating that the channel formed is not conducting. But on occasion, especially during cloud-to-ground flashes, the end of the fast positive breakdown turns into a normal, slowly propagating positive leader.

  2. Grammatical Errors and Communication Breakdown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomiyama, Machiko

    This study investigated the relationship between grammatical errors and communication breakdown by examining native speakers' ability to correct grammatical errors. The assumption was that communication breakdown exists to a certain degree if a native speaker cannot correct the error or if the correction distorts the information intended to be…

  3. Optoelectronic switching in diamond and optical surface breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, E I; Tarasenko, V F

    2008-03-31

    The optoelectronic switching in two natural diamond samples of type 2-A is studied at voltages up to 1000 V and the energy density of control 60-ns, 308-nm laser pulses up to 0.6 J cm{sup -2}. It is shown that the design of a diamond switch affects the switching efficiency. When the energy density exceeds 0.2 J cm{sup -2} and the interelectrode surface is completely illuminated, the surface breakdown is initiated by UV radiation, which shunts the current flow through the diamond crystal. When the illumination of the interelectrode surface is excluded, the surface breakdown does not occur. The threshold radiation densities sufficient for initiating the surface breakdown are determined for electric field strengths up to 10 kV cm{sup -1}. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Breakdown of organic insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells and their associated electrical interconnects and leads were encapsulated in transparent elastomeric materials. Their purpose in a photovoltaic module, one of the most important for these elastomeric encapsulation materials, is to function as electrical insulation. This includes internal insulation between adjacent solar cells, between other encapsulated electrical parts, and between the total internal electrical circuitry and external metal frames, grounded areas, and module surfaces. Catastrophic electrical breakdown of the encapsulant insulation materials or electrical current through these materials or module edges to external locations can lead to module failure and can create hazards to humans. Electrical insulation stability, advanced elastomeric encapsulation materials are developed which are intended to be intrinsically free of in-situ ionic impurities, have ultralow water absorption, be weather-stable (UV, oxygen), and have high mechanical flexibility. Efforts to develop a method of assessing the life potential of organic insulation materials in photovoltaic modules are described.

  5. Basic study of transient breakdown voltage in solid dielectric cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahder, G.; Sosnowski, M.; Katz, C.

    1980-09-01

    A comprehensive review of the technical and scientific publications relating to crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE) and ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) insulated cables revealed that there is very little known with respect to the life expectancy, the final factory voltage test background and the mechanism of voltage breakdown of these cables. A new methodology for the investigation of breakdown voltages of XLPE and EPR insulated cables was developed which is based on the investigation of breakdown voltages at various voltage transients such as unipolarity pulses and dual-polarity pulses, and a.c. voltage at power and high frequency. Also, a new approach to statistical testing was developed which allows one to establish a correlation among the breakdown voltages obtained with various voltage transients. Finally, a method for the determination of threshold voltage regardless of the magnitude of apparent charge was developed. A model of breakdown and electrical aging of XLPE and EPR insulated cables was developed as well as life expectancy characteristics for high voltage stress XLPE insulated cables operated in a dry environment at room temperature and at 900 C.

  6. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  7. Laser damage threshold of diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Sacharia; Cropper, Andre D.; Watkins, Linwood C.; Byvik, Charles E.; Buoncristiani, A. Martin

    1989-03-01

    The possibility that diamond films may inhibit laser-induced damage to optical components in laser systems films was investigated by measuring laser damage thresholds of free-standing diamond film windows, diamond films deposited on silicon substrates, and bare silicon substrate. Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a dc plasma-enhanced CVD process. It was found that free-standing diamond films had the highest laser damage threshold at 1064 nm. For a diamond film of 630 nm, the damage threshold was found to be 7 J/sq cm, as compared to a damage threshold of 4.5 J/sq cm for bare silicon, and a low value of 1.5 J/sq cm for the film/substrate combination. The damage mechanism is considered to involve melting or dielectric breakdown induced by laser radiation. The low value of the film/substrate combination is attributed to film stress and conditions of film deposition.

  8. Breakdown of invariant attractors for the dissipative standard map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, Renato; Celletti, Alessandra

    2010-03-01

    We implement different methods for the computation of the breakdown threshold of invariant attractors in the dissipative standard mapping. A first approach is based on the computation of the Sobolev norms of the function parametrizing the solution. Then we look for the approximating periodic orbits and we analyze their stability in order to compute the critical threshold at which an invariant attractor breaks down. We also determine the domain of convergence of the dissipative standard mapping by extending the computations to the complex parameter space as well as by investigating a two-frequency model.

  9. Breakdown in the pretext tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Benesch, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    Data are presented on the application of ion cyclotron resonance RF power to preionization in tokamaks. We applied 0.3-3 kW at 12 MHz to hydrogen and obtained a visible discharge, but found no scaling of breakdown voltage with any parameter we were able to vary. A possible explanation for this, which implies that higher RF power would have been much more effective, is discussed. Finally, we present our investigation of the dV/dt dependence of breakdown voltage in PRETEXT, a phenomenon also seen in JFT-2. The breakdown is discussed in terms of the physics of Townsend discharges.

  10. Electrical breakdown of a bubble in a water-filled capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, P.J.; Leys, C.A.; Vierendeels, J. A.

    2006-06-01

    In this Communication, the electrical breakdown of a static bubble in a water-filled capillary generated in a dc electrical field is studied. We present experimental results which indicate that the liquid layer between capillary and bubble wall can have an important influence on the breakdown mechanism of the bubble. The breakdown electrical field (atmospheric pressure) without a liquid layer in a (vapor) bubble is 18 kV/cm. When a liquid layer is present, the electrical breakdown of an air bubble is observed at electrical fields typically two times smaller. Local plasma formation is observed in this case possibly due to bubble deformation.

  11. Nonlinear Theory and Breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The main points of recent theoretical and computational studies on boundary-layer transition and turbulence are to be highlighted. The work is based on high Reynolds numbers and attention is drawn to nonlinear interactions, breakdowns and scales. The research focuses in particular on truly nonlinear theories, i.e. those for which the mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original state. There appear to be three such theories dealing with unsteady nonlinear pressure-displacement interactions (I), with vortex/wave interactions (II), and with Euler-scale flows (III). Specific recent findings noted for these three, and in quantitative agreement with experiments, are the following. Nonlinear finite-time break-ups occur in I, leading to sublayer eruption and vortex formation; here the theory agrees with experiments (Nishioka) regarding the first spike. II gives rise to finite-distance blowup of displacement thickness, then interaction and break-up as above; this theory agrees with experiments (Klebanoff, Nishioka) on the formation of three-dimensional streets. III leads to the prediction of turbulent boundary-layer micro-scale, displacement-and stress-sublayer-thicknesses.

  12. An empirical formula for gas switch breakdown delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. H.

    An empirical scaling relationship between the mean electric field and the breakdown time has been found. Many divergent sets of data were used from breakdown experiments on power lines, laser-triggered switches, trigatrons, e-beam triggered gaps, sharp-point electrode to plane gaps, and uniform field gaps. This relationship builds on the Felsenthal and Proud data and extends their breakdown time delay (formative time) data by three orders of magnitude and into the region of interest for triggered gas switching. The data indicates that electrically triggered gaps, laser-triggered gaps, and untriggered gaps are governed by the same time-delay processes. Predictions can be made of trigger gap geometry, trigger delays, and trigger polarity effects. Breakdown delays of sub-centimeter-long to at least 8-meter-long gaps in air with either high or low field-enhanced electrodes are described by this equation. In addition, this relationship appears to be valid for a variety of gases and even accurately predicts the breakdown delay of mixtures of air and SF(sub 6).

  13. Breakdown of glass composites with a TiO2 nanodimensional coating by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemanin, V. G.; Atkarskaya, A. B.

    2016-02-01

    The laser-ablation-induced breakdown of glass composites with nanodimensional coatings obtained by the sol-gel method is studied. It is found that the threshold energy of breakdown depends on the refractive index and light transmission coefficient of the sample. It increases with the refractive index and decreases with decreasing the light transmission coefficient in the range 400-900 nm. This can be explained by the difference in the reflection coefficients of the samples.

  14. Fast shut-down protection system for radio frequency breakdown and multipactor testing.

    PubMed

    Graves, T P; Hanson, P; Michaelson, J M; Farkas, A D; Hubble, A A

    2014-02-01

    Radio frequency (RF) breakdown such as multipactor or ionization breakdown is a device-limiting phenomenon for on-orbit spacecraft used for communication, navigation, or other RF payloads. Ground testing is therefore part of the qualification process for all high power components used in these space systems. This paper illustrates a shut-down protection system to be incorporated into multipactor/ionization breakdown ground testing for susceptible RF devices. This 8 channel system allows simultaneous use of different diagnostic classes and different noise floors. With initiation of a breakdown event, diagnostic signals increase above a user-specified level, which then opens an RF switch to eliminate RF power from the high power amplifier. Examples of this system in use are shown for a typical setup, illustrating the reproducibility of breakdown threshold voltages and the lack of multipactor conditioning. This system can also be utilized to prevent excessive damage to RF components in tests with sensitive or flight hardware. PMID:24593380

  15. The role of morphology and coupling of gold nanoparticles in optical breakdown during picosecond pulse exposures.

    PubMed

    Davletshin, Yevgeniy R; Kumaradas, J Carl

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study of the interaction of a 6 ps laser pulse with uncoupled and plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles. We show how the one-dimensional assembly of particles affects the optical breakdown threshold of its surroundings. For this purpose we used a fully coupled electromagnetic, thermodynamic and plasma dynamics model for a laser pulse interaction with gold nanospheres, nanorods and assemblies, which was solved using the finite element method. The thresholds of optical breakdown for off- and on-resonance irradiated gold nanosphere monomers were compared against nanosphere dimers, trimers, and gold nanorods with the same overall size and aspect ratio. The optical breakdown thresholds had a stronger dependence on the optical near-field enhancement than on the mass or absorption cross-section of the nanostructure. These findings can be used to advance the nanoparticle-based nanoscale manipulation of matter. PMID:27547604

  16. The role of morphology and coupling of gold nanoparticles in optical breakdown during picosecond pulse exposures

    PubMed Central

    Davletshin, Yevgeniy R

    2016-01-01

    Summary This paper presents a theoretical study of the interaction of a 6 ps laser pulse with uncoupled and plasmon-coupled gold nanoparticles. We show how the one-dimensional assembly of particles affects the optical breakdown threshold of its surroundings. For this purpose we used a fully coupled electromagnetic, thermodynamic and plasma dynamics model for a laser pulse interaction with gold nanospheres, nanorods and assemblies, which was solved using the finite element method. The thresholds of optical breakdown for off- and on-resonance irradiated gold nanosphere monomers were compared against nanosphere dimers, trimers, and gold nanorods with the same overall size and aspect ratio. The optical breakdown thresholds had a stronger dependence on the optical near-field enhancement than on the mass or absorption cross-section of the nanostructure. These findings can be used to advance the nanoparticle-based nanoscale manipulation of matter. PMID:27547604

  17. Quenching of vortex breakdown oscillations via harmonic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, J. M.; Cui, Y. D.; Marques, F.; Lim, T. T.

    Vortex breakdown is a phenomenon inherent to many practical problems, such as leading-edge vortices on aircraft, atmospheric tornadoes, and flame-holders in combustion devices. The breakdown of these vortices is associated with the stagnation of the axial velocity on the vortex axis and the development of a near-axis recirculation zone. For large enough Reynolds number, the breakdown can be time-dependent. The unsteadiness can have serious consequences in some applications, such as tail-buffeting in aircraft flying at high angles of attack. There has been much interest in controlling the vortex breakdown phenomenon, but most efforts have focused on either shifting the threshold for the onset of steady breakdown or altering the spatial location of the recirculation zone. There has been much less attention paid to the problem of controlling unsteady vortex breakdown. Here we present results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of vortex breakdown in an enclosed cylinder in which low-amplitude modulations of the rotating endwall that sets up the vortex are used as an open-loop control. As expected, for very low amplitudes of the modulation, variation of the modulation frequency reveals typical resonance tongues and frequency locking, so that the open-loop control allows us to drive the unsteady vortex breakdown to a prescribed periodicity within the resonance regions. For modulation amplitudes above a critical level that depends on the modulation frequency (but still very low), the result is a periodic state synchronous with the forcing frequency over an extensive range of forcing frequencies. Of particular interest is the spatial form of this forced periodic state: for modulation frequencies less than about twice the natural frequency of the unsteady breakdown, the oscillations of the near-axis recirculation zone are amplified, whereas for modulation frequencies larger than about twice the natural frequency the oscillations of the recirculation

  18. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  19. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  20. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  1. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  2. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  3. 40 CFR 98.81 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.81 Section 98.81 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Cement Production § 98.81 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  4. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.361 Section 98.361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities must report GHG emissions under this...

  5. 40 CFR 98.361 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.361 Section 98.361 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Manure Management § 98.361 Reporting threshold. Livestock facilities...

  6. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if...

  7. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  8. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  9. 40 CFR 98.181 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.181 Section 98.181 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Lead Production § 98.181 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  10. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if...

  11. 40 CFR 98.341 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.341 Section 98.341 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Municipal Solid Waste Landfills § 98.341 Reporting threshold. You...

  12. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  13. 40 CFR 98.51 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.51 Section 98.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Adipic Acid Production § 98.51 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  14. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  15. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  16. 40 CFR 98.471 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.471 Section 98.471 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Injection of Carbon Dioxide § 98.471 Reporting threshold. (a) You...

  17. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  18. 40 CFR 98.111 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.111 Section 98.111 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Ferroalloy Production § 98.111 Reporting threshold. You must report...

  19. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  20. 40 CFR 98.421 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.421 Section 98.421 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Suppliers of Carbon Dioxide § 98.421 Reporting threshold. Any supplier...

  1. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if...

  2. 40 CFR 98.231 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.231 Section 98.231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Petroleum and Natural Gas Systems § 98.231 Reporting threshold. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 98.461 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.461 Section 98.461 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Industrial Waste Landfills § 98.461 Reporting threshold. You must report GHG emissions under this subpart if...

  4. Plasma breakdown and combustion ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeill, Donald H.; Tran, Phuoc

    2001-10-01

    Ignition in chemically reactive media and electrical breakdown are among the most widely used transient processes. The two phenomena operate together during electrical (and laser) spark ignition of combustible gases. Analogs between them show up in Semenov's early (1920's) work on chemical chain reactions and on thermal breakdown of dielectrics. Both breakdown and ignition are under active study today. The energy source for breakdown is an applied electric field, and that for ignition, an applied flux of heat or radicals. Electrons and intermediate reactants are the corresponding driver particles, with a velocity difference that implies a vast difference in the growth rates for the two processes. Combustion takes place in a fuel-oxidant mixture, and an ignited reaction can proceed until the fuel or oxidant is depleted, while a (non-afterglow, non-fusion) plasma is sustained by an external power supply. The energy balance, propagation behavior, and time evolution of some specific forms of plasma breakdown and chemical ignition are further compared in order to illustrate their physical nature.

  5. Ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials using air-conducted sound: test parameters and normative data in healthy children; effect of body position on threshold.

    PubMed

    Kastanioudakis, Ioannis; Saravakos, Panagiotis; Leontis, Theodoros; Balatsouras, Dimitrios G; Ziavra, Nausica

    2016-09-01

    In the present prospective study, we both investigated positioning techniques for the enhancement of oVEMP procedures and the viability of oVEMP testing in a healthy children population. A total of 41 healthy children were enrolled in this study. 21 were boys and 20 were girls, with their ages ranging from 4 to 16 years. All children underwent audiometry and tympanometry prior to oVEMP test in upright and supine position. All subjects had normal hearing. The procedure was well tolerated by all children. Typical biphasic oVEMPs presented in 97.56 % in upright position and 90.25 % in the supine position. No statistically significant difference could be found concerning which position elicits the best or worst responses. However, a trend towards the supine position was noticed. It may be concluded that oVEMP test proved to be a well-tolerated examination of the vestibular system in children aged above 4 years old. Our results did not show a statistical difference on the oVEMP thresholds between the two body positions. However, further larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26499188

  6. Breakdown properties of epoxy nanodielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Cantoni, Claudia; More, Karren Leslie; James, David Randy; Polyzos, Georgios; Sauers, Isidor; Ellis, Alvin R

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in polymeric dielectric nanocomposites have shown that these novel materials can improve design of high voltage (hv) components and systems. Some of the improvements can be listed as reduction in size (compact hv systems), better reliability, high energy density, voltage endurance, and multifunctionality. Nanodielectric systems demonstrated specific improvements that have been published in the literature by different groups working with electrical insulation materials. In this paper we focus on the influence of in-situ synthesized titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles on the dielectric breakdown characteristics of an epoxy-based nanocomposite system. The in-situ synthesis of the particles creates small nanoparticles on the order of 10 nm with narrow size distribution and uniform particle dispersion in the matrix. The breakdown strength of the nanocomposite was studied as a function of TiO{sub 2} concentration at cryogenic temperatures. It was observed that between 2 and 6wt% yields high breakdown values for the nanodielectric.

  7. Vortex breakdown incipience: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Stanley A.; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The sensitivity of the onset and the location of vortex breakdowns in concentrated vortex cores, and the pronounced tendency of the breakdowns to migrate upstream have been characteristic observations of experimental investigations; they have also been features of numerical simulations and led to questions about the validity of these simulations. This behavior seems to be inconsistent with the strong time-like axial evolution of the flow, as expressed explicitly, for example, by the quasi-cylindrical approximate equations for this flow. An order-of-magnitude analysis of the equations of motion near breakdown leads to a modified set of governing equations, analysis of which demonstrates that the interplay between radial inertial, pressure, and viscous forces gives an elliptic character to these concentrated swirling flows. Analytical, asymptotic, and numerical solutions of a simplified non-linear equation are presented; these qualitatively exhibit the features of vortex onset and location noted above.

  8. Electrical breakdown in tissue electroporation.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Enric; Klein, Nina; Mikus, Paul; Stehling, Michael K; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-11-27

    Electroporation, the permeabilization of the cell membrane by brief, high electric fields, has become an important technology in medicine for diverse application ranging from gene transfection to tissue ablation. There is ample anecdotal evidence that the clinical application of electroporation is often associated with loud sounds and extremely high currents that exceed the devices design limit after which the devices cease to function. The goal of this paper is to elucidate and quantify the biophysical and biochemical basis for this phenomenon. Using an experimental design that includes clinical data, a tissue phantom, sound, optical, ultrasound and MRI measurements, we show that the phenomenon is caused by electrical breakdown across ionized electrolysis produced gases near the electrodes. The breakdown occurs primarily near the cathode. Electrical breakdown during electroporation is a biophysical phenomenon of substantial importance to the outcome of clinical applications. It was ignored, until now. PMID:26482855

  9. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  10. Guidelines for Auditory Threshold Measurement for Significant Threshold Shift.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathleen; Hammill, Tanisha; Hoffer, Michael; Kil, Jonathan; Le Prell, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for determining a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift in clinical trials involving human populations. The article reviews recommendations for the standards to be referenced for human subjects, equipment, test environment, and personnel. Additional guidelines for military populations are provided. Guidelines for the calibration of audiometers, sound booth noise levels, and immitance equipment are provided. In addition the guidance provides specific suggestions for the subjects history before study onset, and otoscopy.Test frequencies for threshold determination and methods of threshold determination are reviewed for both air conduction and bone conduction for both baseline testing and later determination of either a temporary (TTS) or permanent threshold shift (PTS). Once a Significant Noise-Induced Threshold Shift has been determined, subjects should be retested, conductive component should be ruled out or addressed, and the subject should be counseled or referred for additional medical evaluation. Guidance for reporting procedures and the computerized study database are described. Finally, experimental designs suggested for noise-induced otoprotection clinical trials are described. PMID:27518134

  11. Rotation prevents finite-time breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailiang; Tadmor, Eitan

    2004-02-01

    We consider a two-dimensional (2D) convection model augmented with the rotational Coriolis forcing, Ut+ U·∇ xU=2 kU⊥, with a fixed 2 k being the inverse Rossby number. We ask whether the action of dispersive rotational forcing alone, U⊥, prevents the generic finite-time breakdown of the free nonlinear convection. The answer provided in this work is a conditional yes. Namely, we show that the rotating Euler equations admit global smooth solutions for a subset of generic initial configurations. With other configurations, however, finite-time breakdown of solutions may and actually does occur. Thus, global regularity depends on whether the initial configuration crosses an intrinsic, O(1) critical threshold (CT), which is quantified in terms of the initial vorticity, ω0=∇× U0, and the initial spectral gap associated with the 2×2 initial velocity gradient, η0≔ λ2(0)- λ1(0), λj(0)= λj(∇ U0). Specifically, global regularity of the rotational Euler equation is ensured if and only if 4kω 0(α)+η 20(α)<4k 2,∀α∈ R2. We also prove that the velocity field remains smooth if and only if it is periodic. An equivalent Lagrangian formulation reconfirms the CT and shows a global periodicity of velocity field as well as the associated particle orbits. Moreover, we observe yet another remarkable periodic behavior exhibited by the gradient of the velocity field. The spectral dynamics of the Eulerian formulation [SIAM J. Math. Anal. 33 (2001) 930] reveals that the vorticity and the divergence of the flow evolve with their own path-dependent period. We conclude with a kinetic formulation of the rotating Euler equation.

  12. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for the Measurement of Spatial Structures and Fuel Distribution in Flames.

    PubMed

    Kotzagianni, Maria; Kakkava, Eirini; Couris, Stelios

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the mapping of local structures (i.e., reactants and products zones) and for the determination of fuel distribution by means of the local equivalence ratio ϕ in laminar, premixed air-hydrocarbon flames. The determination of laser threshold energy to induce breakdown in the different zones of flames is employed for the identification and demarcation of the local structures of a premixed laminar flame, while complementary results about fuel concentration were obtained from measurements of the cyanogen (CN) band Β(2)Σ(+)--Χ(2)Σ(+), (Δυ = 0) at 388.3 nm and the ratio of the atomic lines of hydrogen (Hα) and oxygen (O(I)), Hα/O. The combination of these LIBS-based methods provides a relatively simple to use, rapid, and accurate tool for online and in situ combustion diagnostics, providing valuable information about the fuel distribution and the spatial variations of the local structures of a flame. PMID:26865582

  13. Optical Damage Threshold of Silicon for Ultrafast Infrared Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, B.; /SLAC

    2006-09-07

    While silicon has several properties making it an attractive material for structure-based laser-driven acceleration, its optical damage threshold, a key parameter for high-gradient acceleration, has been unknown. Here we present measurements of the optical damage threshold of crystalline silicon for ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared. The wavelengths tested span a range from the telecommunications band at 1550 nm extending longer toward the two-photon absorption threshold at around 2200 nm. We discuss the prevailing theories of ultrafast optical breakdown, describe the experimental setup and preliminary results, and propose a relevant performance parameter for candidate accelerator structures.

  14. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nozari, Hadi; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Rezaei, Fatemeh

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  15. Analysis of organic vapors with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozari, Hadi; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is utilized in the study of acetone, ethanol, methanol, cyclohexane, and nonane vapors. Carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen atomic emission spectra have been recorded following laser-induced breakdown of the organic vapors that are mixed with air inside a quartz chamber at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is generated with focused, Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation at the wavelength of 1064 nm. The effects of ignition and vapor pressure are discussed in view of the appearance of the emission spectra. The recorded spectra are proportional to the vapor pressure in air. The hydrogen and oxygen contributions diminish gradually with consecutive laser-plasma events without gas flow. The results show that LIBS can be used to characterize organic vapor.

  16. Transient material properties during defect-assisted laser breakdown in deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Duchateau, Guillaume; Feit, Michael D.; Demos, Stavros G.

    2014-03-14

    We investigate theoretically the transition from solid dielectric materials to warm solid density plasma during laser-induced breakdown in DKDP crystals (KD{sub 2}PO{sub 4}). Evidence taken from the experimentally measured wavelength dependence of the breakdown threshold suggests that the material excitation mechanisms mainly consist of a sequence of one-photon absorptions between short-lived vibronic defect states spanning the band gap with a quasi-continuum of states. The transition between excitation paths involving different number of photons yields information about the role of temperature in determining the width of the transition and corresponding threshold conduction band density prior to initiation of breakdown. This physical system is well adapted to study a plasma warming up at solid density leading to the so-called warm dense matter.

  17. Effect of surface-breakdown plasma on metal drilling by pulsed CO2-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutiunian, P. V.; Baranov, V. Iu.; Bobkov, I. V.; Bol'Shakov, L. A.; Dolgov, V. A.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of low-threshold surface breakdown produced by short (5-microsec) CO2-laser pulses on the metal drilling process is investigated. Data on the interaction of metals with laser pulses having the same duration but different shape are shown to be different. The effect of the ambient atmospheric pressure on the laser drilling process is investigated.

  18. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  19. Partial discharge degradation and breakdown studies in polypropylene films

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, B.; Nema, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    Internal partial discharge characteristics are investigated on impregnated polypropylene films containing artificial cavity of well-defined dimensions, immersed in oil. Electrical breakdown studies are carried out at step-wise rising stress to evaluate constants of inverse power law model. Partial discharge pulse distribution patterns are acquired using PC interfaced multichannel analyzer and statistical analysis of the discharge pulse spectrum is done by using 3-parameter Weibull distribution function. The results are compared with that for unimpregnated samples in air.

  20. Static and Transient Cavitation Threshold Measurements for Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Moraga, F.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    Transient and static cavitation thresholds for mercury as a function of the cover gas (helium or air), and pressure are reported. Both static and transient cavitation onset pressure thresholds increase linearly with cover gas pressure. Additionally, the cavitation thresholds as a function of dissolved gases were also measured and are reported.

  1. Dielectric breakdown and avalanches at nonequilibrium metal-insulator transitions.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Zapperi, Stefano; Sethna, James P

    2011-12-30

    Motivated by recent experiments on the finite temperature Mott transition in VO(2) films, we propose a classical coarse-grained dielectric breakdown model where each degree of freedom represents a nanograin which transitions from insulator to metal with increasing temperature and voltage at random thresholds due to quenched disorder. We describe the properties of the resulting nonequilibrium metal-insulator transition and explain the universal characteristics of the resistance jump distribution. We predict that by tuning voltage, another critical point is approached, which separates a phase of boltlike avalanches from percolationlike ones. PMID:22243320

  2. Formation and breakdown of a protective layer of chromium sesquioxide on L-605 alloy at 1100 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The formation and breakdown of a protective layer of Cr2O3 on the cobalt-base alloy L-605 during oxidation at 1100 C was evaluated. Deformed surface layers, pressure, and moisture were variables. Increasing surface deformation, decreasing pressure, and decreasing moisture increased time to breakdown. A model was deduced. The breakdown of the Cr2O3 layer was caused by a combination of growth stresses and volatilization. Breakdown exposed a chromium-depleted alloy to air, resulting in very rapid oxidation, which continued until consumption of the depletion zone was complete.

  3. Protein breakdown in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Marco

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly adaptive tissue, capable of altering muscle fiber size, functional capacity and metabolism in response to physiological stimuli. However, pathological conditions such as cancer growth compromise the mechanisms that regulate muscle homeostasis, resulting in loss of muscle mass, functional impairment and compromised metabolism. This tumor-induced condition is characterized by enhanced muscle protein breakdown and amino acids release that sustain liver gluconeogenesis and tissue protein synthesis. Proteolysis is controlled by the two most important cellular degradation systems, the ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy lysosome. These systems are carefully regulated by different signalling pathways that determine protein and organelle turnover. In this review we will describe the involvement of the ubiquitin proteasome and autophagy lysosome systems in cancer cachexia and the principal signalling pathways that regulate tumor-induced protein breakdown in muscle. PMID:26564688

  4. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  5. Proposed RF Breakdown Studies at the AWA

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; Power, J.G.; Spentzouris, L.; Yusof, Z.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2007-03-21

    A study of breakdown mechanism has been initiated at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA). Breakdown may include several factors such as local field enhancement, explosive electron emission, Ohmic heating, tensile stress produced by electric field, and others. The AWA is building a dedicated facility to test various models for breakdown mechanisms and to determine the roles of different factors in the breakdown. We plan to trigger breakdown events with a high-powered laser at various wavelengths (IR to UV) to determine the role of explosive electron emission in the breakdown process. Another experimental idea follows from the recent work on a Schottky-enabled photoemission in an RF photoinjector [1] that allows us to determine in situ the field enhancement factor on a cathode surface. Monitoring the field enhancement factor before and after the breakdown can shed some light on a number of observations such as the crater formation process.

  6. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  7. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  8. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harilal, S S; Yeak, J; Phillips, M C

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filament channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also explain the near absence of ion emission but strong atomic neutral emission from plumes produced during fs LIBS in air. PMID:26480372

  9. Domain wall mobility, stability and Walker breakdown in magnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougin, A.; Cormier, M.; Adam, J. P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Ferré, J.

    2007-06-01

    We present an analytical calculation of the velocity of a single 180° domain wall in a magnetic structure with reduced thickness and/or lateral dimension under the combined action of an external applied magnetic field and an electrical current. As for the case of field-induced domain wall propagation in thick films, two motion regimes with different mobilities are obtained, below and far above the so-called Walker field. Additionally, for the case of current induced motion, a Walker-like current density threshold is defined. The threshold field and current density, stating the wall's internal structure stability, differ from those in thick films; both are reduced by the same geometrical demagnetising factor which accounts for the confinement. This points out the fact that the velocity dependence over an extended field/current range and the knowledge of the Walker breakdown are mandatory to draw conclusions about the phenomenological Gilbert damping parameter tuning the magnetisation dynamics.

  10. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Bubbston-cluster structure under conditions of optical breakdown in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkin, N. F.; Lobeev, Alexander V.

    1994-04-01

    Earlier information on the bubbston-cluster structure of a liquid ('bubbston' is a stable microscopic gas bubble) is used in an analysis of two regimes of the optical breakdown of transparent liquids: steady-state and sporadic. Characteristic features of the sporadic breakdown regime are used to propose a new concept and to carry out measurements of the threshold intensity for the optical breakdown of a transparent liquid. It is shown that the temperature dependence of this intensity has a maximum and its dependence on the concentration of the dissolved electrolyte has a minimum.

  11. An AlGaN/GaN HEMT with enhanced breakdown and a near-zero breakdown voltage temperature coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Gang; Tang, Cen; Wang, Tao; Guo, Qing; Zhang, Bo; Sheng, Kuang; Wai, Tung Ng

    2013-02-01

    An AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with a novel source-connected air-bridge field plate (AFP) is experimentally verified. The device features a metal field plate that jumps from the source over the gate region and lands between the gate and drain. When compared to a similar size HEMT device with a conventional field plate (CFP) structure, the AFP not only minimizes the parasitic gate to source capacitance, but also exhibits higher OFF-state breakdown voltage and one order of magnitude lower drain leakage current. In a device with a gate to drain distance of 6 μm and a gate length of 0.8 μm, three times higher forward blocking voltage of 375 V was obtained at VGS = -5 V. In contrast, a similar sized HEMT with a CFP can only achieve a breakdown voltage no higher than 125 V using this process, regardless of device dimensions. Moreover, a temperature coefficient of 0 V/K for the breakdown voltage is observed. However, devices without a field plate (no FP) and with an optimized conventional field plate (CFP) exhibit breakdown voltage temperature coefficients of -0.113 V/K and -0.065 V/K, respectively.

  12. A study of vortex breakdown in supercritical fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, Loren C.

    The objective of this thesis is to evaluate the hydrodynamic stability theory of vortex breakdown by examining its presence in a swirling supercritical fluid jet. Supercritical fluids were chosen because they are technologically important, and because their strong density gradients near the critical point provide a self-excitable flow regime where hydrodynamic instabilities should be more easily identified. Computations were developed to provide flow conditions for experimental observation of vortex breakdown and to estimate hydrodynamic flow instabilities prior to testing. The RANS computations of an axial-plus-tangential air swirler were developed and verified as grid-independent and in agreement with experimental results reported in the literature. The computations also produced a correlation of momentum swirl number as a function of mass ratio (tangential/total) for estimating swirl number during experiments. Finally, the computations were extended to simulate supercritical CO2 in an axial-plus-tangential swirler that was compatible with the supercritical injection facility. Three mass flow ratio cases were investigated extensively: no-swirl (0%), low-swirl prior to breakdown (25%), and moderate swirl with breakdown (45%). (The three corresponding momentum swirl numbers for these mass flow ratios were 0.0, 0.30 and 0.80.) These three cases also served as the basis for the experimental portion of the work. Swirling supercritical fluid jets were observed in the injection facility using schlieren imaging for three separate swirl numbers. The Sobel method was used to locate the jet edges. The jets were characterized by their radii, including mean and standard deviation, and spreading angles as functions of swirl number and density ratio (2.3, 2.6, and 5.0). The swirl number was identified as the dominant parameter in determining the spreading angle and jet radius. Vortex breakdown was identified as the jet structure changed from straight edges to curved, signifying

  13. Breakdown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskowitz, Eva

    2006-01-01

    The multiplicity of ills facing the nation's public schools can depress even the most optimistic. In this article, the author presents her views about the school system and the negative effects that labor agreements have had on it. Her views on how to solve some seemingly intractable education problems have been informed by two experiences: her…

  14. Physical mechanisms for reduction of the breakdown voltage in the circuit of a rod lightning protector with an opening microswitch

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, Yu. K.; Zhuravkov, I. V.; Ostapenko, E. I.; Starikov, V. V.; Yurgelenas, Yu. V.

    2010-12-15

    The effect of air gap breakdown voltage reduction in the circuit with an opening microswitch is substantiated from the physical point of view. This effect can be used to increase the efficiency of lightning protection system with a rod lightning protector. The processes which take place in the electric circuit of a lightning protector with a microswitch during a voltage breakdown are investigated. Openings of the microswitch are shown to lead to resonance overvoltages in the dc circuit and, as a result, efficient reduction in the breakdown voltage in a lightning protector-thundercloud air gap.

  15. In vivo laser-induced breakdown in the rabbit eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Roach, William P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for femtosecond laser pulsewidths have been made for retinal minimum visible lesions (MVLs) in Dutch Belted rabbit and rhesus monkey eyes. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water have been measured and reported using an artificial eye. We have recorded on video the first LIB causing bubble formation in any eye in vivo using albino rabbit eyes (New Zealand white) with 120- femtosecond (fs) pulses and pulse energies as low as 5 microjoules ((mu) J). These bubbles were clearly formed anterior to the retina within the vitreous humor and, with 60 (mu) J of energy, they lasted for several seconds before disappearing and leaving no apparent damage to the retina. We believe this to be true LIB because of the lack of pigmentation or melanin granules within the albino rabbit eye (thus no absorptive elements) and because of the extremely high peak powers within the 5-(mu) J, 120-fs laser pulse. These high peak powers produce self-focusing of the pulse within the vitreous. The bubble formation at the breakdown site acts as a limiting mechanism for energy transmission and may explain why high-energy femotsecond pulses at energies up to 100 (mu) J sometimes do not cause severe damage in the pigmented rabbit eye. This fact may also explain why it is so difficult to produce hemorrhagic lesions in either the rabbit or primate eye with 100-fs laser pulses.

  16. Internal structure of a vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Leonard, A.; Spalart, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    An axisymmetric vortex breakdown was well simulated by the vortex filament method. The agreement with the experiment was qualitatively good. In particular, the structure in the interior of the vortex breakdown was ensured to a great degree by the present simulation. The second breakdown, or spiral type, which occurs downstream of the first axisymmetric breakdown, was simulated more similarly to the experiment than before. It shows a kink of the vortex filaments and strong three-dimensionality. Furthermore, a relatively low velocity region was observed near the second breakdown. It was also found that it takes some time for this physical phenomenon to attain its final stage. The comparison with the experiment is getting better as time goes on. In this paper, emphasis is placed on the comparison of the simulated results with the experiment. The present results help to make clear the mechanism of a vortex breakdown.

  17. On a criterion for vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, R. E.; Gatski, T. B.; Grosch, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    A criterion for the onset of vortex breakdown is proposed. Based upon previous experimental, computational, and theoretical studies, an appropriately defined local Rossby number is used to delineate the region where breakdown occurs. In addition, new numerical results are presented which further validate this criterion. A number of previous theoretical studies concentrating on inviscid standing-wave analyses for trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and reinterpreted in terms of the Rossby number criterion. Consistent with previous studies, the physical basis for the onset of breakdown is identified as the ability of the flow to sustain such waves. Previous computational results are reviewed and re-evaluated in terms of the proposed breakdown criterion. As a result, the cause of breakdown occurring near the inflow computational boundary, common to several numerical studies, is identified. Finally, previous experimental studies of vortex breakdown for both leading edge and trailing wing-tip vortices are reviewed and quantified in terms of the Rossby number criterion.

  18. Measurements of Intense Femtosecond Laser Pulse Propagation in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    Intense femtosecond pulses generated from chirped pulse amplification (CPA) lasers can deliver laser powers many times above the critical power for self-focusing in air. Catastrophic collapse of the laser pulse is usually prevented by the defocusing of the plasma column formed when the laser intensity gets above the threshold for multiphoton ionization. The resultant laser/plasma filament can extend many meters as the laser pulse propagates in the atmosphere. We have carried out a series of experiments both for understanding the formation mechanisms of the filaments and the nonlinear effects such as white light and harmonics generation associated with them. Many applications of these filaments such as remote atmospheric breakdown, laser induced electrical discharge and femtosecond laser material interactions require direct measurements of their characteristics. Direct measurements of these filaments had been difficult because the high laser intensity ( ˜10^13 W/cm^2) can damage practically any optical diagnostics. A novel technique was invented to obtain the first absolute measurements of laser energy, transverse profile, fluence and spectral content of the filaments. We are investigating a ``remote atmospheric breakdown'' concept of remotely sensing chemical and biological compounds. A short intense laser pulse can be generated at a remote position by using the group velocity dispersion (GVD) of the air to compress an initially long, frequency negatively chirped laser pulse to generate the air breakdown and filaments. We have observed that nonlinear contributions to the laser spectrum through self-phase modulation can lead to modification of the linear GVD compression. We have also observed the generation of ultraviolet (UV) radiations from these filaments in air and the induced fluorescence by the UV radiation of a surrogate biological agent. These and other results such as laser induced electrical discharges will be presented.

  19. Time dependent breakdown in silicon dioxide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svensson, C.; Shumka, A.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted regarding the possible existence of a time-dependent breakdown mechanism in thermal oxides of the type used as gate oxide in MOS circuits. Questions of device fabrication are discussed along with details concerning breakdown measurements and the determination of C-V characteristics. A relatively large prebreakdown current observed in one of the cases is related to the time-dependent breakdown.

  20. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2015-06-12

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of high voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.

  1. A study of dielectric breakdown along insulators surrounding conductors in liquid argon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lockwitz, Sarah; Jostlein, Hans

    2016-03-22

    High voltage breakdown in liquid argon is an important concern in the design of liquid argon time projection chambers, which are often used as neutrino and dark matter detectors. We have made systematic measurements of breakdown voltages in liquid argon along insulators surrounding negative rod electrodes where the breakdown is initiated at the anode. The measurements were performed in an open cryostat filled with commercial grade liquid argon exposed to air, and not the ultra-pure argon required for electron drift. While not addressing all high voltage concerns in liquid argon, these measurements have direct relevance to the design of highmore » voltage feedthroughs especially for averting the common problem of flash-over breakdown. The purpose of these tests is to understand the effects of materials, of breakdown path length, and of surface topology for this geometry and setup. We have found that the only material-specific effects are those due to their permittivity. We have found that the breakdown voltage has no dependence on the length of the exposed insulator. Lastly, a model for the breakdown mechanism is presented that can help inform future designs.« less

  2. Relativistic breakdown in planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2007-04-15

    In 2003, a new electrical breakdown mechanism involving the production of runaway avalanches by positive feedback from runaway positrons and energetic photons was introduced. This mechanism, which shall be referred to as 'relativistic feedback', allows runaway discharges in gases to become self-sustaining, dramatically increasing the flux of runaway electrons, the accompanying high-energy radiation, and resulting ionization. Using detailed Monte Carlo calculations, properties of relativistic feedback are investigated. It is found that once relativistic feedback fully commences, electrical breakdown will occur and the ambient electric field, extending over cubic kilometers, will be discharged in as little as 2x10{sup -5} s. Furthermore, it is found that the flux of energetic electrons and x rays generated by this mechanism can exceed the flux generated by the standard relativistic runaway electron model by a factor of 10{sup 13}, making relativistic feedback a good candidate for explaining terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and other high-energy phenomena observed in the Earth's atmosphere.

  3. Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide program/project teams necessary instruction and guidance in the best practices for Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS dictionary development and use for project implementation and management control. This handbook can be used for all types of NASA projects and work activities including research, development, construction, test and evaluation, and operations. The products of these work efforts may be hardware, software, data, or service elements (alone or in combination). The aim of this document is to assist project teams in the development of effective work breakdown structures that provide a framework of common reference for all project elements. The WBS and WBS dictionary are effective management processes for planning, organizing, and administering NASA programs and projects. The guidance contained in this document is applicable to both in-house, NASA-led effort and contracted effort. It assists management teams from both entities in fulfilling necessary responsibilities for successful accomplishment of project cost, schedule, and technical goals. Benefits resulting from the use of an effective WBS include, but are not limited to: providing a basis for assigned project responsibilities, providing a basis for project schedule development, simplifying a project by dividing the total work scope into manageable units, and providing a common reference for all project communication.

  4. Optimization of HPM device parameters for maximum air transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Tunnell, T.

    1993-02-01

    The propagation of high-power microwave (HPM) pulses through the atmosphere is a subject that has received renewed attention in the last decade. For sufficiently high-power pulses it is possible for air breakdown to be initiated by the front end of the pulse and for ohmic dissipation of the tail end to proceed as the tail propagates through the newly created plasma. Generally, this nonlinear process termed tail erosion is modeled with time-dependent fluid or kinetic codes that require a fine mesh of range and time points. The computational time to run these codes, however, precludes their use in determining theoptimum pulse characteristics and propagation paths for transmission of a desired fluence. In this paper a new frequency scaling law that greatly reduces computational requirements and at the same time incorporates the nonlinear effects inherent to HPM propagation is discussed. Results of a comparison between predictions of air breakdown thresholds made using the frequency scaling law and experimental data taken at various frequencies are presented. The scaling law is implemented in an existing HPM propagation code and has been used recently to develop a new predictive capability that calculates the optimum energy, power, and antenna requirements necessary to transmit a desired fluence. These capabilities provide both the accuracy and rapid computational turnaround necessary for system studies that assess the effects of HPM propagation for particular HPM devices and that attempt to open device parameters for maximum air transmission. Samples of both forward propagation, predictive calculations and inverse, optimization calculations are presented.

  5. Optimization of HPM device parameters for maximum air transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R. ); Tunnell, T. )

    1993-01-01

    The propagation of high-power microwave (HPM) pulses through the atmosphere is a subject that has received renewed attention in the last decade. For sufficiently high-power pulses it is possible for air breakdown to be initiated by the front end of the pulse and for ohmic dissipation of the tail end to proceed as the tail propagates through the newly created plasma. Generally, this nonlinear process termed tail erosion is modeled with time-dependent fluid or kinetic codes that require a fine mesh of range and time points. The computational time to run these codes, however, precludes their use in determining theoptimum pulse characteristics and propagation paths for transmission of a desired fluence. In this paper a new frequency scaling law that greatly reduces computational requirements and at the same time incorporates the nonlinear effects inherent to HPM propagation is discussed. Results of a comparison between predictions of air breakdown thresholds made using the frequency scaling law and experimental data taken at various frequencies are presented. The scaling law is implemented in an existing HPM propagation code and has been used recently to develop a new predictive capability that calculates the optimum energy, power, and antenna requirements necessary to transmit a desired fluence. These capabilities provide both the accuracy and rapid computational turnaround necessary for system studies that assess the effects of HPM propagation for particular HPM devices and that attempt to open device parameters for maximum air transmission. Samples of both forward propagation, predictive calculations and inverse, optimization calculations are presented.

  6. Pausing at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Patrick K.

    2015-01-01

    Since about 2003, the notion of threshold concepts--the central ideas in any field that change how learners think about other ideas--have become difficult to escape at library conferences and in general information literacy discourse. Their visibility will likely only increase because threshold concepts figure prominently in the Framework for…

  7. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  8. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  9. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  10. Note: A novel technique for analysis of aqueous solutions by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rusak, D. A.; Bell, Z. T.; Anthony, T. P.

    2015-11-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates typically consist of gold or silver nanoparticles deposited on a non-conductive substrate. In Raman spectroscopy, the nanoparticles produce an enhancement of the electromagnetic field which, in turn, leads to greater electronic excitation of molecules in the local environment. Here, we show that these same surfaces can be used to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio obtained in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of aqueous solutions. In this case, the SERS substrates not only lower breakdown thresholds and lead to more efficient plasma initiation but also provide an appropriately wettable surface for the deposition of the liquid. We refer to this technique as surface-enhanced laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  11. Breakdown Limits on Gigavolt-per-Meter Electron-Beam-Driven Wakefields in Dielectric Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.; Badakov, H.; Cook, A.M.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Tikhoplav, R.; Travish, G.; Blumenfeld, I.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Muggli, P.; Scott, A.; Yoder, R.B.; /Manhattan Coll., Riverdale

    2008-06-17

    First measurements of the breakdown threshold in a dielectric subjected to GV/m wakefields produced by short (30-330 fs), 28.5 GeV electron bunches have been made. Fused silica tubes of 100 {micro}m inner diameter were exposed to a range of bunch lengths, allowing surface dielectric fields up to 27 GV/m to be generated. The onset of breakdown, detected through light emission from the tube ends, is observed to occur when the peak electric field at the dielectric surface reaches 13.8 {+-} 0.7 GV/m. The correlation of structure damage to beam-induced breakdown is established using an array of postexposure inspection techniques.

  12. 40 CFR 98.151 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING HCFC-22 Production and HFC-23 Destruction § 98.151 Reporting threshold... HFC-23 destruction process and the facility meets the requirements of either § 98.2(a)(1) or (a)(2)....

  13. 40 CFR 98.431 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.431 Section 98.431 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Importers and Exporters of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Contained in...

  14. 40 CFR 98.301 - Reporting threshold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting threshold. 98.301 Section 98.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electrical Transmission and Distribution Equipment Use § 98.301...

  15. Seeded optical breakdown of molecular and noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Polynkin, Pavel; Scheller, Maik; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2012-07-30

    We report experimental results on the dual laser-pulse plasma excitation in various gases at atmospheric pressure. Dilute plasma channels generated through filamentation of ultraintense femtosecond laser pulses in air, argon, and helium are densified through the application of multi-Joule nanosecond heater pulses. Optical breakdown in atomic gases can be achieved for considerably longer delays between femtosecond and nanosecond pulses compared to that in molecular gases. The densification of the seed channel in molecular gases is always accompanied by its fragmentation into discrete bubbles, while in atomic gases the densified channel remains smooth and continuous.

  16. Distribution Characteristics of Normal Pure-Tone Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard H.; Popelka, Gerald R.; Eikelboom, Robert H.; Swanepoel, De Wet; Saly, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined the statistical properties of normal air-conduction thresholds obtained with automated and manual audiometry to test the hypothesis that thresholds are normally distributed and to examine the distributions for evidence of bias in manual testing. Design Four databases were mined for normal thresholds. One contained audiograms obtained with an automated method. The other three were obtained with manual audiometry. Frequency distributions were examined for four test frequencies (250, 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz). Study Sample The analysis is based on 317,569 threshold determinations of 80,547 subjects from four clinical databases. Results Frequency distributions of thresholds obtained with automated audiometry are normal in form. Corrected for age, the mean thresholds are within 1.5 dB of Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Levels. Frequency distributions of thresholds obtained by manual audiometry are shifted toward higher thresholds. Two of the three datasets obtained by manual audiometry are positively skewed. Conclusions The positive shift and skew of the manual audiometry data may result from tester bias. The striking scarcity of thresholds below 0 dB HL suggests that audiologists place less importance on identifying low thresholds than they do for higher-level thresholds. We refer to this as the Good Enough Bias and suggest that it may be responsible for differences in distributions of thresholds obtained by automated and manual audiometry. PMID:25938502

  17. Scintillation Breakdowns in Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Scintillations in solid tantalum capacitors are momentarily local breakdowns terminated by a self-healing or conversion to a high-resistive state of the manganese oxide cathode. This conversion effectively caps the defective area of the tantalum pentoxide dielectric and prevents short-circuit failures. Typically, this type of breakdown has no immediate catastrophic consequences and is often considered as nuisance rather than a failure. Scintillation breakdowns likely do not affect failures of parts under surge current conditions, and so-called "proofing" of tantalum chip capacitors, which is a controllable exposure of the part after soldering to voltages slightly higher than the operating voltage to verify that possible scintillations are self-healed, has been shown to improve the quality of the parts. However, no in-depth studies of the effect of scintillations on reliability of tantalum capacitors have been performed so far. KEMET is using scintillation breakdown testing as a tool for assessing process improvements and to compare quality of different manufacturing lots. Nevertheless, the relationship between failures and scintillation breakdowns is not clear, and this test is not considered as suitable for lot acceptance testing. In this work, scintillation breakdowns in different military-graded and commercial tantalum capacitors were characterized and related to the rated voltages and to life test failures. A model for assessment of times to failure, based on distributions of breakdown voltages, and accelerating factors of life testing are discussed.

  18. Breakdown characteristics of xenon HID Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia; Sato, Ayumu; Brates, Nanu; Noro, Koji; Kushner, Mark

    2009-10-01

    The breakdown characteristics of mercury free xenon high intensity discharge (HID) lamps exhibit a large statistical time lag often having a large scatter in breakdown voltages. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the processes which determine the ignition voltages for positive and negative pulses in commercial HID lamps having fill pressures of up to 20 atm. Steep voltage rise results in higher avalanche electron densities and earlier breakdown times. Circuit characteristics also play a role. Large ballast resistors may limit current to the degree that breakdown is quenched. The breakdown voltage critically depends on cathode charge injection by electric field emission (or other mechanisms) which in large part controls the statistical time lag for breakdown. For symmetric lamps, ionization waves (IWs) simultaneously develop from the bottom and top electrodes. Breakdown typically occurs when the top and bottom IWs converge. Condensed salt layers having small conductivities on the inner walls of HID lamps and on the electrodes can influence the ignition behavior. With these layers, IWs tend to propagate along the inner wall and exhibit a different structure depending on the polarity.

  19. Experimental study on GaP surface damage threshold induced by a high repetition rate femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yi; Liu Feng; Li Yanfeng; Chai Lu; Xing Qirong; Hu Minglie; Wang Chingyue

    2011-05-01

    The surface damage threshold of undoped bulk <110> GaP induced by a high repetition rate femtosecond pulse at 1040 nm with a duration of 61 fs was studied. The threshold value was obtained by a linear fit of the incident single pulse fluence and was confirmed with a breakdown test around the threshold level. The result will be useful in high intensity, high repetition rate laser applications and ultrafast processes.

  20. Gas breakdown and secondary electron yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marić, Dragana; Savić, Marija; Sivoš, Jelena; Škoro, Nikola; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija; Malović, Gordana; Petrović, Zoran Lj.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we present a systematic study of the gas breakdown potentials. An analysis of the key elementary processes in low-current low-pressure discharges is given, with an aim to illustrate how such discharges are used to determine swarm parameters and how such data may be applied to modeling discharges. Breakdown data obtained in simple parallel-plate geometry are presented for a number of atomic and molecular gases. Ionization coefficients, secondary electron yields and their influence on breakdown are analyzed, with special attention devoted to non-hydrodynamic conditions near cathode.

  1. Breakdown of Benford's law for birth data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, M.; Herteliu, C.; Ileanu, B.

    2015-02-01

    Long birth time series for Romania are investigated from Benford's law point of view, distinguishing between families with a religious (Orthodox and Non-Orthodox) affiliation. The data extend from Jan. 01, 1905 till Dec. 31, 2001, i.e. over 97 years or 35 429 days. The results point to a drastic breakdown of Benford's law. Some interpretation is proposed, based on the statistical aspects due to population sizes, rather than on human thought constraints when the law breakdown is usually expected. Benford's law breakdown clearly points to natural causes.

  2. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  3. Breakdown in a bulk of transparent solids under irradiation of a nanosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Z. U.; Grigorov, Y. V.; Tran, K. A.; Janulewicz, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    A single pulse of a nanosecond laser was tightly focused in the bulk of transparent materials (soda lime glass, borosilicate glass, fused silica , sapphire and Gorilla Glass) to a beam spot diameter of ~ 2.1μm. A value of the total energy absorbed in the materials was measured with corrections for the transmitted, scattered and reflected components of the incident energy. It was found that 3-11% of the incident radiation was scattered but the total absorption still achieved a very high level of up to 88%. Absorptance dependence on the incident fluence was reasonably approximated by the sigmoidal Hill function. Here we suggest using this analytical description to identify empirical intrinsic laser-induced breakdown threshold (LIBT). Optical damage threshold (ODT) was identified by optical inspection. The results for some materials suggest significantly lower breakdown threshold than that reported earlier for more loosely focused beams. A study of the damage area morphology with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high resolution transmission microscope (HRTEM) revealed existence of the shock waves-affected area with a localized nano-crystallization. Spectroscopic study of the light emission accompanying breakdown showed typical quasi-continuum emission with temperature as high as 8917K (0.8 eV).

  4. Design of external insulation for VLF/LF bands via breakdown investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Sanabria, Doeg

    This document reports about the role of humidity and frequency upon the breakdown of air in uniform and non-uniform electric fields for the Very Low and Low Frequency (VLF/LF) Bands (10-100 kHz), used for long distance communication. Experiments were conducted using a parallel plane configuration for a gap length range of 5-52.5 mm and a frequency range of 18-52 kHz and 60 Hz. Rod/rod and rod/plane configurations were tested at 60 Hz and 30 kHz, for a gap length range of 8-1000 mm. The results indicate that the breakdown voltage at 30 kHz is affected by humidity with varying impact based on gap configuration and length. The results show that breakdown voltage at VLF/LF decreases with humidity for uniform field gaps, opposite to that observed at 60 Hz. Short (8-45 mm) non-uniform gaps show a reduction in the breakdown voltage with humidity, while no significant variation is observed for long gaps (125-1000 mm). Breakdown voltages are observed to be markedly lower for 30 kHz when compared to the same gap at 60 Hz. The observed breakdown phenomena are explained in terms of increased space charge due to the higher frequencies. Models and humidity correction to estimate breakdown voltages at VLF/LF frequencies for uniform and non-uniform configurations were developed. Electric field simulation, space charge calculation and least squares regression were used. The models are shown to be useful for predicting breakdown voltages at VLF/LF for uniform field gap spacings up to 125 mm and nonuniform field gap spacings up to 4 m.

  5. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  6. Construction of a Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Joseph; Palmer, Andria; Amos, James; Dynka, Tom; Ujj, Lazlo

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a practical spectroscopy to determine the chemical and atomic composition of materials. The third harmonic output of a Nd:YAG Q-switched laser generating 5ns pulses with 10Hz repetition rate was used to ablate the sample and create a micro-plasma. The emission of the radiating plasma was focused into an optical fiber with 0.22 numerical aperture. The spectra was measured with an Ocean Optics micro spectrometer. A synchronized shutter was used to select single laser pulses. In order to reach the breakdown threshold of the sample using the available energy of the laser pulses (<5 mJ) a beam expander and a parabolic mirror was used for tight focusing. The optical and technical details including the characterization of the system will be presented. LIBS spectra taken from a variety of metal and organic samples show appropriate selectivity for quantitative and qualitative analysis for materials. UWF NIH MARC U-STAR 1T34GM110517-01, UWF Office of Undergraduate Research.

  7. Detection of early caries by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasazawa, Shuhei; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    To improve sensitivity of dental caries detection by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis, it is proposed to utilize emission peaks in the ultraviolet. We newly focused on zinc whose emission peaks exist in ultraviolet because zinc exists at high concentration in the outer layer of enamel. It was shown that by using ratios between heights of an emission peak of Zn and that of Ca, the detection sensitivity and stability are largely improved. It was also shown that early caries are differentiated from healthy part by properly setting a threshold in the detected ratios. The proposed caries detection system can be applied to dental laser systems such as ones based on Er:YAG-lasers. When ablating early caries part by laser light, the system notices the dentist that the ablation of caries part is finished. We also show the intensity of emission peaks of zinc decreased with ablation with Er:YAG laser light.

  8. Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children Adopted After Early Care Breakdown.

    PubMed

    Green, Jonathan; Leadbitter, Kathy; Kay, Catherine; Sharma, Kishan

    2016-04-01

    Syndromic autism has been described in children adopted after orphanage rearing. We investigated whether the same existed in children adopted after family breakdown. Families of 54/60 adopted children aged 6-11 years (mean 102 months; SD 20; 45 % male) returned screening questionnaires for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); 21/54 (39 %) screened positive. Detailed in-person phenotyping of screen positive cases showed ASD in 6/54 (11 %), Broad ASD (sub threshold traits) in 10/54 (18.5 %); 5/54 (9 %) screened false positive. The ASD group showed impairments across both social communication and restrictive repetitive behaviour domains, Broad ASD was more mixed. These rates, much higher than population prevalence, are comparable with institutionalised samples. There are implications for developmental science, and assessment, treatment and policy for adopted children. PMID:26739357

  9. Numerical modeling of the electrical breakdown and discharge properties of laser-generated plasma channels.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Tz B; Ladouceur, H D; Baronavski, A P

    2007-12-01

    An extensive nonequilibrium steady-state kinetics model incorporating collisional and radiative processes is developed to study the electrical breakdown and discharge maintenance of laser-induced atmospheric plasma channels formed in externally applied electric fields. The model is based upon a self-consistent numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function coupled with the electron energy balance equation and the population balance equations for electrons and air species. Using the electron energy distribution function, the ionization and electron attachment rates as a function of the reduced applied electric field at different degrees of ionization are calculated. We find that the ionization rate as a function of applied electric field in a laser-induced plasma channel is orders of magnitude larger than that obtained for a natural atmospheric air discharge. Therefore, the electrical breakdown of these plasma channels may occur at significantly lower applied electric fields. The present model predicts a breakdown electric field of 10kVcm , while the experimentally determined breakdown field strength is approximately 5.7kVcm [A. P. Baronavski, NRL Memorandum Report No. NRL/MR/6110-02-8642, 2002 (unpublished)], a reduction of about a factor of 5 from the natural Paschen electrical breakdown field of approximately 30kVcm . PMID:18233930

  10. Microwave cavity diagnostics of microwave breakdown plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eckstrom, D.J.; Williams, M.S.

    1989-08-01

    We have performed microwave cavity perturbation measurements in the LLNL AIM facility using a 329-MHz cavity that allow us to examine in detail the plasma formation and decay processes for electron densities between approximately 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 7}/cm{sup 3}. We believe these to be the lowest density plasmas ever studied in microwave breakdown experiments, and as such they allow us to determine the power and energy required to produce plasmas suitable for HF radar reflection as well as the effective lifetimes of these plasmas before re-ionization is required. Analyses of these results leads to the following conclusions. (1) For microwave breakdown pulses varying from 0.6 to 2.4 {mu}s, the threshold power required to produce measurable plasmas is 30 to 12 MW/m{sup 2} at 0.01 torr, decreasing to 3.5 to 1.8 MW/m{sup 2} at 1 to 3 torr, and then increasing to 5 to 3.5 MW/m{sup 2} at 30 torr. The threshold power in each case decreases with increasing pulse length, but the required pulse energy increases with decreasing power or increasing pulse length. (2) The effective electron density decay rates are approximately 100/s for 0.1 to 1 torr, after which they increase linearly with pressure. Thus, the useful plasma lifetimes are in the range of 20 to 40 ms at the lower pressures and decrease to about 1 ms at 30 torr. These decay rates and lifetimes are comparable to those that would exist for artificially ionized regions in the upper atmosphere. (3) The collision frequencies measured at pressures of 1 torr and above correspond to electron temperatures of 800 K or less. In fact, the inferred temperatures for p > 3 torr are below room temperature. This may be due to a contribution to the measured conductivity by negative ions.

  11. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  12. Breakdown-Resistant RF Connectors for Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caro, Edward R.; Bonazza, Walter J.

    1987-01-01

    Resilient inserts compensate for insulation shrinkage. Coaxial-cable connector for radio-frequency (RF) energy resists electrical breakdown in vacuum. Used on RF equipment in vacuum chambers as well as in spaceborne radar and communication gear.

  13. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Optical breakdown of quartz glass by XeF laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosov, A. V.; Barabanov, V. S.; Gerasimov, S. Yu; Morozov, Nikolai V.; Sergeev, P. B.; Stepanchuk, V. N.

    1994-04-01

    The bulk optical strengths of KU1 and KUVI quartz glasses were determined for pulses of 85 ns duration at the wavelength of 353 nm. The damage thresholds of these materials were the same and amounted to 280 GW cm-2. The optical breakdown thresholds of KU1 at λ = 248 nm and λ = 193 nm, obtained earlier for the same samples under otherwise identical conditions, were used together with the present results to plot the wavelength dependence of the damage threshold of this material. These results showed that nonlinear absorption is the main mechanism responsible for damage to quartz glass in high-intensity ultraviolet laser radiation fields.

  14. Contributions to theory of vortex breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivamoggi, B. K.; Uberoi, M. S.

    A study is made of vortex breakdown in stratified flows, and it is found that a positive stratification in the vortex where the density is increasing away from the axis, postpones the vortex breakdown and vice versa. This is apparent due to the density increasing in a direction opposite to that of an effective gravity which would correspond to a topheavy arrangement under gravity. It is also shown that a wavemotion promotes the possibility of axisymmetric flow downstream of the transaction.

  15. Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

  16. Spark gap with low breakdown voltage jitter

    DOEpatents

    Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.

    1996-04-23

    Novel spark gap devices and electrodes are disclosed. The novel spark gap devices and electrodes are suitable for use in a variety of spark gap device applications. The shape of the electrodes gives rise to local field enhancements and reduces breakdown voltage jitter. Breakdown voltage jitter of approximately 5% has been measured in spark gaps according the invention. Novel electrode geometries and materials are disclosed. 13 figs.

  17. Spark gap with low breakdown voltage jitter

    DOEpatents

    Rohwein, Gerald J.; Roose, Lars D.

    1996-01-01

    Novel spark gap devices and electrodes are disclosed. The novel spark gap devices and electrodes are suitable for use in a variety of spark gap device applications. The shape of the electrodes gives rise to local field enhancements and reduces breakdown voltage jitter. Breakdown voltage jitter of approximately 5% has been measured in spark gaps according the invention. Novel electrode geometries and materials are disclosed.

  18. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lucia, Frank C.; Harmon, Russell S.; McNesby, Kevin L.; Winkel, Raymond J.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2003-10-01

    A number of energetic materials and explosives have been studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). They include black powder, neat explosives such as TNT, PETN, HMX, and RDX (in various forms), propellants such as M43 and JA2, and military explosives such as C4 and LX-14. Each of these materials gives a unique spectrum, and generally the spectra are reproducible shot to shot. We observed that the laser-produced microplasma did not initiate any of the energetic materials studied. Extensive studies of black powder and its ingredients by use of a reference spectral library have demonstrated excellent accuracy for unknown identification. Finally, we observed that these nitrogen- and oxygen-rich materials yield LIBS spectra in air that have correspondingly different O:N peak ratios compared with air. This difference can help in the detection and identification of such energetic materials.

  19. Off-axis vortex breakdown in a shallow whirlpool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.; López-Herrera, José María

    2013-06-01

    The off-axis emergence of vortex breakdown (VB) is revealed. The steady axisymmetric flow in a vertical sealed cylinder, which is partially filled with water and the rest is filled with air, is driven by the rotating bottom disk. The numerical simulations show that VB can emerge away from the rotation axis, interface, and walls. As the rotation intensifies, VB first develops in the water region. If the water height is less (larger) than nearly one half of the cylinder radius, VB emerges off (on) the axis. As the rotation further increases, the off-axis VB ring touches the interface and then a thin countercirculation layer develops in the air flow above the water VB domain. This two-fluid VB ring shrinks (it even disappears in a very shallow whirlpool) as the interface approaches the bottom disk.

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of energetic materials.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Frank C; Harmon, Russell S; McNesby, Kevin L; Winkel, Raymond J; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2003-10-20

    A number of energetic materials and explosives have been studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). They include black powder, neat explosives such as TNT, PETN, HMX, and RDX (in various forms), propellants such as M43 and JA2, and military explosives such as C4 and LX-14. Each of these materials gives a unique spectrum, and generally the spectra are reproducible shot to shot. We observed that the laser-produced microplasma did not initiate any of the energetic materials studied. Extensive studies of black powder and its ingredients by use of a reference spectral library have demonstrated excellent accuracy for unknown identification. Finally, we observed that these nitrogen- and oxygen-rich materials yield LIBS spectra in air that have correspondingly different O:N peak ratios compared with air. This difference can help in the detection and identification of such energetic materials. PMID:14594077

  1. Humidity effects on wire insulation breakdown strength.

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Leah

    2013-08-01

    Methods for the testing of the dielectric breakdown strength of insulation on metal wires under variable humidity conditions were developed. Two methods, an ASTM method and the twisted pair method, were compared to determine if the twisted pair method could be used for determination of breakdown strength under variable humidity conditions. It was concluded that, although there were small differences in outcomes between the two testing methods, the non-standard method (twisted pair) would be appropriate to use for further testing of the effects of humidity on breakdown performance. The dielectric breakdown strength of 34G copper wire insulated with double layer Poly-Thermaleze/Polyamide-imide insulation was measured using the twisted pair method under a variety of relative humidity (RH) conditions and exposure times. Humidity at 50% RH and below was not found to affect the dielectric breakdown strength. At 80% RH the dielectric breakdown strength was significantly diminished. No effect for exposure time up to 140 hours was observed at 50 or 80%RH.

  2. Yield threshold decision framework

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.R.; Younker, L.W.; Hannon, W.J.

    1989-08-17

    The USA is developing a decision analysis framework for evaluating the relative value of lower yield thresholds and related verification policies. The framework facilitates systematic analysis of the major issues in the yield threshold decision. The framework can be used to evaluate options proposed either in the inter-agency process or in the negotiations. In addition, the framework can measure the importance of uncertainties and alternative judgments, and thereby determine the advantages of additional research. Since the model is explicit and quantitative, it provides a rational, defensible approach for reaching important treaty and verification decisions. 9 figs.

  3. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury, scald, or other injury....

  4. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563....1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury....

  5. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury, scald, or other injury....

  6. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563....1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy soft rot, leak, or wet breakdown following freezing injury....

  7. A computational study of the topology of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations has been performed. Solutions to four distinct types of breakdown are identified and compared with experimental results. The computed solutions include weak helical, double helix, spiral, and bubble-type breakdowns. The topological structure of the various breakdowns as well as their interrelationship are studied. The data reveal that the asymmetric modes of breakdown may be subject to additional breakdowns as the vortex core evolves in the streamwise direction. The solutions also show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown.

  8. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  9. Dielectric breakdown in mineral oil ITO 100 based magnetic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudelcik, J.; Bury, P.; Kopcansky, P.; Timko, M.

    The development of dielectric breakdown and the DC dielectric breakdown voltage of magnetic fluids based on inhibited transformer oil ITO 100 were investigated in parallel orientations of external magnetic field. It was shown that the breakdown voltage is strongly influenced by the magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic fluids with the volume concentration 1and 0.2% had better dielectric properties than pure transformer oil. The increase of breakdown voltage was interpreted on the base of the bubble theory of breakdown.

  10. Wavelength dependence of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown in water and implications for laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linz, Norbert; Freidank, Sebastian; Liang, Xiao-Xuan; Vogel, Alfred

    2016-07-01

    The wavelength dependence of the threshold for femtosecond optical breakdown in water provides information on the interplay of multiphoton, tunneling, and avalanche ionization and is of interest for parameter selection in laser surgery. We measured the bubble threshold from ultraviolet to near-infrared wavelengths and found a continuous decrease of the irradiance threshold with increasing wavelength λ . Results are compared to the predictions of a numerical model that assumes a band gap of 9.5 eV and considers the existence of a separate initiation channel via excitation of valence band electrons into a solvated state followed by rapid upconversion into the conduction band. Fits to experimental data yield an electron collision time of ≈1 fs and an estimate for the capacity of the initiation channel. Using that collision time, the breakdown dynamics were explored up to λ = 2 μ m . The irradiance threshold first continues to decrease but levels out for wavelengths longer than 1.3 μ m . This opens promising perspectives for laser surgery at wavelengths around 1.3 and 1.7 μ m , which are attractive because of their large penetration depth into scattering tissues.

  11. Study on statistical breakdown delay time in argon gas using a W-band millimeter-wave gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongsung; Kim, Sung Gug; Sawant, Ashwini; Yu, Dongho; Choe, MunSeok; Choi, EunMi

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigated plasma initiation delay times for argon volume breakdown at the W-band frequency regime. The threshold electric field is defined as the minimum electric field amplitude needed for plasma breakdown at various pressures. The measured statistical delay time showed an excellent agreement with the theoretical Gaussian distribution and the theoretically estimated formative delay time. Also, we demonstrated that the normalized effective electric field as a function of the product of pressure and formative time shows an outstanding agreement to that of 1D particle-in-cell simulation coupled with a Monte Carlo collision model [H. C. Kim and J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Plasmas 13, 123506 (2006)].

  12. Vortex Breakdown in Atmospheric Columnar Vortices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugt, H. J.

    1989-12-01

    Vortex breakdown occurs in tornadoes and waterspouts. This phenomenon may give information on the state and future behavior of those whirlwinds. Because of the rarity of recorded events, archival sources are consulted for qualitative descriptions from earlier times and compared with contemporary sources. Drawings and eyewitness reports from earlier times, rare photographs, movies, and observations from recent years indicate the occurrence of vortex breakdown in tornadoes and waterspouts near the ground, in the midsection of the funnel, and close to or inside the parent cloud. Since the contour of the whirlwind's funnel is delineated only by markers in the form of condensates, dust, or other debris, these markers may distort or obscure the evidence of vortex breakdown. This is a likely reason for the rare observation and identification of vortex breakdown which might be more common in whirlwinds than has been previously thought. According to the records examined, meteorologists deserve the honor for discovering and describing vortex breakdown long before the systematic investigation of recent years.

  13. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-12-21

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  14. Formation of extended directional breakdown channels produced by a copper wire exploding in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonov, V. V.; Pletnev, N. V.

    2013-12-01

    Experimental data for switching initiated by the electrical breakdown of air gaps up to 1.9 m long with an arbitrary geometry that are produced by an exploding copper wire 90 μm in diameter are presented. At an initial voltage of 11 kV, the stored energy equals 100-2100 J. Two channel formation conditions are possible: explosion of a wire without electrical breakdown and electrical breakdown in a channel produced by an exploding wire with a delay (current pause) no longer than 250 μs. Current and voltage waveforms across the discharge gap, as well as the resistivity values, under the electrical breakdown conditions are shown. Mechanisms and conditions for streamer initiation at a mean electric field strength in the discharge gap of 5.3-17.0 kV/m are discussed. The geometrical dimensions of plasma objects in the forming channel, the run of the electrical current under breakdown, and the formation mechanism of wire explosion products are found from color microphotographs. The formation mechanism of large aerosols in the form of tiny spherical copper and copper oxide (CuO, Cu2O) particles under wire explosion conditions is discussed.

  15. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  16. Elaborating on threshold concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-09-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account for both the important and the problematic characteristics of TCs in terms of the Knowledge/Strategies/Mental Models Framework defined in previous work.

  17. Importance of boundary conditions for breakdown in the helium RF discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, M.E.; Greenberg, K.E.; Hebner, G.A.

    1992-12-01

    The authors Boltzmann equation theory and computational procedures can be used effectively for transient plasma simulations. The simulations indicate that various secondary electron emission processes at the electrode surfaces can greatly influence both the low-density plasma growth rate when an rf discharge is initiated, as well as the steady-state plasma density. The authors have compared the simulation results with experimental measurements of the threshold for rf breakdown in a {open_quotes}GEC Reference Cell,{close_quotes} (the threshold being defined as the voltage required to initiate a discharge at a given pressure). The Boltzmann simulations, which include a full five-level model of the Helium atom, do not predict a self-sustaining discharge at the correct threshold when secondary electron production from ion bombardment is the only process included. Secondary emission at the electrodes from both metastable and electron surface interactions must be included to achieve agreement with the experimental results for helium.

  18. Picosecond Electric-Field-Induced Threshold Switching in Phase-Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Zalden, Peter; Shu, Michael J; Chen, Frank; Wu, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Yi; Wen, Haidan; Johnston, Scott; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Landreman, Patrick; Brongersma, Mark; Fong, Scott W; Wong, H-S Philip; Sher, Meng-Ju; Jost, Peter; Kaes, Matthias; Salinga, Martin; von Hoegen, Alexander; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M

    2016-08-01

    Many chalcogenide glasses undergo a breakdown in electronic resistance above a critical field strength. Known as threshold switching, this mechanism enables field-induced crystallization in emerging phase-change memory. Purely electronic as well as crystal nucleation assisted models have been employed to explain the electronic breakdown. Here, picosecond electric pulses are used to excite amorphous Ag_{4}In_{3}Sb_{67}Te_{26}. Field-dependent reversible changes in conductivity and pulse-driven crystallization are observed. The present results show that threshold switching can take place within the electric pulse on subpicosecond time scales-faster than crystals can nucleate. This supports purely electronic models of threshold switching and reveals potential applications as an ultrafast electronic switch. PMID:27541475

  19. Picosecond Electric-Field-Induced Threshold Switching in Phase-Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalden, Peter; Shu, Michael J.; Chen, Frank; Wu, Xiaoxi; Zhu, Yi; Wen, Haidan; Johnston, Scott; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Landreman, Patrick; Brongersma, Mark; Fong, Scott W.; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Sher, Meng-Ju; Jost, Peter; Kaes, Matthias; Salinga, Martin; von Hoegen, Alexander; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2016-08-01

    Many chalcogenide glasses undergo a breakdown in electronic resistance above a critical field strength. Known as threshold switching, this mechanism enables field-induced crystallization in emerging phase-change memory. Purely electronic as well as crystal nucleation assisted models have been employed to explain the electronic breakdown. Here, picosecond electric pulses are used to excite amorphous Ag4In3Sb67Te26 . Field-dependent reversible changes in conductivity and pulse-driven crystallization are observed. The present results show that threshold switching can take place within the electric pulse on subpicosecond time scales—faster than crystals can nucleate. This supports purely electronic models of threshold switching and reveals potential applications as an ultrafast electronic switch.

  20. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-28

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ∼30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  1. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-01

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ˜30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  2. Anticipating electrical breakdown in dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muffoletto, Daniel P.; Burke, Kevin M.; Zirnheld, Jennifer L.

    2013-04-01

    The output strain of a dielectric elastomer actuator is directly proportional to the square of its applied electric field. However, since the likelihood of electric breakdown is elevated with an increased applied field, the maximum operating electric field of the dielectric elastomer is significantly derated in systems employing these actuators so that failure due to breakdown remains unlikely even as the material ages. In an effort to ascertain the dielectric strength so that stronger electric fields can be applied, partial discharge testing is used to assess the health of the actuator by detecting the charge that is released when localized instances of breakdown partially bridge the insulator. Pre-stretched and unstretched samples of VHB4910 tape were submerged in dielectric oil to remove external sources of partial discharges during testing, and the partial discharge patterns were recorded just before failure of the dielectric sample.

  3. Spectrometers for RF breakdown studies for CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacewicz, M.; Ziemann, V.; Ekelöf, T.; Dubrovskiy, A.; Ruber, R.

    2016-08-01

    An e+e- collider of several TeV energy will be needed for the precision studies of any new physics discovered at the LHC collider at CERN. One promising candidate is CLIC, a linear collider which is based on a two-beam acceleration scheme that efficiently solves the problem of power distribution to the acceleration structures. The phenomenon that currently prevents achieving high accelerating gradients in high energy accelerators such as the CLIC is the electrical breakdown at very high electrical field. The ongoing experimental work within the CLIC collaboration is trying to benchmark the theoretical models focusing on the physics of vacuum breakdown which is responsible for the discharges. In order to validate the feasibility of accelerating structures and observe the characteristics of the vacuum discharges and their eroding effects on the structure two dedicated spectrometers are now commissioned at the high-power test-stands at CERN. First, the so called Flashbox has opened up a possibility for non-invasive studies of the emitted breakdown currents during two-beam acceleration experiments. It gives a unique possibility to measure the energy of electrons and ions in combination with the arrival time spectra and to put that in context with accelerated beam, which is not possible at any of the other existing test-stands. The second instrument, a spectrometer for detection of the dark and breakdown currents, is operated at one of the 12 GHz stand-alone test-stands at CERN. Built for high repetition rate operation it can measure the spatial and energy distributions of the electrons emitted from the acceleration structure during a single RF pulse. Two new analysis tools: discharge impedance tracking and tomographic image reconstruction, applied to the data from the spectrometer make possible for the first time to obtain the location of the breakdown inside the structure both in the transversal and longitudinal direction thus giving a more complete picture of the

  4. Breakdown Behavior of a Wireless Communication Network Under UWB Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohe, M.; Koch, M.

    Systems with high priority to safety and reliability such as monitoring systems on airports have to work properly. Fast information transmission, continuous access to databases, as well as the management of air traffic are most important for effective and safe operation. Sources of Intentional Electromagnetic Interference can be manufactured relatively easy using commercially available components by civilian persons with relevant expertise and can be used for sabotage or blackmail purposes. For analyzing the weak points of a system existing on airports, it is necessary to reproduce its setup. In this investigation a UHF transmitter of a wireless communication device is developed and its breakdown behavior to unipolar fast rise pulses (UWB) is determined. A breakdown is a non-permanent damage, but includes a type of upset, that requires manual reset or at least stops communications for some period of time. The transmitter consists of three main components connected by data cables: power supply, microcontroller, and loop antenna. The immunity tests are accomplished as a function of the electromagnetic field direction to the device using an open TEM waveguide.

  5. Dynamics of the breakdown of granular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppex, François; Droz, Michel; Lipowski, Adam

    2002-07-01

    Recently van der Meer et al. studied the breakdown of a granular cluster [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 174302 (2002)]. We reexamine this problem using an urn model, which takes into account fluctuations and finite-size effects. General arguments are given for the absence of a continuous transition when the number of urns (compartments) is greater than two. Monte Carlo simulations show that the lifetime of a cluster τ diverges at the limits of stability as τ~N1/3, where N is the number of balls. After the breakdown, depending on the dynamical rules of our urn model, either normal or anomalous diffusion of the cluster takes place.

  6. Kaon Thresholds and Two-Flavor Chiral Expansions for Hyperons

    SciTech Connect

    Fu-Jiun Jiang, Brian C. Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2011-01-01

    Two-flavor chiral expansions provide a useful perturbative framework to study hadron properties. Such expansions should exhibit marked improvement over the conventional three-flavor chiral expansion. Although one can theoretically formulate two-flavor theories for the various hyperon multiplets, the nearness of kaon thresholds can seriously undermine the effectiveness of the perturbative expansion in practice. We investigate the importance of virtual kaon thresholds on hyperon properties, specifically their masses and isovector axial charges. Using a three-flavor expansion that includes SU(3) breaking effects, we uncover the underlying expansion parameter governing the description of virtual kaon thresholds. For spin-half hyperons, this expansion parameter is quite small. Consequently virtual kaon contributions are well described in the two-flavor theory by terms analytic in the pion mass-squared. For spin three-half hyperons, however, one is closer to the kaon production threshold, and the expansion parameter is not as small. Breakdown of SU(2) chiral perturbation theory is shown to arise from a pole in the expansion parameter associated with the kaon threshold. Estimating higher-order corrections to the expansion parameter is necessary to ascertain whether the two-flavor theory of spin three-half hyperons remains perturbative. We find that, despite higher-order corrections, there is a useful perturbative expansion for the masses and isovector axial charges of both spin-half and spin three-half hyperons.

  7. Theoretical modeling of optimal focusing conditions using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Yaroshchyk, Pavel; Morrison, Richard J S; Body, Doug; Chadwick, Bruce L

    2004-11-01

    Optimal conditions are determined for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in liquid jets by investigating laser de-focusing and laser energy variation in aqueous liquid jets containing dilute levels of calcium chloride. It has been found that the atomic emission shows a strong correlation with both laser pulse energy and focal position. The data cannot be rationalized on the basis of electron density or ionization temperature changes alone, but rather it requires the additional consideration of the volume of the liquid sample interacting with the laser and that portion of the volume which is above the threshold energy for plasma formation. A moving breakdown model has been applied to the plasma formation in the jet to calculate the amount of sample ablated with sufficient energy for plasma formation, which models well the observed results and allows prediction of optimal focusing conditions for a given laser energy. PMID:18070410

  8. Determination of threshold and maximum operating electric stresses for selected high voltage insulations: Investigation of aged polymeric dielectric cable. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Eager, G.S. Jr.; Seman, G.W.; Fryszczyn, B.

    1995-11-01

    Based on the successful completion of the extensive research project DOE/ET/29303-1 February 1982 to develop a new method for the determination of threshold voltage in XLPE and EPR insulated cables, tests were initiated to establish the maximum safe operating voltage stresses of crosslinked polyethylene insulated cables that become wet when they operate in a moist environment. The present report covers the measurement of the threshold voltage, the a.c. breakdown voltage and the impulse breakdown voltage of XLPE cable after undergoing accelerated laboratory aging in water. Model and 15 kV XLPE cables were manufactured in commercial equipment using state-of-the-art semiconducting shields and XLPE insulation. The threshold voltage, a.c. voltage breakdown and impulse voltage breakdown of the model cables were determined before aging, after aging one week and after aging 26 weeks. The model cable, following 26 weeks aging, was dried by passing dry gas through the conductor interstices which removed moisture from the cable. The threshold voltage, the a.c. voltage breakdown and the impulse voltage breakdown of the XLPE model cable after drying was measured.

  9. Measuring breakdown voltage for objectively detecting ignition in fire research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoterena, R.; Försth, M.; Elfsberg, Mattias; Larsson, Anders

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a method intended for detecting the initiation of combustion and the presence of smoke in confined or open spaces by continuously applying an intermittent high-voltage pulse between the electrodes. The method is based on an electrical circuit which generates an electrical discharge measuring simultaneously the breakdown voltage between the electrodes. It has been successfully used for the detection of particle-laden aerosols and flames. However, measurements in this study showed that detecting pyrolysis products with this methodology is challenging and arduous. The method presented here is robust and exploits the necessity of having an ignition system which at the same time can automatically discern between clean air, flames or particle-laden aerosols and can be easily implemented in the existing cone calorimeter with very minor modifications.

  10. Elemental Analysis of Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondal, Mohammed Ashraf; Dastageer, Mohamed A.

    The chemical and elemental composition of soil is very complex as it contains many constituents like minerals, organic matters, living organisms, fossils, air and water. Considering the diversity of soil contents, quality and usability, a systematic scientific study on the elemental and chemical composition of soil is very important. In order to study the chemical composition of soil, Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied recently. The important features of LIBS system and its applications for the measurement of nutrients in green house soil, on-line monitoring of remediation process of chromium polluted soil, determination of trace elements in volcanic erupted soil samples collected from ancient cenozoic lava eruption sites and detection of toxic metals in Gulf war oil spill contaminated soil using LIBS are described in this chapter.

  11. Heme content and breakdown in developing chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.; Weinstein, J.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Heme regulates tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in plants by inhibition of {delta}-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthesis, product inhibition of heme synthesis, and possibly other mechanisms. Plastid heme levels may be modulated by heme synthesis, breakdown and/or efflux. Heme breakdown may be catalyzed by a chloroplast localized heme oxygenase. Chloroplasts isolated from greening cucumber cotyledons were incubated in the presence or absence of various components thought to modulate heme breakdown. Following the incubations, the chloroplasts were broken (freeze-thaw) and then supplemented with horseradish peroxidase apoenzyme. The reconstituted peroxidase activity was used to determine the amount of free heme remaining (Thomas Weinstein (1989) Plant Physiol. 89S: 74). Chloroplasts, freshly isolated from seedlings greened for 16 hours, contained approximately 37 pmol heme/mg protein. When chloroplasts were incubated with 5 mM NADPH for 30 min, the endogenous heme dropped to unmeasurable levels. Exogenous heme was also broken down when NADPH was included in the incubation. Heme levels could be increased by the inclusion of 50 {mu}M ALA and/or p-hydroxymercuribenzoate. The increase due to exogenous ALA was blocked by levulinic acid, an inhibitor of ALA utilization. NADPH-dependent heme breakdown acid was inhibited by p-hydroxymercuribenzoate.

  12. Fear of breakdown and the unlived life.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Thomas H

    2014-04-01

    Winnicott's Fear of breakdown is an unfinished work that requires that the reader be not only a reader, but also a writer of this work which often gestures toward meaning as opposed to presenting fully developed ideas. The author's understanding of the often confusing, sometimes opaque, argument of Winnicott's paper is as follows. In infancy there occurs a breakdown in the mother-infant tie that forces the infant to take on, by himself, emotional events that he is unable to manage. He short-circuits his experience of primitive agony by generating defense organizations that are psychotic in nature, i.e., they substitute self-created inner reality for external reality, thus foreclosing his actually experiencing critical life events. By not experiencing the breakdown of the mother-infant tie when it occurred in infancy, the individual creates a psychological state in which he lives in fear of a breakdown that has already happened, but which he did not experience. The author extends Winnicott's thinking by suggesting that the driving force of the patient's need to find the source of his fear is his feeling that parts of himself are missing and that he must find them if he is to become whole. What remains of his life feels to him like a life that is mostly an unlived life. PMID:24620827

  13. How to Avoid Language Breakdown? Circumlocution!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ann Masters; Marsal, Florence

    1997-01-01

    Circumlocution can prevent communication breakdown and is a required function at the Advanced level on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Oral Proficiency Scale. To encourage this communicative strategy, researchers conducted a study of two intermediate college French classes: one that encouraged circumlocution and…

  14. Numerical Borehole Breakdown Investigations using XFEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckhuis, Sven; Leonhart, Dirk; Meschke, Günther

    2016-04-01

    During pressurization of a wellbore a typical downhole pressure record shows the following regimes: first the applied wellbore pressure balances the reservoir pressure, then after the compressive circumferential hole stresses are overcome, tensile stresses are induced on the inside surface of the hole. When the magnitude of these stresses reach the tensile failure stress of the surrounding rock medium, a fracture is initiated and propagates into the reservoir. [1] In standard theories this pressure, the so called breakdown pressure, is the peak pressure in the down-hole pressure record. However experimental investigations [2] show that the breakdown did not occur even if a fracture was initiated at the borehole wall. Drilling muds had the tendency to seal and stabilize fractures and prevent fracture propagation. Also fracture mechanics analysis of breakdown process in mini-frac or leak off tests [3] show that the breakdown pressure could be either equal or larger than the fracture initiation pressure. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the breakdown process in reservoir rock, numerical investigations using the extended finite element method (XFEM) for hydraulic fracturing of porous materials [4] are discussed. The reservoir rock is assumed to be pre-fractured. During pressurization of the borehole, the injection pressure, the pressure distribution and the position of the highest flux along the fracture for different fracturing fluid viscosities are recorded and the influence of the aforementioned values on the stability of fracture propagation is discussed. [1] YEW, C. H. (1997), "Mechanics of Hydraulic Fracturing", Gulf Publishing Company [2] MORITA, N.; BLACK, A. D.; FUH, G.-F. (1996), "Borehole Breakdown Pressure with Drilling Fluids". International Journal of Rock Mechanics and Mining Sciences 33, pp. 39-51 [3] DETOURNAY, E.; CARBONELL, R. (1996), "Fracture Mechanics Analysis of the Breakdown Process in Minifrac or Leakoff Test", Society of Petroleum

  15. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  16. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  17. Electrical breakdown of carbon nanotube devices and the predictability of breakdown position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Gopal Krishna; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2012-06-01

    We have investigated electrical transport properties of long (>10 μm) multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NTs) by dividing individuals into several segments of identical length. Each segment has different resistance because of the random distribution of defect density in an NT and is corroborated by Raman studies. Higher is the resistance, lower is the current required to break the segments indicating that breakdown occurs at the highly resistive segment/site and not necessarily at the middle. This is consistent with the one-dimensional thermal transport model. We have demonstrated the healing of defects by annealing at moderate temperatures or by current annealing. To strengthen our mechanism, we have carried out electrical breakdown of nitrogen doped NTs (NNTs) with diameter variation from one end to the other. It reveals that the electrical breakdown occurs selectively at the narrower diameter region. Overall, we believe that our results will help to predict the breakdown position of both semiconducting and metallic NTs.

  18. Application of dynamic displacement current for diagnostics of subnanosecond breakdowns in an inhomogeneous electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Tao; Zhang Cheng; Yan Ping; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Burachenko, Alexandr G.; Rybka, Dmitry V.; Kostyrya, Igor' D.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Baksht, Evgeni Kh.

    2013-05-15

    The breakdown of different air gaps at high overvoltages in an inhomogeneous electric field was investigated with a time resolution of up to 100 ps. Dynamic displacement current was used for diagnostics of ionization processes between the ionization wave front and a plane anode. It is demonstrated that during the generation of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with amplitudes of {approx}10 A and more, conductivity in the air gaps at the breakdown stage is ensured by the ionization wave, whose front propagates from the electrode of small curvature radius, and by the dynamic displacement current between the ionization wave front and the plane electrode. The amplitude of the dynamic displacement current measured by a current shunt is 100 times greater than the SAEB. It is shown that with small gaps and with a large cathode diameter, the amplitude of the dynamic displacement current during a subnanosecond rise time of applied pulse voltage can be higher than 4 kA.

  19. Application of dynamic displacement current for diagnostics of subnanosecond breakdowns in an inhomogeneous electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Zhang, Cheng; Burachenko, Alexandr G.; Rybka, Dmitry V.; Kostyrya, Igor'D.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Baksht, Evgeni Kh.; Yan, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The breakdown of different air gaps at high overvoltages in an inhomogeneous electric field was investigated with a time resolution of up to 100 ps. Dynamic displacement current was used for diagnostics of ionization processes between the ionization wave front and a plane anode. It is demonstrated that during the generation of a supershort avalanche electron beam (SAEB) with amplitudes of ˜10 A and more, conductivity in the air gaps at the breakdown stage is ensured by the ionization wave, whose front propagates from the electrode of small curvature radius, and by the dynamic displacement current between the ionization wave front and the plane electrode. The amplitude of the dynamic displacement current measured by a current shunt is 100 times greater than the SAEB. It is shown that with small gaps and with a large cathode diameter, the amplitude of the dynamic displacement current during a subnanosecond rise time of applied pulse voltage can be higher than 4 kA.

  20. A computational study of the taxonomy of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a fully three-dimensional numerical simulation of vortex breakdown using the unsteady, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are presented. The solutions show that the freestream axial velocity distribution has a significant effect on the position and type of vortex breakdown. Common features between bubble-type and spiral-type breakdown are identified and the role of flow stagnation and the critical state are discussed as complimentary ideas describing the initiation of breakdown.

  1. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  2. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  5. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  6. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  7. Recent Studies of RF Breakdown Physics in Normal Conducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, Valery; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    The operating accelerating gradient in normal conducting accelerating structures is often limited by rf breakdown. The behavior of the rf breakdown depends on multiple parameters, including the input rf power, rf circuit, cavity shape and material. Here we discuss recent experimental data and theoretical studies of rf breakdown physics.

  8. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    PubMed Central

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  9. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-01

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  10. Acoustic emission and magnification of atomic lines resolution for laser breakdown of salt water in ultrasound field

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Alexey V.; Nagorny, Ivan G.

    2015-10-28

    Researches of the acoustic effects accompanying optical breakdown in a water, generated by the focused laser radiation with power ultrasound have been carried out. Experiments were performed by using 532 nm pulses from Brilliant B Nd:YAG laser. Acoustic radiation was produced by acoustic focusing systems in the form hemisphere and ring by various resonance frequencies of 10.7 kHz and 60 kHz. The experimental results are obtained, that show the sharply strengthens effects of acoustic emission from a breakdown zone by the joint influence of a laser and ultrasonic irradiation. Essentially various thresholds of breakdown and character of acoustic emission in fresh and sea water are found out. The experimental result is established, testifying that acoustic emission of optical breakdown of sea water at presence and at absence of ultrasound essentially exceeds acoustic emission in fresh water. Atomic lines of some chemical elements like a Sodium, Magnesium and so on were investigated for laser breakdown of water with ultrasound field. The effect of magnification of this lines resolution for salt water in ultrasound field was obtained.

  11. Numerical studies of the high power microwave breakdown in gas using the fluid model with a modified electron energy distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Pengcheng; Liao Cheng; Lin Chenbin; Chang Lei; Fu Haijun

    2011-10-15

    A modified electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is introduced into the fluid model and its effects on the high power microwave (HPM) breakdown in air and argon are investigated. A proper numerical scheme for the finite-difference time-domain method is employed to solve the fluid model. Numerical simulations show that the HPM breakdown time in argon predicted by the fluid model with the modified EEDF agrees well with the results of Particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision simulations, while the Maxwellian EEDF results in faster HPM breakdown when the mean electron energy is less than 20 eV. We also confirm that the Maxwellian EEDF can be used in the fluid model for simulating the air breakdown at the low frequencies based on the reported experiments.

  12. Observations of stimulated Raman scattering and laser-induced breakdown in millimeter-sized droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Pinnick, R. G.; Xie, J.-G.; Ruekgauer, T. E.; Armstrong, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    We report the first observations, to our knowledge, of nonlinear optical effects in large (millimeter-sized) droplets. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and laser-induced breakdown (LIB) are simultaneously observed in acoustically levitated millimeter-sized glycerol droplets irradiated by either a frequency-doubled (532-nm) or a frequency-tripled (355-nm) Nd:YAG laser. The two processes, which occur above a nearby coincident irradiation threshold, are conjectured to arise from a common initiation mechanism: self-focusing. LIB generates vapor bubbles within the droplet, resulting in the quenching of SRS emission.

  13. Detection of operator performance breakdown in a multitask environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hyo-Sang

    The purpose of this dissertation work is: 1) to empirically demonstrate an extreme human operator's state, performance breakdown (PB), and 2) to develop an objective method for detecting such a state. PB has been anecdotally described as a state where the human operator "loses control of the context" and "cannot maintain the required task performance." Preventing such a decline in performance could be important to assure the safety and reliability of human-integrated systems, and therefore PB could be useful as a point at which automation can be applied to support human performance. However, PB has never been scientifically defined or empirically demonstrated. Moreover, there exists no method for detecting such a state or the transition to that state. Therefore, after symbolically defining PB, an objective method of potentially identifying PB is proposed. Next, three human-in-the-loop studies were conducted to empirically demonstrate PB and to evaluate the proposed PB detection method. Study 1 was conducted: 1) to demonstrate PB by increasing workload until the subject reports being in a state of PB, and 2) to identify possible parameters of the PB detection method for objectively identifying the subjectively-reported PB point, and determine if they are idiosyncratic. In the experiment, fifteen participants were asked to manage three concurrent tasks (one primary and two secondary tasks) for 18 minutes. The primary task's difficulty was manipulated over time to induce PB while the secondary tasks' difficulty remained static. Data on participants' task performance was collected. Three hypotheses were constructed: 1) increasing workload will induce subjectively-identified PB, 2) there exists criteria that identify the threshold parameters that best detect the performance characteristics that maps to the subjectively-identified PB point, and 3) the criteria for choosing the threshold parameters are consistent across individuals. The results show that increasing

  14. Breakdown and partial discharges in magnetic liquids.

    PubMed

    Herchl, F; Marton, K; Tomčo, L; Kopčanský, P; Timko, M; Koneracká, M; Kolcunová, I

    2008-05-21

    The dielectric properties (permittivity, loss factor, dielectric breakdown strength) of magnetic liquids were investigated. The magnetic liquids were composed of magnetite particles coated with oleic acid as surfactant and dispersed in transformer oil. To determine their dielectric properties they were subjected to a uniform magnetic field at high alternating electric fields up to 14 MV m(-1). Nearly constant permittivity of magnetic liquid with particle volume concentration Φ = 0.0019 as a function of electric field was observed. Magnetic liquids with concentrations Φ = 0.019 and 0.032 showed significant changes of permittivity and loss factor dependent on electric and magnetic fields. The best concentration of magnetic fluid was found at which partial current impulse magnitudes were the lowest. The breakdown strength distribution of the magnetic liquid with Φ = 0.0025 was fitted with the Duxbury-Leath, Weibull and Gauss distribution functions. PMID:21694240

  15. Electrical breakdown studies with Mycalex insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.; Greenway, W.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.

    2003-05-01

    Insulating materials such as alumina and glass-bonded mica (Mycalex) are used in accelerator systems for high voltage feedthroughs, structural supports, and barriers between high voltage insulating oil and the vacuum beam pipe in induction accelerator cells. Electric fields in the triple points should be minimized to prevent voltage breakdown. Mechanical stress can compromise seals and result in oil contamination of the insulator surface. We have tested various insulator cleaning procedures including ultrasonic cleaning with a variety of aqueous-based detergents, and manual scrubbing with various detergents. Water sheeting tests were used to determine the initial results of the cleaning methods. Ultimately, voltage breakdown tests will be used to quantify the benefits of these cleaning procedures.

  16. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 414) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  17. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1992-01-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles (14, 15, 114, 214, 314, 444) by a plasma arc (3), introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber (26) behind the accelerating projectile (14). The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF.sub.6. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails (12) after the projectile (14) has passed through inlets (16) in the rails (12) or the projectile (114); by coating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) with a material (28) which releases the gas after the projectile (14 ) passes over it; by fabricating the rails (12) or the projectile (15) or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber (26) through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile (214, 314, 414) may have a cavity (232, 332, 432) at its rear to control the release of ablation products (4).

  18. Supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Liu, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    An extensive computational study of supersonic quasi-axisymmetric vortex breakdown in a configured circular duct is presented. The unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are used. The NS equations are solved for the quasi-axisymmetric flows using an implicit, upwind, flux difference splitting, finite volume scheme. The quasi-axisymmetric solutions are time accurate and are obtained by forcing the components of the flowfield vector to be equal on two axial planes, which are in close proximity of each other. The effect of Reynolds number, for laminar flows, on the evolution and persistence of vortex breakdown, is studied. Finally, the effect of swirl ration at the duct inlet is investigated.

  19. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-10-13

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  20. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF[sub 6]. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has travelled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 12 figs.

  1. Prevention of breakdown behind railgun projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.

    1989-04-20

    An electromagnetic railgun accelerator system, for accelerating projectiles by a plasma arc, introduces a breakdown inhibiting gas into the railgun chamber behind the accelerating projectile. The breakdown inhibiting gas, which absorbs electrons, is a halide or a halide compound such as fluorine or SF{sub 6}. The gas is introduced between the railgun rails after the projectile has passed through inlets in the rails or the projectile; by coating the rails or the projectile with a material which releases the gas after the projectile passes over it; by fabricating the rails or the projectile or insulators out of a material which releases the gas into the portions of the chamber through which the projectile has traveled. The projectile may have a cavity at its rear to control the release of ablation products. 9 figs.

  2. Three-dimensional simulation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuruvila, G.; Salas, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The integral form of the complete, unsteady, compressible, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in the conservation form, cast in generalized coordinate system, are solved, numerically, to simulate the vortex breakdown phenomenon. The inviscid fluxes are discretized using Roe's upwind-biased flux-difference splitting scheme and the viscous fluxes are discretized using central differencing. Time integration is performed using a backward Euler ADI (alternating direction implicit) scheme. A full approximation multigrid is used to accelerate the convergence to steady state.

  3. Breakdown of cyclotron resonance in semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, T.; Bhat, R.; Koza, M.; Hwang, D. M.; DeRosa, F.; Grabbe, P.; Allen, S. J.

    1988-03-01

    We have observed breakdown of cyclotron resonance in large magnetic fields oriented perpendicular to the growth direction in semiconductor superlattices. At small magnetic fields conventional cyclotron resonance is observed with the mass related to the miniband mass. At large magnetic fields, when the cyclotron diameter approaches the superlattice period, the resonance frequency appears to saturate and is determined by orbits impaled on the barrier. A model calculation gives good account of the magnetic field dependence of the resonance position and line width.

  4. Shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Kandil, H. A.; Liu, C. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation and study of shock/vortex interaction and vortex-breakdown modes are considered for bound (internal) and unbound (external) flow domains. The problem is formulated using the unsteady, compressible, full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations which are solved using an implicit, flux-difference splitting, finite-volume scheme. For the bound flow domain, a supersonic swirling flow is considered in a configured circular duct and the problem is solved for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. For the unbound domain, a supersonic swirling flow issued from a nozzle into a uniform supersonic flow of lower Mach number is considered for quasi-axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows. The results show several modes of breakdown; e.g., no-breakdown, transient single-bubble breakdown, transient multi-bubble breakdown, periodic multi-bubble multi-frequency breakdown and helical breakdown.

  5. Runaway breakdown and electrical discharges in thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennady; Roussel-Dupré, Robert

    2010-12-01

    This review considers the precise role played by runaway breakdown (RB) in the initiation and development of lightning discharges. RB remains a fundamental research topic under intense investigation. The question of how lightning is initiated and subsequently evolves in the thunderstorm environment rests in part on a fundamental understanding of RB and cosmic rays and the potential coupling to thermal runaway (as a seed to RB) and conventional breakdown (as a source of thermal runaways). In this paper, we describe the basic mechanism of RB and the conditions required to initiate an observable avalanche. Feedback processes that fundamentally enhance RB are discussed, as are both conventional breakdown and thermal runaway. Observations that provide clear evidence for the presence of energetic particles in thunderstorms/lightning include γ-ray and X-ray flux intensifications over thunderstorms, γ-ray and X-ray bursts in conjunction with stepped leaders, terrestrial γ-ray flashes, and neutron production by lightning. Intense radio impulses termed narrow bipolar pulses (or NBPs) provide indirect evidence for RB particularly when measured in association with cosmic ray showers. Our present understanding of these phenomena and their enduring enigmatic character are touched upon briefly.

  6. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Ferroelectric Polymer Composite with Enhanced Breakdown Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kuo; Gadinski, Matthew; Wang, Qing

    2013-03-01

    Numerous efforts have been made in the past decades to improve the energy storage capability of dielectric capacitors by incorporating ceramic addictives into polymers. Ferroelectric polymers have been particularly interesting as matrix for dielectric composites because of their highest dielectric permittivity and energy density. However, most polymer composites suffer from significantly reduced breakdown strength, which compromises the potential gain in energy density. In this work, various metallic alkoxide were introduced into the functionalized ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-co- chlorotrifluoroethylene), P(VDF-CTFE), via covalent bonding. The composite with the optimized composition exhibited the Weibull statistical breakdown strength of 504.8 MV/m, 67.6 % higher than the pristine polymer. The enhanced breakdown strength was mainly ascribed to the cross-linking and the formation of deep traps, which effectively reduced the conduction and further lowered the energy loss. Additionally, the homogeneous dispersion of the inorganic phase and the small contrast in permittivity between the polymer and amorphous oxides also contribute to the improved dielectric strength. The dielectric spectra of the composites have been recorded at varied temperatures and frequencies, which revealed the presence of the interfacial polarization layer in the composites.

  8. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, L.A.; Hart, W.E.; Wilson, D.B.

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  9. Hairpin Vortex Regeneration Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; Maharjan, Rijan

    2015-11-01

    A free surface water channel is used to study hairpin vortex formation created by fluid injection through a narrow slot into a laminar boundary layer. Particle image velocimetry is used to calculate the circulation of the primary hairpin vortex head which is found to monotonically decrease in strength with downstream distance. When a secondary hairpin vortex is formed upstream of the primary vortex, the circulation strength of the head is comparable to the strength of the primary head at the time of regeneration. However, the legs of the primary vortex strengthen up to the moment the secondary hairpin is generated. Although the peak circulation in the legs is not directly correlated to the strength of the original elongated ring vortex, when the circulation is scaled with the injection momentum ratio it is linearly related to scaled injection time. It is proposed that the injection momentum ratio and nondimensionalized injection time based on the wall normal penetration time can be used to identify threshold conditions which produce a secondary vortex. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET- 1040236.

  10. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  11. Extended plasma channels created by UV laser in air and their application to control electric discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V. D. Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    Results are presented from a series of experimental and theoretical studies on creating weakly ionized extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by 248-nm UV laser radiation and their application to control long high-voltage discharges. The main mechanisms of air ionization by UV laser pulses with durations from 100 fs to 25 ns and intensities in the ranges of 3×10{sup 11}–1.5×10{sup 13} and 3×10{sup 6}–3×10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}, respectively, which are below the threshold for optical gas breakdown, as well as the main relaxation processes in plasma with a density of 10{sup 9}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, are considered. It is shown that plasma channels in air can be efficiently created by amplitude-modulated UV pulses consisting of a train of subpicosecond pulses producing primary photoelectrons and a long UV pulse suppressing electron attachment and sustaining the density of free electrons in plasma. Different modes of the generation and amplification of trains of subterawatt subpicosecond pulses and amplitude-modulated UV pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were implemented on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid Ti:sapphire-KrF laser facility. The filamentation of such UV laser beams during their propagation in air over distances of up to 100 m and the parameters of the corresponding plasma channels were studied experimentally and theoretically. Laser initiation of high-voltage electric discharges and control of their trajectories by means of amplitude-modulated UV pulses, as well as the spatiotemporal structure of breakdowns in air gaps with length of up to 80 cm, were studied.

  12. Martian dust threshold measurements: Simulations under heated surface conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Bruce R.; Greeley, Ronald; Leach, Rodman N.

    1991-01-01

    Diurnal changes in solar radiation on Mars set up a cycle of cooling and heating of the planetary boundary layer, this effect strongly influences the wind field. The stratification of the air layer is stable in early morning since the ground is cooler than the air above it. When the ground is heated and becomes warmer than the air its heat is transferred to the air above it. The heated parcels of air near the surface will, in effect, increase the near surface wind speed or increase the aeolian surface stress the wind has upon the surface when compared to an unheated or cooled surface. This means that for the same wind speed at a fixed height above the surface, ground-level shear stress will be greater for the heated surface than an unheated surface. Thus, it is possible to obtain saltation threshold conditions at lower mean wind speeds when the surface is heated. Even though the mean wind speed is less when the surface is heated, the surface shear stress required to initiate particle movement remains the same in both cases. To investigate this phenomenon, low-density surface dust aeolian threshold measurements have been made in the MARSWIT wind tunnel located at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The first series of tests examined threshold values of the 100 micron sand material. At 13 mb surface pressure the unheated surface had a threshold friction speed of 2.93 m/s (and approximately corresponded to a velocity of 41.4 m/s at a height of 1 meter) while the heated surface equivalent bulk Richardson number of -0.02, yielded a threshold friction speed of 2.67 m/s (and approximately corresponded to a velocity of 38.0 m/s at a height of 1 meter). This change represents an 8.8 percent decrease in threshold conditions for the heated case. The values of velocities are well within the threshold range as observed by Arvidson et al., 1983. As the surface was heated the threshold decreased. At a value of bulk Richardson number equal to -0.02 the threshold

  13. Conditions for electron runaway under leader breakdown of long gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Ul'yanov, K. N.

    2008-04-15

    An original hydrodynamic model in which inelastic collisions in the equations of motion and energy balance play a decisive role is developed and applied to simulate electron avalanches in strong electric fields. The mean energy and drift velocity of electrons, as well as the ionization coefficient and electric field in a wide range of mean electron energies, are determined for helium and xenon. A criterion is derived for the runaway of the average electron in discharges with ionization multiplication. It is shown that runaway can take place at any value of E/p, provided that the momentum mean free path exceeds the gap length. The voltage corresponding to electron runaway is found for helium, xenon, and air as a function of the electric field, the electron mean energy, and the parameter pd. Conditions for the formation of a precursor in electronegative gases are analyzed. It is shown that the presence of a precursor with a high electric conductance is necessary for the formation of a new leader step. The voltage and time ranges corresponding to efficient electron runaway and X-ray generation during leader breakdown in air are determined.

  14. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  15. Heavy Metal Detection in Soils by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using Hemispherical Spatial Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Deshuo; Zhao, Nanjing; Ma, Mingjun; Wang, Yin; Hu, Li; Yu, Yang; Fang, Li; Liu, Wenqing

    2015-08-01

    Spatial confinement has great potential for Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instruments after it has been proven that it has the ability to enhance the LIBS signal strength and repeatability. In order to achieve in-situ measurement of heavy metals in farmland soils by LIBS, a hemispherical spatial confinement device is designed and used to collect plasma spectra, in which the optical fibers directly collect the breakdown spectroscopy of the soil samples. This device could effectively increase the stability of the spectrum intensity of soil. It also has other advantages, such as ease of installation, and its small and compact size. The relationship between the spectrum intensity and the laser pulse energy is studied for this device. It is found that the breakdown threshold is 160 cm-2, and when the laser fluence increases to 250 J/cm2, the spectrum intensity reaches its maximum. Four different kinds of laser pulse energy were set up and in each case the limits of detection of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were calculated. The results show that when the laser pulse fluence was 2.12 GW/cm2, we obtained the smallest limits of detection of these heavy metals, which are all under 10 mg/kg. This device can satisfy the needs of heavy metal in-situ detection, and in the next step it will be integrated into a portable LIBS instrument.

  16. Acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB)

    DOEpatents

    O'Donnell, Matthew; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, Jr., James R.; Balogh, Lajos P.; Milas, Susanne M.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Hollman, Kyle W.

    2008-05-06

    An acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) provides information which characterize material which is broken down, microbubbles in the material, and/or the microenvironment of the microbubbles. In one embodiment of the invention, femtosecond laser pulses are focused just inside the surface of a volume of aqueous solution which may include dendrimer nanocomposite (DNC) particles. A tightly focused, high frequency, single-element ultrasonic transducer is positioned such that its focus coincides axially and laterally with this laser focus. When optical breakdown occurs, a microbubble forms and a shock or pressure wave is emitted (i.e., acoustic emission). In addition to this acoustic signal, the microbubble may be actively probed with pulse-echo measurements from the same transducer. After the microbubble forms, received pulse-echo signals have an extra pulse, describing the microbubble location and providing a measure of axial microbubble size. Wavefield plots of successive recordings illustrate the generation, growth, and collapse of microbubbles due to optical breakdown. These same plots can also be used to quantify LIOB thresholds.

  17. Life below the threshold.

    PubMed

    Castro, C

    1991-01-01

    This article explains that malnutrition, poor health, and limited educational opportunities plague Philippine children -- especially female children -- from families living below the poverty threshold. Nearly 70% of households in the Philippines do not meet the required daily level of nutritional intake. Because it is often -- and incorrectly -- assumed that women's nutritional requirements are lower than men's, women suffer higher rates of malnutrition and poor health. A 1987 study revealed that 11.7% of all elementary students were underweight and 13.9% had stunted growths. Among elementary-school girls, 17% were malnourished and 40% suffered from anemia (among lactating mothers, more than 1/2 are anemic). A 1988 Program for Decentralized Educational Development study showed that grade VI students learn only about 1/2 of what they are supposed to learn. 30% of the children enrolled in grade school drop out before they reach their senior year. The Department of Education, Culture and Sports estimates that some 2.56 million students dropped out of school in l989. That same year, some 3.7 million children were counted as part of the labor force. In Manila alone, some 60,000 children work the streets, whether doing odd jobs or begging, or turning to crime or prostitution. the article tells the story of a 12 year-old girl named Ging, a 4th grader at a public school and the oldest child in a poor family of 6 children. The undernourished Ging dreams of a good future for her family and sees education as a way out of poverty; unfortunately, her time after school is spend working in the streets or looking after her family. She considers herself luckier than many of the other children working in the streets, since she at least has a family. PMID:12285009

  18. Threshold Hypothesis: Fact or Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Gralewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The threshold hypothesis (TH) assumes the existence of complex relations between creative abilities and intelligence: linear associations below 120 points of IQ and weaker or lack of associations above the threshold. However, diverse results have been obtained over the last six decades--some confirmed the hypothesis and some rejected it. In this…

  19. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  20. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  1. Insulator breakdown measurements in a poor vacuum and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Vogtlin, G.E.

    1990-06-01

    Breakdown measurements have been made on insulators with 0 and 45 degree angle surfaces. A technique of observing the electrons produced from the process has given some insight into the mechanisms involved. A three nanosecond pulse was used to induce breakdown. The electrons striking the anode were observed with a plastic fluor and open shutter camera. Two breakdown patterns were interpreted as cathode initiated and anode initiated breakdown. The breakdown process normally encountered was anode initiated with a positive 45 degree insulator. If the anode side was relieved with an internal electrode, the breakdown changed to cathode initiated at a higher level. If the cathode surface was then anodized, the breakdown switched back to the anode at an even higher level. Individual explosive emission sites on the cathode surface could be observed. Insulator breakdown was usually not associated with these sites. Multiple pulses allowed measurement of plasma expansion of the explosive emission sites. It is believed that breakdown with longer pulses is due to the expansion of the explosive emission site plasma to the insulator surface. Measurements were conducted with and without voltage conditioning. It appears that conditioning is achieved without explosive emission. It is believed that this is due to organic fibers that are removed by the conditioning. Organic fibers were used to induce both anode and cathode breakdown. Measurements of fiberous material have shown explosive emission a low as 100 kV on a three nanosecond time scale and below 20 kv/cm on a longer time scale. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Enhancement of airborne shock wave by laser-induced breakdown of liquid column in laser shock cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Deoksuk; Kim, Dongsik; Park, Jin-Goo

    2011-04-01

    In laser shock cleaning (LSC), the shock wave is generated by laser-induced breakdown of the ambient gas. The shock wave intensity has thus been a factor limiting the performance of the LSC process. In this work, a novel method of amplifying a laser-induced plasma-generated shock wave by the breakdown of a liquid column is proposed and analyzed. When the laser beam is focused on a microscale liquid column, a shock wave having a significantly amplified intensity compared to that generated by air breakdown alone can be generated in air. Therefore, substantially amplified cleaning force can be obtained. The dynamics of a shock wave induced by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was analyzed by laser flash shadowgraphy. The peak pressure of the laser-induced shock wave was approximately two times greater than that of air breakdown at the same laser fluence. The proposed method of shock wave generation is expected to be useful in various applications of laser shock processing, including surface cleaning.

  3. Threshold selection for regional peaks-over-threshold data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Martin; Jongbloed, Geurt; Adri Buishand, T.

    2016-04-01

    A hurdle in the peaks-over-threshold approach for analyzing extreme values is the selection of the threshold. A method is developed to reduce this obstacle in the presence of multiple, similar data samples. This is for instance the case in many environmental applications. The idea is to combine threshold selection methods into a regional method. Regionalized versions of the threshold stability and the mean excess plot are presented as graphical tools for threshold selection. Moreover, quantitative approaches based on the bootstrap distribution of the spatially averaged Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling test statistics are introduced. It is demonstrated that the proposed regional method leads to an increased sensitivity for too low thresholds, compared to methods that do not take into account the regional information. The approach can be used for a wide range of univariate threshold selection methods. We test the methods using simulated data and present an application to rainfall data from the Dutch water board Vallei en Veluwe.

  4. How much North African dust emission is associated with breakdowns of nocturnal low-level jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, S.; Schepanski, K.; Heinold, B.; Knippertz, P.; Tegen, I.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosol has important impacts on atmospheric radiation transfer, optical properties and precipitability of clouds, as well as human health and eco-systems. Time, location and amount of dust emission are key factors for simulating the atmospheric life cycle of dust and its effects accurately. Dust emission is a non-linear function of surface properties, and the momentum transfer from the atmosphere to the Earth's surface. A phenomenon capable of mobilizing dust is the Nocturnal Low-Level Jet (NLLJ), a wind speed maximum at night caused by air accelerating due to reduced dynamical friction in the nocturnal boundary layer. Momentum from the NLLJ is transferred downwards by turbulence, predominantly during the following morning when surface heating erodes the nocturnal temperature inversion. While this breakdown of NLLJs has been suggested to be a main driver for dust storms in North Africa, a quantitative investigation based on analysis data is lacking. As part of the European Research Council funded 'Desert Storms' project, this work presents the first statistical analysis of the importance of NLLJs for the mineral dust amount emitted in North Africa. A new automated detection algorithm for NLLJs has been developed for analyzing the spatio-temporal characteristics and associated mineral dust emission amounts. The algorithm is applied to the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim re-analysis for 1979-2010. Near-surface wind speed and soil moisture from ERA-interim drive an off-line dust model for calculating associated dust emission fluxes. Annually and spatially averaged, NLLJs form in 29 % of the nights in North Africa. The areal distribution of NLLJs highlights their frequent occurrence along the margins of the Saharan heat-low in summer, and in regions affected by mountain channeling like the Bodélé Depression, Chad, predominantly in winter. In these seasonally varying hotspots NLLJs are identified in 40-80 % of the nights

  5. Production of extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated UV radiation of GARPUN-MTW Ti : sapphire—KrF laser. Part 2. Accumulation of plasma electrons and electric discharge control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2013-04-01

    The problem of the production of extended (~1 m) plasma channels is studied in atmospheric air by amplitude-modulated laser pulses of UV radiation, which are a superposition of a subpicosecond USP train amplified in a regenerative KrF amplifier with an unstable confocal resonator and a quasi-stationary lasing pulse. The USPs possess a high (0.2-0.3 TW) peak power and efficiently ionise oxygen molecules due to multiphoton ionisation, and the quasi-stationary lasing pulse, which has a relatively long duration (~100 ns), maintains the electron density at a level ne = (3-5) × 1014 cm—3 by suppressing electron attachment to oxygen. Experiments in laser triggering of high-voltage electric discharges suggest that the use of combined pulses results in a significant lowering of the breakdown threshold and enables controlling the discharge trajectory with a higher efficiency in comparison with smooth pulses. It was shown that controlled breakdowns may develop with a delay of tens of microseconds relative to the laser pulse, which is many orders of magnitude greater than the lifetime of free electrons in the laser-induced plasma. We propose a mechanism for this breakdown, which involves speeding-up of the avalanche ionisation of the air by negative molecular oxygen ions with a low electron binding energy (~0.5 eV) and a long lifetime (~1 ms), which are produced upon cessation of the laser pulse.

  6. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement in methane and biodiesel flames using an ungated detector.

    PubMed

    Eseller, Kemal E; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to measure the equivalence ratio of CH(4)/air flames using gated detection. In this work, we have developed an ungated, miniature LIBS-based sensor for studying CH(4)/air and biodiesel flames. We have used this sensor to characterize the biodiesel flame. LIBS spectra of biodiesel flames were recorded with different ethanol concentrations in the biodiesel and also at different axial locations within the flame. The sensor performance was evaluated with a CH(4)/air flame. LIBS signals of N, O, and H from a CH(4)/air flame were used to determine the equivalence ratio. A linear relationship between the intensity ratio of H and O lines and the calculated equivalence ratio were obtained with this sensor. PMID:19122695

  7. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurement in methane and biodiesel flames using an ungated detector

    SciTech Connect

    Eseller, Kemal E.; Yueh, Fang Y.; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to measure the equivalence ratio of CH4/air flames using gated detection. In this work, we have developed an ungated, miniature LIBS-based sensor for studying CH4/air and biodiesel flames. We have used this sensor to characterize the biodiesel flame. LIBS spectra of biodiesel flames were recorded with different ethanol concentrations in the biodiesel and also at different axial locations within the flame. The sensor performance was evaluated with a CH4/air flame. LIBS signals of N, O, and H from a CH4/air flame were used to determine the equivalence ratio. A linear relationship between the intensity ratio of H and O lines and the calculated equivalence ratio were obtained with this sensor.

  8. Investigating the effective range of vacuum ultraviolet-mediated breakdown in high-power microwave metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chien-Hao Neher, Joel D. Booske, John H. Behdad, Nader

    2014-10-14

    Metamaterials and periodic structures operating under high-power excitations are susceptible to breakdown. It was recently demonstrated that a localized breakdown created in a given region of a periodic structure can facilitate breakdown in other regions of the structure where the intensity of the incident electromagnetic fields may not be high enough to cause breakdown under normal circumstances. It was also demonstrated that this phenomenon is due to the generation of vacuum ultraviolet radiation at the location of the initial discharge, which propagates to the neighboring regions (e.g., other unit cells in a periodic structure) and facilitates the generation of a discharge at a lower incident power level. In this paper, we present the results of an experimental study conducted to determine the effective range of this physical phenomenon for periodic structures that operate in air and in pure nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure levels. It is demonstrated that when breakdown is induced in a periodic structure using a high-power pulse with a frequency of 9.382 GHz, duration of 0.8 μs, and peak power level of 25 kW, this phenomenon is highly likely to happen in radii of approximately 16–17 mm from the location of the initial discharge under these test conditions. The results of this study are significant in designing metamaterials and periodic structures for high-power microwave applications as they suggest that a localized discharge created in such a periodic structure with a periodicity less than 16–17 mm can spread over a large surface and result in a distributed discharge.

  9. Human skeletal muscle protein breakdown during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Schluter, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Excretion of 3-methylhistidine (3-MH) in the urine is a useful measurement of myofibrillar protein breakdown. Bed rest, particularly with 6 degrees head-down tilt, is an accepted ground-based model for human spaceflight. The objectives of this report were to compare 3-MH excretion from two Life Sciences shuttle missions (duration 9.5 and 15 days, n = 9) and from 17 days of bed rest (n = 7) with 6 degrees head-down tilt. The bed rest study was designed to mimic an actual Life Sciences spaceflight and so incorporated an extensive battery of physiological tests focused on the musculoskeletal system. Results showed that nitrogen retention, based on excretion of nitrogen in the urine, was reduced during both bed rest [from 22 +/- 1 to 1 +/- 5 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 7; P < 0.05)] and spaceflight [from 57 +/- 9 to 19 +/- 3 mg N x kg(-1) x day(-1) (n = 9; P < 0.05)]. 3-MH excretion was unchanged with either bed rest [pre-bed rest 5.30 +/- 0.29 vs. bed rest 5.71 +/- 0.30 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1), n = 7; P = not significant (NS)] or spaceflight [preflight 4.98 +/- 0.37 vs. 4.59 +/- 0.39 micromol 3-MH x kg(-1) x day(-1) in-flight, n = 9; P = NS]. We conclude that 1) 3-MH excretion was unaffected by spaceflight on the shuttle or with bed rest plus exercise, and 2) because protein breakdown (elevated 3-MH) was increased on Skylab but not on the shuttle, it follows that muscle protein breakdown is not an inevitable consequence of spaceflight.

  10. Nonlinear breakdowns in boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Frank T.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical studies of boundary-layer transition are described, based on high Reynolds numbers and with attention drawn to nonlinear interactions, breakdowns and scales. The article notes in particular truly nonlinear theories for which the mean-flow profile is completely altered from its original state. Two- and three-dimensional flow theory and conjectures on turbulent boundary-layer structures are included. Specific recent findings noted, and in qualitative agreement with experiments, are: nonlinear finite-time break-ups in unsteady interactive boundary layers; strong vortex/wave interactions; and prediction of turbulent boundary-layer displacement- and stress sublayer-thicknesses.

  11. Theoretical and experimental investigation of vortex breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, E.

    1986-01-01

    The slender-vortex approximation was analyzed for incompressible and compressible flow. First the equations of motion were reduced in an order of magnitude analysis. Then compatibility conditions were formulated for the inflow conditions. Thereafter finite-difference-solutions were constructed for incompressible and compressible flow. Finally it was shown that these solutions can be used to describe the flow in slender vortices. The analysis of the breakdown process must, however, be excluded, since its upstream influence cannot be predicted with the slender vortex approximation. The investigaton of this problem is left for future work.

  12. Bayesian estimation of dose thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groer, P. G.; Carnes, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    An example is described of Bayesian estimation of radiation absorbed dose thresholds (subsequently simply referred to as dose thresholds) using a specific parametric model applied to a data set on mice exposed to 60Co gamma rays and fission neutrons. A Weibull based relative risk model with a dose threshold parameter was used to analyse, as an example, lung cancer mortality and determine the posterior density for the threshold dose after single exposures to 60Co gamma rays or fission neutrons from the JANUS reactor at Argonne National Laboratory. The data consisted of survival, censoring times and cause of death information for male B6CF1 unexposed and exposed mice. The 60Co gamma whole-body doses for the two exposed groups were 0.86 and 1.37 Gy. The neutron whole-body doses were 0.19 and 0.38 Gy. Marginal posterior densities for the dose thresholds for neutron and gamma radiation were calculated with numerical integration and found to have quite different shapes. The density of the threshold for 60Co is unimodal with a mode at about 0.50 Gy. The threshold density for fission neutrons declines monotonically from a maximum value at zero with increasing doses. The posterior densities for all other parameters were similar for the two radiation types.

  13. Time-dependent MOS breakdown. [of Na contaminated capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. P.; Bates, E. T.; Maserjian, J.

    1976-01-01

    A general model for time-dependent breakdown in metal-oxide-silicon (MOS) structures is developed and related to experimental measurements on samples deliberately contaminated with Na. A statistical method is used for measuring the breakdown probability as a function of log time and applied field. It is shown that three time regions of breakdown can be explained respectively in terms of silicon surface defects, ion emission from the metal interface, and lateral ion diffusion at the silicon interface.

  14. Theoretical and experimental studies of vortex breakdown in a lean, premixed swirl-stabilized combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeh, Chukwueloka O. U.

    Increasingly stringent emissions regulations on fossil fuel-burning combustors in land-based and aviation gas turbine engines has led engine manufacturers to turn to lean burning premixed combustors. In modern lean premixed gas turbine combustors, flame stabilization is achieved by the use of a high level of inlet swirl and an expansion into a larger chamber. This predisposes the inlet vortex flow to transition to a vortex breakdown state, which is characterized by a stagnation and recirculation zone near the exit plane of the inlet region. A compact, turbulent and highly mixed flame results. Although this breakdown phenomenon helps reduce emissions drastically compared to rich-burn engines, it also contributes to the formation of thermo-acoustic instabilities (or combustion dynamics), flashback and lean blow out, which hinder performance and in extreme cases, causes very expensive damage to the combustion system. Theoretical, computational and experimental studies of vortex breakdown in a finite length, axisymmetric chamber with a swirling inlet flow demonstrate that critical conditions for the first appearance of breakdown in the combustion chamber as well as in the combustor's inlet region govern the flow's behavior. These critical conditions are satisfied for both the average and the instantaneous behavior of the flow for ambient temperature, preheated and lean premixed reacting flows. Good agreement is found between the theoretical and numerical simulations, as well as the experimental results. Results show that these critical conditions, as well as the appearance, location, size and stability of the breakdown are affected by inlet airflow rate, inlet air temperature, flame temperature (in reacting flow), inlet tube length, dump plane configuration and chamber air leakage. In the presence of combustion, experimental results show that the existence of a breakdown zone, its shape, location and stability influence flame stabilization, combustion dynamics

  15. Pre-breakdown evaluation of gas discharge mechanisms in microgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Semnani, Abbas; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2013-04-29

    The individual contributions of various gas discharge mechanisms to total pre-breakdown current in microgaps are quantified numerically. The variation of contributions of field emission and secondary electron emission with increasing electric field shows contrasting behavior even for a given gap size. The total current near breakdown decreases rapidly with gap size indicating that microscale discharges operate in a high-current, low-voltage regime. This study provides the first such analysis of breakdown mechanisms and aids in the formulation of physics-based theories for microscale breakdown.

  16. Effect of droplet-induced breakdown on CARS temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Rankin, D. ); Switzer, G.L. ); Obringer, C.A.; Jackson, T. )

    1990-07-20

    This research examines the potential for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) to rovide reliable gas temperature measurements in the presence of liquid droplets. The droplets cause dielectric breakdown by focusing the CARS laser beams. This breakdown produces a plasma that can disrupt or obscure the CARS signal. Specifically, we examine the influence of laser induced breakdown on the CARS signal, and we determine the importance of droplet position relative to the CARS focal volume and droplet concentration on the reliability of CARS temperature measurements in droplet-laden flows. In addition, we propose a reliable data reduction procedure to minimize the disruptive influence of laser induced breakdown on CARS temperature.

  17. Laser radiation attenuation by sparks of optical breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnik, A. P.; Semenov, L. P.; Skripkin, A. M.; Volkovitskii, O. A.

    1989-06-01

    A breakdown generated by laser radiation in a gas contaminated by aerosol particles is known to occur at much lower radiation intensities than in case of pure gases. Laser radiation is heavily attenuated by sparks of plasma formed at breakdowns. Energy loss estimation is important at radiation propagation in the atmosphere and in laser resonators. The breakdown phenomenon may be used in diagnostics of the atmospheric aerosol contamination events. The report presents experimental data on the influence of aerosol size distribution and concentration on optical breakdown generation and other results.

  18. Laser Radiation Attenuation By Sparks Of Optical Breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budnik, A. P.; Semenov, L. P.; Skripkin, A. M.; Volkovitsky, O. A.

    1990-01-01

    A breakdown generated by laser radiation in a gas contaminated by aerosol particles is known to occur at much lower radiation intensities than in case of pure gases, Laser radiation is heavily attenuated by sparks of plasma formed at breakdowns. Energy loss estimation is important at radiation propagation in the atmosphere and in laser resonators. The breakdown phenomenon may be used in diagnostics of the atmospheric aerosol contamination events. The report presents experimental data on the influence of aerosol size distribution and concentration on optical breakdown generation and other results.

  19. Functions of Carotenoid Metabolites and Breakdown Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    It is not only intact carotenoids but also fragments of carotenoid molecules that have important natural functions and actions. The electron-rich polyene chain of the carotenoids is very susceptible to oxidative breakdown, which may be enzymic or non-enzymic. Central cleavage gives C20 compounds, retinoids, as described in Chapter 16. Cleavage at other positions gives smaller fragments, notably C10, C13 and C15 compounds that retain the carotenoid end group. The formation of these is described in Chapter 17 and in Volume 3, Chapter 4. Oxidative breakdown can also take place during storage, processing and curing of plant material, and the products contribute to the desired aroma/flavour properties of, for example, tea, wine and tobacco. The importance of vitamin A (C20) in animals is well known. Vitamin A deficiency is still a major concern in many parts of the world. It can lead to blindness and serious ill-health or death, especially in young children. Volatile smaller carotenoid fragments (`norisoprenoids') are widespread scent/flavour compounds in plants.

  20. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-09-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML.

  1. Effects of cement alkalinity, exposure conditions and steel-concrete interface on the time-to-corrosion and chloride threshold for reinforcing steel in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Jingak

    Effects of (1) cement alkalinity (low, normal and high), (2) exposure conditions (RH and temperature), (3) rebar surface condition (as-received versus cleaned) and (4) density and distribution of air voids at the steel-concrete interface on the chloride threshold and time-to-corrosion for reinforcing steel in concrete have been studied. Also, experiments were performed to evaluate effects of RH and temperature on the diffusion of chloride in concrete and develop a method for ex-situ pH measurement of concrete pore water. Once specimens were fabricated and exposed to a corrosive chloride solution, various experimental techniques were employed to determine time-to-corrosion, chloride threshold, diffusion coefficient and void density along the rebar trace as well as pore water pH. Based upon the resultant data, several findings related to the above parameters have been obtained as summarized below. First, time for the corrosion initiation was longest for G109 concrete specimens with high alkalinity cement (HA). Also, chloride threshold increased with increasing time-to-corrosion and cement alkalinity. Consequently, the HA specimens exhibited the highest chloride threshold compared to low and normal alkalinity ones. Second, high temperature and temperature variations reduced time-to-corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete since chloride diffusion was accelerated at higher temperature and possibly by temperature variations. The lowest chloride threshold values were found for outdoor exposed specimens suggesting that variation of RH or temperature (or both) facilitated rapid chloride diffusion. Third, an elevated time-to-corrosion and chloride threshold values were found for the wire brushed steel specimens compared to as-received ones. The higher ratio of [OH-]/[Fe n+] on the wire brushed steel surface compared to that of as-received case can be the possible cause because the higher ratio of this parameter enables the formation of a more protective passive film on

  2. Detection of Operator Performance Breakdown as an Automation Triggering Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, Hyo-Sang; Lee, Paul U.; Landry, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Performance breakdown (PB) has been anecdotally described as a state where the human operator "loses control of context" and "cannot maintain required task performance." Preventing such a decline in performance is critical to assure the safety and reliability of human-integrated systems, and therefore PB could be useful as a point at which automation can be applied to support human performance. However, PB has never been scientifically defined or empirically demonstrated. Moreover, there is no validated objective way of detecting such a state or the transition to that state. The purpose of this work is: 1) to empirically demonstrate a PB state, and 2) to develop an objective way of detecting such a state. This paper defines PB and proposes an objective method for its detection. A human-in-the-loop study was conducted: 1) to demonstrate PB by increasing workload until the subject reported being in a state of PB, and 2) to identify possible parameters of a detection method for objectively identifying the subjectively-reported PB point, and 3) to determine if the parameters are idiosyncratic to an individual/context or are more generally applicable. In the experiment, fifteen participants were asked to manage three concurrent tasks (one primary and two secondary) for 18 minutes. The difficulty of the primary task was manipulated over time to induce PB while the difficulty of the secondary tasks remained static. The participants' task performance data was collected. Three hypotheses were constructed: 1) increasing workload will induce subjectively-identified PB, 2) there exists criteria that identifies the threshold parameters that best matches the subjectively-identified PB point, and 3) the criteria for choosing the threshold parameters is consistent across individuals. The results show that increasing workload can induce subjectively-identified PB, although it might not be generalizable-only 12 out of 15 participants declared PB. The PB detection method based on

  3. Performance breakdown in optimal stimulus decoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostal, Lubomir; Lansky, Petr; Pilarski, Stevan

    2015-06-01

    Objective. One of the primary goals of neuroscience is to understand how neurons encode and process information about their environment. The problem is often approached indirectly by examining the degree to which the neuronal response reflects the stimulus feature of interest. Approach. In this context, the methods of signal estimation and detection theory provide the theoretical limits on the decoding accuracy with which the stimulus can be identified. The Cramér-Rao lower bound on the decoding precision is widely used, since it can be evaluated easily once the mathematical model of the stimulus-response relationship is determined. However, little is known about the behavior of different decoding schemes with respect to the bound if the neuronal population size is limited. Main results. We show that under broad conditions the optimal decoding displays a threshold-like shift in performance in dependence on the population size. The onset of the threshold determines a critical range where a small increment in size, signal-to-noise ratio or observation time yields a dramatic gain in the decoding precision. Significance. We demonstrate the existence of such threshold regions in early auditory and olfactory information coding. We discuss the origin of the threshold effect and its impact on the design of effective coding approaches in terms of relevant population size.

  4. Activation of bovine oocytes penetrated after germinal vesicle breakdown.

    PubMed

    Abeydeera, L R; Okuda, K; Niwa, K

    1994-11-01

    The present study was designed to examine the ability of bovine oocytes, after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), to be activated by sperm penetration and the sequence of sperm nuclear transformation. Bovine oocytes cultured for 8 h in maturation medium (tissue culture medium TCM-199 containing 10% fetal calf serum) were inseminated in Brackett and Oliphant's medium supplemented with bovine serum albumin (10 mg/ml), caffeine (5 mM) and heparin (10 micrograms/ml). When oocytes were transferred to the maturation medium 8 h after insemination and additionally cultured for 5-40 h at 39 degrees C in 5% CO2 in air, 71-76% of oocytes were penetrated and polyspermy (67-75%) was common. The proportions of penetrated oocytes that were activated significantly increased with the lapse of the additional culture time, reaching 88% and 87% by 25 and 40 h after additional culture, respectively. When compared with unpenetrated oocytes, significantly higher proportions of penetrated oocytes reached metaphase II or beyond 15 and 25 h after additional culture. After penetration, sperm nuclei were transformed into metaphase chromosomes and then to telophase chromosomes before the formation of male pronuclei. These results provide evidence that bovine oocytes acquire the ability to respond to sperm-mediated activation soon after GVBD. PMID:8665157

  5. Detection of explosives with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Hua; Ge, Cong-Hui; Huang, Zhi-Wen

    2012-12-01

    Our recent work on the detection of explosives by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is reviewed in this paper. We have studied the physical mechanism of laser-induced plasma of an organic explosive, TNT. The LIBS spectra of TNT under single-photon excitation are simulated using MATLAB. The variations of the atomic emission lines intensities of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen versus the plasma temperature are simulated too. We also investigate the time-resolved LIBS spectra of a common inorganic explosive, black powder, in two kinds of surrounding atmospheres, air and argon, and find that the maximum value of the O atomic emission line SBR of black powder occurs at a gate delay of 596 ns. Another focus of our work is on using chemometic methods such as principle component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to distinguish the organic explosives from organic materials such as plastics. A PLS-DA model for classification is built. TNT and seven types of plastics are chosen as samples to test the model. The experimental results demonstrate that LIBS coupled with the chemometric techniques has the capacity to discriminate organic explosive from plastics.

  6. Study of Bacterial Samples Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W, A. Farooq; M, Atif; W, Tawfik; M, S. Alsalhi; Z, A. Alahmed; M, Sarfraz; J, P. Singh

    2014-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to investigate two different types of bacteria, Escherichia coli (B1) and Micrococcus luteus (B2) deposited on glass slides using Spectrolaser 7000. LIBS spectra were analyzed using spectrolaser software. LIBS spectrum of glass substrate was compared with bacteria spectra. Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, S, Cl, Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, C, H and CN-band appeared in bacterial samples in air. Two carbon lines at 193.02 nm, 247.88 nm and one hydrogen line at 656.28 nm with intensity ratios of 1.9, 1.83 and 1.53 appeared in bacterial samples B1 and B2 respectively. Carbon and hydrogen are the important components of the bio-samples like bacteria and other cancer cells. Investigation on LIBS spectra of the samples in He and Ar atmospheres is also presented. Ni lines appeared only in B2 sample in Ar atmosphere. From the present experimental results we are able to show that LIBS technique has a potential in the identification and discrimination of different types of bacteria.

  7. RF Breakdown Studies in Tungsten and Copper Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, L.; Adolphsen, C.; Beebe, S.; Döbert, S.; Luhmann, N. C.; Pearson, C.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Scheitrum, G.; Wuensch, W.

    2006-11-01

    This paper reports on experimental results from the SLAC NLC accelerator structure closeout program, and discusses a study that was conducted to improve the smoothness of machined tungsten for use in high gradient structures. At the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA), an X-band (11.424 GHz) structure was operated at a lower temperature to determine whether this would decrease the low rate of breakdowns that still occur after initial processing. Also, various vacuum venting experiments were performed to determine the impact of air, airborne particulates, and oxidation on the performance of a processed accelerator structure. As part of a more long-range high-gradient structure development program, alternative materials to copper are being explored. The CLIC study group at CERN has conducted several accelerator experiments at 30 GHz with structures that have tungsten and molybdenum iris inserts. SLAC has also tested versions of the CLIC 30 GHz design scaled to 11.424 GHz. The results have prompted a tungsten material study directed at exploring new fabrication processes that would provide a cleaner and smoother tungsten surface topography suitable for high gradient applications. A significantly improved tungsten surface finish resulted from this material study, and a single cell X-band cavity containing noses with such tungsten surfaces will be high power tested soon.

  8. Effects of Accelerated Aging on Fiber Damage Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Setchell, R.E.

    1999-02-15

    Laser-induced damage mechanisms that can occur during high-intensity fiber transmission have been under study for a number of years. Our particular interest in laser initiation of explosives has led us to examine damage processes associated with the transmission of Q-switched, Nd:YAG pulses at 1.06 {micro}m through step-index, multimode, fused silica fiber. Laser breakdown at the fiber entrance face is often the first process to limit fiber transmission but catastrophic damage can also occur at either fiber end face, within the initial entry segment of the fiber, and at other internal sites along the fiber path. Past studies have examined how these various damage mechanisms depend upon fiber end-face preparation, fiber fixturing and routing, laser characteristics, and laser-to-fiber injection optics. In some applications of interest, however, a fiber transmission system may spend years in storage before it is used. Consequently, an important additional issue for these applications is whether or not there are aging processes that can result in lower damage thresholds over time. Fiber end-face contamination would certainly lower breakdown and damage thresholds at these surfaces, but careful design of hermetic seals in connectors and other end-face fixtures can minimize this possibility. A more subtle possibility would be a process for the slow growth of internal defects that could lead to lower thresholds for internal damage. In the current study, two approaches to stimulating the growth of internal defects were used in an attempt to produce observable changes in internal damage thresholds. In the first approach test fibers were subjected to a very high tensile stress for a time sufficient for some fraction to fail from static fatigue. In the second approach, test fibers were subjected to a combination of high tensile stress and large, cyclic temperature variations. Both of these approaches were rather arbitrary due to the lack of an established growth mechanism for

  9. Mars Dust Threshold Under Heated Surface Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquilla, R. V.; White, B. R.

    2002-12-01

    A wind tunnel was used to study the effects of a heated surface, thereby creating an unstable near-surface atmosphere, on the threshold of aeolian-blown (windblown) dust-size particles (1-2 mm) under Mars-simulated pressure. Unstable conditions on Mars typically arise during the mid to late afternoon hours due to the accumulation of daytime solar-radiation. When the surface is warmer than the atmosphere just above it, vertical turbulence is increased. Thus, loose dust particles can be more easily lofted and mixed at a threshold wind speed lower than that known under neutral atmospheric conditions. For this wind-tunnel study, unstable (heated) surface conditions were simulated based on the negative temperature gradients and surface bulk Richardson numbers estimated from the Mars Pathfinder Lander (MPL) mission data during the mid-afternoon to early evening Mars period. According to other missions, evidence of highly active dust suspension during this part of the Mars daytime hours was recorded, including the presence of "dust devils". Experiments were performed in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel (MARSWIT) located at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. Based on data acquired from the MPL site, the mean surface pressure was found to be 6.75 mb. Thus, simulations in MARSWIT were conducted at 10-mb atmospheric pressure using air, which agrees with a dynamically similar environment of 6.5 mb on Mars. In order to attain the necessary vertical temperature gradients that would develop an unstable layer, a test bed was heated by sub-surface heaters. Three surface roughness conditions were simulated, over which not only dust threshold was measured but also velocity and temperature profiles were acquired under various heating levels. Boundary layer measurements and analysis conducted under neutral conditions were used to estimate roughness height, zo, and the friction speed, u*, for all stability conditions. Dust threshold tests were conducted using a

  10. A factorization approach to next-to-leading-power threshold logarithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonocore, D.; Laenen, E.; Magnea, L.; Melville, S.; Vernazza, L.; White, C. D.

    2015-06-01

    Threshold logarithms become dominant in partonic cross sections when the selected final state forces gluon radiation to be soft or collinear. Such radiation factorizes at the level of scattering amplitudes, and this leads to the resummation of threshold logarithms which appear at leading power in the threshold variable. In this paper, we consider the extension of this factorization to include effects suppressed by a single power of the threshold variable. Building upon the Low-Burnett-Kroll-Del Duca (LBKD) theorem, we propose a decomposition of radiative amplitudes into universal building blocks, which contain all effects ultimately responsible for next-to-leading-power (NLP) threshold logarithms in hadronic cross sections for electroweak annihilation processes. In particular, we provide a NLO evaluation of the radiative jet function, responsible for the interference of next-to-soft and collinear effects in these cross sections. As a test, using our expression for the amplitude, we reproduce all abelian-like NLP threshold logarithms in the NNLO Drell-Yan cross section, including the interplay of real and virtual emissions. Our results are a significant step towards developing a generally applicable resummation formalism for NLP threshold effects, and illustrate the breakdown of next-to-soft theorems for gauge theory amplitudes at loop level.

  11. Damage thresholds for terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Danielle R.; McQuade, Jill; Vincelette, Rebecca; Ibey, Bennet; Payne, Jason; Thomas, Robert; Roach, W. P.; Roth, Caleb L.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2010-02-01

    Several international organizations establish minimum safety standards to ensure that workers and the general population are protected against adverse health effects associated with electromagnetic radiation. Suitable standards are typically defined using published experimental data. To date, few experimental studies have been conducted at Terahertz (THz) frequencies, and as a result, current THz standards have been defined using extrapolated estimates from neighboring spectral regions. In this study, we used computational modeling and experimental approaches to determine tissue-damage thresholds at THz frequencies. For the computational modeling efforts, we used the Arrhenius damage integral to predict damage-thresholds. We determined thresholds experimentally for both long (minutes) and short (seconds) THz exposures. For the long exposure studies, we used an in-house molecular gas THz laser (υ= 1.89 THz, 189.92 mW/cm2, 10 minutes) and excised porcine skin. For the short exposure studies, we used the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Jefferson Laboratory (υ= 0.1-1.0 THz, 2.0-14.0 mW/cm2, 2 seconds) and wet chamois cloths. Thresholds were determined using conventional damage score determination and probit analysis techniques, and tissue temperatures were measured using infrared thermographic techniques. We found that the FEL was ideal for tissue damage studies, while our in-house THz source was not suitable to determine tissue damage thresholds. Using experimental data, the tissue damage threshold (ED50) was determined to be 7.16 W/cm2. This value was in well agreement with that predicted using our computational models. We hope that knowledge of tissue-damage thresholds at THz frequencies helps to ensure the safe use of THz radiation.

  12. Confusion and its dynamics during device comprehension with breakdown scenarios.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Sidney; Graesser, Art

    2014-09-01

    The incidence and dynamics of confusion during complex learning and problem solving were investigated in an experiment where participants first read illustrated texts on everyday devices (e.g., an electric bell) followed by breakdown scenarios reflecting device malfunctions (e.g., "When a person rang the bell there was a short ding and then no sound was heard"). The breakdown scenarios were expected to trigger impasses and put participants in a state of cognitive disequilibrium where they would experience confusion and engage in effortful confusion resolution activities in order to restore equilibrium. The results confirmed that participants reported more confusion when presented with the breakdown scenarios compared to control scenarios that involved focusing on important device components in the absence of malfunctions. A second-by-second analysis of the dynamics of confusion yielded two characteristic trajectories that distinguished participants who partially resolved their confusion from those who remained confused. Participants who were successful in partial confusion resolution while processing the breakdowns outperformed their counterparts on knowledge assessments after controlling for scholastic aptitude, engagement, and frustration. This effect was amplified for those who were highly confused by the breakdowns. There was no direct breakdown vs. control effect on learning, but being actively engaged and partially resolving confusion during breakdown processing were positive predictors of increased learning with the breakdown compared to control scenarios. Implications of our findings for theories that highlight the role of impasses, cognitive disequilibrium, and confusion to learning are discussed. PMID:24973629

  13. 7 CFR 51.1009 - Stylar end breakdown.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stylar end breakdown. 51.1009 Section 51.1009... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Persian (Tahiti) Limes Definitions § 51.1009 Stylar end breakdown... affected area becomes darker and usually sinks below the healthy surface, but the area remains firm...

  14. Update on the biochemistry of chlorophyll breakdown.

    PubMed

    Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    In land plants, chlorophyll is broken down to colorless linear tetrapyrroles in a highly conserved multi-step pathway. The pathway is termed the 'PAO pathway', because the opening of the chlorine macrocycle present in chlorophyll catalyzed by pheophorbide a oxygenase (PAO), the key enzyme of the pathway, provides the characteristic structural basis found in all further downstream chlorophyll breakdown products. To date, most of the biochemical steps of the PAO pathway have been elucidated and genes encoding many of the chlorophyll catabolic enzymes been identified. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the biochemistry of the PAO pathway and provides insight into recent progress made in the field that indicates that the pathway is more complex than thought in the past. PMID:22790503

  15. Vortex Breakdown-Aircraft Tail Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younjong; Rockwell, Donald

    2003-11-01

    The interaction of vortex breakdown with the tail of an aircraft can lead to severe unsteady loading and vibration. A technique of high-image-density particle image velocimetry is employed to characterize the instantaneous and averaged structure of a broken-down vortex with a generic tail configuration. Interaction of the primary (incident) vortex with the tail results in formation of a relatively large-scale cluster of secondary vorticity. The coexistence of these primary and secondary vortical structures is intimately associated with the unsteadiness of the vortex system, and thereby the near-surface fluctuations associated with buffet loading. Instantaneous and averaged representations of the vortex-tail interaction provide insight into the complex physics. Furthermore, a low order POD model is employed to characterize the most energetic modes of the vortex-tail interaction.

  16. State Regulation, Family Breakdown, and Lone Motherhood

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Using a range of parish records, records from the Registrar General of Scotland, charity organizations, and media reports, this article contributes to the historiography which evaluates the effects of World War I in Britain as well as the history of lone mothers and their children. It highlights how during the war, women, especially lone mothers, made significant gains through the welfare system, changing approaches to illegitimacy and the plentiful nature of women’s work but also how in doing so this brought them under greater surveillance by the state, local parishes, and charity organizations. Moreover, as this article will demonstrate, many of the gains made by women were short-lived and in fact the war contributed to high levels of family breakdown and gendered and intergenerational poverty endured by lone mothers and their children. PMID:26538794

  17. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Yuan, Ting-Bi; Hou, Zong-Yu; Zhou, Wei-Dong; Lu, Ji-Dong; Ding, Hong-Bin; Zeng, Xiao-Yan

    2014-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been regarded as a future superstar for chemical analysis for years due to its unique features such as little or no sample preparation, remote sensing, and fast and multi-element analysis. Chinese LIBS community is one of the most dynamically developing communities in the World. The aim of the work is to inspect what have been done in China for LIBS development and, based on the understanding of the overall status, to identify the challenges and opportunities for the future development. In this paper, the scientific contributions from Chinese LIBS community are reviewed for the following four aspects: fundamentals, instrumentation, data processing and modeling, and applications; and the driving force of LIBS development in China is analyzed, the critical issues for successful LIBS application are discussed, and in our opinion, the potential direction to improve the technology and to realize large scale commercialization in China is proposed.

  18. Cloud-screening for Africa using a geographically and seasonally variable infrared threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Kalb, V. L.

    1991-01-01

    A spatially variable monthly, infrared cloud-threshold data base has been used to screen cloud-contaminated observations from radiances measured by the NOAA-9 AVHRR over Africa. Cloud-screening through a monthly average infrared threshold based on measured surface air temperature, which is geographically dependent, shows an improvement over using a seasonally and geographically independent thermal cloud threshold of 287 K. It is found that differences in cloud-screening for these two thresholds occur for cases of lower altitude clouds or subpixel clouds where the radiative temperature is higher than the 287 K infrared threshold, yet colder than the variable threshold developed by Stowe et al. (1988) for the Nimbus-7 global cloud climatology. The variable IR threshold is shown to be effective over persistently cloud-covered regions, such as the coastal region of the Gulf of Guinea, but may introduce some erroneous cloud identifications over mountains.

  19. On the electric breakdown in liquid argon at centimeter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M.; Blatter, A.; Ereditato, A.; Goeldi, D.; Janos, S.; Kreslo, I.; Luethi, M.; von Rohr, C. Rudolf; Strauss, T.; Weber, M. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a study on the dependence of electric breakdown discharge properties on electrode geometry and the breakdown field in liquid argon near its boiling point. The measurements were performed with a spherical cathode and a planar anode at distances ranging from 0.1 mm to 10.0 mm. A detailed study of the time evolution of the breakdown volt-ampere characteristics was performed for the first time. It revealed a slow streamer development phase in the discharge. The results of a spectroscopic study of the visible light emission of the breakdowns complement the measurements. The light emission from the initial phase of the discharge is attributed to electro-luminescence of liquid argon following a current of drifting electrons. These results contribute to set benchmarks for breakdown-safe design of ionization detectors, such as Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPC).

  20. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Monsé, Christian; Sucker, Kirsten; Hoffmeyer, Frank; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Bünger, Jürgen; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60-350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  1. The Influence of Humidity on Assessing Irritation Threshold of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Sucker, Kirsten; Jettkant, Birger; Berresheim, Hans; Brüning, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A large number of occupational exposure limit values (OELs) are based on avoiding of sensory irritation of the eyes and the upper respiratory tract. In order to investigate the chemosensory effect range of a chemical, odor and sensory irritation thresholds (lateralization thresholds, LTs) can be assessed. Humidity affects olfactory function and thus influences odor thresholds; however, a similar effect has not been shown for sensory irritation thresholds. The purpose of the present study was to explore whether LTs for ammonia vapor vary depending on the water vapor content of the inspired stimulus. Eight healthy nonsmoking volunteers were simultaneously exposed to ammonia vapor through one nostril and clean air through the other and were asked to determine which nostril received the chemical. Within experimental runs, ascending ammonia concentrations (60–350 ppm) that were either dry or humidified were administered at fixed time intervals. Geometric mean LTs obtained at wet (181 ppm) or dry (172 ppm) conditions did not differ significantly (P = 0.19) and were within the range of those reported by previous studies. These results suggest that humidity is not a critical factor in determining sensory irritation thresholds for ammonia, and future studies will examine if these findings are transferable to sensory irritation thresholds for other chemicals. PMID:27379250

  2. Development of Hybrid Product Breakdown Structure for NASA Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaghan, Mark W.; Henry, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The Product Breakdown Structure is traditionally a method of identification of the products of a project in a tree structure. It is a tool used to assess, plan, document, and display the equipment requirements for a project. It is part of a product based planning technique, and attempts to break down all components of a project in as much detail as possible, so that nothing is overlooked. The PBS for ground systems at the Kennedy Space Center is being developed to encompass the traditional requirements including the alignment of facility, systems, and components to the organizational hierarchy. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure is a hybrid in nature in that some aspects of a work breakdown structure will be incorporated and merged with the Architecture Concept of Operations, Master Subsystem List, customer interface, and assigned management responsibility. The Ground Operations Product Breakdown Structure needs to be able to identify the flexibility of support differing customers (internal and external) usage of ground support equipment within the Kennedy Space Center launch and processing complex. The development of the Product Breakdown Structure is an iterative activity Initially documenting the organization hierarchy structure and relationships. The Product Breakdown Structure identifies the linkage between the customer program requirements, allocation of system resources, development of design goals, and identification logistics products. As the Product Breakdown Structure progresses the incorporation of the results of requirement planning for the customer occurs identifying facility needs and systems. The mature Product Breakdown Structure is baselined with a hierarchical drawing, the Product Breakdown Structure database, and an associated document identifying the verification of the data through the life cycle of the program/product line. This paper will document, demonstrate, and identify key aspects of the life cycle of a Hybrid Product

  3. In-depth analysis of ITER-like samples composition using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercadier, L.; Semerok, A.; Kizub, P. A.; Leontyev, A. V.; Hermann, J.; Grisolia, C.; Thro, P.-Y.

    2011-07-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic in-depth measurements were undertaken for two ITER-like calibrated multi-layered samples made of W-Mo or W/C layers on Ti-substrates. The samples were previously characterized by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. For laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic measurements, pulses generated by Nd:YAG laser sources with 1064 nm, 532 nm, 355 nm and 266 nm wavelengths were applied. The effects of laser beam shaping, fluence and wavelength as well as the gas nature (air, Ar, He) and pressure were investigated. The results obtained with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopic in-depth measurements were compared to those obtained with glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and found to be in agreement. However, a mixing of the layers was observed and attributed to diffusion through the melted material and to the non-homogeneity of the laser beam spatial distribution. The depth resolution was found of the order of several thermal diffusion lengths but should be improved by using picosecond laser pulse duration. The results promote applications to tritium concentration measurements with depth resolution in the deposited layers of Tokamak first walls, as in the case of the future fusion reactor ITER.

  4. Breakdown simulations in a focused microwave beam within the simplified model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E. I.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2016-07-01

    The simplified model is proposed to simulate numerically air breakdown in a focused microwave beam. The model is 1D from the mathematical point of view, but it takes into account the spatial non-uniformity of microwave field amplitude along the beam axis. The simulations are completed for different frequencies and different focal lengths of microwave beams. The results demonstrate complicated regimes of the breakdown evolution which represents a series of repeated ionization waves. These waves start at the focal point and propagate towards incident microwave radiation. The ionization wave parameters vary during propagation. At relatively low frequencies, the propagation regime of subsequent waves can also change qualitatively. Each next ionization wave is less pronounced than the previous one, and the breakdown evolution approaches the steady state with relatively small plasma density. The ionization wave parameters are sensitive to the weak source of external ionization, but the steady state is independent on such a source. As the beam focal length decreases, the stationary plasma density increases and the onset of the steady state occurs faster.

  5. Remote time-resolved filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. L.; Liu, W.; Chin, S. L.

    2006-05-01

    We report, for what we believe to be the first time, on the feasibility of remote time-resolved filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy (FIBS) of biological materials. The fluorescence from egg white and yeast powder, induced by femtosecond laser pulse filamentation in air, was detected in the backward direction with targets located 3.5 m away from the detection system. The remarkably distinct spectra of egg white and yeast allow us to propose that this technique, time-resolved FIBS, could be potentially useful for remote detection and identification of harmful biological agents.

  6. Neutrino floor at ultralow threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strigari, Louis E.

    2016-05-01

    By lowering their energy threshold, direct dark matter searches can reach the neutrino floor with experimental technology that is now in development. The 7Be flux can be detected with ˜10 eV nuclear recoil energy threshold and 50 kg/yr exposure. The p e p flux can be detected with ˜3 ton/yr exposure, and the first detection of the CNO flux is possible with similar exposure. The p p flux can be detected with threshold of ˜eV and only ˜ kg /yr exposure. These can be the first pure neutral current measurements of the low-energy solar neutrino flux. Measuring this flux is important for low mass dark matter searches and for understanding the solar interior.

  7. Explosive percolation in thresholded networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaka, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    Explosive percolation in a network is a phase transition where a large portion of nodes becomes connected with an addition of a small number of edges. Although extensively studied in random network models and reconstructed real networks, explosive percolation has not been observed in a more realistic scenario where a network is generated by thresholding a similarity matrix describing between-node associations. In this report, I examine construction schemes of such thresholded networks, and demonstrate that explosive percolation can be observed by introducing edges in a particular order.

  8. Surface characterizations of color threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirson, Allen B.; Wandell, Brian A.; Varner, Denise C.; Brainard, David H.

    1990-01-01

    The paper evaluates how well three different parametric shapes, ellipsoids, rectangles, and parallelograms, serve as models of three-dimentional detection contours. The constraints of the procedures for deriving the best-fitting shapes on inferences about the theoretical visual detection mechanisms are described. Results of two statistical tests show that only the parallelogram fits the data with more precision than the variance in repeated threshold measurements, and thus provides a slightly better fit than the other two shapes. Nevertheless it does not serve as a better guide than the ellipsoidal model for interpolating from the measurements to thresholds in novel color directions.

  9. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-01

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  10. Wavelength dependence of repetitive-pulse laser-induced damage threshold in beta-BaB2O4.

    PubMed

    Kouta, H

    1999-01-20

    The dependence on wavelength of repetitive-pulse (10 Hz, 8-10 ns) laser-induced damage on beta barium metaborate (BBO) has been investigated. The thresholds of dielectric breakdown in bulk crystal have been found to be 0.3 GW/cm(2) at 266 nm, 0.9 GW/cm(2) at 355 nm, 2.3 GW/cm(2) at 532 nm, and 4.5 GW/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Results indicate two-photon absorption at 266 and 355 nm, which helps to produce an avalanche effect that causes breakdown at each of the four wavelengths tested. Neither the BBO refractive indices nor the absorption spectrum change until breakdown occurs. PMID:18305644

  11. Energetic initiators with narrow firing thresholds using Al/CuO Schottky junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Zhu, Peng; Li, Jie; Hu, Bo; Shen, Ruiqi; Ye, Yinghua

    2016-07-01

    We designed and prepared Schottky-junction-based Al/CuO energetic initiators with narrow firing thresholds according to Schottky barrier theory. Using various characterization methods, we preliminarily investigated the electrical breakdown property, withstand strike current ability, and multiple-firing performance of the energetic initiators. The breakdown voltage of the Al/CuO Schottky junction was ~8 V; and electrical breakdown in the initiators occurred one by one rather than simultaneously. The withstand strike current ability of the initiator mainly depended on the heat capacity of its ceramic plug when the electrical stimulus is more than ~8 V, its breakdown voltage. The ceramic plug can absorb heat from the initiator chip, letting the initiator withstand a constant current of 0.5 A for 20 s. More importantly, the initiators might be able to withstand hard electromagnetic interference by coupling the multiple-firing performance with an out-of-line slider in the explosive train. This knowledge of the characteristics of Schottky-junction-based Al/CuO energetic initiators will help in preparing highly insensitive, efficient initiating explosive devices for weapon systems.

  12. Implications of dielectric breakdown weathering for the lunar regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N.; Spence, H. E.; Izenberg, N.

    2015-12-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) penetrate the lunar regolith to depths of ~1 mm and cause deep dielectric charging. The greatest charging occurs in permanently shadowed regions (PSRs), where temperatures make the electrical conductivity extremely low, which inhibits dissipating the charge buildup. Charging by very large SEP events may create subsurface electric fields that are strong enough to cause dielectric breakdown, or sparking, in the upper ~1 mm. Previous work has shown that, in PSRs, this breakdown weathering may have affected 10-25% of the meteoritically gardened regolith in PSRs and may thus be comparable to meteoritic weathering. But even regolith at lower latitudes can reach temperatures <100 K at night, causing it to dissipate charging in a few days--still enough to allow significant charging during large SEP events. Consequently, regolith at lower latitudes may also be susceptible to breakdown. We show how up to a few percent of gardened regolith at lower latitudes may have experienced breakdown. We also estimate the percentage of regolith that experienced breakdown during the two events detected in January and March 2012 by the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER) aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Finally, we discuss what this more global view of breakdown weathering implies about the possibility of Apollo and Luna soil samples containing material that may have experienced breakdown.

  13. Temporal and spatial effects of ablation plume on number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol measured by laser-induced breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, H.; Kakehata, M.

    2013-05-01

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel method of evaluating the number density of droplets in an aerosol by laser-induced breakdown. The number density of droplets is evaluated from the volume in which the laser intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold intensity for droplets, and the number of droplets in this volume, which is evaluated by the experimentally observed breakdown probability. This measurement method requires a large number of laser shots for not only precise measurement but also highly temporally and spatially resolved density distribution in aerosol. Laser ablation plumes ejected from liquid droplets generated by breakdown disturb the density around the measurement points. Therefore, the recovery time of the density determines the maximum repetition rate of the probe laser irradiating a fixed point. The expansion range of the ablation plume determines the minimum distance at which the measurement points are unaffected by a neighboring breakdown when multiple laser beams are simultaneously irradiated. These laser irradiation procedures enable the measurement of the number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol at a large number of points within a short measurement time.

  14. Temporal and spatial effects of ablation plume on number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol measured by laser-induced breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Yashiro, H.; Kakehata, M.

    2013-05-07

    We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel method of evaluating the number density of droplets in an aerosol by laser-induced breakdown. The number density of droplets is evaluated from the volume in which the laser intensity exceeds the breakdown threshold intensity for droplets, and the number of droplets in this volume, which is evaluated by the experimentally observed breakdown probability. This measurement method requires a large number of laser shots for not only precise measurement but also highly temporally and spatially resolved density distribution in aerosol. Laser ablation plumes ejected from liquid droplets generated by breakdown disturb the density around the measurement points. Therefore, the recovery time of the density determines the maximum repetition rate of the probe laser irradiating a fixed point. The expansion range of the ablation plume determines the minimum distance at which the measurement points are unaffected by a neighboring breakdown when multiple laser beams are simultaneously irradiated. These laser irradiation procedures enable the measurement of the number density distribution of droplets in an aerosol at a large number of points within a short measurement time.

  15. New states above charm threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia J.; Lane, Kenneth; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We revise and extend expectations for the properties of charmonium states that lie above charm threshold, in light of new experimental information. We refine the Cornell coupled-channel model for the coupling of c{bar c} levels to two-meson states, defining resonance masses and widths by pole positions in the complex energy plane, and suggest new targets for experiment.

  16. Estimating Conservation Thresholds on Rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is a multi-agency effort designed to quantify the environmental and economic impacts of land conservation practices. One of USDA’s goals is to identify Conservation Thresholds, the point at which accelerated erosion occurs, and to examine the usefu...

  17. Threshold Concepts and Pedagogic Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief exposure to the development of the threshold concepts framework (TCF), the intention being to illuminate for interested readers a broader landscape of research activity than that perhaps conveyed by the individual contributions to this special edition. Design/Methodology/Approach: There is…

  18. Crossing Thresholds in Academic Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual thresholds in relation to academic reading which might be crossed by undergraduate English Literature students. It is part of a wider study following 16 students through three years of undergraduate study. It uses theoretical ideas from Bakhtin and Foucault to analyse interviews with English lecturers. It…

  19. Milagro: A low energy threshold extensive air shower array

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnis, C.

    1994-12-31

    Observations of high-energy gamma rays from astronomical sources have revolutionized our view of the cosmos. Gamma rays with energies up to {approximately}10 GeV can be observed directly with space-based instruments. Above 100 GeV the low flux of gamma rays requires one to utilize ground-based instruments. Milagro is a new type of gamma-ray detector based on water Cerenkov technology. This new design will enable to continuously observe the entire overhead sky, and be sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above {approximately}250 GeV. These attributes make Milagro an ideal detector for the study of high-energy transient phenomenon.

  20. Single cell transfection by laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped gold nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Ploschner, Martin; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-03-01

    Cell selective introduction of therapeutic agents remains a challenging problem. Cavitation-based therapies including ultrasound-induced sonoporation and laser-induced optoporation have led the way for novel approaches to provide the potential of sterility and cell selectivity compared with viral or biochemical counterparts. Acoustic streaming, shockwaves and liquid microjets associated with the cavitation dynamics are implicated in gene and drug delivery. These approaches, however, often lead to non-uniform and sporadic molecular uptake that lacks refined spatial control and suffers from a significant loss of cell viability. Here we demonstrate spatially controlled cavitation instigated by laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped single gold nanoparticle. Our unique approach employs optical tweezers to trap a single nanoparticle, which when irradiated by a nanosecond laser pulse is subject to laser-induced breakdown followed by cavitation. Using this method for laser-induced cavitation, we can gain additional degrees of freedom for the cavitation process - the particle material, its size, and its position relative to cells or tissues. We show the energy breakdown threshold of gold nanoparticles of l00nm with a single nanosecond laser pulse at 532 nm is three orders of magnitude lower than that for water, which leads to gentle nanocavitation enabling single cell transfection. We optimize the shear stress to the cells from the expanding bubble to be in the range of 1-10 kPa for transfection by precisely positioning a trapped gold nanoparticle, and thus nanobubble, relative to a cell of interest. The method shows transfection of plasmid-DNA into individual mammalian cells with an efficiency of 75%.

  1. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ``point defects models`` (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  2. Modeling the effect of native and laser-induced states on the dielectric breakdown of wide band gap optical materials by multiple subpicosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Emmert, Luke A.; Mero, Mark; Rudolph, Wolfgang

    2010-08-15

    A model for the multiple-pulse laser-induced breakdown behavior of dielectrics is presented. It is based on a critical conduction band (CB) electron density leading to dielectric breakdown. The evolution of the CB electron density during the pulse train is calculated using rate equations involving transitions between band and mid-gap states (native and laser-induced). Using realistic estimations for the trap density and ionization cross-section, the model is able to reproduce the experimentally observed drop in the multiple-pulse damage threshold relative to the single-pulse value, as long as the CB electron density is controlled primarily by avalanche ionization seeded by multiphoton ionization of the traps and the valence band. The model shows that at long pulse duration, the breakdown threshold becomes more sensitive to presence of traps close (within one photon energy) to the CB. The effect of native and laser-induced defects can be distinguished by their saturation behavior. Finally, measurements of the multiple-pulse damage threshold of hafnium oxide films are used to illustrate the application of the model.

  3. Back gate induced breakdown mechanisms for thin layer SOI field P-channel LDMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Qiao, Ming; He, Yitao; Yang, Wen; Li, Zhaoji; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The back gate (BG) induced breakdown mechanisms for thin layer SOI Field P-channel LDMOS (FPLDMOS) are investigated in this paper. Surface breakdown, bulk breakdown and punch-through breakdown are discussed, revealing that the block capability depends on not drain voltage (Vd), but also BG voltage (VBG). For surface breakdown, the breakdown voltage (BVs) increases linearly with VBG increasing. An expression of BVs on VBG is given, providing a good fitting to measured and simulated results. Bulk breakdown with a low breakdown voltage is attributed to high VBG. VBG induces depletion in n-well, giving rise to punch-through breakdown. A design requirement for the thin layer SOI FPLDMOS is proposed that breakdown voltages for the three breakdown mechanisms are compelled to be higher than the supply voltage of switching IC.

  4. Control of vortex breakdown by temperature gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrada, Miguel Angel; Shtern, Vladimir

    2003-11-01

    An axial gradient of temperature can either suppress or enhance vortex breakdown (VB). The underlying mechanism of such VB control is centrifugal or/and gravitational convection. An additional thermal-convection flow directed oppositely to the base flow suppresses VB while a co-flow enhances VB. Our numerical simulations of a compressible flow in a sealed cylinder induced by a rotating bottom disk clearly reveal these effects. We vary the temperature gradient (ɛ), Mach (Ma), Froude (Fr), and Reynolds (Re) numbers, and the aspect ratio (h). As ɛ increases (ɛ>0 corresponding to a temperature gradient parallel to the downward near-axis flow), the VB "bubble," which occurs at ɛ=0, diminishes and then totally disappears. The opposite temperature gradient (ɛ<0) enlarges the VB bubble and makes the flow unsteady. These effects of centrifugal convection become more prominent with increasing Ma and Re. Density variations induced by the temperature gradients are more important for VB control than those induced by the increase in Ma. A new efficient time-evolution code for axisymmetric flows of an ideal gas has facilitated these simulations.

  5. Magnetic breakdown in double quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Harff, N.E. |; Simmons, J.A.; Klem, J.F.; Boebinger, G.S.; Pfeiffer, L.N.; West, K.W.

    1996-08-01

    The authors find that a sufficiently large perpendicular magnetic field (B{sub {perpendicular}}) causes magnetic breakdown (MB) in coupled double quantum wells (QWs) that are subject to an in-plane magnetic field (B{sub {parallel}}). B{sub {parallel}} shifts one QW dispersion curve with respect to that of the other QW, resulting in an anticrossing and an energy gap. When the gap is below the Fermi level the resulting Fermi surface (FS) consists of two components, a lens-shaped inner orbit and an hour-glass shaped outer orbit. B{sub {perpendicular}} causes Landau level formation and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations for each component of the FS. MB occurs when the magnetic forces from B{sub {perpendicular}} become dominant and the electrons move on free-electron circular orbits rather than on the lens and hour-glass orbits. MB is observed by identifying the peaks present in the Fourier power spectrum of the longitudinal resistance vs. 1/B{sub {perpendicular}} at constant B{sub {parallel}}, an arrangement achieved with an in-situ tilting sample holder. Results are presented for two strongly coupled GaAs/AlGaAs DQW samples.

  6. Nanopore Fabrication by Controlled Dielectric Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Tabard-Cossa, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Nanofabrication techniques for achieving dimensional control at the nanometer scale are generally equipment-intensive and time-consuming. The use of energetic beams of electrons or ions has placed the fabrication of nanopores in thin solid-state membranes within reach of some academic laboratories, yet these tools are not accessible to many researchers and are poorly suited for mass-production. Here we describe a fast and simple approach for fabricating a single nanopore down to 2-nm in size with sub-nm precision, directly in solution, by controlling dielectric breakdown at the nanoscale. The method relies on applying a voltage across an insulating membrane to generate a high electric field, while monitoring the induced leakage current. We show that nanopores fabricated by this method produce clear electrical signals from translocating DNA molecules. Considering the tremendous reduction in complexity and cost, we envision this fabrication strategy would not only benefit researchers from the physical and life sciences interested in gaining reliable access to solid-state nanopores, but may provide a path towards manufacturing of nanopore-based biotechnologies. PMID:24658537

  7. Electric field breakdown in single molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy A; Zhang, Vivian; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-04-22

    Here we study the stability and rupture of molecular junctions under high voltage bias at the single molecule/single bond level using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We synthesize carbon-, silicon-, and germanium-based molecular wires terminated by aurophilic linker groups and study how the molecular backbone and linker group affect the probability of voltage-induced junction rupture. First, we find that junctions formed with covalent S-Au bonds are robust under high voltage and their rupture does not demonstrate bias dependence within our bias range. In contrast, junctions formed through donor-acceptor bonds rupture more frequently, and their rupture probability demonstrates a strong bias dependence. Moreover, we find that the junction rupture probability increases significantly above ∼1 V in junctions formed from methylthiol-terminated disilanes and digermanes, indicating a voltage-induced rupture of individual Si-Si and Ge-Ge bonds. Finally, we compare the rupture probabilities of the thiol-terminated silane derivatives containing Si-Si, Si-C, and Si-O bonds and find that Si-C backbones have higher probabilities of sustaining the highest voltage. These results establish a new method for studying electric field breakdown phenomena at the single molecule level. PMID:25675085

  8. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  9. Novel laser breakdown spectrometer for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirov, Sergey B.; Pitt, Robert E.; Dergachev, Alex Y.; Lee, Wonwoo; Martyshkin, Dmitri V.; Mirov, Olga D.; Randolph, Jeremy J.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Brouillette, Christie G.; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Orlovskii, Yurii V.; Alimov, Olimkhon K.; Vorob'ev, Ivan N.

    1999-11-01

    A novel experimental set-up using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for environmental analyses of heavy metals is described in this paper. It is based on state-of-the-art spectroscopic equipment, advanced detectors, and laser atomizers: a 0.75 m spectrometer ARC-750, intensified TE- cooled 256 X 1024 CCD camera, probe with fiber optic guide for signal transportation, and Nd:YAG laser plasma atomizers with two different methods for sample delivery. In the first method the liquid solution containing the atoms to be investigated is drawn into the chamber of the nebulizer. The mixture passes through the nozzle, accompanied by argon gas along with formed aerosol, and enters the plasma plume, which is generated by the laser spark in argon. The second method is based on direct generating of the plasma in the water jet of a continuously circulating sample. LIBS testing of samples containing Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, and Cr ions was compared with results using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Initial indications showed good agreement between these two methods. Detection levels of less than 100 ppb were observed for copper and chromium. The described spectroscopic system exhibits high sensitivity, accumulation of luminescence spectrum in real time; and high dynamic range for concentrations detection from 100 ppb to 1000 ppm.

  10. Theoretical studies of breakdown in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    Failure initiates in local regions of a material microstructure which are either especially weak, or which carry an especially large field. The size and location of these weak or hotspots'' depends on the microstructure, and is especially sensitive to microstructural disorder. Using model random microstructures, we have developed analytic and numerical tools to predict where failure initiates, its initiation field, and how it propagates from the initiation sites. We have found it useful to divide the failure process into a nucleation stage, in which damage occurs quite randomly throughout the material, a localisation stage, where a critical crack nucleates, and a catastrophic failure stage during which an unstable crack propagates through the material. Results are being compared with experiments on: Highly porous materials (porous glass, and porous gold); dielectric breakdown of metal loaded insulators (e.g. aluminum in poly-ethyelene) and; the critical current of superconductors containing cracks (Nb and Nb[sub 3]Ge). This report summarises our efforts in these areas.

  11. Rupture models with dynamically determined breakdown displacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    The critical breakdown displacement, Dc, in which friction drops to its sliding value, can be made dependent on event size by specifying friction to be a function of variables other than slip. Two such friction laws are examined here. The first is designed to achieve accuracy and smoothness in discrete numerical calculations. Consistent resolution throughout an evolving rupture is achieved by specifying friction as a function of elapsed time after peak stress is reached. Such a time-weakening model produces Dc and fracture energy proportional to the square root of distance rupture has propagated in the case of uniform stress drop. The second friction law is more physically motivated. Energy loss in a damage zone outside the slip zone has the effect of increasing Dc and limiting peak slip velocity (Andrews, 1976). This article demonstrates a converse effect, that artificially limiting slip velocity on a fault in an elastic medium has a toughening effect, increasing fracture energy and Dc proportionally to rupture propagation distance in the case of uniform stress drop. Both the time-weakening and the velocity-toughening models can be used in calculations with heterogeneous stress drop.

  12. Eye-safe infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei E.; Hömmerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton C.; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. Besides elemental emissions from conventional UV-Vis LIBS, molecular LIBS emission signatures of the target compounds were observed in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region in recent studies. Most current LIBS studies employ the fundamental Nd:YAG laser output at 1.064 μm, which has extremely low eye-damage threshold. In this work, comparative LWIR-LIBS emissions studies using traditional 1.064 μm pumping and eye-safe laser wavelength at 1.574 μm were performed on several energetic materials for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) sensing. A Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm and the 1.574 μm output of a pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator were employed as the excitation sources. The investigated energetic materials were studied for the appearance of LWIR-LIBS emissions (4-12 μm) that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species. The observed molecular IR LIBS emission bands showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the studied materials for 1.064 μm and 1.574 μm pump wavelengths.

  13. Study of effective secondary electron emission in dc breakdown of argon with various metal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Steven; Huang, Xuhai; Howe, Kenneth; Demidov, Vladimir; Tolson, Boyd

    2015-11-01

    An attractive aspect of Townsend's expression for the ionization coefficient, α = A exp[-B/(E/p)], is that the exponential form allows a derivation of a neat analytical expression for the Paschen curve. Notwithstanding the elegance and fame of this expression, the theoretical Paschen curve does not always provide an accurate prediction for all E/p ranges and all gases. Deviations can be attributed to a variety of factors, including non-exponential behavior of α at higher E/p, variations of γ with E/p and geometric effects. An experimental study of the effective secondary electron emission in Townsend breakdown has been conducted in Ar using a variety of electrodes. The threshold breakdown voltage was measured when the current became self-sustained, which corresponded to an effective secondary emission coefficient of γ = 1/[exp((α/p)pd)-1]. This allowed a fundamental relationship to be derived between γ and E/p from an experimental Paschen curve. In this work, argon gas was studied with copper, aluminum and platinum electrodes. The trends of the effective secondary electron emission are analyzed in different E/p ranges for various modes of secondary electron emission, including Ar ion impact, photon absorption, Ar metastable collisions and heavy-particle-ionization.

  14. On the relationship between the Bruno function and the breakdown of invariant tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, Ugo; Froeschlé, Claude; Lega, Elena; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2000-05-01

    We study the ratio εc( ω)/exp(- ηB( ω)), where εc( ω) is the breakdown threshold function for an analytic invariant torus, η is a parameter and B( ω) is the Bruno function, which is purely arithmetic (i.e., it only depends on the number theory properties of ω). We consider the standard map as a model and we focus our analysis on the exponential decay of the chaotic regions close to an invariant torus with Diophantine rotation frequency. Our numerical experiments, together with some heuristic considerations, strongly suggest that εc( ω)/exp(- ηB( ω)) is not a continuous function on Diophantine numbers ω, for all values of η.

  15. Application of Graph Theory to unsupervised classification of materials by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifoni, E.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pagnotta, S.; Palleschi, V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present a new approach for unsupervised classification of materials from the spectra obtained using the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy technique. The method is based on the calculation of the correlation matrix between the LIBS spectra, which is interpreted as an Adjacency matrix in the framework of Graph theory. A threshold is applied on the edge values, which is determined through maximization of the Modularity of the Graph. The classification of the spectra is done automatically after the calculation of the Modularity parameter. An example of the application of the proposed method is given, based on the study of six bronze standards of known composition. The advantages of the proposed approach with respect to Principal Component Analysis are also discussed.

  16. Near-crater discoloration of white lead in wall paintings during laser induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, R.; L'Hermite, D.; Semerok, A.; Salmon, L.; Detalle, V.

    2007-12-01

    During Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis of white lead pigment (basic lead carbonate, 2PbCO 3·Pb(OH) 2), used in wall paintings of historical interest, a yellow-brown discoloration has been observed around the crater. This phenomenon faded after a few days exposure under ambient atmosphere. It was established that the mechanism of this discoloration consists in lead oxides (PbO) formation. It was verified by further experiments under argon atmosphere that recombination of lead with oxygen in the plasma plume produces the oxides, which settle around the crater and induce this discoloration. The impact of discoloration on the artwork's aesthetic aspect and the role of atmosphere on discoloration attenuation are discussed. The mechanism is studied on three other pigments (malachite, Prussian blue and ultramarine blue) and threshold for discoloration occurrence is estimated.

  17. Microwave diagnostics of laser-induced avalanche ionization in air

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhili; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2006-10-01

    This work presents a simplified model of microwave scattering during the avalanche ionization stage of laser breakdown and corresponding experimental results of microwave scattering from laser breakdown in room air. The model assumes and measurements confirm that the breakdown regime can be viewed as a point dipole scatterer of the microwave radiation and thus directly related to the time evolving number of electrons. The delay between the laser pulse and the rise of the microwave scattering signal is a direct measure of the avalanche ionization process.

  18. Stress intensity factor threshold in dental porcelains.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Humberto Naoyuki; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Soki, Fabiana Naomi; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2008-05-01

    The stress intensity factor threshold (KI0) is related to the stress level at which cracks start to grow stably, causing the weakening of porcelain prostheses during their use. The values of KI0 of seven dental porcelains (with and without reinforcing leucite crystal, KAlSi2O6) stored in air (22 degrees C, 60% relative humidity) and artificial saliva (37 degrees C) were determined by measuring the crack growth velocity of radial cracks generated at the corner of Vickers indentations. The results of KI0 were correlated with the leucite content, fracture toughness (KIc), and chemical composition of the porcelains. It was observed that KI0 increased with the increase of leucite content (only for the leucite-based porcelains) and with the increase of KIc. The increase in Al2O3 content or the decrease in the alkali oxide (K2O and Na2O) content of the material's glassy matrix tended to increase the KI0 values. Storage media (air and saliva) did not significantly affect the KI0 of porcelains tested, indicating that the control parameter of KI0 value was not the water content of the storage media. PMID:17943412

  19. Factors contributing to the breakdown of sodium beta-alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Buechele, A.C.

    1982-05-01

    Clarification of the breakdown process occurring during charge transfer in sodium beta alumina solid electrolytes was derived from: (1) studying the effects of molten sodium contact at 350/sup 0/C on single crystal sodium beta alumina and polycrystalline sodium beta alumina; (2) determination of critical current density by monitoring acoustic emissions accompanying crack growth in sodium/sodium beta alumina/sodium cells subjected to linear current ramping at 1 mA cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/; (3) failure analysis conducted on cycled electrolytes, some from commercial sodium/sulfur cells, which had been subjected to up to 703 Ahr cm/sup -2/ of charge transfer. Gray coloration developing in beta aluminas in contact with molten sodium was found to be a consequence of formation, through reduction by sodium, of oxygen vacancies charge compensated by electrons. Electronic conductivity of the electrolyte increases as a result. No second phase formation was detected. Colored electrolytes from sodium/sulfur cells show evidence of a newly recognized degradation mechanism in which fracture occurs when sodium is reduced and deposited internally under pressure as metal in regions where an electronic conductivity gradient exists. Heating colored beta aluminas in air produces reoxidation and bleaching. Kinetics and other properties of the coloration and bleaching processes were determined. Critical current density was found to bear an inverse relation to average electrolyte grain size. Evidence was found in the cycled electrolytes for a slow crack growth mechanism and a progressive mode of degradation advancing from the sulfur electrode interface. Implications of the findings for the construction and operation of sodium/sulfur battery systems are discussed.

  20. 19 CFR 141.87 - Breakdown on component materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.87 Breakdown on component materials. Whenever the classification or appraisement of merchandise depends on the component materials, the...

  1. Suppressing the cellular breakdown in silicon supersaturated with titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Prucnal, S.; Hübner, R.; Yuan, Ye; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2016-06-01

    Hyper doping Si with up to 6 at.% Ti in solid solution was performed by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser annealing and flash lamp annealing. In both cases, the implanted Si layer can be well recrystallized by liquid phase epitaxy and solid phase epitaxy, respectively. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of Ti-implanted Si after liquid phase epitaxy shows the so-called growth interface breakdown or cellular breakdown owing to the occurrence of constitutional supercooling in the melt. The appearance of cellular breakdown prevents further recrystallization. However, the out-diffusion and cellular breakdown can be effectively suppressed by solid phase epitaxy during flash lamp annealing due to the high velocity of amorphous-crystalline interface and the low diffusion velocity for Ti in the solid phase.

  2. Implications of Dielectric Breakdown Weathering for the Lunar Polar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Wilson, J. K.; Stubbs, T. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Izenberg, N. R.

    2015-10-01

    Dielectric breakdown weathering may significantly affect lunar regolith in permanently shadowed regions. We estimate how it may evolve the distribution of grain sizes and properties, which could have operational implications for rovers.

  3. D STAND DELIVERY END OF #44 TANDEM BREAKDOWN MILL WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    D STAND DELIVERY END OF #44 TANDEM BREAKDOWN MILL WITH UPCOILER. BACKUP ROLLS, 40 TONS. WORK ROLLS, 20 TONS., C. 1900. OPERATING SPEED, 600'/MINUTE. AUTOMATIC GAUGE CONTROL. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  4. Vortex breakdown in closed containers with polygonal cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Naumov, I. V. Dvoynishnikov, S. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Tsoy, M. A.

    2015-12-15

    The vortex breakdown bubble in the confined flow generated by a rotating lid in closed containers with polygonal cross sections was analysed both experimentally and numerically for the height/radius aspect ratio equal to 2. The stagnation point locations of the breakdown bubble emergence and the corresponding Reynolds number were determined experimentally and in addition computed numerically by STAR-CCM+ CFD software for square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and octagonal cross section configurations. The flow pattern and the velocity were observed and measured by combining the seeding particle visualization and the temporal accuracy of laser Doppler anemometry. The vortex breakdown size and position on the container axis were determined for Reynolds numbers, ranging from 1450 to 2400. The obtained results were compared with the flow structure in the closed container of cubical and cylindrical configurations. It is shown that the measured evolution of steady vortex breakdown is in close agreement with the numerical results.

  5. Electric field-free gas breakdown in explosively driven generators

    SciTech Connect

    Shkuratov, Sergey I.; Baird, Jason; Talantsev, Evgueni F.; Altgilbers, Larry L.

    2010-07-15

    All known types of gas discharges require an electric field to initiate them. We are reporting on a unique type of gas breakdown in explosively driven generators that does not require an electric field.

  6. Vortex breakdown in closed containers with polygonal cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, I. V.; Dvoynishnikov, S. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Tsoy, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The vortex breakdown bubble in the confined flow generated by a rotating lid in closed containers with polygonal cross sections was analysed both experimentally and numerically for the height/radius aspect ratio equal to 2. The stagnation point locations of the breakdown bubble emergence and the corresponding Reynolds number were determined experimentally and in addition computed numerically by STAR-CCM+ CFD software for square, pentagonal, hexagonal, and octagonal cross section configurations. The flow pattern and the velocity were observed and measured by combining the seeding particle visualization and the temporal accuracy of laser Doppler anemometry. The vortex breakdown size and position on the container axis were determined for Reynolds numbers, ranging from 1450 to 2400. The obtained results were compared with the flow structure in the closed container of cubical and cylindrical configurations. It is shown that the measured evolution of steady vortex breakdown is in close agreement with the numerical results.

  7. Laser Induced Aluminum Surface Breakdown Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Sijun; Wnag, Ten-See (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser powered propulsion systems involve complex fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer processes. Based on an unstructured grid., pressure-based computational aerothermodynamics, platform, several sub-nio"'dels describing such underlying physics as laser ray tracing and focusing, thermal non-equilibrium, plasma radiation and air spark ignition have been developed. This proposed work shall extend the numerical platform and existing sub-models to include the aluminum wall surface Inverse Bremsstrahlung (113) effect from which surface ablation and free-electron generation can be initiated without relying on the air spark ignition sub-model. The following tasks will be performed to accomplish the research objectives.

  8. Laser Induced Aluminum Surface Breakdown Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Sijun; Wang, Ten-See (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Laser powered propulsion systems involve complex fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer processes. Based on an unstructured grid, pressure-based computational aerothermodynamics; platform, several sub-models describing such underlying physics as laser ray tracing and focusing, thermal non-equilibrium, plasma radiation and air spark ignition have been developed. This proposed work shall extend the numerical platform and existing sub-models to include the aluminum wall surface Inverse Bremsstrahlung (IB) effect from which surface ablation and free-electron generation can be initiated without relying on the air spark ignition sub-model. The following tasks will be performed to accomplish the research objectives.

  9. Spatial and temporal dependence of interspark interactions in femtosecond-nanosecond dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Scaffidi, Jon; Pearman, William; Lawrence, Marion; Carter, J Chance; Colston, Bill W; Angel, S Michael

    2004-09-20

    A femtosecond air spark has recently been combined with a nanosecond ablative pulse in order to map the spatial and temporal interactions of the two plasmas in femtosecond-nanosecond orthogonal preablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Good spatial and temporal correlation was found for reduced atomic emission from atmospheric species (nitrogen and oxygen) and increased atomic emission from ablated species (copper and aluminum) in the femtosecond-nanosecond plasma, suggesting a potential role for atmospheric pressure or nitrogen/oxygen concentration reduction following air spark formation in generating atomic emission enhancements in dual-pulse LIBS. PMID:15473246

  10. Spatial and Temporal Dependence of Interspark Interactions in Femtosecond-Nanosecond Dual-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaffidi, Jon; Pearman, William; Lawrence, Marion; Chance Carter, J.; Colston, Bill W., Jr.; Angel, S. Michael

    2004-09-01

    A femtosecond air spark has recently been combined with a nanosecond ablative pulse in order to map the spatial and temporal interactions of the two plasmas in femtosecond-nanosecond orthogonal preablation spark dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Good spatial and temporal correlation was found for reduced atomic emission from atmospheric species (nitrogen and oxygen) and increased atomic emission from ablated species (copper and aluminum) in the femtosecond-nanosecond plasma, suggesting a potential role for atmospheric pressure or nitrogen/oxygen concentration reduction following air spark formation in generating atomic emission enhancements in dual-pulse LIBS.

  11. Plasma structures observed in gas breakdown using a 1.5 MW, 110 GHz pulsed gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hidaka, Yoshiteru; Choi, E. M.; Mastovsky, I.; Shapiro, M. A.; Sirigiri, J. R.; Temkin, R. J.; Edmiston, G. F.; Neuber, A. A.; Oda, Y.

    2009-05-15

    Regular two-dimensional plasma filamentary arrays have been observed in gas breakdown experiments using a pulsed 1.5 MW, 110 GHz gyrotron. The gyrotron Gaussian output beam is focused to an intensity of up to 4 MW/cm{sup 2}. The plasma filaments develop in an array with a spacing of about one quarter wavelength, elongated in the electric field direction. The array was imaged using photodiodes, a slow camera, which captures the entire breakdown event, and a fast camera with a 6 ns window. These diagnostics demonstrate the sequential development of the array propagating back toward the source. Gases studied included air, nitrogen, SF{sub 6}, and helium at various pressures. A discrete plasma array structure is observed at high pressure, while a diffuse plasma is observed at lower pressure. The propagation speed of the ionization front for air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure for 3 MW/cm{sup 2} was found to be of the order of 10 km/s.

  12. Remote monostatic detection of radioactive material by laser-induced breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, Joshua; Miao, Chenlong; Sprangle, Phillip

    2016-03-01

    This paper analyzes and evaluates a concept for remotely detecting the presence of radioactivity using electromagnetic signatures. The detection concept is based on the use of laser beams and the resulting electromagnetic signatures near the radioactive material. Free electrons, generated from ionizing radiation associated with the radioactive material, cascade down to low energies and attach to molecular oxygen. The resulting ion density depends on the level of radioactivity and can be readily photo-ionized by a low-intensity laser beam. This process provides a controllable source of seed electrons for the further collisional ionization (breakdown) of the air using a high-power, focused, CO2 laser pulse. When the air breakdown process saturates, the ionizing CO2 radiation reflects off the plasma region and can be detected. The time required for this to occur is a function of the level of radioactivity. This monostatic detection arrangement has the advantage that both the photo-ionizing and avalanche laser beams and the detector can be co-located.

  13. On the breakdown of passivity of iron by thiocyanate

    SciTech Connect

    Melendres, C.A.; Acho, J.; Knight, R.L. )

    1991-03-01

    In this paper, the authors report that small amounts (0.001 to 0.02M) of SCN{sup {minus}} significantly increased the rate of anodic dissolution of copper and iron; SCN{sup {minus}} causes a breakdown of the passivity of iron but not of copper. The authors communicate results of our studies using the surface enhanced Raman (SER) effect in order to further elucidate the passivity of iron and its breakdown by thiocyanate.

  14. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  15. A threshold for dissipative fission

    SciTech Connect

    Thoennessen, M.; Bertsch, G.F.

    1993-09-21

    The empirical domain of validity of statistical theory is examined as applied to fission data on pre-fission data on pre-fission neutron, charged particle, and {gamma}-ray multiplicities. Systematics are found of the threshold excitation energy for the appearance of nonstatistical fission. From the data on systems with not too high fissility, the relevant phenomenological parameter is the ratio of the threshold temperature T{sub thresh} to the (temperature-dependent) fission barrier height E{sub Bar}(T). The statistical model reproduces the data for T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) < 0.26 {plus_minus} 0.05, but underpredicts the multiplicities at higher T{sub thresh}/E{sub Bar}(T) independent of mass and fissility of the systems.

  16. Hadronic resonances enhanced by thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramés, T. F.; Valcarce, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a neat example of a meson-baryon system where the vicinity of two different thresholds enhances the binding of a hadronic resonance, a pentaquark. As a consequence the pattern of states may change when moving among different flavor sectors, what poses a warning on naive extrapolations to heavy flavor sectors based on systematic expansions. For this purpose we simultaneously analyze the N D bar and NB two-hadron systems looking for possible bound states or resonances. When a resonance is controlled by a coupled-channel effect, going to a different flavor sector may enhance or diminish the binding. This effect may, for example, generate significant differences between the charmonium and bottomonium spectra above open-flavor thresholds or pentaquark states in the open-charm and open-bottom sectors.

  17. Low Threshold Quantum Dot Lasers.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Veena Hariharan; Mahadevu, Rekha; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-04-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have replaced conventional inorganic phosphors in numerous applications. Despite their overall successes as emitters, their impact as laser materials has been severely limited. Eliciting stimulated emission from quantum dots requires excitation by intense short pulses of light typically generated using other lasers. In this Letter, we develop a new class of quantum dots that exhibit gain under conditions of extremely low levels of continuous wave illumination. We observe thresholds as low as 74 mW/cm(2) in lasers made from these materials. Due to their strong optical absorption as well as low lasing threshold, these materials could possibly convert light from diffuse, polychromatic sources into a laser beam. PMID:26978011

  18. The instability and breakdown of a round variable-density jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, D. M.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1993-04-01

    Results of a study of an investigation of the instability and the subsequent breakdown of axisymmetric jets of helium/air mixtures emerging into ambient air are presented. Two kinds of instability are observed in the near field, depending upon the mean flow parameters. When the ratio of the exiting nozzle fluid density to ambient fluid density is greater than 0.6, shear-layer fluctuations evolve in a fashion similar to that observed in constant-density jets: the power spectrum near the nozzle is determined by weak background disturbances whose subsequent spatial amplification agrees closely with the spatial stability theory. When the density ratio is less than 0.6, an intense oscillatory instability may also arise. The overall behavior of this latter mode is found to be independent of the Reynolds number, within the range of the present experiments. The overall structure of the oscillating mode is found to repeat itself with extreme regularity.

  19. Roots at the Percolation Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodepositions. One component of rhizopdeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage was assumed to explain unexpectedly low rhizosphere rewetting rates during irrigation (Carminati et al. 2010) and temporarily water repellency in the rhizosphere after severe drying (Moradi et al. 2012).Here, we present an experimental and theoretical study for the rewetting behaviour of a soil mixed with mucilage, which was used as an analogue of the rhizosphere. Our samples were made of two layers of untreated soils separated by a thin layer (ca. 1 mm) of soil treated with mucilage. We prepared soil columns of varying particle size, mucilage concentration and height of the middle layer above the water table. The dry soil columns were re-wetted by capillary rise from the bottom.The rewetting of the middle layer showed a distinct dual behavior. For mucilage concentrations lower than a certain threshold, water could cross the thin layer almost immediately after rewetting of bulk soil. At slightly higher mucilage concentrations, the thin layer was almost impermeable. The mucilage concentration at the threshold strongly depended on particle size: the smaller the particle size the larger the soil specific surface and the more mucilage was needed to cover the entire particle surface and to induce water repellency.We applied a classic pore network model to simulate the experimental observations. In the model a certain fraction of nodes were randomly disconnected to reproduce the effect of mucilage in temporarily blocking the flow. The percolation model could qualitatively reproduce well the threshold characteristics of the experiments. Our experiments, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively

  20. Breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps at high excitation frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-07

    Microwave (mw) breakdown of atmospheric pressure microgaps is studied by a one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions numerical model. The effect of both field electron emission and secondary electron emission (due to electron impact, ion impact, and primary electron reflection) from surfaces on the breakdown process is considered. For conditions where field emission is the dominant electron emission mechanism from the electrode surfaces, it is found that the breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge coincides with the breakdown voltage of direct-current (dc) microdischarge. When microdischarge properties are controlled by both field and secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge exceeds that of dc microdischarge. When microdischarge is controlled only by secondary electron emission, breakdown voltage of mw microdischarge is smaller than that of dc microdischarge. It is shown that if the interelectrode gap exceeds some critical value, mw microdischarge can be ignited only by electrons initially seeded within the gap volume. In addition, the influence of electron reflection and secondary emission due to electron impact is studied.

  1. Dielectric breakdown weathering of the Moon's polar regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Wilson, J. K.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-02-01

    Galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles (SEPs) can charge the Moon's subsurface, a process expected to be particularly important in the polar regions. Experiments have shown that sufficient fluences (i.e., time-integrated fluxes) of energetic charged particles can cause dielectric breakdown, in which the electric field rapidly vaporizes small, filamentary channels within a dielectric. Lunar regolith has both the characteristics and, in some polar locations, the environment needed to make breakdown likely. We combine the Jet Propulsion Laboratory proton fluence model with temperature measurements from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO's) Diviner instrument and related temperature modeling to estimate how often breakdown occurs in the polar regions. We find that all gardened regolith within permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) has likely experienced up to 2×106 SEP events capable of causing breakdown, while the warmest polar regions have experienced about 2 orders of magnitude fewer events. We also use measurements from the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation on LRO to show that at least two breakdown-inducing events may have occurred since LRO arrived at the Moon in 2009. Finally, we discuss how such "breakdown weathering" may increase the percentage of fine and monomineralic grains within PSRs; explain the presence of so-called "fairy castle" regolith structures; and contribute to other low-albedo features detected by LRO's Lyman Alpha Mapping Project, possibly establishing a correlation between these features and the average temperatures within craters that are only partly in permanent shadow.

  2. AVLIS Production Plant work breakdown structure and Dictionary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-15

    The work breakdown structure has been prepared for the AVLIS Production Plant to define, organize, and identify the work efforts and is summarized in Fig. 1-1 for the top three project levels. The work breakdown structure itself is intended to be the primary organizational tool of the AVLIS Production Plant and is consistent with the overall AVLIS Program Work Breakdown Structure. It is designed to provide a framework for definition and accounting of all of the elements that are required for the eventual design, procurement, and construction of the AVLIS Production Plant. During the present phase of the AVLIS Project, the conceptual engineering phase, the work breakdown structure is intended to be the master structure and project organizer of documents, designs, and cost estimates. As the master project organizer, the key role of the work breakdown structure is to provide the mechanism for developing completeness in AVLIS cost estimates and design development of all hardware and systems. The work breakdown structure provides the framework for tracking, on a one-to-one basis, the component design criteria, systems requirements, design concepts, design drawings, performance projections, and conceptual cost estimates. It also serves as a vehicle for contract reporting. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Luminosity of initial breakdown in lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, M.; Marshall, T. C.; Karunarathne, S.; Karunarathna, N.; Vickers, L. E.; Warner, T. A.; Orville, R. E.; Betz, H.-D.

    2013-04-01

    Time correlated high-speed video and electromagnetic data for 15 cloud-to-ground and intracloud lightning flashes reveal bursts of light, bright enough to be seen through intervening cloud, during the initial breakdown (IB) stage and within the first 3 ms after flash initiation. Each sudden increase in luminosity is coincident with a CG type (12 cases) or an IC type (3 cases) IB pulse in fast electric field change records. The E-change data for 217 flashes indicate that all CG and IC flashes have IB pulses. The luminosity bursts of 14 negative CG flashes occur 11-340 ms before the first return stroke, at altitudes of 4-8 km, and at 4-41 km range from the camera. In seven cases, linear segments visibly advance away from the first light burst for 55-200 µs, then the entire length dims, then the luminosity sequence repeats along the same path. These visible initial leaders or streamers lengthen intermittently to about 300-1500 m. Their estimated 2-D speeds are 4-18 × 105 m s-1 over the first few hundred microseconds and decrease by about 50% over the first 2 ms. In other cases, only a bright spot or a broad area of diffuse light, presumably scattered by intervening cloud, is visible. The bright area grows larger over 20-60 µs before the luminosity fades in about 100 µs, then this sequence may repeat several times. In several flashes, a 1-2 ms period of little or no luminosity and small E-change is observed following the IB stage prior to stepped leader development.

  4. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  5. Optical acoustic experimental investigation of propagation femtosecond laser radiation in air and biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkarev, N. N.; Kabanov, A. M.; Protasevich, E. S.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Using two optical acoustic approaches we experimentally investigated spatial location of filament zone of propagation channel of focused laser radiation. For femtosecond pulses passing in air it was shown that nonlinear focus length had spatial scale of 1/P at initial power P moderate for self-focusing and at optical system focus distance significantly lower than Rayleigh beam length. The results of experimental optical acoustic investigation of femto- and nanosecond pulses attenuation by some biological tissues (muscular tissue, adipose tissue, cutaneous covering, and milk) and optical breakdown thresholds on these one are presented. It was shown that penetration depth of short laser pulse radiation into biological tissues is the same as for longer one. However, amplitude of acoustic response to a process of interaction of femtosecond laser pulse with biological tissue is larger in several times than that to interaction with nanosecond pulses of the same power and spectral distribution. The obtained threshold values can be interesting for tabulation of limit allowable levels of irradiation at work with laser radiation. Such values are unknown for femtosecond laser pulses today.

  6. Threshold parameters of the mechanisms of selective nanophotothermolysis with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovalov, Victor; Zharov, Vladimir

    2008-02-01

    Photothermal-based effects in and around gold nanoparticles under action of short (nano, pico- and femtosecond) laser pulses are analyzed with focus on photoacoustic effects due to the thermal expansion of nanoparticles and liquid around them, thermal protein denaturation, explosive liquid vaporization, melting and evaporation of nanoparticle, optical breakdown initiated by nanoparticles and accompanied to shock waves and explosion (fragmentation) of gold nanoparticles. Characteristic parameters for these processes such as the temperature and laser intensity thresholds are summarized to provide basis for comparison of different mechanisms of selective nanophotothermolysis of different targets (e.g., cancer cells, bacteria, viruses, fungi, and helminths).

  7. Avalanche electron bunching in a Corbino disk in the quantum Hall effect breakdown regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Kensaku; Hata, Tokuro; Arakawa, Tomonori; Matsuo, Sadashige; Nishihara, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Takahiro; Ono, Teruo; Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2014-06-01

    We have measured the current noise in a device with Corbino geometry to investigate the dynamics of electrons in the breakdown regime of the integer quantum Hall effect (QHE). In the breakdown regime, the Fano factor of the current noise exceeds 103, which indicates the presence of electron bunching. As super-Poissonian current noise is observed only in the breakdown regime, the bunching effect is related to the QHE breakdown. These observations support a QHE breakdown mechanism that involves an electron avalanche.

  8. Measurement and modeling of ozone and nitrogen oxides produced by laser breakdown in oxygen-nitrogen atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Gornushkin, Igor B; Stevenson, Chris L; Galbács, Gábor; Smith, Ben W; Winefordner, James D

    2003-11-01

    The production of ozone nad nitrogen oxides was studied during multiple laser breakdown in oxygen-nitrogen mixtures at atmospheric pressure. About 2000 laser shots at 10(10) W cm-2 were delivered into a sealed reaction chamber. The chamber with a long capillary was designed to measure absorption of O3, NO, and NO2 as a function of the number of laser shots. The light source for absorption measurements was the continuum radiation emitted by the plasma during the first 0.2 microsecond of its evolution. A kinetic model was developed that encompassed the principal chemical reactions between the major atmospheric components and the products of laser breakdown. In the model, the laser plasma was treated as a source of nitric oxide and atomic oxygen, whose rates of production were calculated using measured absorption by NO, NO2, and O3. The calculated concentration profiles for NO, NO2, and O3 were in good agreement with measured profiles over a time scale of 0-200 s. The steady-state concentration of ozone was measured in a flow cell in air. For a single breakdown in air, the estimated steady-state yield of ozone was 2 x 10(12) molecules, which agreed with the model prediction. This study can be of importance for general understanding of laser plasma chemistry and for elucidating the nature of spectral interferences and matrix effects that may take place in applied spectrochemical analysis. PMID:14658160

  9. Program For Thresholding In Digital Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolf, Scott R.; Avis, Elizabeth L.; Matthews, Christine G.; Stacy, Kathryn

    1994-01-01

    THRTOOL program applies thresholding techniques to Sun rasterfiles. Provides for choice among four methods of thresholding. Written in C language and implemented on Sun series and Silicon Graphics IRIS machines.

  10. USE OF THRESHOLDS IN LANDSCAPE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification and use of thresholds are potentially important additions to interpretations of ecological monitoring data. However, there are a number of issues related to defining and using thresholds in interpreting ecological data. Most of these issues center around the pauc...

  11. Fiber bundle model with highly disordered breaking thresholds.

    PubMed

    Roy, Chandreyee; Kundu, Sumanta; Manna, S S

    2015-03-01

    We present a study of the fiber bundle model using equal load-sharing dynamics where the breaking thresholds of the fibers are drawn randomly from a power-law distribution of the form p(b)∼b-1 in the range 10-β to 10β. Tuning the value of β continuously over a wide range, the critical behavior of the fiber bundle has been studied both analytically as well as numerically. Our results are: (i) The critical load σc(β,N) for the bundle of size N approaches its asymptotic value σc(β) as σc(β,N)=σc(β)+AN-1/ν(β), where σc(β) has been obtained analytically as σc(β)=10β/(2βeln10) for β≥βu=1/(2ln10), and for β<βu the weakest fiber failure leads to the catastrophic breakdown of the entire fiber bundle, similar to brittle materials, leading to σ_{c}(β)=10-β; (ii) the fraction of broken fibers right before the complete breakdown of the bundle has the form 1-1/(2βln10); (iii) the distribution D(Δ) of the avalanches of size Δ follows a power-law D(Δ)∼Δ-ξ with ξ=5/2 for Δ≫Δc(β) and ξ=3/2 for Δ≪Δc(β), where the crossover avalanche size Δc(β)=2/(1-e10-2β)2. PMID:25871050

  12. Thresholds for impaired species recovery.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-22

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, r(realized), a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (N(max)), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals.Articulation of a 'recovering population paradigm' would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  13. Thresholds for impaired species recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on small and declining populations dominate research in conservation biology. This emphasis reflects two overarching frameworks: the small-population paradigm focuses on correlates of increased extinction probability; the declining-population paradigm directs attention to the causes and consequences of depletion. Neither, however, particularly informs research on the determinants, rate or uncertainty of population increase. By contrast, Allee effects (positive associations between population size and realized per capita population growth rate, rrealized, a metric of average individual fitness) offer a theoretical and empirical basis for identifying numerical and temporal thresholds at which recovery is unlikely or uncertain. Following a critique of studies on Allee effects, I quantify population-size minima and subsequent trajectories of marine fishes that have and have not recovered following threat mitigation. The data suggest that threat amelioration, albeit necessary, can be insufficient to effect recovery for populations depleted to less than 10% of maximum abundance (Nmax), especially when they remain depleted for lengthy periods of time. Comparing terrestrial and aquatic vertebrates, life-history analyses suggest that population-size thresholds for impaired recovery are likely to be comparatively low for marine fishes but high for marine mammals. Articulation of a ‘recovering population paradigm’ would seem warranted. It might stimulate concerted efforts to identify generic impaired recovery thresholds across species. It might also serve to reduce the confusion of terminology, and the conflation of causes and consequences with patterns currently evident in the literature on Allee effects, thus strengthening communication among researchers and enhancing the practical utility of recovery-oriented research to conservation practitioners and resource managers. PMID:26213739

  14. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  15. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  16. Field enhancement factor dependence on electric field and implications on microscale gas breakdown: Theory and experimental interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandro Buendia, Jose; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2015-12-01

    In this letter, we obtain a better understanding of effective field enhancement factors (β eff) in the context of microscale gas breakdown with specific emphasis on its dependence on applied electric field. The theoretical dependence of β eff on electric field for various hemi-ellipsoidal asperities indicates that the value of β eff decreases with increasing electric field. The interpretation of experimental data using a typical one-dimensional modified Paschen law indicates a qualitatively similar electric field dependence even though the data could not be completely explained using a single effective asperity size. The values of β eff extracted from seven independent experimental datasets for microscale breakdown of argon and air are shown to be consistent and an empirical dependence on electric field is determined.

  17. Epidemic threshold in directed networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τ(c) for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ(1) in directed networks, where λ(1), also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ(1), principal eigenvector x(1), spectral gap (λ(1)-|λ(2)|), and algebraic connectivity μ(N-1) is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ(1) decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρ(D). Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution. PMID:24483506

  18. Epidemic threshold in directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cong; Wang, Huijuan; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2013-12-01

    Epidemics have so far been mostly studied in undirected networks. However, many real-world networks, such as the online social network Twitter and the world wide web, on which information, emotion, or malware spreads, are directed networks, composed of both unidirectional links and bidirectional links. We define the directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links. The epidemic threshold τc for the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) epidemic is lower bounded by 1/λ1 in directed networks, where λ1, also called the spectral radius, is the largest eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix. In this work, we propose two algorithms to generate directed networks with a given directionality ξ. The effect of ξ on the spectral radius λ1, principal eigenvector x1, spectral gap (λ1-λ2), and algebraic connectivity μN-1 is studied. Important findings are that the spectral radius λ1 decreases with the directionality ξ, whereas the spectral gap and the algebraic connectivity increase with the directionality ξ. The extent of the decrease of the spectral radius depends on both the degree distribution and the degree-degree correlation ρD. Hence, in directed networks, the epidemic threshold is larger and a random walk converges to its steady state faster than that in undirected networks with the same degree distribution.

  19. Computational gestalts and perception thresholds.

    PubMed

    Desolneux, Agnès; Moisan, Lionel; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2003-01-01

    In 1923, Max Wertheimer proposed a research programme and method in visual perception. He conjectured the existence of a small set of geometric grouping laws governing the perceptual synthesis of phenomenal objects, or "gestalt" from the atomic retina input. In this paper, we review this set of geometric grouping laws, using the works of Metzger, Kanizsa and their schools. In continuation, we explain why the Gestalt theory research programme can be translated into a Computer Vision programme. This translation is not straightforward, since Gestalt theory never addressed two fundamental matters: image sampling and image information measurements. Using these advances, we shall show that gestalt grouping laws can be translated into quantitative laws allowing the automatic computation of gestalts in digital images. From the psychophysical viewpoint, a main issue is raised: the computer vision gestalt detection methods deliver predictable perception thresholds. Thus, we are set in a position where we can build artificial images and check whether some kind of agreement can be found between the computationally predicted thresholds and the psychophysical ones. We describe and discuss two preliminary sets of experiments, where we compared the gestalt detection performance of several subjects with the predictable detection curve. In our opinion, the results of this experimental comparison support the idea of a much more systematic interaction between computational predictions in Computer Vision and psychophysical experiments. PMID:14766147

  20. High field breakdown characteristics of carbon nanotube thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Man Prakash; Behnam, Ashkan; Lian, Feifei; Estrada, David; Pop, Eric; Kumar, Satish

    2013-10-11

    The high field properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) network thin film transistors (CN-TFTs) are important for their practical operation, and for understanding their reliability. Using a combination of experimental and computational techniques we show how the channel geometry (length L(C) and width W(C)) and network morphology (average CNT length L(t) and alignment angle distribution θ) affect heat dissipation and high field breakdown in such devices. The results suggest that when WC ≥ L(t), the breakdown voltage remains independent of W(C) but varies linearly with L(C). The breakdown power varies almost linearly with both W(C) and L(C) when WC > L(t). We also find that the breakdown power is more susceptible to the variability in the network morphology compared to the breakdown voltage. The analysis offers new insight into the tunable heat dissipation and thermal reliability of CN-TFTs, which can be significantly improved through optimization of the network morphology and device geometry. PMID:24029606

  1. Delta Wing Vortex Breakdown Suppression by Vortex Core Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Charles

    2000-11-01

    The flow over a delta wing is characterized by two counter-rotating vortices that can undergo a sudden radial expansion at high angles of attack known as vortex breakdown. Downstream of this breakdown is a region of organized unsteady flow that can cause tail buffeting and structural fatigue, especially on twin-tailed aircraft. The recent self-induction theory of vortex breakdown points to the "pile-up" of vorticity due to the linear addition of vorticity in the spiraling shear layer that surrounds the vortex core as a principal cause of vortex breakdown (Kurosaka 1998). Based on that theory, this research attempts to relieve vorticity pile-up by altering the straight-line path of the vortex core and preventing the linear addition of vorticity. This is accomplished by applying a combination of periodic blowing and suction with low mass and momentum flux. The blowing and suction are directed normal to the low-pressure surface and supplied from ports under the vortex core which are near the forward tip of the delta wing. This oscillating input causes the vortex core to transition into a spiral formation downstream of the input ports. Initial results indicate that this change in the vortex core path may prevent vortex breakdown over the surface of the delta wing.

  2. 42GHz ECRH assisted Plasma Breakdown in tokamak SST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, B. K.; Pradhan, S.; Patel, Paresh; Babu, Rajan; Patel, Jatin; Patel, Harshida; Dhorajia, Pragnesh; Tanna, V.; Atrey, P. K.; Manchanda, R.; Gupta, Manoj; Joisa, Shankar; Gupta, C. N.; Danial, Raju; Singh, Prashant; Jha, R.; Bora, D.

    2015-03-01

    In SST-1, 42GHz ECRH system has been commissioned to carry out breakdown and heating experiments at 0.75T and 1.5T operating toroidal magnetic fields. The 42GHz ECRH system consists of high power microwave source Gyrotron capable to deliver 500kW microwave power for 500ms duration, approximately 20 meter long transmission line and a mirror based launcher. The ECRH power in fundamental O-mode & second harmonic X-mode is launched from low field side (radial port) of the tokamak. At 0.75T operation, approximately 300 kW ECH power is launched in second harmonic X-mode and successful ECRH assisted breakdown is achieved at low loop_voltage ~ 3V. The ECRH power is launched around 45ms prior to loop voltage. The hydrogen pressure in tokamak is maintained ~ 1×10-5mbar and the pre-ionized density is ~ 4×1012/cc. At 1.5T operating toroidal magnetic field, the ECH power is launched in fundamental O-mode. The ECH power at fundamental harmonic is varied from 100 kW to 250 kW and successful breakdown is achieved in all ECRH shots. In fundamental harmonic there is no delay in breakdown while at second harmonic ~ 40ms delay is observed, which is normal in case of second harmonic ECRH assisted breakdown.

  3. Current contacts and the breakdown of the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Son, P. C.; Kruithof, G. H.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    1990-12-01

    The nonlinearities in the I-V characteristics have been studied of high-mobility Si metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors in the quantum Hall regime. The breakdown curves were measured with different sets of voltage contacts and for different directions of magnetic field and current. Comparison of these curves shows that the breakdown of the quantum Hall effect (QHE) in these samples is an intrinsic effect that starts at the current contact where the electrons are injected into the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). This fundamental asymmetry and the crucial role of the current contact are explained using the Büttiker-Landauer approach to the QHE and its recent extension to the nonlinear regime. The electron-injection process contains two mechanisms that lead to breakdown voltages in the 2DEG. We have identified both experimentally by comparing the critical currents of different configurations of current and voltage contacts. In one of the mechanisms, the nonequilibrium distribution of electrons that is injected into the 2DEG extends to the voltage contacts. This means that the equilibration length of the 2D electrons is at least of the order of 100 μm. For currents far beyond breakdown and for voltage contacts that are further from the electron-injection contact, the breakdown characteristics are harder to understand. The variation of the electron density of the 2DEG due to the large Hall voltage has to be taken into account as well as the equilibration induced by additional voltage contacts.

  4. Two-threshold model for scaling laws of noninteracting snow avalanches.

    PubMed

    Faillettaz, Jerome; Louchet, Francois; Grasso, Jean-Robert

    2004-11-12

    The sizes of snow slab failure that trigger snow avalanches are power-law distributed. Such a power-law probability distribution function has also been proposed to characterize different landslide types. In order to understand this scaling for gravity-driven systems, we introduce a two-threshold 2D cellular automaton, in which failure occurs irreversibly. Taking snow slab avalanches as a model system, we find that the sizes of the largest avalanches just preceding the lattice system breakdown are power-law distributed. By tuning the maximum value of the ratio of the two failure thresholds our model reproduces the range of power-law exponents observed for land, rock, or snow avalanches. We suggest this control parameter represents the material cohesion anisotropy. PMID:15600971

  5. Effects of moisture content on wind erosion thresholds of biochar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, F. C.; Borrego, C.; Keizer, J. J.; Amorim, J. H.; Verheijen, F. G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Biochar, i.e. pyrolysed biomass, as a soil conditioner is gaining increasing attention in research and industry, with guidelines and certifications being developed for biochar production, storage and handling, as well as for application to soils. Adding water to biochar aims to reduce its susceptibility to become air-borne during and after the application to soils, thereby preventing, amongst others, human health issues from inhalation. The Bagnold model has previously been modified to explain the threshold friction velocity of coal particles at different moisture contents, by adding an adhesive effect. However, it is unknown if this model also works for biochar particles. We measured the threshold friction velocities of a range of biochar particles (woody feedstock) under a range of moisture contents by using a wind tunnel, and tested the performance of the modified Bagnold model. Results showed that the threshold friction velocity can be significantly increased by keeping the gravimetric moisture content at or above 15% to promote adhesive effects between the small particles. For the specific biochar of this study, the modified Bagnold model accurately estimated threshold friction velocities of biochar particles up to moisture contents of 10%.

  6. Odour and flavour thresholds for key aroma components in an orange juice matrix: esters and miscellaneous compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thresholds for flavor volatiles have been traditionally calculated in water or air, but they may vary widely in more complex matrices such as milk, gels, or fruit slurries. The data presented is part of a continuing study to provide the industry with threshold guidelines more adequate for the use of...

  7. Numerical investigation of the electron dynamic dependence on gas pressure in the breakdown of hydrogen by KrF laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Elsayed, Khaled A.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the measurements that were carried out by Yagi et al. [12] to study the breakdown of molecular hydrogen induced by short laser of wavelength 248 nm and pulse duration 20 ns. The aim of the study is to give a detailed description of the physical processes which contributed to the breakdown of molecular hydrogen at focused intensities between 4×1012 W/cm2 and 8.0×1012 W/cm2 over gas pressure range extended from 150 to 7000 Torr. The applied computer simulation model is based on the numerical solution of the time dependent Boltzmann equation and a set of rate equations that describe the rate of change of the formed excited states population. The experimentally measured rate constants and cross-sections for the various physical processes involved in the model are used in the calculations. Provision is made for the electron impact ionization and photoionization of the excited states. The former process is incorporated parametrically in the calculation owing to the lack of quantitative description of this process. Computations are performed at each gas pressure. The calculated threshold intensities are found to be in good agreement with the experimentally measured ones, both showing a noticeable increase in the higher pressure region. Moreover, calculation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and its parameters demonstrated the exact correlation between gas pressure and the physical processes responsible for determining the breakdown threshold intensity.

  8. Exploration of Underwater Laser Breakdown Using Two Synchronized Gated Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huwel, Lutz; Baumgart, Clayton; Betts, Susannah; Morgan, Thomas J.; Graham, William G.

    2014-10-01

    Using two synchronized intensified CCD cameras, we have studied spatial and temporal characteristics of optical breakdown in water created by a focused 10 ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. For three water samples with different impurity content (ultrapure, distilled, and tap water), the plasma evolution was monitored up to 1 ms after breakdown. Images taken by the two cameras, systematically delayed relative to each other, reveal that the center of emission intensity does not remain at a fixed location. In single plasma events, the center first moves, on average, toward the incoming laser beam. Then, at about 100 to 200 ns, the apparent direction of motion reverses and the center returns towards the focal point. On the other hand, in repetitive breakdown the time averaged center moves steadily downstream with each subsequent pulse. Details of this behavior depend on repetition frequency. We will also present shadowgraphy results revealing time resolved speeds of both shockwave and bubble expansion.

  9. A New Model for Nuclear Envelope BreakdownV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Campagnola, Paul; Rolls, Melissa M.; Stein, Pascal A.; Ellenberg, Jan; Hinkle, Beth; Slepchenko, Boris

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear envelope breakdown was investigated during meiotic maturation of starfish oocytes. Fluorescent 70-kDa dextran entry, as monitored by confocal microscopy, consists of two phases, a slow uniform increase and then a massive wave. From quantitative analysis of the first phase of dextran entry, and from imaging of green fluorescent protein chimeras, we conclude that nuclear pore disassembly begins several minutes before nuclear envelope breakdown. The best fit for the second phase of entry is with a spreading disruption of the membrane permeability barrier determined by three-dimensional computer simulations of diffusion. We propose a new model for the mechanism of nuclear envelope breakdown in which disassembly of the nuclear pores leads to a fenestration of the nuclear envelope double membrane. PMID:11179431

  10. Breakdown of silicon particle detectors under proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaeyrynen, S.; Raeisaenen, J.; Kassamakov, I.; Tuominen, E.

    2009-11-15

    Silicon particle detectors made on Czochralski and float zone silicon materials were irradiated with 7 and 9 MeV protons at a temperature of 220 K. During the irradiations, the detectors were biased up to their operating voltage. Specific values for the fluence and flux of the irradiation were found to cause a sudden breakdown in the detectors. We studied the limits of the fluence and the flux in the breakdown as well as the behavior of the detector response function under high flux irradiations. The breakdown was shown to be an edge effect. Additionally, the buildup of an oxide charge is suggested to lead to an increased localized electric field, which in turn triggers a charge carrier multiplication. Furthermore, we studied the influences of the type of silicon material and the configuration of the detector guard rings.

  11. Analysis of the breakdown voltage in SOI and SOS technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, J.; Vellvehi, M.; Flores, D.; Rebollo, J.; Millan, J.; Krishnan, S.; De Souza, M. M.; Sankara Narayanan, E. M.

    2002-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyse the breakdown voltage performance of lateral power devices in silicon on insulator (SOI) technologies. Both silicon on oxide (termed SOI as per the convention) and silicon on sapphire (SOS) technologies have been considered. Detailed numerical modelling together with analytical evaluation has been carried out on lateral devices employing uniformly doped and variation in lateral doping drift regions. The results indicate that existing theories to predict breakdown voltage are valid only in the case of ultrathin insulator layers and fail when ultrathick layers are considered. Predicted results for devices with ultrathick dielectric layers, as it is the case in SOS technology, are presented. Moreover, the breakdown voltage sensitivity with respect to the SOI layer and dielectric thickness is also analysed.

  12. Electrical breakdown gas detector featuring carbon nanotube array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongyul; Pal, Sunil; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate here detection of dichloro-difluoro-methane and oxygen in mixtures with helium using a carbon nanotube electrical breakdown sensor device. The sensor is comprised of an aligned array of multiwalled carbon nanotubes deposited on a nickel based super-alloy (Inconel 600) as the anode; the counter electrode is a planar nickel sheet. By monitoring the electrical breakdown characteristics of oxygen and dichloro-difluoro-methane in a background of helium, we find that the detection limit for dichloro-difluoro-methane is approximately 0.1% and the corresponding limit for oxygen is approximately 1%. A phenomenologigal model is proposed to describe the trends observed in detection of the two mixtures. These results indicate that carbon nanotube based electrical breakdown sensors show potential as end detectors in gas-chromatography devices. PMID:18468093

  13. Fundamentals of undervoltage breakdown through the Townsend mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, James E.

    The conditions under which an externally supplied pulse of electrons will induce breakdown in an undervoltaged, low-gain, DC discharge gap are experimentally and theoretically explored. The phenomenon is relevant to fundamental understanding of breakdown physics, to switching applications such as triggered spark gaps and discharge initiation in pulsed-plasma thrusters, and to gas-avalanche particle counters. A dimensionless theoretical description of the phenomenon is formulated and solved numerically. It is found that a significant fraction of the charge on the plates must be injected for breakdown to be achieved at low avalanche-ionization gain, when an electron undergoes fewer than approximately 10 ionizing collisions during one gap transit. It is also found that fewer injected electrons are required as the gain due to electron-impact ionization (alpha process) is increased, or as the sensitivity of the alpha process to electric field is enhanced by decreasing the reduced electric field (electric field divided by pressure, E/p). A predicted insensitivity to ion mobility implies that breakdown is determined during the first electron avalanche when space charge distortion is greatest. A dimensionless, theoretical study of the development of this avalanche reveals a critical value of the reduced electric field to be the value at the Paschen curve minimum divided by 1.6. Below this value, the net result of the electric field distortion is to increase ionization for subsequent avalanches, making undervoltage breakdown possible. Above this value, ionization for subsequent avalanches will be suppressed and undervoltage breakdown is not possible. Using an experimental apparatus in which ultraviolet laser pulses are directed onto a photo-emissive cathode of a parallel-plate discharge gap, it is found that undervoltage breakdown can occur through a Townsend-like mechanism through the buildup of successively larger avalanche generations. The minimum number of injected

  14. Resistance of a pulsed electrical breakdown channel in ionic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punanov, I. F.; Emlin, R. V.; Kulikov, V. D.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2014-04-01

    A technique for estimating the resistance of the electrical breakdown channel in ionic crystals is proposed. This technique is based on measuring the channel velocity in a sample when a ballast resistor is connected to the circuit of a needle anode and on using the theoretical dependence of the channel velocity on the channel conductivity. The breakdown channel resistance at a voltage of 140 kV is about 6.5 kΩ in KCl and about 6.1 kΩ in KBr. These resistances are shown to characterize a gas phase. The gas-phase resistance is found to be nonuniform along the breakdown channel. The head part ˜1 mm long has the maximum resistance. This head region is concluded to contain dielectric substance clusters, which then decompose into metal and halogen ions. The cluster lifetime is ˜10-9 s.

  15. Surface Breakdown Characteristics of Silicone Oil for Electric Power Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Junichi; Nakajima, Akitoshi; Miyahara, Hideyuki; Takuma, Tadasu; Okabe, Shigemitu; Kohtoh, Masanori; Yanabu, Satoru

    This paper describes the surface breakdown characteristics of the silicone oil which has the possibility of the application to innovative switchgear as an insulating medium. At the first step, we have experimentally studied on the impulse breakdown characteristics of the configuration with a triple-junction where a solid insulator is in contact with the electrode. The test configurations consist of solid material (Nomex and pressboard) and liquid insulation oil (silicone and mineral oil). We have discussed the experimental results based on the maximal electric field at a triple-junction. As the second step, we have studied the configuration which may improve the surface breakdown characteristics by lowering the electric field near the triple-junction.

  16. High-voltage atmospheric breakdown across intervening rutile dielectrics.

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Simpson, Sean; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2013-09-01

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 on electrical discharge experiments performed to develop predictive computational models of the fundamental processes of surface breakdown in the vicinity of high-permittivity material interfaces. Further, experiments were conducted to determine if free carrier electrons could be excited into the conduction band thus lowering the effective breakdown voltage when UV photons (4.66 eV) from a high energy pulsed laser were incident on the rutile sample. This report documents the numerical approach, the experimental setup, and summarizes the data and simulations. Lastly, it describes the path forward and challenges that must be overcome in order to improve future experiments for characterizing the breakdown behavior for rutile.

  17. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, ... a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  18. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  19. Epidemic thresholds for bipartite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, D. G.; Risau-Gusman, S.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that sexually transmitted diseases (STD) spread across a network of human sexual contacts. This network is most often bipartite, as most STD are transmitted between men and women. Even though network models in epidemiology have quite a long history now, there are few general results about bipartite networks. One of them is the simple dependence, predicted using the mean field approximation, between the epidemic threshold and the average and variance of the degree distribution of the network. Here we show that going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results that are supported by numerical simulations. One of the new features, that can be relevant for applications, is the existence of a critical value for the infectivity of each population, below which no epidemics can arise, regardless of the value of the infectivity of the other population.

  20. Simultaneous species concentration and temperature measurements using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with direct spectrum matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, Brendan J.

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used to simultaneously measure hydrocarbon fuel concentration and temperature in high temperature, high speed, compressible, and reacting flows, a regime in which LIBS has not been done previously. Emission spectra from the plasma produced from a focused laser pulse is correlated in the combustion region of a model scramjet operating in supersonic wind tunnel. A 532 nm Nd:YAG laser operating at 10 Hz is used to induce break-down. The emissions are captured during a 10 ns gate time approximately 75 ns after the first arrival of photons at the measurement location in order to minimize the measurement uncertainty in the turbulent, compressible, high-speed, and reacting environment. Three methods of emission detection are used and a new backward scattering direction method is developed that is beneficial in reducing the amount of optical access needed to perform LIBS measurements. Measurements are taken in the model supersonic combustion and the ignition process is shown to be highly dependent on fuel concentration and gas density as well as combustion surface temperature, concentration gradient, and flow field. Direct spectrum matching method is developed and used for quantitative measurements. In addition, a comprehensive database of spectra covering the fuel concentrations and gas densities found in the wind tunnel of Research Cell 19 at Wright Patterson Air Force Base is created which can be used for further work.

  1. Characterization of superconducting radiofrequency breakdown by two-mode excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory V.; Palczewski, Ari D.

    2014-01-14

    We show that thermal and magnetic contributions to the breakdown of superconductivity in radiofrequency (RF) fields can be separated by applying two RF modes simultaneously to a superconducting surface. We develop a simple model that illustrates how mode-mixing RF data can be related to properties of the superconductor. Within our model the data can be described by a single parameter, which can be derived either from RF or thermometry data. Our RF and thermometry data are in good agreement with the model. We propose to use mode-mixing technique to decouple thermal and magnetic effects on RF breakdown of superconductors.

  2. Infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Clayton S.; Brown, E.; Hommerich, Uwe; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.; Snyder, A. Peter

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosives (CBE) sensing and has significant potential for real time standoff detection and analysis. We have studied LIBS emissions in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral region for potential applications in CBE sensing. Detailed MIR-LIBS studies were performed for several energetic materials for the first time. In this study, the IR signature spectral region between 4 - 12 um was mined for the appearance of MIR-LIBS emissions that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species.

  3. Breakdown voltage of discrete capacitors under single-pulse conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domingos, H.; Scaturro, J.; Hayes, L.

    1981-01-01

    For electrostatic capacitors the breakdown voltage is inherently related to the properties of the dielectric, with the important parameters being the dielectric field strength which is related to the dielectric constant and the dielectric thickness. These are not necessarily related to the capacitance value and the rated voltage, but generally the larger values of capacitance have lower breakdown voltages. Foil and wet slug electrolytics can withstand conduction currents pulses without apparent damage (in either direction for foil types). For solid tantalums, damage occurs whenever the capacitor charges to the forming voltage.

  4. Determination of threshold and maximum operating electric stresses for selected high voltage insulations. Task III. Investigation of high voltage capacitor insulation. Progress report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Sosnowski, M.; Eager, G.S. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    This report covers the investigation of threshold voltage of capacitor insulation. The experimental work was performed on samples prepared from commercial polypropylene insulated, liquid-filled capacitors. The samples were vacuum-impregnated with the original capacitor insulating liquid obtained from the manufacturer. A limited number of full-size capacitor elements also were tested. Impulse voltage breakdown tests with dc voltage prestressing were performed at room temperature and 75/sup 0/C. From the results of these tests, the threshold voltage of the samples of the capacitor insulation was determined at both temperatures and that of the whole capacitor elements at room temperature. The threshold voltage of the capacitor insulation was found to be approximately equal to the impulse breakdown voltage. No difference was found between the threshold voltage at room temperature and at 75/sup 0/C. The threshold voltage of the whole capacitor elements at room temperature was found to be equal to approximately 80% of the threshold voltage of the capacitor insulation samples.

  5. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.H. . Dept. of Physics); Lee, J.H. . Langley Research Center)

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the efficiencies and threshold pump intensities of various solid-state laser materials that have been estimated to compare their performance characteristics as direct solar-pumped CW lasers. Among the laser materials evaluated in this research, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6%; however, it does not seem to be practical for solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AMO) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12% when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  6. A relationship between statistical time to breakdown distributions and pre-breakdown negative differential resistance at nanometric scale

    SciTech Connect

    Foissac, R.; Blonkowski, S.; Delcroix, P.; Kogelschatz, M.

    2014-07-14

    Using an ultra-high vacuum Conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) current voltage, pre-breakdown negative differential resistance (NDR) characteristics are measured together with the time dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) distributions of Si/SiON (1.4 and 2.6 nm thick). Those experimental characteristics are systematically compared. The NDR effect is modelled by a conductive filament growth. It is showed that the Weibull TDDB statistic distribution scale factor is proportional to the growth rate of an individual filament and then has the same dependence on the electric field. The proportionality factor is a power law of the ratio between the surfaces of the CAFM tip and the filament's top. Moreover, it was found that, for the high fields used in those experiments, the TDDB acceleration factor as the growth rate characteristic is proportional to the Zener tunnelling probability. Those observations are discussed in the framework of possible breakdown or forming mechanism.

  7. Microwave window breakdown experiments and simulations on the UM/L-3 relativistic magnetron.

    PubMed

    Hoff, B W; Mardahl, P J; Gilgenbach, R M; Haworth, M D; French, D M; Lau, Y Y; Franzi, M

    2009-09-01

    Experiments have been performed on the UM/L-3 (6-vane, L-band) relativistic magnetron to test a new microwave window configuration designed to limit vacuum side breakdown. In the baseline case, acrylic microwave windows were mounted between three of the waveguide coupling cavities in the anode block vacuum housing and the output waveguides. Each of the six 3 cm deep coupling cavities is separated from its corresponding anode cavity by a 1.75 cm wide aperture. In the baseline case, vacuum side window breakdown was observed to initiate at single waveguide output powers close to 20 MW. In the new window configuration, three Air Force Research Laboratory-designed, vacuum-rated directional coupler waveguide segments were mounted between the coupling cavities and the microwave windows. The inclusion of the vacuum side power couplers moved the microwave windows an additional 30 cm away from the anode apertures. Additionally, the Lucite microwave windows were replaced with polycarbonate windows and the microwave window mounts were redesigned to better maintain waveguide continuity in the region around the microwave windows. No vacuum side window breakdown was observed in the new window configuration at single waveguide output powers of 120+MW (a factor of 3 increase in measured microwave pulse duration and factor of 3 increase in measured peak power over the baseline case). Simulations were performed to investigate likely causes for the window breakdown in the original configuration. Results from these simulations have shown that in the original configuration, at typical operating voltage and magnetic field ranges, electrons emitted from the anode block microwave apertures strike the windows with a mean kinetic energy of 33 keV with a standard deviation of 14 keV. Calculations performed using electron impact angle and energy data predict a first generation secondary electron yield of 65% of the primary electron population. The effects of the primary aperture electron

  8. Embracing thresholds for better environmental management

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ryan P.; Erickson, Ashley L.; Mease, Lindley A.; Battista, Willow; Kittinger, John N.; Fujita, Rod

    2015-01-01

    Three decades of study have revealed dozens of examples in which natural systems have crossed biophysical thresholds (‘tipping points’)—nonlinear changes in ecosystem structure and function—as a result of human-induced stressors, dramatically altering ecosystem function and services. Environmental management that avoids such thresholds could prevent severe social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we review management measures implemented in ecological systems that have thresholds. Using Ostrom's social–ecological systems framework, we analysed key biophysical and institutional factors associated with 51 social–ecological systems and associated management regimes, and related these to management success defined by ecological outcomes. We categorized cases as instances of prospective or retrospective management, based upon whether management aimed to avoid a threshold or to restore systems that have crossed a threshold. We find that smaller systems are more amenable to threshold-based management, that routine monitoring is associated with successful avoidance of thresholds and recovery after thresholds have been crossed, and that success is associated with the explicit threshold-based management. These findings are powerful evidence for the policy relevance of information on ecological thresholds across a wide range of ecosystems.

  9. Whole-body vibration perception thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, K. C.; Griffin, M. J.

    1988-03-01

    This paper presents the results of a series of laboratory experiments concerned with perception thresholds for whole-body vibration. The nature of absolute perception thresholds is discussed and a method of determining vibration thresholds, based upon signal detection theory, is proposed. Thresholds of subjects exposed to x-, y- and z-axis sinusoidal vibration were determined for sitting and standing subjects (from 2 to 100 Hz). Perception thresholds have also been determined for supine subjects exposed to vertical ( x-axis) sinusoidal vibration (10-63 Hz). In additional experiments the effects of complex (e.g., random) vibration and the effects of duration on the perception thresholds were investigated. The relation between perception thresholds and vibration levels, said by subjects to be unacceptable if they occurred in their own homes, was investigated as well as the effects of subjects' personality and the visual and acoustic conditions in the laboratory. For the vertical vibration of seated subjects no significant differences were found between the responses of male and female subjects. Significant differences were found between perception thresholds for sitting and standing postures. The median threshold was approximately 0·01 m/s 2 r.m.s. between 2 and 100 Hz. Perception thresholds for x-axis and y-axis vibration were not significantly different in either sitting or standing subjects but significant differences in thresholds were found between sitting and standing positions for both x-axis and y-axis vibration. Subjects tended to be more sensitive to vibration when lying than when sitting or standing. The results suggested that the perception of random vibrations can be predicted from a knowledge of the perception of its component vibrations. The number of cycles of vibration did not affect perception thresholds for vibration durations of more than about 0·25 s. Some assessments suggested that vibration at more than twice the perception threshold may not

  10. Effect of atmosphere on collinear double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew J. Effenberger, Jr.; Jill R. Scott

    2010-09-01

    Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) has been shown to enhance LIBS spectra. Several researches have reported significant increases in signal-to-noise and or spectral intensity [1-4]. In addition to DP-LIBS, atmospheric conditions can also increase spectra intensity. For example, Iida [5] found that He and Ar both increase LIBS intensity compared to air at one 1 atm. It was also found that as the pressure was decreased to 100 Torr, LIBS intensity increased in Ar and air for single pulse (SP) LIBS. In this study, a collinear DP-LIBS scheme is used along with manipulation of the atmospheric conditions. The DP-LIBS scheme consists of a 355 nm ablative pulse fired into a sample contained in a vacuum chamber. A second analytical 1064 nm pulse is then fired 100 ns to 10 µs after and along the same path of the first pulse. Ar, He and air at pressures ranging from atmospheric pressure (630 Torr at elevation) to 10-5 Torr are introduced during DP-LIBS and SP-LIBS experiments. For a brass sample, a significant increase in spectral intensity of Cu and Zn lines were observed in DP-LIBS under Ar compared to DP-LIBS in air (Figure 1). It was also found that Cu and Zn lines acquired with SP-LIBS in Ar are nearly as intense as DP-LIBS in air. Signal-to-noise for lines from various samples will be reported for both DP-LIBS and SP-LIBS in Ar, He, and air at pressures ranging from 630 Torr to 10-5 Torr.

  11. Effect of Atmosphere on Collinear Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew J. Effenberger, Jr; Jill R. Scott

    2011-07-01

    Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) has been shown to enhance LIBS spectra. Several researches have reported significant increases in signal-to-noise and or spectral intensity. In addition to DP-LIBS, atmospheric conditions can also increase spectra intensity. For example, He and Ar both increase LIBS intensity compared to air at one 1 atm. It was also found that as the pressure was decreased to 100 Torr, LIBS intensity increased in Ar and air for single pulse (SP) LIBS. In this study, a collinear DP-LIBS scheme is used along with manipulation of the atmospheric conditions. The DP-LIBS scheme consists of a 355 nm ablative pulse fired into a sample contained in a vacuum chamber. A second analytical 1064 nm pulse is then fired 100 ns to 10 {micro}s after and along the same path of the first pulse. Ar, He and air at pressures ranging from atmospheric pressure (630 Torr at elevation) to 10{sup -5} Torr are introduced during DP-LIBS and SP-LIBS experiments. For a brass sample, a significant increase in spectral intensity of Cu and Zn lines were observed in DP-LIBS under Ar compared to DP-LIBS in air. It was also found that Cu and Zn lines acquired with SP-LIBS in Ar are nearly as intense as DP-LIBS in air. Signal-to-noise for lines from various samples will be reported for both DP-LIBS and SP-LIBS in Ar, He, and air at pressures ranging from 630 Torr to 10{sup -5} Torr.

  12. Determining the lifetime of detectable amounts of gunshot residue on the hands of a shooter using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Matthew B; Dockery, Christopher R

    2008-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the period of time that a shooter will test positive for gunshot residue (GSR) after firing a revolver. Multiple rounds of primer were fired and samples collected at multiple hour intervals using an adhesive tape pressed against the skin. Samples were analyzed directly using a commercially available laser-induced breakdown spectrometer where barium emission (originating from barium nitrate in the primer) was observed. Population statistics were used to compare suspected GSR to a library of blank samples from which a threshold value was established. Statistically significant results, positive for GSR, are obtained 5.27 days after a firearm discharge using these techniques. PMID:19007466

  13. Strong emission from nano-iron using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, F. F.; ELSherbini, A. M.; Al-Muhamady, A.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we report a strong enhanced emission from laser produced plasma in air from iron oxide nano-material in comparison with the corresponding bulk samples. The enhancement strength differs with different Nd:YAG laser harmonics wavelengths. The analysis showed that such enhancement increased exponentially with the plasma evolution time, while it declines as the laser fluence increased. Experimental data analysis clearly showed that the observed enhancement is mainly associated with the change in the plasma electron density. We claim that this strong enhanced optical emission from laser produced plasma is due to the surface plasmon resonant excitation preferably on nano-oxide materials. Such experimental findings could improve the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy sensitivity down to extremely low concentrations.

  14. Double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of explosives: Initial study towards improved discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Frank C.; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2007-12-01

    Detecting trace explosive residues at standoff distances in real-time is a difficult problem. One method ideally suited for real-time standoff detection is laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). However, atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen contributes to the LIBS signal from the oxygen- and nitrogen-containing explosive compounds, complicating the discrimination of explosives from other organic materials. While bathing the sample in an inert gas will remove atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen interference, it cannot practically be applied for standoff LIBS. Alternatively, we have investigated the potential of double pulse LIBS to improve the discrimination of explosives by diminishing the contribution of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen to the LIBS signal. These initial studies compare the close-contact (< 1 m) LIBS spectra of explosives using single pulse LIBS in argon with double pulse LIBS in atmosphere. We have demonstrated improved discrimination of an explosive and an organic interferent using double pulse LIBS to reduce the air entrained in the analytical plasma.

  15. Spectral selective radio frequency emissions from laser induced breakdown of target materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinoth Kumar, L.; Manikanta, E.; Leela, Ch.; Prem Kiran, P.

    2014-08-11

    The radio frequency emissions scanned over broad spectral range (30 MHz–1 GHz) from single shot nanosecond (7 ns) and picosecond (30 ps) laser induced breakdown (LIB) of different target materials (atmospheric air, aluminum, and copper) are presented. The dominant emissions from ns-LIB, compared to those from the ps-LIB, indicate the presence and importance of atomic and molecular clusters in the plasma. The dynamics of laser pulse-matter interaction and the properties of the target materials were found to play an important role in determining the plasma parameters which subsequently determine the emissions. Thus, with a particular laser and target material, the emissions were observed to be spectral selective. The radiation detection capability was observed to be relatively higher, when the polarization of the input laser and the antenna is same.

  16. Electric breakdowns of the "plasma capacitors" occurs on insulation coating of the ISS surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homin, Taras; Korsun, Anatolii

    High electric fields and currents are occurred in the spacecrafts plasma environment by onboard electric generators. Thus the high voltage solar array (SA) of the American segment of International Space Station (ISS) generates potential 160 V. Its negative pole is shorted to the frames of all the ISS segments. There is electric current between the SA and the frame through the plasma environment, i.e. electric discharge occurs. As a result a potential drop exists between the frames of all the ISS segments and the environmental plasma [1], which is cathode drop potential varphi _{c} defined. When ISS orbiting, the φc varies greatly in the range 0-100 V. A large area of the ISS frames and SA surface is coated with a thin dielectric film. Because of cathode drop potential the frame surfaces accumulate ion charges and the SA surfaces accumulate electron charges. These surfaces become plasma capacitors, which accumulate much charge and energy. Micrometeorite impacts or buildup of potential drop in excess of breakdown threshold varphi_{b} (varphi _{c} > varphi _{b} = 60 V) may cause breakdowns of these capacitors. Following a breakdown, the charge collected at the surfaces disperses and transforms into a layer of dense plasma [2]. This plasma environment of the spacecraft produces great pulsed electric fields E at the frame surfaces as well as heavy currents between construction elements which in turn induce great magnetic fields H. Therefore the conductive frame and the environmental plasma is plasma inductors. We have calculated that the densities of these pulsing and high-frequency fields E and H generated in the plasma environment of the spacecraft may exceed values hazardous to human. Besides, these fields must induce large electromagnetic impulses in the space-suit and in the power supply and control circuits of onboard systems. During astronaut’s space-suit activity, these fields will penetrate the space-suit and the human body with possible hazardous effects

  17. Thresholds for Cenozoic bipolar glaciation.

    PubMed

    Deconto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Wilson, Paul A; Pälike, Heiko; Lear, Caroline H; Pagani, Mark

    2008-10-01

    The long-standing view of Earth's Cenozoic glacial history calls for the first continental-scale glaciation of Antarctica in the earliest Oligocene epoch ( approximately 33.6 million years ago), followed by the onset of northern-hemispheric glacial cycles in the late Pliocene epoch, about 31 million years later. The pivotal early Oligocene event is characterized by a rapid shift of 1.5 parts per thousand in deep-sea benthic oxygen-isotope values (Oi-1) within a few hundred thousand years, reflecting a combination of terrestrial ice growth and deep-sea cooling. The apparent absence of contemporaneous cooling in deep-sea Mg/Ca records, however, has been argued to reflect the growth of more ice than can be accommodated on Antarctica; this, combined with new evidence of continental cooling and ice-rafted debris in the Northern Hemisphere during this period, raises the possibility that Oi-1 represents a precursory bipolar glaciation. Here we test this hypothesis using an isotope-capable global climate/ice-sheet model that accommodates both the long-term decline of Cenozoic atmospheric CO(2) levels and the effects of orbital forcing. We show that the CO(2) threshold below which glaciation occurs in the Northern Hemisphere ( approximately 280 p.p.m.v.) is much lower than that for Antarctica ( approximately 750 p.p.m.v.). Therefore, the growth of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere immediately following Antarctic glaciation would have required rapid CO(2) drawdown within the Oi-1 timeframe, to levels lower than those estimated by geochemical proxies and carbon-cycle models. Instead of bipolar glaciation, we find that Oi-1 is best explained by Antarctic glaciation alone, combined with deep-sea cooling of up to 4 degrees C and Antarctic ice that is less isotopically depleted (-30 to -35 per thousand) than previously suggested. Proxy CO(2) estimates remain above our model's northern-hemispheric glaciation threshold of approximately 280 p.p.m.v. until approximately 25 Myr

  18. Role of the fatty acid breakdown pathway in the leaf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Components of the lipid breakdown pathway including beta-oxidation enzymes and fatty acid transport mechanisms are essential for mobilizing storage lipid in germinating seeds of many plants. Comparatively little is known about their role during the rest of the plant’s life-time, however. We are cur...

  19. Multiple paths to subharmonic laminar breakdown in a boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Thomas A.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1989-01-01

    Numerical simulations demonstrate that laminar breakdown in a boundary layer induced by the secondary instability of two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting waves to three-dimensional subharmonic disturbances need not take the conventional lambda vortex/high-shear layer path.

  20. Using Work Breakdown Structure Models to Develop Unit Treatment Costs

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article presents a new cost modeling approach called work breakdown structure (WBS), designed to develop unit costs for drinking water technologies. WBS involves breaking the technology into its discrete components for the purposes of estimating unit costs. The article dem...